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Sample records for sodium disilicate glass

  1. Magnetic susceptibility of sodium disilicate glasses containing PuO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldred, A.T.

    1979-01-01

    A solubility limit of approx. 6 mol % PuO 2 in sodium disilicate (Na 2 O.2SiO 2 ) glass has been determined. Magnetic susceptibility measurements on these glasses yield approximate Curie-Weiss behavior, in contrast to the temperature-independent susceptibility of crystalline PuO 2 . This result is interpreted to indicate that the local site symmetry around the Pu ion in the sodium disilicate glass is much different than in crystalline PuO 2 . The effective paramagnetic moments determined from the temperature dependence of the susceptibility are found to be consistent with calculated free-ion values based on the most likely 5f electron configurations

  2. Link between optical spectra, crystal-field parameters, and local environments of Eu3+ ions in Eu2O3-doped sodium disilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, T.; Mountjoy, G.; Afify, N. D.; Reid, M. F.; Yeung, Y. Y.; Speghini, A.; Bettinelli, M.

    2011-01-01

    Rare-earth-doped glasses are key materials for optical technology due to the luminescent properties of 4f n ions. The crystal-field model describes the effect of local environment on transitions between 4f electrons. We present a detailed modeling study of the optical spectra of sodium disilicate glass, 33Na 2 O·67SiO 2 , doped with 0.2% and 1.0 mol%Eu 2 O 3 . This study uses very large molecular dynamics models with up to 100 Eu 3+ ions, the superposition model for covalent and overlap effects on crystal-field parameters, and realistic values for homogeneous linewidth broadening. The simulated spectra are in reasonable agreement with experiment. The trends in 7 F J energy levels across different Eu 3+ ion sites have been examined and a very detailed analysis is presented that looks at how features of the spectra are related to features of the local environment of Eu 3+ ions. Increasing the crystal-field strength S total causes the 7 F 0 energy level to decrease and causes the splitting of 7 F J manifolds to increase, and this is due to increasing mixing of 4f wave functions. To a reasonable approximation the crystal-field strength components S k depend on angular positions of ligands independently of distances to ligands. The former are seen to be more significant in determining S k , which are closely related to the rotationally invariant bond-orientational order parameters Q k . The values of S 2 are approximately linear in Q 2 , and the values of Q 2 are higher for fivefold than sixfold coordinated rare-earth ions. These results can be of importance for efforts to enhance the local environment of rare-earth ions in oxide glasses for optical applications.

  3. Wear behavior of pressable lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhongxiao; Izzat Abdul Rahman, Muhammad; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Ling

    2016-07-01

    This article reports effects of surface preparation and contact loads on abrasive wear properties of highly aesthetic and high-strength pressable lithium disilicate glass-ceramics (LDGC). Abrasive wear testing was performed using a pin-on-disk device in which LDGC disks prepared with different surface finishes were against alumina pins at different contact loads. Coefficients of friction and wear volumes were measured as functions of initial surface finishes and contact loads. Wear-induced surface morphology changes in both LDGC disks and alumina pins were characterized using three-dimensional laser scanning microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results show that initial surface finishes of LDGC specimens and contact loads significantly affected the friction coefficients, wear volumes and wear-induced surface roughness changes of the material. Both wear volumes and friction coefficients of LDGC increased as the load increased while surface roughness effects were complicated. For rough LDGC surfaces, three-body wear was dominant while for fine LDGC surfaces, two-body abrasive wear played a key role. Delamination, plastic deformation, and brittle fracture were observed on worn LDGC surfaces. The adhesion of LDGC matrix materials to alumina pins was also discovered. This research has advanced our understanding of the abrasive wear behavior of LDGC and will provide guidelines for better utilization and preparation of the material for long-term success in dental restorations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 968-978, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Wear behavior of human enamel against lithium disilicate glass ceramic and type III gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ahreum; Swain, Michael; He, Lihong; Lyons, Karl

    2014-12-01

    The wear behavior of human enamel that opposes different prosthetic materials is still not clear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate and compare the friction and wear behavior of human tooth enamel that opposes 2 indirect restorative materials: lithium disilicate glass ceramic and Type III gold. Friction-wear tests on human enamel (n=5) that opposes lithium disilicate glass ceramic (n=5) and Type III gold (n=5) were conducted in a ball-on-flat configuration with a reciprocating wear testing apparatus. The wear pairs were subjected to a normal load of 9.8 N, a reciprocating amplitude of approximately 200 μm, and a reciprocating frequency of approximately 1.6 Hz for up to 1100 cycles per test under distilled water lubrication. The frictional force of each cycle was recorded, and the corresponding friction coefficient for different wear pairs was calculated. After wear testing, the wear scars on the enamel specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Type III gold had a significantly lower steady-state friction coefficient (P=.009) and caused less wear damage on enamel than lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Enamel that opposed lithium disilicate glass ceramic exhibited cracks, plow furrows, and surface loss, which indicated abrasive wear as the prominent wear mechanism. In comparison, the enamel wear scar that opposed Type III gold had small patches of gold smear adhered to the surface, which indicated a predominantly adhesive wear mechanism. A lower friction coefficient and better wear resistance were observed when human enamel was opposed by Type III gold than by lithium disilicate glass ceramic in vitro. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gamma ray interactions with undoped and CuO-doped lithium disilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbatal, H.A.; Mandouh, Z.; Zayed, H.; Marzouk, S.Y.; Elkomy, G.; Hosny, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet-visible absorption of undoped lithium disilicate glass reveals strong UV absorption and no visible bands could be identified. Such UV absorption is related to the presence of unavoidable trace iron impurities within raw materials used for the preparation of this glass. Optical absorption of the CuO-doped samples show an extra broad visible band centered at 780 nm and in high CuO contents samples obvious splitting to several component peaks are observed. This characteristic visible absorption of copper-doped samples is correlated with the presence of Cu +2 ions in octahedral coordination with tetragonal distortion. Gamma irradiation of the prepared samples produces radiation-induced defects, which are related to the sharing of host lithium disilicate glass, trace iron impurities and copper iron in their formation. The visible spectrum of the CuO samples shows shielding effect towards successive gamma irradiation.

  6. Effects of crystal refining on wear behaviors and mechanical properties of lithium disilicate glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; Guo, Jiawen; Sun, Yali; Tian, Beimin; Zheng, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Ming; He, Lin; Zhang, Shaofeng

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to improve wear resistance and mechanical properties of lithium disilicate glass-ceramics by refining their crystal sizes. After lithium disilicate glass-ceramics (LD) were melted to form precursory glass blocks, bar (N = 40, n = 10) and plate (N = 32, n = 8) specimens were prepared. According to the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) of precursory glass, specimens G1-G4 were designed to form lithium disilicate glass-ceramics with different crystal sizes using a two-step thermal treatment. In the meantime, heat-pressed lithium disilicate glass-ceramics (GC-P) and original ingots (GC-O) were used as control groups. Glass-ceramics were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and were tested using flexural strength test, nanoindentation test and toughness measurements. The plate specimens were dynamically loaded in a chewing simulator with 350 N up to 2.4 × 10 6 loading cycles. The wear analysis of glass-ceramics was performed using a 3D profilometer after every 300,000 wear cycles. Wear morphologies and microstructures were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the data. Multiple pairwise comparisons of means were performed by Tukey's post-hoc test. Materials with different crystal sizes (p properties. Specifically, G3 with medium-sized crystals presented the highest flexural strength, hardness, elastic modulus and fracture toughness. G1 and G2 with small-sized crystals showed lower flexural strength, whereas G4, GC-P, and GC-O with large-sized crystals exhibited lower hardness and elastic modulus. The wear behaviors of all six groups showed running-in wear stage and steady wear stage. G3 showed the best wear resistance while GC-P and GC-O exhibited the highest wear volume loss. After crystal refining, lithium disilicate glass-ceramic with medium-sized crystals showed the highest wear resistance and mechanical properties. Copyright © 2018

  7. The effect of spark plasma sintering on lithium disilicate glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mansour, Fatima; Karpukhina, Natalia; Grasso, Salvatore; Wilson, Rory M; Reece, Mike J; Cattell, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of spark plasma sintering (SPS) on the microstructure of lithium disilicate glass-ceramics. IPS e.max CAD glass-ceramic samples were processed using spark plasma sintering (SPS) and conventionally sintered (CS) as a comparison. Specimens were sintered at varying temperatures (T1: 840°C, T2: 820°C, T3: 800°C), heating rates (HR1: 150°C/min, HR2: 300°C/min, HR3: 500°C/min) and pressures (P1: 15MPa, P2: 50MPa, P3: 70MPa). IPS e.max Press glass powder samples were densified at 750 and 800°C (50 or 200MPa pressure). Samples were characterized using XRD, HTXRD, and SEM and quantitative image analysis. There was a significant increase in median crystal size (MCS) between the CS and the SPS T1 groups. A statistical difference (p>0.05) in MCS between SPS T1 and SPS T2 groups was observed. The SPS HR3 sample produced a smaller MCS than the CS, SPS HR1 and HR2 groups (pglass samples resulted in fine fibrils or graduated lithium disilicate crystals. The effects of SPS were used to refine the microstructure of IPS e.max CAD lithium disilicate glass-ceramics. Densification by SPS of IPS e.max Press glass resulted in textured and fine nano-crystalline microstructures. SPS generated glass-ceramic microstructures may have unique properties and could be useful in the production of CAD/CAM materials for dentistry. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Does 8-methacryloxyoctyl trimethoxy silane (8-MOTS) improve initial bond strength on lithium disilicate glass ceramic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Yukinori; Nishigawa, Goro; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Minagi, Shogo; Matsumoto, Takuya; Irie, Masao

    2017-03-01

    Dental ceramic surfaces are modified with silane coupling agents, such as γ-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxy silane (γ-MPTS), to improve bond strength. For bonding between lithium disilicate glass ceramic and resin cement, the objective was to investigate if 8-methacryloxyoctyl trimethoxy silane (8-MOTS) could yield a similar performance as the widely used γ-MPTS. One hundred and ten lithium disilicate glass ceramic specimens were randomly divided into 11 groups (n=10) according to pretreatment regime. All specimens were pretreated with a different solution composed of one or a combination of these agents: 10 or 20wt% silane coupling agent of γ-MPTS or 8-MOTS, followed by a hydrolysis solution of acetic acid or 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP). Each pretreated surface was luted to a stainless steel rod of 3.6mm diameter and 2.0mm height with resin cement. Shear bond strength between ceramic and cement was measured after 24-h storage in 37°C distilled water. 8-MOTS produced the same bonding performance as γ-MPTS. Both silane coupling agents significantly increased the bond strength of resin cement, depending on their concentration. When activated by 10-MDP hydrolysis solution, 20wt% concentration produced the highest values (γ-MPTS: 24.9±5.1MPa; 8-MOTS: 24.6±7.4MPa). Hydrolysis with acetic acid produced lower bond strengths than with 10-MDP. Silane coupling pretreatment with 8-MOTS increased the initial bond strength between lithium disilicate glass ceramic and resin cement, rendering the same bonding effect as the conventional γ-MPTS. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of cutting efficiency with different diamond burs and water flow rates in cutting lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Sharon C; Patel, Tejas

    2016-10-01

    This study compared different diamond burs and different water flow rates on the cutting efficiency of sectioning through lithium disilicate glass ceramic. The authors used a standardized cutting regimen with 4 brands of diamond burs to section through lithium disilicate glass ceramic blocks. Twelve diamonds of each brand cut through the blocks in randomized order. In the first part of the study, the authors recorded sectioning rates in millimeters per minute for each diamond bur as a measure of cutting efficiency. In the second part of the study, the authors compared sectioning rates using only 1 brand of diamond bur, with 3 different water flow rates. The authors averaged and compared cutting rates of each brand of diamond bur and the cutting rates for each flow rate using an analysis of variance and determined the differences with a Tukey honest significant difference test. One diamond bur cut significantly slower than the other 3, and one diamond bur cut significantly faster than 2 of the others. The diamond bur cutting efficiency through lithium disilicate glass ceramic with a 20 mL/min water flow rate was significantly higher than 15 mL/min. There are differences in cutting efficiency between diamond burs when sectioning lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Use a minimum of 20 mL/min of water coolant flow when sectioning lithium disilicate glass ceramic with dental diamond burs to maximize cutting efficiency. Recommendations for specific diamond burs with a coarse grit and water flow rate of 20 mL/min can be made when removing or adjusting restorations made from lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Effect of hydrofluoric acid concentration on the surface morphology and bonding effectiveness of lithium disilicate glass ceramics to resin composites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailan, Qian; Lingyan, Ren; Rongrong, Nie; Xiangfeng, Meng

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed at determining the influence of hydrofluoric acid (HF) in varied concentrations on the surface morphology of lithium disilicate glass ceramics and bond durability between resin composites and post-treated lithium disilicate glass ceramics. After being sintered, ground, and washed, 72 as-prepared specimens of lithium disilicate glass ceramics with dimensions of 11 mm×13 mm×2 mm were randomly divided into three groups. Each group was treated with acid solution [32% phosphoric acid (PA) or 4% or 9.5% HF] for 20 s. Then, four acidified specimens from each group were randomly selected. One of the specimens was used to observe the surface morphology using scanning electron microscopy, and the others were used to observe the surface roughness using a surface roughness meter (including Ra, Rz, and Rmax). After treatment with different acid solutions in each group, 20 samples were further treated with silane coupling agent/resin adhesive/resin cement (Monobond S/Multilink Primer A&B/Multilink N), followed by bonding to a composite resin column (Filtek™ Z350) with a diameter of 3 mm. A total of 20 specimens in each group were randomly divided into two subgroups, which were used for measuring the microshear bond strength, with one of them subjected to cool-thermal cycle for 20 000 times. The surface roughness (Ra, Rz, and Rmax) of lithium disilicate glass ceramics treated with 4% or 9.5% HF was significantly higher than that of the ceramic treated with PA (Pglass ceramics treated with 9.5% HF also demonstrated better surface roughness (Rz and Rmax) than that of the ceramics treated with 4% HF. Cool-thermal cycle treatment reduced the bond strength of lithium disilicate glass ceramics in all groups (Pglass ceramics treated with HF had higher bond strength than that of the ceramics treated with PA. The lithium disilicate glass ceramics treated with 4% HF had higher bond strength than that of the ceramics treated with 9.5% HF (Pglass ceramics treated with 4

  11. Machinability of lithium disilicate glass ceramic in in vitro dental diamond bur adjusting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao-Fei; Ren, Hai-Tao; Yin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Esthetic high-strength lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDGC) are used for monolithic crowns and bridges produced in dental CAD/CAM and oral adjusting processes, which machinability affects the restorative quality. A machinability study has been made in the simulated oral clinical machining of LDGC with a dental handpiece and diamond burs, regarding the diamond tool wear and chip control, machining forces and energy, surface finish and integrity. Machining forces, speeds and energy in in vitro dental adjusting of LDGC were measured by a high-speed data acquisition and force sensor system. Machined LDGC surfaces were assessed using three-dimensional non-contact chromatic confocal optical profilometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Diamond bur morphology and LDGC chip shapes were also examined using SEM. Minimum tool wear but significant LDGC chip accumulations were found. Machining forces and energy significantly depended on machining conditions (pceramics (pceramics (pceramics. Surface roughness for machined LDGC was comparable for other glass ceramics. The removal mechanisms of LDGC were dominated by penetration-induced brittle fracture and shear-induced plastic deformation. Unlike most other glass ceramics, distinct intergranular and transgranular fractures of lithium disilicate crystals were found in LDGC. This research provides the fundamental data for dental clinicians on the machinability of LDGC in intraoral adjustments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of crystal size on the mechanical properties of a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 28 West Xianning Road, Xi’an 710049 (China); Guo, J.W.; Wang, X.S; Zhang, S.F. [State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, 145 West Changle Road, Xi’an 710032 (China); He, L., E-mail: helin@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 28 West Xianning Road, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2016-07-04

    Crystal size of lithium disilicate (LD) phase in a LD glass-ceramic was changed by thermally controlled crystallization of a precursory LD glass at different temperatures. Effects of the crystal size on the mechanical properties of the glass-ceramic were investigated. It was found that the flexural strength presented a hump-like variation trend with increasing the crystal size, the hardness monotonously decreased at the same time. It was further confirmed that micro residual compressive stresses existed inside the LD crystals due to the thermal expansion mismatch between the glass matrix and the crystalline phase. The levels of the residual stresses increased with increasing the crystal size. The crystal size performed dual effects on the flexural strength of the glass-ceramic: an “interlocking effect” caused by larger-sized LD crystals and a “micro residual stress effect” related to the balancing tensile stresses in the glass matrix. Higher residual tensile stresses in the glass matrix induced by larger-sized LD crystals would counteract the “interlocking effect” of the crystals, causing the strength degradation. The hardness of the glass-ceramic was mainly controlled by the “micro residual stress effect”.

  13. AFM Surface Roughness and Topography Analysis of Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pantić

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is presenting AFM analysis of surface roughness of Lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max CAD under different finishing procedure (techniques: polishing, glazing and grinding. Lithium disilicate glass ceramics is all-ceramic dental system which is characterized by high aesthetic quality and it can be freely said that properties of material provide all prosthetic requirements: function, biocompatibility and aesthetic. Experimental tests of surface roughness were investigated on 4 samples with dimensions: 18 mm length, 14 mm width and 12 mm height. Contact surfaces of three samples were treated with different finishing procedure (polishing, glazing and grinding, and the contact surface of the raw material is investigated as a fourth sample. Experimental measurements were done using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM of NT-MDT manufacturers, in the contact mode. All obtained results of different prepared samples are presented in the form of specific roughness parameters (Rа, Rz, Rmax, Rq and 3D surface topography.

  14. XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR Spectroscopy of In Situ Crystallization of Lithium Disilicate Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, T.; Mogus-Milankovic, A.; Ray, C. S.; Lesher, C. E.; Youngman, R.; Day, D. E.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a Li2O-2SiO2 (LS2) glass was investigated as a function of pressure and temperature up to 6 GPa and 750 C respectively, using XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR spectroscopy. Glass densified at 6 GPa has an average Si-O-Si bond angle approx.7deg lower than that found in glass processed at 4.5 GPa. At 4.5 GPa, lithium disilicate crystallizes from the glass, while at 6 GPa a new high pressure form of lithium metasilicate crystallizes. The new phase, while having lithium metasilicate crystal symmetry, contains at least 4 different Si sites. NMR results for 6 GPa sample indicate the presence of Q4 species with (Q(sup 4))Si-O-Si(Q(sup 4)) bond angles of approx.157deg. This is the first reported occurrence of Q(sup 4) species with such large bond angles in alumina free alkali silicate glass. No five- or six- coordinated Si are found.

  15. Sodium diffusion in boroaluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Zheng, Qiuju; Mauro, John C.

    2011-01-01

    of isothermal sodium diffusion in BAS glasses by ion exchange, inward diffusion, and tracer diffusion experiments. By varying the [SiO2]/[Al2O3] ratio of the glasses, different structural regimes of sodium behavior are accessed. We show that the mobility of the sodium ions decreases with increasing [SiO2]/[Al2O......Understanding the fundamentals of alkali diffusion in boroaluminosilicate (BAS) glasses is of critical importance for advanced glass applications, e.g., the production of chemically strengthened glass covers for personal electronic devices. Here, we investigate the composition dependence...

  16. Effect of high pressure on the mechanical properties of lithium disilicate glass ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchner, Silvio; Lepienski, Carlos M.; Jr, Paulo C. Soares; Balzaretti, Naira M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → High pressure densification of LS2 decreases the mechanical properties. → Densification of LS2 at high temperature improves the mechanical properties. → Hardness and elastic modulus of LS2 densified at high temperature are notably high. - Abstract: Lithium disilicate glass has been submitted to a high pressure treatment associated to a heat treatment, and the effects of densification and crystallization at high pressure on the mechanical properties were evaluated. The hardness and elastic modulus were examined by instrumented indentation using a Berkovich tip. The crack pattern morphology after indentation with a cube corner indenter was also investigated. The hardness and elastic modulus of the samples submitted to high pressure at room temperature decreased with increasing pressure. The hardness and elastic modulus of the samples submitted simultaneously to high pressure (up to 7.7 GPa) and high temperature increased noticeably. The amount, length and type of cracks induced by the cube corner tip changed with increasing pressure. These results indicate that the high temperature treatment under high pressure improved the mechanical properties of LS 2 .

  17. Silanated Surface Treatment: Effects on the Bond Strength to Lithium Disilicate Glass-Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratto, Samantha Schaffer Pugsley; Spina, Denis Roberto Falcão; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Baratto Filho, Flares; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silanization protocols on the bond strength of two resin cements to a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic. Thirty-two ceramic discs were assigned to 2 groups (n=16): G1 - dual-cured resin cement and G2 - light-cured resin cement. Four subgroups were evaluated according to the used silanization protocol. The glass-ceramic was etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 s and silane was applied for 1 min, as follows: CTL - according to the manufacturer's instructions; HA - dried with hot air; NWA - washed and dried with water and air at room temperature; HWA - washed and dried with hot water and hot air. Thereafter, adhesive was applied and light-cured for 20 s. Silicon molds were used to prepare resin cement cylinders (1x1 mm) on the ceramic surface. The specimens were stored in deionized water at 37 °C for 48 h and subjected to a micro-shear test. The data were submitted to statistical analysis (?#61537;=0.05). Group G1 showed higher bond strengths than G2, except for the CTL and NWA subgroups. Differences as function of the silanization protocol were only observed in G1: HWA (25.13±6.83)≥HA (22.95±7.78)≥CTL(17.44±7.24) ≥NWA(14.63±8.76). For G2 there was no difference among the subgroups. In conclusion, the silanization protocol affected the resin cement/ceramic bond strengths, depending on the material. Washing/drying with hot water and/or hot air increased only the bond strength of the dual-cured resin cement.

  18. Determination of the mechanical behavior of lithium disilicate glass ceramics by nanoindentation and scanning probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Calvin M.; Jiang, Danyu; Gong, Jianghong; Yin, Ling

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the mechanical behavior of high-strength dental ceramics, lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDGC) using nanoindentation and in situ scanning probe microscopy (SPM). The nanoindentation hardness and Young's moduli of LDGC were measured as a function of the applied indentation load. The indentation load/size effect (ISE) was analyzed for both measured nanoindentation hardness and Young's moduli. The true hardness, i.e., the load-independent hardness, was determined based on the proportional specimen resistance (PSR) model. Nanoindentation-induced plasticity in LDGC was characterized by in situ SPM imaging of the indented volumes and by measuring pile-up heights of indented cross-sections. The results show that both nanoindentation hardness and Young's modulus are load-dependent following the expended Meyer's law using a power series. At the nanoindentation loads, indented LDGC can be mainly plastically deformed by limiting cracking events. This unusual behavior, for nominally brittle materials, influences the mode of contact damage in applications such as machining, polishing, wear, impact damage and hardness testing for dental restorations. - Highlights: • Both hardness and Young's modulus of LDGC were load-dependent following the expended Meyer's law. • The true hardness of LDGC was determined based on the proportional specimen resistance (PSR) model. • Nanoindentation-induced plasticity in LDGC was characterized by in situ SPM imaging. • At low nanoindentation loads, indented LDGC can be mainly plastically deformed by limiting cracking events

  19. LED and Halogen Light Transmission through a CAD/CAM Lithium Disilicate Glass-Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carolina Nemesio de Barros; De Magalhães, Cláudia Silami; Daleprane, Bruno; Peixoto, Rogéli Tibúrcio Ribeiro da Cunha; Ferreira, Raquel da Conceição; Cury, Luiz Alberto; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira

    2015-01-01

    The effect of thickness, shade and translucency of CAD/CAM lithium disilicate glass-ceramic on light transmission of light-emitting diode (LED) and quartz-tungsten-halogen units (QTH) were evaluated. Ceramic IPS e.max CAD shades A1, A2, A3, A3.5, high (HT) and low (LT) translucency were cut (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 mm). Light sources emission spectra were determined. Light intensity incident and transmitted through each ceramic sample was measured to determine light transmission percentage (TP). Statistical analysis used a linear regression model. There was significant interaction between light source and ceramic translucency (p=0.008) and strong negative correlation (R=-0.845, pceramic thickness and TP. Increasing one unit in thickness led to 3.17 reduction in TP. There was no significant difference in TP (p=0.124) between shades A1 (ß1=0) and A2 (ß1=-0.45) but significant reduction occurred for A3 (ß1=-0.83) and A3.5 (ß1=-2.18). The interaction QTH/HT provided higher TP (ß1=0) than LED/HT (ß1=-2.92), QTH/LT (ß1=-3.75) and LED/LT (ß1=-5.58). Light transmission was more effective using halogen source and high-translucency ceramics, decreased as the ceramic thickness increased and was higher for the lighter shades, A1 and A2. From the regression model (R2=0.85), an equation was obtained to estimate TP value using each variable ß1 found. A maximum TP of 25% for QTH and 20% for LED was found, suggesting that ceramic light attenuation could compromise light cured and dual cure resin cements polymerization.

  20. Flexural strength and translucent characteristics of lithium disilicate glass-ceramics with different P2O5 content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fu; Gao, Jing; Wang, Hui; Chen, Ji-hua

    2010-01-01

    Lithium disilicate glass-ceramics derived from the SiO 2 -Li 2 O-K 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 -P 2 O 5 system with different P 2 O 5 content (from 0.5 mol.% to 2.0 mol.% at a step of 0.5 mol.%) were prepared for dental restorative application. Flexural strength of final glass-ceramics and translucent characteristics expressed in term of contrast ratio (CR) were measured. The interrelations between P 2 O 5 content, microstructure and properties were discussed. Glass-ceramic with a P 2 O 5 content of 1.0 mol.%, in which elongated rod-like Li 2 Si 2 O 5 crystals formed an interlocking microstructure, showed the highest flexural strength and suitable contrast ratio for dental restorative application.

  1. Evaluation of marginal fit of 2 CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown systems and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Min-Kyung; Park, Ji-Hee; Park, Sang-Won; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Oh, Gye-Jeong; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2015-08-01

    This study was to evaluate the marginal fit of two CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown systems compared to lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crowns. Shoulder and deep chamfer margin were formed on each acrylic resin tooth model of a maxillary first premolar. Two CAD-CAM systems (Prettau®Zirconia and ZENOSTAR®ZR translucent) and lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max®press) crowns were made (n=16). Each crown was bonded to stone dies with resin cement (Rely X Unicem). Marginal gap and absolute marginal discrepancy of crowns were measured using a light microscope equipped with a digital camera (Leica DFC295) magnified by a factor of 100. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Tukey's HSD test were conducted to analyze the significance of crown marginal fit regarding the finish line configuration and the fabrication system. The mean marginal gap of lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns (IPS e.max®press) was significantly lower than that of the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia) (Pmarginal discrepancy (Pmarginal gap than the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia). In terms of absolute marginal discrepancy, the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (ZENOSTAR®ZR translucent) had under-extended margin, whereas the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia) and lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns (IPS e.max®press) had overextended margins.

  2. The effect of variations in translucency and background on color differences in CAD/CAM lithium disilicate glass ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ben Ali, Abdulaziz; Kang, Kiho; Finkelman, Matthew D; Zandparsa, Roya; Hirayama, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of variations in translucency and background on color differences (ΔE) for different shades of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) lithium disilicate glass ceramics. A pilot study suggested n = 10 as an appropriate sample size for the number of lithium disilicate glass ceramic cylinders per group. High-transparency (HT) and low-transparency (LT) cylinders (diameter, 12 mm; length, 13 mm) were fabricated in three ceramic shades (BL1, A2, C3) using CAD/CAM technology and were cut into specimen disks (thickness, 1.2 mm; diameter, 12 mm) for placement on Natural Die (ND1 and ND4) backgrounds. Four combinations of translucency and background color were evaluated in terms of color differences for the three ceramic shades: group 1 (HT ND1, reference), group 2 (HT ND4), group 3 (LT ND1), and group 4 (LT ND4). A spectrophotometer was used to measure the color differences. Nonparametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis tests) were used to evaluate the color differences among the tested groups, and Mann-Whitney U tests with Bonferroni correction were used as post hoc tests. Furthermore, for each ceramic shade, the HT groups were compared to the LT groups using the Mann-Whitney U test. Significant differences were present among the tested groups of the same ceramic shade (p glass ceramic color among the BL1, A2, and C3 ceramic shades. Changing the underlying color from a lighter background to a darker background resulted in increased color differences. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  3. [An experimental study of the wear behavior of dental feldspathic glass-ceramic and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Bei-min; Zhang, Shao-feng; He, Lin; Guo, Jia-wen; Yu, Jin-tao; Wu, Xiao-hong

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the tribology characteristics of two ceramic materials in vitro:feldspathic glass-ceramic (veneer porcelain) and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (heat-pressed ceramic), and to evaluate the wear resistance of different ceramic materials from the dynamic chewing perspective. Wear tests were performed in simulated oral environment with stainless steel ball antagonists (r = 3 mm), veneer porcelain (CERAMCO 3) and heat-pressed ceramic (IPS e.max Press HT type) in the chewing simulator. The tribological tests were carried out under artificial saliva lubrication condition in room temperature with a vertical load of 10 N for 1.2×10(6) cycles (f = 1.5 Hz, uniform circular motion, revolving speed = 90 r/min, radius = 0.5 mm). The wear volumes were measured using three-dimensional profiling, and surface microscopic morphology were observed using scanning electron microscopy at time point of 200 000, 400 000, 600 000, 800 000, 1 000 000, and 1 200 000 cycles. In a simulated oral environment, the wear rates of veneer porcelain were (0.001 20 ± 0.00 018) , (0.000 10 ± 0.000 03) , (0.000 50 ± 0.000 05), (0.000 10 ± 0.000 02) , (0.004 10 ± 0.000 38) , and (0.019 00 ± 0.003 53) (×10(-4) mm(3)/cycles) at 200 000, 400 000, 600 000, 800 000, 1 000 000, 1 200 000 cycles. The wear rates of heat-pressed ceramic were (0.139 50 ± 0.030 94), (0.124 40 ± 0.031 20), (0.054 80 ± 0.005 38), (0.038 80 ± 0.006 10), (0.011 10 ± 0.003 75), (0.198 90 ± 0.045 80) (×10(-4) mm(3)/cycles) at 200 000, 400 000, 600 000, 800 000, 1 000 000, 1 200 000 cycles. Three stages were observed in the wear loss process of the two materials: running-in stage, steady wear stage and severe wear stage. In running-in and steady wear stage, the shallow wear tracks of veneer porcelain were produced by the fatigue effect.While in severe wear stage, the wear tracks turned into ploughing. In running-in stage, the surface of heat-pressed ceramic was characterized by dense and shallow ploughing

  4. The mechanism of deceleration of nucleation and crystal growth by the small addition of transition metals to lithium disilicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Katrin; Avramov, Isak; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of niobium or tantalum oxide to lithium disilicate glass provokes a drastic decrease of the steady-state nucleation rates and the crystal growth velocities. The viscosity of the residual glassy matrix is considered as a function of the crystallization degree in the course of a non-isothermal crystallization. For simplification, a homogeneous distribution of the added oxides in the glass matrix is assumed. While the viscosity initially decreases, it significantly increases again for higher crystallization degrees hindering crystal growth. However, it was shown that the additives are enriched at the crystal interface. Several possible reasons for the inhibition of nucleation and growth kinetics such as viscosity, interfacial energy crystal/glassy phase, thermodynamic driving force or impingement rate are discussed. Since the crystallization front is blocked by the additives the impingement rate is decreased with increasing additive concentration. Since small concentrations of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 have a drastic effect on the nucleation, these components should be enriched at the interface crystal/glass. This will only take place, if it leads to a decrease in the interfacial energy. Since this effect alone should result in an increase of the nucleation rate, it must be overcompensated by kinetic effects. PMID:27150844

  5. Flexural strength and microstructure of two lithium disilicate glass ceramics for CAD/CAM restoration in the dental clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk-Ho Kang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives There has been a growing interest in glass ceramic systems with good esthetics, high fracture resistance and bonding durability, and simplified fabrication techniques using CAD/CAM. The aim of this study is to compare flexural strength before and after heat treatment of two lithium disilicate CAD/CAM blocks, IPS e.max CAD (Ivoclar Vivadent and Rosetta SM (Hass, and to observe their crystalline structures. Materials and Methods Biaxial flexural strength was tested according to ISO 6872 with 20 disc form specimens sliced from each block before and after heat treatment. Also, the crystalline structures were observed using field-emission scanning microscopy (FE-SEM, Hitachi and x-ray diffraction (XRD, Rigaku analysis. The mean values of the biaxial flexural strength were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U test at a significance level of p = 0.05. Results There were no statistically significant differences in flexural strength between IPS e.max CAD and Rosetta SM either before heat treatment or after heat treatment. For both ceramics, the initial flexural strength greatly increased after heat treatment, with significant differences (p < 0.05. The FE-SEM images presented similar patterns of crystalline structure in the two ceramics. In the XRD analysis, they also had similar patterns, presenting high peak positions corresponding to the standard lithium metasilicate and lithium disilicate at each stage of heat treatment. Conclusions IPS e.max CAD and Rosetta SM showed no significant differences in flexural strength. They had a similar crystalline pattern and molecular composition.

  6. Effect of adhesive luting on the fracture resistance of zirconia compared to that of composite resin and lithium disilicate glass ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Jin Lim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of adhesive luting on the fracture resistance of zirconia compared to that of a composite resin and a lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Materials and Methods The specimens (dimension: 2 mm × 2 mm × 25 mm of the composite resin, lithium disilicate glass ceramic, and yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP were prepared. These were then divided into nine groups: three non-luting groups, three non-adhesive luting groups, and three adhesive luting groups, for each restorative material. In the non-luting groups, specimens were placed on the bovine tooth without any luting agents. In the non-adhesive luting groups, only zinc phosphate cement was used for luting the specimen to the bovine tooth. In the adhesive luting groups, specimens were pretreated, and the adhesive luting procedure was performed using a self-adhesive resin cement. For all the groups, a flexural test was performed using universal testing machine, in which the fracture resistance was measured by recording the force at which the specimen was fractured. Results The fracture resistance after adhesive luting increased by approximately 29% in the case of the composite resin, 26% in the case of the lithium disilicate glass ceramic, and only 2% in the case of Y-TZP as compared to non-adhesive luting. Conclusions The fracture resistance of Y-TZP did not increased significantly after adhesive luting as compared to that of the composite resin and the lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

  7. Effect of Silanization on Microtensile Bond Strength of Different Resin Cements to a Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gré, Cristina Parise; de Ré Silveira, Renan C; Shibata, Shizuma; Lago, Carlo Tr; Vieira, Luiz Cc

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the influence of a silane-coupling agent on the bond strength of a self-adhesive cement and a conventional resin cement to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic. A total of eight ceramic blocks were fabricated and divided into four groups (n = 2). In groups 1 and 3, ceramic surfaces were etched with hydrofluoric acid 10% for 20 seconds, rinsed for 30 seconds, and air-dried. One layer of a silane agent was applied onto all ceramic specimens and air-dried for 30 seconds. In groups 2 and 4, ceramic surfaces were etched with hydrofluoric acid, rinsed, and air-dried without application of the silane-coupling agent. The ceramic blocks were bonded to a block of composite with a self-adhesive resin cement or with a conventional resin cement, according to the manufacturer's instructions. After 24 hours in distilled water at 37°C, the specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonding interface area to obtain beams with a bonding area of 0.8 mm(2) and submitted to a microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and the Games-Howell post hoc test (p = 0.05). Fractured specimens were examined under optical microscopy at 40x magnification. Silanization resulted in higher microtensile bond strength compared to groups without silane. No significant differences were found between the conventional resin cement and the self-adhesive resin cement with silane agent (p = 0.983), and without silane agent (p = 0.877). Silanization appears to be crucial for resin bonding to a lithium disilicate-based ceramic, regardless of the resin cement used. The self-adhesive resin cement performed as well as the conventional resin cement. Applying one layer of a silane-coupling agent after etching the ceramic surface with hydrofluoric acid 10% enhanced the bond strength between resin cements and a glass ceramic.

  8. Effect of etching with distinct hydrofluoric acid concentrations on the flexural strength of a lithium disilicate-based glass ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochnow, Catina; Venturini, Andressa B; Grasel, Rafaella; Bottino, Marco C; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2017-05-01

    This study examined the effects of distinct hydrofluoric acid concentrations on the mechanical behavior of a lithium disilicate-based glass ceramic. Bar-shaped specimens were produced from ceramic blocks (e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent). The specimens were polished, chamfered, and sonically cleaned in distilled water. The specimens were randomly divided into five groups (n = 23). The HF1, HF3, HF5, and HF10 specimens were etched for 20 s with acid concentrations of 1%, 3%, 5%, and 10%, respectively, while the SC (control) sample was untreated. The etched surfaces were evaluated using a scanning electron microscope and an atomic force microscope. Finally, the roughness was measured, and 3-point bending flexural tests were performed. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The Weibull modulus and characteristic strength were also determined. No statistical difference in the roughness and flexural strength was determined among the groups. The structural reliabilities (Weilbull moduli) were similar for the tested groups; however, the characteristic strength of the HF1 specimen was greater than that of the HF10 specimen. Compared with the untreated ceramic, the surface roughness and flexural strength of the ceramic were unaffected upon etching, regardless of the acid concentration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 885-891, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Effect of zircon-based tricolor pigments on the color, microstructure, flexural strength and translucency of a novel dental lithium disilicate glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kun; Wang, Fu; Gao, Jing; Sun, Xiang; Deng, Zai-Xi; Wang, Hui; Jin, Lei; Chen, Ji-Hua

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of zircon-based tricolor pigments (praseodymium zircon yellow, ferrum zircon red, and vanadium zircon blue) on the color, thermal property, crystalline phase composition, microstructure, flexural strength, and translucency of a novel dental lithium disilicate glass-ceramic. The pigments were added to the glass frit, milled, pressed, and sintered. Ninety monochrome samples were prepared and the colors were analyzed. The effect of the pigments on thermal property, crystalline phase composition, and microstructure were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Addition of the pigments resulted in the acquisition of subtractive primary colors as well as tooth-like colors, and did not demonstrate significant effects on the thermal property, crystalline phase composition, microstructure, and flexural strength of the experimental glass-ceramic. Although significant differences (p ceramics, the translucencies of the latter were sufficient to fabricate dental restorations. These results indicate that the zircon-based tricolor pigments can be used with dental lithium disilicate glass-ceramic to produce abundant and predictable tooth-like colors without significant adverse effects, if mixed in the right proportions. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Mixed cation effect in sodium aluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.

    , network structure, and the resistances associated with the deformation processes in mixed cation glasses by partially substituting magnesium for calcium and calcium for lithium in sodium aluminosilicate glasses. We use Raman and 27Al NMR spectroscopies to obtain insights into the structural...

  11. Effect of Heat-Pressing Temperature and Holding Time on the Microstructure and Flexural Strength of Lithium Disilicate Glass-Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Wang, Hui; Chen, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the influence of various heat-pressing procedures (different holding time and heat pressing temperature) on the microstructure and flexural strength of lithium disilicate glass ceramic. An experimental lithium silicate glass ceramic (ELDC) was prepared from the SiO2-Li2O-K2O-Al2O3-ZrO2-P2O5 system and heat-pressed following different procedures by varying temperature and holding time. The flexural strength was tested and microstructure was analyzed. The relationships between the microstructure, mechanical properties and heat-pressing procedures were discussed in-depth. Results verified the feasibility of the application of dental heat-pressing technique in processing the experimental lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Different heat-pressing procedures showed significant influence on microstructure and flexural strength. ELDC heat-pressed at 950℃ with holding time of 15 min achieved an almost pore-free microstructure and the highest flexural strength, which was suitable for dental restorative application. PMID:25985206

  12. Effect of heat-pressing temperature and holding time on the microstructure and flexural strength of lithium disilicate glass-ceramics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Wang

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate the influence of various heat-pressing procedures (different holding time and heat pressing temperature on the microstructure and flexural strength of lithium disilicate glass ceramic. An experimental lithium silicate glass ceramic (ELDC was prepared from the SiO2-Li2O-K2O-Al2O3-ZrO2-P2O5 system and heat-pressed following different procedures by varying temperature and holding time. The flexural strength was tested and microstructure was analyzed. The relationships between the microstructure, mechanical properties and heat-pressing procedures were discussed in-depth. Results verified the feasibility of the application of dental heat-pressing technique in processing the experimental lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Different heat-pressing procedures showed significant influence on microstructure and flexural strength. ELDC heat-pressed at 950℃ with holding time of 15 min achieved an almost pore-free microstructure and the highest flexural strength, which was suitable for dental restorative application.

  13. Time-dependent fracture probability of bilayer, lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic molar crowns as a function of core/veneer thickness ratio and load orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, Kenneth J.; Jadaan, Osama M.; Esquivel–Upshaw, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports on bilayer ceramic crown prostheses suggest that fractures of the veneering ceramic represent the most common reason for prosthesis failure. Objective The aims of this study were to test the hypotheses that: (1) an increase in core ceramic/veneer ceramic thickness ratio for a crown thickness of 1.6 mm reduces the time-dependent fracture probability (Pf) of bilayer crowns with a lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic core, and (2) oblique loading, within the central fossa, increases Pf for 1.6-mm-thick crowns compared with vertical loading. Materials and methods Time-dependent fracture probabilities were calculated for 1.6-mm-thick, veneered lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic molar crowns as a function of core/veneer thickness ratio and load orientation in the central fossa area. Time-dependent fracture probability analyses were computed by CARES/Life software and finite element analysis, using dynamic fatigue strength data for monolithic discs of a lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic core (Empress 2), and ceramic veneer (Empress 2 Veneer Ceramic). Results Predicted fracture probabilities (Pf) for centrally-loaded 1,6-mm-thick bilayer crowns over periods of 1, 5, and 10 years are 1.2%, 2.7%, and 3.5%, respectively, for a core/veneer thickness ratio of 1.0 (0.8 mm/0.8 mm), and 2.5%, 5.1%, and 7.0%, respectively, for a core/veneer thickness ratio of 0.33 (0.4 mm/1.2 mm). Conclusion CARES/Life results support the proposed crown design and load orientation hypotheses. Significance The application of dynamic fatigue data, finite element stress analysis, and CARES/Life analysis represent an optimal approach to optimize fixed dental prosthesis designs produced from dental ceramics and to predict time-dependent fracture probabilities of ceramic-based fixed dental prostheses that can minimize the risk for clinical failures. PMID:24060349

  14. Time-dependent fracture probability of bilayer, lithium-disilicate-based, glass-ceramic, molar crowns as a function of core/veneer thickness ratio and load orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, Kenneth J; Jadaan, Osama M; Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F

    2013-11-01

    Recent reports on bilayer ceramic crown prostheses suggest that fractures of the veneering ceramic represent the most common reason for prosthesis failure. The aims of this study were to test the hypotheses that: (1) an increase in core ceramic/veneer ceramic thickness ratio for a crown thickness of 1.6mm reduces the time-dependent fracture probability (Pf) of bilayer crowns with a lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic core, and (2) oblique loading, within the central fossa, increases Pf for 1.6-mm-thick crowns compared with vertical loading. Time-dependent fracture probabilities were calculated for 1.6-mm-thick, veneered lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic molar crowns as a function of core/veneer thickness ratio and load orientation in the central fossa area. Time-dependent fracture probability analyses were computed by CARES/Life software and finite element analysis, using dynamic fatigue strength data for monolithic discs of a lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic core (Empress 2), and ceramic veneer (Empress 2 Veneer Ceramic). Predicted fracture probabilities (Pf) for centrally loaded 1.6-mm-thick bilayer crowns over periods of 1, 5, and 10 years are 1.2%, 2.7%, and 3.5%, respectively, for a core/veneer thickness ratio of 1.0 (0.8mm/0.8mm), and 2.5%, 5.1%, and 7.0%, respectively, for a core/veneer thickness ratio of 0.33 (0.4mm/1.2mm). CARES/Life results support the proposed crown design and load orientation hypotheses. The application of dynamic fatigue data, finite element stress analysis, and CARES/Life analysis represent an optimal approach to optimize fixed dental prosthesis designs produced from dental ceramics and to predict time-dependent fracture probabilities of ceramic-based fixed dental prostheses that can minimize the risk for clinical failures. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  15. Viscosity properties of sodium borophosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaylord, S.; Tincher, B.; Petit, L.; Richardson, K.

    2009-01-01

    The viscosity behavior of (1 - x)NaPO 3 -xNa 2 B 4 O 7 glasses (x = 0.05-0.20) have been measured as a function of temperature using beam-bending and parallel-plate viscometry. The viscosity was found to shift to higher temperatures with increasing sodium borate content. The kinetic fragility parameter, m, estimated from the viscosity curve, decreases from 52 to 33 when x increases from 0.05 to 0.20 indicating that the glass network transforms from fragile to strong with the addition of Na 2 B 4 O 7 . The decrease in fragility with increasing x is due to the progressive depolymerization of the phosphate network by the preferred four-coordinated boron atoms present in the low alkali borate glasses. As confirmed by Raman spectroscopy increasing alkali borate leads to enhanced B-O-P linkages realized with the accompanying transition from solely four-coordinated boron (in BO 4 units) to mixed BO 4 /BO 3 structures. The glass viscosity characteristics of the investigated glasses were compared to those of P-SF67 and N-FK5 commercial glasses from SCHOTT. We showed that the dependence of the viscosity of P-SF67 was similar to the investigated glasses due to similar phosphate network organization confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, whereas N-FK5 exhibited a very different viscosity curve and fragility parameter due to its highly coordinated silicate network

  16. Structure and crystallization of SiO2 and B2O3 doped lithium disilicate glasses from theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlebach, Andreas; Thieme, Katrin; Sierka, Marek; Rüssel, Christian

    2017-09-27

    Solid solutions of SiO 2 and B 2 O 3 in Li 2 O·2SiO 2 are synthesized and characterized for the first time. Their structure and crystallization mechanisms are investigated employing a combination of simulations at the density functional theory level and experiments on the crystallization of SiO 2 and B 2 O 3 doped lithium disilicate glasses. The remarkable agreement of calculated and experimentally determined cell parameters reveals the preferential, kinetically controlled incorporation of [SiO 4 ] and [BO 4 ] at the Li + lattice sites of the Li 2 O·2SiO 2 crystal structure. While the addition of SiO 2 increases the glass viscosity resulting in lower crystal growth velocities, glasses containing B 2 O 3 show a reduction of both viscosities and crystal growth velocities. These observations could be rationalized by a change of the chemical composition of the glass matrix surrounding the precipitated crystal phase during the course of crystallization, which leads to a deceleration of the attachment of building units required for further crystal growth at the liquid-crystal interface.

  17. The structure of leached sodium borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunker, B.C.; Tallant, D.R.; Headley, T.J.; Turner, G.L.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy, solid state 29 Si, 11 B, 17 O, and 23 Na nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy have been used to investigate how the structures of sodium borosilicate glasses change during leaching in water at pH 1, 9, and 12. Results show that the random network structure present prior to leaching is transformed into a network of small condensed ring structures and/or colloidal silica particles. The restructuring of leached glass can be rationalised on the basis of simple hydrolysis (depolymerisation) and condensation (repolymerisation) reactions involving Si-O-Si and Si-O-B bonds. The structural changes that occur during leaching influence the properties of the leached layer, including leaching kinetics, crazing and spalling, and slow crack growth. (author)

  18. The effect of heat treatments applied to superstructure porcelain on the mechanical properties and microstructure of lithium disilicate glass ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Hatice; Özdoğan, Alper

    2018-01-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate that heat treatments with different numbers applied to superstructure porcelain whether effects microstructure and mechanical properties of lithium disilicate ceramic (LDC). Eighty disc-shaped specimens were fabricated from IPS e.max Press. Specimens were fired at heating values of porcelain in different numbers and divided four groups (n=5). Initial Vickers hardness were measured and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was performed. Different surface treatment were applied and then Vickers hardness, surface roughness and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) analysis were performed. Data were analyzed with Varyans analysis and Tukey HSD test (α=0.05). Initial hardness among groups was no significant different (p>0.05), but hardness and surface roughness after surface treatments were significant different (pmicrostructure of LDC. Increasing firing numbers and surface treatments effect the microstructure of LDC.

  19. Computational study of structural, elastic and electronic properties of lithium disilicate (Li(2)Si(2)O(5)) glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biskri, Zine Elabidine; Rached, Habib; Bouchear, Merzoug; Rached, Djamel

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate theoretically the structural, elastic and electronic properties of Lithium Disilicate (LD) crystal (Li2Si2O5), using the pseudo potential method based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) with the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and the Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA). The calculated structural properties namely the equilibrium lattice parameters and cell volume are in good agreement with the available experimental results. However, for the LD crystal elastic moduli: Shear modulus G, Young's modulus E and Poisson's ratio ν we have found a discrepancy between our theoretical values and experimental ones reported in polycrystalline sample containing LD crystals. The calculated elastic properties show that LD is more rigid compared with other components. We also investigated the mechanical stability of Li2Si2O5 compound and we have noticed that this compound is stable against elastic deformations. On the basis of shear to bulk modulus ratio analysis, we inferred that Li2Si2O5 compound is brittle in nature. In order to complete the fundamental characteristics of this compound we have measured the elastic anisotropy. Our results for the energy band structure and Density of States (DOS) show that Li2Si2O5 compound has an insulator characteristic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization and reactivity of sodium aluminoborosilicate glass fiber surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz Rivera, Lymaris, E-mail: luo105@psu.edu [Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bakaev, Victor A.; Banerjee, Joy [Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mueller, Karl T. [Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Pantano, Carlo G. [Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Highlights: • XPS revealed that these fiber surfaces contain sodium carbonate weathering products. • IGC–MS data confirms the products of acetic acid reaction with sodium carbonate. • NMR data shows two closely spaced, but distinct sodium carboxylate peaks. • Acetic acid reacts with both sodium in the glass and sodium in the sodium carbonate. - Abstract: Multicomponent complex oxides, such as sodium aluminoborosilicate glass fibers, are important materials used for thermal insulation in buildings and homes. Although the surface properties of single oxides, such as silica, have been extensively studied, less is known about the distribution of reactive sites at the surface of multicomponent oxides. Here, we investigated the reactivity of sodium aluminoborosilicate glass fiber surfaces for better understanding of their interface chemistry and bonding with acrylic polymers. Acetic acid (with and without a {sup 13}C enrichment) was used as a probe representative of the carboxylic functional groups in many acrylic polymers and adhesives. Inverse gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer (IGC–MS), and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), were used to characterize the fiber surface reactions and surface chemical structure. In this way, we discovered that both sodium ions in the glass surface, as well as sodium carbonate salts that formed on the surface due to the intrinsic reactivity of this glass in humid air, are primary sites of interaction with the carboxylic acid. Surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of sodium carbonates on these surfaces. Computer simulations of the interactions between the reactive sites on the glass fiber surface with acetic acid were performed to evaluate energetically favorable reactions. The adsorption reactions with sodium in the glass structure provide adhesive bonding sites, whereas the reaction with the sodium carbonate consumes the acid to form sodium-carboxylate, H

  1. [Effect of repeated sintering and variations in thickness on the color and microstructure of dental lithium disilicate-based glass ceramic veneers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Huang; Jia, Yu; Shaofeng, Meng; Biyun, Gao

    2017-08-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of repeated sintering and variation in thickness on the color and microstructure of dental lithium disilicate-based glass ceramic veneers. Methods A total of 24 computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) veneers was fabricated using the IPS e.max-CAD LS2 and then randomly divided into four groups (S0, S1, S2, S3; n=6). Each group was sintered 0, 1, 2, 3 times individually according to the manufacturer's recommendation. The color parameters (L, C, H, a, b values) of all the specimens were measured by a Vita easyshade dental colorimeter. The results were statistically analyzed using the SAS 9.1.3 software for MANOVA and LSD. Subsequently, the microstructures of the intersecting surfaces of the specimens were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results After repeated sintering, the L value significantly decreased (P<0.05). For the C and b values, statistical differences were observed among the groups except between S2 and S3. SEM results showed that the interlocking microstructures of rod-shaped Li₂Si₂O₅ crystals became more compact when the number of sintering times was increased. Conclusion Repeated sintering exhibited significant influence on the color of the IPS e.max-CAD LS2 veneers.

  2. Fracture, roughness and phase transformation in CAD/CAM milling and subsequent surface treatments of lithium metasilicate/disilicate glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alao, Abdur-Rasheed; Stoll, Richard; Song, Xiao-Fei; Abbott, John R; Zhang, Yu; Abduo, Jaafar; Yin, Ling

    2017-10-01

    This paper studied surface fracture, roughness and morphology, phase transformations, and material removal mechanisms of lithium metasilicate/disilicate glass ceramics (LMGC/LDGC) in CAD/CAM-milling and subsequent surface treatments. LMGC (IPS e.max CAD) blocks were milled using a chairside dental CAD/CAM milling unit and then treated in sintering, polishing and glazing processes. X-ray diffraction was performed on all processed surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was applied to analyse surface fracture and morphology. Surface roughness was quantitatively characterized by the arithmetic average surface roughness R a and the maximum roughness R z using desktop SEM-assisted morphology analytical software. The CAD/CAM milling induced extensive brittle cracks and crystal pulverization on LMGC surfaces, which indicate that the dominant removal mechanism was the fracture mode. Polishing and sintering of the milled LMGC lowered the surface roughness (ANOVA, p 0.05). In comparison of all applied fabrication process routes, it is found that CAD/CAM milling followed by polishing and sintering produced the smoothest surface with R a = 0.12 ± 0.08µm and R z = 0.89 ± 0.26µm. Thus , it is proposed as the optimized process route for LMGC/LDGC in dental restorations. This route enables to manufacture LMGC/LDGC restorations with cost effectiveness, time efficiency, and improved surface quality for better occlusal functions and reduced bacterial plaque accumulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sodium Is Not Essential for High Bioactivity of Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojing; Chen, Xiaohui; Brauer, Delia S.; Wilson, Rory M.; Law, Robert V.; Hill, Robert G.; Karpukhina, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to demonstrate that excellent bioactivity of glass can be achieved without the presence of an alkali metal component in glass composition. In vitro bioactivity of two sodium-free glasses based on the quaternary system SiO2-P2O5-CaO-CaF2 with 0 and 4.5 mol% CaF2 content was investigated and compared with the sodium containing glasses with equivalent amount of CaF2. The formation of apatite after immersion in Tris buffer was followed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), 31P and 19F solid state MAS-NMR. The dissolution study was completed by ion release measurements in Tris buffer. The results show that sodium free bioactive glasses formed apatite at 3 hours of immersion in Tris buffer, which is as fast as the corresponding sodium containing composition. This signifies that sodium is not an essential component in bioactive glasses and it is possible to make equally degradable bioactive glasses with or without sodium. The results presented here also emphasize the central role of the glass compositions design which is based on understanding of structural role of components and/or predicting the network connectivity of glasses. PMID:29271977

  4. Structural Dependence of Physical Properties in Sodium Boroaluminosilicate Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Qiuju; Potuzak, Marcel; Mauro, John C.

    Boroaluminosilicate glasses have found applications in many fields. The extent and nature of the mixing of network formers like SiO2, B2O3, and Al2O3 play an important role in controlling the macroscopic properties. To understand the structure-property correlations in these glasses, we study...... a series of sodium boroaluminosilicate glasses with various [Al2O3]/[SiO2] ratios to access different regimes of sodium behavior. We determine dynamic properties, elastic moduli, and hardness of these glasses. The results reveal an existence of local minimum for density, fragility index, Young’s and shear...

  5. Characterisation and Properties of Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramics in the SiO2-Li2O-K2O-Al2O3 System for Dental Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naruporn Monmaturapoj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes four different glass formulas derived from the SiO2-Li2O-K2O-Al2O3 system to investigate the effect of glass composition on their crystal formations and properties. Glass LD1 was SiO2-Li2O-K2O-Al2O3 system with the addition of P2O5 and CaF2 as nucleating agents. In Glass LD2, a slight amount of MgO was mixed in order to increase the viscosity of the melting glass. Finally, the important factor of Si : Li ratio was increased in Glasses LD3 and LD4 with compositions otherwise the same as LD1 and LD2. The results found that P2O5 and CaF2 served as a nucleating site for lithium phosphate and fluorapatite to encourage heterogenous nucleation and produce a fine-grained interlocking microstructure of lithium disilicate glass ceramics. MgO content in this system seemed to increase the viscosity of the melting glass and thermal expansion coefficient including the chemical solubility. Increasing the Si : Li ratio in glass compositions resulted in the change of the microstructure of Li2Si2O5 crystals.

  6. Mixed alkaline earth effect in sodium aluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.

    2013-01-01

    While the mixed alkali effect has received significant attention in the glass literature, the mixed alkaline earth effect has not been thoroughly studied. Here, we investigate the latter effect by partial substitution of magnesium for calcium in sodium aluminosilicate glasses. We use Raman and NMR...

  7. Unique sodium phosphosilicate glasses designed through extended topological constraint theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huidan; Jiang, Qi; Liu, Zhao; Li, Xiang; Ren, Jing; Chen, Guorong; Liu, Fude; Peng, Shou

    2014-05-15

    Sodium phosphosilicate glasses exhibit unique properties with mixed network formers, and have various potential applications. However, proper understanding on the network structures and property-oriented methodology based on compositional changes are lacking. In this study, we have developed an extended topological constraint theory and applied it successfully to analyze the composition dependence of glass transition temperature (Tg) and hardness of sodium phosphosilicate glasses. It was found that the hardness and Tg of glasses do not always increase with the content of SiO2, and there exist maximum hardness and Tg at a certain content of SiO2. In particular, a unique glass (20Na2O-17SiO2-63P2O5) exhibits a low glass transition temperature (589 K) but still has relatively high hardness (4.42 GPa) mainly due to the high fraction of highly coordinated network former Si((6)). Because of its convenient forming and manufacturing, such kind of phosphosilicate glasses has a lot of valuable applications in optical fibers, optical amplifiers, biomaterials, and fuel cells. Also, such methodology can be applied to other types of phosphosilicate glasses with similar structures.

  8. Study of Polymorphism of Borovanadate Glass of Sodium by Raman ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Study of Polymorphism of Borovanadate Glass of Sodium by Raman Spectroscopy Low Frequencies. MK Rabia, M Mayoufi, L Grosvalet, B Champagnon. Abstract. Sodium tetraborate (100 – x)(Na2B4O7.10H2O)– xV2O5, (x = 0 to 20 mole %) has been elaborated by splat cooling technique. Raman Measurements on the ...

  9. Effect of Lithium Disilicate Reinforced Liner Treatment on Bond and Fracture Strengths of Bilayered Zirconia All-Ceramic Crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Seok Jang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to evaluate the effect of a lithium-disilicate spray-liner application on both the bond strength between zirconia cores and heat-pressed lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic veneers, and the fracture strength of all-ceramic zirconia crowns. A lithium-disilicate reinforced liner was applied on the surface of a zirconia core and lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic was veneered on zirconia through heat press forming. Microtensile and crown fracture tests were conducted in order to evaluate, respectively, the bonding strength between the zirconia cores and heat pressed lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic veneers, and the fracture strength of bilayered zirconia all-ceramic crowns. The role of lithium-disilicate spray-liner at the interface between zirconia and lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic veneers was investigated through surface and cross-sectional analyses. We confirmed that both the mean bonding strength between the zirconia ceramics and lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic veneers and the fracture strength of the liner-treated groups were significantly higher than those of the untreated groups, which resulted, on the one hand, from the chemical bonding at the interface of the zirconia and lithium-disilicate liner, and, on the other, from the existence of a microgap in the group not treated with liner.

  10. Structure and DC conductivity of lead sodium ultraphosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abid, M.; Et-tabirou, M.; Taibi, M.

    2003-01-01

    Glasses of (0.40-x)Na 2 O-xPbO-0.60P 2 O 5 system with (0≤x≤0.40) molar fraction have been prepared with a conventional melting procedure. Their physical, thermal and spectroscopic studies such as density, molar volume, glass transition temperature, ionic conductivity and infrared spectroscopy have been investigated. The density and thermal stability of theses glasses increase with the substitution of PbO for Na 2 O. The ionic conductivity increases substantially with increasing concentration of sodium oxide and diminishes with increasing PbO content. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy reveals the formation of P-O-Pb bonds in theses glasses. The formation of P-O-Pb bonds which replace P-O - ...Na + bonds is in accordance with variations of glass transition temperature (T g ), molar volume (V m ) and ionic conductivity (σ). The former bonds are the origin of the partial glass-forming ability of Pb 2+

  11. Structural relaxation dynamics and annealing effects of sodium silicate glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, Mohamed; Piazza, Francesco; Guimbretière, Guillaume; Canizarès, Aurélien; Vaills, Yann

    2013-05-09

    Here we report high-precision measurements of structural relaxation dynamics in the glass transition range at the intermediate and short length scale for a strong sodium silicate glass during long annealing times. We evidence for the first time the heterogeneous dynamics at the intermediate range order by probing the acoustic longitudinal frequency in the GHz region by Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy. Or, from in-situ Raman measurements, we show that relaxation is indeed homogeneous at the interatomic length scale. Our results show that the dynamics at the intermediate range order contains two distinct relaxation time scales, a fast and a slow component, differing by about a 10-fold factor below Tg and approaching to one another past the glass transition. The slow relaxation time agrees with the shear relaxation time, proving that Si-O bond breaking constitutes the primary control of structural relaxation at the intermediate range order.

  12. Glass Formulation Development for INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vienna, J.D.; Schweiger, M.J.; Smith, D.E.; Smith, H.D.; Crum, J.V.; Peeler, D.K.; Reamer, I.A.; Musick, C.A.; Tillotson, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    For about four decades, radioactive wastes have been collected and calcined from nuclear fuels reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Over this time span, secondary radioactive wastes have also been collected and stored as liquid from decontamination, laboratory activities, and fuel-storage activities. These liquid wastes are collectively called sodium-bearing wastes (SBW). About 5.7 million liters of these wastes are temporarily stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Vitrification is being considered as an immobilization step for SBW with a number of treatment and disposal options. A systematic study was undertaken to develop a glass composition to demonstrate direct vitrification of INEEL's SBW. The objectives of this study were to show the feasibility of SBW vitrification, not a development of an optimum formulation. The waste composition is relatively high in sodium, aluminum, and sulfur. A specific composition and glass property restrictions, discussed in Section 2, were used as a basis for the development. Calculations based on first-order expansions of selected glass properties in composition and some general tenets of glass chemistry led to an additive (fit) composition (68.69 mass % SiO 2 , 14.26 mass% B 2 O 3 , 11.31 mass% Fe 2 O 3 , 3.08 mass% TiO 2 , and 2.67 mass % Li 2 O) that meets all property restrictions when melted with 35 mass % of SBW on an oxide basis, The glass was prepared using oxides, carbonates, and boric acid and tested to confirm the acceptability of its properties. Glass was then made using waste simulant at three facilities, and limited testing was performed to test and optimize processing-related properties and confirm results of glass property testing. The measured glass properties are given in Section 4. The viscosity at 1150 C, 5 Pa·s, is nearly ideal for waste-glass processing in

  13. Structure-topology-property correlations of sodium phosphosilicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermansen, Christian; Guo, Xiaoju; Youngman, Randall E; Mauro, John C; Smedskjaer, Morten M; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-08-14

    In this work, we investigate the correlations among structure, topology, and properties in a series of sodium phosphosilicate glasses with [SiO2]/[SiO2 + P2O5] ranging from 0 to 1. The network structure is characterized by (29)Si and (31)P magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy. The results show the formation of six-fold coordinated silicon species in phosphorous-rich glasses. Based on the structural data, we propose a formation mechanism of the six-fold coordinated silicon, which is used to develop a quantitative structural model for predicting the speciation of the network forming units as a function of chemical composition. The structural model is then used to establish a temperature-dependent constraint description of phosphosilicate glass topology that enables prediction of glass transition temperature, liquid fragility, and indentation hardness. The topological constraint model provides insight into structural origin of the mixed network former effect in phosphosilicate glasses.

  14. Characterization of ion distributions near the surface of sodium-containing and sodium-depleted calcium aluminosilicate glass melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrales, Louis R.; Du, Jincheng

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of cation and anion components of sodium containing calcium aluminosilicate glass was studied by classical molecular dynamics simulations in a high temperature melt in the bulk and at the vacuum-melt interface. A significant redistribution of the sodium and non-bridging oxygen ions was observed. Subsequently, a sodium depleted calcium aluminosilicate glass melt was simulated to determine the sensitivity of the redistribution of ions near the vacuum-melt interface to the presence of sodium ions. It is found that the thermodynamic equilibrium condition near a surface favors the enrichment of non-bridging oxygen ions that is closely associated with enrichment of the sodium ions

  15. Volume and structural relaxation in compressed sodium borate glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenson, Mouritz N; Youngman, Randall E; Yue, Yuanzheng; Rzoska, Sylwester J; Bockowski, Michal; Jensen, Lars R; Smedskjaer, Morten M

    2016-11-21

    The structure and properties of glass can be modified through compression near the glass transition temperature (T g ), and such modified structure and properties can be maintained at ambient temperature and pressure. However, once the compressed glass undergoes annealing near T g at ambient pressure, the modified structure and properties will relax. The challenging question is how the property relaxation is correlated with both the local and the medium-range structural relaxation. In this paper, we answer this question by studying the volume (density) and structural relaxation of a sodium borate glass that has first been pressure-quenched from its T g at 1 GPa, and then annealed at ambient pressure under different temperature-time conditions. Using 11 B MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopy, we find that the pressure-induced densification of the glass is accompanied by a conversion of six-membered rings into non-ring trigonal boron (B III ) units, i.e. a structural change in medium-range order, and an increase in the fraction of tetrahedral boron (B IV ), i.e. a structural change in short-range order. These pressure-induced structural conversions are reversible during ambient pressure annealing near T g , but exhibit a dependence on the annealing temperature, e.g. the ring/non-ring B III ratio stabilizes at different values depending on the applied annealing temperature. We find that conversions between structural units cannot account for the pressure-induced densification, and instead we suggest the packing of structural units as the main densification mechanism.

  16. Wear characteristics of polished and glazed lithium disilicate ceramics opposed to three ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Akazawa, Nobutaka; Kodaira, Akihisa; Okamura, Kentaro; Matsumura, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the wear characteristics of a heat-pressed lithium disilicate ceramic material opposed to feldspathic porcelain, a lithium disilicate glass ceramic, and zirconia materials. Ceramic plate specimens were prepared from feldspathic porcelain (EX-3 nA1B), lithium disilicate glass ceramics (e.max CAD MO1/C14), and zirconia (Katana KT 10) and then ground or polished. Rounded rod specimens were fabricated from heat-pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramic (e.max press LT A3) and then glazed or polished. A sliding wear testing apparatus was used for wear testing. Wear of glazed rods was greater than that of polished rods when they were abraded with ground zirconia, ground porcelain, polished porcelain, or polished lithium disilicate ceramics. For both glazed and polished rods, wear was greater when the rods were abraded with ground plates. The findings indicate that application of a polished surface rather than a glazed surface is recommended for single restorations made of heat-pressed lithium disilicate material. In addition, care must be taken when polishing opposing materials, especially those used in occlusal contact areas. (J Oral Sci 58, 117-123, 2016).

  17. Effect of heat treatment duration on phase separation of sodium borosilicate glass, containing copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shejnina, T.G.; Gutner, S.Kh.; Anan'in, N.I.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of heat treatment duration on phase separation of sodium borosilicate (SBS) glass, containing copper is studied. It is stated that phase separation close to equilibrium one is attained under 12 hours of heat treatment of SBS glass containing copper

  18. Structure and properties of sodium aluminosilicate glasses from molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiang, Ye; Du, Jincheng; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup

    2013-01-01

    the recent Corning® Gorilla® Glass. In this paper, the structures of sodium aluminosilicate glasses with a wide range of Al/Na ratios (from 1.5 to 0.6) have been studied using classical molecular dynamics simulations in a system containing around 3000 atoms, with the aim to understand the structural role...

  19. A Comparative Study of Structural Stability and Mechanical and Optical Properties of Fluorapatite (Ca5(PO4)3F) and Lithium Disilicate (Li2Si2O5) Components Forming Dental Glass-Ceramics: First Principles Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biskri, Z. E.; Rached, H.; Bouchear, M.; Rached, D.; Aida, M. S.

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this paper is a comparative study of structural stability and mechanical and optical properties of fluorapatite (FA) (Ca5(PO4)3F) and lithium disilicate (LD) (Li2Si2O5), using the first principles pseudopotential method based on density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The stability of fluorapatite and lithium disilicate compounds has been evaluated on the basis of their formation enthalpies. The results show that fluorapatite is more energetically stable than lithium disilicate. The independent elastic constants and related mechanical properties, including bulk modulus ( B), shear modulus ( G), Young's modulus ( E) and Poisson's ratio ( ν) as well as the Vickers hardness ( H v), have been calculated for fluorapatite compound and compared with other theoretical and experimental results. The obtained values of the shear modulus, Young's modulus and Vickers hardness are smaller in comparison with those of lithium disilicate compound, implying that lithium disilicate is more rigid than fluorapatite. The brittle and ductile properties were also discussed using B/ G ratio and Poisson's ratio. Optical properties such as refractive index n( ω), extinction coefficient k( ω), absorption coefficient α( ω) and optical reflectivity R( ω) have been determined from the calculations of the complex dielectric function ɛ( ω), and interpreted on the basis of the electronic structures of both compounds. The calculated values of static dielectric constant ɛ 1(0) and static refractive index n(0) show that the Li2Si2O5 compound has larger values compared to those of the Ca5(PO4)3F compound. The results of the extinction coefficient show that Li2Si2O5 compound exhibits a much stronger ultraviolet absorption. According to the absorption and reflectivity spectra, we inferred that both compounds are theoretically the best visible and infrared transparent materials.

  20. Optical properties of thermally reduced bismuth-doped sodium aluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K.H.; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Heat-treatment of multivalent ion containing glasses in a hydrogen atmosphere may cause both reduction of the multivalent ions and ionic inward diffusion, resulting in improved glass properties. Bismuth-doped glasses are also interesting objects not only concerning the reduction induced diffusion...... pressure of hydrogen. Here, we present results on the effect of the heat-treatment on the optical properties of bismuth-doped sodium aluminosilicate glasses.......Heat-treatment of multivalent ion containing glasses in a hydrogen atmosphere may cause both reduction of the multivalent ions and ionic inward diffusion, resulting in improved glass properties. Bismuth-doped glasses are also interesting objects not only concerning the reduction induced diffusion...

  1. Effect of silicate module of water glass on rheological parameters of poly(sodium acrylate)/sodium silicate hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastalska-Popiawska, J.; Izak, P.

    2017-01-01

    The poly(sodium acrylate)/sodium silicate hydrogels were synthesized in the presence of sodium thiosulphate and potassium persulphate as the redox initiators and N,N’-methylene-bisacrylamide as the cross-linking monomer. 20 wt% aqueous solution of sodium acrylate was polymerized together with water glass with different silicate modules (M) from 1.74 to 2.29, in three mass ratio of the monomer solution to the water glass 2:1, 1:1 and 1:2. Such obtained hybrid composites were rheologically tested using the oscillation method. It allowed to designate the crossover point during polymerization, as well as to define the viscoelastic properties of the casted hydrogel samples one week after the reaction. The obtained results of the oscillation measurements showed that cross-linking reaction proceeds very quickly and the lower the silicate module is, the process starts faster. After the completion of the reaction the silicate-polymer hydrogels are strongly elastic materials and the highest elasticity characterizes systems with the mass ratio 1:2, i.e. with the highest water glass content.

  2. Moessbauer effect study of oxidation and coordination states of iron in some sodium borate glasse:;

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissa, N.A.; Sanad, A.M.; Youssef, S.M.; El-Henawii, S.A.; Gomaa, S.Sh.; Mostafa, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    A structural study of some sodium borate glasses containing iron was carried out applying ME spectroscopy. Both oxidation and coordination states of iron were investigated under the effect of gradual replacing of sodium carbonate by sodium nitrate in the glass batches. The glasses were melted in porcelain crucibles using an electrically heated furnace at 1000+-10 deg C, then were quenched on a steel plate at room temperature (R.T.). The ME source was 20 mCi radioactive Co-57 in chromium. The obtained ME spectra indicated that at lower sodium nitrate content both Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ are present in these glasses. At moderate concentrations some Fe 3+ ions were separated in a crystalline phase and the rest of the iron ions appeared as ferric ions in glassy state. At high sodium nitrate content only Fe 3+ ions in glassy state were detected. The values of the ME parameters for all iron ions indicated that all of them are in the octahedral coordination state. The density measurements confirm the separation of a crystalline phase at moderate sodium nitrate content. (author)

  3. Optimization of the contents of hollow glass microsphere and sodium hexametaphosphate for glass fiber vacuum insulation panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C. D.; Chen, Z. F.; Zhou, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, various additive amounts of hollow glass microspheres (HGMs) and sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) powders were blended with flame attenuated glass wool (FAGW) to form hybrid core materials (HCMs) through the wet method. Among them, the SHMP was dissolved in the glass fiber suspension and coated on the surface of glass fibers while the HGMs were insoluble in the glass fiber suspension and filled in the fiber-fiber pores. The average pore diameter of the FAGW/HGM HCMs was 8-11 μm which was near the same as that of flame attenuated glass fiber mats (FAGMs, i.e., 10.5 µm). The tensile strength of the SHMP coated FAGMs was enhanced from 160 N/m to 370 N/m when SHMP content increased from 0 wt.% to 0.2 wt.%. By contrast, the tensile strength of the FAGW/HGM HCMs decreased from 160 N/m to 40 N/m when HGM content increased from 0 wt.% to 50 wt.%. Both the FAGW/HGM HCMs and SHMP coated FAGMs were vacuumed completely to form vacuum insulation panels (VIPs). The results showed that both the addition of SHMP and HGM led a slight increase in the thermal conductivity of the corresponding VIPs. To obtain a high-quality VIP, the optimal SHMP content and HGM content in glass fiber suspension was 0.12-0.2 wt.% and 0 wt.%.

  4. Influence of sodium content on the properties of bioactive glasses for use in air abrasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, Imran; Brauer, Delia S; Hill, Robert G; Tylkowski, Maxi; Müller, Steffen; Janicki, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Air abrasion is used in minimally invasive dentistry for preparing cavities, while removing no or little sound dentine or enamel, and the use of bioactive glass (rather than alumina) as an abrasive could aid in tooth remineralization. Melt-derived bioactive glasses (SiO 2 –P 2 O 5 –CaO–CaF 2 –Na 2 O) with low sodium content (0 to 10 mol% Na 2 O in exchange for CaO) for increased hardness, high phosphate content for high bioactivity and fluoride content for release of fluoride and formation of fluorapatite were produced, and particles between 38 and 80 µm in size were used for cutting soda-lime silicate glass microscope slides and human enamel. Vickers hardness increased with decreasing Na 2 O content, owing to a more compact silicate network in low sodium content glasses, resulting in shorter cutting times. Cutting times using bioactive glass were significantly longer than using the alumina control (29 µm) when tested on microscope slides; however, glasses showed more comparable results when cutting human enamel. The bioactive glasses formed apatite in Tris buffer within 6 h, which was significantly faster than Bioglass® 45S5 (24 h), suggesting that the hardness of the glasses makes them suitable for air abrasion application, while their high bioactivity and fluoride content make them of interest for tooth remineralization. (paper)

  5. Influence of sodium content on the properties of bioactive glasses for use in air abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Imran; Tylkowski, Maxi; Müller, Steffen; Janicki, Tomasz; Brauer, Delia S; Hill, Robert G

    2013-12-01

    Air abrasion is used in minimally invasive dentistry for preparing cavities, while removing no or little sound dentine or enamel, and the use of bioactive glass (rather than alumina) as an abrasive could aid in tooth remineralization. Melt-derived bioactive glasses (SiO2-P2O5-CaO-CaF2-Na2O) with low sodium content (0 to 10 mol% Na2O in exchange for CaO) for increased hardness, high phosphate content for high bioactivity and fluoride content for release of fluoride and formation of fluorapatite were produced, and particles between 38 and 80 µm in size were used for cutting soda-lime silicate glass microscope slides and human enamel. Vickers hardness increased with decreasing Na2O content, owing to a more compact silicate network in low sodium content glasses, resulting in shorter cutting times. Cutting times using bioactive glass were significantly longer than using the alumina control (29 µm) when tested on microscope slides; however, glasses showed more comparable results when cutting human enamel. The bioactive glasses formed apatite in Tris buffer within 6 h, which was significantly faster than Bioglass® 45S5 (24 h), suggesting that the hardness of the glasses makes them suitable for air abrasion application, while their high bioactivity and fluoride content make them of interest for tooth remineralization.

  6. Electron irradiation effect on bubble formation and growth in a sodium borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X.; Birtcher, R. C.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the authors studied simultaneous and intermittent electron irradiation effects on bubble growth in a simple sodium borosilicate glass during Xe ion implantation at 200 C. Simultaneous electron irradiation increases the average bubble size in the glass. This enhanced diffusion is also shown by the migration of Xe from bubbles into the matrix when the sample is irradiated by an electron beam after the Xe implantation

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of sodium aluminosilicate glass structures and glass surface-water reactions using the reactive force field (ReaxFF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongol, R.; Wang, L.; Cormack, A. N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2018-05-01

    Reactive potentials are increasingly used to study the properties of glasses and glass water reactions in a reactive molecular dynamics (MD) framework. In this study, we have simulated a ternary sodium aluminosilicate glass and investigated the initial stages of the glass surface-water reactions at 300 K using reactive force field (ReaxFF). On comparison of the simulated glass structures generated using ReaxFF and classical Buckingham potentials, our results show that the atomic density profiles calculated for the surface glass structures indicate a bond-angle distribution dependency. The atomic density profiles also show higher concentrations of non-bridging oxygens (NBOs) and sodium ions at the glass surface. Additionally, we present our results of formation of silanol species and the diffusion of water molecules at the glass surface using ReaxFF.

  8. Spectral-luminescence properties of trivalent titanium in aluminum-sodium phosphate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhanov, S.B.; Batyaev, I.M.

    1992-01-01

    Since development of the first crystal laser, Al 2 O 3 crystals remain the most widely used in quantum electronics. In the present work, the aluminum-sodium phosphate glass, Al 2 O 3 -Na 2 O 3 -P 2 O 5 , was studied with different proportions of components. A luminescence medium is obtained based on phosphate glass doped by Ti 3+ ions with intense emission in the 700-900-nm spectral range. This glass is a promising lasing medium for tunable solid-state lasers. 12 refs., 2 figs

  9. Optical and structural investigation on sodium borosilicate glasses doped with Cr2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, E.; Rezvani, M.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, Sodium borosilicate glasses with chemical composition of 60% SiO2-20% B2O3-20%Na2O doped with different contents of Cr2O3 were prepared by melting-quenching method. Physical, structural and optical properties of glasses were investigated by studying density and molar volume, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectra and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The results showed an increase in density of glasses with the increase of Cr2O3 that can be due to addition of oxide with high molar mass. The optical absorption spectra of un-doped glass reveals UV absorption due to trace iron impurities with no visible band however Cr2O3 doped glasses shows absorption in visible range that are characteristic. Increasing of Cr3 + ions in the glassy microstructure of samples provides a semiconducting character to Sodium borosilicate glass by reducing the direct and indirect optical band gaps of glass samples from 3.79 to 2.59 (ev) and 3.36 to 2.09 (ev), respectively. These changes could be attributed to the role of Cr3 + ions as the network former which asserts improvement of semiconducting behavior in presence of Cr2O3.

  10. Structural and thermochemical properties of sodium magnesium phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oueslati Omrani, Refka [Université de Tunis El Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Chemistry Department, LR01SE10 Applied Thermodynamics Laboratory, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Kaoutar, Abdeltif; El Jazouli, Abdelaziz [LCMS, URAC 17, Faculté des Sciences Ben M’Sik, UH2MC, Casablanca (Morocco); Krimi, Saida [LPCMI, Faculté des Sciences Aïn Chok, UH2C, Casablanca (Morocco); Khattech, Ismail, E-mail: ismail.khattech@fst.rnu.tn [Université de Tunis El Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Chemistry Department, LR01SE10 Applied Thermodynamics Laboratory, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Jemal, Mohamed [Université de Tunis El Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Chemistry Department, LR01SE10 Applied Thermodynamics Laboratory, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Videau, Jean-Jacques [ICMCB, Institut de Chimie de la matière condensée, Université de Bordeaux 1 (France); Couzi, Michel [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires, CNRS-Université de Bordeaux 1 (France)

    2015-05-25

    Highlights: • Phosphate glasses were prepared by met quenching technique. • Structural study is investigated using FTIR, Raman and {sup 31}PNMR spectroscopy. • A 4.5% weight of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} solution has use for glass dissolution. • Dissolution is endothermic for lower MgO content and becomes exothermic when x rises. - Abstract: Ternary phosphate based glasses with the general formula (50−x/2)Na{sub 2}O–xMgO–(50−x/2)P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 42.8 mol%), where the O/P ratio was varied from 3 to 3.75, have been prepared using a conventional melt quenching technique. Samples were investigated by means of density measurements, Fourier-transformed infrared (FTIR), Raman and {sup 31}P solid state magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopies, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES) analysis and calorimetric dissolution. The depolymerization of metaphosphate chains are described by the decrease of Q{sup 2} tetrahedral sites allowing the formation of pyrophosphate groups (Q{sup 1}) revealed by spectroscopic investigations. As a result, the increase of density and glass transition temperature when x rises. Calorimetric study shows that the dissolution phenomenon is endothermic for a lower MgO content and becomes exothermic when magnesium oxide is gradually incorporated, suggesting the disruption of phosphate chains with increasing O/P ratio.

  11. Femtosecond laser-induced reduction in Eu-doped sodium borate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Ki-Soo [Department of Physics and Basic Science Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: kslim@chungbuk.ac.kr; Lee, Sunkyun [Department of Physics and Basic Science Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Trinh, Minh-Tuan [Department of Physics and Basic Science Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suk-Ho [Department of Physics and Basic Science Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myeongkyu [Departent of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Hamilton, Douglas S. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Gibson, George N. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2007-01-15

    In this work, we report permanent reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} in sodium borate glasses by irradiation of near-infrared femtosecond laser. Glass composition of sodium borate was 85B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-15Na{sub 2}O. The glasses were doped with 0.05, 0.1, and 0.5 mol% Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Absorption and fluorescence dynamics were studied to investigate valence state change of europium ions and the energy transfer between Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} ions. As the femtosecond laser intensity or exposure time increases, the emission band at 400 nm becomes stronger. However, the photoreduction efficiency decreases as the dopant concentration increases. We discuss the photoreduction mechanism under multiphoton absorption.

  12. On the Elastic behavior of Sodium Borate Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignarooban, K.; Boolchand, P.; Kerner, R.; Micoulaut, M.

    2010-03-01

    Alkali Borates are industrial glasses and their physical properties are of general interest. We have made a special effort to synthesize dry (Na2O)x(B2O3)100-x glasses over a wide composition range, 0 modulated-DSC, Raman scattering, FTIR, and molar volume experiments. The enthalpy of relaxation at Tg shows a global minimum in the 20% < x < 40% range, which we identify with the rigid but stress-free Intermediate Phase (IP). The Boroxyl ring vibrational mode near 808 cm-1 in B2O3, steadily softens by about 4 cm-1 as the soda content increases to about 20%. A vibrational mode of mixed ringsfootnotetextKamitsos et al., Jour. Mol. Struct 247, 1 (1996). (containing 3-fold and 4-fold B) is also observed near 775 cm-1 at low x, and it also steadily softens by nearly 10 cm-1 as x increases in the 20% < x < 40% soda range (IP). We are examining the underlying optical elasticity power-laws to ascertain the nature of the elastic phases. IR reflectance experiments provide the 4-fold coordinated B fraction to increase from 0.17 near x = 20% to 0.44 near x = 40% in broad agreement with NMR results. Evolution of physical properties of these glasses with soda content will be reviewed.

  13. Red light emission from europium doped zinc sodium bismuth borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Vinod; Viswanath, C. S. Dwaraka; Upadhyaya, Vyasa; Mahato, K. K.; Kamath, Sudha D.

    2017-12-01

    Zinc sodium bismuth borate (ZNBB) glasses doped with different concentrations of europium were prepared by conventional melt quenching method and characterized through the measurements of density, refractive index, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra, optical absorption, luminescence and radiative lifetimes. FTIR spectra showed seven characteristic peaks of bismuth and borate functional groups in the range of 400-1600 cm-1. The optical band gap and bonding parameters have been calculated from absorption spectra. Photoluminescence spectra recorded in the visible region with 394 nm excitation are used to calculate the Judd-Ofelt (JO) intensity parameters (Ω2 and Ω4). The JO intensity parameters have been used to calculate the radiative parameters such as branching ratio (β), stimulated emission cross-section (σse), transition probability (A) for the fluorescent level of 5D0→7F2. Decay rates through single exponential are used to calculate the lifetime (τm) of the meta-stable state 5D0 of (Eu3+ ion) these glasses. The radiative parameters measured for all these glasses show 0.7 mol% europium doped zinc sodium bismuth borate glass 5D0→7F2 transition has the potential for red laser applications. The quality of the colour emitted by the present glasses are estimated quantitatively by CIE chromaticity coordinates, which confirms the suitability of these glasses as a red emitting material for field emission technologies and LEDs.

  14. Deformation mechanisms during nanoindentation of sodium borosilicate glasses of nuclear interest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilymis, D. A.; Delaye, J.-M., E-mail: jean-marc.delaye@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD, Service d’Etude et Comportement des Matériaux de Conditionnement, BP17171 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France)

    2014-07-07

    In this paper we analyze results of Molecular Dynamics simulations of Vickers nanoindentation, performed for sodium borosilicate glasses of interest in the nuclear industry. Three glasses have been studied in their pristine form, as well as a disordered one that is analogous to the real irradiated glass. We focused in the behavior of the glass during the nanoindentation in order to reveal the mechanisms of deformation and how they are affected by microstructural characteristics. Results have shown a strong dependence on the SiO{sub 2} content of the glass, which promotes densification due to the open structure of SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra and also due to the strength of Si-O bonds. Densification for the glasses is primarily expressed by the relative decrease of the Si-O-Si and Si-O-B angles, indicating rotation of the structural units and decrease of free volume. The increase of alkali content on the other hand results to higher plasticity of the matrix and increased shear flow. The most important effect on the deformation mechanism of the disordered glasses is that of the highly depolymerized network that will also induce shear flow and, in combination with the increased free volume, will result in the decreased hardness of these glasses, as has been previously observed.

  15. Deformation mechanisms during nanoindentation of sodium borosilicate glasses of nuclear interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilymis, D A; Delaye, J-M

    2014-07-07

    In this paper we analyze results of Molecular Dynamics simulations of Vickers nanoindentation, performed for sodium borosilicate glasses of interest in the nuclear industry. Three glasses have been studied in their pristine form, as well as a disordered one that is analogous to the real irradiated glass. We focused in the behavior of the glass during the nanoindentation in order to reveal the mechanisms of deformation and how they are affected by microstructural characteristics. Results have shown a strong dependence on the SiO2 content of the glass, which promotes densification due to the open structure of SiO4 tetrahedra and also due to the strength of Si-O bonds. Densification for the glasses is primarily expressed by the relative decrease of the Si-O-Si and Si-O-B angles, indicating rotation of the structural units and decrease of free volume. The increase of alkali content on the other hand results to higher plasticity of the matrix and increased shear flow. The most important effect on the deformation mechanism of the disordered glasses is that of the highly depolymerized network that will also induce shear flow and, in combination with the increased free volume, will result in the decreased hardness of these glasses, as has been previously observed.

  16. Optical and spectroscopic properties of neodymium doped cadmium-sodium borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Shaweta; Thind, Kulwant Singh

    2017-10-01

    Neodymium doped cadmium sodium borate glasses having composition xCdO-(40-x) Na2CO3-59.5H3BO3-0.5Nd2O3; x = 10, 20 and 30 mol% were prepared by conventional melt-quenching technique. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the amorphous nature of the prepared glasses. Conventional methods were used to determine the physical properties such as density, molar volume, refractive index, and rare earth ion concentration. The Judd-Ofelt theory was applied on the optical absorption spectra of the glasses to evaluate the three phenomenological intensity parameters Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6. The calculated intensity parameters were further used to predict the radiative transition probability (A), radiative lifetime (τR) and branching ratio (βR) for the various fluorescent levels of Nd3+ ion in the prepared glass series. The effect of the compositional changes on the spectroscopic characteristics of Nd3+ ions have been studied and reported. The value of Ω2 is found to decrease with the decrease in the sodium content and the corresponding increase in the cadmium content. This can be ascribed to the changes in the asymmetry of the ligand field at the rare earth ion site and the change in rare earth oxygen (RE-O) covalency. Florescence spectra has been used to determine the peak wavelength (λp), effective line widths (Δλeff) and stimulated emission cross-section (σp) for the 4F3/2 → 4I9/2,4I11/2,4I13/2 transitions of the Nd3+ ion. The reasonably higher values of branching ratios and stimulated emission cross-section for the prepared glasses points towards the efficacy of these glasses as laser host materials. However, the glass with more sodium content is found to show better lasing properties.

  17. STUDY OF POLYMORPHISM OF BOROVANADATE GLASS OF SODIUM BY RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY LOW FREQUENCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Rabia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sodium tetraborate (100 – x(Na2B4O7.10H2O­­ ­­­­­– xV2O5, (x = 0 to 20 mole % has been elaborated by splat cooling technique. Raman Measurements on the doped and non polish samples reveal the presence of the of α-NaVO3 crystal on the superficial layer. After polishing, Raman spectra characteristic of glasses are obtained with two main bands located at 555 and 1097 cm-1 in the undoped glass and four bands at 241, 381, 776 and 938 cm-1 for the vanadium oxyde doped glasses. The volume devitrification of these glasses occurs at 750° C and the β-NaVO3 crystalline phase is identified by Raman scattering.

  18. Laser and thermal bleaching of colour centres in sodium borate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bukharaev, A A; Yafaev, N R [AN SSSR, Kazan. Fiziko-Tekhnicheskij Inst.

    1978-12-01

    The maximum of the additional absorption band in ..gamma..- or UV-irradiated sodium borate glasses shifts to higher energy when the low-energy side of the band is bleached by a helium-neon laser, ..lambda.. = 632.8 nm. Simultaneously the half-width of the additional absorption band decreases. This phenomenon is associated with the fact that because of structural disorder of glasses there is a distribution of ground-state energies of trapped electrons forming the light-sensitive absorption band. The distribution interval of the activation energy for trapped electrons is estimated using the decomposition of the initial thermal bleaching curves into components. For UV irradiated glasses it is aproximately 0.24 eV, and for ..gamma..-irradiated glasses only 0.12 eV. These values correlate with the relative shift maximum of the absorption band at laser bleaching.

  19. Laser- and gamma-induced transformations of optical spectra of indium-doped sodium borate glass

    CERN Document Server

    Kopyshinsky, O V; Zelensky, S E; Danilchenko, B A; Shakhov, O P

    2003-01-01

    The optical absorption and luminescence properties of indium-doped sodium borate glass irradiated by gamma-rays and by powerful UV lasers within the impurity-related absorption band are investigated experimentally. It is demonstrated that both the laser- and gamma-irradiation cause similar transformations of optical spectra in the UV and visible regions. The changes of the spectra observed are described with the use of a model which includes three types of impurity centres formed by differently charged indium ions.

  20. Optical and physical properties of sodium lead barium borate glasses doped with praseodymium ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkennavar, Susheela K.; Madhu, A.; Eraiah, B.; Kokila, M. K.

    2018-05-01

    Praseodymium doped sodium lead barium borate glasses have been prepared using single step melt quenching technique. The XRD spectrum confirms amorphous nature of glasses. The optical absorbance studies were carried out on these glasses using PekinElemer Lambda-35 Uv-Vis spectrometer in the range of 200 -1100 nm. The optical direct band gap energies were found to be in the range of 3.62 eV to 3.69 eV and indirect band gap energies were found to be in the range of 3.57 eV to 3.62eV. The refractive indices were measured by using Abbe refractometer the values are in the range of 1.620 to 1.625.

  1. Comparison of radiation and quenching rate effects on the structure of a sodium borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peuget, Sylvain; Maugeri, Emilio-Andrea; Mendoza, Clement; Fares, Toby; Bouty, Olivier; Jegou, Christophe; Charpentier, Thibault; Moskura, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    The effects of quenching rate and irradiation on the structure of a sodium borosilicate glass were compared using 29 Si, 11 B, and 23 Na nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy. Quenching rate ranging from 0.1 to 3 * 10 4 K min -1 was studied. Various irradiation conditions were performed, i.e. gold-ion irradiation in a multi-energy mode (from 1 to 6.75 MeV), and Kr and Xe ion irradiations with energy of 74 and 92 MeV, respectively. In pile irradiation with thermal neutron flux was performed as well, to study the effect of alpha radiation from the nuclear reaction 10 B(n,α) 7 Li. Both irradiation and high quenching rate induce similar local order modification of the glass structure, mainly a decrease of the mean boron coordination and an increase of Q 3 units. Nevertheless, the variations observed under irradiation are more pronounced than the ones induced by the quenching rate. Moreover, some important modifications of the glass medium range order, i.e. the emergence of the D2 band associated to three members silica rings and a modification of the Si-O-Si angle distribution were only noticed after irradiation. These results suggest that the irradiated structure is certainly not exactly the one obtained by a rapidly quenched equilibrated melt, but rather a more disordered structure that was weakly relaxed during the very rapid quenching phase following the energy deposition step. Raman spectroscopy showed a similar irradiated structure whereas the glass evolutions were controlled by the electronic energy loss in the ion track formation regime for Kr-ion irradiation or by the nuclear energy loss for Au and OSIRIS irradiation. The similar irradiated structure despite different irradiation routes, suggests that the final structural state of this sodium borosilicate glass is mainly controlled by the glass reconstruction after the energy deposition step. (authors)

  2. Optical properties of 3d transition metal ion-doped sodium borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Hongli; Tanner, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Photographs of undoped (SiO 2 ) 50 (Na 2 O) 25 (B 2 O 3 ) 25 (SiNaB) glass and transition metal ion-doped (TM) 0.5 (SiO 2 ) 49.5 (Na 2 O) 25 (B 2 O 3 ) 25 glass samples. - Highlights: • 3d transition metal ion (from Ti to Zn) doped SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 glasses. • Optical properties of doped glasses investigated. • V(IV,V); Cr(III, VI); Mn(II,III); Fe(II,III); Co(II); Ni(II); Cu(II) by XANES, DRS. • Strong visible absorption but only vanadium ion gives strong emission in glass. - Abstract: SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 glasses doped with 3d-transition metal species from Ti to Zn were prepared by the melting-quenching technique and their optical properties were investigated. The X-ray absorption near edge spectra of V, Cr, and Mn-doped glasses indicate that the oxidation states of V(IV, V), Cr(III, VI) and Mn(II, III) exist in the studied glasses. The oxidation states revealed from the diffuse reflectance spectra of the glasses are V(IV, V), Cr(III, VI), Mn(III), Fe(II, III), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II). Most of the 3d transition element ions exhibit strong absorption in the visible spectral region in the glass. Under ultraviolet excitation, the undoped sodium borosilicate glass produces weak and broad emission, while doping of vanadium introduces strong and broad emission due to the V(V) charge transfer transition. Only weak emission is observed from Ti(IV), Mn(II), Fe(III) and Cu(II), partly resulting from the strong electron–phonon coupling of the 3d-electrons and the relatively high phonon energy of the studied glass host, with the former leading to dominant nonradiative relaxation based on multiphonon processes for most of the 3d excited states

  3. Thermal, optical and structural properties of Dy3+ doped sodium aluminophosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, Anupinder; Thakur, Vanita; Singh, Lakhwant

    2016-03-01

    Trivalent Dysprosium doped sodium aluminophosphate glasses with composition 50P2O5-10Al2O3-(20-x)Na2O-20CaO-xDy2O3 (x varying from 0 to 5 mol%) were prepared by melt quench technique. The density of the prepared samples was measured using Archimedes principle and various physical properties like molar volume, rare earth ion concentration, polaron radius, inter nuclear distance and field strength were calculated using different formulae. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was carried out to study the thermal stability of prepared glasses. The UV Visible absorption spectra of the dysprosium doped glasses were found to be comprised of ten absorption bands which correspond to transitions from ground state 6H15/2 to various excited states. The indirect optical band gap energy of the samples was calculated by Tauc's plot and the optical energy was found to be attenuated with Dy3+ ions. The photoluminescence spectrum revealed that Dy3+ doped aluminophosphate glasses have strong emission bands in the visible region. A blue emission band centred at 486 nm, a bright yellow band centred at 575 nm and a weak red band centred at 668 nm were observed in the emission spectrum due to excitation at 352 nm wavelength. Both FTIR and Raman spectra assert slight structural changes induced in the host glass network with Dy3+ ions.

  4. Peculiarities of the diffusion of silver and sodium ions in phosphate glasses with a high content of sodium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syutkin, V.M.; Tolkatchev, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    The phosphate glasses with a high content of alkali metal ions are good ionic conductors. Despite active studies, the mechanism of ion diffusion is not so far clear. The present work discusses the characteristics of ion diffusion in phosphate glasses with a high content of sodium oxide. An effective method to study ion transport is the investigation of relaxation processes the kinetics of which depends on ion diffusion. We use the data for two types of relaxation processes the kinetics of which is determined by ion diffusion. This is the conductivity relaxation due to sodium (host) ions and the decay of radiation-induced centers controlled by silver (guest) ion diffusion. Both of the processes being actually the first-order processes display a nonexponential kinetic behavior. The relaxation law can be interpreted either as the inherently nonexponential function or as the weighted sum of exponential decay functions with a distribution of relaxation times. It has been demonstrated that on the molecular level the relaxation function should be interpreted in the frame of the scheme of parallel first-order processes. This fact allows one to formulate a number of features of ion diffusion: (i) the mean square displacement of ions does not exceed several angstrom when transport becomes non-dispersive; (ii) the diffusion coefficient of ions is the function of coordinates. In this case, a characteristic distance at which D(r) noticeably varies is no less than a hundred of angstrom; (iii) the instantaneous concentration of mobile ions is well below the overall concentration ions

  5. Comparison of the Remineralizing Effects of Sodium Fluoride and Bioactive Glass Using Bioerodible Gel Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attiguppe Ramashetty Prabhakar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. A carious lesion is the accumulation of numerous episodes of de- and remineralization, rather than a unidirectional demineralization process. Tooth destruction can be arrested or reversed by the frequent delivery of fluoride or calcium/phosphorous ions to the tooth surface. The present study compared and evaluated the remineralization potential of sodium fluoride and bioactive glass delivered through a bioerodible gel system. Materials and methods. Longitudinal sections of artificial carious lesions, created at the gingivofacial surface of 64 primary maxillary incisors were photographed under a polarized light microscope and quantified for demineralization. The sections were repositioned into the tooth form and randomly mounted in sets of four that simulated an arch form. The teeth were divided into 4 groups: 1 sodium fluoride films, 2 bioactive glass films, 3 control films placed interproximally and 4 nontreatment group. Following exposure to artificial saliva for 30 days, the lesions were again photographed and quantified as above. The recorded values were statistically analyzed using Student’s paired t-test for intragroup comparison, one-way ANOVA and Post-Hoc Tukey’s test for pairwise comparison. Results. The sodium fluoride and bioactive gel groups showed significant remineralization compared with the control groups (P < 0.001. Conclusion. Bioerodible gel films can be used to deliver remineralizing agents to enhance remineralization.

  6. Potassium/sodium ion exchange of sodium aluminosilicate and soda-lime glasses with potassium nitrate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, E.

    1983-08-01

    The alkali self-diffusion coefficients, the concentration-dependent interdiffusion coefficients, and the actual equilibrium constants of the ion exchange process were determinated for model glasses of the Na 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 type and the Na 2 O-CaO-SiO 2 type by nuclear techniques. The measured self-diffusion data and interdiffusion coefficients were used to estimate the stress profiles initiated by the K/Na exchange below the transformation temperature in the surface region. The activation volume of the sodium and potassium ions for diffusion through the surface zone stressed by ion exchange was determined. The disturbing influence of small concentrations of determined divalent cations in KNO 3 (especially Ca 2+ ) was investigated and thermodynamically described. Possibilities were demonstrated to remove these disturbances by anionic admixtures to the KNO 3 melt. Conclusions were drawn for the technical process of the chemical strengthening of glass by K/Na ion exchange at lower temperatures. (author)

  7. Oriented color centres being formed in anisotropic action of optical radiation on sodium-silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barinova, N.A.; Glebov, L.B.; Dokuchaev, V.G.; Savel'ev, V.L.

    1992-01-01

    A study was made of anisotropy of absorption of hole colour centres appearing in sodium-silicate glass due to anisotropic action of UV radiation. In case of such action in the field of long-wave edge of their fundamental absorption oriented hole colour centres occurs with maximum of absorption bands to 2.0, 2.8, 4.1 eV. Principal direction of hole colour centres orientation in this case coincides with orientation of ionized glass matrix centres. Orientation of such kind is connected with selective ionization of disorderedly oriented centres forming edge of fundamental absorption. Value of guided dichroism of colour centres absorption is determined by hole migration

  8. STRUCTURE FEATURES OF THE SODIUM-GERMANATE GLASSES DOPED WITH YTTERBIUM ERBIUM RETRIEVED FROM RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Sevastianova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.The paper deals with study of Raman spectra and luminescence spectra in the visible region of the sodium-germanate glass: 49 GeO2 – 13 Na2O – 27 Yb2O3 – 11 La2O3 - 0,25 Er2O3 and presents research results. In addition, this glass is doped with 5 mol% of the following components MgO, BaO, Al2O3, PbO, Nb2O5, TiO2, SiO2, P2O5 in order to study the effect of these additives on the structure of the glassy matrix and the anti-Stokes luminescence spectra of erbium ions. Method. Raman scatteringspectra were recorded by Renishaw inVia Raman Microscope. Excitation source is a helium neon laser (λ= 633 nm with power equal to 50Wt. Anti-Stokes luminescence of erbium ions was registered in spectral region of 450–750 nm at room temperature (excitation laser wavelength is 975 nm, power is 1Wt. Main Results. It was shown that the structure of the initial glass does not change with the introduction of niobium as Nb2O5 in any coordination plays a role of network forming, building a single mixed grid with tetrahedrons [GeO4]. Introduction of the second glass former P2O5 leads to loosening germanate structure due to the appearance of the phosphate sublattice. This leads to a redistribution of the relative intensity of up-conversion luminescence bands with maxima at 540 and 670 nm compared with the initial glass. Introduction of additives PbO, MgO, Al2O3, TiO2 results in a multicenter structure. In case of titanium oxide addition it leads to a change in the relative intensities of the erbium luminescence.

  9. Thermo-physical and structural studies of sodium zinc borovanadate glasses in the region of high concentration of modifier oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chethana, B.K. [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Reddy, C. Narayana [Maharani' s Science College for Women, Bangalore 560 001 (India); Rao, K.J., E-mail: kalyajrao@yahoo.co.in [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: ► Highly modified sodium zinc borovanadate glasses. ► Structural model for borovanadate glasses. ► Network forming tendency of ZnO in borovanadate glasses. ► Fragility can be limited to NBO concentration in borovanadate glasses. -- Abstract: This paper reports investigation of Na{sub 2}O and ZnO modified borovanadate glasses in the highly modified regime of compositions. These glasses have been prepared by microwave route. Ultraviolet (UV) and visible, infrared (IR), Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopies have been used to characterize the speciation in the glasses. Together with the variation of properties such as molar volume and glass transition temperatures, spectroscopic data indicate that at high levels of modification, ZnO tends to behave like network former. It is proposed that the observed variation of all the properties can be reasonably well understood with a structural model. The model considers that the modification and speciation in glasses are strongly determined by the hierarchy of group electronegativities. Further, it is proposed that the width of the transitions of glasses obtained under same condition reflects the fragility of the glasses. An empirical expression has been suggested to quantify fragility on the basis of width of the transition regions.

  10. Synthesis and different optical properties of Gd2O3 doped sodium zinc tellurite glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Buddhadev; Dutta, Dibakar; Ghosh, Subhankar

    2017-06-01

    A series of Gd2O3 doped sodium zinc tellurite [xGd2O3-(0.8-x) TeO2-0.1Na2O-0.1ZnO] glasses are prepared by the conventional melt quenching method and their optical properties have been studied. UV-vis spectrophotometric studies within the wavelength range from 230 nm-800 nm are carried out in the integrating sphere mode to study the effect of Gd2O3 doping on the optical band gap (Eg), refractive index (n), dielectric constant (εr) and susceptibility (χ). Other physical properties like molar volume, molar refraction, polarizability, metallization criterion, number density of rare-earth ions (N), polaron radius (rp), inter ionic distance (ri), molar cation polarizability (∑αi), number of oxide ions in chemical composition (NO2-), optical band gap based electronic oxide ion polarizability (αO2-) and optical basicity (Λ) of glass samples have been studied on the basis of UV-vis spectra and density profile of the different glasses.

  11. Effect of Crystallization Firing on Marginal Gap of CAD/CAM Fabricated Lithium Disilicate Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Steven A; Ferracane, Jack L; da Costa, Juliana

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the marginal gaps of CAD/CAM (CEREC 3) produced crowns made from leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic (IPS Empress CAD) blocks (LG), and lithium-disilicate (IPS e.max CAD) blocks before (LD-B), and after (LD-A) crystallization firing. A human molar tooth (#19) was mounted with adjacent teeth on a typodont and prepared for a full-coverage ceramic crown. The typodont was assembled in the mannequin head to simulate clinical conditions. After tooth preparation 15 individual optical impressions were taken by the same operator using titanium dioxide powder and a CEREC 3 camera per manufacturer's instructions. One operator designed and machined the crowns in leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic blocks (n = 5) and lithium-disilicate blocks (n = 10) using the CEREC 3 system. The crowns were rigidly seated on the prepared tooth, and marginal gaps (μm) were measured with an optical microscope (500×) at 12 points, 3 on each of the M, B, D, and L surfaces of the leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns and the lithium-disilicate crowns before and after crystallization firing. Results were analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by a Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (α = 0.05). The overall mean marginal gaps (μm) for the crowns evaluated were: LG = 49.2 ± 5.5, LD-B = 42.9 ± 12.2, and LD-A = 57.2 ± 16.0. The marginal gaps for LG and LD-B were not significantly different, but both were significantly less than for LD-A. The type of ceramic material did not affect the marginal gap of CAD/CAM crowns. The crystallization firing process required for lithium-disilicate crowns resulted in a significant increase in marginal gap size, likely due to shrinkage of the ceramic during the crystallization process. The marginal gap of CAD/CAM-fabricated lithium disilicate crowns increases following crystallization firing. The marginal gap still remains within clinically acceptable parameters. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. In vitro bioactivity of soda lime borate glasses with substituted SrO in sodium phosphate solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Marzouk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Borate glasses with the basic composition 0.6B2O3·0.2Na2O·0.2CaO and SrO progressively substituting CaO were prepared and characterized for their bone-bonding ability. The obtained glasses were thermally treated and converted to their glass-ceramic derivatives. In this study, FTIR spectral analyses were done for the prepared glasses and glass-ceramics before and after immersion in a sodium phosphate solution for extended times. The appearance of two IR bands within the spectral range 550–680 cm-1 after immersion confirms the formation of hydroxyapatite. X-ray diffraction studies and scanning electron microscope analysis supported the obtained infrared spectroscopy results. The solubility test (measurements of the weight loss in aqueous sodium phosphate solution was conducted for measuring the dissolution of both glassy and crystalline derivatives to find out the role of SrO. The corrosion behaviour of the glasses and glass-ceramics indicate the increase of weight loss with the increase of SrO content. Different suggested proposals were introduced to explain this abnormal behaviour.

  13. Ionic conductivity of sodium silicate glasses grown within confined volume of mesoporous silica template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Soumi; Saha, Shyamal Kumar; Chakravorty, Dipankar

    2018-04-01

    Nanodimensional sodium silicate glasses of composition 30Na2O.70SiO2 has been prepared within the pores of 5.5 nm of mesoporous silica as a template using the surfactant P123. The nanocomposite was characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Electrical conductivity of the sample was studied by ac impedance spectroscopy. The activation energy for ionic conduction was found to be 0.13 eV with dc conductivity at room temperature of 10-6 S-cm-1. This is attributed to the creation of oxygen ion vacancies at the interface of mesoporous silica and nanoglass arising out of the presence of Si2+ species in the system. These nanocomposites are expected to be useful for applications in sodiumion battery for storage of renewable energy.

  14. Corrosion of K-3 glass-contact refractory in sodium-rich aluminosilicate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, X.D.; Gan, H.; Buechele, A.C.; Pegg, I.L.

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion of the glass-contact refractory Monofrax K-3 in two sodium-rich aluminosilicate melts has been studied at 1,208 and 1,283 C using a modified ASTM procedure with constant agitation of the melt by air bubbling. The results for the monolithic refractory indicate a fast initial stage involving phase dissolution and transformation and a later passivated stage in which the surface of the refractory has been substantially modified. The composition of the stable spinel phase in the altered layer on monolithic coupons of K-3 is almost identical to the equilibrium composition bracketed by the dissolution of powdered K-3 into under-saturated melts on the other. The temperature and melt shear viscosity were found to have significant effects on the rates of K-3 dissolution and transformation

  15. Effect of Sodium bicarbonate on Fire behaviour of tilled E- Glass Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, S.; Devendra, K.; Bharath, K. N.

    2016-09-01

    Composites such as fibre reinforced polymers give us the good mechanical properties, but their fire behaviour is not appreciable and needs to be improved. In this work, E- glass fiber is used as a reinforcement material and Epoxy resin is used as a matrix with particulate sodium bi-carbonate (NaHCO3) is used as additive. The hand lay-up technique is adopted for the development of composites by varying percentage of additive. All the tests were conducted according to ASTM standards to study the Fire behaviour of the developed composites. The different fire properties like Ignition time, mass loss rate and flame propagation rate of Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) with NaHCO3 are compared with neat FRPs. It is found that the ignition time increases as the percentage of additive is increased.

  16. Preparation and nonlinear optical properties of indium nanocrystals in sodium borosilicate glass by the sol–gel route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Jiasong; Xiang, Weidong; Zhao, Haijun; Chen, Zhaoping; Liang, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Wenguang; Chen, Guoxin

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The sodium borosilicate glass doped with indium nanocrystals have been successfully prepared by sol–gel methods. And the indium nanocrystals in tetragonal crystal system have formed uniformly in the glass, and the average diameter of indium nanocrystals is about 30 nm. The third-order optical nonlinear refractive index γ, absorption coefficient β, and susceptibility χ (3) of the glass are determined to be −4.77 × 10 −16 m 2 /W, 2.67 × 10 −9 m/W, and 2.81 × 10 −10 esu, respectively. Highlights: ► Indium nanocrystals embedded in glass matrix have been prepared by sol–gel route. ► The crystal structure and composition are investigated by XRD and XPS. ► Size and distribution of indium nanocrystals is determined by TEM. ► The third-order optical nonlinearity is investigated by using Z-scan technique. -- Abstract: The sodium borosilicate glass doped with indium nanocrystals have been successfully prepared by sol–gel route. The thermal stability behavior of the stiff gel is investigated by thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermal (DTA) analysis. The crystal structure of the glass is characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). Particle composition is determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Size and distribution of the nanocrystals are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Results show that the indium nanocrystals in tetragonal crystal structure have formed in glass, and the average diameter is about 30 nm. Further, the glass is measured by Z-scan technique to investigate the nonlinear optical (NLO) properties. The third-order NLO coefficient χ (3) of the glass is determined to be 2.81 × 10 −10 esu. The glass with large third-order NLO coefficient is promising materials for applications in optical devices.

  17. Properties of lithium disilicate reinforced with ZrO_2 (3mol%Y_2O_3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, M.F.R.P.; Cossu, C.M.F.A.; Santos, C.; Simba, B.G.

    2016-01-01

    The new generation of dental ceramics based on lithium disilicate, Li_2Si_2O_5, allows the production of restorative prosthetic with reduced times compared to alumina and / or zirconia (Y-TZP). A great limitation of their use is related low fracture strength of such glass-ceramics, which reduces their use in unit fixed prosthesis. In this work, lithium disilicate reinforced with 10% ZrO_2 (3-mol% Y_2O_3) is characterized by relative density, crystalline phase, hardness, fracture toughness and microstructural aspects. Lithium metasilicate and tetragonal zirconia, prior to heat treatment. After thermal treatment under vacuum at 840 deg C-8min the lithium metasilicate is converted to lithium disilicate as the ZrO_2 phase remains in the tetragonal structure. This maintenance of the tetragonal phase ensures the material a good fracture toughness, reaching average values near 2MPam"1"/"2, while the average hardness of 600HV. Morphological analysis of the samples indicates that ZrO_2 particles are uniformly dispersed in the matrix composed of high aspect ratio lithium disilicate grains, which contributes to the results presented.. A critical analysis of the performance of toughening mechanisms such as cracks deflection, phase transformation of ZrO_2 (T-M), residual stress between the matrix and the reinforcement are presented, discussed and compared with other ceramic materials used in dentistry restorer. (author)

  18. Study on sodium water glass-based anti-reflective film and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Q.Z. [Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy, Guangdong Key Laboratory of New and Renewable Energy Research and Development, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Shi, J.F., E-mail: shijf@ms.giec.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy, Guangdong Key Laboratory of New and Renewable Energy Research and Development, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510000 (China); Wang, L.L.; Li, Y.J.; Zhong, L.W. [Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy, Guangdong Key Laboratory of New and Renewable Energy Research and Development, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510000 (China); Xu, G., E-mail: xugang@ms.giec.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy, Guangdong Key Laboratory of New and Renewable Energy Research and Development, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510000 (China)

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, anti-reflective (AR) films are prepared from sodium water glass with a simple dip-coating method. The effects of SiO{sub 2}/Na{sub 2}O molar ratio, concentration of water glass, and withdrawal speed on the anti-reflection performance of the AR films are systematically studied. The optimized AR film is further applied in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The optical properties and surface morphology of AR films are analyzed by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer, scanning electron microscope, and atomic force microscope. Transmittance of the glass coated with sodium water glass-based AR film is increased by 3.2% when the SiO{sub 2}/Na{sub 2}O molar ratio, concentration, and withdrawal speed equal to 3.8, 5 wt%, and 80 mm/min, respectively. Under this condition, the thickness of the AR film is 127 nm and the AR film has obvious porous structure. In addition, the power conversion efficiency of DSC coated by AR film is increased from 7.92% to 8.24%, compared with the DSC without AR film. - Highlights: • Anti-reflective films are prepared from sodium water glass. • Transmittance of anti-reflective film is increased by 3.2%. • Efficiency of dye-sensitized cell is improved by anti-reflective film.

  19. Study on sodium water glass-based anti-reflective film and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Q.Z.; Shi, J.F.; Wang, L.L.; Li, Y.J.; Zhong, L.W.; Xu, G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, anti-reflective (AR) films are prepared from sodium water glass with a simple dip-coating method. The effects of SiO_2/Na_2O molar ratio, concentration of water glass, and withdrawal speed on the anti-reflection performance of the AR films are systematically studied. The optimized AR film is further applied in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The optical properties and surface morphology of AR films are analyzed by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer, scanning electron microscope, and atomic force microscope. Transmittance of the glass coated with sodium water glass-based AR film is increased by 3.2% when the SiO_2/Na_2O molar ratio, concentration, and withdrawal speed equal to 3.8, 5 wt%, and 80 mm/min, respectively. Under this condition, the thickness of the AR film is 127 nm and the AR film has obvious porous structure. In addition, the power conversion efficiency of DSC coated by AR film is increased from 7.92% to 8.24%, compared with the DSC without AR film. - Highlights: • Anti-reflective films are prepared from sodium water glass. • Transmittance of anti-reflective film is increased by 3.2%. • Efficiency of dye-sensitized cell is improved by anti-reflective film.

  20. Thermal lens and interferometric method for glass transition and thermo physical properties measurements in Nd2O3 doped sodium zincborate glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrath, N G C; Steimacher, A; Rohling, J H; Medina, A N; Bento, A C; Baesso, M L; Jacinto, C; Catunda, T; Lima, S M; Karthikeyan, B

    2008-12-22

    In this work the time resolved thermal lens method is combined with interferometric technique, the thermal relaxation calorimetry, photoluminescence and lifetime measurements to determine the thermo physical properties of Nd(2)O(3) doped sodium zincborate glass as a function of temperature up to the glass transition region. Thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity, fluorescence quantum efficiency, linear thermal expansion coefficient and thermal coefficient of electronic polarizability were determined. In conclusion, the results showed the ability of thermal lens and interferometric methods to perform measurements very close to the phase transition region. These techniques provide absolute values for the measured physical quantities and are advantageous when low scan rates are required.

  1. A 125Te and 23Na NMR investigation of the structure and crystallisation of sodium tellurite glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, D; Bailey, J; Ward, G; Turner, B; Tierney, P; Dupree, R

    2005-01-01

    125Te static nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and 23Na and 125Te magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR have been used, in conjunction with X-ray diffraction, to examine the structure and crystallisation behaviour of glasses of composition xNa2O.(1-x)TeO2 (0.075 x 0.4). The MAS NMR 23Na spectra from the glasses are broad and featureless but shift by approximately +5 ppm with increased x, i.e. as the system becomes more ionic. The static 125Te NMR spectra show an increase in axial symmetry with increasing x, indicating a shift from predominantly [TeO4] to [TeO3] structural units. The 23Na and 125Te spectra from the crystallised samples have been fitted to obtain information on the sites in the metastable crystal phases, which are the first to form on heating and which are therefore more closely related to the glass structure than thermodynamically stable crystal phases. New sodium tellurite phases are reported, including a sodium stabilised, face centred cubic phase related to delta-TeO2; a metastable form of Na2Te4O9 containing 3 sodium and 4 tellurium sites; and a metastable form of Na2Te2O5 containing 2 sodium sites. There is evidence of oxidation of TeIV to TeVI occurring in glasses with high values of x and, at x=0.40 and 0.50 (outside the glass forming range), some sodium metatellurate (Na2TeO4) is formed at the same time as sodium metatellurite (Na2TeO3). The 125Te shift is very sensitive to environment within the sodium tellurite system, covering more than 320 ppm, with anisotropies varying from 640 to 1540 ppm. The lack of features in the 125Te spectra of the glass phases, combined with the large shift range and high but variable anisotropy, means than it is not possible to obtain a unique fit to any presumed species present. Furthermore, the chemical shift anisotropy parameters for three of the four Te sites in the Na2Te4O9 phase are found to lie outside the range used for previous simulations of glass spectra.

  2. Effect of TeO2 on the elastic moduli of sodium borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saddeek, Y.B.; Abd El Latif, Lamia

    2004-01-01

    Sodium borate glass containing tellurite as Te x Na 2-2x B 4-4x O 7-5x with x=0, 0.05, 0.15, 0.25 and 0.35 have been prepared by rapid quenching. Ultrasonic velocity (both longitudinal and shear) measurements have been made using a transducer operated at the fundamental frequency of 4 MHz at room temperature. The density was measured by the conventional Archimedes method. The elastic moduli, the Debye temperature, Poisson's ratio, and the parameters derived from the Makishima-Mackenzie model and the bond compression model have been obtained as a function of TeO 2 content. The monotonic decrease in the velocities and the elastic moduli, and the increase in the ring diameter and the ratio K bc /K e as a function of TeO 2 modifier content reveals the loose packing structure, which is attributed to the increase in the molar volume and the reduction in the vibrations of the borate lattice. The observed results confirm that the addition of TeO 2 changes the rigid character of Na 2 B 4 O 7 to a matrix of ionic behaviour bonds (NBOs). This is due to the creation of more and more discontinuities and defects in the glasses, thus breaking down the borax structure

  3. Investigating the effect of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} addition on sodium barium borosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halder, Rumu, E-mail: rumuhalder24feb@gmail.com; Sengupta, Pranesh; Dey, G. K. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-700 085 (India); Sudarsan, V. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-700 085 (India); Kaushik, C. P. [Waste Management Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-700 085 (India)

    2016-05-23

    V{sub 2}O{sub 5} doped sodium barium borosilicate glasses were characterized by photoluminescence spectroscopy and electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). The glass remains homogeneous for lower concentration of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} but a phase separation is observed when V{sub 2}O{sub 5} doping is increased beyond 5 mol%. Detailed microanalysis reveals that the phase separated glass consists of a phase containing V, Ba and Si and a separate Si rich phase within the glass matrix. The luminescence study demonstrated that at low concentration the vanadium mainly interacts with the structural units of B/Si while at higher concentrations, V-O-V/ V-O{sup −} Na{sup +}/Ba{sup 2+} linkages are formed.

  4. Infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies on sodium borosilicate glass interacted with thermally oxidized aluminides formed on alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusufali, C.; Dutta, R.S.; Dey, G.K.; Kshirsagar, R.J.; Jagannath; Mishra, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    Thermally oxidized aluminides formed on Ni-Cr-Fe based superalloy 690 substrates were subjected to interaction with sodium borosilicate melt (used as matrices for immobilization of high-level radioactive liquid waste) at 1248 K for 192 hours. After the interaction, Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy analysis of glass samples indicated the incorporation of Al in the glass network. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of glass specimens revealed modified glass structure. (author)

  5. Glass composition development for plasma processing of Hanford high sodium content low-level radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, J.C.

    1995-02-01

    To assess the acceptability of prospective compositions, response criteria based on durability, homogeneity, viscosity and volatility were defined. Response variables were weighted: durability 35%, homogeneity 25%, viscosity 25%, volatility 15%. A Plackett-Burman experimental design was used to define the first twelve glass formulations. Glass former additives included Al2O3, B2O3, CaO, Li2O, ZrO2 and SiO2. Lithia was added to facilitate fritting of the additives. The additives were normalized to silica content to ease experimental matrix definition and glass formulation. Preset high and low values of these ratios were determined for the initial twelve melts. Based on rankings of initial compositions, new formulations for testing were developed based on a simplex algorithm. Rating and ranking of subsequent compositions continued until no apparent improvement in glass quality was achieved in newly developed formulations. An optimized composition was determined by averaging the additive component values of the final best performing compositions. The glass former contents to form the optimized glass were: 16.1 wt % Al2O3, 12.3 wt % B2O3, 5.5 wt % CaO, 1.7 wt % Li2O, 3.3 wt % ZrO2, 61.1 wt % SiO2. An optimized composition resulted after only 25 trials despite studying six glass additives. A vitrification campaign was completed using a small-scale Joule heated melter. 80 lbs of glass was produced over 96 hours of continuous operation. Several salt compounds formed and deposited on melter components during the run and likely caused the failure of several pour chamber heaters. In an attempt to minimize sodium volatility, several low or no boron glasses were formulated. One composition containing no boron produced a homogeneous glass worthy of additional testing

  6. Effect of antimony-oxide on the shielding properties of some sodium-boro-silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoulfakar, A M; Abdel-Ghany, A M; Abou-Elnasr, T Z; Mostafa, A G; Salem, S M; El-Bahnaswy, H H

    2017-09-01

    Some sodium-silicate-boro-antimonate glasses having the molecular composition [(20) Na 2 O - (20) SiO 2 - (60-x) B 2 O 3 - (x) Sb 2 O 3 (where x takes the values 0, 5 … or 20)] have been prepared by the melt quenching method. The melting and annealing temperatures were 1500 and 650K respectively. The amorphous nature of the prepared samples was confirmed by using X-ray diffraction analysis. Both the experimental and empirical density and molar volume values showed gradual increase with increasing Sb 2 O 3 content. The empirical densities showed higher values than those obtained experimentally, while the empirical molar volume values appeared lower than those obtained experimentally, which confirm the amorphous nature and randomness character of the studied samples. The experimentally obtained shielding parameters were approximately coincident with those obtained theoretically by applying WinXCom program. At low gamma-ray energies (0.356 and 0.662MeV) Sb 2 O 3 has approximately no effect on the total Mass Attenuation Coefficient, while at high energies it acts to increase the total Mass Attenuation Coefficient gradually. The obtained Half Value Layer and Mean Free Path values showed gradual decrease as Sb 2 O 3 was gradually increased. Also, the Total Mass Attenuation Coefficient values obtained between about 0.8 and 3.0MeV gamma-ray energy showed a slight decrease, as gamma-ray photon energy increased. This may be due to the differences between the Attenuation Coefficients of both antimony and boron oxides at various gamma-ray photon energies. However, it can be stated that the addition of Sb 2 O 3 into sodium-boro-silicate glasses increases the gamma-ray Attenuation Coefficient and the best sample is that contains 20 mol% of Sb 2 O 3 , which is operating well at 0.356 and 0.662MeV gamma-ray. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of lead removal behaviors and generation of water-soluble sodium compounds in molten lead glass under a reductive atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takashi; Nishimura, Fumihiro; Xu, Zhanglian; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2018-06-01

    We propose a method of reduction-melting at 1000 °C, using a sodium-based flux, to recover lead from cathode-ray tube funnel glass. To recover the added sodium from the treated glass, we combined a reduction-melting process with a subsequent annealing step at 700 °C, generating water-soluble sodium compounds in the molten glass. Using this combined process, this study compares lead removal behavior and the generation of water-soluble sodium compounds (sodium silicates and carbonates) in order to gain fundamental information to enhance the recovery of both lead and sodium. We find that lead removal increases with increasing melting time, whereas the generation efficiency of water-soluble sodium increases and decreases periodically. In particular, near 90% lead removal, the generation of water-soluble sodium compounds decreased sharply, increasing again with the prolongation of melting time. This is due to the different crystallization and phase separation efficiencies of water-soluble sodium in molten glass, whose structure continuously changes with lead removal. Previous studies used a melting time of 60 min in the processes. However, in this study, we observe that a melting time of 180 min enhances the water-soluble sodium generation efficiency.

  8. Sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Table salt is a combination of two minerals - sodium and chloride Your body needs some sodium to work properly. It helps with the function ... in your body. Your kidneys control how much sodium is in your body. If you have too ...

  9. Deep-UV Raman spectroscopic analysis of structure and dissolution rates of silica-rich sodium borosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windisch, Charles F.; Pierce, Eric M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Bovaird, Chase C.

    2011-03-24

    As part of ongoing studies to evaluate the relationships between structural variations in silicate glasses and rates of glass dissolution in aqueous media, molecular structures present in sodium borosilicate glasses of composition Na2O.xB2O3.(3-x)SiO2, with x 1 (Na2O/B2O3 ratio 1), were analyzed using deep-UV Raman spectroscopy. The results were quantified in terms of the fraction of SiO4 tetrahedra with one non-bridging oxygen (Q3) and then correlated with Na2O and B2O3 content. Increasing Na2O was found to raise the fraction of Q3 units in the glasses systematically, in agreement with studies on related glasses, and, as long as the value of x was not too high, contribute to higher rates of dissolution in single pass flow-through testing. The finding was obtained across more than one series of silica-rich glasses prepared for independent dissolution studies. In contrast, dissolution rates were less strongly determined by the Q3 fraction when the value of x was near unity and appeared to grow larger upon further reduction of the Q3 fraction. The results were interpreted to indicate the increasingly important role of network hydrolysis in the glass dissolution mechanism as the BO4 tetrahedron replaces the Q3 unit as the charge-compensating structure for Na+ ions. Finally, the use of deep-UV Raman spectroscopy was found to be advantageous in studying finely powdered glasses in cases where visible Raman spectroscopy suffered from weak Raman scattering and fluorescence interference.

  10. Synthesis, electrical and magnetic properties of sodium borosilicate glasses containing Co-ferrites nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, H.A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Menoufia University, Shibin El-Kom 32511, Menoufia (Egypt); Eltabey, M.M. [Department of Basic Engineering Science, Faculty of Engineering, Menoufia University, Shibin El-Kom, Menoufia (Egypt); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Jazan University (Saudi Arabia); Ibrahim, Samia E.; El-Deen, L.M. Sharaf; Elkholy, M.M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Menoufia University, Shibin El-Kom 32511, Menoufia (Egypt)

    2017-02-01

    Co-ferrites nanoparticles that have been prepared by the co-precipitation method were added to sodium borosilicate (Na{sub 2}O–B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2}) glass matrix by the solid solution method and they were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and magnetization measurements. (XRD) revealed the formation of the Co-ferrite magnetic crystalline phase embedded in an amorphous matrix in all the samples. The investigated samples by (TEM) showed the formation of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with a spherical shape and highly monodispersed with an average size about 13 nm. IR data revealed that the BO{sub 3} and BO{sub 4} are the main structural units of these samples network. IR spectra of the investigated samples showed the characteristic vibration bands of Co-ferrite. Composition and frequency dependent dielectric properties of the prepared samples were measured at room temperature in the frequency range 100–100 kHz. The conductivity was found to increase with increasing cobalt ferrite content. The variations of conductivity and dielectric properties with frequency and composition were discussed. Magnetic hysteresis loops were traced at room temperature using VSM and values of saturation magnetization M{sub S} and coercive field H{sub C} were determined. The obtained results revealed that a ferrimagnetic behavior were observed and as Co-ferrite concentration increases the values of M{sub S} and H{sub C} increase from 2.84 to 8.79 (emu/g) and from 88.4 to 736.3 Oe, respectively.

  11. Deep-UV Raman spectroscopic analysis of structure and dissolution rates of silica-rich sodium borosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M [ORNL; WindischJr., Charles F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Burton, Sarah D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Bovaird, Chase C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2010-01-01

    As part of ongoing studies to evaluate relationships between structure and rates of dissolution of silicate glasses in aqueous media, sodium borosilicate glasses of composition Na2O xB2O3 (3 x)SiO2, with x 1 (Na2O/B2O3 ratio 1), were analyzed using deep-UV Raman spectroscopy. Results were quantified in terms of the fraction of SiO4 tetrahedra with one non-bridging oxygen (Q3) and then correlated with Na2O and B2O3 content. The Q3 fractionwas found to increase with increasing Na2O content, in agreement with studies on related glasses, and, as long as the value of x was not too high, this contributed to higher rates of dissolution in single pass flow-through testing. In contrast, dissolution rates were less strongly determined by the Q3 fraction when the value of x was near unity, and appeared to grow larger upon further reduction of the Q3 fraction. Results were interpreted to indicate the increasingly important role of network hydrolysis in the glass dissolution mechanism as the BO4 tetrahedron replaces the Q3 unit as the charge-compensating structure for Na+ ions. Finally, the use of deep-UV Raman spectroscopy was found to be advantageous in studying finely powdered glasses in cases where visible Raman spectroscopy suffered from weak Raman scattering and fluorescence interference.

  12. A relationship between leach rate of nuclear waste glass and residual amount of sodium on the glass surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamizono, Hiroshi; Banba, Tsunetaka

    1984-12-01

    Leach tests of simulated high-level waste glass were carried out in order to examine the quantitative relationship between the amount of elements on the sample surface and that in the leachate. An experimental equation was obtained expressing the relationship between the amount of Na on the sample surface and that in the leachate. This shows that it is possible in some cases to estimate the amount of Na in the leachate by measuring the amount of Na on the sample surface. One example of such an estimation was observed with the simulated high-level waste glass leached at 100 0 C in the presence of a backfill material. (author)

  13. Intrinsic strength of sodium borosilicate glass fibers by using a two-point bending technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikubo, Y; Yoshida, S; Sugawara, T; Matsuoka, J

    2011-01-01

    Flaws existing on glass surface can be divided into two types, extrinsic and intrinsic. Although the extrinsic flaws are generated during processing and using, the intrinsic flaws are regarded as structural defects which result from thermal fluctuation. It is known that the extrinsic flaws determine glass strength, but effects of the intrinsic flaws on the glass strength are still unclear. Since it is considered that the averaged bond-strength and the intrinsic flaw would affect the intrinsic strength, the intrinsic strength of glass surely depends on the glass composition. In this study, the intrinsic failure strain of the glass fibers with the compositions of 20Na 2 O-40xB 2 O 3 -(80-40x)SiO 2 (mol%, x = 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5) were measured by using a two-point bending technique. The failure strength was estimated from the failure strain and Young's modulus of glass. It is elucidated that two-point bending strength of glass fiber decreases with increasing B 2 O 3 content in glass. The effects of the glass composition on the intrinsic strength are discussed in terms of elastic and inelastic deformation behaviors prior to fracture.

  14. Simulation of Self-Irradiation of High-Sodium Content Nuclear Waste Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankov, Alexey S.; Ojovan, Michael I.; Batyukhnova, Olga G.; Lee, William E.

    2007-01-01

    Alkali-borosilicate glasses are widely used in nuclear industry as a matrix for immobilisation of hazardous radioactive wastes. Durability or corrosion resistance of these glasses is one of key parameters in waste storage and disposal safety. It is influenced by many factors such as composition of glass and surrounding media, temperature, time and so on. As these glasses contain radioactive elements most of their properties including corrosion resistance are also impacted by self-irradiation. The effect of external gamma-irradiation on the short-term (up to 27 days) dissolution of waste borosilicate glasses at moderate temperatures (30 deg. to 60 deg. C) was studied. The glasses studied were Magnox Waste glass used for immobilisation of HLW in UK, and K-26 glass used in Russia for ILW immobilisation. Glass samples were irradiated under γ-source (Co-60) up to doses 1 and 11 MGy. Normalised rates of elemental release and activation energy of release were measured for Na, Li, Ca, Mg, B, Si and Mo before and after irradiation. Irradiation up to 1 MGy results in increase of leaching rate of almost all elements from both MW and K-26 with the exception of Na release from MW glass. Further irradiation up to a dose of 11 MGy leads to the decrease of elemental release rates to nearly initial value. Another effect of irradiation is increase of activation energies of elemental release. (authors)

  15. Development of lithium disilicate based glass-ceramics =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Hugo Alexandre Goncalves da Rocha

    O principal objectivo deste estudo foi o desenvolvimento de vitroceramicos a base de dissilicato de litio no sistema Li2O-K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 contendo uma razao molar SiO2/Li2O muito afastada da do dissilicato de litio (Li2Si2O5) usando composicoes simples e a tecnica tradicional de fusao-vazamento de vidro de forma a obter materiais com propriedades mecanicas, termicas, quimicas e electricas superiores que permitam a utilizacao destes materiais em diversas aplicacoes funcionais. Investigou-se o fenomeno de separacao de fases, a cristalizacao e as relacoes estrutura-propriedades de vidros nos sistemas Li2O-SiO2, Li2O-Al2O3-SiO2 e Li2O-K2O-Al2O3-SiO2. Os vidros nos sistemas Li2O-SiO2 e Li2O-Al2O3-SiO2 apresentaram fraca densificacao e resultaram em materiais frageis, contrastando com a boa sinterizacao dos vidros no sistema Li2O-K2O-Al2O3-SiO2. Pequenas adicoes de Al2O3 e K2O ao sistema Li2O-SiO2 permitiram controlar a separacao de fases devido a formacao de especies de Al(IV) que confirmaram o papel de Al2O3 como formador de rede. Os compactos de po de vidro das composicoes contendo Al2O3 e K2O tratados termicamente resultaram em vitroceramicos bem densificados, apresentando dissilicato de litio como a principal fase cristalina, e valores de resistencia mecanica a flexao, resistencia quimica e condutividade electrica (173-224 MPa, 25-50 mg/cm2 e 2´10-18 S/cm, respectivamente) que possibilitam a utilizacao destes materiais em diversas aplicacoes funcionais. A adicao de P2O5, TiO2 e ZrO2 ao sistema Li2O-K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 como agentes nucleantes revelou que os vidros contendo apresentaram cristalizacao em volume, com a formacao de metassilicato de litio a temperaturas mais baixas e dissilicato de litio para as temperaturas mais elevadas, enquanto a adicao de zirconia reduz o grau de segregacao, aumenta a polimerizacao da matriz vitrea e desloca o valor de Tg para temperaturas superiores, inibindo a cristalizacao.

  16. Unique crystallization behavior of sodium manganese pyrophosphate Na2MnP2O7 glass and its electrochemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morito Tanabe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization behavior of Na2MnP2O7 precursor glass was examined. Layered type Na2MnP2O7 was formed at 461 °C for 3 h in N2 filled electric furnace. Irreversible phase change was confirmed from layered Na2MnP2O7 to β-Na2MnP2O7 over 600 °C. At 650 °C crystallized phase was completely changed to β-phase. By means of charge and discharge testing it is found that layered Na2MnP2O7 is also active as cathode in sodium ion batteries. We found glass-ceramics technology is one of the suitable process for the synthesis of layered Na2MnP2O7 cathode without any complicate process.

  17. Chemically durable iron phosphate glasses for vitrifying sodium bearing waste (SBW) using conventional and cold crucible induction melting (CCIM) techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C.W. E-mail: cheol@umr.edu; Ray, C.S.; Zhu, D.; Day, D.E.; Gombert, D.; Aloy, A.; Mogus-Milankovic, A.; Karabulut, M

    2003-11-01

    A simulated sodium bearing waste (SBW) was successfully vitrified in iron phosphate glasses (IPG) at a maximum waste loading of 40 wt% using conventional and cold crucible induction melting (CCIM) techniques. No sulfate segregation or crystalline phases were detectable in the IPG when examined by SEM and XRD. The IPG wasteforms containing 40 wt% SBW satisfy current DOE requirements for aqueous chemical durability as evaluated from their bulk dissolution rate (D{sub R}), product consistency test, and vapor hydration test. The fluid IPG wasteforms can be melted at a relatively low temperature (1000 deg. C) and for short times (<6 h). These properties combined with a significantly higher waste loading, and the feasibility of CCIM melting offer considerable savings in time, energy, and cost for vitrifying the SBW stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in iron phosphate glasses.

  18. Radiative properties and luminescence spectra of Sm{sup 3+} ion in zinc–aluminum–sodium-phosphate (ZANP) glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brahmachary, K.; Rajesh, D.; Ratnakaram, Y.C., E-mail: ratnakaramsvu@gmail.com

    2015-05-15

    The fluorescence properties of different concentrations of Sm{sup 3+} doped zinc–aluminum–sodium-phosphate (ZANP) glasses were studied by the XRD, SEM, FTIR, TG–DTA, optical absorption, photoluminescence and decay cure analysis. X-ray diffraction profiles and SEM images confirmed the amorphous nature of the glass samples. Structural information of these glass matrices was provided by FTIR spectrum. Judd–Ofelt (J–O) theory was applied to the experimental oscillator strengths to evaluate three phenomenological J–O intensity parameters, Ω{sub λ} (λ=2, 4 and 6). Using J–O intensity parameters and emission spectra, various radiative parameters such as radiative transition probabilities (A{sub R}), radiative lifetimes (τ{sub R}), calculated and measured branching ratios (β{sub R} and β{sub m}), effective bandwidths (Δλ{sub eff}) and stimulated emission cross-sections (σ{sub P}) were calculated for observed emission transitions. The intensity of emission transitions with the variation of Sm{sup 3+} ion concentration was studied. The nature of decay curves of {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} level for different Sm{sup 3+} ion concentrations in ZANP glass was analyzed and obtained measured lifetimes (τ{sub exp}). Quantum efficiency of {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} level was calculated based on experimental and measured radiative lifetimes (τ{sub exp} and τ{sub R}). - Highlights: • The amorphous nature of glasses was confirmed due to lack of sharp peaks in the XRD profiles. • Higher covalency and rigidity were obtained in ZANPSm05 and ZANPSm15 glass matrices respectively. • The symmetric nature present in ZANP glass matrix is confirmed from MD transition, {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}→{sup 6}H{sub 7/2} of Sm{sup 3+} ion. • The decrease of intensity of emission transitions beyond 0.5 mol% is attributed to dipole–dipole interactions. • Among all the glass matrices studied, all the spectroscopic parameters are higher in ZANPSm05 glass matrix.

  19. Structural and luminescence studies of Ho{sup 3+}-doped zinc-aluminium-sodium-phosphate (ZANP) glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brahmachary, K.; Rajesh, D.; Ratnakaram, Y. C., E-mail: ratnakaramsvu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati-517502 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Trivalent holmium doped zinc-aluminium-sodium-phosphate (ZANP) glasses were prepared by conventional melt-quenching technique and characterized for their structural and luminescence properties. The amorphous nature, elemental analysis and thermal stability of the glasses were studied by using X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectrum and differential scanning calorimetry analysis, respectively. The absorption and fluorescence spectra have been recorded at room temperature. Based on the absorption spectra, the Judd-Ofelt parameters and radiative parameters such as spontaneous transition probabilities (A{sub R}), branching ratios (β{sub R}), radiative lifetimes (τ{sub R}) were calculated and discussed. From the emission spectra emission peak positions (λ{sub P}), effective bandwidths (Δλ{sub eff}) and stimulated emission cross-sections (σ{sub P}) were calculated for the observed emission transitions,{sup 5}S{sub 2} ({sup 5}F{sub 4}→{sup 5}I{sub 8}) and {sup 5}F{sub 5}→{sup 5}I{sub 8} in all the glass samples. The stimulated emission cross-section is higher for ZANPHo10 glass matrix and so it may be useful for laser excitation.

  20. FY-97 operations of the pilot-scale glass melter to vitrify simulated ICPP high activity sodium-bearing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musick, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    A 3.5 liter refractory-lined joule-heated glass melter was built to test the applicability of electric melting to vitrify simulated high activity waste (HAW). The HAW streams result from dissolution and separation of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) calcines and/or radioactive liquid waste. Pilot scale melter operations will establish selection criteria needed to evaluate the application of joule heating to immobilize ICPP high activity waste streams. The melter was fabricated with K-3 refractory walls and Inconel 690 electrodes. It is designed to be continuously operated at 1,150 C with a maximum glass output rate of 10 lbs/hr. The first set of tests were completed using surrogate HAW-sodium bearing waste (SBW). The melter operated for 57 hours and was shut down due to excessive melt temperatures resulting in low glass viscosity (< 30 Poise). Due to the high melt temperature and low viscosity the molten glass breached the melt chamber. The melter has been dismantled and examined to identify required process improvement areas and successes of the first melter run. The melter has been redesigned and is currently being fabricated for the second run, which is scheduled to begin in December 1997

  1. REACTION PRODUCTS AND CORROSION OF MOLYBDENUM ELECTRODE IN GLASS MELT CONTAINING ANTIMONY OXIDES AND SODIUM SULFATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIŘÍ MATĚJ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The products on the interface of a molybdenum electrode and glass melt were investigated primarily at 1400°C in three model glass melts without ingredients, with 1 % Sb2O3 and with 1 % Sb2O3 and 0.5 % SO3 (wt. %, both under and without load by alternating current. Corrosion of the molybdenum electrode in glass melt without AC load is higher by one order of magnitude if antimony oxides are present. The corrosion continues to increase if sulfate is present in addition to antimony oxides. Isolated antimony droplets largely occur on the electrode-glass melt interface, and numerous droplets are also dissipated in the surrounding glass if only antimony oxides are present in the glass melt. A comparatively continuous layer of antimony occurs on the interface if SO3 is also present, antimony being always in contact with molybdenum sulfide. Almost no antimony droplets are dissipated in the glass melt. The total amount of precipitated antimony also increases. The presence of sulfide on the interface likely facilitates antimony precipitation. The reaction of molybdenum with antimony oxides is inhibited in sites covered by an antimony layer. The composition of sulfide layers formed at 1400°C approximates that of Mo2S3. At 1100°C, the sulfide composition approximates that of MoS4. Corrosion multiplies in the glass melt without additions through the effect of AC current, most molybdenum being separated in the form of metallic particles. Corrosion also increases in the glass melt containing antimony oxides. This is due to increased corrosion in the neighborhood of the separated antimony droplets. This mechanism also results in the loosening of molybdenum particles. The amount of precipitated antimony also increases through the effect of the AC current. AC exerts no appreciable effect on either corrosion, the character of the electrode-glass interface, or antimony precipitation in the glass melt containing SO3.

  2. Nanostructured sodium lithium niobate and lithium niobium tantalate solid solutions obtained by controlled crystallization of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radonjic, L.; Todorovic, M.; Miladinovic, J.

    2005-01-01

    Transparent, nanostructured glass ceramics based on ferroelectric solid solutions of the type Na 1-x Li x NbO 3 (in very narrow composition regions for x = 0.12 and 0.93) and LiNb 1-y Ta y O 3 (y = 0.5 unlimited solid solubility), can be obtained by controlled crystallization of glass. The parent glass samples were prepared by conventional melt-quenching technique. Heat-treatment of the parent glasses was performed at the various temperatures, for the same time. The glass structure evolution during the controlled crystallization was examined by FT-IR spectroscopy analysis. Crystalline phases were identified by X-ray diffraction analysis and SEM was used for microstructure characterization. Densities of the crystallized glasses were measured by Archimedean principle. The capacitance and dielectric loss tangent were measured at a frequency of 1 kHz, at the room temperature. It was found that in the all investigated systems crystallize solid solutions Na 1-x Li x NbO 3 and LiNb 1-y Ta y O 3 in the glassy matrix, have crystal size on nanoscale (less than 100 nm), which is one of requirements to get a transparent glass ceramic that could be a good ferroelectric material regarding to the measured properties

  3. Energy transfer upconversion in Er3+-Tm3+ codoped sodium silicate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Pandey, Anurag; Ntwaeaborwa, O. M.; Swart, H. C.

    2018-04-01

    Er3+/Tm3+ doped and codoped Na2O-SiO2-ZnO (NSZO) glasses were prepared by the conventional melt-quenching method. The amorphous nature of the prepared glasses was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction analysis. The optical absorption spectrum displayed several peaks, which correspond to Er3+ and Tm3+ dopant ions embedded into the NSZO glass. Both dopants experienced upconversion emission under 980 nm excitation. Efficient energy transfer from Er3+ to Tm3+ was observed in the co-doped samples to enhance the near infrared emission of the Tm3+ ions.

  4. Sodium aluminum-iron phosphate glass-ceramics for immobilization of lanthanide oxide wastes from pyrochemical reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanovsky, S. V.; Stefanovsky, O. I.; Kadyko, M. I.; Nikonov, B. S.

    2018-03-01

    Sodium aluminum (iron) phosphate glass ceramics containing of up to 20 wt.% rare earth (RE) oxides simulating pyroprocessing waste were produced by melting at 1250 °C followed by either quenching or slow cooling to room temperature. The iron-free glass-ceramics were composed of major glass and minor phosphotridymite and monazite. The iron-bearing glass-ceramics were composed of major glass and minor monazite and Na-Al-Fe orthophosphate at low waste loadings (5-10 wt.%) and major orthophosphate and minor monazite as well as interstitial glass at high waste loadings (15-20 wt.%). Slowly cooled samples contained higher amount of crystalline phases than quenched ones. Monazite is major phase for REs. Leach rates from the materials of major elements (Na, Al, Fe, P) are 10-5-10-7 g cm-2 d-1, RE elements - lower than 10-5 g cm-2 d-1.

  5. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  6. Selection of a glass-ceramic formulation to immobilize fluorinel- sodium calcine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, B.A.; Wood, H.C.

    1994-12-01

    One option for immobilizing calcined high level wastes produced by nuclear fuel reprocessing activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is conversion to a glass-ceramic form through hot isostatic pressing. Calcines exist in several different chemical compositions, and thus candidate formulations have been developed for converting each to glass-ceramic forms which are potentially resistant to aqueous corrosion and stable enough to qualify for repository storage. Fluorinel/Na, a chemically complex calcine type, is one of the types being stored at ICPP, and development efforts have identified three formulations with potential for immobilizing it. These are a glass forming additive that uses aluminum metal to enhance reactivity, a second glass forming additive that uses titanium metal to enhance reactivity and a third that uses not only a combination of silicon and titanium metals but enough phosphorous pentoxide to form a calcium phosphate host phase in the glass-ceramic product. Glass-ceramics of each formulation performed well in restricted characterization tests. However, none of the three was subjected to rigorous testing that would provide information on whether each was processable, that is able to retain favorable characteristics over a practical range of processing conditions

  7. Compatibility of butorphanol with granisetron in 0.9% sodium chloride injection packaged in glass bottles or polyolefin bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu-Chao; Xiong, Hui; Liu, Hui-Min; Fang, Bao-Xia; Li, Peng

    2015-08-15

    The stability of admixtures containing butorphanol and granisetron in polyolefin bags and glass bottles stored at 4 and 25 °C was studied. Commercial solutions of butorphanol tartrate and granisetron hydrochloride were combined and further diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride injection to final concentrations of butorphanol tartrate 0.08 mg/mL and granisetron 0.03 or 0.06 mg/mL; the resulting mixtures were packaged in polyolefin bags and glass bottles. The admixtures were assessed for periods of up to 48 hours after storage at 25 °C without protection from room light and up to 14 days at 4 °C with protection from room light. The chemical stability of the admixtures was evaluated by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and by measurement of pH values. Solution appearance and color were assessed by observing the samples against room light and dark backgrounds. HPLC analysis demonstrated that the percentages of the initial concentrations of butorphanol and granisetron in the various solutions remained above 97% during the testing period. No changes in color or turbidity were observed in any of the prepared solutions. Throughout this period, pH values remained stable. Admixtures of butorphanol tartrate 0.08 mg/mL and granisetron 0.03 or 0.06 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride injection in polyolefin bags or glass bottles remained stable for 48 hours when stored at 25 °C exposed to room light and for 14 days when stored at 4 °C protected from room light. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Optical study of gamma irradiated sodium metaphosphate glasses containing divalent metal oxide MO (ZnO or CdO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nabhan

    Full Text Available Sodium metaphosphate glasses containing divalent metal oxide, ZnO or CdO with composition 50 P2O5 – (50 − x Na2O – x MO (ZnO, or CdO where x = 0, 10, 20 (mol% were prepared by conventional melt method. UV/visible spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy are measured before and after exposing to successive gamma irradiation doses (5–80 kGy. The optical absorption spectra results of the samples before irradiation reveal a strong UV absorption band at (∼230 nm which is related to unavoided iron impurities. The effects of gamma irradiation on the optical spectral properties of the various glasses have been compared. From the optical absorption spectral data, the optical band gap is evaluated. The main structural groups and the influence of both divalent metal oxide and gamma irradiation effect on the structural vibrational groups are realized through IR spectroscopy. The FTIR spectra of γ-irradiated samples are characterized by the stability of the number and position for the main characteristic band of phosphate groups. To better understood the structural changes during γ-irradiation, a deconvolution of FTIR spectra in the range 650–1450 cm−1 is made. The FTIR deconvolution results found evidence that, the changes occurring after gamma irradiation have been related to irradiation induced structural defects and compositional changes. Keywords: Sodium metaphosphate glass, UV–visible spectra, IR spectra, Deconvolution, Optical band gap, Gamma ray

  9. Hydrothermal reaction of albite and a sodium aluminosilicate glass: A solid-state NMR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wang-hong Alex; Kirkpatrick, R. James

    1989-04-01

    We present here a solid-state NMR study of the structure and chemical composition of the products and mechanisms of the reaction of crystalline low albite and a glass of nearly albite composition with aqueous solutions of pH from 1 to 11 at 250°C. For the crystalline albite, there are no detectable bulk or surface structural changes due to aqueous attack, consistent with the idea that both cation exchange and disruption of the aluminosilicate framework occur only near the mineral/solution interface and that the hydrated surface layer, if it exists, is not more than about 30 Å thick. This reaction occurs by solution/reprecipitation, and its rate decreases with increasing solution pH, supporting the idea that the dissolution of feldspar is initiated by cation-exchange. For the glass, the reaction proceeds by cation exchange of protons for Na +, incorporation of molecular water into the bulk glass, and a small amount of depolymerization of the aluminosilicate framework in the interior of the glass. Cation exchange becomes less important with increasing solution pH. The incorporation of molecular water and cation-exchange cause structural changes in the glass via solidstate adjustment without dissolution/reprecipitation. The large cations in the hydrated glass (Na and K) probably have a shell of water molecules around them, with a maximum average coordination number of six. The secondary phases formed from both albite and the glass are often amorphous and can be well characterized by NMR. The compositional and structural variations of the amorphous phases are important factors in these reactions and cannot be ignored in theoretical models of aluminosilicate dissolution. As expected, the aluminum coordination in the secondary phases changes from six-fold to four-fold as the solution pH increases.

  10. Physical and optical property studies on Bi3+ ion containing vanadium sodium borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, G.; Meera, B. N.; Eraiah, B.

    2018-04-01

    xBi2O3-(15-x)V2O5-45B2O3-40Na2O glasses have been prepared using melt quenching technique. Amorphous nature of the glasses is verified using powder XRD. Densities and molar volume have been determined as a function of bismuth content and interestingly both increases as a function of bismuth content. Further oxygen packing density (OPD) is found to decrease with bismuth content. The increase in the molar volume as a function of bismuth content may be due to structural changes in the glass network. The optical properties performed from the optical absorption spectra were recorded in the wavelength range 200-1100 nm using UV-Visible spectrophotometer. The theoretical optical basicity of the oxides have also been estimated. The calculated energy band gap values increases with increase in Bi2O3 content.

  11. sodium

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Les initiatives de réduction de la consommation de sel qui visent l'ensemble de la population et qui ciblent la teneur en sodium des aliments et sensibilisent les consommateurs sont susceptibles de réduire la consommation de sel dans toutes les couches de la population et d'améliorer la santé cardiovasculaire. Ce projet a ...

  12. Gold nanoparticles assisted surface enhanced Raman scattering and luminescence of Er{sup 3+} doped zinc–sodium tellurite glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoshal, S.K.; Awang, Asmahani, E-mail: asmahani_awang@yahoo.com; Sahar, M.R.; Arifin, R.

    2015-03-15

    Significant enhancements in Er{sup 3+} luminescence and Raman intensity mediated via surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs) embedded zinc–sodium tellurite glass are reported. The observed modifications in the physical and spectroscopic properties are ascribed to the alterations in the glass network. XRD pattern confirms the amorphous nature of prepared glass sample. UV–vis-NIR spectra reveal seven absorption bands. Surface plasmon band is evidenced around 626–630 nm. TEM images manifest the growth of non-spherical Au NPs with average diameter between ∼7.2 nm and 8.6 nm. The visible up-conversion (UC) emission for all samples under 779 nm excitation exhibits three bands centered at 503 nm (green), 546 (green) and 637 nm (red) ascribed to {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transitions. Glass sample with 0.4 mol% Au displaying the highest luminescence intensity with enhancement factor of 3.85 and 3.56 for green bands, and 7.61 for the red band is ascribed to the NPs local field enhancement and energy transfer between rare earth (RE) ions and NPs. FTIR spectra show the vibration of ZnO{sub 4} bonds, Te-O bond in TeO{sub 3} (tp) and TeO{sub 4} (tbp) units and the hydroxyl groups. Raman spectra demonstrate the presence of Er-O and Zn-O bond, anti-symmetric vibrations of Te-O-Te bonds and stretching modes of non-bonded oxygen exists in TeO{sub 3} and TeO{sub 3+1} unit. The amplifications in Raman signals by a factor of 1.62, 1.58, 1.64, 1.68 and 1.69 corresponding to the peak centered at 262 cm{sup −1}, 382 cm{sup −1}, 521 cm{sup −1}, 670 cm{sup −1} and 725 cm{sup −1} are attributed to the contribution of a surface plasmon generating a strong, localized and secondary field. We assert that our glass compositions offer favorable potential to develop solid state lasers and other versatile nanophotonic devices. - Highlights: • Gold

  13. Reaction products and corrosion of molybdenum electrode in glass melt containing antimony oxides and sodium sulfate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matěj, J.; Langrová, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 3 (2012), s. 280-285 ISSN 0862-5468 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : antimony oxides * corrosion * glass melt * Molybdenum electrode * sulfate Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 0.418, year: 2012 http://www.ceramics-silikaty.cz/2012/pdf/2012_03_280.pdf

  14. Sulphate decomposition and sodium oxide activity in soda-lime-silica glass metls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2003-01-01

    Reaction equilibrium constants for the sulfate decomposition process, which releases oxygen and sulfur oxide gas in sodalimesilica glass melts, have been determined. The chemical solubility of SO2, probably in the form of sulfite ions in sodalimesilica melts, has also been determined. The chemical

  15. Luminescence properties of erbium doped sodium barium borate glass with silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeshree Patwari, D.; Eraiah, B.

    2018-02-01

    Alteration in the absorption features of rare earth (RE) doped glasses with silver nanoparticles is ever-challenging in photonics. Erbium (Er3+) doped glasses with composition (60-x-y)B2O3-30Na2CO3-10BaO-xEr2O3-yAgCl where (x=0.5, 1.0 and y=1.0 mol %) are synthesized using melt-quenching method. The density is determined by Archimedes principle and molar volumes are calculated. Glass samples were characterized by XRD and UV-Visible spectroscopy. UV-Visible spectra shows eleven prominent absorption peaks centred around 366, 378, 408, 442, 452, 489, 521, 547, 652, 800 and 977 nm equivalent to the rare earth (Er3+) ion transitions. The sample without rare earth shows no peaks which specifies that rare earth ion plays a spirited role in the glass matrix. The glass samples with silver and without rare earth ion shows plasmon peak on heat treatment. The energy band gap values calculated for direct and indirect transitions are in the range of 3.126-3.440eV and 2.58-3.177eV respectively. The refractive indices and Urbach energies are also determined. Photoluminescence spectra are recorded and studied for excitation of the most intense peaks of wavelengths 378 and 521nm. The luminescence of erbium ion is enhanced by the presence of silver when the concentration of rare earth ion is less than that of silver.

  16. Water speciation in sodium silicate glasses (quenched melts): A comprehensive NMR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, X.; Kanzaki, M.; Eguchi, J.

    2012-12-01

    Dissolution mechanism of water is an important factor governing how the dissolved water affects the physical and thermodynamic properties of silicate melts and glasses. Our previous studies have demonstrated that 1H MAS NMR in combination with 29Si-1H and 27Al-1H double-resonance NMR experiments is an effective approach for unambiguously differentiating and quantifying different water species in quenched silicate melts (glasses). Several contrasting dissolution mechanisms have been revealed depending on the melt composition: for relatively polymerized melts, the formation of SiOH/AlOH species (plus molecular H2O) and depolymerization of the network structure dominate; whereas for depolymerized Ca-Mg silicate melts, free OH (e.g. MgOH) become increasingly important (cf. [1]). The proportion of free OH species has been shown to decrease with both increasing melt polymerization (silica content) and decreasing field strength of the network modifying cations (from Mg to Ca). Our previous 1H and 29Si MAS NMR results for hydrous Na silicate glasses of limited compositions (Na2Si4O9 and Na2Si2O5) were consistent with negligible free OH (NaOH) species and depolymerizing effect of water dissolution [2]. On the other hand, there were also other studies that proposed the presence of significant NaOH species in hydrous glasses near the Na2Si2O5 composition. The purpose of this study is apply the approach of combined 1H MAS NMR and double-resonance (29Si-1H and 23Na-1H) NMR to gain unambiguous evidence for the OH speciation in Na silicate glasses (melts) as a function of composition. Hydrous Na silicate glasses containing mostly ≤ 1 wt% H2O for a range of Na/Si ratios from 0.33 to 1.33 have been synthesized by rapidly quenching melts either at 0.2 GPa using an internally heated gas pressure vessel or at 1 GPa using a piston cylinder high-pressure apparatus. NMR spectra have been acquired using a 9.4 T Varian Unity-Inova spectrometer. The 29Si and 1H chemical shifts are

  17. Effect of prior silane application on the bond strength of a universal adhesive to a lithium disilicate ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, André Fábio Vasconcelos; Ramos, Amanda Barreto; Rocha, Gustavo Miranda; Perez, Cesar Dos Reis

    2017-11-01

    Universal adhesives combine silane and various monomers in a single bottle to make them more versatile. Their adhesive performance is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the effects of an additional silane application before using a universal adhesive on the adhesion between a disilicate glass ceramic and a composite resin by using a microshear bond strength test (μSBS) and fracture analysis immediately and after thermocycling. One hundred lithium disilicate glass ceramic disks were divided into 10 groups for bond strength testing according to the following 3 surface treatments: silane application (built-in universal adhesive or with additional application), adhesive (Adper Single Bond Plus [SB, 3M ESPE], Scotchbond Universal Adhesive [U, 3M ESPE], and mixed U with Dual Cure Activator [DCA, 3M ESPE]); or thermocycling (half of the specimens were thermocycled 10000 times). After surface treatment, 5 resin cylinders were bonded to each disk and submitted to a μSBS test. The failure mode was analyzed under a stereomicroscope and evaluated by scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Data from the μSBS test were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey HSD post hoc test (α=.05). An additional silane application resulted in a higher μSBS result for all adhesive groups (Padhesives, which may be improved with an additional silane application. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Photoluminescence study of Er-doped zinc-sodium-antimonite glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zavadil, Jiří; Ivanova, Z. G.; Kostka, Petr; Hamzaoui, M.; Soltani, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 611, 25 October (2014), s. 111-116 ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/12/2384; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK009 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 ; RVO:67985891 Keywords : Erbium * Photoluminescence * Antimonite glasses Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (USMH-B) Impact factor: 2.999, year: 2014

  19. Optical and luminescence properties of Dy3+ doped sodium silicate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisittipokakun, N.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the optical and luminescence properties of Dy2O3 doped Na2O-BaO-Bi2O3-SiO2 glasses. The Dy3+ ion is chosen as dopant because it emits three visible bands, blue (470-485 nm; 4F9/2→6H15/2), yellow (570-580 nm; 4F9/2→6H13/2) and red (640-655 nm; 4F9/2→6H11/2) luminescence and finds its applications in the fields of laser, white LEDs, telecommunication technology and display devices. NaBaBiSiDy glasses with the compositions of (30-x)SiO2: 10Bi2O3: 30Na2O: 30BaO: xDy2O3 where x=0.0, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mol% were prepared by melt-quenching technique and characterized by using density, optical absorption photoluminescence (PL) and decay rate measurements as function of different concentrations. The density (ρ), molar volume (VM) and refractive index obtained were found to increase with increase in the concentration of Dy2O3 in the glass matrix. The chromaticity coordinates were calculated from emission spectra and analyzed with CIE color diagram and appear in the white light region under ultraviolet excitation.

  20. Structural properties of alkaline sodium lead fluoride borate glasses incorporated with Praseodymium ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkennavar, Susheela K.; Madhu, A.; Eraiah, B.; Kokila, M. K.

    2018-05-01

    The effect of different alkaline and Pr ions on the density and structure of Na2O-PbO-MO-B2O3 (M represents Ba/Ca/Sr) has been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR). The amorphous phase has been identified based on X-ray diffraction analysis. The Praseodymium oxide plays the role as a glass-modifier and influences on BO3↔BO4 conversion. The same effect is also observed in density and molar volume variation due to non bridging oxygen's (NBO) created when BO3 units are converted.

  1. Crack tip fracture toughness of base glasses for dental restoration glass-ceramics using crack opening displacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deubener, J; Höland, M; Höland, W; Janakiraman, N; Rheinberger, V M

    2011-10-01

    The critical stress intensity factor, also known as the crack tip toughness K(tip), was determined for three base glasses, which are used in the manufacture of glass-ceramics. The glasses included the base glass for a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, the base glass for a fluoroapatite glass-ceramic and the base glass for a leucite glass-ceramic. These glass-ceramic are extensively used in the form of biomaterials in restorative dental medicine. The crack tip toughness was established by using crack opening displacement profiles under experimental conditions. The crack was produced by Vickers indentation. The crack tip toughness parameters determined for the three glass-ceramics differed quite significantly. The crack tip parameters of the lithium disilicate base glass and the leucite base glass were higher than that of the fluoroapatite base glass. This last material showed glass-in-glass phase separation. The discussion of the results clearly shows that the droplet glass phase is softer than the glass matrix. Therefore, the authors conclude that a direct relationship exists between the chemical nature of the glasses and the crack tip parameter. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation of the electrical conductivity of γ-irradiated sodium silicate glasses containing multivalence Cu ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawansi, A.; Basha, A.F.; El-Konsol, S.

    1981-07-01

    The present investigation deals with a study of the γ-radiation effects on the d.c. electrical resistivity (rho) of SiO 2 -Na 2 O-CaO glasses containing Cu 0 , Cu + , Cu 2+ and mixture of Cu + and Cu 2+ ions over the temperature (T) range from 300 to 630 0 K. The applicability of the polaron hopping conduction mechanism has been established from the reciprocal temperature dependence of 1n rho/T for the samples under investigation. The electrical resistivity is found to decrease by increasing the TM valancy which enhances the hoping process. The post-irradiation effect due to ionizing gamma-radiation is investigated within the frame work of the electron (and hole) trapping theory, and an average value of 0.45 is obtained for the parameter Δ, characterizing traps with an exponentially decreasing numbers below the conduction band. (author)

  3. Effect of different cement types on monolithic lithium disilicate complete crowns with feather-edge preparation design in the posterior region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Johannes H; Beani, Massimiliano

    2016-06-01

    Ideally, tooth preparation for complete crowns should require the removal of the smallest amount possible of sound tooth structure to maximize the strength of the remaining tooth. Some preparation designs, such as the feather-edge margin, are less invasive. However, limited data are available regarding monolithic lithium disilicate crowns for molars and premolars with this type of margin geometry. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical outcome and survival of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns in the posterior region fabricated with feather-edge margins and cemented either with conventional (glass ionomer) or resin self-etching cement in 2 private practices. A total of 257 monolithic lithium disilicate restorations on posterior teeth (108 premolars, 149 molars) were placed in 158 patients. All teeth were prepared with feather-edge margins and restored with single crowns. The modified California Dental Association (CDA) criteria were used to clinically evaluate participants recalled between June and December 2014. The mean ±standard deviation follow-up time was 24 (±13.6; range: 6-75) months. Three crowns were replaced during the follow-up period because of the bulk fracture of the material (98.83% survival rate). No other technical or biological failure was observed. In this retrospective evaluation, monolithic lithium disilicate crowns with feather-edge margins yielded clinical outcomes similar to those reported with other margin designs and materials. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. New reddish-orange and greenish-yellow light emitting phosphors: Eu3+ and Tb3+/Eu3+ in sodium germanate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Álvarez, E.; Zayas, Ma. E.; Alvarado-Rivera, J.; Félix-Domínguez, F.; Duarte-Zamorano, R.P.; Caldiño, U.

    2014-01-01

    A spectroscopic analysis of sodium germanate glasses activated with Eu 3+ , Tb 3+ and Eu 3+ /Tb 3+ is performed from their photoluminescence spectra and decay times. In the Eu 3+ -singly doped glass reddish-orange light emission, with x=0.64 and y=0.35 CIE1931 chromaticity coordinates, is obtained upon Eu 3+ excitation at 393 nm. Such chromaticity coordinates are close to those (0.67, 0.33) proposed by the National Television Standard Committee for the red phosphor. When the sodium germanate glass is co-doped with Tb 3+ and Eu 3+ greenish-yellow light emission, with (0.41, 0.46) CIE1931 chromaticity coordinates, is obtained upon Tb 3+ excitation at 344 nm. Such greenish-yellow luminescence is due mainly to the terbium 5 D 4 → 7 F 6,5 and europium 5 D 0 → 7 F 1,2 emissions, Eu 3+ being sensitized by Tb 3+ through a non-radiative energy transfer. The non-radiative nature of this energy transfer is inferred from the increase in the decay rate of the Tb 3+ emission when the glass is co-doped with Eu 3+ . From an analysis of the Tb 3+ emission decay time curves it is inferred that such energy transfer might take place between Tb 3+ and Eu 3+ clusters through a short-range interaction mechanism. - Highlights: • Sodium germanate glasses are optically activated with Eu 3+ (GNE) and Tb 3+ /Eu 3+ (GNTE). • Reddish-orange light (0.64, 0.35) is generated by GNE pumped with 393 nm light. • Greenish-yellow light (0.41, 0.46) is generated by GNTE pumped with 344 nm light. • Non-radiative energy transfer Tb 3+ →Eu 3+ takes place in GNTE

  5. UV-visible, Raman and E.S.R. studies of gamma-irradiated NiO-doped sodium metaphosphate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElBatal, Fatma H; Morsi, Reham M; Ouis, Mona A; Marzouk, Samir Y

    2010-11-01

    UV-visible spectroscopic measurements of Ni-doped sodium phosphate glasses were carried out before and after successive gamma irradiation. The undoped glass reveals strong UV absorption originating from trace iron impurities. NiO-doped glasses show characteristic absorption bands due mainly to octahedral coordination of Ni(2+) ions. Gamma irradiation produces induced bands generated from intrinsic defects and extrinsic defects. The changes in the spectroscopic data are discussed in relation to the structural evolution caused by the changes in composition and coordination state of nickel ions. The change in the growth behaviour of the induced bands is related to the annihilation or approach saturation of these characteristic induced bands. Raman and E.S.R. spectroscopic measurements confirm the presence of nickel as Ni(2+) ions in octahedral state. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of system size and cooling rate on the structure and properties of sodium borosilicate glasses from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lu; Du, Jincheng

    2018-01-14

    Borosilicate glasses form an important glass forming system in both glass science and technologies. The structure and property changes of borosilicate glasses as a function of thermal history in terms of cooling rate during glass formation and simulation system sizes used in classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were investigated with recently developed composition dependent partial charge potentials. Short and medium range structural features such as boron coordination, Si and B Q n distributions, and ring size distributions were analyzed to elucidate the effects of cooling rate and simulation system size on these structure features and selected glass properties such as glass transition temperature, vibration density of states, and mechanical properties. Neutron structure factors, neutron broadened pair distribution functions, and vibrational density of states were calculated and compared with results from experiments as well as ab initio calculations to validate the structure models. The results clearly indicate that both cooling rate and system size play an important role on the structures of these glasses, mainly by affecting the 3 B and 4 B distributions and consequently properties of the glasses. It was also found that different structure features and properties converge at different sizes or cooling rates; thus convergence tests are needed in simulations of the borosilicate glasses depending on the targeted properties. The results also shed light on the complex thermal history dependence on structure and properties in borosilicate glasses and the protocols in MD simulations of these and other glass materials.

  7. Effects of system size and cooling rate on the structure and properties of sodium borosilicate glasses from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lu; Du, Jincheng

    2018-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses form an important glass forming system in both glass science and technologies. The structure and property changes of borosilicate glasses as a function of thermal history in terms of cooling rate during glass formation and simulation system sizes used in classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were investigated with recently developed composition dependent partial charge potentials. Short and medium range structural features such as boron coordination, Si and B Qn distributions, and ring size distributions were analyzed to elucidate the effects of cooling rate and simulation system size on these structure features and selected glass properties such as glass transition temperature, vibration density of states, and mechanical properties. Neutron structure factors, neutron broadened pair distribution functions, and vibrational density of states were calculated and compared with results from experiments as well as ab initio calculations to validate the structure models. The results clearly indicate that both cooling rate and system size play an important role on the structures of these glasses, mainly by affecting the 3B and 4B distributions and consequently properties of the glasses. It was also found that different structure features and properties converge at different sizes or cooling rates; thus convergence tests are needed in simulations of the borosilicate glasses depending on the targeted properties. The results also shed light on the complex thermal history dependence on structure and properties in borosilicate glasses and the protocols in MD simulations of these and other glass materials.

  8. Properties of sodium borosilicate glasses/Al2O3 sintered composites containing fluorides. Gan Fukkabutsu hokei san natoriumu garasu to alumina fukugo shoketsutai no bussei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Bonggi; Yasui, I [The Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Inst. of Industrial Science

    1993-06-01

    Glass/alumina sintered composites were synthesized from sodium borosilicate glass powder containing fluorides like AlF3 and NaF3, and Al2O3, and change in material properties was examined. Glass compositions of B2O3 and Na2O greatly affected the crystal phase and material properties. Nephelin crystal phase was extracted by the reaction of Na2O, NaF2, SiO2 and Al2O3 when B/Na<1. Coefficient of thermal expansion increased with the increase of Na/Si ratio. The residual amount of fluorides of sintered materials in nitrogen atmosphere was higher than that of air, and differed with the type of fluoride. The F[sup -] of NaF is bonded with Si of glass network and forms quiet stable glass structure, whereas, F[sup -] of AlF3 reacts with Si[sup 4+] forming SiF4 which is vaporized. Sintering temperature and dielectric constant of sintered materials containing fluoride was lower than the sintered materials without fluorides addition, however, at a sintering temperature range of 100 to 150[degree]C, it was inferred that this was because of the increase in voids due to SiF4 formed in the reaction. 16 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Effect of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} dopant on electrical and optical properties of potassium sodium niobate silicate glass-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongsiri, Ploypailin [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sirisoonthorn, Somnuk [National Metal and Materials Technology Center, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Pengpat, Kamonpan, E-mail: kamonpan.p@cmu.ac.th [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The KNN–SiO{sub 2} doped Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass-ceramics was prepared by incorporation method. • High dielectric constant (458.41 at 100 kHz) and low loss (0.0005) could be obtained. • TEM and SEM confirmed the existence of KNN crystals embedded in glass matrix. • The Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} dopant causes insignificant effect on modifying E{sub g} value. - Abstract: In this study, transparent glass-ceramics from potassium sodium niobate (KNN)-silicate glass system doped with erbium oxide (Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were successfully prepared by incorporation method. KNN was added in glass batches as heterogeneous nucleating agent. The KNN powder was mixed with SiO{sub 2} and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} dopant with KNN and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} content varied between 70–80 and 0.5–1.0 mol%, respectively. Each batch was subsequently melted at 1300 °C for 15 min in a platinum crucible using an electric furnace. The quenched glasses were then subjected to heat treatment at various temperatures for 4 h. XRD results showed that the prepared glass ceramics contained crystals of KNN solid solution. In contrary, dielectric constant (ϵ{sub r}) and dielectric loss (tan δ) were found to increase with increasing heat treatment temperature. Additionally, optical properties such as absorbance and energy band gap have been investigated.

  10. Stability of tranexamic acid in 0.9% sodium chloride, stored in type 1 glass vials and ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Susan V; Sztajnkrycer, Matthew D; Jenkins, Donald A; Zietlow, Scott P; Berns, Kathleen S; Park, Myung S

    2014-01-01

    Tranexamic acid has recently been demonstrated to decrease all-cause mortality and deaths due to hemorrhage in trauma patients. The optimal administration of tranexamic acid is within one hour of injury, but not more than three hours from the time of injury. To aid with timely administration, a premixed solution of 1 gram tranexamic acid and 0.9% sodium chloride was proposed to be stocked as a medication in both the aeromedical transport helicopters and Emergency Department at Mayo Clinic Hospital--Rochester Saint Marys Campus. Since no published stability data exists for tranexamic acid diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride, this study was undertaken to determine the stability of tranexamic acid diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride while being stored in two types of containers. Stability was determined through the use of a stability-indicating high-performance liquid reverse phase chromatography assay, pH, and visual tests. Tranexamic acid solutions of 1 gram in 0.9% sodium chloride 65 mL were studied at predetermined intervals for 90 days in ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers, protected from light, and at both controlled room and refrigerated temperatures. Tranexamic acid solutions of 1 gram in 0.9% sodium chloride 50 mL were studied at predetermined intervals for 180 days in clear Type 1 borosilicate glass vials sealed with intact elastomeric, Flourotec-coated stoppers, stored protected from light at controlled room temperature. Solutions stored in the ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers at both storage temperatures maintained at least 98% of initial potency throughout the 90-day study period. Solutions stored in glass vials at controlled room temperature maintained at least 92% of initial potency throughout the 180-day study period. Visual and pH tests revealed stable, clear, colorless, and particulate-free solutions throughout the respective study periods.

  11. Study of the mixed alkali effect in lithium and sodium metaphosphate glass-forming liquids by photon correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changstrom, J R; Sidebottom, D L

    2008-01-01

    We report results of an extensive study of the structural relaxation occurring in mixed alkali metaphosphate liquids obtained by photon correlation spectroscopy. Values for the glass transition temperature, the fragility index, and the heterogeneity parameter (also known as the Kohlrausch exponent) are extracted from the measurements and are all shown to exhibit a mixed alkali effect wherein nonlinear variations with mixing occur. The depression in the glass transition temperature is shown to be the direct result of mechanical relaxations, present in the solid, which prematurely loosen the glass structure. A minimum in the fragility index is believed to be an artifact of the resulting depression of the glass transition temperature

  12. X-ray absorption spectroscopy on phosphoric-salt pellets. Determination of the geometric and electronic structure of metal-oxide doped sodium-phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brendebach, B.

    2004-02-01

    Sodium metaphosphate glasses doped with transition metal oxides show characteristic colors. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) investigations provide information whether the coloration stems from different electronic transitions or changes in the geometrical structure of the glasses. Even though the violet color of MnO y -doped glasses is considered as an evidence for Mn 3+ -ions, Mn K-XAS reveals that the majority of the manganese ions are in the oxidation state +II and have a mixed coordination of four and six oxygen atoms, respectively. The oxygen coordination around the nickel ions in NiO-doped glasses with different metall oxide concentrations is always six. The change of color from citreous to auburn with increasing nickel oxide content is attributed to a systematic change in the bonding characteristic from mainly ionic-like to a small but significant contribution of covalent-like bonding. Analysis of higher coordination shells provides no indication of the formation of metal oxide clusters. (orig.)

  13. New reddish-orange and greenish-yellow light emitting phosphors: Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+}/Eu{sup 3+} in sodium germanate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Álvarez, E. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Sonora (UNISON), Boulevard Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, Hermosillo 83000, Sonora (Mexico); Zayas, Ma. E. [Departamento de Investigación en Física, Universidad de Sonora (UNISON), Boulevard Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, Hermosillo 83000, Sonora (Mexico); Alvarado-Rivera, J. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Sonora (UNISON), Boulevard Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, Hermosillo 83000, Sonora (Mexico); Félix-Domínguez, F. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Sonora (UNISON), Boulevard Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, Hermosillo 83000, Sonora (Mexico); Centro de investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C. Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo industrial Chihuahua, Chihuahua 31109, Chihuahua (Mexico); Duarte-Zamorano, R.P. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Sonora (UNISON), Boulevard Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, Hermosillo 83000, Sonora (Mexico); Caldiño, U., E-mail: cald@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, PO Box 55-534, México City 09340, Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2014-09-15

    A spectroscopic analysis of sodium germanate glasses activated with Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+}/Tb{sup 3+} is performed from their photoluminescence spectra and decay times. In the Eu{sup 3+}-singly doped glass reddish-orange light emission, with x=0.64 and y=0.35 CIE1931 chromaticity coordinates, is obtained upon Eu{sup 3+} excitation at 393 nm. Such chromaticity coordinates are close to those (0.67, 0.33) proposed by the National Television Standard Committee for the red phosphor. When the sodium germanate glass is co-doped with Tb{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} greenish-yellow light emission, with (0.41, 0.46) CIE1931 chromaticity coordinates, is obtained upon Tb{sup 3+} excitation at 344 nm. Such greenish-yellow luminescence is due mainly to the terbium {sup 5}D{sub 4}→{sup 7}F{sub 6,5} and europium {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub 1,2} emissions, Eu{sup 3+} being sensitized by Tb{sup 3+} through a non-radiative energy transfer. The non-radiative nature of this energy transfer is inferred from the increase in the decay rate of the Tb{sup 3+} emission when the glass is co-doped with Eu{sup 3+}. From an analysis of the Tb{sup 3+} emission decay time curves it is inferred that such energy transfer might take place between Tb{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} clusters through a short-range interaction mechanism. - Highlights: • Sodium germanate glasses are optically activated with Eu{sup 3+} (GNE) and Tb{sup 3+}/Eu{sup 3+} (GNTE). • Reddish-orange light (0.64, 0.35) is generated by GNE pumped with 393 nm light. • Greenish-yellow light (0.41, 0.46) is generated by GNTE pumped with 344 nm light. • Non-radiative energy transfer Tb{sup 3+}→Eu{sup 3+} takes place in GNTE.

  14. Fracture resistance of aluminium oxide and lithium disilicate-based crowns using different luting cements: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wahadni, Ahed M; Hussey, David L; Grey, Nicholas; Hatamleh, Muhanad M

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fracture resistance of two types of ceramic crowns cemented with two different cements. Forty premolar crowns were fabricated using lithium-disilicate (IPS Empress-2) and glass-infiltrated aluminium-oxide (In-Ceram) ceramic systems. The crowns were divided into four groups (n=10) with Group 1 (IPS Empress-2) and Group 2 (In-Ceram) cemented with glass ionomer cement. Group 3 (IPS Empress-2) and Group 4 (In-Ceram) were cemented with resin cement. Crowns were tested in a universal testing machine at a compressive-load speed of 10 mm/min. Fracture modes were grouped into five categories. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni post-hoc tests were used to detect statistical significances (p0.05) on fracture resistance within each ceramic system tested. In-Ceram crowns cemented with either glass ionomer or resin cements exhibited a statistically significantly higher fracture-resistance than IPS Empress-2 crowns (pEmpress-2 and In-Ceram crowns was not affected by the type of cement used for luting. Both In-Ceram and IPS Empress-2 crowns can be successfully luted with the cements tested with In-Ceram exhibiting higher fracture resistance than IPS Empress-2.

  15. Marginal and internal fit of pressed lithium disilicate inlays fabricated with milling, 3D printing, and conventional technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsy, Foudda R; Özcan, Mutlu; Khoury, Marwan; Majzoub, Zeina A K

    2017-09-29

    The subtractive and additive computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) of lithium disilicate partial coverage restorations is poorly documented. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the marginal and internal fit accuracy of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic inlays fabricated with conventional, milled, and 3-dimensional (3D) printed wax patterns. A dentoform mandibular first molar was prepared for a mesio-occlusal ceramic inlay. Five groups of 15 inlays were obtained through conventional impression and manual wax pattern (group CICW); conventional impression, laboratory scanning of the stone die, CAD-CAM milled wax blanks (group CIDW) or 3D printed wax patterns (group CI3DW); and scanning of the master preparation with intraoral scanner and CAD-CAM milled (group DIDW) or 3D printed wax patterns (group DI3DW). The same design was used to produce the wax patterns in the last 4 groups. The replica technique was used to measure marginal and internal adaptation by using stereomicroscopy. Mixed-model ANOVA was used to assess differences according to the groups and discrepancy location (α=.05). Group DIDW showed the smallest marginal discrepancy (24.3 μm) compared with those of groups CICW (45.1 μm), CIDW (33.7 μm), CI3DW (39.8 μm), and DI3DW (39.7 μm) (Pimpressions and subtractive milling of wax patterns resulted in better marginal and internal fit accuracy than either conventional impression/fabrication or additive 3D manufacturing. Three-dimensional printed wax patterns yielded fit values similar to those of the conventionally waxed inlays. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of aluminum and silicon reactants and process parameters on glass-ceramic waste form characteristics for immobilization of high-level fluorinel-sodium calcined waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1993-06-01

    In this report, the effects of aluminum and silicon reactants, process soak time and the initial calcine particle size on glass-ceramic waste form characteristics for immobilization of the high-level fluorinel-sodium calcined waste stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) are investigated. The waste form characteristics include density, total and normalized elemental leach rates, and microstructure. Glass-ceramic waste forms were prepared by hot isostatically pressing (HIPing) a pre-compacted mixture of pilot plant fluorinel-sodium calcine, Al, and Si metal powders at 1050 degrees C, 20,000 psi for 4 hours. One of the formulations with 2 wt % Al was HIPed for 4, 8, 16 and 24 hours at the same temperature and pressure. The calcine particle size range include as calcined particle size smaller than 600 μm (finer than -30 mesh, or 215 μm Mass Median Diameter, MMD) and 180 μm (finer than 80 mesh, or 49 μm MMD)

  17. The effect of electron irradiation on the structure and iron speciation in sodium aluminum (iron) phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanovsky, S.V., E-mail: serge.stefanovsky@yandex.ru [Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry RAS (Russian Federation); Presniakov, I.A.; Sobolev, A.V.; Glazkova, I.S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Kadyko, M.I.; Stefanovsky, O.I. [Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry RAS (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-01

    The effect of 8 MeV electron irradiation on the structure of glasses in the series 40 Na{sub 2}O, (20-x) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, x Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 40 P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (mol.%) and on the iron speciation in these samples was studied by FTIR and Mössbauer spectroscopic techniques. Irradiation up to a dose of 1.0 MGy has no appreciable effects on the character of the bonds within anionic motif of the glass network. Electron irradiation increases the fraction of aluminum in octahedral coordination. Iron in both unirradiated and irradiated glasses is present mainly as Fe(III) (60–75% of the total amount) in the glasses and partly as Fe(II) and the ratio of two forms remains constant up to a dose of 1.0 MGy.

  18. Thermal stability and Judd-Ofelt analysis of optical properties of Sm3+-doped sodium tellurite glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawlud, Saman Q.; Ameena, Mudhafar M.; Sahar, Md. Rahim; Mahraz, Zahra A. Said; Ahmed, Kasim Fawzy

    2017-09-01

    Series of glasses based on (70-x) TeO2 - 20Na2O - xSm2O3 (x=0, 0.3, 0.6, 1, 1.2, 1.5 mol%) have been prepared using melt-quenching technique. The nature of the glass has been confirmed using X-ray diffraction; it is found that the glass samples are amorphous in nature. The thermal stability of the glass has been determined by means of Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). From the DTA curve, the glass transition temperature (Tg), crystallization temperature (Tc) and melting temperature (Tm) have been identified and thermal stability is also calculated. The absorption properties of these samples are obtained by using UV-Visible-NIR spectrometer, the recorded absorption spectra exhibit nine absorption transition bands peaks corresponding to the transitions from ground level 6H5/2→6P3/2, 4I11/2, 6F11/2, 6F9/2, 6F7/2, 6F5/2, 6F3/2, 6H15/2 and 6F1/2. The emission characteristic of this glass is characterized using Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy at excited wavelength 404 nm, the emission spectra consisted of four emission bands at 561.95 nm, 598.69 nm, 643.77 nm and 704.56 nm which were assigned as a transition 4G5/2→6H5/2, 6H7/2, 6H9/2 and 6H11/2 respectively. From f-f intensity model the experimental oscillator strengths, fexp and theoretical oscillator strength fcal were calculated. Using Judd-Ofelt theory and fit process of least square, the phenomenological intensity parameters Ωλ (λ=2,4,6) were obtained, In order to evaluate potential applications of Sm3+ ions in telluride glasses, the spectroscopic parameters: transition probability AR, branching ratio Br, radiative life time τr, emission pick cross section σλ for each band were calculated. The comparative studies with other Sm3+ doped different glasses showed that present glasses could be a potential candidate for lasers.

  19. [Microstructure and mechanical property of a new IPS-Empress 2 dental glass-ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao-ping; Watts, D C; Wilson, N H F; Silsons, N; Cheng, Ya-qin

    2005-03-01

    To investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties of a new IPS-Empress 2 dental glass-ceramic. AFM, SEM and XRD were used to analyze the microstructure and crystal phase of IPS-Empress 2 glass-ceramic. The flexural strength and fracture toughness were tested using 3-point bending method and indentation method respectively. IPS-Empress 2 glass-ceramic mainly consisted of lithium disilicate crystal, lithium phosphate and glass matrix, which formed a continuous interlocking structure. The crystal phases were not changed before and after hot-pressed treatment. AFM showed nucleating agent particles of different sizes distributed on the highly polished ceramic surface. The strength and fracture toughness were 300 MPa and 3.1 MPam(1/2). The high strength and fracture toughness of IPS-Empress 2 glass ceramic are attributed to the fine lithium disilicate crystalline, interlocking microstructure and crack deflection.

  20. Properties of lithium disilicate reinforced with ZrO{sub 2} (3mol%Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}; Propriedades de dissilicato de litio reforcado com ZrO{sub 2} (3mol%Y{sub 2}O{sub 3})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, M.F.R.P.; Cossu, C.M.F.A.; Santos, C., E-mail: manuelfellipealves@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Tecnologia; Silva, C.L.M. [Centro Universitario de Volta Redonda (UniFOA), Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil); Simba, B.G. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia; Fernandes, M.H.F. [Universidade de Aveiro (Portugal)

    2016-07-01

    The new generation of dental ceramics based on lithium disilicate, Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}, allows the production of restorative prosthetic with reduced times compared to alumina and / or zirconia (Y-TZP). A great limitation of their use is related low fracture strength of such glass-ceramics, which reduces their use in unit fixed prosthesis. In this work, lithium disilicate reinforced with 10% ZrO{sub 2} (3-mol% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is characterized by relative density, crystalline phase, hardness, fracture toughness and microstructural aspects. Lithium metasilicate and tetragonal zirconia, prior to heat treatment. After thermal treatment under vacuum at 840 deg C-8min the lithium metasilicate is converted to lithium disilicate as the ZrO{sub 2} phase remains in the tetragonal structure. This maintenance of the tetragonal phase ensures the material a good fracture toughness, reaching average values near 2MPam{sup 1/2}, while the average hardness of 600HV. Morphological analysis of the samples indicates that ZrO{sub 2} particles are uniformly dispersed in the matrix composed of high aspect ratio lithium disilicate grains, which contributes to the results presented.. A critical analysis of the performance of toughening mechanisms such as cracks deflection, phase transformation of ZrO{sub 2} (T-M), residual stress between the matrix and the reinforcement are presented, discussed and compared with other ceramic materials used in dentistry restorer. (author)

  1. Spectroscopic investigations of OH- influence on near-infrared fluorescence quenching of Yb3+/Tm3+ co-doped sodium-metaphosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terra, I.A.A.; Camargo, A.S.S. de; Terrile, M.C.; Nunes, L.A.O.

    2008-01-01

    Energy transfer processes were studied in two sets of Yb 3+ and Tm 3+ co-doped sodium-metaphosphate glasses, prepared in air and nitrogen atmospheres. Using Foerster, Dexter, and Miyakawa theoretical models, the energy transfer parameters were calculated. The main ion-ion energy transfer processes analyzed were energy migration among Yb 3+ ions, cross-relaxations between Yb 3+ and Tm 3+ ions, and interactions with OH - radicals. The results indicated that Yb→Tm energy transfer favors 1.8 μm emissions, and there is no evidence of concentration quenching up to 2% Tm 2 O 3 doping. As expected, samples prepared in nitrogen atmosphere present higher fluorescence quantum efficiency than those prepared in air, and this feature is specially noted in the near-infrared region, where the interaction with the OH - radicals is more pronounced

  2. Glass transition dynamics and conductivity scaling in ionic deep eutectic solvents: The case of (acetamide + lithium nitrate/sodium thiocyanate) melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathy, Satya N., E-mail: satyanarayantripathy@gmail.com; Wojnarowska, Zaneta; Knapik, Justyna; Paluch, Marian [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Silesian Center for Education and Interdisciplinary Research, 75 Pulku Piechoty 1A, 41-500 Chorzow (Poland); Shirota, Hideaki [Department of Nanomaterial Science and Department of Chemistry, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Biswas, Ranjit [Department of Chemical, Biological and Macromolecular Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India)

    2015-05-14

    A detailed investigation on the molecular dynamics of ionic deep eutectic solvents (acetamide + lithium nitrate/sodium thiocyanate) is reported. The study was carried out employing dielectric relaxation spectroscopy covering seven decades in frequency (10{sup −1}-10{sup 6} Hz) and in a wide temperature range from 373 K down to 173 K, accessing the dynamic observables both in liquid and glassy state. The dielectric response of the ionic system has been presented in the dynamic window of modulus formalism to understand the conductivity relaxation and its possible connection to the origin of localized motion. Two secondary relaxation processes appear below glass transition temperature. Our findings provide suitable interpretation on the nature of secondary Johari-Goldstein process describing the ion translation and orientation of dipoles in a combined approach using Ngai’s coupling model. A nearly constant loss feature is witnessed at shorter times/lower temperatures. We also discuss the ac conductivity scaling behavior using Summerfield approach and random free energy barrier model which establish the time-temperature superposition principle. These experimental observations have fundamental importance on theoretical elucidation of the conductivity relaxation and glass transition phenomena in molten ionic conductors.

  3. Role of valence state of vanadium ions on structural and spectroscopic properties of sodium lead bismuth silicate glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. V. Sambasiva; Tirupataiah, Ch.; Kumar, A. Suneel; Narendrudu, T.; Suresh, S.; Ram, G. Chinna; Rao, D. Krishna

    2018-04-01

    Glass ceramics with composition 10Na2O- 30PbO-10Bi2O3-(50-x)SiO2: xV2O5 (0 ≤ x ≤ 5) were synthesized by melt quenching and heat treatment method. XRD and SEM studies have indicated that the samples contain well defined and randomly distributed grains of different crystalline phases. Optical absorption spectra of these samples exhibited two absorption bands at 629 and 835 nm which are the characteristics of V4+ ions. The EPR spectra of these samples have exhibited well resolved hyperfine structure consisting of sixteen-eight parallel and eight perpendicular lines with a raise in their intensity with an increase in the content of V2O5 up to 3 mol% indicates the increase of redox ratio V4+/V5+ in the glass ceramic matrix.

  4. Marginal Integrity of Glass Ionomer and All Ceramic Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    North Carolina), scanned by the CEREC Omnicam , and milled by CEREC inLab MC XL system. 15 List of Procedures in Chronological Order 1. The...Fuji II LC, GC America, Alsip, Illinois). Forty lithium disilicate porcelain ceramic inlays will be milled from CEREC Block PC (Sirona, Charlotte...evolution of the CEREC system. Journal of the American Dental Association, 137, 7s-13s. Mount G.J. (1991). Adhesion of glass-ionomer cement in the clinical

  5. Transient and residual stresses in a pressable glass-ceramic before and after resin-cement coating determined using profilometry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-05-01

    The effect of heat-pressing and subsequent pre-cementation (acid-etching) and resin-cementation operative techniques on the development of transient and residual stresses in different thicknesses of a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic were characterised using profilometry prior to biaxial flexure strength (BFS) determination.

  6. Crystallization kinetic study of the lithium-disilicate bioceramic obtained from rice-husk silica starting powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, F.A.; Santos, C.; Pinatti, D.G.; Davim, E.; Fernandes, M.H.F.V.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the study of crystallization of the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic produced for alternative source (rice husk silica), and comparatively by commercial source (commercial silica) it was carried through. The stoichiometry 66%.mol SiO_2: 33%.mol LiO_2 was used. The kinetic studies of crystallization and calculations had been carried through thermal analysis (DTA), and were possible to study the behavior of the curves in accordance with the variation of taxes (5; 10; 15; e 20°C/min), of the granulometries 63 μm, 250μm and 1mm), and for the influence of the substitution commercial SiO_2 by rice husk. The structural characterization was carried through by X-Ray diffractometry (DRX) and scanning electron microscopy (MEV), for chemical characterization used X-Ray fluorescence (FRX). The preliminary results show that the substitution of the silica source is sufficiently promising, since the gotten properties are similar. (author)

  7. Fracture Strength of Titanium based Lithium Disilicate and Zirconia Abutment Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-12

    zirconia abutment/lithium-disilicate crown. INTRODUCTION Dental implants and the use of esthetic abutments are widely practiced procedures for dentists...first implant abutments were fabricated from metals of mostly gold or titanium alloy. The downside of these materials, especially in esthetic areas...abutments presented esthetic complications. Because dentists and patients desire more naturally appearing restorations, the dental manufacturers

  8. Structural change of NaO1/2-WO3-NbO5/2-LaO3/2-PO5/2 glass induced by electrochemical substitution of sodium ions with protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, Tomohiro; Yamaguchi, Takuya; Nishii, Junji; Yamashita, Toshiharu; Kawazoe, Hiroshi; Kuwata, Naoaki; Kawamura, Junichi; Omata, Takahisa

    2015-05-28

    Structural changes of 35NaO1/2-1WO3-8NbO5/2-5LaO3/2-51PO5/2 glass (1W-glass) before and after the electrochemical substitution of sodium ions with protons by alkali-proton substitution (APS) are studied by Raman and (31)P magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopies. The glass before APS consists of (PO3(-))8.6(P2O7(4-)) chains on average and the terminal Q(1) units (-O-PO3(3-)) are bound to MO6 octahedra (M denotes niobium or tungsten) through P-O-M bonds. Some non-bridging oxygens (NBOs) in the MO6 octahedra are present in addition to the bridging oxygens (BOs) in P-O-M bonds. APS induces fragmentation of the phosphate chains because the average chain length decreases to (PO3(-))3.7(P2O7(4-)) after APS, despite the total number of modifier cations of sodium and lanthanum ions and protons being unaffected by APS. This fragmentation is induced by some of the NBOs in the MO6 octahedra before APS, changing to BOs of the newly formed M-O-P bonds after APS, because of the preferential formation of P-OH bonds over M-OH ones in the present glass. We show that APS under the conditions used here is not a simple substitution of sodium ions with protons, but it is accompanied by the structural relaxation of the glass to stabilize the injected protons.

  9. Properties and Clinical Application of Three Types of Dental Glass-Ceramics and Ceramics for CAD-CAM Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzberger, Christian; Apel, Elke; Höland, Wolfram; Peschke, Arnd; Rheinberger, Volker M.

    2010-01-01

    The main properties (mechanical, thermal and chemical) and clinical application for dental restoration are demonstrated for three types of glass-ceramics and sintered polycrystalline ceramic produced by Ivoclar Vivadent AG. Two types of glass-ceramics are derived from the leucite-type and the lithium disilicate-type. The third type of dental materials represents a ZrO2 ceramic. CAD/CAM technology is a procedure to manufacture dental ceramic restoration. Leucite-type glass-ceramics demonstrate high translucency, preferable optical/mechanical properties and an application as dental inlays, onlays and crowns. Based on an improvement of the mechanical parameters, specially the strength and toughness, the lithium disilicate glass-ceramics are used as crowns; applying a procedure to machine an intermediate product and producing the final glass-ceramic by an additional heat treatment. Small dental bridges of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic were fabricated using a molding technology. ZrO2 ceramics show high toughness and strength and were veneered with fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. Machining is possible with a porous intermediate product.

  10. Fit of lithium disilicate crowns fabricated from conventional and digital impressions assessed with micro-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Jeong, Ji-Hye; Lee, Jin-Han; Cho, Hye-Won

    2016-10-01

    Although the number of lithium disilicate crowns fabricated with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology has increased, the accuracy of the prostheses produced by using digital pathways remains unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare marginal and internal discrepancies of lithium disilicate crowns fabricated from digital and conventional impressions. A typodont mandibular first molar was prepared for a lithium disilicate crown, and 20 duplicate dies were fabricated by milling poly(methyl methacrylate) resin blocks from laboratory scans. Four groups of 5 lithium disilicate crowns each were created by using a CS3500 (Carestream Dental) intraoral digital impression; Trios (3shape) intraoral digital impression; Ceramill Map400 (Amann Girrbach) extraoral digital impression; and a heat-press technique as a control group. All of the IPS e.max CAD (Ivoclar Vivadent AG) crowns were produced using a 5-axis milling engine (Ceramill Motion2). The lithium disilicate crowns were cemented with zinc phosphate cement under finger pressure. Marginal and internal discrepancies were measured using micro-computed tomography (SkyScan1172). One-way ANOVAs with the Tukey honest significant differences test were used for statistical analysis of the data (α=.05). The mean marginal discrepancies of CS3500 lithium disilicate crowns were 129.6 μm, 200.9 μm for Ceramill Map400, and 207.8 μm 176.1 μm for the heat-press technique; and the internal discrepancy volumes for CS3500 were 25.3 mm 3 , 40.7 mm 3 for Trios, 29.1 mm 3 for Ceramill Map400, and 29.1 and 31.4 mm 3 for the heat-press technique. The CS3500 group showed a significantly better marginal discrepancy than the other 3 groups and a smaller internal discrepancy volume than the Trios group (Pdigital impressions, whereas no differences were found between IPS e.max CAD crowns produced from an extraoral digital impression and IPS e.max Press crowns produced using a heat

  11. Strength and microstructure of IPS Empress 2 glass-ceramic after different treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S C; Dong, J K; Lüthy, H; Schärer, P

    2000-01-01

    This investigation was designed to determine whether heat pressing and/or simulated heat treatments affect the flexure strength and microstructure of the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic of the IPS Empress 2 system. Four groups of the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic were prepared as follows: group 1 = as-received material; group 2 = heat-pressed material; group 3 = heat-pressed and stimulated initial heat-treated material; and group 4 = heat-pressed and simulated heat-treated material with full firings for a final restoration. Three-point bending tests and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis were conducted. The flexure strength of group 2 was significantly higher than that of group 1. However, there were no significant differences in strength among groups 2, 3, and 4, or between groups 1 and 4. The SEM micrographs of the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic showed a closely packed, multidirectionally interlocking microstructure of numerous lithium disilicate crystals protruding from the glass matrix. The crystals in the glass matrix of the heat-pressed materials (groups 2, 3, and 4) were a little more homogeneous and about 2 times bigger than those of the as-received material (group 1). These changes of the microstructure were greatest between groups 1 and 2. However, there were no marked differences among groups 2, 3, and 4. Although there were significant increases in the strength and some changes of the microstructure after the heat-pressing operation, the combination of heat pressing and simulated subsequent heat treatments did not produce an increase of strength of IPS Empress 2 glass-ceramic.

  12. Mechanical properties of zirconia reinforced lithium silicate glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E; Elnaghy, Amr M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the mechanical properties of recently introduced zirconia reinforced lithium silicate glass-ceramic. Two types of CAD/CAM glass-ceramics (Vita Suprinity (VS); zirconia reinforced lithium silicate and IPS e.max CAD (IC); lithium disilicate) were used. Fracture toughness, flexural strength, elastic modulus, hardness, brittleness index, and microstructures were evaluated. Data were analyzed using independent t tests. Weibull analysis of flexural strength data was also performed. VS had significantly higher fracture toughness (2.31±0.17MPam(0.5)), flexural strength (443.63±38.90MPa), elastic modulus (70.44±1.97GPa), and hardness (6.53±0.49GPa) than IC (Pglass-ceramic revealed significantly a higher brittleness index (2.84±0.26μm(-1/2)) (lower machinability) than IC glass-ceramic (Pglass-ceramic revealed a lower probability of failure and a higher strength than IC glass-ceramic according to Weibull analysis. The VS zirconia reinforced lithium silicate glass-ceramic revealed higher mechanical properties compared with IC lithium disilicate glass-ceramic. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Soft tissue adhesion of polished versus glazed lithium disilicate ceramic for dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunot-Gohin, C; Duval, J-L; Azogui, E-E; Jannetta, R; Pezron, I; Laurent-Maquin, D; Gangloff, S C; Egles, C

    2013-09-01

    Ceramics are widely used materials for prosthesis, especially in dental fields. Despite multiple biomedical applications, little is known about ceramic surface modifications and the resulting cell behavior at its contact. The aim of this study is to evaluate the biological response of polished versus glazed surface treatments on lithium disilicate dental ceramic. We studied a lithium disilicate ceramic (IPS e.max(®) Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) with 3 different surface treatments: raw surface treatment, hand polished surface treatment, and glazed surface treatment (control samples are Thermanox(®), Nunc). In order to evaluate the possible modulation of cell response at the surface of ceramic, we compared polished versus glazed ceramics using an organotypic culture model of chicken epithelium. Our results show that the surface roughness is not modified as demonstrated by equivalent Ra measurements. On the contrary, the contact angle θ in water is very different between polished (84°) and glazed (33°) samples. The culture of epithelial tissues allowed a very precise assessment of histocompatibility of these interfaces and showed that polished samples increased cell adhesion and proliferation as compared to glazed samples. Lithium disilicate polished ceramic provided better adhesion and proliferation than lithium disilicate glazed ceramic. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time, how it is possible to use simple surface modifications to finely modulate the adhesion of tissues. Our results will help dental surgeons to choose the most appropriate surface treatment for a specific clinical application, in particular for the ceramic implant collar. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Shear Bond Strength of Resin Buttons to Lithium Disilicate and Leucite Reinforced Feldspathic Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    utilizing enamel bonding procedures. These fixed orthodontic appliances are the gold standard in orthodontic treatment and can be used to correct... enamel of teeth. When this same procedure needs to be done on a restorative material such as lithium disilicate, or leucite reinforced feldspathic...toughness from its crystal size and orientation which causes cracks to deflect instead of propagate. The second material being tested, IPS Empress

  15. Crystallization in Y-Si-Al-O-N glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leng-Ward, G; Lewis, M H

    1985-05-01

    The development of crystallization in oxynitride glasses has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray (energy-dispersive) microanalysis, and powder X-ray diffraction techniques. A series of glasses was prepared while maintaining the ratio of yttrium-to-silicon-to-aluminium, but replacing oxygen with nitrogen up to the nitrogen solubility limit. On annealing at 1250 C, the oxide glass fully crystallized into yttrium disilicate (Y2Si2O7). Al2O3 and mullite (Al6Si2O13) while, with increasing nitrogen content, the disilicate phase was progressively replaced by yttrium aluminium garnet (Y3Al5O12) and nitrogen was mainly incorporated into Si2N2O. Annealing of the nitrogen glasses at 1100 C produced partial crystallization involving an intermediate phase related to nitrogen-wollastonite. Phase separation in an as-quenched SiO2-rich Y-Si-Al-O composition glass is illustrated. 9 references.

  16. Activity of NaOH buffered by silicate solids in molten sodium acetate-water at 3170C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weres, O.; Tsao, L.

    1988-01-01

    Silica and sodium acetate are present in the steam generator tube sheet crevices of many nuclear power plants. Trace solutes in the condensate are tremendously concentrated in the crevices by boiling. Sparingly soluble sodium silicates and other solids precipitate from the crevice liquid leaving an extremely concentrated molten mixture of water, sodium acetate and other salts. The precipitates buffer the activity of sodium hydroxide in the superheated liquid that remains. The activity of NaOH corresponding to the buffers quartz/sodium disilicate and sodium disilicate/sodium metasilicate at 317 0 C has been determined experimentally. The sodium hydroxide content of a sodium acetate-water melt buffered by these reactions was determined by chemical analysis, and the corresponding activity of NaOH at temperature was calculated using the recently published Pitzer-Simonson Model of molten salt-water mixtures. The molten mixture of sodium acetate and water plays the role solvent in these experiments and calculations. The free energies of formation of solid sodium silicates at 317 0 C were also determined. The activity of NaOH corresponding to other silicate and phosphate buffers was calculated using published thermodynamic data and estimated from phase diagrams

  17. Preliminary study in development of glass-ceramic based on SiO2-LiO2 system, starting of different SiO2 starting powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daguano, J.K.M.F.; Santos, F.A.; Santos, C.; Marton, L.F.M.; Conte, R.A.; Rodrigues Junior, D.; Melo, F.C.L.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, lithium disilicate glass-ceramics were developed starting of the rice ash- SiO 2 and Li 2 CO 3 powders. The results were compared with glass ceramics based on the lithium disilicate obtained by commercial SiO 2 powders. Glass were melted at 1580 deg C, and annealed at 850 deg C. X-Ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used for characterization of the materials, and hardness and fracture toughness were evaluated using Vickers indentation method. Glasses with amorphous structure were obtained in both materials. After annealing, 'rice-ash' samples presented Li 2 SiO 3 and residual SiO 2 as crystalline phases. On the other side, commercial SiO 2 - Samples presented only Li 2 Si 2 O 5 as crystalline phases and the better results of hardness and fracture toughness. (author)

  18. X-ray absorption spectroscopy on phosphoric-salt pellets. Determination of the geometric and electronic structure of metal-oxide doped sodium-phosphate glasses; Roentgenabsorptionsspektroskopie an Phosphorsalzperlen. Bestimmung der geometrischen und elektronischen Struktur von metalloxid-dotierten Natriumphosphatglaesern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brendebach, B.

    2004-02-01

    Sodium metaphosphate glasses doped with transition metal oxides show characteristic colors. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) investigations provide information whether the coloration stems from different electronic transitions or changes in the geometrical structure of the glasses. Even though the violet color of MnO{sub y}-doped glasses is considered as an evidence for Mn{sup 3+}-ions, Mn K-XAS reveals that the majority of the manganese ions are in the oxidation state +II and have a mixed coordination of four and six oxygen atoms, respectively. The oxygen coordination around the nickel ions in NiO-doped glasses with different metall oxide concentrations is always six. The change of color from citreous to auburn with increasing nickel oxide content is attributed to a systematic change in the bonding characteristic from mainly ionic-like to a small but significant contribution of covalent-like bonding. Analysis of higher coordination shells provides no indication of the formation of metal oxide clusters. (orig.)

  19. Manufacture, characterisation and properties of novel fluorcanasite glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollington, Sarah; van Noort, Richard

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the manufacture and characterisation of different compositions of fluorcanasite glass-ceramics with reduced fluorine content and to assess their mechanical and physical properties. Three compositional variations (S80, S81 and S82) of a fluorcanasite glass were investigated. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) identified crystallisation temperatures and phases. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) determined the element composition in the glass-ceramics. Different heat treatments [2 h nucleation and either 2 or 4 h crystallisation] were used for the glasses. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examined the microstructure of the cerammed glass. The chemical solubility, biaxial flexural strength, fracture toughness, hardness and brittleness index of S81 and S82 fluorcanasite were investigated with lithium disilicate (e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent) as a commercial comparison. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA with Tukey's multiple comparison tests (Pglasses. XRD analysis confirmed fluorcanasite formation with the S81 and S82 compositions, with the S82 (2+2h) showing the most prominent crystal structure. The chemical solubility of the glass-ceramics was significantly different, varying from 2565 ± 507 μg/cm(2) for the S81 (2+2 h) to 722 ± 177 μg/cm(2) for the S82 (2+2 h) to 37.4 ± 25.2 μg/cm(2) for the lithium disilicate. BFS values were highest for the S82 (2+2 h) composition (250 ± 26 MPa) and lithium disilicate (266 ± 37 MPa) glass-ceramics. The fracture toughness was higher for the S82 compositions, with the S82 (2+2h) attaining the highest value of 4.2 ± 0.3 MPa m(1/2)(P=0.01). The S82 (2+2 h) fluorcanasite glass-ceramic had the lowest brittleness index. The S82 (2+2 h) fluorcanasite glass-ceramic has acceptable chemical solubility, high biaxial flexural strength, fracture toughness and hardness. A novel glass-ceramic has been developed with potential as a restorative material. The

  20. Effect of various additives on microstructure, mechanical properties, and in vitro bioactivity of sodium oxide-calcium oxide-silica-phosphorus pentoxide glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H C; Wang, D G; Hu, J H; Chen, C Z

    2013-09-01

    The partial substitution of MgO, TiO2, or CaF2 for CaO in the Na2O-CaO-SiO2-P2O5 (45S5) system was conducted by the sol-gel method and a comparative study on structural, mechanical properties, and bioactivity of the glasses was reported. Based on thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis, the gels were sintered with a suitable heat treatment procedure. The glass-ceramic properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and so on, and the bioactivity of the glass-ceramic was evaluated by in vitro assays in simulated body fluid (SBF). Results indicate that with the partial substitution of MgO, TiO2, CaF2 for CaO in glass composition, the mechanical properties of the glass-ceramics have been significantly improved. Furthermore, CaF2 promotes glass crystallization and the crystallization does not inhibit the glass-ceramic bioactivity. All samples possess bioactivity; however, the bioactivity of these glass-ceramics is quite different. Compared with 45S5, the introduction of MgO decreases the ability of apatite induction. The addition of TiO2 does not significantly improve the bioactivity, and the replacement of CaO by CaF2 shows a higher bioactivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of different resin luting cements on the marginal fit of lithium disilicate pressed crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounajjed, Radek; Salinas, Thomas J; Ingr, Tomas; Azar, Basel

    2017-11-15

    The vertical marginal discrepancy of restorations can increase upon cementation, and poor marginal fit can lead to cement dissolution, marginal discoloration, microleakage, and secondary caries. The amount of increase is related to the type of luting cement used, but how lithium disilicate pressed crowns are affected by different resin cements is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effect of using different resin luting cements on the vertical marginal discrepancy of lithium disilicate pressed crowns. A total of 18 intact extracted mandibular third molars were disinfected in a solution of 10% formalin for 7 days and were then prepared to receive a ceramic crown. Impressions were made with polyvinyl siloxane and lithium disilicate pressed crowns made and cemented with 1 of 3 resin luting cements. The marginal discrepancy was measured at 4 points on the finishing line of each tooth, with optical microscopy at ×200 magnification before and after cementation. Statistical analysis was done with the Kruskal-Wallis test to compare the median marginal increase among the 3 groups. The least amount of marginal increase after cementation was with Harvard PremiumFlow cement, with an average marginal increase of 42 ±11 μm. RelyX Ultimate cement increased the margins by an average 45 ±29 μm. The highest marginal increase was found in the Enamel Plus HRi preheated composite resin group (116 ±47 μm). The marginal increase of pressed crowns cemented with preheated composite resin (Enamel Plus HRi) exceeded the clinically acceptable range of marginal discrepancy. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Phase separation, clustering, and fractal characteristics in glass: A magic-angle-spinning NMR spin-lattice relaxation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, S.; Stebbins, J. F.

    1994-07-01

    A comparative study of the 29Si spin-lattice relaxation behavior (induced by trace amounts of paramagnetic dopants in the glass) in phase-separated Li2Si4O9 and monophasic Li2Si2O5 and Na2Si2O5 glasses has been made in order to understand the nature of clustering and the resulting intermediate-range ordering. Optically clear tetrasilicate and disilicate glasses were prepared with 500 to 2000 ppm of Gd2O3, a paramagnetic dopant. The constituent structural units (Q3 and Q4 species) in all tetrasilicate glasses show strong differential relaxation following a power-law behavior. This is due to preferential partitioning of Gd3+ into the lower silica (Q3-rich) regions of these glasses, indicating the presence of Q species clusters too small to produce optical opalescence (a few nm to perhaps tens of nm). Preliminary results on 6Li spin-lattice relaxation in these glasses support this hypothesis. Differential relaxation becomes more pronounced on annealing due to growth of such clusters. No such differential relaxation was observed in the monophase disilicate glasses. For spin-lattice relaxation induced by direct dipolar coupling to paramagnetic ions, the recovery of magnetization is proportional to time as M(t)~tα where α is a function of the dimensionality D of mass distribution of the constituent Q species around the Gd3+ paramagnetic centers in the glass. For tetrasilicate glasses D~=2.62+/-0.22 and the system behaves as a mass fractal up to a length scale of 2 to 3 nm. D is thus equal to, within error, the theoretical value of 2.6 for an infinite percolation cluster of one type of Q species in another. For disilicate glasses, D~=3.06+/-0.18 which indicates a three-dimensional (and thus nonfractal) mass distribution of the constituent Q species over the same length scale.

  3. Diffusion of cesium in sodium-borosilicate glasses for nuclear waste immobilisation. Diffusie van cesium in natrium borosilicaat glazen voor het immobiliseren van radioaktief afval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, F.J.J.G.; Sengers, E.G.F. (Keuring van Electrotechnische Materialen NV, Arnhem (Netherlands)); Waal, H. de (TPD-TNO-Glass technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands))

    1989-09-26

    Diffusion of cesium in borosilicate glass for high-level radioactive waste is discussed. For this purpose model glasses with non-radioactive elements are being made, in accordance with the specifications of the reprocessing plants, from which concentration couples are composed. A concentration couple consists of two cylinders of borosilicate glass which contain different amounts of cesium. After heat treatment the couples are studied by means of the scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis. The model study will provide a basis for predictions of the containment achieved over a longer period of time. (author). 11 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs.

  4. Recent progress to understand stress corrosion cracking in sodium borosilicate glasses: linking the chemical composition to structural, physical and fracture properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountree, Cindy L.

    2017-08-01

    This topical review is dedicated to understanding stress corrosion cracking in oxide glasses and specifically the SiO_2{\\text-B_2O_3{\\text-}Na_2O} (SBN) ternary glass systems. Many review papers already exist on the topic of stress corrosion cracking in complex oxide glasses or overly simplified glasses (pure silica). These papers look at how systematically controlling environmental factors (pH, temperature...) alter stress corrosion cracking, while maintaining the same type of glass sample. Many questions still exist, including: What sets the environmental limit? What sets the velocity versus stress intensity factor in the slow stress corrosion regime (Region I)? Can researchers optimize these two effects to enhance a glass’ resistance to failure? To help answer these questions, this review takes a different approach. It looks at how systemically controlling the glass’ chemical composition alters the structure and physical properties. These changes are then compared and contrasted to the fracture toughness and the stress corrosion cracking properties. By taking this holistic approach, researchers can begin to understand the controlling factors in stress corrosion cracking and how to optimize glasses via the initial chemical composition.

  5. Disilicate Dental Ceramic Surface Preparation by 1070 nm Fiber Laser: Thermal and Ultrastructural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Fornaini

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lithium disilicate dental ceramic bonding, realized by using different resins, is strictly dependent on micro-mechanical retention and chemical adhesion. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the capability of a 1070 nm fiber laser for their surface treatment. Samples were irradiated by a pulsed fiber laser at 1070 nm with different parameters (peak power of 5, 7.5 and 10 kW, repetition rate (RR 20 kHz, speed of 10 and 50 mm/s, and total energy density from 1.3 to 27 kW/cm2 and the thermal elevation during the experiment was recorded by a fiber Bragg grating (FBG temperature sensor. Subsequently, the surface modifications were analyzed by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. With a peak power of 5 kW, RR of 20 kHz, and speed of 50 mm/s, the microscopic observation of the irradiated surface showed increased roughness with small areas of melting and carbonization. EDS analysis revealed that, with these parameters, there are no evident differences between laser-processed samples and controls. Thermal elevation during laser irradiation ranged between 5 °C and 9 °C. A 1070 nm fiber laser can be considered as a good device to increase the adhesion of lithium disilicate ceramics when optimum parameters are considered.

  6. Ten-year survival and complication rates of lithium-disilicate (Empress 2) tooth-supported crowns, implant-supported crowns, and fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Maren; Göckler, Fabian; Weber, Volker; Yildirim, Murat; Wolfart, Stefan; Edelhoff, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the clinical long-term outcome of tooth-supported crowns (SCs), implant-supported crowns (ISCs), and fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) made of a lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic framework material (IPS Empress 2). Between 1997 and 1999, a total of 184 restorations (106 SCs, 32 ISCs, 33 FDPs, and 13 diverse restorations) were placed in 73 patients. Kaplan-Meier estimation was applied for survival and chipping-free rates. Inter-group comparison of both rates was realized by a log rank test and a 2×2 contingency table. Also, SCs and FDPs were compared regarding adhesive vs. conventional cementation, and anterior vs. posterior positioning, for impact on survival. Due to 14 dropouts (34 restorations) and reasonable exclusion of 19 other restorations, the final dataset included: i) 87 SCs [37 patients, mean observation time 11.4 (±3.8)years]; ii) 17 ISCs [12 patients, mean observation time 13.3 (±2.3)years; and iii) 27 FDPs [19 patients, mean observation time 8.9 (±5.4)years]. The 10-year survival rate/chipping-free rate for SCs were 86.1%/83.4%, for ISCs 93.8%/94.1%, and for FDPs were 51.9%/90.8%. Both ISCs and SCs had a significantly higher survival than FDPs (ISCs vs. FDPs: both tests p=0.001; SCs vs. FDPs: p=0.001 and p=0.005). Differences in the chipping-free rates did not reach significance. Also, neither the cementation mode nor positioning of the restoration had an impact on survival. SCs had a slightly lower outcome than can generally be expected from single crowns. In contrast, ICSs had a favorable outcome and the FDPs predominantly failed. The practitioner's choice of dental materials is based (at best) on long-term experience. The present 10-year results are based on comprehensive data analyses and show the high potential of lithium-disilicate as a reliable material, especially for single-unit restoration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Optical properties of highly Er{sup 3+}-doped sodium-aluminium-phosphate glasses for broadband 1.5 {mu}m emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, A. Amarnath [Nanophotonics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Babu, S. Surendra [Laser Instrumentation Design Centre, Instrument Research and Development Establishment, Dehradun 248008 (India); Pradeesh, K. [Nanophotonics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Otton, C.J. [Valencia Nanophotonics Technology Center, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Vijaya Prakash, G., E-mail: prakash@physics.iitd.ac.in [Nanophotonics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2011-03-03

    Research highlights: > Highly Er{sup 3+} doped phosphate glasses for the 1.54 {mu}m laser emission were explored. > Emission from these doped glasses shows larger lifetimes and quantum efficiencies. > Optical amplifier parameters are greater than other reported phosphate glasses. > The durability and obtained results are most favourable for short-length amplifiers. - Abstract: Erbium-doped Na{sub 3}Al{sub 2}P{sub 3}O{sub 12} (NAP) glasses with compositions 92NAP-(8-x)Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-(x)Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} (where x = 2-8) were prepared and characterized for absorption, visible and NIR emission and decay time properties. Judd-Ofelt analysis has been carried out to predict radiative properties of luminescent levels of Er{sup 3+} ions. Comparatively larger photoluminescence lifetimes (7.86 ms) and larger quantum efficiencies (74%) for the laser transition, {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} {yields} {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} (at 1.54 {mu}m) are observed. The moisture insensitivity, large Er{sup 3+} ion doping capability and relatively high-gain and broad emission at 1.5 {mu}m are the most notable features of these glasses to realize efficient short-length optical amplifiers.

  8. Real time neutron diffraction and NMR of the Empress II glass-ceramic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, M D; Hill, R G; Karpukhina, N; Law, R V

    2011-10-01

    This study reports real time neutron diffraction on the Empress II glass-ceramic system. The commercial glass-ceramics was characterized by real time neutron diffraction, ³¹P and ²⁹Si solid-state MAS-NMR, DSC and XRD. On heating, the as-received glass ceramic contained lithium disilicate (Li₂Si₂O₅), which melted with increasing temperature. This was revealed by neutron diffraction which showed the Bragg peaks for this phase had disappeared by 958°C in agreement with thermal analysis. On cooling lithium metasilicate (Li₂SiO₃) started to form at around 916°C and a minor phase of cristobalite at around 852°C. The unit cell volume of both Li-silicate phases increased linearly with temperature at a rate of +17×10⁻³ ų.°C⁻¹. Room temperature powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the material after cooling confirms presence of the lithium metasilicate and cristobalite as the main phases and shows, in addition, small amount of lithium disilicate and orthophosphate. ³¹P MAS-NMR reveals presence of the lithiorthophosphate (Li₃PO₄) before and after heat treatment. The melting of lithium disilicate on heating and crystallisation of lithium metasilicate on cooling agree with endothermic and exotermic features respectively observed by DSC. ²⁹Si MAS-NMR shows presence of lithium disilicate phase in the as-received glass-ceramic, though not in the major proportion, and lithium metasilicate in the material after heat treatment. Both phases have significantly long T₁ relaxation time, especially the lithium metasilicate, therefore, a quantitative analysis of the ²⁹Si MAS-NMR spectra was not attempted. Significance. The findings of the present work demonstrate importance of the commercially designed processing parameters in order to preserve desired characteristics of the material. Processing the Empress II at a rate slower than recommended 60°C min⁻¹ or long isothermal hold at the maximal processing temperature 920°C can cause

  9. Spectroscopic investigations of OH{sup -} influence on near-infrared fluorescence quenching of Yb{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 3+} co-doped sodium-metaphosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terra, I.A.A. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense 400, CEP 13566-590, USP-Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: idelma@ifsc.usp.br; Camargo, A.S.S. de; Terrile, M.C.; Nunes, L.A.O. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense 400, CEP 13566-590, USP-Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2008-05-15

    Energy transfer processes were studied in two sets of Yb{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} co-doped sodium-metaphosphate glasses, prepared in air and nitrogen atmospheres. Using Foerster, Dexter, and Miyakawa theoretical models, the energy transfer parameters were calculated. The main ion-ion energy transfer processes analyzed were energy migration among Yb{sup 3+} ions, cross-relaxations between Yb{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} ions, and interactions with OH{sup -} radicals. The results indicated that Yb{yields}Tm energy transfer favors 1.8 {mu}m emissions, and there is no evidence of concentration quenching up to 2% Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} doping. As expected, samples prepared in nitrogen atmosphere present higher fluorescence quantum efficiency than those prepared in air, and this feature is specially noted in the near-infrared region, where the interaction with the OH{sup -} radicals is more pronounced.

  10. Simplified cementation of lithium disilicate crowns: Retention with various adhesive resin cement combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Glen H; Lepe, Xavier; Patterson, Amanda; Schäfer, Oliver

    2017-09-27

    A composite resin cement and matching self-etch adhesive was developed to simplify the dependable retention of lithium disilicate crowns. The efficacy of this new system is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether lithium disilicate crowns cemented with a new composite resin and adhesive system and 2 other popular systems provide clinically acceptable crown retention after long-term aging with monthly thermocycling. Extracted human molars were prepared with a flat occlusal surface, 20-degree convergence, and 4 mm axial length. The axio-occlusal line angle was slightly rounded. The preparation surface area was determined by optical scanning and the analysis of the standard tessellation language (STL) files. The specimens were distributed into 3 cement groups (n=12) to obtain equal mean surface areas. Lithium disilicate crowns (IPS e.max Press) were fabricated for each preparation, etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid for 15 seconds, and cleaned. Cement systems were RelyX Ultimate with Scotch Bond Universal (3M Dental Products); Monobond S, Multilink Automix with Multilink Primer A and B (Ivoclar Vivadent AG); and NX3 Nexus with OptiBond XTR (Kerr Corp). Each adhesive provided self-etching of the dentin. Before cementation, the prepared specimens were stored in 35°C water. A force of 196 N was used to cement the crowns, and the specimens were polymerized in a 35°C oven at 100% humidity. After 24 hours of storage at 100% humidity, the cemented crowns were thermocycled (5°C to 55°C) for 5000 cycles each month for 6 months. The crowns were removed axially at 0.5 mm/min. The removal force was recorded and the dislodgement stress calculated using the preparation surface area. The type of cement failure was recorded, and the data were analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and the chi-square test (α=.05) after the equality of variances had been assessed with the Levene test. The Levene test was nonsignificant (P=.936). The ANOVA revealed the mean removal

  11. Influence of Etching Protocol and Silane Treatment with a Universal Adhesive on Lithium Disilicate Bond Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalavacharla, V K; Lawson, N C; Ramp, L C; Burgess, J O

    2015-01-01

    To measure the effects of hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching and silane prior to the application of a universal adhesive on the bond strength between lithium disilicate and a resin. Sixty blocks of lithium disilicate (e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent) were sectioned into coupons and polished. Specimens were divided into six groups (n=10) based on surface pretreatments, as follows: 1) no treatment (control); 2) 5% HF etch for 20 seconds (5HF); 3) 9.5% HF etch for 60 seconds (9.5HF); 4) silane with no HF (S); 5) 5% HF for 20 seconds + silane (5HFS); and 6) 9.5% HF for 60 seconds + silane (9.5HFS). All etching was followed by rinsing, and all silane was applied in one coat for 20 seconds and then dried. The universal adhesive (Scotchbond Universal, 3M ESPE) was applied onto the pretreated ceramic surface, air thinned, and light cured for 10 seconds. A 1.5-mm-diameter plastic tube filled with Z100 composite (3M ESPE) was applied over the bonded ceramic surface and light cured for 20 seconds on all four sides. The specimens were thermocycled for 10,000 cycles (5°C-50°C/15 s dwell time). Specimens were loaded until failure using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The peak failure load was used to calculate the shear bond strength. Scanning electron microscopy images were taken of representative e.max specimens from each group. A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) determined that there were significant differences between HF etching, silane treatment, and the interaction between HF and silane treatment (puniversal adhesive.

  12. Test plan for glass melter system technologies for vitrification of hign-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid waste, Project No. RDD-43288

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higley, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a test plan for the conduct of combustion fired cyclone vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System, Low-Level Waste Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it is the Babcock ampersand Wilcox Company Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. This vendor is one of seven selected for glass melter testing

  13. Sodium distiller II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, A.C.; Castro, P.M. e; Torres, A.R.; Correa, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    A sodium distiller allows the evaluation of the sodium purity, contained in plants and circuits of Fast Reactors. The sodium distillers of the IEN Reactor's Department was developed initially as a prototype, for the testing of the distillation process and in a second step, as a equipment dedicated to attendance the operation of these circuits. This last one was build in stainless steel, with external heat, rotating crucible of nickel for four samples, purge system for pipe cleaning and a sight glass that permits the observation of the distillation during all the operation. The major advantage of this equipment is the short time to do a distillation operation, which permits its routine utilization. As a consequence of the development of the distillers and its auxiliary systems an important amount of new information was gathered concerning components and systems behaviour under high temperature, vacuum and sodium. (author)

  14. Effect of co-doping of sodium on the thermoluminescence dosimetry properties of copper-doped zinc lithium borate glass system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidu, A.; Wagiran, H.; Saeed, M.A.; Alajerami, Y.S.M.; Kadir, A.B.A.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of sodium as a co-dopant on the thermoluminescence (TL) properties of copper-doped zinc lithium borate (ZLB: Cu) subjected to Co-60 gamma radiation is reported in this study. TL intensity is enhanced with the introduction of sodium in ZLB: Cu. The obtained glow curve is simple with a single peak. The annealing procedure and the best heating rate for the proposed thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) are established, and the phosphor is reusable. The TL response within the dose range of 0.5–1000 Gy is investigated. The results show that the thermal fading behaviour is improved significantly. - Highlights: • Dosimetry properties of an improved TL dosimeter. • The dosimeter is made of lithium borate, modified with ZnO, doped with CuO and co-doped with Na 2 O. • With addition of Na to Cu in the ZLB host, TL yield and sensitivity has significantly enhanced. • The fading behaviour has also been minimized significantly. • The new material is also characterized with the linear dose response, and good reproducibility behaviour.

  15. Q(n) species distribution in K2O.2SiO2 glass by 29Si magic angle flipping NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael C; Kaseman, Derrick C; Parvani, Sahar M; Sanders, Kevin J; Grandinetti, Philip J; Massiot, Dominique; Florian, Pierre

    2010-05-06

    Two-dimensional magic angle flipping (MAF) was employed to measure the Q((n)) distribution in a (29)Si-enriched potassium disilicate glass (K(2)O.2SiO(2)). Relative concentrations of [Q((4))] = 7.2 +/- 0.3%, [Q((3))] = 82.9 +/- 0.1%, and [Q((2))] = 9.8 +/- 0.6% were obtained. Using the thermodynamic model for Q((n)) species disproportionation, these relative concentrations yield an equilibrium constant k(3) = 0.0103 +/- 0.0008, indicating, as expected, that the Q((n)) species distribution is close to binary in the potassium disilicate glass. A Gaussian distribution of isotropic chemical shifts was observed for each Q((n)) species with mean values of -82.74 +/- 0.03, -91.32 +/- 0.01, and -101.67 +/- 0.02 ppm and standard deviations of 3.27 +/- 0.03, 4.19 +/- 0.01, and 5.09 +/- 0.03 ppm for Q((2)), Q((3)), and Q((4)), respectively. Additionally, nuclear shielding anisotropy values of zeta =-85.0 +/- 1.3 ppm, eta = 0.48 +/- 0.02 for Q((2)) and zeta = -74.9 +/- 0.2 ppm, eta = 0.03 +/- 0.01 for Q((3)) were observed in the potassium disilicate glass.

  16. Energy transfer processes in Yb{sup 3+}-Tm{sup 3+} co-doped sodium alumino-phosphate glasses with improved 1.8 {mu}m emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, Andrea S S de; Terra, Idelma A A; Nunes, Luiz Antonio de O; Li, M Siu [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 13560-970, Sao Carlos-SP (Brazil)], E-mail: andreasc@ifsc.usp.br

    2008-06-25

    Sodium alumino-phosphate glasses co-doped with Yb{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} ions have been prepared with notably low OH{sup -} content, and characterized from the viewpoint of their spectroscopic properties. In these glasses, Yb{sup 3+} acts as an efficient sensitizer of excitation energy at 0.98 {mu}m-which can be provided by high power and low cost diode lasers, and subsequently undergoes non-resonant energy transfer to Tm{sup 3+} ions ({sup 2}F{sub 5/2}, {sup 3}H{sub 6} {yields} {sup 2}F{sub 7/2}, {sup 3}H{sub 5}). Through this process, the emitting level {sup 3}F{sub 4} is rapidly populated, generating improved emission at 1.8 {mu}m ({sup 3}F{sub 4} {yields} {sup 3}H{sub 6}). In order to guarantee the efficiency of such favorable energy transfer, energy losses via multiphonon decay, Yb-Yb radiative trapping, and non-radiative transfer to OH{sup -} groups were evaluated, and minimized when possible. The dipole-dipole energy transfer microscopic parameters corresponding to Yb{sup 3+} {yields} Tm{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} {yields} Yb{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} {yields} Tm{sup 3+} transfers, calculated by the Foerster-Dexter model, are C{sub Yb-Tm} = 2.9 x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}, C{sub Yb-Yb} = 42 x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} and C{sub Tm-Tm} = 43 x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}, respectively.

  17. Glass sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  18. Electrochromic Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-31

    this glass and that dipole-dipole correlations contribute to the "ferroelectric-like" character of this amorphous system. The TeO2 -W03 glasses can only...shows the dielectric constant and Fig. I(b) glass from pure TeO2 ot pure WO. In addition, glass the tan 8 of the WO glass as a function of temperature... glasses containing WO, in various glass forming nitworks of LifO-B1O0, Na:O-BzO,, and TeO2 were prepared from reagent grade oxides at 800 C - 9SO C in

  19. The Effect of Lithium Disilicate Ceramic Thickness and Translucency on Shear Bond Strength of Light-cured Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Moghaddas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To achieve acceptable clinical performance, a ceramic veneer must be bonded to enamel by well-polymerized resin cement. Among different factors, thickness and translucency of the ceramic may affect the resin cement polymerization. Thus, the current study evaluated the effect of the thickness and translucency of lithium disilicate ceramic on light-cured resin cement bond strength to enamel. Methods: In this laboratory study, 208 sound bovine incisors were equally divided into 16 groups (n = 13. The lithium disilicate ceramic cubes in four thicknesses (0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1 mm with four translucencies (high and medium opaque, high and low translucent were fabricated and bonded to prepared enamel surfaces using a light-cured translucent resin cement according to manufacturer recommendations. After 5000 cycles of thermocycling, the bonded specimens were placed in a universal testing machine and loaded to the point of fracture. To determine the mode of failure, each sample was observed under a stereomicroscope. Data were recorded and analyzed by Shapiro-Wilk test and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: The ceramic thickness and translucency could not significantly affect shear bond strength (SBS of resin cement to enamel (p = 0.17 and p = 0.097, respectively.  The Adhesive and ceramic cohesive failures were reported as the maximum and minimum mode of failure, respectively. Conclusion: The SBS of the light-cured resin cement bonding to enamel and lithium disilicate ceramic was not affected by the translucency of ceramics having a thickness of less than 1 mm.

  20. Prospective assessment of CAD/CAM zirconia abutment and lithium disilicate crown restorations: 2.4 year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lyndon F; Stanford, Clark; Feine, Jocelyne; McGuire, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Single-tooth implant restorations are commonly used to replace anterior maxillary teeth. The esthetic, functional, and biologic outcomes are, in part, a function of the abutment and crown. The purpose of this clinical study was to describe the implant, abutment, and crown survival and complication rates for CAD/CAM zirconia abutment and lithium disilicate crown restorations for single-tooth implants. As part of a broader prospective investigation that enrolled and treated 141 participants comparing tissue responses at the conical interface (CI; AstraTech OsseoSpeed), flat-to-flat interface (FI; NobelSpeedy), and platform-switch interface (PS; NanoTite Certain Prevail) of single-tooth implants, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) zirconia abutments (ATLANTIS Abutment) and cemented lithium disilicate (e.max) crowns were used in the restoration of all implants. After 2.4 years in function (3 years after implant placement), the implant, abutment, and crown of 110 participants were evaluated. Technical and biologic complications were recorded. Demographic results were tabulated as percentages with mean values and standard deviations. Abutment survival was calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. After 2.4 years, no abutments or crowns had been lost. Abutment complications (screw loosening, screw fracture, fracture) were absent for all 3 implant groups. Crown complications were limited to 2 crowns debonding and 1 with excess cement (2.5%). Five biological complications (4.0%) were recorded. The overall complication rate was 6.5%. CAD/CAM zirconia abutments restored with cemented lithium disilicate crowns demonstrated high survival on 3 different implant-abutment interface designs. No abutment or abutment screw fracture occurred. The technical complications observed after 2.4 years were minor and reversible. The use of CAD/CAM zirconia abutments with cemented lithium disilicate crowns is associated with high technical and biologic success at 2

  1. Mechanism of Phase Formation in the Batch Mixtures for Slag-Bearing Glass Ceramics - 12207

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanovsky, Sergey V.; Stefanovsky, Olga I.; Malinina, Galina A. [SIA Radon, 7th Rostovskii lane 2/14, Moscow 119121 (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Slag surrogate was produced from chemicals by heating to 900 deg. C and keeping at this temperature for 1 hr. The product obtained was intermixed with either sodium di-silicate (75 wt.% waste loading) or borax (85 wt.% slag loading). The mixtures were heat-treated within a temperature range of 25 to 1300 deg. C. The products were examined by X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. The products prepared at temperatures of up to 1000 deg. C contained both phase typical of the source slag and intermediate phases as well as phases typical of the materials melted at 1350 deg. C such as nepheline, britholite, magnetite and matrix vitreous phase. Vitrification process in batch mixtures consisting of slag surrogate and either sodium di-silicate or sodium tetraborate runs through formation of intermediate phases mainly silico-phosphates capable to incorporate Sm as trivalent actinides surrogate. Reactions in the batch mixtures are in the whole completed by ∼1000 deg. C but higher temperatures are required to homogenize the products. If in the borate-based system the mechanism is close to simple dissolution of slag constituents in the low viscous borate melt, then in the silicate-based system the mechanism was found to be much complicated and includes re-crystallization during melting with segregation of newly-formed nepheline type phase. (authors)

  2. Digital workflow for virtually designing and milling ceramic lithium disilicate veneers: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandinejad, A; Lin, W S; Atarodi, M; Abdel-Azim, T; Metz, M J; Morton, D

    2015-01-01

    Laminate veneers have been routinely used to restore and enhance the appearance of natural dentition. The traditional pathway for fabricating veneers consisted of making conventional polyvinyl siloxane impressions, producing stone casts, and fabricating final porcelain prostheses on stone dies. Pressed ceramics have successfully been used for laminate veneer fabrication for several years. Recently, digital computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing scanning has become commercially available to make a digital impression that is sent electronically to a dental laboratory or a chairside milling machine. However, technology has been developed to allow digital data acquisition in conjunction with electronically transmitted data that enables virtual design of restorations and milling at a remote production center. Following the aforementioned workflow will provide the opportunity to fabricate a physical cast-free restoration. This new technique has been reported recently for all-ceramic IPS e.max full-coverage pressed-ceramic restorations. However, laminate veneers are very delicate and technique-sensitive restorations when compared with all-ceramic full-coverage ones made from the same material. Complete digital design and fabrication of multiple consecutive laminate veneers seems to be very challenging. This clinical report presents the digital workflow for the virtual design and fabrication of multiple laminate veneers in a patient for enhancing the esthetics of his maxillary anterior teeth. A step-by-step process is presented with a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of this novel technique. Additionally, the use of lithium disilicate ceramic as the material of choice and the rationale for such a decision is discussed.

  3. Marginal adaptation of lithium disilicate ceramic crowns cemented with three different resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroz, Ingrid; Mitsas, Triantafyllos; Erdelt, Kurt; Kopsahilis, Niko

    2018-04-17

    The cementation process and cementation materials have an influence on the marginal adaptation of restorations. The gap could be affected by thermal and mechanical loading (TCML). The computerized x-ray microtomography (μCT) method offers the possibility of measuring the marginal gap without destruction of the restoration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal gap (MG) and the absolute marginal discrepancy (AMD) before and after TCML. Thirty-nine human premolars were prepared for full ceramic crowns made of lithium disilicate. The crowns were cemented by three different resins-Panavia F 2.0, Variolink II, and Relyx Unicem. The MG and AMD were evaluated by μCT before and after TCML. Panavia F 2.0 had the lowest MG (before 118 μm-after TMCL 124 μm) and AMD (before 145 μm-after TMCL 154 μm), followed by Relyx Unicem (MG: before 164 μm-after TCML 155 μm; AMD: before 213 μm-after TMCL 209 μm) and Variolink II (MG: before 317 μm-after TMCL 320 μm; AMD: before 412 μm-after TMCL 406 μm). The differences were statistically significant before and after TCML. Rather than TCML, it appeared the resin cement was responsible for differences between the MG and AMD before and after TCML. μCT is an accurate technique for assessing cemented restorations. Panavia F 2.0 has the lowest MG and AMD before and after TCML. The resin material that features a three-step protocol (Variolink II) produced higher MG and AMG values than the Panavia or Relyx Unicem varieties with less or no intermediate steps at all.

  4. Biocompatibility study of lithium disilicate and zirconium oxide ceramics for esthetic dental abutments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The increasing demand for esthetically pleasing results has contributed to the use of ceramics for dental implant abutments. The aim of this study was to compare the biological response of epithelial tissue cultivated on lithium disilicate (LS2) and zirconium oxide (ZrO2) ceramics. Understanding the relevant physicochemical and mechanical properties of these ceramics will help identify the optimal material for facilitating gingival wound closure. Methods Both biomaterials were prepared with 2 different surface treatments: raw and polished. Their physicochemical characteristics were analyzed by contact angle measurements, scanning white-light interferometry, and scanning electron microscopy. An organotypic culture was then performed using a chicken epithelium model to simulate peri-implant soft tissue. We measured the contact angle, hydrophobicity, and roughness of the materials as well as the tissue behavior at their surfaces (cell migration and cell adhesion). Results The best cell migration was observed on ZrO2 ceramic. Cell adhesion was also drastically lower on the polished ZrO2 ceramic than on both the raw and polished LS2. Evaluating various surface topographies of LS2 showed that increasing surface roughness improved cell adhesion, leading to an increase of up to 13%. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that a biomaterial, here LS2, can be modified using simple surface changes in order to finely modulate soft tissue adhesion. Strong adhesion at the abutment associated with weak migration assists in gingival wound healing. On the same material, polishing can reduce cell adhesion without drastically modifying cell migration. A comparison of LS2 and ZrO2 ceramic showed that LS2 was more conducive to creating varying tissue reactions. Our results can help dental surgeons to choose, especially for esthetic implant abutments, the most appropriate biomaterial as well as the most appropriate surface treatment to use in accordance with specific clinical

  5. Citrate increases glass transition temperature of vitrified sucrose preparations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kets, E.P.W.; Lipelaar, P.J.; Hoekstra, F.A.; Vromans, H.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sodium citrate on the properties of dried amorphous sucrose glasses. Addition of sodium citrate to a sucrose solution followed by freeze-drying or convective drying resulted in a glass transition temperature (T-g) that was higher than the

  6. The ions displacement through glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevegnani, F.X.

    1980-01-01

    A method to introduce sodium, potassium, lithium, calcium, iron and other ions in vacuum or gas light bulb by mean of a strong stationay electric field. The experiments showed that the mass deposited inside the bulbs obey Faraday's law of electrolysis, although the process of mass transfer is not that of a conventional electrolysis. A method which allows to show that hydrogen ions do not penetrate the glass structure is also described. Using radioactive tracers, it is shown that heavy ions, such PO 4 --- do not penetrate the glass structure. The vitreous state and the glass properties were studied for interpreting experimental results. (Author) [pt

  7. Crystallization kinetic study of the lithium-disilicate bioceramic obtained from rice-husk silica starting powder; Estudo cinetico da cristalizacao da bioceramica de dissilicato de litio obtida atraves da silica da casca de arroz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, F.A.; Santos, C.; Pinatti, D.G., E-mail: elipeantunes@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EEL/USP), Lorena, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia; Lazar, D.R.R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Davim, E.; Fernandes, M.H.F.V. [Universidade de Aveiro, Campos Universitario de Santiago, Aveiro (Portugal)

    2011-07-01

    In this work, the study of crystallization of the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic produced for alternative source (rice husk silica), and comparatively by commercial source (commercial silica) it was carried through. The stoichiometry 66%.mol SiO{sub 2}: 33%.mol LiO{sub 2} was used. The kinetic studies of crystallization and calculations had been carried through thermal analysis (DTA), and were possible to study the behavior of the curves in accordance with the variation of taxes (5; 10; 15; e 20°C/min), of the granulometries 63 μm, 250μm and 1mm), and for the influence of the substitution commercial SiO{sub 2} by rice husk. The structural characterization was carried through by X-Ray diffractometry (DRX) and scanning electron microscopy (MEV), for chemical characterization used X-Ray fluorescence (FRX). The preliminary results show that the substitution of the silica source is sufficiently promising, since the gotten properties are similar. (author)

  8. Fracture Resistance of Lithium Disilicate Ceramics Bonded to Enamel or Dentin Using Different Resin Cement Types and Film Thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojpaibool, Thitithorn; Leevailoj, Chalermpol

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the influence of cement film thickness, cement type, and substrate (enamel or dentin) on ceramic fracture resistance. One hundred extracted human third molars were polished to obtain 50 enamel and 50 dentin specimens. The specimens were cemented to 1-mm-thick lithium disilicate ceramic plates with different cement film thicknesses (100 and 300 μm) using metal strips as spacers. The cements used were etch-and-rinse (RelyX Ultimate) and self-adhesive (RelyX U200) resin cements. Compressive load was applied on the ceramic plates using a universal testing machine, and fracture loads were recorded in Newtons (N). Statistical analysis was performed by multiple regression (p enamel showed the highest mean fracture load (MFL; 1591 ± 172.59 N). The RelyX Ultimate groups MFLs were significantly higher than the corresponding RelyX U200 groups (p enamel (p enamel. Reduced resin film thickness could reduce lithium disilicate restoration fracture. Etch-and-rinse resin cements are recommended for cementing on either enamel or dentin, compared with self-adhesive resin cement, for improved fracture resistance. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. A new paramagnetic center of copper ion γ-irradiated phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogomolova, L.D.; Fedorov, A.G.; Jachkin, V.A.; Lazukin, V.N.; Pavlushkina, T.K.

    1981-01-01

    In the present paper are shown the results of EPR and optical absorption investigations of copper ions in γ-irradiated sodium-phosphate glasses and in MO-P 2 O 5 glasses (M = MG,Ca, Sr, Zn, Ba) containing copper and comparisons are made with the data for sodium-silicate glasses. (orig./HOF)

  10. Glass consistency and glass performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    Glass produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will have to consistently be more durable than a benchmark glass (evaluated using a short-term leach test), with high confidence. The DWPF has developed a Glass Product Control Program to comply with this specification. However, it is not clear what relevance product consistency has on long-term glass performance. In this report, the authors show that DWPF glass, produced in compliance with this specification, can be expected to effectively limit the release of soluble radionuclides to natural environments. However, the release of insoluble radionuclides to the environment will be limited by their solubility, and not glass durability

  11. Colloidal glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Colloidal glasses. Glassy state is attained when system fails to reach equilibrium due to crowding of constituent particles. In molecular glasses, glassy state is reached by rapidly lowering the temperature. In colloidal glasses, glassy state is reached by increasing the ...

  12. In vitro Evaluation of the Marginal Fit and Internal Adaptation of Zirconia and Lithium Disilicate Single Crowns: Micro-CT Comparison Between Different Manufacturing Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccitiello, Francesco; Amato, Massimo; Leone, Renato; Spagnuolo, Gianrico; Sorrentino, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    Prosthetic precision can be affected by several variables, such as restorative materials, manufacturing procedures, framework design, cementation techniques and aging. Marginal adaptation is critical for long-term longevity and clinical success of dental restorations. Marginal misfit may lead to cement exposure to oral fluids, resulting in microleakage and cement dissolution. As a consequence, marginal discrepancies enhance percolation of bacteria, food and oral debris, potentially causing secondary caries, endodontic inflammation and periodontal disease. The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the marginal and internal adaptation of zirconia and lithium disilicate single crowns, produced with different manufacturing procedures. Forty-five intact human maxillary premolars were prepared for single crowns by means of standardized preparations. All-ceramic crowns were fabricated with either CAD-CAM or heat-pressing procedures (CAD-CAM zirconia, CAD-CAM lithium disilicate, heat-pressed lithium disilicate) and cemented onto the teeth with a universal resin cement. Non-destructive micro-CT scanning was used to achieve the marginal and internal gaps in the coronal and sagittal planes; then, precision of fit measurements were calculated in a dedicated software and the results were statistically analyzed. The heat-pressed lithium disilicate crowns were significantly less accurate at the prosthetic margins (p0.05); nevertheless CAD-CAM zirconia copings presented the best marginal fit among the experimental groups. As to the thickness of the cement layer, reduced amounts of luting agent were noticed at the finishing line, whereas a thicker layer was reported at the occlusal level. Within the limitations of the present in vitro investigation, the following conclusions can be drawn: the recorded marginal gaps were within the clinical acceptability irrespective of both the restorative material and the manufacturing procedures; the CAD-CAM processing techniques for

  13. Modeling of evaporation processes in glass melting furnaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, van J.A.C.

    2007-01-01

    The majority of glass furnaces worldwide, apply fossil fuel combustion to transfer heat directly by radiation from the combustion processes to the melting batch and glass melt. During these high temperature melting processes, some glass components, such as: sodium, potassium, boron and lead species

  14. Effect of surface acid etching on the biaxial flexural strength of two hot-pressed glass ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Tabassom; Parvizi, Shaghayegh; Keshvad, Alireza

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of surface acid etching on the biaxial flexural strength of two hot-pressed glass ceramics reinforced by leucite or lithium disilicate crystals. Forty glass ceramic disks (14-mm diameter, 2-mm thick) consisting of 20 leucite-based ceramic disks (IPS Empress) and 20 lithia disilicate-based ceramic (IPS Empress 2) were produced by hot-pressing technique. All specimens were polished and then cleaned ultrasonically in distilled water. Ten specimens of each ceramic group were then etched with 9% hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel for 2 minutes and cleaned ultrasonically again. The biaxial flexural strength was measured by the piston-on-three-ball test in a universal testing machine. Data based on ten specimens in each group were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (alpha= 0.05). Microstructure of ceramic surfaces before and after acid etching was also examined by a scanning electron microscope. The mean biaxial flexural strength values for each group tested were (in MPa): nonetched IPS Empress = 118.6 +/- 25.5; etched IPS Empress = 102.9 +/- 15.4; nonetched IPS Empress 2 = 283.0 +/- 48.5; and etched IPS Empress 2 = 250.6 +/- 34.6. The results showed that the etching process reduced the biaxial flexural strengths significantly for both ceramic types (p= 0.025). No significant interaction between the ceramic type and etching process was found (p= 0.407). From the results, it was concluded that surface HF acid etching could have a weakening effect on hot-pressed leucite or lithia disilicate-based glass ceramic systems.

  15. Low sodium diet (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for you. Look for these words on labels: low-sodium, sodium-free, no salt added, sodium-reduced, ... for you. Look for these words on labels: low-sodium, sodium-free, no salt added, sodium-reduced, ...

  16. Marginal Adaptation and Quality of Interfaces in Lithium Disilicate Crowns - Influence of Manufacturing and Cementation Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo Freire, C A; Borges, G A; Caldas, Dbm; Santos, R S; Ignácio, S A; Mazur, R F

    To evaluate the cement line thickness and the interface quality in milled or injected lithium disilicate ceramic restorations and their influence on marginal adaptation using different cement types and different adhesive cementation techniques. Sixty-four bovine teeth were prepared for full crown restoration (7.0±0.5 mm in height, 8.0 mm in cervical diameter, and 4.2 mm in incisal diameter) and were divided into two groups: CAD/CAM automation technology, IPS e.max CAD (CAD), and isostatic injection by heat technology, IPS e.max Press (PRESS). RelyX ARC (ARC) and RelyX U200 resin cements were used as luting agents in two activation methods: initial self-activation and light pre-activation for one second (tack-cure). Next, the specimens were stored in distilled water at 23°C ± 2°C for 72 hours. The cement line thickness was measured in micrometers, and the interface quality received scores according to the characteristics and sealing aspects. The evaluations were performed with an optical microscope, and scanning electron microscope images were presented to demonstrate the various features found in the cement line. For the cement line thickness, data were analyzed with three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Games-Howell test (α=0.05). For the variable interface quality, the data were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U-test, the Kruskal-Wallis test, and multiple comparisons nonparametric Dunn test (α=0.05). The ANOVA presented statistical differences among the ceramic restoration manufacturing methods as well as a significant interaction between the manufacturing methods and types of cement (pcement line thickness values when compared to the ARC with both cementation techniques (pmanufacturing methods and cementation techniques. The PRESS ceramics obtained lower scores than did the CAD ceramics when using ARC cement (pcemented with self-adhesive resin cement resulted in a thinner cement line that is statistically different from that of CAD or pressed

  17. Silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    Vitrification of liquid high-level radioactive wastes has received the greatest attention, world-wide, compared to any other HLW solidification process. The waste form is a borosilicate-based glass. The production of phosphate-based glass has been abandoned in the western world. Only in the Soviet Union are phosphate-based glasses still being developed. Vitrification techniques, equipment and processes and their remote operation have been developed and studied for almost thirty years and have reached a high degree of technical maturity. Industrial demonstration of the vitrification process has been in progress since 1978. This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e., borosilicate glasses

  18. An In Vitro Evaluation of Alumina, Zirconia, and Lithium Disilicate Surface Roughness Caused by Two Scaling Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigolo, Paolo; Buzzo, Ottavia; Buzzo, Maurizio; Mutinelli, Sabrina

    2017-02-01

    Plaque control is crucial for the prevention of inflammatory periodontal disease. Hand scaling instruments have been shown to be efficient for the removal of plaque; however, routine periodontal prophylactic procedures may modify the surface profile of restorative materials. The purpose of this study was to assess in vitro the changes in roughness of alumina, zirconia, and lithium disilicate surfaces treated by two hand scaling instruments. Forty-eight alumina specimens, 48 zirconia specimens, and 48 lithium disilicate specimens, were selected. All specimens were divided into three groups of 16 each; one group for each material was considered the control group and no scaling procedures were performed; the second group of each material was exposed to scaling with steel curettes simulating standard clinical conditions; the third group of each material was exposed to scaling with titanium curettes. After scaling, the surface roughness of the specimens was evaluated with a profilometer. First, a statistical test was carried out to evaluate the difference in surface roughness before the scaling procedure of the three materials was effected (Kruskal-Wallis test). Subsequently, the effect of curette material (steel and titanium) on roughness difference and roughness ratio was analyzed throughout the entire sample and within each material group, and a nonparametric test for dependent values was conducted (Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Finally, the roughness ratios of the three material groups were compared by means of a Kruskal-Wallis test and a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Upon completion of profilometric evaluation, representative specimens from each group were prepared for SEM evaluation to evaluate the effects of the two scaling systems on the different surfaces qualitatively. After scaling procedure, the roughness profile value increased in all disks. Classifying the full sample according to curette used, the roughness of the disks treated with a steel curette reached a

  19. Effect of Two Polishing Systems on Surface Roughness, Topography, and Flexural Strength of a Monolithic Lithium Disilicate Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadibassir, Mahshid; Rezvani, Mohammad Bagher; Golzari, Hossein; Moravej Salehi, Elham; Fahimi, Mohammad Amin; Kharazi Fard, Mohammad Javad

    2017-03-08

    To evaluate the effect of overglazing and two polishing procedures on flexural strength and quality and quantity of surface roughness of a monolithic lithium disilicate ceramic computer-aided design (CAD) after grinding. This in vitro study was conducted on 52 partially crystalized bar-shaped specimens (16 × 4 × 1.6 mm) of monolithic lithium disilicate ceramic. The specimens were wet polished with 600-, 800-, and 1200-grit silicon carbide papers for 15 seconds using a grinding/polishing machine at a speed of 300 rpm. Then, the specimens were crystalized and glaze-fired in one step simultaneously and randomly divided into four groups of 13: (I) Glazing group (control); (II) Grinding-glazing group, subjected to grinding with red band finishing diamond bur (46 μm) followed by glazing; (III) Grinding-D+Z group, subjected to grinding and then polishing by coarse, medium, and fine diamond rubber points (D+Z); and (IV) Grinding-OptraFine group, subjected to grinding and then polishing with a two-step diamond rubber polishing system followed by a final polishing step with an OptraFine HP brush and diamond polishing paste. The surface roughness (Ra and Rz) values (μm) were measured by a profilometer, and the mean values were compared using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane's test (post hoc comparison). One specimen of each group was evaluated under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) for surface topography. The three-point flexural strength values of the bars were measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed and recorded. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane's test (α = 0.05). Statistically significant differences were noted among the experimental groups for Ra, Rz (p SEM analysis of polished surfaces revealed regular morphology with some striations. The OptraFine system created smoother and more uniform surfaces in terms of quantity (p < 0.03 for Ra, p < 0.01 for Rz) and quality of roughness compared to glazing. The flexural

  20. Hidden Sodium

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-03-04

    In this podcast, learn about reducing sodium intake by knowing what to eat and the main sources of sodium in the diet. It's important for a healthy lifestyle.  Created: 3/4/2013 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/4/2013.

  1. Dietary sodium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Niels

    2015-01-01

    The 2013 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report "Sodium Intake in Populations: Assessment of Evidence" did not support the current recommendations of the IOM and the American Heart Association (AHA) to reduce daily dietary sodium intake to below 2,300 mg. The report concluded that the population...

  2. Lead-iron phosophate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales, B.C.; Boatner, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    The lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glasses (LIPNWG) are the subject of the present chapter. They were discovered in 1984 while the authors were attempting to find a sintering aid for certain types of crystalline monazite ceramic high-level nuclear waste forms. In the present chapter, the term waste glass is synonymous with nuclear waste glass (NWG), and the acronym LIP is often used for lead-iron phosphate. Lead-iron phosphate glasses, like many of the previously studied phosphate glasses, are corrosion resistant in aqueous solutions at temperatures below 100 degrees C, and they can be melted and poured at temperatures that are relatively low in comparison with the processing temperatures required for current silicate glass compositions. Unlike the phosphate glasses investigated previously, however, LIPNWGs do not suffer from alteration due to devitrification during realistic and readily, achievable cooling periods. Additionally, lead-iron phosphate glass melts are not nearly as corrosive as the sodium phosphate melts investigated during the 1960s; and, therefore, they can be melted and processed using crucibles made from a variety of materials

  3. Recycle Glass in Foam Glass Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass industry turn recycle glass into heat insulating building materials. The foaming process is relative insensitive to impurities in the recycle glass. It is therefore considered to play an important role in future glass recycling. We show and discuss trends of use of recycled glasses...... in foam glass industry and the supply sources and capacity of recycle glass....

  4. CO2 and Nd:YAP laser interaction with lithium disilicate and Zirconia dental ceramics: A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Jean-Paul; Fornaini, Carlo; Brulat-Bouchard, Nathalie; Bassel Seif, Samy; Darque-Ceretti, Evelyne

    2014-04-01

    Lithium disilicate and Zirconia ceramics offer a high level of accuracy when used in prosthetic dentistry. Their bonding using different resins is highly dependent on micro-mechanical interlocking and adhesive chemical bonding. Investigation of the performances of high strength ceramics when their surface is modified for chemical and mechanical bonding is then required. The aim of this study is to investigate the possibility of using laser for surface treatment of different high strength CAD/CAM ceramics and thus to improve their mechanical and chemical properties. Thirty two CAD/CAM ceramic discs were divided into two different groups: lithium disilicate ceramics (IPS e.max CAD®, Ivoclar, Vivadent, Italy) and Zirconia ceramics (IPS e.max ZirCAD®, Ivoclar, Vivadent, Italy). The Laser surface treatment was performed by Carbon Dioxide laser (Dream Pulse Laser®, Daeshin Enterprise Corp., Korea) at 20 W, 25 W and 30 W CW and by Neodymium Yttrium Aluminum Perovskite laser (Nd:YAP Lokki®, Lobel Medical, France) at 10 W and 30 Hz. Physical modifications of the irradiated ceramic discs were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemically analyzed by Energy-Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Surface wettability was tested using the water drop test and the crystalline structure was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The macroscopic observation showed a shinier structure in all the groups, while at the SEM observation only CO2 25 W and 30 W treated groups showed cracks and fissures. In the conditions of this study, CO2 laser and Nd:YAP laser with the parameters used create chemical and physical surface modifications of the ceramics, indicating the possibility of an improvement in adhesion of the tested ceramics.

  5. Highly spatially resolved structural and optical investigation of Bi nanoparticles in Y-Er disilicate thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarangella, A. [CNR IMM-MATIS, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Amiard, G.; Boninelli, S., E-mail: simona.boninelli@ct.infn.it; Miritello, M. [CNR IMM-MATIS, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Reitano, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Priolo, F. [CNR IMM-MATIS, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Scuola Superiore di Catania, Università di Catania, Via Valdisavoia 9, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2016-08-08

    Er-containing silicon compatible materials have been widely used as infrared emitters for microphotonics application. In this field, the additional introduction of a proper sensitizer permits to increase the Er excitation cross sections, thus increasing its optical efficiency. This work aims to investigate the influence of a post-transition metal, bismuth, on the optical properties of erbium-yttrium disilicate thin films synthesized by magnetron co-sputtering. After thermal treatments at 1000 °C in O{sub 2} or N{sub 2} environment, the presence of small precipitates, about 6 nm in diameter, was evidenced by transmission electron microscopy analyses. The spatially resolved chemical nature of the nanoparticles was discerned in the Si and O rich environments by means of scanning transmission electron microscopy–energy dispersive X-ray and scanning transmission electron microscopy–electron energy loss spectroscopy analyses performed with nanometric resolution. In particular, metallic Bi nanoparticles were stabilized in the N{sub 2} environment, being strongly detrimental for the Er emission. A different scenario was instead observed in O{sub 2}, where the formation of Bi silicate nanoparticles was demonstrated with the support of photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy. In particular, a broad band peaked at 255 nm, correlated to the excitation band of Bi silicate nanoparticles, was identified in Er excitation spectrum. Thus Bi silicate clusters act as sensitizer for Er ions, permitting to improve Er emission up to 250 times with respect to the resonant condition. Moreover, the Er decay time increases in the presence of the Bi silicate nanoparticles that act as cages for Er ions. These last results permit to further increase Er optical efficiency in the infrared range, suggesting (Bi + Er)-Y disilicate as a good candidate for applications in microphotonics.

  6. Controlled parallel crystallization of lithium disilicate and diopside using a combination of internal and surface nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Rampf

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the mid-19th century, Dr. Donald Stookey identified the importance and usability of nucleating agents and mechanisms for the development of glass-ceramic materials. Today, a number of various internal and surface mechanisms as well as combinations thereof have been established in the production of glass-ceramic materials. In order to create new innovative material properties the present study focuses on the precipitation of CaMgSiO6 as a minor phase in Li2Si2O5 based glass-ceramics. In the base glass of the SiO2-Li2O-P2O5-Al2O3-K2O-MgO-CaO system P2O5 serves as nucleating agent for the internal precipitation of Li2Si2O5 crystals while a mechanical activation of the glass surface by means of ball milling is necessary to nucleate the minor CaMgSi2O6 crystal phase. For a successful precipitation of CaMgSi2O6 a minimum ratio of MgO and CaO in the range between 1.4 mol% and 2.9 mol% in the base glasses was determined. The nucleation and crystallization of both crystal phases takes place during sintering a powder compact. Dependent on the quality of the sintering process the dense Li2Si2O5-CaMgSi2O6 glass-ceramics show a mean biaxial strength of up to 392 ± 98 MPa. The microstructure of the glass-ceramics is formed by large (5-10 µm bar like CaMgSi2O6 crystals randomly embedded in a matrix of small (≤ 0.5 µm plate like Li2Si2O5 crystals arranged in an interlocking manner. While there is no significant influence of the minor CaMgSi2O6 phase on the strength of the material, the translucency of the material decreases upon precipitation of the minor phase.

  7. Sodium Oxybate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or give your sodium oxybate to anyone else; selling or sharing it is against the law. Store ... dehydrogenase deficiency (an inherited condition in which certain substances build up in the body and cause retardation ...

  8. Sodium Azide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Exposure to a large amount of sodium azide by any route may cause these other health effects as well: Convulsions Low blood pressure Loss of consciousness Lung injury Respiratory failure leading to death Slow heart rate ...

  9. Cosmos & Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    1996-01-01

    The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne....

  10. Glass Glimpsed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology.......Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology....

  11. Spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Bovier, Anton

    2007-01-01

    Spin glass theory is going through a stunning period of progress while finding exciting new applications in areas beyond theoretical physics, in particular in combinatorics and computer science. This collection of state-of-the-art review papers written by leading experts in the field covers the topic from a wide variety of angles. The topics covered are mean field spin glasses, including a pedagogical account of Talagrand's proof of the Parisi solution, short range spin glasses, emphasizing the open problem of the relevance of the mean-field theory for lattice models, and the dynamics of spin glasses, in particular the problem of ageing in mean field models. The book will serve as a concise introduction to the state of the art of spin glass theory, usefull to both graduate students and young researchers, as well as to anyone curious to know what is going on in this exciting area of mathematical physics.

  12. Glass packages in interim storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet-Francillon, N.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarize the current state of knowledge concerning the behavior of type C waste packages consisting of vitrified high-level solutions produced by reprocessing spent fuel. The composition and the physical and chemical properties of the feed solutions are reviewed, and the vitrification process is described. Sodium alumino-borosilicate glass compositions are generally employed - the glass used at la Hague for LWR fuel solutions, for example, contains 45 % SiO 2 . The major physical, chemical, mechanical and thermal properties of the glass are reviewed. In order to allow their thermal power to diminish, the 3630 glass packages produced (as of January 1993) in the vitrification facilities at Marcoule and La Hague are placed in interim storage for several decades. The actual interim storage period has not been defined, as it is closely related to the concept and organization selected for the final destination of the packages: a geological repository. The glass behavior under irradiation is described. Considerable basic and applied research has been conducted to assess the aqueous leaching behavior of nuclear containment glass. The effects of various repository parameters (temperature, flow rate, nature of the environmental materials) have been investigated. The experimental findings have been used to specify a model describing the kinetics of aqueous corrosion of the glass. More generally all the ''source term'' models developed in France by the CEA or by ANDRA are summarized. (author). 152 refs., 33 figs

  13. GLASS BOX

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curtis, Laura

    2008-01-01

    The goals of this effort were to develop Glass Box capabilities to allow for the capturing of analyst activities and the associated data resources, track and log the results of automated processing...

  14. Marginal and Internal Gap of Handmade, Milled and 3D Printed Additive Manufactured Patterns for Pressed Lithium Disilicate Onlay Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla-León, M; Olea-Vielba, M; Esteso-Saiz, A; Martínez-Klemm, I; Özcan, M

    2018-03-01

    On a pressed lithium disilicate restoration, the building up of a wax pattern of the future restoration is a necessary step on the fabrication process. Conventionally, a wax pattern can be produced by handmade or milled procedures; however, the development of additive manufacturing technologies allows a new fabrication method. The present study measured the marginal and internal gap of handmade, milled and additive manufactured patterns for an onlay restoration. A preparation of an onlay restoration was made on an extracted mandibular tooth. A definitive cast was fabricated from a conventional silicone impression of the prepared tooth. Three groups were established: handmade (HM), milled (ML) and additive manufactured (AM); 4 specimens per group were obtained. The marginal and internal gap of each pattern was measured on the extracted molar through a computed tomography test. Sixty measurements were done to measure the marginal gap and another 60 measurements were calculated to analyze the internal gap on each pattern on the prepared tooth. A total of 1.440 measurements were completed. Mann-Whitney and Turkey statistical tests were used for pairwise comparison. The mean of the marginal and internal gap was of 67.56 ± 6.08 μm and 80.62 ± 3.26 μm for the HM group, 85.28 ± 2.17 μm and 96 ± 1.97 μm for the ML group and 86.49 ± 1.74 μm and 91.86 ± 2.88 μm for the AM group, respectively. The HM group presented significantly lower marginal (p=0.029) and internal (p=0.029) gap compared to the ML and AM groups. There was no statistical significant difference (p=0.486) on the marginal gap between the ML and the AM groups, but the AM group, showed significantly (p=0.029) smaller internal gap than the ML group. All the groups presented less than 100 μm marginal and internal gap, which is a considered clinically acceptable. The three fabrication processes are viable option for manufacturing patterns for lithium disilicate onlay restorations, but the best marginal

  15. Relative leach behavior of waste glasses and naturally occurring glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, P.B.

    1979-01-01

    Simulated nuclear waste glasses of the sodium-borosilicate type with a low waste loading and of the zinc-borosilicate type with a high waste loading have been compared with obsidians. The resuls indicate that the waste glasses would corrode in normal natural environments at a rate of about 0.1 μm per year at 30 0 C and about 5 μm per year at 90 0 C, compared with obsidians which seem to corrode at, or less than, about 0.01 μm per year at 30 0 C and less than 1 μm per year at 90 0 C. Activation energies for reactions of the two waste glasses with pure water are about 20 kcal/g-mol. 3 figures, 7 tables

  16. Influence of glass furnace operational conditions on the evaporation from soda-lime and borosilicate glass melts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2000-01-01

    The evaporation of sodium and boron species from the melts in industrial glass furnaces leads to emissions of particulates (dust) and to furnace atmospheres containing reactive evaporation products. These reactive species, especially alkali vapors, can react with the superstructure refractories

  17. A comparative study of progressive wear of four dental monolithic, veneered glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; Yi, Yuanping; Wang, Xuesong; Guo, Jiawen; Li, Ding; He, Lin; Zhang, Shaofeng

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluated the wear performance and wear mechanisms of four dental glass-ceramics, based on the microstructure and mechanical properties in the progressive wear process. Bar (N = 40, n = 10) and disk (N = 32, n = 8) specimens were prepared from (A) lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (LD), (B) leucite reinforced glass-ceramic (LEU), (C) feldspathic glass-ceramic (FEL), and (D) fluorapatite glass-ceramic (FLU). The bar specimens were tested for three-point flexural strength, hardness, fracture toughness and elastic modulus. The disk specimens paired with steatite antagonists were tested in a pin-on-disk tribometer with 10N up to 1000,000 wear cycles. The wear analysis of glass-ceramics was performed using a 3D profilometer after every 200,000 wear cycles. Wear loss of steatite antagonists was calculated by measuring the weight and density using sensitive balance and Archimedes' method. Wear morphologies and microstructures were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The crystalline phase compositions were determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the data. Multiple pair-wise comparison of means was performed by Tukey's post-hoc test. LD showed the highest fracture toughness, flexural strength, elastic modulus and crystallinity, followed by LEU and FEL, and FLU showed the lowest. However, the hardness of LD was lower than all the other three types of ceramics. For steatite antagonists, LD produced the least wear loss of antagonist, followed by LEU and FEL, and FLU had the most wear loss. For glass-ceramic materials, LD exhibited similar wear loss as LEU, but more than FLU and FEL did. Moreover, fracture occurred on the wear surface of FLU. In the progressive wear process, veneering porcelains showed better wear resistance but fluorapatite veneering porcelains appeared fracture surface. Monolithic lithium disilicate glass-ceramics with higher mechanical properties showed more wear loss, however

  18. Test Your Sodium Smarts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You may be surprised to learn how much sodium is in many foods. Sodium, including sodium chloride ... foods with little or no salt. Test your sodium smarts by answering these 10 questions about which ...

  19. Theoretical and practical aspects of aqueous solution sodium silicate modifying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuryaev Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research deals with the use of liquid glass in industry particularly for porous filler production. The aim of this paper is to show the necessity liquid glass modification for the purpose of its rheological characteristics change for raw granules formation and providing given structure after porization. Data on chemical liquid glass modification are provided by adding sodium chloride. Moreover, inert mineral additives influence on porous filler properties are shown in this paper. The basic principles of light concrete composition selection are specified. Test results of light concrete on the developed porous sodium silicate filler are given.

  20. Hafnium in peralkaline and peraluminous boro-aluminosilicate glass, and glass subcomponents: a solubility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Linda L.; Darab, John G.; Qian, Maoxu; Zhao, Donggao; Palenik, Christopher S.; Li, Hong; Strachan, Denis M.; Li, Liyu

    2003-01-01

    A relationship between the solubility of hafnia (HfO2) and the host glass composition was explored by determining the solubility limits of HfO2 in peralkaline and peraluminous borosilicate glasses in the system SiO2-Al2O3-B2O3-Na2O, and in glasses in the system SiO2-Na2O-Al2O3 in air at 1450 C. The only Hf-bearing phase to crystallize in the peralkaline borosilicate melts is hafnia, while in the boron-free melts sodium-hafnium silicates crystallize. All peraluminous borosilicate melts crystallize hafnia, but the slightly peraluminous glasses also have sector-zoned hafnia crystals that contain Al and Si. The more peraluminous borosilicate glasses also crystallize a B-containing mullite. The general morphology of the hafnia crystals changes as peralkalinity (Na2O/(Na2O+Al2O3)) decreases, as expected in melts with increasing viscosity. In all of the glasses with Na2O > Al2O3, the solubility of hafnia is linearly and positively correlated with Na2O/(Na2O + Al2O3) or Na2O - Al2O3 (excess sodium), despite the presence of 5 to 16 mol% B2O3. The solubility of hafnia is higher in the sodium-aluminum borosilicate glasses than in the sodium-aluminosilicate glasses, suggesting that the boron is enhancing the effect that excess sodium has on the incorporation of Hf into the glass structure. The results of this solubility study are compared to other studies of high-valence cation solubility in B-free silicate melts. From this, for peralkaline B-bearing glasses, it is shown that, although the solubility limits are higher, the solution behavior of hafnia is the same as in B-free silicate melts previously studied. By comparison, also, it is shown that in peraluminous melts, there must be a different solution mechanism for hafnia: different than for peralkaline sodium-aluminum borosilicate glasses and different than for B-free silicate melts studied by others

  1. Glass compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    France, P W

    1985-05-30

    A fluoride glass for use in the production of optical fibres has an enhanced D/H ratio, preferably such that OD:OH is at least 9:1. In the example, such a glass is prepared by treating with D/sub 2/O a melt comprising 51.53 mole per cent ZrF/sub 4/, 20.47 mole per cent BaF/sub 2/, 5.27 mole per cent LaF/sub 3/, 3.24 mole per cent AlF/sub 3/, and 19.49 mole per cent LiF.

  2. Diffusion and ionic conduction in oxide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrer, H; Imre, A W; Tanguep-Nijokep, E

    2008-01-01

    The ion transport properties of soda-lime silicate and alkali borate glasses have been studied with complimentary tracer diffusion and impedance spectroscopy techniques in order to investigate the ion dynamics and mixed-alkali effect (MAE). In soda-lime silicate glasses the tracer diffusivity of 22 Na alkali ions is more than six orders of magnitude faster than the diffusivity of earth alkali 45 Ca ions. This observation is attributed to a stronger binding of bivalent earth alkali ions to the glass network as compared to that of alkali ions. The conductivity of the investigated standard soda-lime silicate glasses is mostly due to the high mobility of sodium ions and a temperature independent Haven ratio of about 0.45 is obtained. For single alkali sodium-borate glasses, the Haven ratio is also temperature independent, however, it is decreases with decreasing temperature for rubidium-borate glass. The MAE was investigated for Na-Rb borate glasses and it was observed that the tracer diffusivities of 22 Na and 86 Rb ions cross, when plotted as function of the relative alkali content. This crossover occurs near the Na/(Na+Rb) ratio of the conductivity minimum due to MAE. The authors suggest that this crossover and the trend of diffusion coefficients is the key to an understanding of the MAE

  3. Facing slag glass and slag glass ceramic produced from thermal power plant ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buruchenko, A.E.; Kolesnikov, A.A.; Lukoyanov, A.G.

    1990-10-01

    Evaluates properties of fly ash and slags from the Krasnoyarsk coal-fired power plants and their utilization for glass and ceramic glass production. Composition of a mixture of fly ash and slag was: silica 40-55%, aluminium oxides 10-40%, ferric trioxide 6-14%, calcium oxides 20-35%, magnesium oxides 3-6%, potassium oxides 0.3-1.5%, sodium oxides 0.2-05%, sulfur trioxide 0.9-5.0%. The analyzed fly ash and slags from the Krasnoyarsk plant were an economic waste material for glass production. Properties of sand, clay and other materials used in glass production and properties of glass and ceramic glass produced on the basis of fly ash and slags are analyzed. Economic aspects of fly ash and slag utilization are also evaluated. 3 refs.

  4. Measurements of natural radioactivity in historical glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kierzek, J.; Kunicki-Goldfinger, J.J.; Kasprzak, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Natural radioactive components of historical glasses and two methods of the respective measurement of the radioactivity are discussed. The evaluation of radioactivity of glass objects using a Geiger-Mueller counter and high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry is presented. A survey of the Warsaw National Museum glass collection with a Geiger-Mueller counter allowed distinguishing the vessels made of potassium and sodium glass by their level of natural radioactivity. Gamma spectrometry, on the other hand, enables estimating a specific radionuclide content. Special attention is given to uranium glasses. One 19th century Bohemian vessel, coloured with a uranium compound, was carefully examined using gamma spectrometry. K 2 O and U content were estimated to be 16.2 and 0.33%, respectively. (orig.)

  5. The chemical durability of alkali aluminosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tait, J.C.; Mandolesi, D.L.

    1983-09-01

    The aqueous durabilities of a series of glasses based on the sodium aluminosilicate system (Na 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 ) have been studied. The effects of molecular substitution of K 2 O or CaO for Na 2 O, and B 2 O 3 for Al 2 O 3 have been investigated. The temperature dependence of leaching in the Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 system was studied with glasses containing 2 wt percent simulated UO 2 fuel recycle waste. The results confirm that aluminosilicate glasses are more durable than their borosilicate counterparts. The leaching results are explained in terms of glass structure and bonding, and a general leaching mechanism for aluminosilicate glasses is presented

  6. Modelling aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste phosphate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poluektov, Pavel P.; Schmidt, Olga V.; Kascheev, Vladimir A. [Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute for Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), Moscow (Russian Federation); Ojovan, Michael I., E-mail: m.ojovan@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    A model is presented on nuclear sodium alumina phosphate (NAP) glass aqueous corrosion accounting for dissolution of radioactive glass and formation of corrosion products surface layer on the glass contacting ground water of a disposal environment. Modelling is used to process available experimental data demonstrating the generic inhibiting role of corrosion products on the NAP glass surface. - Highlights: • The radionuclides yield is determined by the transport from the glass through the surface corrosion layer. • Formation of the surface layer is due to the dissolution of the glass network and the formation of insoluble compounds. • The model proposed accounts for glass dissolution, formation of corrosion layer, specie diffusion and chemical reactions. • Analytical solutions are found for corrosion layer growth rate and glass components component leaching rates.

  7. A study of the local structure around Eu3+ ions in oxide glasses using Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todoroki, S.; Hirao, K.; Soga, N.

    1993-01-01

    The local structure around Eu 3+ ions in several oxide glasses (silicate, germanate and borophosphate glasses) was investigated by using 151 Eu Moessbauer spectroscopy. It was found that the isomer shift (IS) of silicate and borophosphate glasses was independent of the sodium content, but that of germanate glasses was not. This means the first coordination sphere around Eu 3+ ions in silicate glasses is insensitive to the composition of the glass matrix. It is assumed that, regardless of the sodium content, Eu 3+ ions in silicate glasses attract a certain amount of nonbridging oxygen (NBO, Si-O direct difference ) when incorporated stably into silicate glass matrix, because NBO is the only species donating negative charge. For germanate glasses, the behavior of IS is considered to be related to the resence of GeO 6/2 octahedra. On the basis of experimental results, the coordination models of Eu 3+ in these systems are proposed. (orig.)

  8. Effectiveness of Chlorinated Water, Sodium Hypochlorite, Sodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the efficacy of chlorinated water, sodium hypochlorite solution, sodium chloride solution and sterile distilled water in eliminating pathogenic bacteria on the surfaces of raw vegetables. Lettuce vegetables were dipped in different concentrations of chlorinated water, sodium hypochlorite solution, sodium ...

  9. Comparison of shear bond strength of self-etch and self-adhesive cements bonded to lithium disilicate, enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Jennifer; Ali, Mohsin; Belles, Donald

    2015-11-01

    Comparison of shear bond strength of self-etch and self-adhesive cements bonded to lithium disilicate, enamel and dentin. With several self-adhesive resin cements currently available, there is confusion about which product and technique is optimal for bonding ceramic restorations to teeth. The objective of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of lithium disilicate cemented to enamel and dentin using 5 adhesive cements. 100 lithium disilicate rods were pretreated with 5% hydrofluoric acid, silane, and cemented to 50 enamel and 50 dentin surfaces using five test cements: Variolink II (etch-and-rinse) control group, Clearfil Esthetic (two step self-etch), RelyX Unicem, SpeedCEM, and BifixSE (self-adhesive). All specimens were stored (37 degrees C, 100% humidity) for 24 hours before testing their shear bond strength using a universal testing machine (Instron). Debonded surfaces were observed under a low-power microscope to assess the location and type of failure. The highest bond strength for both enamel and dentin were recorded for Variolink II, 15.1MPa and 20.4MPa respectively, and the lowest were recorded for BifixSE, 0.6MPa and 0.9MPa respectively. Generally, higher bond strengths were found for dentin (7.4MPa) than enamel (5.3MPa). Tukey's post hoc test showed no significant difference between Clearfil Esthetic and SpeedCem (p = 0.059), Unicem and SpeedCem (p = 0.88), and Unicem and BifixSE (p = 0.092). All cements bonded better to lithium disilicate than to enamel or dentin, as all bond failures occurred at the tooth/adhesive interface except for Variolink II. Bond strengths recorded for self-adhesive cements were very low compared to the control "etch and rinse" and self-etch systems. Further improvements are apparently needed in self-adhesive cements for them to replace multistep adhesive systems. The use of conventional etch and rinse cements such as Veriolink II should be preferred for cementing all ceramic restorations over self-adhesive cements

  10. A comparison of the microstructure and properties of the IPS Empress 2 and the IPS Empress glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, W; Schweiger, M; Frank, M; Rheinberger, V

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this report is to analyze the microstructures of glass-ceramics of the IPS Empress 2 and IPS Empress systems by scanning electron microscopy. The main properties of the glass-ceramics were determined and compared to each other. The flexural strength of the pressed glass-ceramic (core material) was improved by a factor of more than three for IPS Empress 2 (lithium disilicate glass-ceramic) in comparison with IPS Empress (leucite glass-ceramic). For the fracture toughness, the K(IC) value was measured as 3.3 +/- 0.3 MPa. m(0.5) for IPS Empress 2 and 1.3 +/- 0.1 MPa. m(0.5) for IPS Empress. Abrasion behavior, chemical durability, and optical properties such as translucency of all glass-ceramics fulfill the dental standards. The authors concluded that IPS Empress 2 can be used to fabricate 3-unit bridges up to the second premolar. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. Glass: Rotary Electric Glass Furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recca, L.

    1999-01-29

    Compared to conventional gas-fired furnaces, the new rotary electric furnace will increase energy efficiency while significantly reducing air emissions, product turnaround time, and labor costs. As this informative new fact sheet explains, the thousand different types of glass optical blanks produced for the photonics industry are used for lasers, telescopes, cameras, lights, and many other products.

  12. Influence of Some Nuclear Waste on The Durability and Mechanical Properties of Borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Alaily, N.A.

    2003-01-01

    Various glass systems have been shown to be suitable for producing waste glass forms that are thermally and mechanically stable and exhibit good chemical durability. In this study borosilicate glass containing sodium oxide and aluminum oxide was prepared as a host for high level nuclear waste. The glass durability when the samples were immersed either in distilled water or ground water at 70 degree was studied. The density, porosity and mechanical properties were also investigated. The effects of exposing the samples immersed in groundwater to gamma rays in the glass durability and all other mentioned properties were also studied. The results showed that immersing the glass in ground water causing a decrease in the glass durability. The exposure of the glass immersed in ground water to the gamma rays increases the durability of the glass. The mechanical properties of the prepared glass were good. Although these properties decrease for the corroded glass but they were still good

  13. Sodium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - sodium (salt); Hyponatremia - sodium in diet; Hypernatremia - sodium in diet; Heart failure - sodium in diet ... Too much sodium in the diet may lead to: High blood pressure in some people A serious buildup of fluid in people with heart failure , cirrhosis of ...

  14. Nitrate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirilenko, I.A.; Vinogradov, E.E.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental evidence on behaviour of nitrate glasses is reviewed in terms of relationships between the presence of water in vitrescent nitrate systems and the properties of the systems. The glasses considered belong to systems of Mg(NO 3 ) 2 - Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; Hg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; NaNO 3 -Mg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; M-Zn(NO 3 ) 3 , where M is a mixture of 20% mass NaNO 3 and 80% mass Mg(NO 3 ) 2 , and Zn is a rare earth ion. Nitrate glass is shown to be a product of dehydration. Vitrification may be regarded as a resusl of formation of molecular complexes in the chain due to hydrogen bonds of two types, i.e. water-water, or water-nicrate group. Chain formation, along with low melting points of the nitrates, hinder crystallization of nitrate melts. Provided there is enough water, this results in vitrification

  15. Crystallization and thermo-mechanical properties of Li2O-ZnO-CaOSiO2 glass-ceramics with In2O3 and Fe2O3 additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad M. Salman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Li2O-ZnO-CaO-SiO2 based glasses were prepared by the conventional melting technique and subsequently converted to glass-ceramics by controlled crystallization. The nucleation and crystallization temperatures were determined by differential thermal analysis (DTA. The effects of adding In2O3 and Fe2O3 addition on the crystallization behaviour and thermo-mechanical properties of the prepared glass-ceramics were investigated. A study on the microstructure, close to the internal phases of the resulting glass-ceramics, was followed by using scanning electron microscope (SEM. The dilatometric thermal expansion and Vickers’ microhardness of the crystalline products were also evaluated. The crystalline phases that can be found in the resulting glass-ceramics, identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, are α-quartz-[SiO2], lithium zinc silicate-[Li2ZnSiO4], lithium disilicate-[Li2Si2O5], wollastonite-[CaSiO3], wollastonite containing iron, ferrobustamite-[(Ca0.79Fe0.21SiO3], and lithium indium silicate of pyroxene type-[LiInSi2O6]. Average thermal expansion coefficient (in the temperature range 25–700 °C decreased from 191×10-7 1/°C to 115×10-7 1/°C and the Vickers’ microhardness increased from 3.56 to 5.44 GPa with the increase of In2O3 and Fe2O3 contents in the glass-ceramics. The changes in the obtained expansion coefficient and microhardness were due to the formation of different phases which in turn influenced the rigidity/bonding and microstructure in the resultant glass-ceramics.

  16. Sodium technology handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-09-01

    This document was published as a textbook for the education and training of personnel working for operations and maintenances of sodium facilities including FBR plants and those engaged in R and D activities related to sodium technology. This handbook covers the following technical areas. Properties of sodium. Compatibilities of sodium with materials. Thermalhydraulics and structural integrity. Sodium systems and components. Sodium instrumentations. Sodium handling technology. Sodium related accident evaluation and countermeasures for FBRs. Operation, maintenance and repair technology of sodium facilities. Safety measures related to sodium. Laws, regulations and internal rules related to sodium. The plannings and discussions of the handbook were made in the Sodium Technology Education Committee organized in O-arai Engineering Center consisting of the representatives of the related departments including Tsuruga headquarters. Experts in various departments participated in writing individual technical subjects. (author)

  17. Structure-Property Relationships and the Mixed Network Former Effect in Boroaluminosilicate Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Qiuju; Potuzak, Marcel; Mauro, John C.

    compositions by substituting Al2O3 for SiO2. We also investigate the various roles of sodium in the glasses including charge compensation of tetrahedral aluminum and boron atoms and formation of non-bridging oxygen. We find that mechanical properties (density, elastic moduli, and hardness), glass transition......Boroaluminosilicate glasses are important materials for various applications, e.g., liquid crystal display substrates, glass fibers for reinforcement, and thermal shock-resistant glass containers. The complicated structural speciation in these glasses leads to a mixed network former effect yielding...... nonlinear variation in many macroscopic properties. It is therefore crucial to investigate and understand structure-property correlations in boroaluminosilicate glasses. Here we study the structure-property relationships of a range of sodium boroaluminosilicate glasses from peralkaline to peraluminous...

  18. The sodium coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, G.

    2004-01-01

    The sodium is the best appropriate coolant for the fast neutrons reactors technology. Thus the fast neutrons reactors development is intimately bound to the sodium technology. This document presents the sodium as a coolant point of view: atomic structure and characteristics, sodium impacts on the fast neutron reactors technology, chemical properties of the sodium and the consequences, quality control in a nuclear reactor, sodium treatment. (A.L.B.)

  19. Iodine release from sodium pool combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagawa, N.; Fukushima, Y.; Yokota, N.; Akagane, K.; Mochizuki, K.

    1979-01-01

    Iodine release associated with sodium pool combustion was determined by heating 20 gr sodium containing sodium iodide, which was labelled with 131 I and dissolved in the sodium in concentration of 1∼1,000 ppm, to burn on a nickel crucible in conditioned atmosphere in a closed vessel of 0.4 m 3 . Oxygen concentration was changed in 5∼21% and humidity in 0∼89% by mixing nitrogen gas and air. Combustion products were trapped by a Maypack filter composed of particle filters, copper screens and activated charcoal beds and by a glass beads pack cooled by liquid argon. Iodine collected on these filter elements was determined by radio-gas chromatography. When the sodium sample burned in the atmosphere of air at room temperature, the release fractions observed were 6∼33% for sodium and 1∼20% for iodine added in the sodium. The release iodine was present in aerosol at a ratio of 98%, and the remainder in the gas form. The release fraction of iodine trended to decrease as oxygen concentration and humidity in the atmosphere increased. No organic iodide was detected in the combustion products. (author)

  20. Preliminary study in development of glass-ceramic based on SiO{sub 2}-LiO{sub 2} system, starting of different SiO{sub 2} starting powders; Um estudo preliminar do desenvolvimento de materiais vitroceramicos do sistema SiO{sub 2}-LiO{sub 2} obtidos a partir de diferentes fontes de silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daguano, J.K.M.F.; Santos, F.A.; Santos, C.; Marton, L.F.M.; Conte, R.A.; Rodrigues Junior, D. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EEL/USP), Lorena, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia de Lorena. Dept. de Materiais; Melo, F.C.L. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (AMR/CTA/IAE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco. Div. de Materiais

    2009-07-01

    In this work, lithium disilicate glass-ceramics were developed starting of the rice ash- SiO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} powders. The results were compared with glass ceramics based on the lithium disilicate obtained by commercial SiO{sub 2} powders. Glass were melted at 1580 deg C, and annealed at 850 deg C. X-Ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used for characterization of the materials, and hardness and fracture toughness were evaluated using Vickers indentation method. Glasses with amorphous structure were obtained in both materials. After annealing, 'rice-ash' samples presented Li{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} and residual SiO{sub 2} as crystalline phases. On the other side, commercial SiO{sub 2}- Samples presented only Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5} as crystalline phases and the better results of hardness and fracture toughness. (author)

  1. Oxide glass structure evolution under swift heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, C.; Peuget, S.; Charpentier, T.; Moskura, M.; Caraballo, R.; Bouty, O.; Mir, A.H.; Monnet, I.; Grygiel, C.; Jegou, C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Structure of SHI irradiated glass is similar to the one of a hyper quenched glass. • D2 Raman band associated to 3 members ring is only observed in irradiated glass. • Irradiated state seems slightly different to an equilibrated liquid quenched rapidly. - Abstract: The effects of ion tracks on the structure of oxide glasses were examined by irradiating a silica glass and two borosilicate glass specimens containing 3 and 6 oxides with krypton ions (74 MeV) and xenon ions (92 MeV). Structural changes in the glass were observed by Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a multinuclear approach ( 11 B, 23 Na, 27 Al and 29 Si). The structure of irradiated silica glass resembles a structure quenched at very high temperature. Both borosilicate glass specimens exhibited depolymerization of the borosilicate network, a lower boron coordination number, and a change in the role of a fraction of the sodium atoms after irradiation, suggesting that the final borosilicate glass structures were quenched from a high temperature state. In addition, a sharp increase in the concentration of three membered silica rings and the presence of large amounts of penta- and hexacoordinate aluminum in the irradiated 6-oxide glass suggest that the irradiated glass is different from a liquid quenched at equilibrium, but it is rather obtained from a nonequilibrium liquid that is partially relaxed by very rapid quenching within the ion tracks

  2. Randomized controlled within-subject evaluation of digital and conventional workflows for the fabrication of lithium disilicate single crowns. Part II: CAD-CAM versus conventional laboratory procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Irena; Benic, Goran I; Fehmer, Vincent; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Mühlemann, Sven

    2017-07-01

    Clinical studies are needed to evaluate the entire digital and conventional workflows in prosthetic dentistry. The purpose of the second part of this clinical study was to compare the laboratory production time for tooth-supported single crowns made with 4 different digital workflows and 1 conventional workflow and to compare these crowns clinically. For each of 10 participants, a monolithic crown was fabricated in lithium disilicate-reinforced glass ceramic (IPS e.max CAD). The computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) systems were Lava C.O.S. CAD software and centralized CAM (group L), Cares CAD software and centralized CAM (group iT), Cerec Connect CAD software and lab side CAM (group CiL), and Cerec Connect CAD software with centralized CAM (group CiD). The conventional fabrication (group K) included a wax pattern of the crown and heat pressing according to the lost-wax technique (IPS e.max Press). The time for the fabrication of the casts and the crowns was recorded. Subsequently, the crowns were clinically evaluated and the corresponding treatment times were recorded. The Paired Wilcoxon test with the Bonferroni correction was applied to detect differences among treatment groups (α=.05). The total mean (±standard deviation) active working time for the dental technician was 88 ±6 minutes in group L, 74 ±12 minutes in group iT, 74 ±5 minutes in group CiL, 92 ±8 minutes in group CiD, and 148 ±11 minutes in group K. The dental technician spent significantly more working time for the conventional workflow than for the digital workflows (P.05). Irrespective of the CAD-CAM system, the overall laboratory working time for a digital workflow was significantly shorter than for the conventional workflow, since the dental technician needed less active working time. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The influence of Al2O3, MgO and ZnO on the crystallization characteristics and properties of lithium calcium silicate glasses and glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salman, S.M.; Darwish, H.; Mahdy, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    The crystallization characteristics of glasses based on the Li 2 O-CaO-SiO 2 eutectic (954 ± 4 deg. C) system containing Al 2 O 3 , MgO and ZnO has been investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The partial replacement of Li 2 O by Al 2 O 3 and CaO by MgO or ZnO in the studied glass-ceramics led to the development of different crystalline phase assemblages, including lithium meta- and di-silicates, lithium calcium silicates, α-quartz, diopside, clinoenstatite, wollastonite, β-eucryptite ss, β-spodumene, α-tridymite, lithium zinc orthosilicate, hardystonite and willemite using various heat-treatment processes. The dilatometric thermal expansion of the glasses and their corresponding glass-ceramics were determined. A wide range of thermal expansion coefficient values were obtained for the investigated glasses and their corresponding crystalline products. The thermal expansion coefficients of the investigated glasses were decreased by Al 2 O 3 , MgO or ZnO additions. The α-values of the investigated glasses were ranged from (+18) to (+108) x 10 -7 K -1 (25-300 deg. C), while those of the glass-ceramics were (+3) to (+135) x 10 -7 K -1 (25-700 deg. C). The chemical durability of the glass-ceramics, towards the attack of 0.1N HCl solution, was markedly improved by Al 2 O 3 with MgO replacements. The composition containing 11.5 mol% Al 2 O 3 and 6.00 mol% MgO exhibited low thermal expansion values and good chemical durability

  4. Effect of Finishing and Polishing on Roughness and Gloss of Lithium Disilicate and Lithium Silicate Zirconia Reinforced Glass Ceramic for CAD/CAM Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichi, A; Fonzar, R Fabian; Goracci, C; Carrabba, M; Ferrari, M

    To assess the efficacy of dedicated finishing/polishing systems on roughness and gloss of VITA Suprinity and IPS e.max CAD. A total of 24 blocks of Suprinity and 24 of e.max were cut into a wedge shape using an InLab MC-XL milling unit. After crystallization, the 24 Suprinity wedges were divided into four subgroups: group A.1: Suprinity Polishing Set Clinical used for 30 seconds and group A.2: for 60 seconds; group A.3: VITA Akzent Plus Paste; and group A.4: spray. The 24 e.max wedges (group B) were divided into four subgroups according to the finishing procedure: group B.1: Optrafine Ceramic Polishing System for 30 seconds and group B.2: for 60 seconds; group B.3: IPS e.max CAD Crystall/Glaze paste; and group B.4: spray. After finishing/polishing, gloss was assessed with a glossmeter and roughness evaluated with a profilometer. Results were analyzed by applying a two-way analysis of variance for gloss and another for roughness (α=0.05). One specimen per each subgroup was observed with a scanning electron microscope. For roughness, materials and surface were significant factors ( pgloss, both material and surface treatment were significant factors ( pgloss than e.max. Also the Material-Surface Treatment interaction was statistically significant ( pgloss. VITA Suprinity displayed higher polishability than IPS e.max CAD.

  5. Marginal Fit of Lithium Disilicate Crowns Fabricated Using Conventional and Digital Methodology: A Three-Dimensional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Nezrine Z; Ruse, N Dorin; Ford, Nancy L; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Wyatt, Chris C L

    2018-02-01

    To compare the marginal fit of lithium disilicate (LD) crowns fabricated with digital impression and manufacturing (DD), digital impression and traditional pressed manufacturing (DP), and traditional impression and manufacturing (TP). Tooth #15 was prepared for all-ceramic crowns on an ivorine typodont. There were 45 LD crowns fabricated using three techniques: DD, DP, and TP. Microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) was used to assess the 2D and 3D marginal fit of crowns in all three groups. The 2D vertical marginal gap (MG) measurements were done at 20 systematically selected points/crown, while the 3D measurements represented the 3D volume of the gap measured circumferentially at the crown margin. Frequencies of different marginal discrepancies were also recorded, including overextension (OE), underextension (UE), and marginal chipping. Crowns with vertical MG > 120 μm at more than five points were considered unacceptable and were rejected. The results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA with Scheffe post hoc test (α = 0.05). DD crowns demonstrated significantly smaller mean vertical MG (33.3 ± 19.99 μm) compared to DP (54.08 ± 32.34 μm) and TP (51.88 ± 35.34 μm) crowns. Similarly, MG volume was significantly lower in the DD group (3.32 ± 0.58 mm 3 ) compared to TP group (4.16 ± 0.59 mm 3 ). The mean MG volume for the DP group (3.55 ± 0.78 mm 3 ) was not significantly different from the other groups. The occurrence of underextension error was higher in DP (6.25%) and TP (5.4%) than in DD (0.33%) group, while overextension was more frequent in DD (37.67%) than in TP (28.85%) and DP (18.75%) groups. Overall, 4 out of 45 crowns fabricated were deemed unacceptable based on the vertical MG measurements (three in TP group and one in DP group; all crowns in DD group were deemed acceptable). The results suggested that digital impression and CAD/CAM technology is a suitable, better alternative to traditional impression and manufacturing. © 2017 by the American College

  6. Elastic Properties of Lithium Disilicate Versus Feldspathic Inlays: Effect on the Bonding by 3D Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Flávia Zardo; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; de Jager, Niek; Bottino, Marco Antônio; Kleverlaan, Cornelis Johannes

    2016-10-03

    To determine the elastic properties of five ceramic systems with different compositions (lithium disilicate vs. feldspathic ceramics) and processing methods and compare the stress distribution in premolars in the interface with inlays made with these systems loaded with the maximum normal bite force (665 N) using 3D finite element analysis (FEA). The elastic properties of five ceramic restoration materials (IPS e.max Press, IPS e.max CAD, Vita PM9, Vita Mark II, Vita VM7) were obtained using the ultrasonic pulse-echo method. Three-dimensional FEA simplified models of maxillary premolars restored with these ceramic materials were created. The models were loaded with a load at the two nodes on the occlusal surface in the middle of the tooth, 2 mm from the outside of the tooth, simulating a loading ball with a radius of 6 mm. The means values of density (g/cm³), Young's modulus (GPa), and Poison's ratio was 2.6 ± 0.3, 82.3 ± 18.3, and 0.22 ± 0.01 for IPS e.max Press; 2.3 ± 0.1, 83.5 ± 15.0, and 0.21 ± 0.01 for IPS e.max CAD; 2.5 ± 0.1, 44.4 ± 11.5, and 0.26 ± 0.08 for PM9; 2.4 ± 0.1, 70.6 ± 4.9, and 0.22 ± 0.01 for Vitamark II; 2.4 ± 0.1, 63.3 ± 3.9, and 0.23 ± 0.01 for VM7, respectively. The 3D FEA showed the tensile stress at the interface between the tooth and the inlay was dependent on the elastic properties of the materials, since the Vita PM9 and IPS e.max CAD ceramics presented the lowest and the highest stress concentration in the interface, respectively. The elastic properties of ceramic materials were influenced by composition and processing methods, and these differences influenced the stress concentration at the bonding interface between tooth and restoration. The lower the elastic modulus of inlays, the lower is the stress concentration at the bonding interfaces. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  7. Nuclear waste immobilization in iron phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, D.A.; Rodriguez, Diego A.; Menghini, Jorge E.; Bevilacqua, Arturo

    2007-01-01

    Iron-phosphate glasses have become important in the nuclear waste immobilization area because they have some advantages over silicate-based glasses, such as a lower processing temperature and a higher nuclear waste load without losing chemical and mechanical properties. Structure and chemical properties of iron-phosphate glasses are determined in terms of the main components, in this case, phosphate oxide along with the other oxides that are added to improve some of the characteristics of the glasses. For example, Iron oxide improves chemical durability, lead oxide lowers fusion temperature and sodium oxide reduces viscosity at high temperature. In this work a study based on the composition-property relations was made. We used different techniques to characterize a series of iron-lead-phosphate glasses with uranium and aluminium oxide as simulated nuclear waste. We used the Arquimedes method to determine the bulk density, differential temperature analysis (DTA) to determine both glass transition temperature and crystallization temperature, dilatometric analysis to calculate the linear thermal expansion coefficient, chemical durability (MCC-1 test) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). We also applied some theoretic models to calculate activation energies associated with the glass transition temperature and crystallization processes. (author)

  8. Liquid sodium pool fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casselman, C [DSN/SESTR, Centre de Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1979-03-01

    Experimental sodium pool combustion results have led to a definition of the combustion kinetics, and have revealed the hazards of sodium-concrete contact reactions and the possible ignition of organic matter (paint) by hydration of sodium peroxide aerosols. Analysis of these test results shows that the controlling mechanism is sodium evaporation diffusion. (author)

  9. Liquid sodium pool fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casselman, C.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental sodium pool combustion results have led to a definition of the combustion kinetics, and have revealed the hazards of sodium-concrete contact reactions and the possible ignition of organic matter (paint) by hydration of sodium peroxide aerosols. Analysis of these test results shows that the controlling mechanism is sodium evaporation diffusion. (author)

  10. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  11. Crystallization In Multicomponent Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  12. Effect of the addition of Na2O on the thermal stability of alumino silicated glasses rich in rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassalle-Herraud, Olivier; Matecki, Marc; Glorieux, Benoit; Sadiki, Najim; Montoullout, Valerie; Dussossoy, Jean-Luc

    2006-01-01

    Alumino silicated glasses rich in rare earths have been prepared by concentrated solar way. Their recrystallization, the structural and microstructural properties as well as the mechanical and thermal properties of these glasses have been studied. The results show the effect of sodium addition on the thermal stability of the materials, the vitreous transition temperature and the recrystallization temperature. A heat treatment has allowed to reveal the formation of sodium apatite micro-crystallites and of lanthanum silicate in the glasses. (O.M.)

  13. Small liquid sodium leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufresne, J.; Rochedereux, Y.; Antonakas, D.; Casselman, C.; Malet, J.C.

    1986-05-01

    Usually, pessimistic considerations inassessing the safety of secondary sodium loops in LMFBR reactor lead to assume guillotine rupture releasing a large amount of sodium estimate the consequences of large sodium fires. In order to reduce these consequences, one has to detect the smallest leak as soon as possible and to evaluate the future of an initial small leak. Analysis of the relationship between crack size and sodium outflow rate; Analysis of a sodium pipe with a small open crack

  14. Recycling of Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Damgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Glass is used for many purposes, but in the waste system glass is predominantly found in terms of beverage and food containers with a relatively short lifetime before ending up in the waste. Furthermore there is a large amount of flat glass used in building materials which also ends up in the waste...... system; this glass though has a long lifetime before ending up in the waste. Altogether these product types add up to 82% of the production of the European glass industry (IPCC, 2001). Recycling of glass in terms of cleaning and refilling of bottles as well as the use of broken glass in the production...... of new glass containers is well established in the glass industry. This chapter describes briefly howglass is produced and howwaste glass is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of glass recycling....

  15. Fractographic features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based dental restorations fractured during clinical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oilo, Marit; Hardang, Anne D; Ulsund, Amanda H; Gjerdet, Nils R

    2014-06-01

    Fractures during clinical function have been reported as the major concern associated with all-ceramic dental restorations. The aim of this study was to analyze the fracture features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based restorations fractured during clinical use. Twenty-seven crowns and onlays were supplied by dentists and dental technicians with information about type of cement and time in function, if available. Fourteen lithium disilicate glass-ceramic restorations and 13 zirconia-based restorations were retrieved and analyzed. Fractographic features were examined using optical microscopy to determine crack initiation and crack propagation of the restorations. The material comprised fractured restorations from one canine, 10 incisors, four premolars, and 11 molars. One crown was not categorized because of difficulty in orientation of the fragments. The results revealed that all core and veneer fractures initiated in the cervical margin and usually from the approximal area close to the most coronally placed curvature of the margin. Three cases of occlusal chipping were found. The margin of dental all-ceramic single-tooth restorations was the area of fracture origin. The fracture features were similar for zirconia, glass-ceramic, and alumina single-tooth restorations. Design features seem to be of great importance for fracture initiation. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  16. Electrical conductivity and viscosity of borosilicate glasses and melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrt, Doris; Keding, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    , 0 to 62·5 mol% B2O3, and 25 to 85 mol% SiO2. The glass samples were characterised by different methods. Refractive indices, density and thermal expansion were measured. Phase separation effects were investigated by electron microscopy. The electrical conductivity of glasses and melts were determined......Simple sodium borosilicate and silicate glasses were melted on a very large scale (35 l Pt crucible) to prepare model glasses of optical quality in order to investigate various properties depending on their structure. The composition of the glass samples varied in a wide range: 3 to 33·3 mol% Na2O...... by impedance measurements in a wide temperature range (250 to 1450°C). The activation energies were calculated by Arrhenius plots in various temperature regions: below the glass transition temperature, Tg, above the melting point, Tl, and between Tg and Tl. Viscosity measurements were carried out...

  17. Comparison of the marginal fit of lithium disilicate crowns fabricated with CAD/CAM technology by using conventional impressions and two intraoral digital scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Azim, Tamer; Rogers, Kelly; Elathamna, Eiad; Zandinejad, Amirali; Metz, Michael; Morton, Dean

    2015-10-01

    Conventional impression materials and techniques have been used successfully to fabricate fixed restorations. Recently, digital pathways have been developed, but insufficient data are available regarding their marginal accuracy. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the marginal gap discrepancy of lithium disilicate single crowns fabricated with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology by using both conventional and 2 digital impression techniques. One typodont maxillary right central incisor was prepared for a ceramic crown. Ten impressions were made by using each method: conventional with polyvinyl siloxane impression material, Lava COS (3M ESPE), and iTero (Cadent) intraoral scanning devices. Lithium disilicate (e.max CAD) crowns were fabricated with CAD/CAM technology, and the marginal gap was measured for each specimen at 4 points under magnification with a stereomicroscope. The mean measurement for each location and overall mean gap size by group were calculated. Statistically significant differences among the impression techniques were tested with F and t tests (α=.05). The average (±SD) gap for the conventional impression group was 112.3 (±35.3) μm. The digital impression groups had similar average gap sizes; the Lava group was 89.8 (±25.4) μm, and the iTero group was 89.6 (±30.1) μm. No statistically significant difference was found in the effects among impression techniques (P=.185) CONCLUSIONS: Within the limitations of this study, digital and conventional impressions were found to produce crowns with similar marginal accuracy. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Glass: a candidate engineered material for management of high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, R.K.; Kaushik, C.P.

    2011-01-01

    While the commercial importance of glass is generally recognized, a few people are aware of extremely wide range of glass formulations that can be made and of the versatility of this engineered material. Some of the recent developments in the field of glass leading to various technological applications include glass fiber reinforcement of cement to give new building materials, substrates for microelectronics circuitry in form of semiconducting glasses, nuclear waste immobilization and specific medical applications. The present paper covers fundamental understanding of glass structure and its application for immobilization of high level radioactive liquid waste. High level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) arising during reprocessing of spent fuel are immobilized in sodium borosilicate glass matrix developed indigenously. Glass compositions are modified according to the composition of HLW to meet the criteria of desirable properties in terms. These glass matrices have been characterized for different properties like homogeneity, chemical durability, thermal stability and radiation stability. (author)

  19. Spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mookerjee, Abhijit

    1976-01-01

    ''Spin glasses'', are entire class of magnetic alloys of moderate dilution, in which the magnetic atoms are far enough apart to be unlike the pure metal, but close enough so that the indirect exchange energy between them (mediated by the s-d interaction between local moments and conduction electrons) dominates all other energies. Characteristic critical phenomena displayed such as freezing of spin orientation at 'Tsub(c)' and spreading of magnetic ordering, are pointed out. Anomalous behaviour, associated with these critical phenomena, as reflected in : (i) Moessbauer spectroscopy giving hyperfine splitting at Tsub(c), (ii) maxima in susceptibility and remanent magnetism, (iii) thermopower maxima and change in slope, (iv) Characteristic cusp in susceptibility and its removal by very small magnetic fields, and (v) conductivity-resistivity measurements, are discussed. Theoretical developments aimed at explaining these phenomena, in particular, the ideas from percolation and localisation theories, and the approach based on the gellations of polymers, are discussed. Finally, a new approach based on renormalisation group in disordered systems is also briefly mentioned. (K.B.)

  20. Fluoride removal performance of glass derived hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Wen; Zhan, Lei; Piao, Longhua; Russel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Novel sodium calcium borate glass derived hydroxyapatite (G-HAP) is prepared. → Micro-G-HAP adsorbs F - ions in solutions more effectively than commercial nano-HAP. → The adsorption kinetics and isotherms are well fitted by a second order kinetic model and Freundlich isotherm model. -- Abstract: A novel sodium calcium borate glass derived hydroxyapatite (G-HAP) with different ranges of particle size was prepared by immersion sodium calcium borate glass in 0.1 M K 2 HPO 4 solution by the ratio of 50 g L -1 for 7 days. The unique advantage of G-HAP for the adsorption of fluoride ions in solutions was studied. The effects of size and quantity of particles, pH value and adsorption time on adsorption performance were investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity was 17.34 mg g -1 if 5 g L -1 , - in solution more effectively than commercial nano-HAP, which makes potential application of the G-HAP in removing the fluoride ions from wastewater. The adsorption kinetics and isotherms for F - could be well fitted by a second order kinetic model and Freundlich isotherm model respectively, which could be used to describe the adsorption behavior. The mechanism of G-HAP in immobilizing F - from aqueous solutions was investigated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectra (IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  1. Sodium Ferric Gluconate Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium ferric gluconate injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of ... are also receiving the medication epoetin (Epogen, Procrit). Sodium ferric gluconate injection is in a class of ...

  2. Naproxen sodium overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002507.htm Naproxen sodium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Naproxen sodium is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used ...

  3. Sodium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium hydroxide is a very strong chemical. It is also known as lye and caustic soda. This ... poisoning from touching, breathing in (inhaling), or swallowing sodium hydroxide. This article is for information only. Do ...

  4. Sodium pumping: pump problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guer, M.; Guiton, P.

    Information on sodium pumps for LMFBR type reactors is presented concerning ring pump design, pool reactor pump design, secondary pumps, sodium bearings, swivel joints of the oscillating annulus, and thermal shock loads

  5. Docusate Sodium and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a risk of miscarriage. Can use of docusate sodium during pregnancy cause birth defects? Few studies have been done to look at the possible risks of docusate sodium during pregnancy. However, the available studies show that when used ...

  6. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium carbonate (known as washing soda or soda ash) is a chemical found in many household and industrial products. This article focuses on poisoning due to sodium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  7. ELTA: Citatrademark: Sodium measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauvais, O.

    2002-01-01

    ELTA is pleased to present its last model of Sodium analyzers: CITA 2340: Automatically controlled sodium meter, integrating more automation and performances results respecting costs and wastes reduction. (authors)

  8. Liquid sodium technology research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W.C.; Lee, Y.W.; Nam, H.Y.; Chun, S.Y.; Kim, J.; Won, S.Y.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the technology of impurity control and measurement of liquid sodium, problems associated with material degradation and change of heat transfer characteristics in liquid sodium, and the conceptual design of multipurpose sodium test loop. Discussion and the subsequent analysis are also made with regard to the test results for the sodium-H 2 0 reaction and its effects on the system. (author)

  9. Evolution of mechanical properties of silicate glasses: Impact of the chemical composition and effects of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlet, Marina

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines: (1) how the chemical composition changes the hardness, toughness, and stress corrosion cracking behavior in model pristine and (2) how external irradiation impact these properties. It is to be incorporated in the context of the storage of nuclear waste in borosilicate glass matrix, the structural integrity of which should be assessed. Eight simplified borosilicate glasses made of 3 oxides with modulated proportions (SiO 2 -B 2 O 3 -Na 2 O (SBN) have been selected and their hardness, toughness, and stress corrosion cracking behavior have been characterized prior and after irradiation. The comparative study of the non-irradiated SBN glasses provides the role played by the chemical composition. The sodium content is found to be the key parameter: As it increases, the glass plasticity increases, leading to changes in the mechanical response to strain. Hardness (Hv) and toughness (Kc) decrease since the flow under indenter increases. The analysis of the stress corrosion behavior evidences a clear shift of the SCC curves linked also to the glass plasticity. Four of the 8 simplified SBN glass systems highlight the influence of electron, light and heavy ions irradiations on the mechanical properties. Once again, the sodium content is a key parameter. It is found to inhibit the glass modification: Glasses with high sodium content are more stable. Ions irradiations highlight the predominant role of nuclear interaction in changing the glass properties. Finally, electronic interaction induced by helium and electron irradiation does not lead to the same structural/mechanical glasses variations. (author) [fr

  10. Demonstration of sulfur solubility determinations in high waste loading, low-activity waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-04-25

    A method recommended by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for sulfate solubility determinations in simulated low-activity waste glasses was demonstrated using three compositions from a recent Hanford high waste loading glass study. Sodium and sulfate concentrations in the glasses increased after each re-melting step. Visual observations of the glasses during the re-melting process reflected the changes in composition. The measured compositions showed that the glasses met the targeted values. The amount of SO3 retained in the glasses after washing was relatively high, ranging from 1.6 to 2.6 weight percent (wt %). Measured SnO2 concentrations were notably low in all of the study glasses. The composition of the wash solutions should be measured in future work to determine whether SnO2 is present with the excess sulfate washed from the glass. Increases in batch size and the amount of sodium sulfate added did not have a measureable impact on the amount of sulfate retained in the glass, although this was tested for only a single glass composition. A batch size of 250 g and a sodium sulfate addition targeting 7 wt %, as recommended by PNNL, will be used in future experiments.

  11. Glass material oxidation and dissolution system: Converting miscellaneous fissile materials to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Ferrada, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    The cold war and the development of nuclear energy have resulted in significant inventories of miscellaneous fissile materials (MFMs). MFMs include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel (SNF), (3) certain hot cell wastes, and (4) many one-of-a-kind materials. Major concerns associated with the long-term management of these materials include: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns. waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by converting the MFMs to glass for secure, long-term storage or repository disposal; however, conventional glass-making processes require oxide-like feed materials. Converting MFMs to oxide-like materials with subsequent vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), which directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride (NaCl) stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium, Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. However, significant work is required to develop GMODS further for applications at an industrial scale. If implemented, GMODS will provide a new approach to manage these materials

  12. Study on Modified Water Glass Used in High Temperature Protective Glass Coating for Ti-6Al-4V Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Yang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Sodium silicate water glass was modified with sodium polyacrylate as the binder, the composite slurry used for high-temperature oxidation-resistant coating was prepared by mixing glass powder with good lubrication properties in the binder. The properties of the modified binder and high-temperature oxidation resistance of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy coated with composite glass coating were studied by XRD, SEM, EDS, TG-DSC and so on. Results showed that sodium polyacrylate modified water glass could obviously improve the suspension stability of the binder, the pyrolytic carbon in the binder at high temperature could increase the surface tension in the molten glass system, and the composite glass coating could be smooth and dense after heating. Pyrolytic carbon diffused and combined with oxygen in the coating under the heating process to protect the titanium alloy from oxidation. The thickness of the oxide layer was reduced 51% after applying the high-temperature oxidation-resistant coating. The coating also showed a nearly 30% reduction in friction coefficient due to the boundary lubricant regime. During cooling, the coating could be peeled off easily because of the mismatched CTE between the coating and substrate.

  13. Sodium sieving in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusthoven, Esther; Krediet, Raymond T.; Willems, Hans L.; Monnens, Leo A.; Schröder, Cornelis H.

    2005-01-01

    Sodium sieving is a consequence of dissociation between the amount of water and sodium transported over the peritoneal membrane. This dissociation occurs in the presence of aquaporin-mediated water transport. Sieving of sodium can be used as a rough measure for aquaporin-mediated water transport.

  14. Phase separation of cesium from lead borosilicate glass by heat treatment under a reducing atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhanglian; Okada, Takashi, E-mail: t-okada@u-fukui.ac.jp; Nishimura, Fumihiro; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Cesium was phase separated from lead borosilicate glass under a reductive atmosphere. • The phase separation occurred on the glass surface that was in contact with the gas. • The leachability of cesium was enhanced by the phase separation. • The degree of such enhancement varied depending on the heat treatment conditions. - Abstract: A phase-separation technique for removing sodium from glass using a heat-treatment method under a reducing atmosphere was previously developed for sodium recovery from waste glass. In this study, this technique was applied to cesium-containing lead borosilicate glass to concentrate the cesium in phase-separated sodium-rich materials for efficient cesium extraction. The theoretical phase-separation temperature of the sodium-rich phase was simulated by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and was predicted to occur below 700 °C for lead borosilicate glass. Experimentally, a simulated lead borosilicate glass was melted at 1000 °C and subsequently annealed below 700 °C under a CO-containing reducing atmosphere. The phase separation of cesium was found to occur with sodium enrichment on the glass surface that was in contact with the gas phase, promoting cesium extraction from the treated glass using water. The cesium extraction efficiency was affected by the surface area of the treated glass that was in contact with water, and under the examined conditions, the cesium extraction efficiency was up to 66%. Phase separation using reductive heat treatment, combined with a water leaching technique, is suggested to be effective for extracting cesium incorporated in borosilicate glass waste.

  15. Composition-Structure-Property Relationships in Boroaluminosilicate Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Qiuju; Potuzak, M.; Mauro, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    boroaluminosilicate glasses from peralkaline to peraluminous compositions by substituting Al2O3 for SiO2. Our results reveal a pronounced change in all the measured physical properties (density, elastic moduli, hardness, glass transition temperature, and liquid fragility) around [Al2O3]–[Na2O]=0. The structural......The complicated structural speciation in boroaluminosilicate glasses leads to a mixed network former effect yielding nonlinear variation in many macroscopic properties as a function of chemical composition. Here we study the composition–structure–property relationships in a series of sodium...

  16. lead glass brick

    CERN Multimedia

    When you look through the glass at a picture behind, the picture appears raised up because light is slowed down in the dense glass. It is this density (4.06 gcm-3) that makes lead glass attractive to physicists. The refractive index of the glass is 1.708 at 400nm (violet light), meaning that light travels in the glass at about 58% its normal speed. At CERN, the OPAL detector uses some 12000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies.

  17. Influence of fining agents on glass melting: A review, Part 2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hujová, Miroslava; Vernerová, Miroslava

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2017), s. 202-208 ISSN 0862-5468 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melting * sodium sulphate * chemical reactions * gas evolution * dissolution * fining * bubble nucleation * foaming Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass OBOR OECD: Ceramics Impact factor: 0.439, year: 2016

  18. Pressure-Induced Changes in Inter-Diffusivity and Compressive Stress in Chemically Strengthened Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Mouritz Nolsøe; Thirion, Lynn M.; Youngman, Randall E.

    chamber to compress bulk glass samples isostatically up to 1 GPa at elevated temperature before or after the ion exchange treatment of an industrial sodium-magnesium aluminosilicate glass. Compression of the samples prior to ion exchange leads to a decreased Na+-K+ inter-diffusivity, increased compressive...

  19. Influence of fining agents on glass melting: A review, Part 1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hujová, Miroslava; Vernerová, Miroslava

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 2 (2017), s. 119-126 ISSN 0862-5468 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melting * sodium sulphate * chemical reactions * gas evolution * dissolution * fining * bubble nucleation * foaming Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass OBOR OECD: Ceramics Impact factor: 0.439, year: 2016

  20. Report of sodium cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murai, Hitoshi; Shima, Akira; Oba, Toshisaburo; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki

    1975-01-01

    The damage of components for LMFBRs due to sodium cavitation is serious problem. This report summarizes the following items, (1) mechanism of the incipience of sodium cavitation, (2) damage due to sodium cavitation, (3) detection method for sodium cavitation, and (4) estimation method for sodium cavitation by the comparison with water cavitation. Materials were collected from the reports on liquid metal cavitation, sodium cavitation and water cavitation published from 1965 to now. The mechanism of the incipience of sodium cavitation cavitation parameters (mean location, distributed amount or occurrence aspect and stability), experiment of causing cavitation with Venturi tube, and growth of bubbles within superheated sodium. The sodium cavitation damage was caused by magnetostriction vibration method and with Venturi tube. The state of damage was investigated with the cavitation performance of a sodium pump, and the damage was examined in view of the safety of LMFBR plants. Sodium cavitation was detected with acoustic method, radiation method, and electric method. The effect of physical property of liquid on incipient cavitation was studied. These are thermodynamic effect based on quasistatic thermal equilibrium condition and the effect of the physical property of liquid based on bubble dynamics. (Iwase, T.)

  1. Sodium safety manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, D.J.; Gardiner, R.L.

    1980-09-01

    The sodium safety manual is based upon more than a decade of experience with liquid sodium at Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories (BNL). It draws particularly from the expertise and experience developed in the course of research work into sodium fires and sodium water reactions. It draws also on information obtained from the UKAEA and other sodium users. Many of the broad principles will apply to other Establishments but much of the detail is specific to BNL and as a consequence its application at other sites may well be limited. Accidents with sodium are at best unpleasant and at worst lethal in an extremely painful way. The object of this manual is to help prevent sodium accidents. It is not intended to give detailed advice on specific precautions for particular situations, but rather to set out the overall strategy which will ensure that sodium activities will be pursued safely. More detail is generally conveyed to staff by the use of local instructions known as Sodium Working Procedures (SWP's) which are not reproduced in this manual although a list of current SWP's is included. Much attention is properly given to the safe design and operation of larger facilities; nevertheless evidence suggests that sodium accidents most frequently occur in small-scale work particularly in operations associated with sodium cleaning and special care is needed in all such cases. (U.K.)

  2. Revealing the fast atomic motion of network glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruta, B; Baldi, G; Chushkin, Y; Rufflé, B; Cristofolini, L; Fontana, A; Zanatta, M; Nazzani, F

    2014-05-19

    Still very little is known on the relaxation dynamics of glasses at the microscopic level due to the lack of experiments and theories. It is commonly believed that glasses are in a dynamical arrested state, with relaxation times too large to be observed on human time scales. Here we provide the experimental evidence that glasses display fast atomic rearrangements within a few minutes, even in the deep glassy state. Following the evolution of the structural relaxation in a sodium silicate glass, we find that this fast dynamics is accompanied by the absence of any detectable aging, suggesting a decoupling of the relaxation time and the viscosity in the glass. The relaxation time is strongly affected by the network structure with a marked increase at the mesoscopic scale associated with the ion-conducting pathways. Our results modify the conception of the glassy state and asks for a new microscopic theory.

  3. Migration behaviour of Pu released from Pu-doped glass in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashida, T.; Kohara, Y.; Yui, M.

    1994-01-01

    In order to investigate the coupled behavior of Pu release from the waste glass and transport in bentonite, a migration experiment with compacted sodium-type bentonite saturated with distilled water was carried out at room temperature, in which Pu-doped borosilicate glass was sandwiched. Under these conditions, leaching of Pu from the glass, diffusion and sorption of Pu in the compacted bentonite occur simultaneously. (orig.)

  4. Identification of glass compositions suitable for disposal of waste reactive metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, R.; Brown, A.P.; Kumar, R.; San-Pedro, R.; Freeman, C.J.; Helt, J.E.

    1988-09-01

    This study was conducted in support of a project to convert waste sodium to a form that is amenable to easy disposal in ordinary landfills. This waste sodium will be from reactor and other operations at the US Department of Energy and will contain small amounts of radioactive species that must not be released to the environment in an uncontrolled manner. The sodium will be converted into a glass that will contain and isolate the radionuclides present in it. This study was conducted to define acceptable glass compositions that (1) are resistant to leaching of sodium by groundwater and rainwater, (2) contain a relatively large proportion of sodium so that unreasonably large volumes of the glass for disposal will not be produced, and (3) are conveniently prepared from the waste sodium. For this purpose, glass samples containing varying amounts of the oxides of sodium, calcium, boron, aluminum, and silicon were prepared in the laboratory. The samples were subjected to the accelerated MCC-1 test to determine resistance to leaching by water at 60/degree/C. Soda-silica glasses were observed to dissolve in the water rather quickly. Addition of the other ingredients was found to impart significant leach resistance to the glasses. Among the high-Na 2 O glasses, those containing alumina (3% Al 2 O 3 -10% CaO-30% Na 2 O and 6% Al 2 O 3 -10% B 2 O 3 -30% Na 2 O) were found to be most resistant to leaching. Lowering the Na 2 O content to 20% made these glasses even more leach resistant. 8 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Glass and nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombret, C.

    1982-10-01

    Glass shows interesting technical and economical properties for long term storage of solidified radioactive wastes by vitrification or embedding. Glass composition, vitrification processes, stability under irradiation, thermal stability and aqueous corrosion are studied [fr

  6. Microstructuring of glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Hülsenberg, Dagmar; Bismarck, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    As microstructured glass becomes increasingly important for microsystems technology, the main application fields include micro-fluidic systems, micro-analysis systems, sensors, micro-actuators and implants. And, because glass has quite distinct properties from silicon, PMMA and metals, applications exist where only glass devices meet the requirements. The main advantages of glass derive from its amorphous nature, the precondition for its - theoretically - direction-independent geometric structurability. Microstructuring of Glasses deals with the amorphous state, various glass compositions and their properties, the interactions between glasses and the electromagnetic waves used to modify it. Also treated in detail are methods for influencing the geometrical microstructure of glasses by mechanical, chemical, thermal, optical, and electrical treatment, and the methods and equipment required to produce actual microdevices.

  7. Dialysate sodium and sodium gradient in maintenance hemodialysis: a neglected sodium restriction approach?

    OpenAIRE

    Munoz Mendoza, Jair; Sun, Sumi; Chertow, Glenn M.; Moran, John; Doss, Sheila; Schiller, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Background. A higher sodium gradient (dialysate sodium minus pre-dialysis plasma sodium) during hemodialysis (HD) has been associated with sodium loading; however, its role is not well studied. We hypothesized that a sodium dialysate prescription resulting in a higher sodium gradient is associated with increases in interdialytic weight gain (IDWG), blood pressure (BP) and thirst.

  8. Mechanical behavior of bulk direct composite versus block composite and lithium disilicate indirect Class II restorations by CAD-FEM modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausiello, Pietro; Ciaramella, Stefano; Fabianelli, Andrea; Gloria, Antonio; Martorelli, Massimo; Lanzotti, Antonio; Watts, David C

    2017-06-01

    To study the influence of resin based and lithium disilicate materials on the stress and strain distributions in adhesive class II mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) restorations using numerical finite element analysis (FEA). To investigate the materials combinations in the restored teeth during mastication and their ability to relieve stresses. One 3D model of a sound lower molar and three 3D class II MOD cavity models with 95° cavity-margin-angle shapes were modelled. Different material combinations were simulated: model A, with a 10μm thick resin bonding layer and a resin composite bulk filling material; model B, with a 70μm resin cement with an indirect CAD-CAM resin composite inlay; model C, with a 70μm thick resin cement with an indirect lithium disilicate machinable inlay. To simulate polymerization shrinkage effects in the adhesive layers and bulk fill composite, the thermal expansion approach was used. Shell elements were employed for representing the adhesive layers. 3D solid CTETRA elements with four grid points were employed for modelling the food bolus and tooth. Slide-type contact elements were used between the tooth surface and food. A vertical occlusal load of 600 N was applied, and nodal displacements on the bottom cutting surfaces were constrained in all directions. All the materials were assumed to be isotropic and elastic and a static linear analysis was performed. Displacements were different in models A, B and C. Polymerization shrinkage hardly affected model A and mastication only partially affected mechanical behavior. Shrinkage stress peaks were mainly located marginally along the enamel-restoration interface at occlusal and mesio-distal sites. However, at the internal dentinal walls, stress distributions were critical with the highest maximum stresses concentrated in the proximal boxes. In models B and C, shrinkage stress was only produced by the 70μm thick resin layer, but the magnitudes depended on the Young's modulus (E) of the inlay

  9. Gamma radiation induced changes in nuclear waste glass containing Eu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, M.; Kadam, R. M.; Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P.; Tomar, B. S.; Godbole, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    Gamma radiation induced changes were investigated in sodium-barium borosilicate glasses containing Eu. The glass composition was similar to that of nuclear waste glasses used for vitrifying Trombay research reactor nuclear waste at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. Photoluminescence (PL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques were used to study the speciation of the rare earth (RE) ion in the matrix before and after gamma irradiation. Judd-Ofelt ( J- O) analyses of the emission spectra were done before and after irradiation. The spin counting technique was employed to quantify the number of defect centres formed in the glass at the highest gamma dose studied. PL data suggested the stabilisation of the trivalent RE ion in the borosilicate glass matrix both before and after irradiation. It was also observed that, the RE ion distributes itself in two different environments in the irradiated glass. From the EPR data it was observed that, boron oxygen hole centre based radicals are the predominant defect centres produced in the glass after irradiation along with small amount of E’ centres. From the spin counting studies the concentration of defect centres in the glass was calculated to be 350 ppm at 900 kGy. This indicated the fact that bulk of the glass remained unaffected after gamma irradiation up to 900 kGy.

  10. Measurement of optical glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolau-Rebigan, S.

    1978-11-01

    The possibilities of measurement of the optical glasses parameters needed in building optical devices especially in lasers devices are presented. In the first chapter the general features of the main optical glasses as well as the modalities of obtaining them are given. Chapter two defines the optical glass parameters, and the third chapter describes the measuring methods of the optical glass parameters. Finally, the conclusions which point out the utilization of this paper are presented. (author)

  11. Utilization of borosilicate glass for transuranic waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledford, J.A.; Williams, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    Incinerated transuranic waste and other low-level residues have been successfully vitrified by mixing with boric acid and sodium carbonate and heating to 1050 0 C in a bench-scale continuous melter. The resulting borosilicate glass demonstrates excellent mechanical durability and chemical stability

  12. Mechanically reinforced glass beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes

    2007-01-01

    laminated float glass beam is constructed and tested in four-point bending. The beam consist of 4 layers of glass laminated together with a slack steel band glued onto the bottom face of the beam. The glass parts of the tested beams are \\SI{1700}{mm} long and \\SI{100}{mm} high, and the total width of one...

  13. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La.sub.2 O.sub.3), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li.sub.2 O), sodium oxide (Na.sub.2 O), silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), or titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900.degree. C., and generally about 700.degree.-800.degree. C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  14. Role of SrO on the bioactivity behavior of some ternary borate glasses and their glass ceramic derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelghany, A. M.; Ouis, M. A.; Azooz, M. A.; ElBatal, H. A.; El-Bassyouni, G. T.

    2016-01-01

    Borate glasses containing SrO substituting both CaO and NaO were prepared and characterized for their bioactivity or bone bonding ability. Glass ceramic derivatives were prepared by thermal heat treatment process. FTIR, XRD and SEM measurements for the prepared glass and glass-ceramics before and after immersion in sodium phosphate solution for one and two weeks were carried out. The appearance of two IR peaks within the range 550-680 cm-1 after immersion in phosphate solution indicates the formation of hydroxyapatite or equivalent Sr phosphate layer. X-ray diffraction data agree with the FTIR spectral analysis. The solubility test was carried out for both glasses and glass ceramics derivatives in the same phosphate solution. The introduction of SrO increases the solubility for both glasses and glass ceramics and this is assumed to be due to the formation of Sr phosphate which is more soluble than calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite). SEM images reveal varying changes in the surfaces of glass ceramics after immersion according to the SrO content.

  15. Role of SrO on the bioactivity behavior of some ternary borate glasses and their glass ceramic derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelghany, A M; Ouis, M A; Azooz, M A; ElBatal, H A; El-Bassyouni, G T

    2016-01-05

    Borate glasses containing SrO substituting both CaO and NaO were prepared and characterized for their bioactivity or bone bonding ability. Glass ceramic derivatives were prepared by thermal heat treatment process. FTIR, XRD and SEM measurements for the prepared glass and glass-ceramics before and after immersion in sodium phosphate solution for one and two weeks were carried out. The appearance of two IR peaks within the range 550-680cm(-1) after immersion in phosphate solution indicates the formation of hydroxyapatite or equivalent Sr phosphate layer. X-ray diffraction data agree with the FTIR spectral analysis. The solubility test was carried out for both glasses and glass ceramics derivatives in the same phosphate solution. The introduction of SrO increases the solubility for both glasses and glass ceramics and this is assumed to be due to the formation of Sr phosphate which is more soluble than calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite). SEM images reveal varying changes in the surfaces of glass ceramics after immersion according to the SrO content. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Diopside-Fluorapatite-Wollastonite Based Bioactive Glasses and Glass-ceramics =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansal, Ishu

    Bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics are a class of biomaterials which elicit special response on their surface when in contact with biological fluids, leading to strong bonding to living tissue. This particular trait along with good sintering ability and high mechanical strength make them ideal materials for scaffold fabrication. The work presented in this thesis is directed towards understanding the composition-structure-property relationships in potentially bioactive glasses designed in CaO-MgO-P2O5-SiO2-F system, in some cases with added Na2O. The main emphasis has been on unearthing the influence of glass composition on molecular structure, sintering ability and bioactivity of phosphosilicate glasses. The parent glass compositions have been designed in the primary crystallization field of the pseudo-ternary system of diopside (CaO•MgO•2SiO2) - fluorapatite (9CaO•3P2O5•CaF2) - wollastonite (CaO•SiO2), followed by studying the impact of compositional variations on the structure-property relationships and sintering ability of these glasses. All the glasses investigated in this work have been synthesized via melt-quenching route and have been characterized for their molecular structure, sintering ability, chemical degradation and bioactivity using wide array of experimental tools and techniques. It has been shown that in all investigated glass compositions the silicate network was mainly dominated by Q2 units while phosphate in all the glasses was found to be coordinated in orthophosphate environment. The glass compositions designed in alkali-free region of diopside - fluorapatite system demonstrated excellent sintering ability and good bioactivity in order to qualify them as potential materials for scaffold fabrication while alkali-rich bioactive glasses not only hinder the densification during sintering but also induce cytotoxicity in vitro, thus, are not ideal candidates for in vitro tissue engineering. One of our bioglass compositions with low sodium

  17. Solubilities of sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in simulated nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, D.A.; Herting, D.L.

    1984-09-01

    Solubilities were determined for sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in synthetic nuclear waste liquor. Solubilities were determined as a function of temperature and solution composition (concentrations of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate). Temperature had the greatest effect on the solubilities of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite and a somewhat lesser effect on sodium aluminate solubility. Hydroxide had a great effect on the solubilities of all three salts. Other solution components had minor effects. 2 references, 8 figures, 11 tables

  18. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  19. Multiple Glass Ceilings

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Giovanni; Hassink, Wolter

    2011-01-01

    Both vertical (between job levels) and horizontal (within job levels) mobility can be sources of wage growth. We find that the glass ceiling operates at both margins. The unexplained part of the wage gap grows across job levels (glass ceiling at the vertical margin) and across the deciles of the intra-job-level wage distribution (glass ceiling at the horizontal margin). This implies that women face many glass ceilings, one for each job level above the second, and that the glass ceiling is a p...

  20. Homogeneity of Inorganic Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Zhang, L.; Keding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Homogeneity of glasses is a key factor determining their physical and chemical properties and overall quality. However, quantification of the homogeneity of a variety of glasses is still a challenge for glass scientists and technologists. Here, we show a simple approach by which the homogeneity...... of different glass products can be quantified and ranked. This approach is based on determination of both the optical intensity and dimension of the striations in glasses. These two characteristic values areobtained using the image processing method established recently. The logarithmic ratio between...

  1. Sodium aerosol recovering device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimori, Koji; Ueda, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Kazuhisa.

    1997-01-01

    A main body of a recovering device is disposed in a sodium cooled reactor or a sodium cooled test device. Air containing sodium aerosol is sucked into the main body of the recovering device by a recycling fan and introduced to a multi-staged metal mesh filter portion. The air about against each of the metal mesh filters, and the sodium aerosol in the air is collected. The air having a reduced sodium aerosol concentration circulates passing through a recycling fan and pipelines to form a circulation air streams. Sodium aerosol deposited on each of the metal mesh filters is scraped off periodically by a scraper driving device to prevent clogging of each of the metal filters. (I.N.)

  2. [Sodium intake during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delemarre, F M; Franx, A; Knuist, M; Steegers, E A

    1999-10-23

    International studies have yielded contradictory results on efficacy of a sodium-restricted diet during pregnancy in preventing and curing hypertension of pregnancy. In the Netherlands three studies have been performed to investigate the value of dietary sodium restriction in pregnancy; they concerned epidemiology, prevention and treatment. Midwives often prescribed this dietary intervention. Urinary sodium excretion was not related to blood pressure changes in pregnancy. Dietary sodium restriction from the third month of pregnancy onwards did not reduce the incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension. Maternal side effects were a decreased intake of nutrients, decreased maternal weight gain, lowered plasma volume and stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. A dietary sodium restriction in women with early symptoms of pregnancy-induced hypertension showed no therapeutic effect on blood pressure. There is no place for dietary sodium restriction in the prevention or treatment of hypertension in pregnancy.

  3. Sodium fire protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, C.; Kale, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    Results of experiments carried out with sodium fires to develop extinguishment techniques are presented. Characteristics, ignition temperature, heat evolution and other aspects of sodium fires are described. Out of the powders tested for extinguishment of 10 Kg sodium fires, sodium bi-carbonate based dry chemical powder has been found to be the best extinguisher followed by large sized vermiculite and then calcium carbonate powders distributed by spray nozzles. Powders, however, do not extinguish large fires effectively due to sodium-concrete reaction. To control large scale fires in a LMFBR, collection trays with protective cover have been found to cause oxygen starvation better than flooding with inert gas. This system has an added advantage in that there is no damage to the sodium facilities as has been in the case of powders which often contain chlorine compounds and cause stress corrosion cracking. (M.G.B.)

  4. Sodium fire suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malet, J C [DSN/SESTR, Centre de Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1979-03-01

    Ignition and combustion studies have provided valuable data and guidelines for sodium fire suppression research. The primary necessity is to isolate the oxidant from the fuel, rather than to attempt to cool the sodium below its ignition temperature. Work along these lines has led to the development of smothering tank systems and a dry extinguishing powder. Based on the results obtained, the implementation of these techniques is discussed with regard to sodium fire suppression in the Super-Phenix reactor. (author)

  5. Sodium fire suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malet, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Ignition and combustion studies have provided valuable data and guidelines for sodium fire suppression research. The primary necessity is to isolate the oxidant from the fuel, rather than to attempt to cool the sodium below its ignition temperature. Work along these lines has led to the development of smothering tank systems and a dry extinguishing powder. Based on the results obtained, the implementation of these techniques is discussed with regard to sodium fire suppression in the Super-Phenix reactor. (author)

  6. Comparative study of ion conducting pathways in borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Andreas; Swenson, Jan; Adams, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    The conduction pathways in metal-halide doped silver, lithium, and sodium diborate glasses have been examined by bond valence analysis of reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) produced structural models of the glasses. Although all glass compositions have basically the same short-range structure of the boron-oxygen network, it is evident that the intermediate-range structure is strongly dependent on the type of mobile ion. The topography of the pathways and the coordination of the pathway sites differ distinctly between the three glass systems. The mobile silver ions in the AgI-doped glass tend to be mainly iodine-coordinated and travel in homogeneously distributed pathways located in salt-rich channels of the borate network. In the NaCl-doped glass, there is an inhomogeneous spatial distribution of pathways that reflects the inhomogeneous introduction of salt ions into the glass. However, since the salt clusters are not connected, no long-range conduction pathways are formed without including also oxygen-rich regions. The pathways in the LiCl-doped glass are slightly more evenly distributed compared to the NaCl-doped glass (but not as ordered as in the AgI-doped glass), and the regions of mainly oxygen-coordinated pathway sites are of higher importance for the long-range migration. In order to more accurately investigate how these differences in the intermediate-range order of the glasses affect the ionic conductivity, we have compared the realistic structure models to more or less randomized structures. An important conclusion from this comparison is that we find no evidence that a pronounced intermediate-range order in the atomic structure or in the network of conduction pathways, as in the AgI-doped glass, is beneficial for the dc conductivity

  7. Thermal phase stability of some simulated Defense waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, R.P.

    1981-04-01

    Three simulated defense waste glass compositions developed by Savannah River Laboratories were studied to determine viscosity and compositional effects on the comparative thermal phase stabilities of these glasses. The glass compositions are similar except that the 411 glasses are high in lithium and low in sodium compared to the 211 glass, and the T glasses are high in iron and low in aluminum compared to the C glass. Specimens of these glasses were heat treated using isothermal anneals as short as 10 min and up to 15 days over the temperature range of 450 0 C to 1100 0 C. Additionally, a specimen of each glass was cooled at a constant cooling rate of 7 0 C/hour from an 1100 0 C melt down to 500 0 C where it was removed from the furnace. The following were observed. The slow cooling rate of 7 0 C/hour is possible as a canister centerline cooling rate for large canisters. Accordingly, it is important to note that a short range diffusion mechanism like cooperative growth phenomena can result in extensive devitrification at lower temperatures and higher yields than a long-range diffusion mechanism can; and can do it without the growth of large crystals that can fracture the glass. Refractory oxides like CeO 2 and (Ni, Mn, Fe) 2 O 4 form very rapidly at higher temperatures than silicates and significant yields can be obtained at sufficiently high temperatures that settling of these dense phases becomes a major microstructural feature during slow cooling of some glasses. These annealing studies further show that below 500 0 C there is but little devitrification occurring implying that glass canisters stored at 300 0 C may be kinetically stable despite not being thermodynamically so

  8. Thermal phase stability of some simulated Defense waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, R.P.

    1981-04-01

    Three simulated defense waste glass compositions developed by Savannah River Laboratories were studied to determine viscosity and compositional effects on the comparative thermal phase stabilities of these glasses. The glass compositions are similar except that the 411 glasses are high in lithium and low in sodium compared to the 211 glass, and the T glasses are high in iron and low in aluminum compared to the C glass. Specimens of these glasses were heat treated using isothermal anneals as short as 10 min and up to 15 days over the temperature range of 450/sup 0/C to 1100/sup 0/C. Additionally, a specimen of each glass was cooled at a constant cooling rate of 7/sup 0/C/hour from an 1100/sup 0/C melt down to 500/sup 0/C where it was removed from the furnace. The following were observed. The slow cooling rate of 7/sup 0/C/hour is possible as a canister centerline cooling rate for large canisters. Accordingly, it is important to note that a short range diffusion mechanism like cooperative growth phenomena can result in extensive devitrification at lower temperatures and higher yields than a long-range diffusion mechanism can; and can do it without the growth of large crystals that can fracture the glass. Refractory oxides like CeO/sub 2/ and (Ni, Mn, Fe)/sub 2/O/sub 4/ form very rapidly at higher temperatures than silicates and significant yields can be obtained at sufficiently high temperatures that settling of these dense phases becomes a major microstructural feature during slow cooling of some glasses. These annealing studies further show that below 500/sup 0/C there is but little devitrification occurring implying that glass canisters stored at 300/sup 0/C may be kinetically stable despite not being thermodynamically so.

  9. Leaching of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hench, L.L.

    1977-01-01

    Understanding surface compositional profiles of glasses over a range of 0-2000 A with a variety of analytical instruments shows that five general types of glass surfaces exist. The surface character of a glass article depends upon bulk composition and environmental history during which surface dealkalization, film formation, and network dissolution can occur. Environmental-surface interactions generally result in complex compositional profiles of all the constituents in a glass. Durable glasses almost always develop a stable surface film which has a higher concentration of network formers than the bulk composition. Compositional effects that are used to improve glass durability usually improve the stability of the surface films. Durability tests or service conditions that lead to film destruction are especially severe for the most silicate glasses. 43 references

  10. Sodium fill of FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldo, J.B.; Greenwell, R.K.; Keasling, T.A.; Collins, J.R.; Klos, D.B.

    1980-02-01

    With construction of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) completed, the first major objective in the startup program was to fill the sodium systems. A sodium fill sequence was developed to match construction completion, and as systems became available, they were inerted, preheated, and filled with sodium. The secondary sodium systems were filled first while dry refueling system testing was in progress in the reactor vessel. The reactor vessel and the primary loops were filled last. This paper describes the methods used and some of the key results achieved for this major FFTF objective

  11. Fires of sodium installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, L.; Tlalka, R.

    1984-01-01

    A survey is presented of the literature dealing with fires of sodium installations between 1974 and 1981. Also described are three experimental fires of ca 50 kg of sodium in an open area, monitored by UJV Rez. The experimental conditions of the experiments are described and a phenomenological description is presented of the course of the fires. The experiments showed a relationship between wind velocity in the area surrounding the fire and surface temperature of the sodium flame. Systems analysis methods were applied to sodium area, spray and tube fires. (author)

  12. Contribution to the study of transport and diffusion properties inside fluoride glasses based on zirconium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobe, Jean-Marc

    1995-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study of electric and diffusion properties of fluoride and fluorine-oxide glasses based on zirconium tetrafluoride, and more specifically in the case either of glasses free of alkaline fluoride, or of glasses containing lithium fluoride or sodium fluoride. Some techniques have been systematically used for this purpose: impedance spectroscopy, and NMR of Fluorine 19, lithium 7 or sodium 23 atoms. The objectives were to determine: 1) the presence or absence of different sites for fluorine ions and, should the occasion occurs, the distribution of these ions among the different sites; 2) the nature and number of mobile ions within these materials; 3) the role played by alkaline ions in these materials. After a presentation of experimental techniques, the author reports the comparative study of electric and diffusion properties of some sets of fluorinated glasses free of alkaline fluoride, and, for comparative purposes, of some crystallized phases having a similar composition. Two chapters respectively address the study of fluorinated glasses containing sodium fluoride and of fluorinated glasses containing sodium fluoride. Then, by applying the Almond-West model to some glasses containing NaF, conductivity parameters (number of carriers, mobility, entropic factor, and so on) have been assessed for a wide range of temperatures and frequencies. Movements of F ions determined by impedance spectroscopy are compared with those obtained by NMR. [fr

  13. Thermoluminescence properties of alkali borate glasses containing neodymium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, A.F.; Henaish, B.A.; Kenaway, M.A.; Salem, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    The thermoluminescence properties of sodium borate glasses as a function of neodymium oxide content as well as the divalent metal oxides (RO = ZnO, MgO and CaO) in replacement of Na/sub 2/O have been investigated. It is observed that the addition of Nd/sub 2/O/sub 3/ imparts to the host glass a monopeak glow curve according to an active luminescent centre (E approx. = 0.97 eV to 1.232 eV). The gradual addition of neodymium oxide to the sodium borate glass causes gradual enhancement in the TL-intensity up to a quenching concentration value (4 g Nd/sub 2/O/sub 3/ added to 100 g of borate glass) above which a draw back in TL-intensity occurs. On the other hand the replacement of 5 wt% Na/sub 2/O by RO shows that CaO dominates the other two divalent metal oxides used, as it possesses a much deeper luminescent trap (1.232 eV). The results obtained suggest that these glasses can be used in radiation detection and dosimetry. The ..gamma..-induced Tl-signal of such type of glass is found to be reproducible within an acceptable error of not more than 3.5% in all individual and group scattering over the detector samples each of which is used 10 times for evaluating the same ..gamma..-dose.

  14. The thermal electrical properties of lithium sodium borate gasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Anita R.; Bichile, G.K.

    2012-01-01

    Lithium sodium borate glasses with various composition have been prepared by melt quenching method. DSC studies were carried out. The glass transition temperature were found to decrease with alkali content in single alkali system and increase with second alkali content in mixed alkali system. The dc electrical conductivity has been measured as a function of temperature. The activation energy from the slope of the Arrhenius plots is calculated and it depends on the composition. In one set of single alkali glasses activation energies were found to increase with alkali content and in another set a single alkali system a transition from predominantly electronic to ionic conduction has been observed above 0.16 mol fraction of alkali content. The mixed alkali glasses have shown higher activation energies and lower conductivities. (author)

  15. Structure, biodegradation behavior and cytotoxicity of alkali-containing alkaline-earth phosphosilicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansal, Ishu; Reddy, AlluAmarnath; Muñoz, Francisco; Choi, Seong-Jun; Kim, Hae-Won; Tulyaganov, Dilshat U; Ferreira, José M F

    2014-11-01

    We report on the effect of sodium on the structure, chemical degradation and bioactivity of glasses in the CaO-MgO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 system. The (29)Si and (31)P magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of melt-quenched glasses with varying Na2O/MgO ratios exhibit a silicate glass network with the dominance of Q(2)(Si) units and phosphorus mainly forming orthophosphate species. Sodium incorporation in the glasses did not induce a significant structural change in the silicate network, while it did influence the phosphate environment due to its lower ionic field strength in comparison with that of magnesium. The apatite forming ability of glasses has been investigated by immersion of glass powders in simulated body fluid (SBF) for time durations varying between 1h and 7 days while their chemical degradation has been studied in Tris-HCl in accordance with ISO-10993-14. Increasing Na(+)/Mg(2+) ratio caused a decrease in the chemical durability of glasses and in the apatite forming ability especially during initial steps of interaction between glass and SBF solution. The cellular responses were observed in vitro on bulk glass samples using mouse-derived pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell line. The preliminary study suggested that the increasing alkali-concentration in glasses led to cytotoxicity in the cell culture medium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Visibility in sodium fume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, G.W.; Anderson, N.R.

    1971-01-01

    The appearance of sodium fume of unknown concentration and the effects of short term exposure on unprotected workers is described. The molecular extinction coefficient of sodium fume is calculated from which light transmission data, and a rapid method for the estimation of the fume concentration is proposed. (author)

  17. Sodium outleakage detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casselman, C.

    1979-01-01

    Effective detection of outleakage from sodium facilities permits timely intervention capable of limiting the consequences of such leakage. Two types of detection systems are described: local and overall detection. The use of two independent systems in sodium facilities is recommended. (author)

  18. Annular sodium flowsensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, W.C.; Brewer, J.; Forster, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a unique eddy-current type liquid sodium flowsensor, designed as a joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory and Kaman Instrumentation Corp. Test results are included for operation of the flowsensor mounted on a sodium test loop whose configuration simulates the actual operating conditions, except for the magnetic field of the ALIP

  19. Topological Origin of the Network Dilation Anomaly in Ion-Exchanged Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengyi; Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Mauro, John C.; Sant, Gaurav; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2017-11-01

    Ion exchange is commonly used to strengthen oxide glasses. However, the resulting stuffed glasses usually do not reach the molar volume of as-melted glasses of similar composition—a phenomenon known as the network dilation anomaly. This behavior seriously limits the potential for the chemical strengthening of glasses and its origin remains one of the mysteries of glass science. Here, based on molecular dynamics simulations of sodium silicate glasses coupled with topological constraint theory, we show that the topology of the atomic network controls the extent of ion-exchange-induced dilation. We demonstrate that isostatic glasses do not show any network dilation anomaly. This is found to arise from the combined absence of floppy modes of deformation and internal eigenstress in isostatic atomic networks.

  20. Reduction-induced inward diffusion and crystal growth on the surfaces of iron-bearing silicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S.J.; Tao, H.Z.; Zhang, Y.F.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the sodium inward diffusion (i.e., sodium diffusion from surface toward interior) in iron containing alkaline earth silicate glasses under reducing conditions around Tg and the induced surface crystallization. The surface crystallization is caused by formation of a silicate-gel lay......+ ions have stronger bonds to oxygen and lower coordination number (4~5) than Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+ ions. In contrast, a cristobalite layer forms in Ca-, Sr- and Ba-containing glasses....

  1. Conversion of plutonium-containing materials into borosilicate glass using the glass material oxidation and dissolution system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1996-01-01

    The end of the cold war has resulted in excess plutonium-containing materials (PCMs) in multiple chemical forms. Major problems are associated with the long-term management of these materials: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns; waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by conversion of the PCMs to glass: however, conventional glass processes require oxide-like feed materials. Conversion of PCMs to oxide-like materials followed by vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS) to allow direct conversion of PCMs to glass. GMODS directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium (a plutonium surrogate), Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. Equipment options have been identified for processing rates between 1 and 100,000 t/y. Significant work, including a pilot plant, is required to develop GMODS for applications at an industrial scale

  2. A-thermal elastic behavior of silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabia, Mohammed Kamel; Degioanni, Simon; Martinet, Christine; Le Brusq, Jacques; Champagnon, Bernard; Vouagner, Dominique

    2016-02-24

    Depending on the composition of silicate glasses, their elastic moduli can increase or decrease as function of the temperature. Studying the Brillouin frequency shift of these glasses versus temperature allows the a-thermal composition corresponding to an intermediate glass to be determined. In an intermediate glass, the elastic moduli are independent of the temperature over a large temperature range. For sodium alumino-silicate glasses, the a-thermal composition is close to the albite glass (NaAlSi3O8). The structural origin of this property is studied by in situ high temperature Raman scattering. The structure of the intermediate albite glass and of silica are compared at different temperatures between room temperature and 600 °C. When the temperature increases, it is shown that the high frequency shift of the main band at 440 cm(-1) in silica is a consequence of the cristobalite-like alpha-beta transformation of 6-membered rings. This effect is stronger in silica than bond elongation (anharmonic effects). As a consequence, the elastic moduli of silica increase as the temperature increases. In the albite glass, the substitution of 25% of Si(4+) ions by Al(3+) and Na(+) ions decreases the proportion of SiO2 6-membered rings responsible for the silica anomaly. The effects of the silica anomaly balance the anharmonicity in albite glass and give rise to an intermediate a-thermal glass. Different networks, formers or modifiers, can be added to produce different a-thermal glasses with useful mechanical or chemical properties.

  3. Total-body sodium and sodium excess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aloia, J.F.; Cohn, S.H.; Abesamis, C.; Babu, T.; Zanzi, I.; Ellis, K.

    1980-01-01

    Total-body levels of sodium (TBNa), chlorine (TBCI), calcium (TBCa), and potassium (TBK) were measured by neutron activation and analysis of results by whole body counting in 66 postmenopausal women. The relationship between TBNa, and TBCl, TBK, and TBCa on the one hand, and height and weight on the other, were found to compare with those previously reported. The hypothesis that TBNa and TBCl are distributed normally could not be rejected. The sodium excess (Na/sub es/) is defined as the sodium that is present in excess of that associated with the extracellular fluid (chlorine) space; the Na/sub es/ approximates nonexchangeable bone sodium. In these 66 postmenopausal women, and in patients with different endocrinopathies previously described, the values on Na/sub es/ did not differ from the normal values except in the thyrotoxicosis patients, where they were decreased. A close relationship between Na/sub es/ and TBCa was maintained in the endocrinopathies studied. This relationship was found in conditions accompanied by either an increment or a loss of skeletal mass. It appears that the NA/sub es/ value is primarily dependent upon the calcium content of bone

  4. Phase behaviour and molecular dynamics in the binary system of sodium perchlorate and 1,2-propanediamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terashima, Yukio; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Honda, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    The phase and glass transition behaviour in a binary mixture of sodium perchlorate and 1,2-propanediamine {(NaClO 4 ) x (12PDA) 1-x , x 4 ) 1 (12PDA) 4 and (NaClO 4 ) 2 (12PDA) 5 . The concentration dependence of the glass transition point shows a sigmoid curve implying an underlying anomaly.

  5. Fluoride removal performance of glass derived hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Wen, E-mail: wliang@ecust.edu.cn [Research Institute of Biomaterials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology (China); Zhan, Lei; Piao, Longhua [Research Institute of Biomaterials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology (China); Russel, Christian [Otto-Schott-Institut, Universitaet Jena, Jena (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Novel sodium calcium borate glass derived hydroxyapatite (G-HAP) is prepared. {yields} Micro-G-HAP adsorbs F{sup -} ions in solutions more effectively than commercial nano-HAP. {yields} The adsorption kinetics and isotherms are well fitted by a second order kinetic model and Freundlich isotherm model. -- Abstract: A novel sodium calcium borate glass derived hydroxyapatite (G-HAP) with different ranges of particle size was prepared by immersion sodium calcium borate glass in 0.1 M K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} solution by the ratio of 50 g L{sup -1} for 7 days. The unique advantage of G-HAP for the adsorption of fluoride ions in solutions was studied. The effects of size and quantity of particles, pH value and adsorption time on adsorption performance were investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity was 17.34 mg g{sup -1} if 5 g L{sup -1}, <100 {mu}m G-HAP was added to a solution with an initial pH value of 6.72 and the adsorption time was 12 h. The results showed that the micro-G-HAP could immobilize F{sup -} in solution more effectively than commercial nano-HAP, which makes potential application of the G-HAP in removing the fluoride ions from wastewater. The adsorption kinetics and isotherms for F{sup -} could be well fitted by a second order kinetic model and Freundlich isotherm model respectively, which could be used to describe the adsorption behavior. The mechanism of G-HAP in immobilizing F{sup -} from aqueous solutions was investigated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectra (IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  6. Fractography of glass

    CERN Document Server

    Tressler, Richard

    1994-01-01

    As the first major reference on glass fractography, contributors to this volume offer a comprehensive account of the fracture of glass as well as various fracture surface topography Contributors discuss optical fibers, glass containers, and flatglass fractography In addition, papers explore fracture origins; the growth of the original flaws of defects; and macroscopic fracture patterns from which fracture patterns evolve This volume is complete with photographs and schematics

  7. Diamond turning of glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  8. Glass to contain wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncouyoux, M.; Jacquet-Francillon, M.

    1994-01-01

    Here are the tables and figures presented during the conference on the glass to confine high level radioactive wastes: definition, fabrication, storage and disposal. The composition of glasses are detailed, their properties and the vitrification proceeding. The behaviour of these glasses in front of water, irradiation and heat are shown. The characteristics of parcels are given according to the radiation protection rule, ALARA principle, the concept of multi-barriers and the geological stability

  9. Glass microspheres for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado, Miguel O.; Prastalo, Simon; Blaumann, Herman; Longhino, Juan M.; Repetto Llamazares, A.H.V.

    2007-01-01

    We developed the capacity to produce glass microspheres containing in their structure one or more radioactive isotopes useful for brachytherapy. We studied the various facts related with their production: (Rare earth) alumino silicate glass making, glass characterization, microspheres production, nuclear activation through (n,γ) nuclear reactions, mechanical characterization before and after irradiation. Corrosion tests in simulated human plasma and mechanical properties characterization were done before and after irradiation. (author) [es

  10. Silicate glasses. Chapter 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e. borosilicate glass. A historical overview of waste form development programs in nine countries is followed by a summary of the design criteria for borosilicate glass compositions glass compositions. In the sections on glass properties the waste form is characterized in terms of potential alterations under the influence of heat, thermal gradients, radiation, aqueous solutions and combinations thereof. The topics are phase transformations, mechanical properties, radiation effects and chemical durability. The results from studies of volcanic glasses, as natural analogues for borosilicate nuclear waste glasses in order to verify predictions obtained from short-term tests in the laboratory, have been compiled in a special section on natural analogues. A special section on advanced vitrification techniques summarizes the various actual and potential processing schemes and describes the facilities. The literature has been considered until 1985. (author). 430 refs.; 68 figs.; 29 tabs

  11. Glass and vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, J.L.; Vacher, R.; Moncouyoux, J.P.; Vernaz, E.

    1997-01-01

    Most glasses used as materials are oxides glasses that are produced by a quick quench of a liquid. Glasses are characterized by the absence of periodicity in the atomic arrangements, they do not have symmetries and do not present order over a long distance. This series of 4 short articles present: 1) the properties of glass and its industrial story, 2) the glass structure, 3) a forty years long story of glass as dies used to confine wastes and 4) the methodology used to study the behaviour of glass over very long periods of time. This methodology is based on 5 steps: 1) define and specify the material to study (the prediction of long term alteration of a material is nonsense unless you know well its initial properties), 2) identify all the alteration processes that are likely to happen, determine their kinetics and the influence of environmental parameters, 3) develop mathematical models in order to simulate long-term behaviour of glasses, 4) determine the release rates of the radionuclides confined in the glass, and 5) validate data and models, it is not possible to expect a complete validation of a model that will be extrapolated over tens of thousands of years, nevertheless some ways of validation can lead to a satisfactory level of confidence taking into account reasonable uncertainties. (A.C.)

  12. Silicon-to-silicon wafer bonding using evaporated glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Lindahl, M.

    1998-01-01

    Anodic bending of silicon to silicon 4-in. wafers using an electron-beam evaporated glass (Schott 8329) was performed successfully in air at temperatures ranging from 200 degrees C to 450 degrees C. The composition of the deposited glass is enriched in sodium as compared to the target material....... The roughness of the as-deposited films was below 5 nm and was found to be unchanged by annealing at 500 degrees C for 1 h in air. No change in the macroscopic edge profiles of the glass film was found as a function of annealing; however, small extrusions appear when annealing above 450 degrees C. Annealing...... of silicon/glass structures in air around 340 degrees C for 15 min leads to stress-free structures. Bonded wafer pairs, however, show no reduction in stress and always exhibit compressive stress. The bond yield is larger than 95% for bonding temperatures around 350 degrees C and is above 80% for bonding...

  13. Characterization of glass and glass ceramic nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.; Borchardt, J.; De, A.K.

    1979-01-01

    Characteristics of solidified nuclear waste forms, glass and glass ceramic compositions and the properties (composition, thermal stability, crystallization, phase behavior, chemical stability, mechanical stability, and radiation effects) of glasses and glass ceramics are discussed. The preparation of glass ceramics may be an optional step for proposed vitrification plants if tailored glasses are used. Glass ceramics exhibit some improved properties with respect to glasses. The overall leach resistance is similar to that of glasses. An increased leach resistance may become effective for single radionuclides being hosted in highly insoluble crystal phases mainly when higher melting temperatures are applicable in order to get more leach resistant residual glass phases. The development of glass ceramic is going on. The technological feasibility is still to be demonstrated. The potential gain of stability when using glass ceramics qualifies the material as an alternative nuclear waste form

  14. Enzyme stabilization by glass-derived silicates in glass-exposed aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, J.A.; Moffett, J.R.; Arun, P.; Lam, D.; Todorov, T.I.; Brothers, A.B.; Anick, D.J.; Centeno, J.; Namboodiri, M.A.A.; Jonas, W.B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the solutes leaching from glass containers into aqueous solutions, and to show that these solutes have enzyme activity stabilizing effects in very dilute solutions. Methods: Enzyme assays with acetylcholine esterase were used to analyze serially succussed and diluted (SSD) solutions prepared in glass and plastic containers. Aqueous SSD preparations starting with various solutes, or water alone, were prepared under several conditions, and tested for their solute content and their ability to affect enzyme stability in dilute solution. Results: We confirm that water acts to dissolve constituents from glass vials, and show that the solutes derived from the glass have effects on enzymes in the resultant solutions. Enzyme assays demonstrated that enzyme stability in purified and deionized water was enhanced in SSD solutions that were prepared in glass containers, but not those prepared in plastic. The increased enzyme stability could be mimicked in a dose-dependent manner by the addition of silicates to the purified, deionized water that enzymes were dissolved in. Elemental analyses of SSD water preparations made in glass vials showed that boron, silicon, and sodium were present at micromolar concentrations. Conclusions: These results show that silicates and other solutes are present at micromolar levels in all glass-exposed solutions, whether pharmaceutical or homeopathic in nature. Even though silicates are known to have biological activity at higher concentrations, the silicate concentrations we measured in homeopathic preparations were too low to account for any purported in vivo efficacy, but could potentially influence in vitro biological assays reporting homeopathic effects. ?? 2009 The Faculty of Homeopathy.

  15. Relaxations in spin glasses: Similarities and differences from ordinary glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngai, K.L.; Rajagopal, A.K.; Huang, C.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Relaxation phenomena have become a major concern in the physics of spin glasses. There are certain resemblances of these relaxation properties to those of ordinary glasses. In this work, we compare the relaxation properties of spin glasses near the freezing temperature with those of glasses near the glass transition temperature. There are similarities between the two types of glasses. Moreover, the relaxation properties of many glasses and spin glasses are in conformity with two coupled ''universality'' relations predicted by a recent model of relaxations in condensed matter

  16. 3D and 2D marginal fit of pressed and CAD/CAM lithium disilicate crowns made from digital and conventional impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anadioti, Evanthia; Aquilino, Steven A; Gratton, David G; Holloway, Julie A; Denry, Isabelle; Thomas, Geb W; Qian, Fang

    2014-12-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the 3D and 2D marginal fit of pressed and computer-aided-designed/computer-aided-manufactured (CAD/CAM) all-ceramic crowns made from digital and conventional impressions. A dentoform tooth (#30) was prepared for an all-ceramic crown (master die). Thirty type IV definitive casts were made from 30 polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impressions. Thirty resin models were produced from thirty Lava Chairside Oral Scanner impressions. Thirty crowns were pressed in lithium disilicate (IPS e.max Press; 15/impression technique). Thirty crowns were milled from lithium disilicate blocks (IPS e.max CAD; 15/impression technique) using the E4D scanner and milling engine. The master die and the intaglio of the crowns were digitized using a 3D laser coordinate measurement machine with accuracy of ±0.00898 mm. For each specimen a separate data set was created for the Qualify 2012 software. The digital master die and the digital intaglio of each crown were merged using best-fitting alignment. An area above the margin with 0.75 mm occlusal-gingival width circumferentially was defined. The 3D marginal fit of each specimen was an average of all 3D gap values on that area. For the 2D measurements, the marginal gap was measured at two standardized points (on the margin and at 0.75 mm above the margin), from standardized facial-lingual and mesial-distal digitized sections. One-way ANOVA with post hoc Tukey's honestly significant difference and two-way ANOVA tests were used, separately, for statistical analysis of the 3D and 2D marginal data (alpha = 0.05). One-way ANOVA revealed that both 3D and 2D mean marginal gap for group A: PVS impression/IPS e.max Press (0.048 mm ± 0.009 and 0.040 mm ± 0.009) were significantly smaller than those obtained from the other three groups (p max CAD (0.088 mm ± 0.024 and 0.076 mm ± 0.023), C: digital impression/IPS e.max Press (0.089 mm ± 0.020 and 0.075 mm ± 0.015) and D: digital impression/IPS e.max CAD (0.084 mm ± 0.021 and 0

  17. Methodology for Extraction of Remaining Sodium of Used Sodium Containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Minhwan; Kim, Jongman; Cho, Youngil; Jeong, Jiyoung

    2014-01-01

    Sodium used as a coolant in the SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor) reacts easily with most elements due to its high reactivity. If sodium at high temperature leaks outside of a system boundary and makes contact with oxygen, it starts to burn and toxic aerosols are produced. In addition, it generates flammable hydrogen gas through a reaction with water. Hydrogen gas can be explosive within the range of 4.75 vol%. Therefore, the sodium should be handled carefully in accordance with standard procedures even though there is a small amount of target sodium remainings inside the containers and drums used for experiment. After the experiment, all sodium experimental apparatuses should be dismantled carefully through a series of draining, residual sodium extraction, and cleaning if they are no longer reused. In this work, a system for the extraction of the remaining sodium of used sodium drums has been developed and an operation procedure for the system has been established. In this work, a methodology for the extraction of remaining sodium out of the used sodium container has been developed as one of the sodium facility maintenance works. The sodium extraction system for remaining sodium of the used drums was designed and tested successfully. This work will contribute to an establishment of sodium handling technology for PGSFR. (Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor)

  18. Evaluation of Structural Cellular Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. A.; Zwissler, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary design information presented. First report discusses state of structural-cellular-glass programs as of June 1979. Second report gives further details of program to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize properties of glasses and commercially available materials.

  19. Structure, biodegradation behavior and cytotoxicity of alkali-containing alkaline-earth phosphosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kansal, Ishu; Reddy, AlluAmarnath [Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, University of Aveiro, CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Muñoz, Francisco [Ceramics and Glass Institute (CSIC), Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Choi, Seong-Jun [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan 330714 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan 330714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae-Won [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan 330714 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan 330714 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan 330714 (Korea, Republic of); Tulyaganov, Dilshat U. [Turin Polytechnic University in Tashkent, 100095 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Ferreira, José M.F., E-mail: jmf@ua.pt [Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, University of Aveiro, CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2014-11-01

    We report on the effect of sodium on the structure, chemical degradation and bioactivity of glasses in the CaO–MgO–SiO{sub 2}–P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–CaF{sub 2} system. The {sup 29}Si and {sup 31}P magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of melt-quenched glasses with varying Na{sub 2}O/MgO ratios exhibit a silicate glass network with the dominance of Q{sup 2}(Si) units and phosphorus mainly forming orthophosphate species. Sodium incorporation in the glasses did not induce a significant structural change in the silicate network, while it did influence the phosphate environment due to its lower ionic field strength in comparison with that of magnesium. The apatite forming ability of glasses has been investigated by immersion of glass powders in simulated body fluid (SBF) for time durations varying between 1 h and 7 days while their chemical degradation has been studied in Tris–HCl in accordance with ISO-10993-14. Increasing Na{sup +}/Mg{sup 2+} ratio caused a decrease in the chemical durability of glasses and in the apatite forming ability especially during initial steps of interaction between glass and SBF solution. The cellular responses were observed in vitro on bulk glass samples using mouse-derived pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell line. The preliminary study suggested that the increasing alkali-concentration in glasses led to cytotoxicity in the cell culture medium. - Highlights: • Na{sup +} did not induce significant structural changes in chemical Si environment. • Sodium is more prone to affect the chemical environment around P. • Increasing Na{sup +}/Mg{sup 2+} ratios hinder bio-mineralization and chemical durability. • Alkali-containing glasses confer cyto-toxicity to the cell culture medium.

  20. Structure, biodegradation behavior and cytotoxicity of alkali-containing alkaline-earth phosphosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kansal, Ishu; Reddy, AlluAmarnath; Muñoz, Francisco; Choi, Seong-Jun; Kim, Hae-Won; Tulyaganov, Dilshat U.; Ferreira, José M.F.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the effect of sodium on the structure, chemical degradation and bioactivity of glasses in the CaO–MgO–SiO 2 –P 2 O 5 –CaF 2 system. The 29 Si and 31 P magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of melt-quenched glasses with varying Na 2 O/MgO ratios exhibit a silicate glass network with the dominance of Q 2 (Si) units and phosphorus mainly forming orthophosphate species. Sodium incorporation in the glasses did not induce a significant structural change in the silicate network, while it did influence the phosphate environment due to its lower ionic field strength in comparison with that of magnesium. The apatite forming ability of glasses has been investigated by immersion of glass powders in simulated body fluid (SBF) for time durations varying between 1 h and 7 days while their chemical degradation has been studied in Tris–HCl in accordance with ISO-10993-14. Increasing Na + /Mg 2+ ratio caused a decrease in the chemical durability of glasses and in the apatite forming ability especially during initial steps of interaction between glass and SBF solution. The cellular responses were observed in vitro on bulk glass samples using mouse-derived pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell line. The preliminary study suggested that the increasing alkali-concentration in glasses led to cytotoxicity in the cell culture medium. - Highlights: • Na + did not induce significant structural changes in chemical Si environment. • Sodium is more prone to affect the chemical environment around P. • Increasing Na + /Mg 2+ ratios hinder bio-mineralization and chemical durability. • Alkali-containing glasses confer cyto-toxicity to the cell culture medium

  1. Electric glass capturing markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikman, K.; Wikstroem, T.

    1996-11-01

    Electric glass has found its place on the construction market. In public buildings, electrically heatable windows are becoming the leading option for large glass walls. Studies on detached houses, both new and renovated, show that floor heating combined with electrically heatable windowpanes is the best choice with respect to resident`s comfort. (orig.)

  2. Radioresistance of inorganic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, A.A.; Zavadovskaya, E.K.; Fedorov, B.V.; Starodubtsev, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Regularities are considered in the variation of properties of glass due to irradiations. On the basis of previous theoretical statements and experimental investigations, it is inferred that the irradiation resistance of glasses of the same type, synthesis conditions, content of impurities and amount of imperfections, is a function of the ''element-oxygen'' bond energy. The irradiation resistance depends on the number and the nature of glass structure imperfections. The averaged level of bonding forces is indicative of the glass formation temperature; the imperfections in glasses are formed in structure elements whose amount predominates as compared to the others. Electric charges which accumulate on the crack surface tend to increase its size, thus lessening even further the electric strength of the dielectric. The greater the irradiation time, the greater the number of irradiation imperfections causing a drop in the electric strength of glass. When choosing a glass for service in a radiation field, it is necessary to select those of a highest temperature of glass formation and with a least amount of imperfections

  3. Nucleation in ZBLAN glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leede, G.L.A.; Waal, de H.

    1989-01-01

    Nucleation rates were detd. in a ZrF4-BaF2-NaF-LaF3-AlF3 glass (ZBLAN) using an optical method. The results were compared with a similar glass having a slightly different compn. The difference in the nucleation rate is explained by classical nucleation theory using calcd. free-energy differences

  4. Sodium oxide aerosol filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duverger de Cuy, G [DSN/SESTR, Centre de Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1979-03-01

    In the scope of the sodium aerosol trapping research effort by the CEA/DSN, the retention capacity and yield were measured for very high efficiency fiberglass filters and several types of prefilters (cyclone agglomerator, fabric prefilters, water scrubbers). (author)

  5. Sodium oxide aerosol filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duverger de Cuy, G.

    1979-01-01

    In the scope of the sodium aerosol trapping research effort by the CEA/DSN, the retention capacity and yield were measured for very high efficiency fiberglass filters and several types of prefilters (cyclone agglomerator, fabric prefilters, water scrubbers). (author)

  6. Sodium hypochlorite poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that can cause choking and serious breathing problems. Symptoms of sodium hypochlorite poisoning may include: Burning, red eyes Chest pain Coma Coughing (from the fumes) Delirium Gagging sensation Low blood pressure Pain in the ...

  7. Mechanical relaxation in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiki, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The basic properties of glasses and the characteristics of mechanical relaxation in glasses were briefly reviewed, and then our studies concerned were presented. Experimental methods adopted were viscosity, internal friction, ultrasonic attenuation, and Brillouin scattering measurements. The specimens used were several kinds of inorganic, organic, and metallic glasses. The measurements were mainly carried out from the room temperature up to the glass transition temperature, and the relaxation time was determined as a function of temperature. The 'double relaxation' composed of two Arrhenius-type relaxations was observed in many materials. In both relaxations, the 'compensation effect' showing a correlation of the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy was observed. These results were explained by considering the 'complex relaxation' due to cooperative motions of atoms or group of atoms. Values of activation energy near the glass transition determined by the various experimental methods were compared with each other

  8. Polymorphism in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landa, L.M.; Nikolaeva, I.N.

    1979-01-01

    To defect phase interfaces and spasmodic properties change, the inhomogeneity and the second radiation effects in quartz glass, metamict phase and intermediate states have been investigated. When irradiating with fast neutrons the transformation of quartz glass - metamict phase occurs completely. The transformation is completed at 2x10 20 part./cm 2 dose. Thermal treatment not only increases the number of inhomogeneities but also results in increasing quartz glass density. Annealing transforms the metamict phase into common quartz glass at 1400 K. The fact, that thermal treatment results in the complete transformation of metamict phase into quartz glass, and the inverse transformation occurs only partially, is quite regular, as the metamict phase has a lesser entropy and is a more ordered state. It is shown that different amorphous phases of a chemical composition have different structures and properties, that there are interfaces between them, and the transformation from one state to another in microvolumes is realized spasmodically and requires expenditure of energy

  9. Redox reaction and foaming in nuclear waste glass melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, J.L.

    1995-08-01

    This document was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and is an attempt to analyze and estimate the effects of feed composition variables and reducing agent variables on the expected chemistry of reactions occurring in the cold cap and in the glass melt in the nuclear waste glass Slurry-fed, joule-heated melters as they might affect foaming during the glass-making process. Numerous redox reactions of waste glass components and potential feed additives, and the effects of other feed variables on these reactions are reviewed with regard to their potential effect on glass foaming. A major emphasis of this report is to examine the potential positive or negative aspects of adjusting feed with formic acid as opposed to other feed modification techniques including but not limited to use of other reducing agents. Feed modification techniques other than the use of reductants that should influence foaming behavior include control of glass melter feed pH through use of nitric acid. They also include partial replacement of sodium salts by lithium salts. This latter action (b) apparently lowers glass viscosity and raises surface tension. This replacement should decrease foaming by decreasing foam stability.

  10. Glass packages in interim storage; Les verres dans les stockages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet-Francillon, N

    1994-10-01

    This report summarize the current state of knowledge concerning the behavior of type C waste packages consisting of vitrified high-level solutions produced by reprocessing spent fuel. The composition and the physical and chemical properties of the feed solutions are reviewed, and the vitrification process is described. Sodium alumino-borosilicate glass compositions are generally employed - the glass used at la Hague for LWR fuel solutions, for example, contains 45 % SiO{sub 2}. The major physical, chemical, mechanical and thermal properties of the glass are reviewed. In order to allow their thermal power to diminish, the 3630 glass packages produced (as of January 1993) in the vitrification facilities at Marcoule and La Hague are placed in interim storage for several decades. The actual interim storage period has not been defined, as it is closely related to the concept and organization selected for the final destination of the packages: a geological repository. The glass behavior under irradiation is described. Considerable basic and applied research has been conducted to assess the aqueous leaching behavior of nuclear containment glass. The effects of various repository parameters (temperature, flow rate, nature of the environmental materials) have been investigated. The experimental findings have been used to specify a model describing the kinetics of aqueous corrosion of the glass. More generally all the ``source term`` models developed in France by the CEA or by ANDRA are summarized. (author). 152 refs., 33 figs.

  11. Liquid sodium oxygenmeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakes, D.; Fresl, M.; Svoboda, V.

    1979-02-01

    The results of test runs of two design varieties of liquid sodium oxygenmeter in sodium loops are described. The accuracy and sensitivity are discussed reached using this instrument within 1 and 10 p.p.m. of oxygen concentration. A change in the used reference system is proposed based on practical experiences and thermochemical calculations. Ceramic electrolyte corrosion is analysed and the possible interpretation of the corrosion effect on the galvanic cell electromotive force is suggested. (author)

  12. Too Much Sodium

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast is based on the February 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. Ninety percent of Americans age two and older eat too much sodium which can increase your risk for high blood pressure and often leads to heart disease and stroke, two leading causes of death in the US. Learn several small steps you can take to reduce the amount of sodium in your diet.

  13. Glass leaching performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1983-05-01

    Current understanding of the leaching performance of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass is summarized. The empirical model of waste glass leaching behavior developed shows that at high water flow rates the glass leach rate is kinetically limited to a maximum value. At intermediate water flow rates, leaching is limited by the solution concentration of silica and decreases with decreasing water flow rates. Release of soluble elements is controlled by silica dissolution because silica forms the binding network of the glass. At low water flow rates, mass loss rates reach values controlled by formation rates of alteration minerals, or by diffusion of dissolution products through essentially stagnant water. The parameters reviewed with respect to their quantifiable influence on leaching behavior include temperature, pH, leachant composition, glass composition, thermal history, and radiation. Of these, temperature is most important since the rate of mass loss approximately doubles with each 10 0 C increase in dilute solutions. The pH has small effects within the 4 to 10 range. The chemical composition of the leachant is most important with regard to its influence on alteration product formation. Glass composition exhibits the largest effects at high flow rates where improved glasses leach from ten to thirty times slower than glass 76 to 68. The effects of the thermal history (devitrification) of the glass are not likely to be significant. Radiation effects are important primarily in that radiolysis can potentially drive pH values to less than 4. Radiation damage to the glass causes insignificant changes in leaching performance

  14. The fatigue behavior of X 6 CrNi 18 11 under sodium corrosion conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huthmann, H.; Menken, G.; Husslage, W.

    1977-01-01

    To carry out fatigue tests in sodium the experience gained in an ongoing program on irradiation effects was used for the definition of the test procedure and sample conditions, i.e. strain controlled experiments with an hour glass sample and axial strain measurement. In order to allow sodium corrosion to take place during the test, the samples were welded into a bellow and connected to a dynamic sodium loop. Due to the restricted test capacities, INTERATOM and the Metaalinstituut TNO (MI-TNO) pursued in a combined experimental program two different concepts with regard to the corrosion conditions. INTERATOM tested the samples during exposure in flowing sodium within a nonisothermal loop. The MI-TNO tested the samples after a precorrosion in a nonisothermal sodium loop. During the test at TNO the bellow-sealed samples were surrounded by static sodium

  15. The fatigue behavior of X 6 CrNi 18 11 under sodium corrosion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huthmann, H; Menken, G [INTERATOM, Bergisch Gladbach (Germany); Husslage, W [TNO, Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    1977-07-01

    To carry out fatigue tests in sodium the experience gained in an ongoing program on irradiation effects was used for the definition of the test procedure and sample conditions, i.e. strain controlled experiments with an hour glass sample and axial strain measurement. In order to allow sodium corrosion to take place during the test, the samples were welded into a bellow and connected to a dynamic sodium loop. Due to the restricted test capacities, INTERATOM and the Metaalinstituut TNO (MI-TNO) pursued in a combined experimental program two different concepts with regard to the corrosion conditions. INTERATOM tested the samples during exposure in flowing sodium within a nonisothermal loop. The MI-TNO tested the samples after a precorrosion in a nonisothermal sodium loop. During the test at TNO the bellow-sealed samples were surrounded by static sodium.

  16. Comparative study on the change in index of refraction in ion-exchange interdiffusion in alkali-silicate glasses containing calcium, strontium, barium and titanium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livshits, V.Ya.; Marchuk, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    Different ability to ion exchange from the salts of lithium-sodium-silicate glass melt containing calcium (or strontium, or barium) and titanium oxides in addition has been shown. CaO, SrO and BaO have negative effect, but TiO 2 -positive one on the fullness of ion exchange of lithium-sodium and on the rate of interdiffusion in alkali-silicate glass. The value of change in index of refraction of glass with TiO 2 is twice higher than glass with calcium oxide (or strontium, or barium) as the fourth component

  17. R7T7 nuclear waste glass behavior in moist clay: role of the clay mass/glass surface area ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godon, N.; Vernaz, E.

    1989-01-01

    R7T7 glass alteration was investigated in the presence of various moist clays. In contact with smectite 4a, selected in France as a potential engineered barrier material, the glass was significantly corroded: after 6 months the glass corrosion rate was practically the same as the initial alteration rate in double-distilled water. Substantially lower alteration was observed in contact with bentonite 6 activated by sodium carbonate. Smectite 4a consumes silicon released by glass corrosion, and thus retards the rise to high silicon concentrations in solution at which the glass corrosion rate diminishes. Glass can therefore in some cases be altered as much in moist clay as in water with high renewal rates. Other experiments with smaller quantities of smectite 4a showed that the phenomenon becomes less important in time: its duration is proportional to the ratio between the clay mass (C) and the glass surface area (SA). Comparing the results of studies at different C/SA ratios indicates that low glass corrosion rates are obtained more slowly at higher C/SA ratios. Tests with 239 Pu-doped R7T7 glass also showed that the radionuclide retention factor in the alteration film at the glass surface is only 6, compared with a factor of nearly 50 in double-distilled water

  18. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Due to the increased focus on energy savings and waste recycling foam glass materials have gained increased attention. The production process of foam glass is a potential low-cost recycle option for challenging waste, e.g. CRT glass and industrial waste (fly ash and slags). Foam glass is used...... as thermal insulating material in building and chemical industry. The large volume of gas (porosity 90 – 95%) is the main reason of the low thermal conductivity of the foam glass. If gases with lower thermal conductivity compared to air are entrapped in the glass melt, the derived foam glass will contain...... only closed pores and its overall thermal conductivity will be much lower than that of the foam glass with open pores. In this work we have prepared foam glass using different types of recycled glasses and different kinds of foaming agents. This enabled the formation of foam glasses having gas cells...

  19. Sodium fires and its extinguishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhedov, V.G.

    1979-01-01

    The fire safety problems of NPP with sodium coolants in USSR are presented. The design of sodium reactors is made with premises with sodium coolants being hermetic and filled with nitrogen. Some engineering solutions of fire safety including design, elaboration and choice of construction and protection materials are presented. Some theoretical aspects of sodium burning are presented as well as methods of sodium fire extinguishing methods including the use of powder

  20. Test of Anderson-Stuart model in sodium silicate glasses and the general Arrhenian conductivity rule in wide composition range Teste do modelo de Anderson-Stuart em vidros silicatos de sódio e a regra geral da condutividade de Arrhenius numa ampla faixa de composições

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. F. Nascimento

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We collected and analyzed literature data on ionic conductivity sigma and activation energy E A in the binary sodium silicate system in a wide composition range. The Anderson and Stuart model has been considered to describe the decreasing tendency of activation energy E A with alkali concentration in this system. In this analysis were considered experimental parameters, such as shear modulus G and relative dielectric permittivity epsilon. A general conductivity rule is found in 194 of 205 glasses, when one plots log sigma vs. E A/kB T, where kB is the Boltzmann constant and T is the absolute temperature. This fact means that the arrhenian relation has universal uniqueness of form sigma = sigma (E A,T in wide Na2O composition range. The results also show that there is strong correlation by more than 19 orders of magnitude on conductivity with E A/kBT. An explanation for this behavior links ionic conductivity and microscopic structure. The problem of phase separation in this system is also considered.Foram colecionados e analisados dados da literatura sobre condutividade iônica sigma e energia de ativação de condução E A, considerando o sistema binário silicato de sódio numa ampla faixa de composições. O modelo de Anderson e Stuart foi utilizado para descrever a tendência de decréscimo da energia de ativação EA com a concentração de álcalis neste sistema. Nesta análise foram considerados parâmetros experimentais tais como módulo de cisalhamento G e permissividade dielétrica relativa épsilon. Uma regra geral de condutividade foi observada em 194 de 205 vidros analisados quando se plota log sigma vs. E A/kB T, onde kB é a constante de Boltzmann e T é a temperatura absoluta. Isto significa que a relação de Arrhenius apresenta uma unicidade característica universal da forma sigma = sigma (E A,T numa ampla faixa de composições (Na2O. Os resultados também mostraram que há uma forte correlação, por mais de 19 ordens de

  1. Liquidus temperature and chemical durability of selected glasses to immobilize rare earth oxides waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohd Fadzil, Syazwani, E-mail: mfsyazwani86@postech.ac.kr [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 790784 Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, The National University of Malaysia, 43650 Bandar Baru Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Hrma, Pavel [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 790784 Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA (United States); Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Pyroprocessing is are processing method for managing and reusing used nuclear fuel (UNF) by dissolving it in an electrorefiner with a molten alkali or alkaline earth chloride salt mixture while avoiding wet reprocessing. Pyroprocessing UNF with a LiCl–KCl eutectic salt releases the fission products from the fuel and generates a variety of metallic and salt-based species, including rare earth (RE) chlorides. If the RE-chlorides are converted to oxides, borosilicate glass is a prime candidate for their immobilization because of its durability and ability to dissolve almost any RE waste component into the glass matrix at high loadings. Crystallization that occurs in waste glasses as the waste loading increases may complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. This work compares three types of borosilicate glasses in terms of liquidus temperature (T{sub L}): the International Simple Glass designed by the International Working Group, sodium borosilicate glass developed by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, and the lanthanide aluminoborosilicate (LABS) glass established in the United States. The LABS glass allows the highest waste loadings (over 50 mass% RE{sub 2}O{sub 3}) while possessing an acceptable chemical durability. - Highlights: • We investigated crystallization in borosilicate glasses containing rare earth oxides. • New crystallinity and durability data are shown for glasses proposed in the literature. • Both liquidus temperature and chemical durability increased as the waste loading increased.

  2. Results of testing the Grambow rate law for use in HWVP glass durability correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, W.L.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1996-03-01

    A theory based on Grambow's work on hydration of glass as linear function of solution composition was evaluated. Use of Grambow's linear rate law for correlation of durability with glass composition is not recommended. Dissolution rate of the glass was determined using the rate of release of sodium with an ion selective electrode. This method was tested first applying it to initial dissolution rate of several glasses at several temperatures with zero initial concentration of silicic acid. HW39-2, HW39-4, and SRL-202 from Savannah River were tested; there was significant scatter in the data, with the dissolution rates of HW39 glasses and the SRL glass being comparable within this scatter. The dissolution rate of SRL-202 at 80 C and pH 7 for silicic acid concentrations 0, 25, 50, and 100% saturation, was found to decrease dramatically at only 25% of the saturated silicic acid concentration, which does not conform to the linear theory

  3. Effect of MoO3 addition on phase separation in borosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, Hajimu; Yamanaka, Hiroshi; Terai, Ryohei; Fukumoto, Shinji.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of MoO 3 addition on the phase separation of sodium borosilicate glasses has been studied by electron microscopic observation and electrical conductivity measurement. With increasing MoO 3 addition, the immiscibility temperatures rose, the growth rate of phase separation increased, and the immiscibility region in the Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -SiO 2 system extended. When MoO 3 more than 5 mol% was added to the glasses, two stages of phase separation appeared ; one is metastable immiscibility, which takes place below the liquidus temperature, and the other is stable immiscibility, occurring above the liquidus temperature. The present experiment confirmed that the conductivity measurement of molten glasses is usefull to detect phase separation in the glasses, giving some suggestions for preventing the separation of molybdates in nuclear waste glasses and also for controlling the micro-pore sizes of porous glasses. (author)

  4. EFFECTS OF INCORPORATING NATURAL MINERALS ON PRODUCTION AND BIOACTIVITY OF BIOACTIVE GLASS CERAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Matias Stabile

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Two glass-ceramics composition were produced from natural minerals. Quartzes and feldspars were pre-selected on the basis of their purities studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD and chemical analysis. Prepared compositions of glasses precursors were two different theoretical leucite (KAlSi₂O₆ /Bioglass 45S5 (L/Bg ratios. Transformations of raw materials mixtures and glass precursors were studied by differential thermal analyses. On the basis of thermal analysis results, glass ceramics were produced and characterized by XRD. Glass-ceramics were composed of two major crystalline phases, leucite and sodium calcium silicate. Bioactivity tests were performed submerging the glass-ceramics into simulated body fluid (SBF for different periods (1, 5 and 10 days. Bioactive behavior was monitored by XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Studied samples were found to be bioactive, in which hydroxyapatite layer was developed within 5 days of contact with SBF.

  5. Effect of different glasses in glass bonded zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.A.; Ackerman, J.P.; Verma, S.

    1995-01-01

    A mineral waste form has been developed for chloride waste salt generated during the pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste form consists of salt-occluded zeolite powders bound within a glass matrix. The zeolite contains the salt and immobilizes the fission products. The zeolite powders are hot pressed to form a mechanically stable, durable glass bonded zeolite. Further development of glass bonded zeolite as a waste form requires an understanding of the interaction between the glass and the zeolite. Properties of the glass that enhance binding and durability of the glass bonded zeolite need to be identified. Three types of glass, boroaluminosilicate, soda-lime silicate, and high silica glasses, have a range of properties and are now being investigated. Each glass was hot pressed by itself and with an equal amount of zeolite. MCC-1 leach tests were run on both. Soda-lime silicate and high silica glasses did not give a durable glass bonded zeolite. Boroaluminosilicate glasses rich in alkaline earths did bind the zeolite and gave a durable glass bonded zeolite. Scanning electron micrographs suggest that the boroaluminosilicate glasses wetted the zeolite powders better than the other glasses. Development of the glass bonded zeolite as a waste form for chloride waste salt is continuing

  6. Contribution to the study of hydrogenated and oxygenated impurities in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naud, G.

    1964-07-01

    This study is made up essentially of two parts. The first is devoted to the development of dosage methods for selectively determining the oxygenated and hydrogenated impurities present in sodium, that is the oxide, the hydride and the hydroxide. The second makes use of these methods for a study of the Na-H 2 -O 2 system, as well as of the related problem of the attack of pyrex glass by molten sodium. The conventional method for dosing oxygen by amalgamation was first adapted to the simultaneous measurement of the hydride. We then developed a method for dosing the total hydrogen by measuring successively the concentrations of gas present in the hydride and hydroxide form. This method is based on the thermal decomposition of the hydride and the reaction between sodium and the hydroxide. Our contribution to the study of the Na-H 2 -O 2 System consists first of all in the study of the reaction between hydrogen and sodium in the temperature range from 150 to 250 deg C and at a pressure of about 150 mm of mercury. The study of the thermal decomposition of the hydride in sodium was then studied. It was possible to make some qualitative observations concerning the reaction between sodium and sodium hydroxide. Finally some complementary tests made it possible to define the nature of the phenomena occurring during the attack of pyrex glass by sodium. (author) [fr

  7. Oxynitride glasses: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.R.; Clausell, C.; Barba, A.

    2016-07-01

    Oxynitride glasses are special types of silicates or silicoaluminates which have been the object of many studies over the last forty years. They can be prepared by means of various complex methods, leading to variable levels of nitrogen incorporation, though in all cases giving limited transparency in the visible range. More recently, a new family of oxynitride glasses incorporating fluorine has been investigated. This paper outlines the effect of composition, in particular nitrogen and fluorine content, on properties such as glass transition temperature, hardness, Young's modulus, compactness and molar volume. (Author)

  8. Orbital glass in HTSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusmartsev, F.V.

    1992-10-01

    The physical reasons why the orbital glass may exist in granular high-temperature superconductors and the existing experimental data appeared recently are discussed. The orbital glass is characterized by the coexistence of the orbital paramagnetic state with the superconducting state and occurs at small magnetic fields H c0 c1 . The transition in orbital glass arises at the critical field H c0 which is inversely proportional to the surface cross-area S of an average grain. In connection with theoretical predictions the possible experiments are proposed. (author). 10 refs

  9. Bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Aza, P. N.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the late 1960´s, a great interest in the use of bioceramic materials for biomedical applications has been developed. In a previous paper, the authors reviewed crystalline bioceramic materials “sensus stricto”, it is to say, those ceramic materials, constituted for non-metallic inorganic compounds, crystallines and consolidates by thermal treatment of powders at high temperature. In the present review, the authors deal with those called bioactive glasses and glassceramics. Although all of them are also obtained by thermal treatment at high temperature, the first are amorphous and the second are obtained by devitrification of a glass, although the vitreous phase normally prevails on the crystalline phases. After an introduction to the concept of bioactive materials, a short historical review of the bioactive glasses development is made. Its preparation, reactivity in physiological media, mechanism of bonding to living tissues and mechanical strength of the bone-implant interface is also reported. Next, the concept of glass-ceramic and the way of its preparation are exposed. The composition, physicochemical properties and biological behaviour of the principal types of bioactive glasses and glass-ceramic materials: Bioglass®, Ceravital®, Cerabone®, Ilmaplant® and Bioverit® are also reviewed. Finally, a short review on the bioactive-glass coatings and bioactive-composites and most common uses of bioactive-glasses and glass-ceramics are carried out too.

    Desde finales de los años sesenta, se ha despertado un gran interés por el uso de los materiales biocerámicos para aplicaciones biomédicas. En un trabajo previo, los autores hicieron una revisión de los denominados materiales biocerámicos cristalinos en sentido estricto, es decir, de aquellos materiales, constituidos por compuestos inorgánicos no metálicos, cristalinos y consolidados mediante tratamientos térmicos a altas temperaturas. En el presente trabajo, los autores

  10. Acoustic and turbulent agglomeration of sodium aerosols. Progress report, January 1, 1977--December 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinds, W.C.

    1977-09-01

    Freshly formed and aged sodium aerosols generated by burning metallic sodium in air were decontaminated in wet cell washers of experimental design. Two wetted cells in series packed with curly glass fibers 35 μm in diameter gave removal efficiencies in excess of 90%. More efficient cell packings and a larger number of cells in series can be used to raise collection efficiency above 99%

  11. The potential impacts of sodium management on Frit Development for Coupled Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, F. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Peeler, D. K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-06-10

    In this report, Section 2.0 provides a description of sodium management and its impact on the glass waste form, Section 3.0 provides background information on phase separation, Section 4.0 provides the impact of sodium management on SB9 frit development efforts and the results of a limited scoping study investigating phase separation in potential DWPF frits, and Section 5.0 discusses potential technical issues associated with using a phase separated frit for DWPF operations.

  12. Development of sodium technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Sung Tai; Nam, H. Y.; Choi, Y. D.

    2000-05-01

    The objective of present study is to produce the experimental data for development and verification of computer codes for development of LMR and to develop the preliminary technologies for the future large scale verification experiments. A MHD experimental test loop has been constructed for the quantitative analysis of the effect of magnetic field on the sodium flow and experiments are carried out for three EM pumps. The previous pressure drop correlations are evaluated using the experimental data obtained from the pressure drop experiment in a 19-pin fuel assembly with wire spacer. An dimensionless variable is proposed to describe the amplitude and frequency of the fluctuation of free surface using the experimental data obtained from free surface experimental apparatus and an empirical correlation is developed using this dimensionless variable. An experimental test loop is constructed to measure the flow characteristics in IHX shell side and the local pressure drop in fuel assembly, and to test the vibration behaviour of fuel pins due to flow induced vibration. The sodium two-phase flow measuring technique using the electromagnetic flowmeter is developed and the sodium differential pressure drop measuring technique using the method of direct contact of sodium and oil is established. The work on the analysis of sodium fire characteristics and produce data for vlidation of computer code is performed. Perfect reopen time of self plugged leak path was observed to be about 130 minutes after water leak initiation. Reopen shape of a specimen appeared to be double layer of circular type, and reopen size of this specimen surface was about 2mm diameter on sodium side. In small water leakage experiments, the following correlation equation about the reopen time between sodium temperature and initial leak rate was obtained, τ c = δ·g -0.83 ·10 (3570/T Na -3.34) , in 400-500 deg C of liquid sodium atmosphere. The characteristics of pressure propagation and gas flow, and

  13. Development of sodium technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Sung Tai; Nam, H Y; Choi, Y D [and others

    2000-05-01

    The objective of present study is to produce the experimental data for development and verification of computer codes for development of LMR and to develop the preliminary technologies for the future large scale verification experiments. A MHD experimental test loop has been constructed for the quantitative analysis of the effect of magnetic field on the sodium flow and experiments are carried out for three EM pumps. The previous pressure drop correlations are evaluated using the experimental data obtained from the pressure drop experiment in a 19-pin fuel assembly with wire spacer. An dimensionless variable is proposed to describe the amplitude and frequency of the fluctuation of free surface using the experimental data obtained from free surface experimental apparatus and an empirical correlation is developed using this dimensionless variable. An experimental test loop is constructed to measure the flow characteristics in IHX shell side and the local pressure drop in fuel assembly, and to test the vibration behaviour of fuel pins due to flow induced vibration. The sodium two-phase flow measuring technique using the electromagnetic flowmeter is developed and the sodium differential pressure drop measuring technique using the method of direct contact of sodium and oil is established. The work on the analysis of sodium fire characteristics and produce data for vlidation of computer code is performed. Perfect reopen time of self plugged leak path was observed to be about 130 minutes after water leak initiation. Reopen shape of a specimen appeared to be double layer of circular type, and reopen size of this specimen surface was about 2mm diameter on sodium side. In small water leakage experiments, the following correlation equation about the reopen time between sodium temperature and initial leak rate was obtained, {tau}{sub c} = {delta}{center_dot}g{sup -0.83}{center_dot}10{sup (3570/T{sub Na}-3.34)}, in 400-500 deg C of liquid sodium atmosphere. The characteristics

  14. Fun with Singing Wine Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Christine; Galloway, Melodie; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2018-01-01

    A fun activity is presented using singing wine glasses for introductory physics students. Students tune a white wine glass and a red wine glass to as many semitones as possible by filling the glasses with the appropriate amounts of water. A smart phone app is used to measure the frequencies of equal-temperament tones. Then plots of frequency…

  15. Development of soda-lime glasses from ornamental rock wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babisk, Michelle Pereira

    2009-01-01

    During the ornamental rocks production, among other steps, one saw the rock blocks in order to transform them into semi-finished plates. In this step, expressive amounts of residues are generated, which are not properly discharged in nature, without any programmed utilization. The residues of silicide rocks present, in their compositions, oxides which are raw materials employed to fabricate soda-lime type glasses (containing SiO_2, Al_2O_3, CaO, Na_2O and K_2O). On the other hand the residues of carbonatic rocks are constituted of glass net modifier oxides, like CaO and MgO. In this work it was developed four types of soda-lime glasses using ornamental rock residues, where the glasses compositions were adjusted by adding sand, as silica source, as well as sodium and calcium carbonates as sources of Na_2O and CaO, respectively. The obtained glasses were characterized by means of Archimed's method for densities measurements, microstructure by using optical and electronic microscopy, phases by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), hardness by Vickers indentation, spectroscopy (UV/VIS), and hydrolytic resistance according to ISO 719. The XRD analyses confirmed the compositions total vitrification, where the greened aspect of the samples was due to the presence of the iron oxides. The produced glasses properties were compared with those of commercial glasses aiming their industrial employment. The main difference between the produced glasses and those commercials varied primarily regarding the amount of carbonates incorporated. The results showed that the ornamental rocks residues may be used as raw materials for glasses fabrication, and they found a useful economic destination rather than discharge which promotes undesirable environmental impact. (author)

  16. Waste glass weathering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.

    1994-01-01

    The weathering of glass is reviewed by examining processes that affect the reaction of commercial, historical, natural, and nuclear waste glass under conditions of contact with humid air and slowly dripping water, which may lead to immersion in nearly static solution. Radionuclide release data from weathered glass under conditions that may exist in an unsaturated environment are presented and compared to release under standard leaching conditions. While the comparison between the release under weathering and leaching conditions is not exact, due to variability of reaction in humid air, evidence is presented of radionuclide release under a variety of conditions. These results suggest that both the amount and form of radionuclide release can be affected by the weathering of glass

  17. Super ionic conductive glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susman, S.; Volin, K.J.

    Described is an ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A/sub 1 + x/D/sub 2-x/3/Si/sub x/P/sub 3 - x/O/sub 12 - 2x/3/, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  18. Phosphate glasses, containing nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisitsyna, E.A.; Khalilev, V.D.; Koryavin, A.A.; Goncharova, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    Possibilities of nitrogen-containing glass synthesis by the introduction into the charge of ammonium salts, as well as aluminium nitride, are studied. Zinc alumoyttrium phosphate glass (mol. %) Zn(PO 3 ) 2 - 4O, Al(PO 3 ) 3 - 3O, Y(PO 3 ) 3 -3O is suggested as a matrix. It is shown that the effect of amide and imide groups on the properties of the glass is less noticeable than the effect of nitride groups. Direct introduction of nitride constituent was realized using AlN, but aluminium introduction was taken into account so that the oxide was subtracted. The attempt to introduce more than 2.5 mass % of nitrogen into initial matrix by aluminium nitride has failed due to repeated restoration of glass with amorphous phosphorus isolation

  19. Lead and copper removal from aqueous solutions by porous glass derived calcium hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Wen; Zhan Lei; Piao Longhua; Ruessel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: . Adsorption of Pb 2+ increases with the increase in NaCl volume percentage (1:0%, 2:30%, 3:40%, 4:40%) of the Glass Derived Hydroxyapatite and reaches equilibrium after 24 h. Highlights: → Novel porous glass derived hydroxyapatite matrix is prepared. → Glass derived hydroxyapatite matrix adsorbs lead and copper ions in solutions effectively. → Two adsorption mechanisms including ion exchange theory and the dissolution and precipitation theory are involved in removal of the heavy metal ions from the solutions. - Abstract: A porous glass was prepared by sintering Na 2 O-CaO-B 2 O 3 glass powder with powdered sodium chloride. Subsequently, the sodium chloride was dissolved in water resulting in a highly porous material. A sample was prepared consisting of 60 vol% glass and 40 vol% salt which both had particle sizes 2 HPO 4 solutions at room temperature for 1 day. The porous glass derived hydroxyapatite matrix was then processed for removing lead and copper ions from aqueous solutions. The results showed that the glass derived calcium hydroxyapatite matrix effectively immobilizes lead and copper ions in solution. The adsorption mechanism was investigated by the X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy including Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry (SEM-EDX).

  20. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Mooers, Cavin; Bazemore, Gina; Pegg, Ian L.; Hight, Kenneth; Lai, Shan Tao; Buechele, Andrew; Rielley, Elizabeth; Gan, Hao; Muller, Isabelle S.; Cecil, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements

  1. Conversion of radioactive ferrocyanide compounds to immobile glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.W.; Dressen, A.L.

    1977-01-01

    Complex radioactive ferrocyanide compounds result from the scavenging of cesium from waste products produced in the chemical reprocessing of nuclear fuel. These ferrocyanides, in accordance with this process, are converted to an immobile glass, resistant to leaching by water, by fusion together with sodium carbonate and a mixture of (a) basalt and boron trioxide (B 2 O 3 ) or (b) silica (SiO 2 ) and lime (CaO). 7 claims

  2. Glass formulation requirements for DWPF coupled operations using crystalline silicotitanates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbour, J.R.; Andrews, M.K.

    1997-01-01

    The design basis DWPF flowsheet couples the vitrification of two waste streams: (1) a washed sludge and (2) a hydrolyzed sodium tetraphenylborate precipitate product, PHA. The PHA contains cesium-137 which had been precipitated from the tank supernate with sodium tetraphenylborate. Smaller amounts of strontium and plutonium adsorbed on sodium titanate are also present with the PHA feed. Currently, DWPF is running a sludge-only flowsheet while working towards solutions to the problems encountered with In Tank Precipitation (ITP). The sludge loading for the sludge-only flowsheet and for the anticipated coupled operations is 28 wt% on an oxide basis. For the coupled operation, it is essential to balance the treatment of the two waste streams such that no supernate remains after immobilization of all the sludge. An alternative to ITP and sodium titanate is the removal of Cs-137, Sr-90, and plutonium from the tank supernate by ion exchange using crystalline silicotitanate (CST). This material has been shown to effectively sorb these elements from the supernate. It is also known that CST sorbs plutonium. The loaded CST could then be immobilized with the sludge during vitrification. It has recently been demonstrated that CST loadings approaching 70 wt% for a CST-only glass can be achieved using a borosilicate glass formulation which can be processed by the DWPF melter. Initial efforts on coupled waste streams with simulated DWPF sludge show promise that a borosilicate glass formulation can incorporate both sludge and CST. This paper presents the bases for research efforts to develop a glass formulation which will incorporate sludge and CST at loadings appropriate for DWPF operation

  3. Sodium fire tests for investigating the sodium leak in Monju

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Shinya; Miyake, Osamu; Tanabe, Hiromi

    1996-01-01

    As a part of the work for investigating the sodium leak accident which occurred in Monju on December 8, 1995, three tests, (1) sodium leak test, (2) sodium fire test-I, and (3) sodium fire test-II, were carried out at OEC/PNC. Main objectives of these tests are to confirm leak and burning behavior of sodium from the damaged thermometer, and effects of the sodium fire on integrity of the surrounding structure, etc. The main conclusions obtained from the tests are shown as below. 1) Average sodium leak rate obtained from the sodium leak test was about 50 g/sec. This was equivalent to the value estimated from level change in the sodium overflow tank in the Monju accident. 2) Observation from video cameras in the sodium fire tests revealed that in early stages of sodium leak, sodium dropped down out of the flexible tube of thermometer in drips. This dripping and burning were expanded in range as sodium splashed on the duct. 3) Though, in the sodium fire test-I, there was a decrease of about 1 mm at a thickness of the burning pan in the vicinity in just under in the leak point, there were completely no crack and failure. In the meantime, in the sodium fire test-II the six open holes were found in the floor liner. By this liner failure, the reaction between sodium and concrete might take place. At present, while the detailed evaluation on the sodium fire test-II has been mainly carried out, the investigation for clarifying the cause of the liner failure has been also carried out. (author)

  4. Effect of alkali content on AC conductivity of borate glasses containing two transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashif, I.; Rahman, Samy A.; Soliman, A.A.; Ibrahim, E.M.; Abdel-Khalek, E.K.; Mostafa, A.G.; Sanad, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Sodium borate glasses containing iron and molybdenum ions with the total concentration of transition ions constant and gradual substitution of sodium oxide (network modifier) by borate oxide (network former) was prepared. Densities, molar volume, DC and AC conductivities are measured. The trends of these properties are attributed to changes in the glass network structure. Their DC and AC conductivity increased with increasing NaO concentration. The increase of AC conductivity of sodium borate glasses is attributed to the chemical composition and the hopping mechanism of conduction. Measurements of the dielectric constant (ε) and dielectric loss (tan δ) as a function of frequency (50 Hz-100 kHz) and temperature (RT-600 K) indicate that the increase in dielectric constant and loss (ε and tan δ) values with increasing sodium ion content could be attributed to the assumption that Fe and Mo ions tend to assume network-forming position in the glass compositions studied. The variation of the value of frequency exponent s for all glass samples as the function of temperature at a definite frequency indicates that the value of s decreases with increasing the temperature which agrees with the correlated barrier-hopping (CBH) model.

  5. Effect of certain alkaline metals on Pr doped glasses to investigate spectroscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkennavar Susheela, K.; Madhu, A.; Eraiah, B.; Kokila, M. K.

    2018-02-01

    Incorporation of different Alkaline earth metal like Barium, Calcium and strontium in sodium lead borate glass doped with Pr3+ is studied. Physical parameters such as density, molar volume, molar refractivity etc have been evaluated. Effect of different atomic size of alkaline metal using optical and physical parameters is analysed. XRD and FTIR were carried out to know the structural behaviour of the glasses. Absorption and Emission spectra are recorded at room temperature and the results were discussed.

  6. The combustion of sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.N.

    1978-01-01

    The burning rates of sodium in the form of vapour jets, droplets, sprays and unconfined and confined pools have been reviewed. Attention has been paid to assessing the value of models in the various combustion modes. Additional models have been constructed for the descriptions of laminar and turbulent vapour jets, stationary droplets, forced convection over ambient pool fires together with correlations for peak pressures in confined pool environments. Where appropriate experiments with sodium have not been conducted, the likely behaviour is predicted by comparison with the burning of other fuels, particularly in the field of large free ambient fires. Some areas where further knowledge is required are highlighted. (author)

  7. Sodium cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokkyo, N; Inoue, K; Maeda, H

    1968-11-21

    In a sodium cooled fast neutron reactor, an ultrasonic generator is installed at a fuel assembly hold-down mechanism positioned above a blanket or fission gas reservoir located above the core. During operation of the reactor an ultrsonic wave of frequency 10/sup 3/ - 10/sup 4/ Hz is constantly transmitted to the core to resonantly inject the primary bubble with ultrasonic energy to thereby facilitate its growth. Hence, small bubbles grow gradually to prevent the sudden boiling of sodium if an accident occurs in the cooling system during operation of the reactor.

  8. Too Much Sodium

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-07

    This podcast is based on the February 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. Ninety percent of Americans age two and older eat too much sodium which can increase your risk for high blood pressure and often leads to heart disease and stroke, two leading causes of death in the US. Learn several small steps you can take to reduce the amount of sodium in your diet.  Created: 2/7/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 2/7/2012.

  9. Wastes based glasses and glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbieri, L.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Actually, the inertization, recovery and valorisation of the wastes coming from municipal and industrial processes are the most important goals from the environmental and economical point of view. An alternative technology capable to overcome the problem of the dishomogeneity of the raw material chemical composition is the vitrification process that is able to increase the homogeneity and the constancy of the chemical composition of the system and to modulate the properties in order to address the reutilization of the waste. Moreover, the glasses obtained subjected to different controlled thermal treatments, can be transformed in semy-cristalline material (named glass-ceramics with improved properties with respect to the parent amorphous materials. In this review the tailoring, preparation and characterization of glasses and glass-ceramics obtained starting from municipal incinerator grate ash, coal and steel fly ashes and glass cullet are described.

    Realmente la inertización, recuperación y valorización de residuos que proceden de los procesos de incineración de residuos municipales y de residuos industriales son metas importantes desde el punto de vista ambiental y económico. Una tecnología alternativa capaz de superar el problema de la heterogeneidad de la composición química de los materiales de partida es el proceso de la vitrificación que es capaz de aumentar la homogeneidad y la constancia de la composición química del sistema y modular las propiedades a fin de la reutilización del residuo. En este artículo se presentan los resultados de vitrificación en que los vidrios fueron sometidos a tratamientos térmicos controlados diferentes, de manera que se transforman en materiales semicristalinos (también denominados vitrocerámicos con mejores propiedades respecto a los materiales amorfos originales. En esta revisión se muestra el diseño, preparación y caracterización de vidrios y vitrocerámicos partiendo de

  10. A Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for the Immobilization of Rare Earth Oxides from the Pyroprocessing Waste salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Byung-Gil; Park, Hwan-Seo; Kim, Hwan-Young; Kim, In-Tae

    2008-01-01

    The fission product of rare earth (RE) oxide wastes are generates during the pyroprocess . Borosilicate glass or some ceramic materials such as monazite, apatite or sodium zirconium phosphate (NZP) have been a prospective host matrix through lots of experimental results. Silicate glasses have long been the preferred waste form for the immobilization of HLW. In immobilization of the RE oxides, the developed process on an industrial scale involves their incorporation into a glass matrix, by melting under 1200 ∼ 1300 .deg. C. Instead of the melting process, glass powder sintering is lower temperature (∼ 900 .deg. C) required for the process which implies less demanding conditions for the equipment and a less evaporation of volatile radionuclides. This study reports the behaviors, direct vitrification of RE oxides with glass frit, glass powder sintering of REceramic with glass frit, formation of RE-apatite (or REmonazite) ceramic according to reaction temperature, and the leach resistance of the solidified waste forms

  11. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2008-11-24

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point

  12. Optimized Synthesis of Foam Glass from Recycled CRT Panel Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Most of the panel glass from cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is landfilled today. Instead of landfilling, the panel glass can be turned into new environment-friendly foam glass. Low density foam glass is an effective heat insulating material and can be produced just by using recycle glass and foaming...... additives. In this work we recycle the CRT panel glass to synthesize the foam glass as a crucial component of building and insulating materials. The synthesis conditions such as foaming temperature, duration, glass particle size, type and concentrations of foaming agents, and so on are optimized...... by performing systematic experiments. In particular, the concentration of foaming agents is an important parameter that influences the size of bubbles and the distribution of bubbles throughout the sample. The foam glasses are characterised regarding density and open/closed porosity. Differential scanning...

  13. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, D.; Pickenheim, Bradley

    2008-01-01

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point

  14. Studies on the accelerated chemical durability test and its impact on structural changes in borosilicate glass matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorat, Vidya S.; Kadam, P.S.; Mishra, R.K.; Kumar, Amar; Kaushik, C.P.; Sudarsan, V.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Sodium borosilicate glass used for the immobilisation of high level nuclear waste with tentative compositions (SiO 2 ) 0.477 (B 2 O 3 ) 0.239 (Na 2 O) 0.170 (TiO 2 ) 0.02 )3 (CaO) 0.068 (Al 2 O 3 ) 0.023 was evaluated for its long term stability in the repository conditions where it may be exposed to high temperature and pressure. 29 Si MAS NMR studies have confirmed that, upon leaching, sodium borosilicate glass undergoes congruent crystallization leading to the formation of an aluminosilicate phase, Na 6 Al 6 Si 10 O 32 . Further the residual glass structure in the composite sample is identical with that of the un-leached glass. Boron structural units are unaffected in the glass compositions upon leaching

  15. The influence of precursor addition order on the porosity of sol-gel bioactive glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Delihta; Colon, Pierre; Cresswell, Mark; Journet, Catherine; Pradelle-Plasse, Nelly; Jackson, Phil; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Attik, Nina

    2018-06-16

    The superior textural properties of sol-gel derived bioactive glasses compared to conventional melt quench glasses accounts for their accelerated bioactivity in vitro. Several studies have explored ways to improve the surface properties of sol-gel glasses in order to maximise their efficiency for bone and tooth regeneration. In this study, we investigated the effect of order of network modifying precursor addition on the textural properties of sol-gel derived bioactive glasses. The effect of precursor addition order on the glass characteristics was assessed by switching the order of network modifying precursor (calcium acetate monohydrate and sodium acetate anhydrous) addition for a fixed composition of bioactive glass (75SiO 2 :5CaO:10Na 2 O:10P 2 O 5 ). The results of this study showed that the order of precursor addition does influence the porosity of these glasses. For the glasses of a fixed composition and preparation conditions we achieved a doubling of surface area, a 1.5 times increase in pore volume and a 1.2 times decrease in pore size just by the mixing the network modifying precursors and adding them together in the sol-gel preparation. This simple and straightforward route adaptation to the preparation of bioactive glasses would allow us to enhance the textural properties of existing and novel composition of bioactive glasses and thus accelerate their bioactivity. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses. Nature and properties of alteration layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotignon, Laurent

    1990-01-01

    This research thesis addresses physical and chemical processes which occur during aqueous corrosion of silicates, and the study of the properties of their interfaces with solutions, and thus issues related to the fate of high activity nuclear wastes which are embedded in a vitreous matrix as the potential release of radionuclides towards the environment then depends on the glass parcel behaviour submitted to chemical attacks which could alter it, notably by aqueous corrosion. The objective is then to model the dissolution of nuclear glass over long periods of time, and to predict the behaviour of radionuclides. The author compared the corrosion and alteration layers of gradually more complex borosilicate glasses, from a ternary sodium borosilicate glass to a simulated nuclear glass (the French reference glass R7T7). Complexity is increased by adding oxides. After some theoretical recalls on the structure and corrosion of borosilicate glasses, the author presents the studied materials, the corrosion experiments, and analytical techniques used to study alteration layers. The mechanism of formation of altered layers is studied based on corrosion experiments performed at 90 C on the whole set of glasses. Alteration layers formed on corroded glasses are studied and compared by using various techniques: electronic microscopy, high energy ion beams, spectroscopy, infrared, photo-electron spectroscopy. Implications for underground storage of nuclear glasses are discussed

  17. Sodium fluxes in sweet pepper exposed to varying sodium concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom-Zandstra, M.; Vogelzang, S.A.; Veen, B.W.

    1998-01-01

    The sodium transport and distribution of sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) under saline conditions were studied after transferring the plants to a sodium-free nutrient solution. Sodium stress up to 60 mM did not affect the growth of sweet pepper, as it appears able to counteract the unfavourable

  18. High electric field conduction in low-alkali boroaluminosilicate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Priyanka; Yuan, Mengxue; Gao, Jun; Furman, Eugene; Lanagan, Michael T.

    2018-02-01

    Electrical conduction in silica-based glasses under a low electric field is dominated by high mobility ions such as sodium, and there is a transition from ionic transport to electronic transport as the electric field exceeds 108 V/m at low temperatures. Electrical conduction under a high electric field was investigated in thin low-alkali boroaluminosilicate glass samples, showing nonlinear conduction with the current density scaling approximately with E1/2, where E is the electric field. In addition, thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) characterization was carried out on room-temperature electrically poled glass samples, and an anomalous discharging current flowing in the same direction as the charging current was observed. High electric field conduction and TSDC results led to the conclusion that Poole-Frenkel based electronic transport occurs in the mobile-cation-depleted region adjacent to the anode, and accounts for the observed anomalous current.

  19. Sodium hydride precipitation in sodium cold traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPheeters, C.C.; Raue, D.J.

    1979-10-01

    A series of experiments have been performed to test a calculational model for precipitation of NaH in sodium cold traps. The calculational model, called ACTMODEL, is a computer simulation that uses the system geometry and operating conditions as input to calculate a mass transfer coefficient and the distribution of NaH in a cold trap. The ACTMODEL was tested using an analytical cold trap (ACT) that is simple and essentially one-dimensional. The ACT flow and temperature profile may be controlled at any desired condition. The ACT was analyzed destructively after each test to measure the actual NaH distribution. Excellent agreement was obtained between the ACTMODEL simulations and the experiments

  20. Sodium hydride precipitation in sodium cold traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPheeters, C.C.; Raue, D.J.

    1980-06-01

    A series of experiments have been performed to test a calculational model for precipitation of NaH in sodium cold traps. The calculational model, called ACTMODEL, is a computer simulation that uses the system geometry and operating conditions as input to calculate a mass-transfer coefficient and the distribution of NaH in a cold trap. The ACTMODEL was tested using an analytical cold trap (ACT) that is simple and essentially one-dimensional. The ACT flow and temperature profile can be controlled at any desired condition. The ACT was analyzed destructively after each test to measure the actual NaH distribution. Excellent agreement was obtained between the ACTMODEL simulations and the experiments. Mass-transfer coefficients ranging upward from 6 x 10 -5 m/s were measured in both packless and packed traps. As much as a fourfold increase in precipitation surface area was observed with increasing amount of NaH deposited. 11 figures, 2 tables

  1. Laboratory testing of glasses for Lockheed Idaho Technology Company: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, A.J.G.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.; Wolf, S.F.; Bates, J.K.

    1997-06-01

    Tests have been conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in support of the efforts of Lockheed Idaho Technology Company (LITCO) to vitrify high-level waste calcines. Tests were conducted with three classes of LITCO glass formulations: Formula 127 (fluorine-bearing), Formula 532 (fluorine-free), and 630 series (both single- and mixed-alkali) glasses. The test matrices included, as appropriate, the Product Consistency Test Method B (PCT-B), the Materials Characterization Center Test 1 (MCC-1), and the Argonne vapor hydration test (VHT). Test durations ranged from 7 to 183 d. In 7-d PCT-Bs, normalized mass losses of major glass-forming elements for the LITCO glasses are similar to, or lower than, normalized mass losses obtained for other domestic candidate waste glasses. Formula 532 glasses form zeolite alteration phases relatively early in their reaction with water. The formation of those phases increased the dissolution rate. In contrast, the Formula 127 glass is highly durable and forms alteration phases only after prolonged exposure to water in tests with very high surface area to volume ratios; these alteration phases have a relatively small effect on the rate of glass corrosion. No alteration phases formed within the maximum test duration of 183 d in PCT-Bs with the 630 series glasses. The corrosion behavior of the mixed-alkali 630 series glasses is similar to that of 630 series glasses containing sodium alone. In VHTs, both single- and mixed-alkali glasses form zeolite phases that increase the rate of glass reaction. The original 630 series glasses and those based on a revised surrogate calcine formulation react at the same rate in PCT-Bs and form the same major alteration phases in VHTs

  2. Innovative hydrogen storage in hollow glass-microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keding, M.; Schmid, G.; Tajmar, M. [Austrian Research Centers, Vienna (Austria)

    2009-07-01

    Hydrogen storage technologies are becoming increasingly important for a number of future applications. The Austrian Research Centers (ARC) are developing a unique hydrogen storage system that combines the advantages of both hollow glass microsphere and chemical compound hydrogen storage, but eliminates their respective drawbacks. Water is utilized as a functional liquid to carry the hollow glass microspheres that are loaded with up to 700 bar of hydrogen gas. Sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) is then injected together with the glass microspheres into a reaction chamber where the water reacts catalytically with the NaBH{sub 4} producing hydrogen and heat. The heat is then utilized to release the hydrogen from the hollow glass microspheres providing a double hydrogen generation process without any external energy or heat during storage or gas release. The paper described this hydrogen storage system with particular reference to microspheres, the coating process, the experimental facility and NaBH{sub 4} test results. It was concluded that hydrogen storage and production on demand is possible with microspheres and sodium borohydride solution. 9 refs., 16 figs.

  3. Thermophysical properties of sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harant, M.

    1978-01-01

    Substitution, inverse and substitution inverse relations in form of regression polynomials were used in calculating saturation pressure and density for thermodynamic and transport properties determination of sodium. Program UNISOAUT/A3 was used in calculating regression polynomials coefficients. (J.P.)

  4. Extinction of sodium fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malet, J.C.; Spagna, F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents how, starting from a knowledge of sodium ignition and burning, principles for extinction (smothering catch trays, leak recuperation systems, powders) can be developed. These techniques applied in Superphenix 1 and PEC reactors have been tested in the ESMERALDA experimental program which is a joint French/Italian project. (author)

  5. Decomposition of Sodium Tetraphenylborate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical decomposition of aqueous alkaline solutions of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) has been investigated. The focus of the investigation is on the determination of additives and/or variables which influence NaTBP decomposition. This document describes work aimed at providing better understanding into the relationship of copper (II), solution temperature, and solution pH to NaTPB stability

  6. Sodium purification in Rapsodie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, B.

    1968-01-01

    This report is one of a series of publications presenting the main results of tests carried out during the start-up of the first french fast neutron reactor: Rapsodie. The article presents the sodium purification techniques used in the reactor cooling circuits both from the constructional point of view and with respect to results obtained during the first years working. (author) [fr

  7. The medical sodium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2002-01-01

    In the institute was investigated the chemical composition of rock salt of some deposits of Tajikistan and was show the presence in it admixture of ions of Ca 2 + , Mg 2 + a nd SO 2 - a nd absence of heavy metals, ammonium salts, iron, potassium and arsenic. Was elaborated the fundamental instrument-technologic scheme of sodium chloride receiving

  8. Creep in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charnock, W.; Cordwell, J.E.

    1978-03-01

    Available information on the creep of austenitic, ferritic and Alloy-800 type steels in liquid sodium is critically reviewed. Creep properties of stainless steels can be affected by element transfer and corrosion. At reactor structural component temperatures environmental effects are likely to be less important than changes due to thermal ageing. At high clad temperatures (700 0 C) decarburisation may cause the loss of strength and ductility in unstabilised steels while cavity formation may cause embrittlement in stabilised steels. The properties of Alloy 800 are, in some experiments, found to deteriorate while in others they are enhanced. This may be a consequence of the metallurgical complexity of the material or arise from the nature of the various techniques employed. Low alloy ferritic steels tend to decarburise in sodium at temperatures greater than 500 0 C and this leads to loss of strength and an increase in ductility. High alloy ferritics are immune to this effect and appear to be able to tolerate a degree of carburisation. Although intergranular cracking may be enhanced in liquid sodium the mechanical consequences are not significant and evidence for the existence of an embrittlement effect not associated with element transfer or corrosion is weak. Stress and strain may enhance element transfer at crack tips. However in real cracks the gettering or supply action of the crack faces conditions the chemistry of the cracks in sodium and protects the crack tip from element transfer. Thus creep crack extension rates should be independent of changes in bulk coolant chemistry. (author)

  9. Technology for sodium purity control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ji Young; Kim, B. H.; Kim, T. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    When sodium is used as heat transfer fluid, the plugging in coolant flow, the corrosion of structure material and the transfer of radioactive material caused by the impurities in sodium are worth considerable. Accordingly, these impurities must be monitored and controlled continuously by sodium purification devices in the heat transfer system which sodium is used as coolant. Sodium purification loop was constructed for the purpose of accumulating the technology for purity control of the coolant, developing and verifying further efficient instruments for sodium purification. The plugging meter and the cold trap is used as the implement for measuring and controlling the oxygen and the hydrogen, the main impurities in sodium coolant. They are capable of excellent performance as the implements which could detect and monitor the impurities to the concentration limit required for nuclear reactor. Sodium purification loop could be used variably according to the experimental purpose. 18 refs., 34 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  10. Memo, "Incorporation of HLW Glass Shell V2.0 into the Flowsheets," to ED Lee, CCN: 184905, October 20, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimpel, Rodney F.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-12-18

    Efforts are being made to increase the efficiency and decrease the cost of vitrifying radioactive waste stored in tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The compositions of acceptable and processable high-level waste (HL W) glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to reduce cost. A database of glass properties of waste glass and associated simulated waste glasses was collected and documented in PNNL 18501, Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume and glass property models were curve-fitted to the glass compositions. A routine was developed that estimates HL W glass volumes using the following glass property models: II Nepheline, II One-Percent Crystal Temperature (T1%), II Viscosity (11) II Product Consistency Tests (PCT) for boron, sodium, and lithium, and II Liquidus Temperature (TL). The routine, commonly called the HL W Glass Shell, is presented in this document. In addition to the use of the glass property models, glass composition constraints and rules, as recommend in PNNL 18501 and in other documents (as referenced in this report) were incorporated. This new version of the HL W Glass Shell should generally estimate higher waste loading in the HL W glass than previous versions.

  11. Nuclear waste glass corrosion mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1987-04-01

    Dissolution of nuclear waste glass occurs by corrosion mechanisms similar to those of other solids, e.g., metallurgical and mineralogic systems. Metallurgical phenomena such as active corrosion, passivation and immunity have been observed to be a function of the glass composition and the solution pH. Hydration thermodynamics was used to quantify the role of glass composition and its effect on the solution pH during dissolution. A wide compositional range of natural, lunar, medieval, and nuclear waste glasses, as well as some glass-ceramics were investigated. The factors observed to affect dissolution in deionized water are pertinent to the dissolution of glass in natural environments such as the groundwaters anticipated to interact with nuclear waste glass in a geologic repository. The effects of imposed pH and oxidation potential (Eh) conditions existing in natural environments on glass dissolution is described in the context of Pourbaix diagrams, pH potential diagrams, for glass

  12. Electrical properties of phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mogus-Milankovic, A; Santic, A; Reis, S T; Day, D E

    2009-01-01

    Investigation of the electrical properties of phosphate glasses where transition metal oxide such as iron oxide is the network former and network modifier is presented. Phosphate glasses containing iron are electronically conducting glasses where the polaronic conduction is due to the electron hopping from low to high iron valence state. The identification of structural defects caused by ion/polaron migration, the analysis of dipolar states and electrical conductivity in iron phosphate glasses containing various alkali and mixed alkali ions was performed on the basis of the impedance spectroscopy (IS). The changes in electrical conductivity from as-quenched phosphate glass to fully crystallized glass (glass-ceramics) by IS are analyzed. A change in the characteristic features of IS follows the changes in glass and crystallized glass network. Using IS, the contribution of glass matrix, crystallized grains and grain boundary to the total electrical conductivity for iron phosphate glasses was analyzed. It was shown that decrease in conductivity is caused by discontinuities in the conduction pathways as a result of the disruption of crystalline network where two or more crystalline phases are formed. Also, phosphate-based glasses offer a unique range of biomaterials, as they form direct chemical bonding with hard/soft tissue. The surface charges of bioactive glasses are recognized to be the most important factors in determining biological responses. The improved bioactivity of the bioactive glasses as a result of the effects of the surface charges generated by electrical polarization is discussed.

  13. Studies Conducted of Sodium Carbonate Contaminant Found on the Wing Leading Edge and the Nose Cap of the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Palou, Jaime J.

    2003-01-01

    In early 2001, three of the space shuttle orbiters were found to have a sodium carbonate contaminant on the wing leading edge and nose cap. These parts are made of a reinforced carbon/carbon material protected by silicon carbide (SiC) and a glass coating. The glass coating is known as Type A and is primarily sodium silicate with particles of SiC. NASA Glenn Research Center's Environmental Durability Branch was asked to determine the chemistry of this deposit formation and assess any possible detrimental effects. At low temperatures, the reverse reaction is favorable. Previous studies of the corrosion of glass show that carbon dioxide in the presence of water does form sodium carbonate on sodium silicate glass (ref. 1). It is quite likely that a similar scenario exists for the orbiter wing leading edge. All three orbiters that formed sodium carbonate were exposed to rain. This formation of sodium carbonate was duplicated in the laboratory. The Type A glass, which coats the wing leading edge and nose cap, was made in a freestanding form and exposed to water in two separate experiments. In one set of experiments, the coating was placed in a petri dish filled with water. As the water evaporated, sodium carbonate formed. In another case, water was slowly dripped on the coating and sodium carbonate formed. The sodium carbonate was detected by chemical analysis and, in some cases, xray diffraction showed a hydrated sodium carbonate. The next step was to examine possible detrimental effects of this sodium carbonate. There are three likely scenarios for the sodium carbonate deposit: (1) it may be removed with a simple rinse, (2) it may remain and flow back into the Type A glass after heating during reentry, or (3) it may remain and flow onto unprotected SiC and/or other parts after heating during reentry. The effect of case 1 is to remove the Na2O constituent from the Type A glass, thus decreasing its effectiveness as a sealant. Even so, overall, it is probably the best

  14. Theory of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivier, N.

    1985-01-01

    The physical properties of glass are direct consequences of its non-crystalline structure. The structure is described from a topological point of view, since topology is the only geometry surviving non-crystallinity, i.e. absence of metric and trivial space group. This fact has two main consequences: the overall homogeneity of glass is a gauge symmetry, and the only extended, structurally stable constituents are odd lines (or 2π-disclinations in the elastic continuum limit). A gauge theory of glass, based on odd lines as sources of frozen-in strain, can explain those properties of glasses which are both specific to, and universal in amorphous solids: low-temperature excitations, and relaxation at high temperatures. The methods of statistical mechanics can be applied to give a minimal description of amorphous structures in statistical equilibrium. Criteria for statistical equilibrium of the structure and detailed balance are given, together with structural equations of state, which turn out to be well-known empirically among botanists and metallurgists. This review is based on lectures given in 1984 in Niteroi. It contains five parts: I - Structure, from a topological viewpoint; II - gauge invariance; III - Tunneling modes; IV - Supercooled liquid and the glass transitions; V - Statistical crystallography. (Author) [pt

  15. Sol-Gel Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  16. Slicing sodium from bakery products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, M.

    2012-01-01

    The need for sodium reduction in our diet is clear to consumers, dieticians and food manufacturers. As sodium concentration has a strengthening effect on gluten, sodium reduction decreases dough mixing tolerance, dough resistance and induces dough stickiness. In particular, the latter may cause

  17. Safety measuring for sodium handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ji Young; Jeong, K C; Kim, T J; Kim, B H; Choi, J H

    2001-09-01

    This is the report for the safety measures of sodium handling. These contents are prerequisites for the development of sodium technology and thus the workers participate in sodium handling and experiments have to know them perfectly. As an appendix, the relating parts of the laws are presented.

  18. HIGH ALUMINUM HLW GLASSES FOR HANFORD'S WTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Joseph, I.; Bowman, B.W.; Gan, H.; Kot, W.; Matlack, K.S.; Pegg, I.L

    2009-01-01

    achievements of this program with emphasis on the recent enhancements in Al 2 O 3 loadings in HLW glass and its processing characteristics. Glass formulation development included crucible-scale preparation and characterization of glass samples to assess compliance with all melt processing and product quality requirements, followed by small-scale screening tests to estimate processing rates. These results were used to down-select formulations for subsequent engineering-scale melter testing. Finally, further testing was performed on the DM1200 vitrification system installed at VSL, which is a one-third scale (1.20 m 2 ) pilot melter for the WTP HLW melters and which is fitted with a fully prototypical off-gas treatment system. These tests employed glass formulations with high waste loadings and Al 2 O 3 contents of ∼25 wt%, which represents a near-doubling of the present WTP baseline maximum Al 2 O 3 loading. In addition, these formulations were processed successfully at glass production rates that exceeded the present requirements for WTP HLW vitrification by up to 88%. The higher aluminum loading in the HLW glass has an added benefit in that the aluminum leaching requirements in pretreatment are reduced, thus allowing less sodium addition in pretreatment, which in turn reduces the amount of LAW glass to be produced at the WTP. The impact of the results from this ORP program in reducing the overall cost and schedule for the Hanford waste treatment mission will be discussed

  19. Characterization of the LAWB99-series and ORLEC-series Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, W. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-12-01

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analysis results for a series of simulated low activity waste (LAW) glass compositions. These data will be used in the development of improved sulfur solubility models for LAW glass. A procedure developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for producing sulfur saturated melts (SSMs) was used to fabricate the glasses characterized in this report. This method includes triplicate melting steps with excess sodium sulfate, followed by grinding and washing to remove unincorporated sulfur salts. The wash solutions were also analyzed as part of this study.

  20. Contribution to the study of the effects of α-irradiation in nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, A.

    2001-01-01

    The main topic of this work is to characterise the effects of α-disintegration in nuclear waste glasses. Experimental and numerical approaches have been considered. The structure of the French nuclear waste glass (R7T7) has been simulated using four- and six-oxides simplified glasses which contain the main elements of the R7T7 glass: SiO 2 , B 2 O 3 , Na 2 O, ZrO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and CaO. Four- and six-oxides glasses have been irradiated with 1 MeV-He + (ionisation) and 2.1 MeV-Kr 3+ (ionisation and atomic collisions) ions in order to reproduce the effects of the α-particle and of the recoil nucleus emitted during α-disintegration of actinides, and also to differentiate electronic and ballistic effects. Irradiated glasses have been characterised using several techniques, which have been adapted to the peculiarities of our samples (isolated material, small irradiated depth). The results point out the salient role of sodium in the observed modifications: depth concentration profiles obtained with RBS show an accumulation of sodium at the irradiated surface. We found a apparent acceleration of sodium release in leaching experiments which confirm that point. Modifications observed in Raman spectra of irradiated glasses show an increase of the polymerisation (increase of Q 3 /Q 2 ratio) due to sodium migration. In simplified glasses we have found that the modifications of mechanical properties by external irradiations reproduce the modifications observed in actinide doped nuclear glass (decrease of hardness and increase of fracture toughness). At the same time, we performed Molecular Dynamics simulations of a six-oxides glass. We have shown that the surface modifies the glass structure down to a depth of 10 Angstrom: modification of depth concentration profiles, decrease of the atomic coordination number (A1, B and Si). During cascades, we found that atomic displacements are easier near the surface. This behaviour is also observed when the glass is submitted to an

  1. Sulfur Solubility Testing and Characterization of LAW Phase 1 Matrix Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-02-24

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provides chemical analysis results for a series of simulated low-activity waste (LAW) glass compositions. These data will be used in the development of improved sulfur solubility models for LAW glass. A procedure developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for producing sulfur saturated melts (SSMs) was carried out at both SRNL and PNNL to fabricate the glasses characterized in this report. This method includes triplicate melting steps with excess sodium sulfate, followed by grinding and washing to remove unincorporated sulfur salts. The wash solutions were also analyzed as part of this study.

  2. Sulfur Solubility Testing and Characterization of Hanford LAW Phase 2, Inner Layer Matrix Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Caldwell, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, W. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-27

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for a series of simulated low activity waste (LAW) glass compositions. A procedure developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for producing sulfur saturated melts (SSMs) was carried out at both SRNL and PNNL to fabricate the glasses characterized in this report. This method includes triplicate melting steps with excess sodium sulfate, followed by grinding and washing to remove unincorporated sulfur salts. The wash solutions were also analyzed as part of this study. These data will be used in the development of improved sulfur solubility models for LAW glass.

  3. Ion exchange for glass strengthening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gy, Rene

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a short overview of silicate glass strengthening by exchange of alkali ions in a molten salt, below the glass transition temperature (chemical tempering). The physics of alkali inter-diffusion is briefly explained and the main parameters of the process, which control the glass reinforcement, are reviewed. Methods for characterizing the obtained residual stress state and the strengthening are described, along with the simplified modelling of the stress build-up. The fragmentation of chemically tempered glass is discussed. The concept of engineered stress profile glass is presented, and finally, the effect of glass and salt compositions is overviewed

  4. Perspectives on spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Contucci, Pierluigi

    2013-01-01

    Presenting and developing the theory of spin glasses as a prototype for complex systems, this book is a rigorous and up-to-date introduction to their properties. The book combines a mathematical description with a physical insight of spin glass models. Topics covered include the physical origins of those models and their treatment with replica theory; mathematical properties like correlation inequalities and their use in the thermodynamic limit theory; main exact solutions of the mean field models and their probabilistic structures; and the theory of the structural properties of the spin glass phase such as stochastic stability and the overlap identities. Finally, a detailed account is given of the recent numerical simulation results and properties, including overlap equivalence, ultrametricity and decay of correlations. The book is ideal for mathematical physicists and probabilists working in disordered systems.

  5. Waste glass melting stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1994-01-01

    Three simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600 degrees C to 1000 degrees C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentru Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. The behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied. 2 refs., 8 tabs

  6. Waste glass melting stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1993-04-01

    Three different simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600 degrees C--1000 degrees C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin-sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. Behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied

  7. Using physical properties of molten glass to estimate glass composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kwan Sik; Yang, Kyoung Hwa; Park, Jong Kil

    1997-01-01

    A vitrification process is under development in KEPRI for the treatment of low-and medium-level radioactive waste. Although the project is for developing and building Vitrification Pilot Plant in Korea, one of KEPRI's concerns is the quality control of the vitrified glass. This paper discusses a methodology for the estimation of glass composition by on-line measurement of molten glass properties, which could be applied to the plant for real-time quality control of the glass product. By remotely measuring viscosity and density of the molten glass, the glass characteristics such as composition can be estimated and eventually controlled. For this purpose, using the database of glass composition vs. physical properties in isothermal three-component system of SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 , a software TERNARY has been developed which determines the glass composition by using two known physical properties (e.g. density and viscosity)

  8. Rheological behavior of high-concentration sodium caseinate dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveday, Simon M; Rao, M Anandha; Creamer, Lawrence K; Singh, Harjinder

    2010-03-01

    Apparent viscosity and frequency sweep (G', G'') data for sodium caseinate dispersions with concentrations of approximately 18% to 40% w/w were obtained at 20 degrees C; colloidal glass behavior was exhibited by dispersions with concentration >or=23% w/w. The high concentrations were obtained by mixing frozen powdered buffer with sodium caseinate in boiling liquid nitrogen, and allowing the mixtures to thaw and hydrate at 4 degrees C. The low-temperature G'-G'' crossover seen in temperature scans between 60 and 5 degrees C was thought to indicate gelation. Temperature scans from 5 to 90 degrees C revealed gradual decrease in G' followed by plateau values. In contrast, G'' decreased gradually and did not reach plateau values. Increase in hydrophobicity of the sodium caseinate or a decrease in the effective volume fraction of its aggregates may have contributed to these phenomena. The gelation and end of softening temperatures of the dispersions increased with the concentration of sodium caseinate. From an Eldridge-Ferry plot, the enthalpy of softening was estimated to be 29.6 kJ mol(-1). The results of this study should be useful for creating new products with high concentrations of sodium caseinate.

  9. Superductile bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, K.F.; Ruan, F.; Yang, Y.Q.; Chen, N.

    2006-01-01

    Usually, monolithic bulk metallic glasses undergo inhomogeneous plastic deformation and exhibit poor ductility (<2%) at room temperature. We report a newly developed Pd-Si binary bulk metallic glass, which exhibits a uniform plastic deformation and a large plastic engineering strain of 82% and a plastic true strain of 170%, together with initial strain hardening, slight strain softening and final strain hardening characteristics. The uniform shear deformation and the ultrahigh plasticity are mainly attributed to strain hardening, which results from the nanoscale inhomogeneity due to liquid phase separation. The formed nanoscale inhomogeneity will hinder, deflect, and bifurcate the propagation of shear bands

  10. Magnetic properties of bioactive glass-ceramics containing nanocrystalline zinc ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Rajendra Kumar; Srinivasan, A.

    2011-01-01

    Glass-ceramics with finely dispersed zinc ferrite (ZnFe 2 O 4 ) nanocrystallites were obtained by heat treatment of x(ZnO,Fe 2 O 3 )(65-x)SiO 2 20(CaO,P 2 O 5 )15Na 2 O (6≤x≤21 mole%) glasses. X-ray diffraction patterns of the glass-ceramic samples revealed the presence of calcium sodium phosphate [NaCaPO 4 ] and zinc ferrite [ZnFe 2 O 4 ] as major crystalline phases. Zinc ferrite present in nanocrystalline form contributes to the magnetic properties of the glass-ceramic samples. Magnetic hysteresis cycles of the glass-ceramic samples were obtained with applied magnetic field sweeps of ±20 kOe and ±500 Oe, in order to evaluate the potential of these glass-ceramics for hyperthermia treatment of cancer. The evolution of magnetic properties in these samples, viz., from a partially paramagnetic to fully ferrimagnetic nature has been explored using magnetometry and X-ray diffraction studies. - Research highlights: → The glass-ceramics contain bone mineral and magnetic phases. → Calcium sodium phosphate and zinc ferrite nanocrystallites have been identified in all the sample. → With an increase in ZnO and Fe2O3 content, magnetic property of samples evolved from partially paramagnetic to fully ferrimagnetic nature. → Large magnetic hysteresis loops have been obtained for samples with high ZnO+Fe2O3 content.

  11. 3D printed glass: surface finish and bulk properties as a function of the printing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Susanne; Avery, Michael P.; Richardson, Robert; Bartlett, Paul; Frei, Regina; Simske, Steven

    2015-03-01

    It is impossible to print glass directly from a melt, layer by layer. Glass is not only very sensitive to temperature gradients between different layers but also to the cooling process. To achieve a glass state the melt, has to be cooled rapidly to avoid crystallization of the material and then annealed to remove cooling induced stress. In 3D-printing of glass the objects are shaped at room temperature and then fired. The material properties of the final objects are crucially dependent on the frit size of the glass powder used during shaping, the chemical formula of the binder and the firing procedure. For frit sizes below 250 μm, we seem to find a constant volume of pores of less than 5%. Decreasing frit size leads to an increase in the number of pores which then leads to an increase of opacity. The two different binders, 2- hydroxyethyl cellulose and carboxymethylcellulose sodium salt, generate very different porosities. The porosity of samples with 2-hydroxyethyl cellulose is similar to frit-only samples, whereas carboxymethylcellulose sodium salt creates a glass foam. The surface finish is determined by the material the glass comes into contact with during firing.

  12. Specialists' meeting on sodium fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlov, F A; Kuznetsova, R I [eds.

    1989-07-01

    The four sessions of the meeting covered the following topics: 1. general approach to fast reactor safety, standards of fire safety, maximum design basis accidents for sodium leaks and fires, status of sodium fires in different countries; 2. physical and chemical processes during combustion of sodium and its interaction with structural and technological materials and methods for structural protection; 3. methods of sodium fires extinguishing and measures for localizing aerosol combustion products, organization of fire fighting procedures, instruction and training of fire personnel; 4. elimination of the consequences of sodium fires.

  13. Specialists' meeting on sodium fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, F.A.; Kuznetsova, R.I.

    1989-01-01

    The four sessions of the meeting covered the following topics: 1. general approach to fast reactor safety, standards of fire safety, maximum design basis accidents for sodium leaks and fires, status of sodium fires in different countries; 2. physical and chemical processes during combustion of sodium and its interaction with structural and technological materials and methods for structural protection; 3. methods of sodium fires extinguishing and measures for localizing aerosol combustion products, organization of fire fighting procedures, instruction and training of fire personnel; 4. elimination of the consequences of sodium fires

  14. X-ray spectrometric determination of glass content of melts incorporating radioactive waste: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slates, R.V.

    1978-09-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry was evaluated for the determination of glass content and homogeneity of glass incorporating high-level radioactive waste. Accuracy and precision were determined for analyses of Al 2 O 3 , SiO 2 , CaO, TiO 2 , MnO, Fe 2 O 3 , and NiO in specimens of known composition. These specimens were prepared by fusing powdered glass with nonradioactive synthetic waste. Matrix effects of sodium on these analyses were specifically evaluated. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry was shown to be applicable to the proposed determinations by comparing the known glass contents of 14 glass waste compositions with those calculated from experimentally determined concentrations of SiO or TiO 2

  15. Development of Sodium Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong Hyun; Nam, H. Y.; Kim, T. J.; Jeong, K. C.; Park, J. H.; Kim, B. H.; Jeong, J. Y.; Kim, J. M.; Choi, B. H.; Kim, B. S.

    2003-02-01

    The basic P and ID and fabrication method for IHTS simplification experiment were prepared for the experimental apparatus. In order to investigate the later phase of a SWR event, an experimental apparatus was designed and manufactured. The 620 data set have been obtained in the experiment of free surface fluctuation and an experimental correlation for the critical gas entertainment condition is additionally developed. For development of water into sodium leak detection technology, the properties from leak noises were extracted, and the tools for analyzing acoustic noises were constructed. The state-of-the-art on the flow and differential pressure measuring techniques in the piping system is investigated to develop new techniques which are applicable to high temperature sodium flow environment. The plan for the minimization of errors in temperature measurement was drawn up by analysing the error factors in temperature measurement. And the countermeasures for the minimization of errors in temperature measurement due to complex heat transfer were prepared

  16. Sodium conducting polymer electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaarup, S.; West, K. (eds.)

    1989-04-01

    This section deals with the aspects of ionic conduction in general as well as specific experimental results obtained for sodium systems. The conductivity as a function of temperature and oxygen/metal ratio are given for the systems NaI, NaCF/sub 3/SO/sub 3/ and NaClO/sub 4/ plus polyethylene oxide. Attempts have been made to produce mixed phase solid electrolytes analogous to the lithium systems that have worked well. These consist of mixtures of polymer and a solid electrolyte. The addition of both nasicon and sodium beta alumina unexpectedly decreases the ionic conductivity in contrast to the lithium systems. Addition of the nonconducting silica AEROSIL in order to increase the internal surface area has the effect of retarding the phase transition at 60 deg. C, but does not enhance the conductivity. (author) 23 refs.

  17. Wastewater reuse in liquid sodium silicate manufacturing in alexandria, egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Gaber A; Abd El-Salam, Magda M; Arafa, Anwar K

    2009-01-01

    Soluble sodium silicates (waterglass) are liquids containing dissolved glass which have some water like properties. They are widely used in industry as sealants, binders, deflocculants, emulsifiers and buffers. Their most common applications in Egypt are in the pulp and paper industry (where they improve the brightness and efficiency of peroxide bleaching) and the detergent industry, in which they improve the action of the detergent and lower the viscosity of liquid soaps. The survey results showed that the production was carried out batch-wise, in an autoclave (dissolver). Sodium silicate in the state of crushed glass was charged in an autoclave (dissolver) with sodium hydroxide and water. The product is filtered through a press. The left over sludge (mud and silicates impurities) is emptied into the local sewer system. Also, sludge (silica gel) was discharged from the neutralization process of the generated alkaline wastewater and consequently clogging the sewerage system. So this study was carried out to modify the current wastewater management system which eliminates sludge formation, the discharge of higher pH wastewater to the sewer system, and to assess its environmental and economic benefits. To assess the characteristics of wastewater to be reused, physico-chemical parameters of 12 samples were tested using standard methods. The survey results showed that a total capacity of the selected enterprise was 540 tons of liquid sodium silicates monthly. The total amount of wastewater being discharged was 335 m3/month. Reusing of wastewater as feed autoclave water reduced water consumption of 32.1% and reduced wastewater discharge/month that constitutes 89.6% as well as saving in final product of 6 ton/month. It was concluded that reusing of wastewater generated from liquid sodium silicate manufacturing process resulted in cheaper and environmental-friendly product.

  18. Wear Resistance of Nano Alumina Containing SiO2-B2O3-Na2O Glass-Ceramic on Steel Substrate

    OpenAIRE

    A. Faeghinia; A. Zamanian

    2016-01-01

    The experimental study has been carried out to investigate the tribological properties of nano Alumina reinforced glass-ceramic enamel. The mixtures of (5, 10, 15 wt.%) nano alumina and glass powders have been air sprayed on stainless steel substrate.. The thixotropy, wetting angle and surface tension of used slurry were increased inherently by 15-wt.% nano alumina. By heat treating at 870-640-525 ºC, the homogeneous crystalline sodium silicate phase beside nano alumina was obtained in glass ...

  19. Aging in a Structural Glass

    OpenAIRE

    Kob, Walter; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the relaxation dynamics of a simple structural glass which has been quenched below its glass transition temperature. We demonstrate that time correlation functions show strong aging effects and investigate in what way the fluctuation dissipation theorem is violated.

  20. Foam Glass for Construction Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund

    2016-01-01

    Foaming is commonly achieved by adding foaming agents such as metal oxides or metal carbonates to glass powder. At elevated temperature, the glass melt becomes viscous and the foaming agents decompose or react to form gas, causing a foamy glass melt. Subsequent cooling to room temperature, result...... in a solid foam glass. The foam glass industry employs a range of different melt precursors and foaming agents. Recycle glass is key melt precursors. Many parameters influence the foaming process and optimising the foaming conditions is very time consuming. The most challenging and attractive goal is to make...... low density foam glass for thermal insulation applications. In this thesis, it is argued that the use of metal carbonates as foaming agents is not suitable for low density foam glass. A reaction mechanism is proposed to justify this result. Furthermore, an in situ method is developed to optimise...

  1. Fabrication and characterization of strontium incorporated 3-D bioactive glass scaffolds for bone tissue from biosilica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Özarslan, Ali Can, E-mail: alicanozarslan@gmail.com; Yücel, Sevil, E-mail: syucel@yildiz.edu.tr

    2016-11-01

    Bioactive glass scaffolds that contain silica are high viable biomaterials as bone supporters for bone tissue engineering due to their bioactive behaviour in simulated body fluid (SBF). In the human body, these materials help inorganic bone structure formation due to a combination of the particular ratio of elements such as silicon (Si), calcium (Ca), sodium (Na) and phosphorus (P), and the doping of strontium (Sr) into the scaffold structure increases their bioactive behaviour. In this study, bioactive glass scaffolds were produced by using rice hull ash (RHA) silica and commercial silica based bioactive glasses. The structural properties of scaffolds such as pore size, porosity and also the bioactive behaviour were investigated. The results showed that undoped and Sr-doped RHA silica-based bioactive glass scaffolds have better bioactivity than that of commercial silica based bioactive glass scaffolds. Moreover, undoped and Sr-doped RHA silica-based bioactive glass scaffolds will be able to be used instead of undoped and Sr-doped commercial silica based bioactive glass scaffolds for bone regeneration applications. Scaffolds that are produced from undoped or Sr-doped RHA silica have high potential to form new bone for bone defects in tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Production of 3-D bioactive glass scaffolds from different silica sources • The effect of biosilica from rice hull ash on the bioactive glass scaffold • Sr additive impact on the bioactivity and biodegradability properties of scaffolds.

  2. Aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses: experiments, modeling and Monte-Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledieu, A.

    2004-10-01

    This work is concerned with the corrosion of borosilicate glasses with variable oxide contents. The originality of this study is the complementary use of experiments and numerical simulations. This study is expected to contribute to a better understanding of the corrosion of nuclear waste confinement glasses. First, the corrosion of glasses containing only silicon, boron and sodium oxides has been studied. The kinetics of leaching show that the rate of leaching and the final degree of corrosion sharply depend on the boron content through a percolation mechanism. For some glass contents and some conditions of leaching, the layer which appears at the glass surface stops the release of soluble species (boron and sodium). This altered layer (also called the gel layer) has been characterized with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Second, additional elements have been included in the glass composition. It appears that calcium, zirconium or aluminum oxides strongly modify the final degree of corrosion so that the percolation properties of the boron sub-network is no more a sufficient explanation to account for the behavior of these glasses. Meanwhile, we have developed a theoretical model, based on the dissolution and the reprecipitation of the silicon. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have been used in order to test several concepts such as the boron percolation, the local reactivity of weakly soluble elements and the restructuring of the gel layer. This model has been fully validated by comparison with the results on the three oxide glasses. Then, it has been used as a comprehensive tool to investigate the paradoxical behavior of the aluminum and zirconium glasses: although these elements slow down the corrosion kinetics, they lead to a deeper final degree of corrosion. The main contribution of this work is that the final degree of corrosion of borosilicate glasses results from the competition of two opposite mechanisms

  3. Water leaching of borosilicate glasses: experiments, modeling and Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledieu, A.

    2004-10-01

    This work is concerned with the corrosion of borosilicate glasses with variable oxide contents. The originality of this study is the complementary use of experiments and numerical simulations. This study is expected to contribute to a better understanding of the corrosion of nuclear waste confinement glasses. First, the corrosion of glasses containing only silicon, boron and sodium oxides has been studied. The kinetics of leaching show that the rate of leaching and the final degree of corrosion sharply depend on the boron content through a percolation mechanism. For some glass contents and some conditions of leaching, the layer which appears at the glass surface stops the release of soluble species (boron and sodium). This altered layer (also called the gel layer) has been characterized with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Second, additional elements have been included in the glass composition. It appears that calcium, zirconium or aluminum oxides strongly modify the final degree of corrosion so that the percolation properties of the boron sub-network is no more a sufficient explanation to account for the behavior of these glasses. Meanwhile, we have developed a theoretical model, based on the dissolution and the reprecipitation of the silicon. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have been used in order to test several concepts such as the boron percolation, the local reactivity of weakly soluble elements and the restructuring of the gel layer. This model has been fully validated by comparison with the results on the three oxide glasses. Then, it has been used as a comprehensive tool to investigate the paradoxical behavior of the aluminum and zirconium glasses: although these elements slow down the corrosion kinetics, they lead to a deeper final degree of corrosion. The main contribution of this work is that the final degree of corrosion of borosilicate glasses results from the competition of two opposite mechanisms

  4. Glass ceilings of professionalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Dawn L

    2016-04-01

    The term glass ceiling is a political term often used to describe an unbreakable barrier that isnot visible with the human eye, but it keeps minorities from rising up i.e. it is a barrier to minoritygroups, in the past (and sometimes still) for women, that stops them from achieving theirtrue potential.

  5. What Glass Ceiling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael; Post, Katherine

    1996-01-01

    A recent study drawing on data from the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggests that the wage gap between men and women has virtually disappeared, and that the so-called "glass ceiling" results more from age and qualifications than from explicit discrimination. (SLD)

  6. Metallic glasses: structural models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassif, E.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this work is to give a summary of the attempts made up to the present in order to discribe by structural models the atomic arrangement in metallic glasses, showing also why the structure factors and atomic distribution functions cannot be always experimentally determined with a reasonable accuracy. (M.W.O.) [pt

  7. Microchips on glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanver, L.; De Vreede, L.; Keulemans, M.

    2007-01-01

    Microchips on glass. What about a mobile phone that uses a single microchip to receive all the available frequency bands, plus extras such as television, gps, and Internet access? Or, in due time, see-though implants that will monitor your state of health, and equipment that will let you see through

  8. Glass as matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Refraiming the Moderns - Substitute Windows and Glass. In general terms, the seminar has contributed to the growing interest in the problems concerning the restoration of Modern Movement architecture. More particularly, it has of course drawn our attention to modern windows, which are increasingly...

  9. Glass ... current issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.F.; Dupuy, J.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives of the School were twofold. Firstly to inform participants of actual and developing technological applications of glassy materials in which fundamental science makes a strong contribution, and secondly to bring together scientists from the widely different backgrounds of glass science and technology to promote mutual understanding and collaboration. (orig.)

  10. Stained Glass and Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-02-01

    Dr. Robert Webster, an Emeritus member of the Department of Infectious Diseases at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, discusses his cover art story on stained glass and influenza.  Created: 2/1/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/1/2017.

  11. Thermogravimetric analysis of phase transitions in cement compositions mixed by sodium silicate solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedosov Sergey Viktorovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the capability to modify cement by mechanical activation of sodium silicate water solution. Admixtures or blends of binding agents were employed for modifying concrete properties. The liquid glass is applied to protect from chemically or physically unfavorable environmental impacts, such as acidic medium and high temperature. The sodium silicate is a high-capacity setting accelerator. The increasing of the liquid glass proportion in the mix leads to the degradation of the cement paste plasticity and for this reason it is necessary to reduce the amount of liquid glass in the cement paste. The activation of dilute water solution of sodium silicate into rotary pulsating apparatus directly before tempering of the cement paste is an effective way to decrease mass fraction of liquid glass in the cement paste. The results of the combined influence of liquid glass and mechanical activation on physicochemical processes taking place in cement stone are represented in this research. Thermogravimetric analysis was used in order to study cement blends. Thermogravimetric analysis of modified cement stone assays was performed by thermo analyzer SETARAM TGA 92-24. The results of the analysis of phase transition taking place under high-temperature heating of cement stone modified by the mechanical activation of the water solution of the sodium silicate were introduced. Thermograms of cement stone assays were obtained at different hardening age. The comparison of these thermograms allows us to come to a conclusion on the formation and the retention during long time of a more dense structure of the composite matrix mixed by the mechanical activation of sodium silicate water solution. The relation between the concrete composition and its strength properties was stated. Perhaps, the capability of modified concrete to keep calcium ions in sparingly soluble hydrosilicates leads to the increase in its durability and corrosion resistance.

  12. Glasses and nuclear waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojovan, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Glass is an amorphous solid material which behaves like an isotropic crystal. Atomic structure of glass lacks long-range order but possesses short and most probably medium range order. Compared to crystalline materials of the same composition glasses are metastable materials however crystallisation processes are kinetically impeded within times which typically exceed the age of universe. The physical and chemical durability of glasses combined with their high tolerance to compositional changes makes glasses irreplaceable when hazardous waste needs immobilisation for safe long-term storage, transportation and consequent disposal. Immobilisation of radioactive waste in glassy materials using vitrification has been used successfully for several decades. Nuclear waste vitrification is attractive because of its flexibility, the large number of elements which can be incorporated in the glass, its high corrosion durability and the reduced volume of the resulting wasteform. Vitrification involves melting of waste materials with glass-forming additives so that the final vitreous product incorporates the waste contaminants in its macro- and micro-structure. Hazardous waste constituents are immobilised either by direct incorporation into the glass structure or by encapsulation when the final glassy material can be in form of a glass composite material. Both borosilicate and phosphate glasses are currently used to immobilise nuclear wastes. In addition to relatively homogeneous glasses novel glass composite materials are used to immobilise problematic waste streams. (author)

  13. Silicate glasses corrosion. Texture analysis of the corrosion layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portal, Sabine

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the kinetic and the texture evolution of the corroded layer that forms on glass surfaces exposed to acidic solutions. The corroded layer is depleted in alkali cations and is produced by an ion exchange mechanism. It is porous and shows a lower refractive index than the one of the bulk glass. Spectroscopic ellipsometry allows determining the thickness of the layer and its refractive index. Several other techniques have been developed for characterizing the corrosion behaviour of glass surfaces: porosity is thus investigated by adsorption-desorption of nitrogen; the thickness and the composition of the layer are studied by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (S.I.M.S.); sodium concentration in the solution has been analyzed by atomic absorption. This study shows the importance of leaching conditions and glass preparation. The type of drying employed is susceptible to modify the texture and the structure of the layer. The layers produced in the early stages of the leaching process are not easily detectable. The different results lead however to the same conclusion: after a strong increase of porosity, a densification of the layer is observed with increasing time. The evolution of the layer texture could therefore modify the kinetic of the glass corrosion. (author) [fr

  14. Extraction of lead from waste CRT funnel glass by generating lead sulfide - An approach for electronic waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Biao; Hui, Wenlong

    2017-09-01

    Waste cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass is the key and difficult points in waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) disposal. In this paper, a novel and effective process for the detoxification and reutilization of waste CRT funnel glass was developed by generating lead sulfide precipitate via a high-temperature melting process. The central function in this process was the generation of lead sulfide, which gathered at the bottom of the crucible and was then separated from the slag. Sodium carbonate was used as a flux and reaction agent, and sodium sulfide was used as a precipitating agent. The experimental results revealed that the lead sulfide recovery rate initially increased with an increase in the amount of added sodium carbonate, the amount of sodium sulfide, the temperature, and the holding time and then reached an equilibrium value. The maximum lead sulfide recovery rate was approximately 93%, at the optimum sodium carbonate level, sodium sulfide level, temperature, and holding time of 25%, 8%, 1200°C, and 2h, respectively. The glass slag can be made into sodium and potassium silicate by hydrolysis in an environmental and economical process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Volatility mechanisms of borosilicate glasses and molten glasses of nuclear interest structural effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorme, L.

    1998-01-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the mechanisms which control the volatility of the reference glass used for the confinement of radioactive waste. It was conducted on simplified compositions, in the SiO 2 -B 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 -αNa 2 O-(1-alpha)Li 2 O-CaO system.The structural approach carried out by NMR, from room temperature up to 1500 deg.C, shows a strong increase in the mobility of alkalis above Tg. A rapid exchange between B III and B IV sites near 700 deg.C, and the change of coordination number B IV- B III near 1100 deg.C, also seem to take place. The analysis of the vapor phase, carried out by High Temperature Mass Spectrometry coupled to Knudsen cells, reveals the presence between 780 deg.C and 830 deg.C of NaBO 2 (g), LiBO 2 (g) and Na 2 (BO 2 )2(g). The calculation of the partial pressure of each species shows that the total pressure of simplified glasses is dominated by the contribution of sodium. To study the volatility of glasses at higher temperature, equipment using the Transpiration method was used. The analysis of the deposits indicate the presence at 1060 deg.C of the species quoted previously. The vaporization rate and the vapor density were determined for each composition studied in a saturated state. Thus, we show that the volatility of the reference glass can be simulated by that of a simplified glass. For α=1, the kinetic of vaporization between 1060 deg.C and 1200 deg.C reveals an evaporation from the surface associated with a mechanism of diffusion in the molten glass. This is similar to the volatility of the reference glass at 1060 deg.C. To finally explain these mechanisms on a microscopic basis, we develop a model of molecular interactions. Between 780 deg.C and 830 deg.C, these mechanisms are controlled by a strong attraction between Na 2 O and Li 2 O, which maintains the total vapor pressure on a quasi-constant lever up to α=0.27. (author)

  16. A study on sodium-concrete reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jae Heum; Min, Byong Hun [Suwon University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    A small sodium-concrete reaction facility was designed, manufactured and installed. this facility has been operated under inert gas(N{sub 2}) with different experimental variables such as sodium injection temperature, injection amount of sodium, aging period of concrete, sodium reservoir temperature. As a result, it was found that sodium injection temperature and injected amount of sodium has little effect on sodium-concrete reaction. However, sodium reservoir temperature and aging period of concrete has relatively high impact on sodium-concrete reaction. Sodium-concrete reaction model has also been developed and compared with experimental results. (Author) 51 refs., 16 tabs., 64 figs.

  17. Influence of SrO substitution for CaO on the properties of bioactive glass S53P4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massera, Jonathan; Hupa, Leena

    2014-03-01

    Commercial melt-quenched bioactive glasses consist of the oxides of silicon, phosphorus, calcium and sodium. Doping of the glasses with oxides of some other elements is known to affect their capability to support hydroxyapatite formation and thus bone tissue healing but also to modify their high temperature processing parameters. In the present study, the influence of gradual substitution of SrO for CaO on the properties of the bioactive glass S53P4 was studied. Thermal analysis and hot stage microscopy were utilized to measure the thermal properties of the glasses. The in vitro bioactivity and solubility was measured by immersing the glasses in simulated body fluid for 6 h to 1 week. The formation of silica rich and hydroxyapatite layers was assessed from FTIR spectra analysis and SEM images of the glass surface. Increasing substitution of SrO for CaO decreased all characteristic temperatures and led to a slightly stronger glass network. The initial glass dissolution rate increased with SrO content. Hydroxyapatite layer was formed on all glasses but on the SrO containing glasses the layer was thinner and contained also strontium. The results suggest that substituting SrO for CaO in S53P4 glass retards the bioactivity. However, substitution greater than 10 mol% allow for precipitation of a strontium substituted hydroxyapatite layer.

  18. Apollo 12 ropy glasses revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, S. J.; Mckay, D. S.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Basu, A.; Martinez, R. R.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    1994-01-01

    We analyzed ropy glasses from Apollo 12 soils 12032 and 12033 by a variety of techniques including SEM/EDX, electron microprobe analysis, INAA, and Ar-39-Ar-40 age dating. The ropy glasses have potassium rare earth elements phosphorous (KREEP)-like compositions different from those of local Apollo 12 mare soils; it is likely that the ropy glasses are of exotic origin. Mixing calculations indicate that the ropy glasses formed from a liquid enriched in KREEP and that the ropy glass liquid also contained a significant amount of mare material. The presence of solar Ar and a trace of regolith-derived glass within the ropy glasses are evidence that the ropy glasses contain a small regolith component. Anorthosite and crystalline breccia (KREEP) clasts occur in some ropy glasses. We also found within these glasses clasts of felsite (fine-grained granitic fragments) very similar in texture and composition to the larger Apollo 12 felsites, which have a Ar-39-Ar-40 degassing age of 800 +/- 15 Ma. Measurements of 39-Ar-40-Ar in 12032 ropy glass indicate that it was degassed at the same time as the large felsite although the ropy glass was not completely degassed. The ropy glasses and felsites, therefore, probably came from the same source. Most early investigators suggested that the Apollo 12 ropy glasses were part of the ejecta deposited at the Apollo 12 site from the Copernicus impact. Our new data reinforce this model. If these ropy glasses are from Copernicus, they provide new clues to the nature of the target material at the Copernicus site, a part of the Moon that has not been sampled directly.

  19. Sodium characterization during the starting period of a sodium loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lievens, F.; Parmentier, C.; Soenen, M.

    1976-01-01

    A sodium loop for analytical chemistry studies has been built by S.C.K./C.E.N. at Mol Belgium. Its first working period was used to test analytical methods, to characterize the sodium and to define the operating parameters of the loop. This report covers the working parameters of the loop, the characterization of the filling sodium and its purity evolution during the first working period of the loop

  20. Chemical characterization of the stained glass window from the rose window, Siena Duomo (Italy, 1288-1289)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimeno, D.; Aulinas, M.; Bazzocchi, F.; Fernandez-Turiel, J. L.; Garcia-Valles, M.; Novembre, D.; Basso, E.; Messiga, B.; Riccardi, M. P.; Tarozzi, C.; Mendera, M.

    2010-07-01

    The chemical composition of nine medieval coloured stained glasses from Duomo (Catedral) of Siena, Italy, has been characterized. They come from the rose window elaborated under the drawing of Duccio di Buoninsegna masterwork (1288- 89 AD). This note explains the results obtained by EMPA, representative of bulk chemistry of several coloured glasses (deep green, olive green, yellow, purple, pink, deep blue, light blue, red plaque and also uncoloured), as well as the associated trace elements (obtained by Induced Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry) that represent the chemical fingerprint of these glasses. The studied samples are sodium-calcium glass (chemical compositions in the range 13-14 wt% Na{sub 2}O, 56-64 wt% SiO{sub 2}, 4 wt% MgO, 9-10 wt% CaO, 2,5-4 wt% K{sub 2}O); thus of Mediterranean tradition.This fact has been found by our team in previous studies (stained glasses from the church of Monestir de Pedralbes, Barcelona) for XIV century glass made at least 40 years later. As a general rule, the conservation state of these sodium glasses is good, except for the cohesion of grisaille to glass mesostase. This study allowed to identify three glass groups developed from different raw material formulations: a first group is constituted by deep green, olive green, light blue and yellow glass; a second one comprises by uncoloured, deep purple, deep blue and pink glass; and finally, the plaque red glass that shows deeply different composition. Pink and yellow glass was produced following the traditional recipe compiled by Theophilus, a monk who lived at the beginning of XII century. This implies a separate process of raw material purification and a careful control of the redox kiln conditions; thus, these glasses can be considered as traditional or technologically not evolved. The deep blue, light blue and deep purple were obtained after the artisan dosed addition of a cobalt salt. Olive green and deep green glasses were produced with addition of copper (together with

  1. Glass bead cultivation of fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Droce, Aida; Sørensen, Jens Laurids; Giese, H.

    2013-01-01

    Production of bioactive compounds and enzymes from filamentous fungi is highly dependent on cultivation conditions. Here we present an easy way to cultivate filamentous fungi on glass beads that allow complete control of nutrient supply. Secondary metabolite production in Fusarium graminearum...... and Fusarium solani cultivated on agar plates, in shaking liquid culture or on glass beads was compared. Agar plate culture and glass bead cultivation yielded comparable results while liquid culture had lower production of secondary metabolites. RNA extraction from glass beads and liquid cultures was easier...... to specific nutrient factors. •Fungal growth on glass beads eases and improves fungal RNA extraction....

  2. Intravitreal flomoxef sodium in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, K; Torisaki, M; Yamashita, Y; Komatsu, M; Tanahashi, T

    1993-01-01

    We studied the intraocular concentration of flomoxef sodium in nonvitrectomized and vitrectomized eyes of albino rabbits after intravenous administration of 100 mg/kg flomoxef sodium. The concentration of flomoxef sodium in the vitreous body was undetectable (flomoxef sodium was investigated with ophthalmoscopy, electroretinography (ERG) and light microscopy after intravitreal injection of 200, 500, 1,000 and 2,000 micrograms flomoxef sodium in albino and pigmented rabbits. No ERG changes were induced with 200 micrograms. Other higher doses caused transient ERG changes. After the 200-micrograms injection, the intravitreal concentration decreased exponentially, the half-life being 4.4 h. The antibacterial activity, broad coverage and low intravitreal toxicity of flomoxef sodium suggest that this compound may be used to treat bacterial endophthalmitis.

  3. Double sodium rubidium molybdates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhoseev, M.V.; Khal'baeva, K.M.; Khajkina, E.G.; Ogurtsov, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    According to ceramic technique double sodium-rubidium molybdates of the compositions Rb 2-x Na x MoO 4 (0.5≤x≤0.67) and Na 3 Rb(MoO 4 ) 2 have been prepared. It is ascertained that Rb 2-x Na x MoO 4 is crystallized in glaserite structural type (trigonal crystal system, sp.gr. P3m1, Z=2) and melts incongruently at 640 deg C. Na 3 Rb(MoO 4 ) 2 at room temperature is unstable and gradually decomposes into Na 2 MoO 4 and Rb 2-x Na x MoO 4

  4. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  5. Fun with singing wine glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Christine; Galloway, Melodie; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2018-05-01

    A fun activity is presented using singing wine glasses for introductory physics students. Students tune a white wine glass and a red wine glass to as many semitones as possible by filling the glasses with the appropriate amounts of water. A smart phone app is used to measure the frequencies of equal-temperament tones. Then plots of frequency against water volume percent are made using a spreadsheet. Students can also play combinations of pitches with several glasses. A video (Ruiz 2018 Video: Singing glasses http://mjtruiz.com/ped/wineglasses/) is provided which includes an excerpt of a beautiful piece written for singing glasses and choir: Stars by Latvian composer Ēriks Ešenvalds.

  6. Bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi-Yim, H.; Johnson, W.L.

    1997-01-01

    Composites with a bulk metallic glass matrix were synthesized and characterized. This was made possible by the recent development of bulk metallic glasses that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the undercooled liquid state. In this letter, experimental methods for processing metallic glass composites are introduced. Three different bulk metallic glass forming alloys were used as the matrix materials. Both ceramics and metals were introduced as reinforcement into the metallic glass. The metallic glass matrix remained amorphous after adding up to a 30 vol% fraction of particles or short wires. X-ray diffraction patterns of the composites show only peaks from the second phase particles superimposed on the broad diffuse maxima from the amorphous phase. Optical micrographs reveal uniformly distributed particles in the matrix. The glass transition of the amorphous matrix and the crystallization behavior of the composites were studied by calorimetric methods. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  7. The borosilicate glass for 'PAMELA'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiewer, E.

    1986-01-01

    The low enriched waste concentrate (LEWC) stored at Mol, Belgium, will be solidified in the vitrification plant 'PAMELA'. An alkali-borosilicate glass was developed by the Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Berlin, which dissolves (11 +- 3)wt% waste oxides while providing sufficient flexibility for changes in the process parameters. The development of the glass labelled SM513LW11 is described. Important properties of the glass melt (viscosity, resistivity, formation of yellow phase) and of the glass (corrosion in aqueous solutions, crystallization) are reported. The corrosion data of this glass are similar to those of other HLW-glasses. Less than five wt% of crystalline material are produced upon cooling of large glass blocks. Crystallization does not affect the chemical durability. (Auth.)

  8. Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael D.; Kramer, Daniel P.

    1987-11-10

    In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

  9. The various sodium purification techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courouau, J.L.; Masse, F.; Rodriguez, G.; Latge, C.; Redon, B.

    1997-01-01

    In the framework of sodium waste treatment, the sodium purification phase plays an essential role in the chain of operations leading to the transformation of the active sodium, considered as waste, into a stable sodium salt. The objectives of the purification operations are: To keep a low impurity level, particularly a low concentration in oxygen and hydrogen, in order to allow its transfer to a processing plant, and in order to avoid risks of plugging and/or corrosion in sodium facilities; To reduce the sodium activity in order to limit the dose rate close to the facilities, and in order to reduce the activity of the liquid and gaseous effluents. After a recall of the different kind of impurities that can be present in sodium, and of the different purification methods that could be associated with, the following points are highlighted: (i) Oxygen and hydrogen purification needs, and presentation of some selection criteria for a purification unit adapted to a sodium processing plant, as well as 2 cold trap concepts that are in accordance with these criteria: PSICHOS and PIRAMIDE. (ii) Tritium reduction in a bulk of liquid sodium by swamping, isotopic exchange, or permeation throughout a membrane. (iii) Caesium trapping on carbonaceous matrix. The main matrices used at present are R.V.C. (Reticulated Vitreous Carbon) and Actitex/Pica products. Tests in the laboratory and on an experimental device have demonstrated the performances of these materials, which are able to reduce sodium activity in Cs 134 and Cs 137 to very low values. The sodium purification processes as regards to the hydrogen, oxygen and caesium, that are aimed at facilitating the subsequent treatment of sodium, are therefore mastered operations. Regarding the operations associated with the reduction of the tritium activity, the methods are in the process of being qualified, or to be qualified. (author)

  10. Physical properties of liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberdi Primicia, J.; Martinez Piquer, T.A.

    1977-01-01

    The molten sodium has been the more accepted coolant for the first generation of FBR, by this reason the knowledge of its technology is needed for the development of the next LMFBR. A series of necessary data for designing sodium liquid systems are given. Tables and graphics about the most important physical sodium properties between 1200-1400 degC are gathered. The results have been obtained from equations that relate the properties with temperature using a Fortran IV program. (author) [es

  11. Carbon transport in sodium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Espigares, M.; Lapena, J.; La Torre, M. de

    1983-01-01

    Carbon activities in dynamic non isothermal sodium system are determined using an equilibratium method. Foils of Fe-18 w% Cr-8 W% Ni alloy with low carbon content (in the as received condition) are exposed to dynamic liquid sodium in the temperature range between 450 0 C and 700 0 C. The analysis was used to evaluate the carburization-decarburization behaviour of type 304 stainless steel exposed to sodium. (author)

  12. Glasses for Mali

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    We are collecting old pairs of glasses to take out to Mali, where they can be re-used by people there. The price for a pair of glasses can often exceed 3 months salary, so they are prohibitively expensive for many people. If you have any old spectacles you can donate, please put them in the special box in the ATLAS secretariat, Bldg.40-4-D01 before the Christmas closure on 19 December so we can take them with us when we leave for Africa at the end of the month. (more details in ATLAS e-news edition of 29 September 2008: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/news/news_mali.php) many thanks! Katharine Leney co-driver of the ATLAS car on the Charity Run to Mali

  13. Glass manufacturing through induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boen, R.; Paya, B.; Roscini, M.; Fautrelle, Y.; Tuaz, F.; Delage, D.

    1991-01-01

    Oxides and glasses are electrical and thermal insulators, but show the characteristic of being weakly conductors of electricity when they are melt. It is then possible to heat them through HF induction. This interesting property allows the development of a melting process in cold crucible induction furnace. The process is being studied and developed by a consortium made up of CFEI, CEA Marcoule, ELECTRICITE DE FRANCE and MADYLAM laboratory. The studies include 2 parts: a) One experimental part to develop the technology and research for satisfying configurations, through a small size platform (10 to 30 kg/h). The long run continuous pouring melting tests made on different kinds of glass allow to go-on with industrial range units. b) One theoretical part to understand the magneto-thermo-hydraulic phenomenon hardly in relation with the heavy dependence of the physical characteristics (electrical and heat conductivities, viscosity) according to temperature. 6 refs., 4 figs [fr

  14. Glass matrix armor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calkins, N.C.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an armor system which utilizes glass. A plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the insides surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material consisting of glass and a ceramic material and, in certain embodiments, a polymeric material

  15. Breaking the glass ceiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, A

    1997-03-01

    The glass ceiling is a form of organizational bias and discrimination that prevents qualified professionals from achieving positions of top governance and leadership. This article examines glass ceiling barriers that keep physicians from the upper reaches of management. While these factors apply mainly to women and minority physicians in academia, and are attributable to sexual harassment and discrimination, physicians as a class are frequently denied executive management positions. Such denial results from inadequate preparation for a career in health care administration. Important issues in the professional development of physician executives include mentoring, training and education, administrative experience, and cultural and personality factors. All of those must be considered when making the transition from medicine to management.

  16. HLW immobilization in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, P.; Jacquet-Francillon, N.; Runge, S.

    1992-01-01

    The immobilization of High Level Waste in glass in France is a long history which started as early as in the 1950's. More than 30 years of Research and Development have been invested in that field. Two industrial facilities are operating (AVM and R7) and a third one (T7), under cold testing, is planned to start active operation in the mid-92. While vitrification has been demonstrated to be an industrially mastered process, the question of the quality of the final waste product, i.e. the HLW glass, must be addressed. The scope of the present paper is to focus on the latter point from both standpoints of the R and D and of the industrial reality

  17. Modelling glass alteration in an altered argillaceous environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bildstein, O.; Trotignon, L.; Pozo, C.; Jullien, M.

    2007-01-01

    The long term behaviour of materials such as glass, steel and clay has been investigated in the context of deep geological disposal of radioactive wastes. The interactions between vitrified wastes, canister corrosion products (CPs) and clay are studied using a modified version of the reaction-transport code Crunch, especially looking at pH changes and possible cementation at the interface with the clayey materials. These perturbations may indeed affect the lifetime of glass matrix in deep repositories, e.g., high pH enhances the rate of glass alteration. This work focuses on the argillite of Bure. The calculations were performed at 323 K with a glass alteration rate switching from a high initial rate to a residual rate according to the sorption capacity of CPs. The time at which this sorption capacity is saturated is crucial to the system in terms of wastes package lifetime. The results show that the glass alteration imposes a high pH value at the interface with CPs and clay: up to a value of 9.2, compared to 7.3 which is the initial pH value in the argillite. Experimental data show that the rate of glass alteration is much higher in such pH conditions. For a R7T7-type glass, the rate is about five times higher at pH 9 than at pH 7. This pH perturbation migrates through the clayey domain as a result of the migration of mobile elements such as boron and sodium, and despite the existence of strong pH buffers in the argillite. The cementation of porosity at the interface between glass and clay is predicted by the model due to the massive precipitation of iron corrosion products and glass alteration products. At this point of the evolution of the system, the pH starts to decrease and the alteration rate of the glass could be significantly reduced. This porosity clogging effect is difficult to confirm by experiments especially since existing data on short term experiments tend to show a pervasive precipitation of silica in the domain instead of a localized precipitation

  18. Nuclear traces in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segovia A, M. de N.

    1978-01-01

    The charged particles produce, in dielectric materials, physical and chemical effects which make evident the damaged zone along the trajectory of the particle. This damaged zone is known as the latent trace. The latent traces can be enlarged by an etching of the detector material. This treatment attacks preferently the zones of the material where the charged particles have penetrated, producing concavities which can be observed through a low magnification optical microscope. These concavities are known as developed traces. In this work we describe the glass characteristics as a detector of the fission fragments traces. In the first chapter we present a summary of the existing basic theories to explain the formation of traces in solids. In the second chapter we describe the etching method used for the traces development. In the following chapters we determine some chatacteristics of the traces formed on the glass, such as: the development optimum time; the diameter variation of the traces and their density according to the temperature variation of the detector; the glass response to a radiation more penetrating than that of the fission fragments; the distribution of the developed traces and the existing relation between this ditribution and the fission fragments of 252 Cf energies. The method which has been used is simple and cheap and can be utilized in laboratories whose resources are limited. The commercial glass which has been employed allows the registration of the fission fragments and subsequently the realization of experiments which involve the counting of the traces as well as the identification of particles. (author)

  19. Amorphous gauge glass theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Bennett, D.L.

    1987-08-01

    Assuming that a lattice gauge theory describes a fundamental attribute of Nature, it should be pointed out that such a theory in the form of a gauge glass is a weaker assumption than a regular lattice model in as much as it is not constrained by the imposition of translational invariance; translational invariance is, however, recovered approximately in the long wavelength or continuum limit. (orig./WL)

  20. Polyamorphism in metalic glass.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, H. W.; Liu, H. Z.; Cheng, Y. Q.; Wen, J.; Lee, P.L.; Luo, W.K.; Shastri, S.D.; Ma, E.; X-Ray Science Division; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2007-03-01

    A metal, or an alloy, can often exist in more than one crystal structure. The face-centered-cubic and body-centered-cubic forms of iron (or steel) are a familiar example of such polymorphism. When metallic materials are made in the amorphous form, is a parallel 'polyamorphism' possible? So far, polyamorphic phase transitions in the glassy state have been observed only in glasses involving directional and open (such as tetrahedral) coordination environments. Here, we report an in situ X-ray diffraction observation of a pressure-induced transition between two distinct amorphous polymorphs in a Ce{sub 55}Al{sub 45} metallic glass. The large density difference observed between the two polyamorphs is attributed to their different electronic and atomic structures, in particular the bond shortening revealed by ab initio modeling of the effects of f-electron delocalization. This discovery offers a new perspective of the amorphous state of metals, and has implications for understanding the structure, evolution and properties of metallic glasses and related liquids. Our work also opens a new avenue towards technologically useful amorphous alloys that are compositionally identical but with different thermodynamic, functional and rheological properties due to different bonding and structural characteristics.