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Sample records for sodium carbonate conditioning

  1. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium carbonate (known as washing soda or soda ash) is a chemical found in many household and industrial products. This article focuses on poisoning due to sodium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  2. Carbon transport in sodium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Espigares, M.; Lapena, J.; La Torre, M. de

    1983-01-01

    Carbon activities in dynamic non isothermal sodium system are determined using an equilibratium method. Foils of Fe-18 w% Cr-8 W% Ni alloy with low carbon content (in the as received condition) are exposed to dynamic liquid sodium in the temperature range between 450 0 C and 700 0 C. The analysis was used to evaluate the carburization-decarburization behaviour of type 304 stainless steel exposed to sodium. (author)

  3. 21 CFR 582.1742 - Sodium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium carbonate. 582.1742 Section 582.1742 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1742 Sodium carbonate. (a) Product. Sodium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  4. Measurement of carbon thermodynamic activity in sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlov, F A; Zagorulko, Yu I; Kovalev, Yu P; Alekseev, V V [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (USSR)

    1980-05-01

    The report presents the brief outline on system of carbon activity detecting system in sodium (SCD), operating on the carbon-permeable membrane, of the methods and the results of testing it under the experimental circulating loop conditions. The results of carbon activity sensor calibration with the use of equilibrium samples of XI8H9, Fe -8Ni, Fe -12Mn materials are listed. The behaviour of carbon activity sensor signals in sodium under various transitional conditions and hydrodynamic perturbation in the circulating loop, containing carbon bearing impurities in the sodium flow and their deposits on the surfaces flushed by sodium, are described. (author)

  5. The foil equilibration method for carbon in sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgstedt, H; Frees, G; Peric, Z [Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, Institute of Materials and Solid State Research, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1980-05-01

    Among the non-metallic impurities in sodium, carbon plays an important role since at high temperatures the structural materials exposed to sodium are subject to carburization and decarburization depending on the carbon activity of the sodium. Carburization of austenitic stainless steels leads to reduction in ductility and fatigue properties whereas decarburization results in a decrease in the high temperature creep strength. A knowledge of the carbon activities in sodium will help understanding of the carbon transfer phenomena in operating sodium systems of the fast reactors, and also carbon diffusion, microstructural stability and mechanical behaviour of materials under different service conditions. An understanding of the carbon behaviour in sodium becomes difficult in view of the complexities of the different species present as elemental carbon, carbide, acetylide, carbonate, and cyanide. Carbon estimation techniques for sodium presently in use are: chemical analytical methods, on-line carbon monitors, and oil equilibration method. Various chemical methods have been developed for the estimation of different species like acetylide, cyanide, carbonate, elemental carbon, and total carbon in sodium. All these methods are time consuming and subject to various errors. The on-line monitors developed for carbon in sodium are able to give continuous indication of carbon activities and have higher sensitivity than the chemical methods. A still more simple method for the determination of carbon activities is by the foil equilibration first published by Natesan et al. Because of its simplicity like the vanadium wire equilibration for oxygen it is being used widely for the estimation of carbon activities in sodium systems. Carbon concentrations in operating sodium systems estimated by this procedure by applying solubility relation to carbon activities have yielded very low values of carbon, lower than the sensitivity limits of the chemical estimation methods. Foil

  6. The foil equilibration method for carbon in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstedt, H.; Frees, G.; Peric, Z.

    1980-01-01

    Among the non-metallic impurities in sodium, carbon plays an important role since at high temperatures the structural materials exposed to sodium are subject to carburization and decarburization depending on the carbon activity of the sodium. Carburization of austenitic stainless steels leads to reduction in ductility and fatigue properties whereas decarburization results in a decrease in the high temperature creep strength. A knowledge of the carbon activities in sodium will help understanding of the carbon transfer phenomena in operating sodium systems of the fast reactors, and also carbon diffusion, microstructural stability and mechanical behaviour of materials under different service conditions. An understanding of the carbon behaviour in sodium becomes difficult in view of the complexities of the different species present as elemental carbon, carbide, acetylide, carbonate, and cyanide. Carbon estimation techniques for sodium presently in use are: chemical analytical methods, on-line carbon monitors, and oil equilibration method. Various chemical methods have been developed for the estimation of different species like acetylide, cyanide, carbonate, elemental carbon, and total carbon in sodium. All these methods are time consuming and subject to various errors. The on-line monitors developed for carbon in sodium are able to give continuous indication of carbon activities and have higher sensitivity than the chemical methods. A still more simple method for the determination of carbon activities is by the foil equilibration first published by Natesan et al. Because of its simplicity like the vanadium wire equilibration for oxygen it is being used widely for the estimation of carbon activities in sodium systems. Carbon concentrations in operating sodium systems estimated by this procedure by applying solubility relation to carbon activities have yielded very low values of carbon, lower than the sensitivity limits of the chemical estimation methods. Foil

  7. 21 CFR 184.1742 - Sodium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium carbonate. 184.1742 Section 184.1742 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1742 Sodium carbonate. (a) Sodium carbonate (Na2CO3, CAS Reg. No... ore calcined to impure soda ash and then purified; or (3) synthesized from limestone by the Solvay...

  8. Chemistry of carbon in dynamic sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lievens, F.; Casteels, F.

    1980-01-01

    The chemistry of carbon in sodium is described by its chemical activity measurements using alloy monitor foils, by its behaviour in the heat exchanger of the Na 2 sodium loop after 60,000 hours of operation, and by measurements with on-line meters. Efforts toward the identification of the carbon chemical states present in dynamic sodium, and responsible for the carbon chemical activity, are described. (author)

  9. Chemistry of carbon in dynamic sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lievens, F; Casteels, F [SCK/CEN, Mol (Belgium)

    1980-05-01

    The chemistry of carbon in sodium is described by its chemical activity measurements using alloy monitor foils, by its behaviour in the heat exchanger of the Na 2 sodium loop after 60,000 hours of operation, and by measurements with on-line meters. Efforts toward the identification of the carbon chemical states present in dynamic sodium, and responsible for the carbon chemical activity, are described. (author)

  10. A Simple Quantitative Synthesis: Sodium Chloride from Sodium Carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Marvin

    1988-01-01

    Describes a simple laboratory procedure for changing sodium carbonate into sodium chloride by adding concentrated HCl to cause the reaction and then evaporating the water. Claims a good stoichiometric yield can be obtained in one three-hour lab period. Suggests using fume hood for the reaction. (ML)

  11. Analysis and monitoring of carbon in sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lievens, F; Parmentier, C [SCK/CEN, Mol (Belgium)

    1980-05-01

    Chemical analyses used by SCK/CEN at Mol Belgium, in the carbon mass transfer studies include on-line activity measurements, and off-line carbon determinations on sodium samples and on alloys equilibrated with the carbon activity in the loop sodium. For carbon activity measurements efforts were directed to the development of EMF and diffusion type carbon meters. The Monitor tab technique was used for calibration. Chemical off-line analyses were developed for identification and measurement of total carbon and for carbon chemical states in the ppb range. Analysed chemical states are carbides, Carbonates, Carbonyl and Cyanide. (author)

  12. Analysis and monitoring of carbon in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lievens, F.; Parmentier, C.

    1980-01-01

    Chemical analyses used by SCK/CEN at Mol Belgium, in the carbon mass transfer studies include on-line activity measurements, and off-line carbon determinations on sodium samples and on alloys equilibrated with the carbon activity in the loop sodium. For carbon activity measurements efforts were directed to the development of EMF and diffusion type carbon meters. The Monitor tab technique was used for calibration. Chemical off-line analyses were developed for identification and measurement of total carbon and for carbon chemical states in the ppb range. Analysed chemical states are carbides, Carbonates, Carbonyl and Cyanide. (author)

  13. Mixed Solvent Reactive Recrystallization of Sodium Carbonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaertner, R.S.

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of the reactive recrystallization of trona (sodium sesquicarbonate) and sodium bicarbonate to sodium carbonate (soda) in a mixed solvent led to the design of several alternative, less energy consumptive, economically very attractive process routes for the production of soda from all

  14. Dosage of trace carbon in sodium (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannier, J.; Vasseur, A.

    1963-01-01

    A wet method for dosing carbon in sodium has been developed. The carbon is oxidised in a vacuum using Van SLYKE'S solution. The carbonic acid formed is measured volumetrically; its purity can be controlled by chromatographic analysis. The results obtained show that this method makes it possible to measure carbon in concentrations of about 10 ppm. (authors) [fr

  15. Sodium to sodium carbonate conversion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    A method of converting radioactive alkali metal into a low level disposable solid waste material. The radioactive alkali metal is atomized and introduced into an aqueous caustic solution having caustic present in the range of from about 20 wt % to about 70 wt % to convert the radioactive alkali metal to a radioactive alkali metal hydroxide. The aqueous caustic containing radioactive alkali metal hydroxide and CO.sub.2 are introduced into a thin film evaporator with the CO.sub.2 present in an amount greater than required to convert the alkali metal hydroxide to a radioactive alkali metal carbonate, and thereafter the radioactive alkali metal carbonate is separated from the thin film evaporator as a dry powder. Hydroxide solutions containing toxic metal hydroxide including one or more metal ions of Sb, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Ni, Se, Ag and T1 can be converted into a low level non-hazardous waste using the thin film evaporator of the invention.

  16. Reaction velocity of sodium hydration in humid air and sodium carbonation in humid carbon dioxide atmosphere. Fundamental study on sodium carbonate process in FBR bulk sodium coolant disposal technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadokoro, Yutaka; Yoshida, Eiichi

    1999-11-01

    A sodium carbonate processing method, which changes sodium to sodium carbonate and/or sodium bicarbonate by humid carbon dioxide, has been examined and about to be applied to large test loops dismantling. However, that the basic data regarding the progress of the reaction is insufficient on the other hand, is a present condition. The present report therefore aims at presenting basic data regarding the reaction velocity of sodium hydration in humid air and sodium carbonation in humid carbon dioxide atmosphere, and observing the reaction progress, for the application to large test loops dismantling. The test result is summarized as follows. (1) Although the reaction velocity of sodium varied with sodium specimen sizes and velocity measurement methods, the reaction velocity of sodium hydration was in about 0.16 ∼ 0.34 mmh -1 (0.016 ∼ 0.033g cm -2 h -1 , 6.8x10 -4 ∼ 1.4x10 -3 mol cm -2 h -1 ) and that of sodium carbonation was in about 0.16 ∼ 0.27mmh -1 (0.016 ∼ 0.023g cm -2 h -1 , 6.8x10 -4 ∼ 1.1x10 -3 mol cm -2 h -1 ) (26 ∼ 31degC, RH 100%). (2) The reaction velocity of sodium in carbon dioxide atmosphere was greatly affected by vapor partial pressure (absolutely humidity). And the velocity was estimated in 0.08 ∼ 0.12mmh -1 (0.008 ∼ 0.012g cm -2 h -1 , 3.4x10 -4 ∼ 5.2x10 -4 mol cm -2 h -1 ) in the carbon dioxide atmosphere, whose temperature of 20degC and relative humidity of 80% are assumed real sodium carbonate process condition. (3) By the X-ray diffraction method, NaOH was found in humid air reaction product. Na 2 CO 3 , NaHCO 3 were found in carbon dioxide atmosphere reaction product. It was considered that Sodium changes to NaOH, and subsequently to NaHCO 3 through Na 2 CO 3 . (4) For the application to large test loops dismantling, it is considered possible to change sodium to a target amount of sodium carbonate (or sodium bicarbonate) by setting up gas supply quantity and also processing time appropriately according to the surface area

  17. Parametric Effect of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Carbonate on the Potency of a Degreaser

    OpenAIRE

    Babatope Abimbola Olufemi

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and statistical analysis was carried out on the comparative effect of sodium hydroxide and sodium carbonate on the potency of a laboratory produced degreaser in this work. The materials used include; octadecyl benzene sulphonic acid, sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate, sodium metasilicate, carboxyl methyl cellulose (C.M.C), formadelhyde, perfume, colourant and distilled water. Different samples of degreaser were produced with varying composition of sodium hydroxide and sodium car...

  18. Process for the production of sodium carbonate anhydrate

    OpenAIRE

    Oosterhof, H.; Van Rosmalen, G.M.; Witkamp, G.J.; De Graauw, J.

    2000-01-01

    The invention is directed to a process for the production of sodium carbonate-anhydrate having a bulk density of at least 800 kg/m, said process comprising: providing a suspension of solid sodium carbonate and/or solid sodium bicarbonate and/or solid double salts at least comprising one of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate, in a mixture containing water and an organic, water miscible or partly water miscible solvent, which solvent influences the transition temperature below which sodium...

  19. An efficient and high-yielding one-pot synthesis of 1H-pyrazolo[1,2-b]phthalazine-5,10-diones catalyzed by sodium hydrogen carbonate under solvent-free conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Asieh Vafaee; Abolghasem Davoodnia; Mehdi Pordel; Mohammad Reza Bozorgmehr

    2015-01-01

    Sodium hydrogen carbonate, NaHCO3, efficiently catalyzes the one-pot, three-component reaction of phthalhydrazide, an aromatic aldehyde, and malononitrile or ethyl cyanoacetate under solvent-free conditions, to afford the corresponding 1H-pyrazolo[1,2-b]phthalazine-5,10-diones in high yields. Easy work‐up, inexpensive and readily available catalyst and avoiding the use of harmful organic solvents are other advantages of this simple procedure.

  20. Process for the production of sodium carbonate anhydrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhof, H.; Van Rosmalen, G.M.; Witkamp, G.J.; De Graauw, J.

    2000-01-01

    The invention is directed to a process for the production of sodium carbonate-anhydrate having a bulk density of at least 800 kg/m<3>, said process comprising: providing a suspension of solid sodium carbonate and/or solid sodium bicarbonate and/or solid double salts at least comprising one of sodium

  1. Specialists' meeting on carbon in sodium. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for the exchange of views on: the chemistry and thermodynamics of carbon in sodium; the analysis and monitoring of carbon in sodium; the behaviour of carbon in sodium circuits; and the implications of the above in LMFBRs. The technical parts of the meeting were divided into five major sessions

  2. Specialists' meeting on carbon in sodium. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for the exchange of views on: the chemistry and thermodynamics of carbon in sodium; the analysis and monitoring of carbon in sodium; the behaviour of carbon in sodium circuits; and the implications of the above in LMFBRs. The technical parts of the meeting were divided into five major sessions.

  3. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the active substances, sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate coated with sodium carbonate and sodium silicate, bentonite, sodium chloride, sodium carbonate for use in active food contact materials

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF)

    2013-01-01

    This scientific opinion of the Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of the powder mixture of the active substances sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate coated with sodium carbonate and sodium silicate (FCM substance No 1009), bentonite (CAS No 1302-78-9, FCM No 393), sodium chloride (CAS No 7647-14-5, FCM No 985), sodium carbonate (CAS No 497-19-8, FCM No 1008) which are intended to be used as combined oxygen generator and carbon...

  4. Dosage of trace carbon in sodium (1963); Dosage de traces de carbone dans le sodium (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sannier, J; Vasseur, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    A wet method for dosing carbon in sodium has been developed. The carbon is oxidised in a vacuum using Van SLYKE'S solution. The carbonic acid formed is measured volumetrically; its purity can be controlled by chromatographic analysis. The results obtained show that this method makes it possible to measure carbon in concentrations of about 10 ppm. (authors) [French] Une methode de dosage par voie humide du carbone dans le sodium a ete mise au point. L'oxydation du carbone par la solution de Van SLYKE est realisee sous vide. Le gaz carbonique forme est dose volumetriquement; sa purete peut etre controlee par analyse chromatographique. Les resultats obtenus montrent que cette methode permet de doser des teneurs en carbone de l'ordre de 10 ppm. (auteurs)

  5. Behaviour of carbon-bearing impurity suspensions in sodium loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlov, F A; Zagorulko, Yu I; Alexseev, V V [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (USSR)

    1980-05-01

    The experimental estimation results of the carbon-bearing impurity particle sizes in sodium by the sedimentometric analysis methods are presented. The techniques and results of the mass transfer calculations between the sodium flows contained the carbon-bearing impurity disperse phase, and the channel walls, the carbon particles solution kinetics and the soluble carbon near-wall concentration in channel with allowance for the flow-wall mass transfer processes, are given. (author)

  6. Behaviour of carbon-bearing impurity suspensions in sodium loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, F.A.; Zagorulko, Yu.I.; Alexseev, V.V.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental estimation results of the carbon-bearing impurity particle sizes in sodium by the sedimentometric analysis methods are presented. The techniques and results of the mass transfer calculations between the sodium flows contained the carbon-bearing impurity disperse phase, and the channel walls, the carbon particles solution kinetics and the soluble carbon near-wall concentration in channel with allowance for the flow-wall mass transfer processes, are given. (author)

  7. The effect of variations in carbon activity on the carburization of austenitic steels in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwyther, J.R.; Hobdell, M.R.; Hooper, A.J.

    1978-07-01

    Experience has shown that the liquid sodium coolant of fast breeder reactors is an effective carbon-transport medium; the resulting carburization of thin austenitic stainless steel components (eg IHX and fuel cladding) could adversely affect their mechanical integrity. The degree and nature of steel carburization depend, inter alia, on the carbon activity of the sodium environment. Exploratory tests are described in which specimens of austenitic stainless steel were carburized in sodium, the carbon activity of which was continuously monitored by a BNL electrochemical carbon meter. The sodium carbon activity was initially high, but decreased with time, simulating conditions equivalent to plant start-up or coolant clean-up following accidental oil ingress. The extent and nature of steel carburization was identified by metallography, electron microscopy, X-ray crystallography and chemical analysis. (author)

  8. Sodium-carbonate co-substituted hydroxyapatite ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Z. Zyman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Powders of sodium-carbonate co-substituted hydroxyapatite, having sodium content in the range of 0.25–1.5 wt.% with a 0.25 wt.% step, were prepared by a precipitation-solid state reaction route. Compacts of the powders were sintered in a CO2 flow (4 mL/min at 1100 °C for 2 h. The sintered ceramics contained sodium and carbonate ions in the ranges of 0–1.5 wt.% and 1.3–6 wt.%, respectively, which are typical impurity concentrations in biological apatite. A relationship between sodium and carbonate contents and the type of carbonate substitution was found. The total carbonate content progressively increased with the sodium content. The obtained ceramics showed an AB-type carbonate substitution. However, the substitution became more B-type as the sodium content increased. As a result, the carbonation was almost B-type (94 % for the highest sodium content (1.5 wt.%.

  9. Carbon in sodium: a status review of the USA R and D work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCown, J.J.; Bagnall, C.

    1979-01-01

    A review is presented concerning R and D work on carbon in sodium with reference to LMFBR primary coolant circuits. The chemistry of carbon in sodium, analysis and monitoring of carbon in sodium, carbon meters, and problems of carbon in sodium are described. 31 references

  10. THE SODIUM PREVALENCE IN CARBONATED SOFT DRINKS SOLD IN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Fernanda Nunes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The carbonated soft drinks intake has changed the children eating habits. This factor may be directly associated with arterial hypertension due the high consumption of sodium present in foods and drinks industrialized. This study was to compare sodium levels between two different types of carbonated soft drinks, carbonated sugar drinks and diet drinks to define what type of drink has the lowest sodium content and alerting healthcare professionals about the presence of sodium in industrialized beverages. The study included labels of carbonated soft drinks n = 33 – sugar drinks (n = 21 or diet drinks (n = 12 – of five different flavors.All carbonated soft drinks evaluated have sodium in its composition. However, the sodium presence in carbonated sugar drinks was significantly lower when compared with carbonated diet drinks (69.05 ± 16.55 vs. 145.30 ± 47.36mg Na/l, respectively.Studies to identify children's eating habits related with increased consumption of foods and drinks manufactured are needed to identify, reduce and prevent high blood pressure.

  11. Reducing biomass recalcitrance via mild sodium carbonate pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmohamadsadeghi, Safoora; Chen, Zhu; Wan, Caixia

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the effects of mild sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) pretreatment on enzymatic hydrolysis of different feedstocks (i.e., corn stover, Miscanthus, and switchgrass). The results showed that sodium carbonate pretreatment markedly enhanced the sugar yields of the tested biomass feedstocks. The pretreated corn stover, Miscanthus, and switchgrass gave the glucose yields of 95.1%, 62.3%, and 81.3%, respectively, after enzymatic hydrolysis. The above glucose yields of pretreated feedstocks were 2-4 times that of untreated ones. The pretreatment also enhanced the xylose yields, 4 times for corn stover and 20 times for both Miscanthus and switchgrass. Sodium carbonate pretreatment removed 40-59% lignin from the tested feedstocks while preserving most of cellulose (sodium carbonate pretreatment was effective for reducing biomass recalcitrance and subsequently improving the digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Carbon in sodium - A status review of the U.S.A. R and D work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCown, J.J.; Bagnall, C.

    1980-01-01

    Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors contain several types of steel in primary and secondary sodium systems. Austenitic stainless steels are used for in-core components, valves, heat exchangers, tanks and fuel cladding in primary systems. In power generating plants, the secondary or intermediate heat transport system may contain both austenitic and ferritic steel such as 2-1/4 Cr-l Mo type. Sodium circulating throughout the plant contains a number of impurities, metallic and non-metallic, with the steel interstitial elements carbon, hydrogen and oxygen being of prime importance. These elements can affect corrosion rates and mechanical behavior of materials. In the case of carbon, the sodium provides a transport medium with carburization and decarburization occurring in several parts of a system at rates depending upon temperature and types of steel. The US Sodium Technology R and D programs have investigated the behavior, transport, measurement and control of carbon in sodium. Measurement and control methods for carbon-containing materials which might contaminate the plant systems during reactor operation have also been studied. During the early 1970's, several US laboratories were active in studying carbon solubility, activity in sodium and interstitial transfer using both theoretical and experimental approaches. Modelling studies were done and models were used to predict FFTF and CRBRP materials requirements, component design and plant operating conditions. Over the past several years, carbon work has not been heavily emphasized. Most of the R and D studies have centered on improving chemical analysis methods for measuring active carbon, both by on-line monitors and by metal foil equilibration procedures; and on studies of pump oil-sodium reactions, reaction products, temperature effects and oil leak detection methods. One program at General Electric is investigating carburization-decarburization in a ferritic-austenitic system simulating conditions expected in

  13. Carbon in sodium - A status review of the U.S.A. R and D work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCown, J J; Bagnall, C [HEDL, Richland, WA (United States)

    1980-05-01

    Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors contain several types of steel in primary and secondary sodium systems. Austenitic stainless steels are used for in-core components, valves, heat exchangers, tanks and fuel cladding in primary systems. In power generating plants, the secondary or intermediate heat transport system may contain both austenitic and ferritic steel such as 2-1/4 Cr-l Mo type. Sodium circulating throughout the plant contains a number of impurities, metallic and non-metallic, with the steel interstitial elements carbon, hydrogen and oxygen being of prime importance. These elements can affect corrosion rates and mechanical behavior of materials. In the case of carbon, the sodium provides a transport medium with carburization and decarburization occurring in several parts of a system at rates depending upon temperature and types of steel. The US Sodium Technology R and D programs have investigated the behavior, transport, measurement and control of carbon in sodium. Measurement and control methods for carbon-containing materials which might contaminate the plant systems during reactor operation have also been studied. During the early 1970's, several US laboratories were active in studying carbon solubility, activity in sodium and interstitial transfer using both theoretical and experimental approaches. Modelling studies were done and models were used to predict FFTF and CRBRP materials requirements, component design and plant operating conditions. Over the past several years, carbon work has not been heavily emphasized. Most of the R and D studies have centered on improving chemical analysis methods for measuring active carbon, both by on-line monitors and by metal foil equilibration procedures; and on studies of pump oil-sodium reactions, reaction products, temperature effects and oil leak detection methods. One program at General Electric is investigating carburization-decarburization in a ferritic-austenitic system simulating conditions expected in

  14. Radioactive sodium waste treatment and conditioning. Review of main aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This publication reviews the main aspects relating to the treatment and conditioning of radioactive sodium waste. This waste arises from the operation of liquid metal fast reactors (LMFRs). In this type of reactor, sodium (Na) or sodium-potassium alloys (NaK) are used as a low-effect neutron moderating coolant medium for extracting and transferring thermal energy from the core and they represent a significant technical and safety challenge during operation and decommissioning. This publication provides the reader with technologically oriented information on the present status of sodium waste management approaches and recent achievements related to treatment and conditioning, with the objective of facilitating planning and preparatory work for the decommissioning of LMFRs. This publication provides a comprehensive review of the hazards associated with sodium waste management. Given the large quantities of sodium waste arising during decommissioning or reactor refurbishment, as well as the challenges and varied techniques associated with removal of 100% of all sodium and NaK bulk quantities and residues during decommissioning, a hazards review and analysis is a critical component in planning the dismantling and waste management activities. Roughly half of this publication focuses on sodium waste generating, handling and treatment processes. This includes draining sodium and NaK from plant systems; in situ treatment of residual sodium; cutting techniques for pumps, valves, piping and other components; cleaning of components; potential reuse of sodium; and removal of selected radionuclides from sodium waste with the objective of reducing the waste classification or converting it to exempt waste. The focus is on proven techniques and technologies, and each discussed method includes a review of the associated principle or theory, practical applications, advantages and disadvantages, limitations, industry experience, and final waste products. A review is provided of final

  15. Survey on investigations on carbon chemistry and transfer in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menken, G.; Jung, J.

    1980-01-01

    The operation of Liquid Metal Fast Reactor Systems at elevated temperatures requires the control of carbon impurities in sodium and of carbon transfer related to the metallic structural materials wetted by the coolant. This review is aimed at providing a brief statement of the objectives and accomplishments in some major areas of the investigations on the behaviour of carbon impurities in the heat transfer circuits of the SNR-300 reactor presently under construction at Kalkar on the Rhine

  16. Carbon in sodium - A review of work in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorley, A W; Hobdell, M R [CEGB, Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories, Berkely, Gloucestershire (United Kingdom)

    1980-05-01

    It has been shown experimentally that when a difference in carbon potential exists between two points in a sodium circuit, carbon will move from regions of high carbon potential to regions of low carbon potential. Instrumental in this transport process is the liquid sodium which provides an efficient. means of transport between sources and sinks. In terms of operation of LMFBRs the point of concern is that impairment of mechanical properties may occur if significant amounts of carbon are gained or lost from structures exposed to sodium. In the UK the behaviour of carbon in liquid sodium is being studied at AERE Harwell, Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories (BNL), the Dounreay Nuclear Establishment (DNE), and the Risley Nuclear Laboratories (RNL). The scope of this review reflects the type of work being carried out at various establishments and presents our current views on certain topics. A survey of the UK position and an indication of where more work is required is also included in the paper. Specialist material is provided in the form of appendices.

  17. Carbon in sodium - A review of work in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorley, A.W.; Hobdell, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    It has been shown experimentally that when a difference in carbon potential exists between two points in a sodium circuit, carbon will move from regions of high carbon potential to regions of low carbon potential. Instrumental in this transport process is the liquid sodium which provides an efficient. means of transport between sources and sinks. In terms of operation of LMFBRs the point of concern is that impairment of mechanical properties may occur if significant amounts of carbon are gained or lost from structures exposed to sodium. In the UK the behaviour of carbon in liquid sodium is being studied at AERE Harwell, Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories (BNL), the Dounreay Nuclear Establishment (DNE), and the Risley Nuclear Laboratories (RNL). The scope of this review reflects the type of work being carried out at various establishments and presents our current views on certain topics. A survey of the UK position and an indication of where more work is required is also included in the paper. Specialist material is provided in the form of appendices

  18. Promoting effect of active carbons on methanol dehydrogenation on sodium carbonate - hydrogen spillover

    OpenAIRE

    Su, S.; Prairie, M.; Renken, A.

    1993-01-01

    Methanol dehydrogenation to formaldehyde was conducted in a fixed-bed flow reactor with sodium carbonate catalyst mixed with active carbons or transition metals. The additives promoted the reaction rate at 880-970 K without modifying formaldehyde selectivity. This effect increases with increasing carbon content in the carbon-carbonate mixture. Activation energy of methanol conversion is the same for the mixture and the carbonate alone. Temperature-programmed desorption experiments showed that...

  19. Measurement of carbon activity of sodium using nickel tabs and the Harwell Carbon Meter - Preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blundell, A.; Thorley, A.W.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon can have an important effect on the mechanical properties of certain constructional materials likely to be used in the LMFBRs. Transfer of carbon will occur between the metal and the sodium at any particular location to bring the chemical potential of carbon in both components to the sam: value. Thus, in a mixed system containing austenitic stainless steel and unstabilized ferritic steel, carbon could be transferred by the sodium from the high carbon activity ferritic to the lower activity austenitic steel. Loss of carbon from the unstabilized ferritic steel leads to a weaker, more ductile material, while carburization of the stainless steel could lead to its embrittlement. Similarly carbon entering the coolant in the form of oil from leaking mechanical pumps could have similar effects on the mechanical property of stainless steels. In the light of these possibilities it is essential to measure the carbon activity of the sodium so that its effect on materials properties can be predicted

  20. Measurement of carbon activity of sodium using nickel tabs and the Harwell Carbon Meter - Preliminary experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blundell, A; Thorley, A W [UKAEA, Risley, Warrington, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    1980-05-01

    Carbon can have an important effect on the mechanical properties of certain constructional materials likely to be used in the LMFBRs. Transfer of carbon will occur between the metal and the sodium at any particular location to bring the chemical potential of carbon in both components to the sam: value. Thus, in a mixed system containing austenitic stainless steel and unstabilized ferritic steel, carbon could be transferred by the sodium from the high carbon activity ferritic to the lower activity austenitic steel. Loss of carbon from the unstabilized ferritic steel leads to a weaker, more ductile material, while carburization of the stainless steel could lead to its embrittlement. Similarly carbon entering the coolant in the form of oil from leaking mechanical pumps could have similar effects on the mechanical property of stainless steels. In the light of these possibilities it is essential to measure the carbon activity of the sodium so that its effect on materials properties can be predicted.

  1. Using Sodium Hydrogen Carbonate for Foaming Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satin Lukáš

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available All plastics products are made of the essential polymer mixed with a complex blend of materials known collectively as additives. Without additives, plastics would not work, but with them, they can be made safer, cleaner, tougher and more colourful. Additives cost money, but by reducing production costs and making products live longer, they help us save money and conserve the world's precious raw material reserves. In fact, our world would be a lot less safe, a lot more expensive and a great deal duller without the additives that turn basic polymers into useful plastics. One of these additives is sodium bicarbonate. Influence of sodium bicarbonate on properties of the product made of polystyrene was observed in the research described in this paper. Since polystyrene is typically used as a material for electrical components, the mechanical properties of tensile strength and inflammability were measured as a priority. Inflammability parameters were measured using a cone calorimeter.

  2. The evaluation of the efficacy of sodium carbonate as zearalenone destructor in feeding stuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, M; Gajecki, M; Kulik, T; Łuczyński, M K; Obremski, K; Góra, M; Gajecka, M; Jakimiuk, E; Zielonka, Ł

    2009-01-01

    Contamination of feed with zearalenone (ZEA) is still a serious problem in farm animals feeding, especially in gilts, sensitive to this compound. The relative failure of current methods of decontamination and quality control lead us to look for new techniques. The commonly accepted method for breaking down ZEA was performed in controlled temperature and time conditions. Various sodium carbonate doses (0.5 - 4%) were added to feed naturally contaminated with ZEA (ZEA biosynthesis by F. graminearum isolates). These doses were found to be effective in in vitro studies. The addition of 2% sodium carbonate gave the best results in reducing the phytoestrogen in the feed.

  3. Titration of Monoprotic Acids with Sodium Hydroxide Contaminated by Sodium Carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalowski, Tadeusz

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the effects of using carbon dioxide contaminated sodium hydroxide solution as a titrant for a solution of a weak monoprotic acid and the resulting distortion of the titration curve in comparison to one obtained when an uncontaminated titrant is used. (CW)

  4. Measurement of carbon activity in sodium and steel and the behaviour of carbon-bearing species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajendran Pillai, S.; Ranganathan, R.; Mathews, C.K.

    1988-01-01

    Carburization or decarburization of structural materials in a sodium system depends on the local differences in carbon activity. The behaviour of carbon-bearing species in sodium influences its carbon activity. In order to understand the behaviour of carbon in these systems, an electrochemical carbon meter was fabricated in our laboratory. The original version of this meter was capable of operating in the temperature range of 850-980 K. Studies are carried out to extend this lower limit of temperature. Employing the carbon meter, experiments were carried out to understand the behaviour of carbon-bearing species. Gas equilibration experiments were also carried out with the same view. A new method for measuring the carbon activity in steels are described which employs the carbon meter. A review on these investigations and the conclusions reached on the behaviour of carbon in fast reactor loops are described

  5. Preliminary Plugging tests in Narrow Sodium Channels by Sodium and Carbon Dioxide reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun Hee; Wi, Myung-Hwan; Min, Jae Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This report is on the investigation of the physical/chemical phenomena that a slow loss of CO{sub 2} inventory into sodium after the sodium-CO{sub 2} boundary failure in PCHEs in realistic operating conditions. The first phenomenon is potential channel plugging inside the narrow PCHE channel. Unlike a conventional shell and- tube type HXs, failures in a PCHE are expected to be small cracks. If the faulted channel is blocked, it may have a positive function for plant safety because the pressure boundary would automatically recover due to this self-plugging. The other one is damage propagation on pressure boundary, which is referred to as potential wastage with combined corrosion/erosion effect. Physical/chemical phenomena that a slow loss of CO{sub 2} inventory into sodium after the sodium-CO{sub 2} boundary failure in printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs) were investigated. Our preliminary experimental results of plugging show that sodium flow immediately stopped as CO{sub 2} was injected through the nozzle at 300-400 .deg. C in 3 mm sodium channels, whereas sodium flow stopped about 60 min after CO{sub 2} injection in 5 mm sodium channels.

  6. Investigation of Plugging of Narrow Sodium Channels by Sodium and Carbon Dioxide Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun Hee; Wi, Myung-Hwan; Min, Jae Hong; Kim, Tae-joon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle system is known to be a promising power conversion system for improving the efficiency and preventing the sodium water reaction (SWR) of the current SFR concept using a Rankine steam cycle. PCHEs are known to have potential for reducing the volume occupied by the sodium-to-CO{sub 2} exchangers as well as the heat exchanger mass relative to traditional shell-and-tube heat exchangers. Here, we report a study on a plugging test by the interaction of sodium and CO{sub 2} to investigate design parameters of sodium channels in the realistic operating conditions. We investigated a plugging test by an interaction of sodium and CO{sub 2} with different cross sectional areas of the sodium channels. It was found that the flow rate of sodium decreased earlier and faster with a narrower cross sectional area compared to a wider one. Our experimental results are expected to be used for determining the sodium channel areas of PCHEs.

  7. Carbon and nitrogen transport in sodium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrock, S.L.; Shiels, S.A.; Bagnall, C.

    1976-01-01

    Materials for the liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor will be exposed to high temperature sodium for time periods up to 30 years. One consequence of this exposure will be changes in the interstitial element concentrations of the alloys and concomitant alterations in their mechanical behavior characteristics. Several ongoing technology programs have as their objective a quantitative definition of the rate and extent of this interstitial movement. The paper summarizes the status of these programs and reports in detail on the results of a recently completed, USERDA funded program at the Advanced Reactors Division of Westinghouse. These results, while substantiating earlier reported trends on interstitial movement, indicate the problem is not as severe as initially estimated. Moreover, the present wastage allowance for most reactor components contains sufficient conservatism to compensate for changes in mechanical strength resulting from this change in interstitial concentration

  8. Nickel adsorption by sodium polyacrylate-grafted activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewecharoen, A. [Division of Biotechnology, School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 83 Moo 8 Thakham, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand); Thiravetyan, P., E-mail: paitip@hotmail.com [Division of Biotechnology, School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 83 Moo 8 Thakham, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand); Wendel, E.; Bertagnolli, H. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    A novel sodium polyacrylate grafted activated carbon was produced by using gamma radiation to increase the number of functional groups on the surface. After irradiation the capacity for nickel adsorption was studied and found to have increased from 44.1 to 55.7 mg g{sup -1}. X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that the adsorbed nickel on activated carbon and irradiation-grafted activated carbon was coordinated with 6 oxygen atoms at 2.04-2.06 A. It is proposed that this grafting technique could be applied to other adsorbents to increase the efficiency of metal adsorption.

  9. 40 CFR 180.1234 - Sodium carbonate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sodium carbonate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1234 Sodium carbonate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of sodium carbonate. [70 FR 33363...

  10. Laboratory-scale sodium-carbonate aggregate concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westrich, H.R.; Stockman, H.W.; Suo-Anttila, A.

    1983-09-01

    A series of laboratory-scale experiments was made at 600 0 C to identify the important heat-producing chemical reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate concretes. Reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate were found to be responsible for the bulk of heat production in sodium-concrete tests. Exothermic reactions were initiated at 580+-30 0 C for limestone and dolostone aggregates as well as for hydrated limestone concrete, and at 540+-10 0 C for dehydrated limestone concrete, but were ill-defined for dolostone concrete. Major reaction products included CaO, MgO, Na 2 CO 3 , Na 2 O, NaOH, and elemental carbon. Sodium hydroxide, which forms when water is released from cement phases, causes slow erosion of the concrete with little heat production. The time-temperature profiles of these experiments have been modeled with a simplified version of the SLAM computer code, which has allowed derivation of chemical reaction rate coefficients

  11. A Small-Scale Capsule Test for Investigating the Sodium-Carbon Dioxide Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, B. H.; Choi, J. H.; Suk, S. D.; Kim, J. M.; Choi, B. H.; Kim, B. H.; Hahn, D. H.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization of modular sodium-to-supercritical CO 2 heat exchangers may yield significant improvements for an overall plant energy utilization. The consequences of a failure of the sodium CO 2 heat exchanger boundary, however, would involve the blowdown and intermixing of high-pressure CO 2 in a sodium pool, causing a pressurization which may threaten the structural integrity of the heat exchanger. Available data seems to indicate that the chemical reaction between sodium and CO 2 would likely produce sodium oxides, sodium carbonate, carbon and carbon monoxide. Information on the kinetics of the sodium-CO 2 reaction is virtually non-existent

  12. Thermodynamics of aqueous carbonate solutions including mixtures of sodium carbonate, bicarbonate, and chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peiper, J.C.; Pitzer, K.S.

    1982-01-01

    Recently the authors examined electrochemical-cell data leading to values of the activity coefficient for aqueous sodium bicarbonate. Since that preliminary analysis, new experimental measurements have been published which contribute significantly to the overall thermodynamic understanding of (sodium carbonate + sodium bicarbonate + carbonic acid). In this more extensive examination we consider a wide variety of measurements leading to activity coefficients of Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ and NaHCO/sub 3/ from 273 to 323 K and to relative molar enthalpies and heat capacities at 298.15 K. Tables of thermodynamic quantities at selected temperatures are included. 47 references, 2 figures, 6 tables.

  13. Separation of uranium from sodium carbonate - sodium bicarbonate eluate by ion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakane, Kohji; Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1982-01-01

    The ion exchange method was used for separating uranium from the eluate (0.5 N Na 2 CO 3 -0.5 N NaHCO 3 ) that was obtained in the extraction process of uranium from natural sea water by using the titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent. Uranium in the eluate containing 3 mg/1 uranium was adsorbed by ion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400), and was eluted with the eluant (5 % NaCl-0.5 % Na 2 CO 3 ). The concentration ratio of uranium in the final concentrated-eluate became more than 20 times. The eluting solution to the adsorbent and the eluant to the resin could be repeatedly used in the desorption-ion exchange process. Sodium carbonate was consumed at the desorption step, and sodium bicarbonate was consumed at the ion exchange step. The concentration ratio of uranium was found to decrease as chloride ion in the eluate increased. (author)

  14. Separation of uranium from sodium carbonate-sodium bicarbonate eluate by ion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakane, Kohji; Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1982-01-01

    The ion exchange method was used for separating uranium from the eluate (0.5 N Na 2 CO 3 -0.5 N NaHCO 3 ) that was obtained in the extraction process of uranium from natural sea water by using the titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent. Uranium in the eluate containing 3 mg/l uranium was adsorbed by ion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400), and was eluted with the eluent (5% NaCl-0.5% Na 2 CO 3 ). The concentration ratio of uranium in the final concentrated-eluate became more than 20 times. The eluting solution to the adsorbent and the eluant to the resin could be repeatedly used in the desorption-ion exchange process. Sodium carbonate was consumed at the desorption step, and sodium bicarbonate was consumed at the ion exchange step. The concentration ratio of uranium was found to decrease as chloride ion in the eluate increased. (author)

  15. Analysis of carbon transport in the EBR-II and FFTF primary sodium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, R.B.; Natesan, K.; Kassner, T.F.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the carburization-decarburization behavior of austenitic stainless steels in the primary heat-transport systems of the EBR-II and FFTF has been made that is based upon a kinetic model for the diffusion process and the surface area of steel in contact with flowing sodium at various temperatures in the two systems. The analysis was performed for operating conditions that result in sodium outlet temperatures of 474 and 566 0 C in the FFTF and 470 0 C in the EBR-II. If there was no external source of carbon to the system, i.e., other than the carbon initially present in the steel and the sodium, the dynamic-equilibrium carbon concentrations calculated for the FFTF primary sodium were approximately 0.025 and approximately 0.065 ppm for the 474 and 566 0 C outlet temperatures, respectively, and approximately 0.018 ppm for the EBR-II primary system. The analysis indicated that a carbon-source rate of approximately 250 g/y would be required to increase the carbon concentration of the EBR-II sodium to the measured range of approximately 0.16--0.19 ppm. An evaluation of possible carbon sources and the amount of carbonaceous material introduced into the reactor cover gas and sodium suggests that the magnitude of the calculated contamination rate is reasonable. For a 566 0 C outlet temperature, carbonaceous material would have to be introduced into the FFTF primary system at a rate approximately 4--6 times higher than in EBR-II to achieve the same carbon concentration in the sodium in the two systems. Since contamination rates of approximately 1500 g/y are unlikely, high-temperature fuel cladding in the FFTF should exhibit decarburization similar to that observed in laboratory loop systems, in contrast to the minimal compositional changes that result after exposure of Type 316 stainless steel to EBR-II sodium at temperatures between approximately 625 and 650 0 C

  16. Dehydration of sodium carbonate monohydrate with indirect microwave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyrankaya, Abdullah; Ozalp, Baris

    2006-01-01

    In this study, dehydration of sodium carbonate monohydrate (Na 2 CO 3 .H 2 O) (SCM) in microwave (MW) field with silicon carbide (SiC) as an indirect heating medium was investigated. SCM samples containing up to 3% free moisture were placed in the microwave oven. The heating experiments showed that SCM is a poor microwave energy absorber for up to 6 min of irradiation at an 800 W of microwave power. The heat for SCM calcination is provided by SiC which absorbs microwave. The monohydrate is then converted to anhydrous sodium carbonate on the SiC plate by calcining, i.e. by removing the crystal water through heating of the monohydrate temperatures of over 120 deg. C. The calcination results in a solid phase recrystallization of the monohydrate into anhydrate. In the microwave irradiation process, dehydration of SCM in terms of indirect heating can be accelerated by increasing the microwave field power

  17. Leaching of uranium from Syrian phosphorite (sodium carbonate-bicarbonate)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Jamous, J.Kh.

    1991-01-01

    The leaching of uranium from Syrian phosphorite by sodium carbonate-bicarbonate solution has been studied, using a batch technique. Parameters influencing percentage extraction of uranium that are considered and studies in this work are: Leachant concentration, particle size, heat treatment, leachant renewal, phosphorite renewal and contact time. All measurements of uranium from aqueous solutions were carried out by fluorometry. (author). 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  18. Reactions between sodium and various carbon bearing compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raine, A C; Thorley, A W [UKAEA, Risley, Warrington, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    1980-05-01

    The presence of carbon bearing materials in liquid sodium is undesirable because of their ability to carburise stainless steel components. It has been demonstrated for example that carbon taken up by stainless steels can affect their mechanical properties and that thinner sectioned material such as fuel cladding and the tubing of intermediate heat exchanger may be more sensitive to such effects. Generally speaking, there are a number of potential carbon sources in reactor systems. Some of the sources such as the graphite in neutron shield rods, boron carbide in control rods and carbide fuels are part of the reactor designs while others such as oil in mechanical pumps arid 'coupling-fluids' used to inspect plant components are associated with the respective operation arid inspection of the plant. In this paper it is intended to discuss in general terms the way these various compounds behave in liquid sodium and to assess what effect their presence will have on the materials of construction in fast reactor systems. The paper also reviews the chemistry of the environment in relation to the types of carburizing species which may exist in sodium systems.

  19. Sodium Carbonate is Saltier Than Sodium Chloride to Sodium-Depleted Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John, Steven J; McBrayer, Anya M; Krauskopf, Erin E

    2017-10-01

    In a series of behavioral experiments in the 1960s, G.R. Morrison identified several unique features of the taste of Na2CO3 to rats; namely, it is 1) considerably more intense than NaCl at isomolar concentrations, 2) avoided at 10 times lower concentrations than NaCl to thirsty rats, 3) preferred at 10 times lower concentrations than NaCl in sodium-depleted rats. He also demonstrated its qualitatively similarity to NaCl. In Experiment 1, we confirmed and extended many of Morrison's observations. Rats were injected with furosemide on 3 occasions to stimulate a sodium appetite. After each depletion, rats were given a brief-access taste test in a lickometer presenting, in random order, water and 7 concentrations of salt. One test used NaCl (0.028-0.89 M, quarter log steps), another used Na2CO3, and the third used Na2CO3, but at a tenfold lower concentration range (0.0028-0.089 M). Rats licked NaCl in an inverted-U shaped concentration-response function peaking at 0.158-0.281 M. As Morrison's results predicted, rats licked Na2CO3 in nearly identical fashion, but at a tenfold lower concentration range (peak at 0.0158-0.028 M). In a second experiment, furosemide-treated rats were repeatedly tested with the lower Na2CO3 range but mixed in the epithelial sodium channel blocker amiloride at various concentrations (3-300 μM, half log steps). Amiloride reduced licking for Na2CO3 and shifted the peak response rightward up to about half a log unit. Thus, this "super-saltiness" of Na2CO3 to rats is at least partly amiloride-dependent. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Low-Dimensional Network Formation in Molten Sodium Carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, Martin C; Wilson, Mark; Alderman, Oliver L G; Benmore, Chris; Weber, J K R; Parise, John B; Tamalonis, Anthony; Skinner, Lawrie

    2016-04-15

    Molten carbonates are highly inviscid liquids characterized by low melting points and high solubility of rare earth elements and volatile molecules. An understanding of the structure and related properties of these intriguing liquids has been limited to date. We report the results of a study of molten sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) which combines high energy X-ray diffraction, containerless techniques and computer simulation to provide insight into the liquid structure. Total structure factors (F(x)(Q)) are collected on the laser-heated carbonate spheres suspended in flowing gases of varying composition in an aerodynamic levitation furnace. The respective partial structure factor contributions to F(x)(Q) are obtained by performing molecular dynamics simulations treating the carbonate anions as flexible entities. The carbonate liquid structure is found to be heavily temperature-dependent. At low temperatures a low-dimensional carbonate chain network forms, at T = 1100 K for example ~55% of the C atoms form part of a chain. The mean chain lengths decrease as temperature is increased and as the chains become shorter the rotation of the carbonate anions becomes more rapid enhancing the diffusion of Na(+) ions.

  1. Sodium Hypochlorite and Sodium Bromide Individualized and Stabilized Carbon Nanotubes in Water

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xuezhu

    2017-09-20

    Aggregation is a major problem for hydrophobic carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in water because it reduces the effective particle concentration, prevents particles from entering the medium, and leads to unstable electronic device performances when a colloidal solution is used. Molecular ligands such as surfactants can help the particles to disperse, but they tend to degrade the electrical properties of CNTs. Therefore, self-dispersed particles without the need for surfactant are highly desirable. We report here, for the first time to our knowledge, that CNT particles with negatively charged hydrophobic/water interfaces can easily self-disperse themselves in water via pretreating the nanotubes with a salt solution with a low concentration of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) and sodium bromide (NaBr). The obtained aqueous CNT suspensions exhibit stable and superior colloidal performances. A series of pH titration experiments confirmed the presence and role of the electrical double layers on the surface of the salted carbon nanotubes and of functional groups and provided an in-depth understanding of the phenomenon.

  2. Sodium Hypochlorite and Sodium Bromide Individualized and Stabilized Carbon Nanotubes in Water

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Colombo, Veronica; Xin, Yangyang; Tao, Ran; Lubineau, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Aggregation is a major problem for hydrophobic carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in water because it reduces the effective particle concentration, prevents particles from entering the medium, and leads to unstable electronic device performances when a colloidal solution is used. Molecular ligands such as surfactants can help the particles to disperse, but they tend to degrade the electrical properties of CNTs. Therefore, self-dispersed particles without the need for surfactant are highly desirable. We report here, for the first time to our knowledge, that CNT particles with negatively charged hydrophobic/water interfaces can easily self-disperse themselves in water via pretreating the nanotubes with a salt solution with a low concentration of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) and sodium bromide (NaBr). The obtained aqueous CNT suspensions exhibit stable and superior colloidal performances. A series of pH titration experiments confirmed the presence and role of the electrical double layers on the surface of the salted carbon nanotubes and of functional groups and provided an in-depth understanding of the phenomenon.

  3. Adsorption of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate on activated carbons: effects of solution chemistry and presence of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Toledo, M I; Méndez-Díaz, J D; Sánchez-Polo, M; Rivera-Utrilla, J; Ferro-García, M A

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to determine the effectiveness of activated carbon in removing sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) and to analyze the chemical and textural characteristics of the activated carbons that are involved in the adsorption process. Studies were also performed on the influence of operational variables (pH, ionic strength, and presence of microorganisms) and on the kinetics and interactions involved in the adsorption of this pollutant on activated carbon. The kinetics study of SDBS adsorption revealed no problems in its diffusion on any of the activated carbons studied, and Weisz-Prater coefficient (C WP) values were considerably lower than unity for all activated carbons studied. SDBS adsorption isotherms on these activated carbons showed that: (i) adsorption capacity of activated carbons was very high (260-470 mg/g) and increased with larger surface area; and (ii) dispersive interactions between SDBS and carbon surface were largely responsible for the adsorption of this pollutant. SDBS adsorption was not significantly affected by the solution pH, indicating that electrostatic adsorbent-adsorbate interactions do not play an important role in this process. The presence of electrolytes (NaCl) in the medium favors SDBS adsorption, accelerating the process and increasing adsorption capacity. Under the working conditions used, SDBS is not degraded by bacteria; however, the presence of bacteria during the process accelerates and increases SDBS adsorption on the activated carbon. Microorganism adsorption on the activated carbon surface increases its hydrophobicity, explaining the results observed.

  4. Pretreatment combining ultrasound and sodium percarbonate under mild conditions for efficient degradation of corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Kazunori; Ebi, Yuuki; Kubo, Masaki; Shibasaki-Kitakawa, Naomi; Yonemoto, Toshikuni

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) can be used to disrupt microcrystalline cellulose to give nanofibers via ultrasonic cavitation. Sodium percarbonate (SP), consisting of sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide, generates highly reactive radicals, which cause oxidative delignification. Here, we describe a novel pretreatment technique using a combination of US and SP (US-SP) for the efficient saccharification of cellulose and hemicellulose in lignocellulosic corn stover. Although US-SP pretreatment was conducted under mild condition (i.e., at room temperature and atmospheric pressure), the pretreatment greatly increased lignin removal and cellulose digestibility. We also determined the optimum US-SP treatment conditions, such as ultrasonic power output, pretreatment time, pretreatment temperature, and SP concentration for an efficient cellulose saccharification. Moreover, xylose could be effectively recovered from US-SP pretreated biomass without the formation of microbial inhibitor furfural. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Separation of uranium from sodium carbonate - sodium bicarbonate eluate by ion exchange method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakane, Kohji; Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko (Government Industrial Research Inst., Shikoku, Takamatsu (Japan))

    1982-09-01

    The ion exchange method was used for separating uranium from the eluate (0.5 N Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-0.5 N NaHCO/sub 3/) that was obtained in the extraction process of uranium from natural sea water by using the titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent. Uranium in the eluate containing 3 mg/1 uranium was adsorbed by ion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400), and was eluted with the eluant (5 % NaCl-0.5 % Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/). The concentration ratio of uranium in the final concentrated-eluate became more than 20 times. The eluting solution to the adsorbent and the eluant to the resin could be repeatedly used in the desorption-ion exchange process. Sodium carbonate was consumed at the desorption step, and sodium bicarbonate was consumed at the ion exchange step. The concentration ratio of uranium was found to decrease as chloride ion in the eluate increased.

  6. Separation of uranium from sodium carbonate-sodium bicarbonate eluate by ion exchange method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakane, K.; Hirotsu, T.; Fujii, A.; Katoh, S.; Sugasaka, K. (Government Industrial Research. Inst., Shikoku, Takamatsu (Japan))

    1982-01-01

    The ion exchange method was used for separating uranium from the eluate (0.5 N Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-0.5 N NaHCO/sub 3/) that was obtained in the extraction process of uranium from natural sea water by using the titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent. Uranium in the eluate containing 3 mg/l uranium was adsorbed by ion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400), and was eluted with the eluent (5% NaCl-0.5% Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/). The concentration ratio of uranium in the final concentrated-eluate became more than 20 times. The eluting solution to the adsorbent and the eluant to the resin could be repeatedly used in the desorption-ion exchange process. Sodium carbonate was consumed at the desorption step, and sodium bicarbonate was consumed at the ion exchange step. The concentration ratio of uranium was found to decrease as chloride ion in the eluate increased.

  7. Measurement of the activity coefficient of carbon in steels in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surville, G.

    1983-06-01

    In sodium cooled fast reactors carbon is both a carbon impurity and element of structural materials. Carbon transfert through liquid sodium can produce carburization or decarburization of structural materials. Carbon content in sodium is determined with thin foils of austenitic alloys, when equilibrium is reached thermodynamic activity of carbon in sodium is deduced from carbon activity in alloys. Studied alloys are FeMn 20%, FeNi 30%, Z2CN 18-10 and Z3CND17-13. Carbon activity of alloys in sodium was between 5.10 -3 and 10 -1 at 600 and 650 0 C. Calibration was obtained with the alloys FeNi 30% in gaseous mixtures He-CO-CO 2 of known activity [fr

  8. Pyro-oxidation of plutonium spent salts with sodium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourges, G.; Godot, A.; Valot, C.; Devillard, D.

    2001-01-01

    The purification of plutonium generates spent salts, which are temporarily stored in a nuclear building. A development programme for pyrochemical treatment is in progress to stabilize and concentrate these salts in order to reduce the quantities for long-term disposal. The treatment, inspired by work previously done by LANL, consists of a pyro-oxidation of the salt with sodium carbonate to convert the actinides into oxides, then of a vacuum distillation to separate the oxides from the volatile salt matrix. Pyro-oxidation of NaCl/KCl base spent salts first produces a 'black salt' which contains more than 97% of the initial actinides. XRD analyses indicate PuO 2 as major plutonium species and sodium plutonates or plutonium sub-oxides PuO 2-x can also be identified. Next appears a 'white salt' containing less than 500 ppm of plutonium, which meets the operational criterion for LLW discard. For these salts, the pyro-oxidation process in and of itself is expected to reduce the quantities to be stored on-site by more than one-third. The pyro-oxidation of CaCl 2 /NaCl base americium extraction salts leads to oxides PuO 2 and probably AmO 2 , but the yield of concentration in the black salt is lower and the white salt cannot be discarded as LLW. During vacuum distillation, excess carbonate can dissociate and damage the efficiency of the process. Appropriate chlorine sparging at the end of the oxidation can eliminate this carbonate. (authors)

  9. Enhanced electrochemical stability of carbon-coated antimony nanoparticles with sodium alginate binder for sodium-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Feng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The poor cycling stability of antimony during a repeated sodium ion insertion and desertion process is the key issue, which leads to an unsatisfactory application as an anode material in a sodium-ion battery. Addressed at this, we report a facile two-step method to coat antimony nanoparticles with an ultrathin carbon layer of few nanometers (denoted Sb@C NPs for sodium-ion battery anode application. This carbon layer could buffer the volume change of antimony in the charge-discharge process and improve the battery cycle performance. Meanwhile, this carbon coating could also enhance the interfacial stability by firmly connecting the sodium alginate binders through its oxygen-rich surface. Benefitted from these advantages, an improved initial discharge capacity (788.5 mA h g−1 and cycling stability capacity (553 mA h g−1 after 50 times cycle have been obtained in a battery using Sb@C NPs as anode materials at 50 mA g−1. Keywords: Sodium-ion battery, Antimony, Sodium alginate, Liquid-phase reduction, Carbon coating

  10. A Small-Scale Capsule Test for Investigating the Sodium-Carbon Dioxide Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B. H.; Choi, J. H.; Suk, S. D.; Kim, J. M.; Choi, B. H.; Kim, B. H.; Hahn, D. H

    2007-01-15

    The utilization of modular sodium-to-supercritical CO{sub 2} heat exchangers may yield significant improvements for an overall plant energy utilization. The consequences of a failure of the sodium CO{sub 2} heat exchanger boundary, however, would involve the blowdown and intermixing of high-pressure CO{sub 2} in a sodium pool, causing a pressurization which may threaten the structural integrity of the heat exchanger. Available data seems to indicate that the chemical reaction between sodium and CO{sub 2} would likely produce sodium oxides, sodium carbonate, carbon and carbon monoxide. Information on the kinetics of the sodium-CO{sub 2} reaction is virtually non-existent.

  11. Gold nanoparticle/multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode as a sensitive voltammetric sensor for the determination of diclofenac sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkhami, Abbas; Bahiraei, Atousa; Madrakian, Tayyebeh

    2016-02-01

    A simple and highly sensitive sensor for the determination of diclofenac sodium based on gold nanoparticle/multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode is reported. Scanning electron microscopy along with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry was used to characterize the nanostructure and performance of the sensor and the results were compared with those obtained at the multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode and bare glassy carbon electrode. Under the optimized experimental conditions diclofenac sodium gave linear response over the range of 0.03-200μmolL(-1). The lower detection limits were found to be 0.02μmolL(-1). The effect of common interferences on the current response of DS was investigated. The practical application of the modified electrode was demonstrated by measuring the concentration of diclofenac sodium in urine and pharmaceutical samples. This revealed that the gold nanoparticle/multiwalled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode shows excellent analytical performance for the determination of diclofenac sodium in terms of a very low detection limit, high sensitivity, very good accuracy, repeatability and reproducibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Gold nanoparticle/multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode as a sensitive voltammetric sensor for the determination of diclofenac sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afkhami, Abbas; Bahiraei, Atousa; Madrakian, Tayyebeh

    2016-01-01

    A simple and highly sensitive sensor for the determination of diclofenac sodium based on gold nanoparticle/multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode is reported. Scanning electron microscopy along with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry was used to characterize the nanostructure and performance of the sensor and the results were compared with those obtained at the multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode and bare glassy carbon electrode. Under the optimized experimental conditions diclofenac sodium gave linear response over the range of 0.03–200 μmol L −1 . The lower detection limits were found to be 0.02 μmol L −1 . The effect of common interferences on the current response of DS was investigated. The practical application of the modified electrode was demonstrated by measuring the concentration of diclofenac sodium in urine and pharmaceutical samples. This revealed that the gold nanoparticle/multiwalled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode shows excellent analytical performance for the determination of diclofenac sodium in terms of a very low detection limit, high sensitivity, very good accuracy, repeatability and reproducibility. - Highlights: • GCE was modified with multiwalled carbon nanotube and gold nanoparticles. • AuNP/MWCNT/GCE was used for the determination of diclofenac sodium. • Modified electrode was characterized by SEM, EDS and EIS. • The proposed method showed excellent analytical figures of merit. • This sensor was used for the determination of diclofenac sodium in real samples.

  13. Gold nanoparticle/multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode as a sensitive voltammetric sensor for the determination of diclofenac sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afkhami, Abbas, E-mail: afkhami@basu.ac.ir; Bahiraei, Atousa; Madrakian, Tayyebeh

    2016-02-01

    A simple and highly sensitive sensor for the determination of diclofenac sodium based on gold nanoparticle/multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode is reported. Scanning electron microscopy along with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry was used to characterize the nanostructure and performance of the sensor and the results were compared with those obtained at the multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode and bare glassy carbon electrode. Under the optimized experimental conditions diclofenac sodium gave linear response over the range of 0.03–200 μmol L{sup −1}. The lower detection limits were found to be 0.02 μmol L{sup −1}. The effect of common interferences on the current response of DS was investigated. The practical application of the modified electrode was demonstrated by measuring the concentration of diclofenac sodium in urine and pharmaceutical samples. This revealed that the gold nanoparticle/multiwalled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode shows excellent analytical performance for the determination of diclofenac sodium in terms of a very low detection limit, high sensitivity, very good accuracy, repeatability and reproducibility. - Highlights: • GCE was modified with multiwalled carbon nanotube and gold nanoparticles. • AuNP/MWCNT/GCE was used for the determination of diclofenac sodium. • Modified electrode was characterized by SEM, EDS and EIS. • The proposed method showed excellent analytical figures of merit. • This sensor was used for the determination of diclofenac sodium in real samples.

  14. Continuous analyzers of hydrogen and carbon in liquid sodium and of hydrocarbon total in protective atmosphere above sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitak, O.; Fresl, M.

    1980-01-01

    The principle is described of a leak detector for detecting water penetration into sodium in a steam generator. The device operates as a diffusion H-meter with an ion pump. Ni or Fe diffusion diaphragm is washed with sodium while diffused hydrogen is pumped and also monitored with the ion pump. Another detector uses the principle of analyzing hydrocarbons in the cover gas above the sodium level. The carrier gas flow for the analyzer divided into measuring and reference parts is passed through a chamber housing the diffusion standard. For measuring carbon content in sodium, the detector analytical part may be completed with a chamber with moisturizing filling for scrubbing gas. Carbon passing through the diffusion Fe diaphragm is scrubbed on the inner wall in the form of CO which is reduced to methane and measured using the detector C-meter. (M.S.)

  15. Study of new complexes of uranium and comba radical. I.- Complexes defective in sodium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera Palomino, J.; Galiano Sedano, J. A.; Parellada Bellod, R.; Bellido Gonzalez, A.

    1975-01-01

    Some complexes formed in presence of defect of sodium carbonate with respect to the stoichiometric ratio (U): (C0 3 ) = 1:3 are studied. This ratio corresponds to the main complex which is responsible for the uranium extraction with CDMBAC organic solutions and from U(VI) aqueous solutions with an excess of sodium carbonate. (Author) 10 refs

  16. Comparative solubilisation of potassium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate and sodium carbonate in hot dimethylformamide: application of cylindrical particle surface-controlled dissolution theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forryan, Claire L; Compton, Richard G; Klymenko, Oleksiy V; Brennan, Colin M; Taylor, Catherine L; Lennon, Martin

    2006-02-07

    A surface-controlled dissolution of cylindrical solid particles model is applied to potassium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate and sodium carbonate in dimethylformamide at elevated temperatures. Previously published data for the dissolution of potassium carbonate is interpreted assuming a cylindrical rather than a spherical shape of the particles, the former representing a closer approximation to the true shape of the particles as revealed by scanning electron microscopy. The dissolution kinetics of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate in dimethylformamide at 100 degrees C were investigated via monitoring of the deprotonation of 2-cyanophenol with dissolved solid to form the 2-cyanophenolate anion that was detected with UV-visible spectroscopy. From fitting of experimental results to theory, the dissolution rate constant, k, for the dissolutions of potassium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate and sodium carbonate in dimethylformamide at 100 degrees C were found to have the values of (1.0 +/- 0.1) x 10(-7) mol cm(-2) s(-1), (5.5 +/- 0.3) x 10(-9) mol cm(-2) s(-1) and (9.7 +/- 0.8) x 10(-9) mol cm(-2) s(-1), respectively.

  17. Optimisation of entrapped activated carbon conditions to remove coloured compounds from winery wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devesa-Rey, R; Bustos, G; Cruz, J M; Moldes, A B

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this work was to study the entrapped conditions of activated carbon in calcium-alginate beads for the clarification of winery wastewaters. An incomplete 3(3) factorial design was carried out to study the efficiency of activated carbon (0.5-2%); sodium alginate (1-5%); and calcium chloride (0.050-0.900 M), on the following dependent variables: colour reduction at 280, 465, 530 and 665 nm. The activated carbon and calcium chloride were the most influential variables in the colour reduction. Nearly 100% colour reductions were found for the wavelengths assayed when employing 2% of activated carbon, 5% of sodium alginate and intermediate concentrations of calcium chloride (0.475 M). Instead, other conditions like, 2% of activated carbon, 4% of sodium alginate and 0.580 M of calcium chloride can also give absorbance reductions close to 100%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Efficient lactulose production from cheese whey using sodium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Park, Gwon Woo; Han, Jong-In

    2015-04-15

    An economical method of lactulose production from cheese whey was developed using sodium carbonate (Na2CO3). Three parameters such as temperature, reaction time, and Na2CO3 concentration were identified as experimental factors, and yield was selected as a response parameter. The experimental factors were optimised employing Response Surface Methodology (RSM). Maximum yield of 29.6% was obtained at reaction time of 20.41 min, Na2CO3 of 0.51% at 90 °C. To overcome this limited lactulose yield, due to the conversion of lactulose to galactose, fed batch system was applied using dried cheese whey as lactose source. By this system, limit was broken, and 15.8 g/L of lactulose is produced in hour. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Application of a commercial diffusion type carbon meter in a sodium circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, N.P.; Borgstedt, H.U.; Peric, Z.; Witting, G.

    1980-01-01

    The exchange of carbon between structural materials and liquid sodium influences the mechanical properties of components of the cooling circuits. Therefore, the estimation of the carbon content of the alkali metal and the knowledge of its carburizing potential is of importance. Since some years the measurement of the carburizing potential of sodium is easy to perform by the application of the foil equilibration method which leads to good results in spite of the very low carbon concentrations in the liquid metal. Thin foils (0.025 to 0.125 mm) of Fe-18Cr-8Ni-C alloy (corresponding to stainless steel type AISI 304) are immersed in sodium at 550 to 700 deg. C for 200 to 400 hours. The equilibrium of the carbon distribution must be reached. Chemical analyses of the steel tabs and relation of concentration to activity of carbon lead to information on the carbon concentration in the sodium, if the saturation concentration of carbon in sodium is known. The method gives arbitrary values over a longer period of time. The time needed for equilibration and analysis causes a delay for the getting of results. Therefore, there is a need for instruments which are capable to measure carbon directly in the circuits and give continuously information on the actual carbon activities in the fluid. Until 1975 only one carbon meter was commercially available. One unit in was tested a chemical analytical sodium circuit

  20. Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 1: Laboratory Experiments and Application to EBR-II Secondary Sodium System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven R. Sherman

    2005-04-01

    Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decommissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidified carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, U.S.A. This report is Part 1 of a two-part report. It is divided into three sections. The first section describes the chemistry of carbon dioxide-water-sodium reactions. The second section covers the laboratory experiments that were conducted in order to develop the residual sodium deactivation process. The third section discusses the application of the deactivation process to the treatment of residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary sodium cooling system. Part 2 of the report, under separate cover, describes the application of the technique to residual sodium

  1. Kinetic Effect on the Freezing of Ammonium-Sodium-Carbonate-Chloride Brines and Implications for Origin of Ceres' Bright Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodyss, R. P.; Thomas, E. C.; Vu, T. H.; Johnson, P. V.; Choukroun, M.

    2017-12-01

    Subsurface brines on Ceres containing natrite (Na2CO3) and smaller amounts of NH4Cl or NH4HCO3 have been proposed to reach the dwarf planet's surface from an internal reservoir, where the brines freeze and result in bright spots across Ceres. Kinetically frozen solutions containing the likely constituents of Ceres' subsurface brines (ammonium, sodium, carbonate, and chloride ions) were studied via infrared and micro-Raman spectroscopy, where the flash-frozen mixtures were found to preferentially form ammonium chloride and ammonium bicarbonate, even in sodium-dominated solutions. Additionally, sodium chloride only formed when sodium or chloride (or both) were present in excess in the brine solutions. Raman spectroscopy was further employed to analyze the effect of vacuum exposure on these frozen brines over longer periods of time to simulate the surface conditions of Ceres.

  2. Sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Table salt is a combination of two minerals - sodium and chloride Your body needs some sodium to work properly. It helps with the function ... in your body. Your kidneys control how much sodium is in your body. If you have too ...

  3. Thermal Decomposition of Sodium Hydrogen Carbonate and Textural Features of Its Calcines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Svoboda, Karel; Pohořelý, Michael; Šyc, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 31 (2013), s. 10619-10626 ISSN 0888-5885 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7C11009 Grant - others:RFCS(XE) RFCR-CT-2010-00009 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : thermal decomposition * sodium hydrogen carbonate * sodium bicarbonate Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.235, year: 2013

  4. Design and test of a vacuum distillation method for determining carbon in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irmisch, R.; Rettig, D.; Woelke, K.

    1976-08-01

    A method is described for determining total and carbonate carbon in sodium samples until 10 g. Sodium is removed by vacuum distillation at 300 0 C and the carbon in the residue is converted to carbon dioxide by combustion in a stream of air or thermic splitting in a stream of cover gas at 1000 0 C. The carbon dioxide is measured manometrically. It is therefore not necessary to carry out calibration. Distillation and combustion rig are combined with inertgas filled transfer box. Therefore the sodium sample does not get into touch with air. Test of this method was carried out with Na 2 CO 3 and WC. Carbon recoveries were for Na 2 CO 3 between 103 and 107% and for WC between 92 and 96%. The blank value found being 9 μg C and sensitivity 3 μg C. (author)

  5. Factors Affecting Dissolution Resistance of AC Anodizing Al in Sodium Carbonate Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Krisha, M.

    2001-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine the effect of different factors on the properties and so the dissolution resistance of the anodic film of Al. Conductance and thermometric measurements were applied to evaluate the dissolution rate. The effect of applied AC voltage concentration of sodium carbonate solution, the anodization time and the temperature of sodium carbonate solutions show a parallel increase in the dissolution resistance of studied Al in hydrochloride acid. The results show that films formed by sodium carbonate solution were of porous type and have pronounced high resistance. Scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction further examined the films. The anodic and cathodic behavior and the effect of the scanning rate on the polarization of Al in sodium carbonate solution were studied. The regression analysis was applied to all results. (Author)

  6. Solubility of ammonium metavanadate in ammonium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate solutions at 25 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, P.I.; Andreev, V.K.; Slotvinskij-Sidak, N.P.

    1978-01-01

    Solubility at 25 deg C has been studied in the system ammonium metavanadate - sodium bicarbonate - water which is a stable section of the corresponding quaternary mutual system. In the eutonic point the content of ammonium metavanadate is 4.95% and of sodium bicarbonate 12.1%. The crystallization branch of ammonium metavanadate has been studied in the system ammonium metavanadate - ammonium carbonate - water at 25 deg C. Metavanadate solubility attains minimum (0.14%) at ammonium carbonate concentration 2.6%. Three sections have been studied of the quaternary system ammonium - metavanadate - ammonium carbonate - sodium bicarbonate-water at 25 deg C in the crystallization region of ammonium metavanadate at a ratio of sodium bicarbonate to ammonium carbonate 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3. A region of minimum solubility of ammonium metavanadate has been detected (0.1%)

  7. Ultrasonic Assisted Synthesis of Chromenes Catalyzed by Sodium Carbonate in Aqueous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbaghan, Maryam; Sofalgar, Pegah

    2015-01-01

    A simple, efficient, and environmentally benign procedure for the synthesis of 2-amino-4H-chromene ring has been achieved by the three-component reaction of an aromatic aldehyde, malononitrile and diverse enolizable C-H activated compound under ultrasound irradiation using sodium carbonate as a catalyst in aqueous media. Sodium carbonate as a natural salt, being available as an inexpensive catalyst combined with ultrasound method promoted this protocol in comparison to other methods and catalysts.

  8. Geographic distribution of soluble salts, exchangeable sodium and calcium carbonate in the Caribbean Region of Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulido, Carlos E

    2000-01-01

    A research was carried out to establish the distribution of soluble salts, exchangeable sodium and calcium carbonate in the soils of the Caribbean Region. The results show that 28,3% (3.506.033 ha) of the soils have problems related to salinity. The soils of the arid and semiarid zones and those belonging to the sea plain are affected severely by soluble salts, exchangeable sodium and calcium carbonate

  9. The effectiveness of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) on the impurities removal of saturated salt solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujiastuti, C.; Ngatilah, Y.; Sumada, K.; Muljani, S.

    2018-01-01

    Increasing the quality of salt can be done through various methods such as washing (hydro-extraction), re-crystallization, ion exchange methods and others. In the process of salt quality improvement by re-crystallization method where salt product diluted with water to form saturated solution and re-crystallized through heating process. The quality of the salt produced is influenced by the quality of the dissolved salt and the crystallization mechanism applied. In this research is proposed a concept that before the saturated salt solution is recrystallized added a chemical for removal of the impurities such as magnesium ion (Mg), calcium (Ca), potassium (K) and sulfate (SO4) is contained in a saturated salt solution. The chemical reagents that used are sodium hydroxide (NaOH) 2 N and sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) 2 N. This research aims to study effectiveness of sodium hydroxide and sodium carbonate on the impurities removal of magnesium (Mg), calcium (Ca), potassium (K) and sulfate (SO4). The results showed that the addition of sodium hydroxide solution can be decreased the impurity ions of magnesium (Mg) 95.2%, calcium ion (Ca) 45%, while the addition of sodium carbonate solution can decreased magnesium ion (Mg) 66.67% and calcium ion (Ca) 77.5%, but both types of materials are not degradable sulfate ions (SO4). The sodium hydroxide solution more effective to decrease magnesium ion than sodium carbonate solution, and the sodium carbonate solution more effective to decrease calcium ion than sodium hydroxide solution.

  10. Fluoroethylene Carbonate-Based Electrolyte with 1 M Sodium Bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide Enables High-Performance Sodium Metal Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yongwon; Lee, Jaegi; Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, Koeun; Cha, Aming; Kang, Sujin; Wi, Taeung; Kang, Seok Ju; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Choi, Nam-Soon

    2018-05-02

    Sodium (Na) metal anodes with stable electrochemical cycling have attracted widespread attention because of their highest specific capacity and lowest potential among anode materials for Na batteries. The main challenges associated with Na metal anodes are dendritic formation and the low density of deposited Na during electrochemical plating. Here, we demonstrate a fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC)-based electrolyte with 1 M sodium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (NaFSI) salt for the stable and dense deposition of the Na metal during electrochemical cycling. The novel electrolyte combination developed here circumvents the dendritic Na deposition that is one of the primary concerns for battery safety and constructs the uniform ionic interlayer achieving highly reversible Na plating/stripping reactions. The FEC-NaFSI constructs the mechanically strong and ion-permeable interlayer containing NaF and ionic compounds such as Na 2 CO 3 and sodium alkylcarbonates.

  11. The fatigue behavior of X 6 CrNi 18 11 under sodium corrosion conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huthmann, H.; Menken, G.; Husslage, W.

    1977-01-01

    To carry out fatigue tests in sodium the experience gained in an ongoing program on irradiation effects was used for the definition of the test procedure and sample conditions, i.e. strain controlled experiments with an hour glass sample and axial strain measurement. In order to allow sodium corrosion to take place during the test, the samples were welded into a bellow and connected to a dynamic sodium loop. Due to the restricted test capacities, INTERATOM and the Metaalinstituut TNO (MI-TNO) pursued in a combined experimental program two different concepts with regard to the corrosion conditions. INTERATOM tested the samples during exposure in flowing sodium within a nonisothermal loop. The MI-TNO tested the samples after a precorrosion in a nonisothermal sodium loop. During the test at TNO the bellow-sealed samples were surrounded by static sodium

  12. The fatigue behavior of X 6 CrNi 18 11 under sodium corrosion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huthmann, H; Menken, G [INTERATOM, Bergisch Gladbach (Germany); Husslage, W [TNO, Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    1977-07-01

    To carry out fatigue tests in sodium the experience gained in an ongoing program on irradiation effects was used for the definition of the test procedure and sample conditions, i.e. strain controlled experiments with an hour glass sample and axial strain measurement. In order to allow sodium corrosion to take place during the test, the samples were welded into a bellow and connected to a dynamic sodium loop. Due to the restricted test capacities, INTERATOM and the Metaalinstituut TNO (MI-TNO) pursued in a combined experimental program two different concepts with regard to the corrosion conditions. INTERATOM tested the samples during exposure in flowing sodium within a nonisothermal loop. The MI-TNO tested the samples after a precorrosion in a nonisothermal sodium loop. During the test at TNO the bellow-sealed samples were surrounded by static sodium.

  13. Metal corrosion in a supercritical carbon dioxide - liquid sodium power cycle.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Robert Charles; Conboy, Thomas M.

    2012-02-01

    A liquid sodium cooled fast reactor coupled to a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton power cycle is a promising combination for the next generation nuclear power production process. For optimum efficiency, a microchannel heat exchanger, constructed by diffusion bonding, can be used for heat transfer from the liquid sodium reactor coolant to the supercritical carbon dioxide. In this work, we have reviewed the literature on corrosion of metals in liquid sodium and carbon dioxide. The main conclusions are (1) pure, dry CO{sub 2} is virtually inert but can be highly corrosive in the presence of even ppm concentrations of water, (2) carburization and decarburization are very significant mechanism for corrosion in liquid sodium especially at high temperature and the mechanism is not well understood, and (3) very little information could be located on corrosion of diffusion bonded metals. Significantly more research is needed in all of these areas.

  14. Na-ion capacitor using sodium pre-doped hard carbon and activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuratani, Kentaro; Yao, Masaru; Senoh, Hiroshi; Takeichi, Nobuhiko; Sakai, Tetsuo; Kiyobayashi, Tetsu

    2012-01-01

    We assembled a sodium-ion capacitor (Na-IC) by combining sodium pre-doped hard carbon (HC) as the negative- and activated carbon (AC) as the positive-electrode. The electrochemical properties were compared with two lithium-ion capacitors (Li-ICs) in which the negative electrodes were prepared with Li pre-doped HC and mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB). The positive and negative electrodes were prepared using the established doctor blade method. The negative electrodes were galvanostatically pre-doped with Na or Li to 80% of the full capacity of carbons. The potential of the negative electrodes after pre-doping was around 0.0 V vs. Na/Na + or Li/Li + , which resulted in the higher output potential difference of the Na-IC and Li-ICs than that of the conventional electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) because AC positive electrode works in the same principle both in the ion capacitors and in the EDLC. The state-of-charge of the negative electrode varied 80 ± 10% during the electrochemical charging and discharging. The capacity of the cell was evaluated using galvanostatic charge–discharge measurement. At the discharge current density of 10 mA cm −2 , the Na-IC maintained 70% of the capacity that obtained at the current density of 0.5 mA cm −2 , which was comparable to the Li-ICs. At 50 mA cm −2 , the capacities of the Li-IC(MCMB) and the Na-IC dropped to 20% whereas the Li-IC(HC) retained 30% of the capacity observed at 0.5 mA cm −2 . The capacities of the Na-IC and Li-ICs decreased by 9% and 3%, respectively, after 1000 cycles of charging and discharging.

  15. Comparative toxicity of sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate to freshwater organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geer, Tyler D; Kinley, Ciera M; Iwinski, Kyla J; Calomeni, Alyssa J; Rodgers, John H

    2016-10-01

    Sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate (SCP) is a granular algaecide containing H2O2 as an active ingredient to control growth of noxious algae. Measurements of sensitivities of target and non-target species to hydrogen peroxide are necessary for water resource managers to make informed decisions and minimize risks for non-target species when treating noxious algae. The objective of this study was to measure and compare responses among a target noxious alga (cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa) and non-target organisms including a eukaryotic alga (chlorophyte Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), microcrustacean (Ceriodaphnia dubia), benthic amphipod (Hyalella azteca), and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) to exposures of hydrogen peroxide as SCP. Hydrogen peroxide exposures were confirmed using the I3(-) method. SCP margins of safety for these organisms were compared with published toxicity data to provide context for other commonly used algaecides and herbicides (e.g. copper formulations, endothall, and diquat dibromide). Algal responses (cell density and chlorophyll a concentrations) and animal mortality were measured after 96h aqueous exposures to SCP in laboratory-formulated water to estimate EC50 and LC50 values, as well as potency slopes. Despite a shorter test duration, M. aeruginosa was more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide as SCP (96h EC50:0.9-1.0mgL(-)(1) H2O2) than the eukaryotic alga P. subcapitata (7-d EC50:5.2-9.2mgL(-1) H2O2), indicating potential for selective control of prokaryotic algae. For the three non-target animals evaluated, measured 96-h LC50 values ranged from 1.0 to 19.7mgL(-1) H2O2. C. dubia was the most sensitive species, and the least sensitive species was P. promelas, which is not likely to be affected by concentrations of hydrogen peroxide as SCP that would be used to control noxious algae (e.g. M. aeruginosa). Based on information from peer-reviewed literature, other algaecides could be similarly selective for cyanobacteria. Of the

  16. A computational model for the carbon transfer in stainless steel sodium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casadio, S.; Scibona, G.

    1980-01-01

    A method is proposed of computing the carbon transfer in the type 316, 304 and 321 stainless steels in sodium environment as a function of temperature, exposure time and carbon concentration in the sodium. The method is based on the criteria developed at ANL by introducing some simplifications and takes also into account the correlations obtained at WARD. Calculated carbon profiles are compared both with experimental data and with the results available by the other computer methods. The limits for quantitative predictions of the stainless steel carburization or decarburization exposed in a specific environment are discussed. (author)

  17. Effects of sodium intake on cardiovascular variables in humans during posture changes and ambulatory conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, M.; Gabrielsenm A.; Heer, M.

    2002-01-01

    and controlled laboratory conditions at the end of two consecutive 5-day periods with sodium intakes of 70 (low) and 250 (high) mmol/24 h or vice versa, respectively. Comparing high and low sodium intake, plasma volume and plasma protein concentrations were 9 and 8% higher in the seated and the supine position...

  18. Crystal growth of calcium carbonate in silk fibroin/sodium alginate hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Jinfa; Zuo, Baoqi

    2014-01-01

    As known, silk fibroin-like protein plays a pivotal role during the formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) crystals in the nacre sheets. Here, we have prepared silk fibroin/sodium alginate nanofiber hydrogels to serve as templates for calcium carbonate mineralization. In this experiment, we report an interesting finding of calcium carbonate crystal growth in the silk fibroin/sodium alginate nanofiber hydrogels by the vapor diffusion method. The experimental results indicate calcium carbonate crystals obtained from nanofiber hydrogels with different proportions of silk fibroin/sodium alginate are mixture of calcite and vaterite with unusual morphologies. Time-dependent growth study was carried out to investigate the crystallization process. It is believed that nanofiber hydrogels play an important role in the process of crystallization. This study would help in understanding the function of organic polymers in natural mineralization, and provide a novel pathway in the design and synthesis of new materials related unique morphology and structure.

  19. Enhanced Lithium- and Sodium-Ion Storage in an Interconnected Carbon Network Comprising Electronegative Fluorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seok-Min; Etacheri, Vinodkumar; Hong, Chulgi Nathan; Choi, Seung Wan; Lee, Ki Bong; Pol, Vilas G

    2017-06-07

    Fluorocarbon (C x F y ) anode materials were developed for lithium- and sodium-ion batteries through a facile one-step carbonization of a single precursor, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). Interconnected carbon network structures were produced with doped fluorine in high-temperature carbonization at 500-800 °C. The fluorocarbon anodes derived from the PVDF precursor showed higher reversible discharge capacities of 735 mAh g -1 and 269 mAh g -1 in lithium- and sodium-ion batteries, respectively, compared to the commercial graphitic carbon. After 100 charge/discharge cycles, the fluorocarbon showed retentions of 91.3% and 97.5% in lithium (at 1C) and sodium (at 200 mA g -1 ) intercalation systems, respectively. The effects of carbonization temperature on the electrochemical properties of alkali metal ion storage were thoroughly investigated and documented. The specific capacities in lithium- and sodium-ion batteries were dependent on the fluorine content, indicating that the highly electronegative fluorine facilitates the insertion/extraction of lithium and sodium ions in rechargeable batteries.

  20. The Effects of Voltage and Concentration of Sodium Bicarbonate on Electrochemical Synthesis of Ethanol from Carbon Dioxide Using Brass as Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Septian; Fariduddin, Sholah; Rizki Aminudin, Afianti; Kurnia Hayatri, Antisa; Riyanto

    2017-11-01

    The effects of voltage and concentration of sodium bicarbonate were investigated to determine the optimum conditions of the electrochemical synthesis process to convert carbon dioxide into ethanol. The conversion process is carried out using a sodium bicarbonate electrolyte solution in an electrochemical synthesis reactor equipped with a cathode and anode. As the cathode was used brass, while as the anode carbon was utilized. Sample of the electrochemical synthesis process was analyzed by gas chromatography to determine the content of the compounds produced. The optimum electrochemical synthesis conditions to convert carbon dioxide into ethanol are voltage and concentration of sodium bicarbonate are 3 volts and 0.4 M with ethanol concentration of 1.33%.

  1. Green synthesis of graphitic carbon nitride nanodots using sodium chloride template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Bo [National University of Defense Technology, College of Science (China); Zou, Xianshuai; Yan, Tingnan; Fei, Junjie [Xiangtan University, College of Chemistry (China); Chu, Zengyong, E-mail: chuzy@nudt.edu.cn [National University of Defense Technology, College of Science (China)

    2016-05-15

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) nanodots are simply prepared by a thermal treatment of dicyandiamide (DCDA) confined within NaCl templates. Cyano groups are introduced to the nanodots due to the catalytic effect of NaCl. NaCl could facilitate the polymerization of DCDA at lower temperatures, but will promote the decomposition when the temperature is above 550 °C. Thermal treatment at 600 °C for 30 min is the optimal condition for the scalable synthesis of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanodots with an average diameter of ~9 nm. g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanodots have a higher band gap of 3.1 eV, which can emit bright blue light due to the decreased diameter, the introduction of cyano groups, and the incorporation of some sodium ions. The residue sodium ions and the cyano groups might lead to the local distortion of the graphitic crystals, or act as recombination centers for the enhanced photoluminescence.Graphical Abstract.

  2. Investigation of sodium - carbon dioxide interactions with calorimetric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, N.; Latge, C.; Gicquel, L.

    2007-01-01

    The supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycle could be a promising option to enhance the competitiveness of future Sodium fast reactors but it is highly necessary to get thermodynamic and kinetics information on potential sodium-CO 2 chemical reactions and their consequences. We have studied the interaction between Na and CO 2 via calorimetric methods. These methods are able to point out exothermic/endothermic phenomena and to measure heat of chemical reactions. The main feature of the Na/CO 2 interaction seems to be its sharp dependence on temperature. At low temperature, below 500 C degrees, CO 2 and sodium react and exhibit an induction time which decreases when temperature increases. Above 500 C degrees, we observe a global phenomenon with a fast and instantaneous chemical reaction which may be understood as an auto-combustion of CO 2 in sodium. We clearly demonstrated that Na/CO 2 interaction does not proceed as an auto-catalytic process and is more satisfactorily explained by the occurring of an auto-combustion phenomenon

  3. Chemical acceleration of a neutral granulated blast-furnace slag activated by sodium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovtun, Maxim; Kearsley, Elsabe P.; Shekhovtsova, Julia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results of a study on chemical acceleration of a neutral granulated blast-furnace slag activated using sodium carbonate. As strength development of alkali-activated slag cements containing neutral GBFS and sodium carbonate as activator at room temperature is known to be slow, three accelerators were investigated: sodium hydroxide, ordinary Portland cement and a combination of silica fume and slaked lime. In all cements, the main hydration product is C–(A)–S–H, but its structure varies between tobermorite and riversideite depending on the accelerator used. Calcite and gaylussite are present in all systems and they were formed due to either cation exchange reaction between the slag and the activator, or carbonation. With accelerators, compressive strength up to 15 MPa can be achieved within 24 h in comparison to 2.5 MPa after 48 h for a mix without an accelerator

  4. Carbon coated anatase TiO2 mesocrystals enabling ultrastable and robust sodium storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weifeng; Lan, Tongbin; Ding, Tianli; Wu, Nae-Lih; Wei, Mingdeng

    2017-08-01

    Nanoporous anatase TiO2 mesocrystals with tunable architectures and crystalline phases were successfully fabricated in the presence of the butyl oleate and oleylamine. Especially, the introduced surfactants served as a carbon source, bring a uniform carbon layer (about 2-8 nm) for heightening the electronic conductivity. The carbon coated TiO2 mesocrystals assembled from crystalline tiny subunits have more space sites for sodium-ion storage. When the material was applied as an electrode material in rechargeable sodium-ion batteries, it exhibited a superior capacity of about 90 mA h g-1 at 20 C (1 C = 168 mA g-1) and a highly reversible capacity for 5000 cycles, which is the longest cycle life reported for sodium storage in TiO2 electrodes.

  5. Biological activity and safety of Tripterygium extract prepared by sodium carbonate extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wei; Peng, Fan; Yi, Tao; Zhang, Cong; Wan, Chunxi; Xu, Huibi; Lam, Christopher Waikei; Yang, Xiangliang

    2012-09-17

    The commercial preparation named “Tripterygium glycosides” prepared by column chromatography has been used for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases with significant efficacy but concurrent toxicity. The aim of this study was to reduce the toxicity of Tripterygium extracts, using cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory activity of the three principal active components of Tripterygium wilfordii Hook. F. (TWHF)as guiding parameters. Column chromatography was replaced by sodium carbonate extraction for removing the acidic compounds and enriching epoxyditerpenoids and alkaloids in the extract. Results showed that the therapeutic index (IC50/EC50) on murine macrophage Raw 264.7 cells and rat mesangial HBZY-1 cells of the extract prepared by sodium carbonate extraction was significantly higher than that of Tripterygium glycosides(0.8 and 5.2 vs. 0.3 and 2.6, p sodium carbonate extraction may represent a potentially optimal source of medicine with good therapeutic index.

  6. Effects of Inulin and Sodium Carbonate in Phosphate-Free Restructured Poultry Steaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, B.; Serdaroğlu, M.

    2017-09-01

    Recently inorganic phosphates used in meat product formulations have caused negative impact on consumers due to their potential health risks. Therefore, utilization of natural ingredients as phosphate replacers has come into prominence as a novel research topic to meet consumer demands for clean-label trends. In this study, we objected to investigate the effects of inulin utilization either in the powder or gelled form, alone or in combination with sodium carbonate on quality of phosphate-free restructured chicken steaks. Total moisture, protein, lipid and ash values of the trial groups were in the range of 71.54-75.46%, 22.60-24.31%, 0.94-1.70% and 1.45-2.13%, respectively. pH of the samples was between 6.18-6.39, significant increments were recorded in samples containing inulin with sodium carbonate. L*, a* and b* values were recorded as 78.92-81.05, 1.76-3.05 and 10.80-11.94, respectively, where use of gelled inulin resulted in changes of L* and a* values. Utilization of inulin in combination with sodium carbonate decreased cook loss and enhanced product yield. Sensory scores in control group with phosphate showed a similar pattern to sensory scores in groups with inulin and sodium carbonate. During storage, purge loss and lipid oxidation rate were similar in control and inulin + sodium carbonate samples. The results showed that use of inulin in combination with sodium carbonate provided equivalent physical, chemical and sensory quality to phosphates in restructured chicken steaks.

  7. Studies on sorption of plutonium on inorganic exchangers from sodium carbonate medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pius, I C; Charyulu, M M; Sivaramakrishnan, C K [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Venkataramani, B [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    Sorption of Pu(IV) from sodium carbonate medium has been investigated by using different inorganic exchangers alumina, silica gel and hydrous titanium oxide. Distribution ratios of Pu(IV) for its sorption on these exchangers from sodium carbonate medium were found to be sufficiently high indicating the suitability of these exchangers for the removal of Pu(IV). The presence of uranium and dibutyl phosphate do not have any effect on distribution ratio. The 10% Pu(IV) breakthrough capacities for above exchangers have been determined with 5 ml bed at a flow rate of 30 ml/hour. (author). 4 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. The use of sodium carbonate to improve curing treatments against green and blue moulds on citrus fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Pilar; Usall, Josep; Torres, Rosario; Abadias, Maribel; Smilanick, Joseph L; Viñas, Immaculada

    2004-08-01

    The effectiveness of curing oranges and lemons at 33 degrees C for 65h followed by storage under ambient and cold-storage conditions was investigated. This treatment effectively reduced the incidence of Penicillium digitatum (Pers) Sacc and P italicum Wehmer decay on inoculated and naturally infected oranges and lemons stored at 20 degrees C for 7 days. However, it failed to control green and blue mould infections on fruits placed in long-term cold storage, except green mould on oranges, which was effectively controlled. Dipping fruits in a sodium carbonate solution (20 g litre(-1)) for 2.5 min following a curing treatment at 33 degrees C for 65 h satisfactorily reduced green and blue mould incidence during subsequent long-term storage at 4 degrees C on oranges and at 10 degrees C on lemons. The efficacy was greater on injured fruits inoculated after the combination of treatments was applied, achieving a 60-80% reduction in decay in comparison with the curing treatment alone in all cases. A significant reduction of blue mould was also observed on fruits inoculated both before the treatments and on those re-inoculated after the treatments, demonstrating both protectant and eradicant activity. Thus, combining curing at 33 degrees C for 65 h with sodium carbonate treatment effectively controlled these post-harvest diseases on artificially inoculated citrus fruits and protected against re-infection. With naturally inoculated lemons, curing followed by sodium carbonate significantly reduced both green and blue mould incidence, but was not superior to curing alone. With naturally infected oranges, curing significantly reduced blue mould, but decay was not reduced further when followed by sodium carbonate treatment.

  9. Long-term progress prediction for the carbon steel corrosion in diluted artificial seawater with and without zinc / sodium carbonate mixed phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Kazumi; Ishioka, Shinichi; Iwanami, Masaru; Kaneko, Tetsuji; Tanaka, Norihiko; Kawaharada, Yoshiyuki; Yokoyama, Yutaka; Umehara, Ryuji; Kato, Chiaki; Ueno, Fumiyoshi; Fukaya, Yuichi; Kumaga, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants (1F) were damaged by an unprecedented severe accident in the great east Japan earthquake on 11th, March, 2011, and seawater and fresh water were injected as an emergency countermeasure for the core cooling. The primary containment vessels (PCVs), made of carbon steel, were exposed to seawater and fresh water, and have had the possibility of corrosion. The PCVs of 1F are the most important equipment for the core cooling and removal of the fuel debris, the structural integrity of the PCV must be maintained until decommissioning. Therefore, evaluation of PCV carbon steel corrosion behavior is important, as well as evaluation of corrosion inhibitors as one of the corrosion protection methods. In this study, long-term immersion corrosion tests for up to 10000 hours were performed in diluted artificial seawater simulating 1F with and without zinc / sodium carbonate mixed phosphate. Based on the long-term immersion corrosion test results, diagnosis method of the reduction in plate thickness of the nuclear vessel was examined. The validity of the existing corrosion progress models following parabolic rate law was confirmed. The corrosion progress models were also applicable to the corrosion inhibited condition adding zinc / sodium carbonate mixed phosphate. It was found that the corrosion rate of carbon steel drastically fell down by adding this corrosion inhibitor. (author)

  10. Effect of carbon activity on the creep behaviour of 21/4Cr, 1Mo steel in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordwell, J.E.; Charnock, W.; Nicholson, R.D.

    1979-02-01

    The creep endurance and creep cracking behaviour of 2 1/4Cr, 1Mo steel in sodium at 475 0 C have been studied at three different sodium carbon activities. Creep endurance was found to increase with increasing carbon activity of the sodium. Tests carried out in high carbon activity sodium were discontinued before fracture. Creep crack initiation displacement at notches decreased with increasing carbon activity, presumably as a result of notch tip carburisation. The plastic zones at the tips of blunt notches in specimens exposed in high carbon activity sodium were preferentially carburised. These observations were similar to those made previously on 9Cr, 1Mo steel. One difference detected metallographically was that in a high carburising environment uniform carburisation was obtained in the 2 1/4Cr, 1Mo steel specimens whereas carburisation gradients were observed in the 9Cr, 1Mo steel. Creep crack propagation rates for given notch opening displacement rates in low and intermediate carbon activity sodium were indistinguishable. However, the strenthening that resulted from the mild carburisation of the specimen in the intermediate carbon activity sodium caused slower notch opening displacement rates and crack propagation rates than in the low carbon activity sodium, when the rates were compared at the same crack length. (author)

  11. Rubber-based carbon electrode materials derived from dumped tires for efficient sodium-ion storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen-Yue; Ma, Chao; Bai, Yu-Lin; Liu, Yu-Si; Wang, Shi-Feng; Wei, Xiao; Wang, Kai-Xue; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2018-04-03

    The development of sustainable and low cost electrode materials for sodium-ion batteries has attracted considerable attention. In this work, a carbon composite material decorated with in situ generated ZnS nanoparticles has been prepared via a simple pyrolysis of the rubber powder from dumped tires. Upon being used as an anode material for sodium-ion batteries, the carbon composite shows a high reversible capacity and rate capability. A capacity as high as 267 mA h g-1 is still retained after 100 cycles at a current density of 50 mA g-1. The well dispersed ZnS nanoparticles in carbon significantly enhance the electrochemical performance. The carbon composites derived from the rubber powder are proposed as promising electrode materials for low-cost, large-scale energy storage devices. This work provides a new and effective method for the reuse of dumped tires, contributing to the recycling of valuable waste resources.

  12. Room temperature synthesis of glycerol carbonate catalyzed by spray dried sodium aluminate microspheres

    OpenAIRE

    Sreerangappa, Ramesh; Debecker, Damien P.; 13th European Congress on Catalysis – EuropaCat 2017

    2017-01-01

    Nanostructured NaAlO2 microspheres are produced by one-pot spray dried route, and are characterized by various physico-chemical methods. The obtained solids are composed of spherical aggregates of sodium aluminate with small crystallite size and strong surface basicity. This makes them highly active catalysts in the base-catalyzed synthesis of glycerol carbonate from glycerol and dimethyl carbonate. The catalyst does not leach and showed good reusability up to three cycles.

  13. High cyclability of carbon-coated TiO2 nanoparticles as anode for sodium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge, Yeqian; Jiang, Han; Zhu, Jiadeng; Lu, Yao; Chen, Chen; Hu, Yi; Qiu, Yiping; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Titanium oxide nanopaticles were modified by carbon coating from pyrolyzing of PVP. • Carbon coating gave rise to excellent cycling ability of TiO 2 for sodium-ion batteries. • The reversible capacity of carbon-coated TiO 2 reached 242.3 mAh g −1 at 30 mA g −1 . • Good rate performance of carbon-coated TiO 2 was presented up to 800 mA g −1 . - Abstract: Owing to the merits of good chemical stability, elemental abundance and nontoxicity, titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) has drawn increasing attraction for use as anode material in sodium-ion batteries. Nanostructured TiO 2 was able to achieve high energy density. However, nanosized TiO 2 is typically electrochemical instable, which leads to poor cycling performance. In order to improve the cycling stability, carbon from thermolysis of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) was coated onto TiO 2 nanoparticles. Electronic conductivity and electrochemical stability were enhanced by coating carbon onto TiO 2 nanoparticles. The resultant carbon-coated TiO 2 nanoparticles exhibited high reversible capacity (242.3 mAh g −1 ), high coulombic efficiency (97.8%), and good capacity retention (87.0%) at 30 mA g −1 over 100 cycles. By comparison, untreated TiO 2 nanoparticles showed comparable reversible capacity (237.3 mAh g −1 ) and coulombic efficiency (96.2%), but poor capacity retention (53.2%) under the same condition. The rate performance of carbon-coated TiO 2 nanoparticles was also displayed as high as 127.6 mAh g −1 at a current density of 800 mA g −1 . The improved cycling performance and rate capability were mostly attributed to protective carbon layer helping stablize solid electrolyte interface formation of TiO 2 nanoparticles and improving the electronic conductivity. Therefore, it is demonstrated that carbon-coated TiO 2 nanoparticles are promising anode candidate for sodium-ion batteries

  14. sodium

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Les initiatives de réduction de la consommation de sel qui visent l'ensemble de la population et qui ciblent la teneur en sodium des aliments et sensibilisent les consommateurs sont susceptibles de réduire la consommation de sel dans toutes les couches de la population et d'améliorer la santé cardiovasculaire. Ce projet a ...

  15. Sodium carbonate activated slag as cement replacement in autoclaved aerated concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, B.; Straub, C.; Segers, S.; Yu, Q.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to study the suitability of fully replacing cement by sodium carbonate activated slag in producing autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC). The material properties of the product are characterized in terms of green strength development, mechanical properties, pore related properties such

  16. Autogenous and drying shrinkage of sodium carbonate activated slag altered by limestone powder incorporation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, B.; Yu, Q.L.; Dainese, E.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to study the shrinkage mechanism of sodium carbonate activated slag containing limestone powder (LP). The workability, pore structure, reaction kinetics and strength development were characterized. The results show that the autogenous shrinkage increases when the dosage of LP is low

  17. Assessing the chemical involvement of limestone powder in sodium carbonate activated slag

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, B.; Yu, Q.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of limestone powder (LP) on the reaction of sodium carbonate activated slag. The results show that the incorporated LP up to 30% improves the strength development, especially at advanced curing ages. A slightly accelerated reaction is observed for samples

  18. The determination of hydroxide and carbonate in concentrated sodium chloride solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roolvink, W.B.; Bos, M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer method for the determination of carbonate and hydroxide in concentrated (2.89 M) sodium chloride solutions is described. The method is based on multiparametric curve-fitting and can also be applied to salts of dibasic acids with unknown equilibrium constants. The systematic error is not

  19. Efficacy of Sodium Carbonate Peroxyhydrate as A Catfish Egg Disinfectant and Comparison to Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate (SCP) for improving channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus hatching success when used as a prophylactic chemotherapeutant during egg incubation. In the first experiment, efficacy of SCP was evaluated in 379-L, al...

  20. Influences of sodium carbonate on physicochemical properties of lansoprazole in designed multiple coating pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Yang, Min; Fan, Jun Hong; Feng, Cai Xia; Zhang, Su Juan; Wang, Jin Xu; Guan, Pei Pei; Wu, Wei

    2010-09-01

    Lansoprazole (LSP), a proton-pump inhibitor, belongs to class II drug. It is especially instable to heat, light, and acidic media, indicating that fabrication of a formulation stabilizing the drug is difficult. The addition of alkaline stabilizer is the most powerful method to protect the drug in solid formulations under detrimental environment. The purpose of the study was to characterize the designed multiple coating pellets of LSP containing an alkaline stabilizer (sodium carbonate) and assess the effect of the stabilizer on the physicochemical properties of the drug. The coated pellets were prepared by layer-layer film coating with a fluid-bed coater. In vitro release and acid-resistance studies were carried out in simulated gastric fluid and simulated intestinal fluid, respectively. Furthermore, the moisture-uptake test was performed to evaluate the influence of sodium carbonate on the drug stability. The results indicate that the drug exists in the amorphous state or small (nanometer size) particles without crystallization even after storage at 40°C/75% for 5 months. The addition of sodium carbonate to the pellet protects the drug from degradation in simulated gastric fluid in a dose-dependent manner. The moisture absorbed into the pellets has a detrimental effect on the drug stability. The extent of drug degradation is directly correlated with the content of moisture absorption. In conclusion, these results suggest that the presence of sodium carbonate influence the physicochemical properties of LSP, and the designed multiple coating pellets enhance the drug stability.

  1. Characteristics of Sodium Polyacrylate/Nano-Sized Carbon Hydrogel for Biomedical Patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Kyu; Seo, Sun-Kyo; Cho, Seungkwan; Kim, Han-Sung; Lee, Chi-Hwan

    2018-03-01

    Conductive hydrogels were prepared for biomedical patch in order to improve the electrical conductivity. Sodium polyacrylate and nano-sized carbon were mixed and fabricated by aqueous solution gelation process in various contents of nano-sized carbon with 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 wt%. Sodium polyacrylate/nano-sized carbon conductive hydrogels were investigated by molecular structure, surface morphology and electrical conductivity. The conductivity of the hydrogel/nano-sized carbon conductive hydrogel proved to be 10% higher than conductive hydrogel without nano-sized carbon. However, it was founded that conductive hydrogels with nano-sized carbon content from 0.5 up to 2.0 wt% were remarkably decreased. This may be due to the non-uniform distribution of nano-sized carbon, resulting from agglomerates of nano-sized carbon. The developed hydrogel is intended for use in the medical and cosmetic fields that is applicable to supply micro-current from device to human body.

  2. Behavior of sodium chloride during the combustion of carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinsmead, K H; Kear, R W

    1956-01-01

    The effects of combustion time, temperature, atmosphere, and the presence of other minerals on the release of Na and Cl from carbon that contained varying amounts of NaCl were examined. Initial testing consisted of adding 0.25, 12.7 and 2.54% NaCl to carbon, and pelletizing and burning the carbon for an hour at the following temperatures: 700, 800, 900, and 1000/sup 0/C. Pellets containing 1.27% NaCl were also burned at 400, 500, and 600/sup 0/C. Additional testing involved the combustion of pellets in dry nitrogen, dry air, moist nitrogen, moist air, and adding various amounts of kaolin to the carbon prior to pelletizing. The testing program demonstrated the following: in all tests the percentage of Na and Cl released increased as the temperature and the salt content increased; generally more Cl was released than Na, particularly at temperatures between 600 to 900 degrees; the release of Na and Cl was significantly less in an atmosphere of N, particularly at lower temperatures; the water vapor present in the moist air seemed to hinder the release of Na but increased the amount of Cl released; a reduction in the amount of Na but not the amount of Cl released was noticed when kaolin was added. The following was concluded from the test results: since Na and Cl were released at different rates there seems to be more than a physical volatization involved; water vapor in the air could affect the amount of Na and Clreleased by lowering the combustion temperature of the carbon, thereby allowing the Na and Cl to react with the water present to form NaOH and HC1; and the reduction in the amount of Na released when kaolin was added was a result of Na reacting with kaolin to form an insoluble silicate.

  3. Solvation behavior of carbonate-based electrolytes in sodium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresce, Arthur V; Russell, Selena M; Borodin, Oleg; Allen, Joshua A; Schroeder, Marshall A; Dai, Michael; Peng, Jing; Gobet, Mallory P; Greenbaum, Steven G; Rogers, Reginald E; Xu, Kang

    2016-12-21

    Sodium ion batteries are on the cusp of being a commercially available technology. Compared to lithium ion batteries, sodium ion batteries can potentially offer an attractive dollar-per-kilowatt-hour value, though at the penalty of reduced energy density. As a materials system, sodium ion batteries present a unique opportunity to apply lessons learned in the study of electrolytes for lithium ion batteries; specifically, the behavior of the sodium ion in an organic carbonate solution and the relationship of ion solvation with electrode surface passivation. In this work the Li + and Na + -based solvates were characterized using electrospray mass spectrometry, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, 17 O, 23 Na and pulse field gradient double-stimulated-echo pulse sequence nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and conductivity measurements. Spectroscopic evidence demonstrate that the Li + and Na + cations share a number of similar ion-solvent interaction trends, such as a preference in the gas and liquid phase for a solvation shell rich in cyclic carbonates over linear carbonates and fluorinated carbonates. However, quite different IR spectra due to the PF 6 - anion interactions with the Na + and Li + cations were observed and were rationalized with the help of density functional theory (DFT) calculations that were also used to examine the relative free energies of solvates using cluster - continuum models. Ion-solvent distances for Na + were longer than Li + , and Na + had a greater tendency towards forming contact pairs compared to Li + in linear carbonate solvents. In tests of hard carbon Na-ion batteries, performance was not well correlated to Na + solvent preference, leading to the possibility that Na + solvent preference may play a reduced role in the passivation of anode surfaces and overall Na-ion battery performance.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of a lithium/sodium carbonate mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottochian, Alistar; Ricca, Chiara; Labat, Frederic; Adamo, Carlo

    2016-03-01

    The diffusion and ionic conductivity of Li x Na1-x CO3 salt mixtures were studied by means of Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, using the Janssen and Tissen model (Janssen and Tissen, Mol Simul 5:83-98; 1990). These salts have received particular attention due to their central role in fuel cells technology, and reliable numerical methods that could perform as important interpretative tool of experimental data are thus required but still lacking. The chosen computational model nicely reproduces the main structural behaviour of the pure Li2CO3, Na2CO3 and K2CO3 carbonates, but also of their Li/K and Li/Na mixtures. However, it fails to accurately describe dynamic properties such as activation energies of diffusion and conduction processes, outlining the need to develop more accurate models for the simulation of molten salt carbonates.

  5. The monitoring of oxygen, hydrogen and carbon in the sodium circuits of the PFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, L.; Morrison, N.S.; Robertson, C.M.; Trevillion, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The paper reviews the instrumentation available for monitoring oxygen, hydrogen, tritium and carbon impurity levels on the primary and secondary circuits of PFR. Circuit oxygen levels measured using electrochemical oxygen meters are compared to estimates from circuit plugging meters. The data are interpreted in the light of information from cold trap temperatures. Measurements of secondary circuit hydrogen levels using both the sodium and gas phase hydrogen detection equipment are compared to estimates of circuit hydrogen levels from plugging meters and variations in sodium phase hydrogen levels during power operation are discussed. (author)

  6. Effects of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate on yield and characteristics of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantarasuwan, C; Benjakul, S; Visessanguan, W

    2011-08-01

    Effects of sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) on yield and characteristics of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) were studied. Shrimp soaked in 2.5% NaCl containing both compounds at different levels of pH (5.5, 7, 8.5, 10 and 11.5) showed an increase in the weight gain and cooking yield and a reduced cooking loss as pH of solutions increased (p<0.05). Increases in pH and salt content in soaked shrimp muscle were obtained with increasing pH (p<0.05). Higher pH of soaking solution partially solubilized proteins in the muscle as well as carotenoproteins. pH of solutions above 8.5 led to the pronounced leaching of pigments, associated with the lowered redness of cooked shrimp. Shear force of raw and cooked shrimp continuously decreased as pH of solution increased (p<0.05). Solution containing 2.5% NaCl and 2.0% NaHCO3 (pH 8.5) was recommended for treatment of white shrimp as a promising alternative for phosphates to increase the yield and to lower cooking loss without any negative effect on sensory properties.

  7. Nitrate-dependent shoot sodium accumulation and osmotic functions of sodium in Arabidopsis under saline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Aragón, Rocío; Rodríguez-Navarro, Alonso

    2017-07-01

    Improving crop plants to be productive in saline soils or under irrigation with saline water would be an important technological advance in overcoming the food and freshwater crises that threaten the world population. However, even if the transformation of a glycophyte into a plant that thrives under seawater irrigation was biologically feasible, current knowledge about Na + effects would be insufficient to support this technical advance. Intriguingly, crucial details about Na + uptake and its function in the plant have not yet been well established. We here propose that under saline conditions two nitrate-dependent transport systems in series that take up and load Na + into the xylem constitute the major pathway for the accumulation of Na + in Arabidopsis shoots; this pathway can also function with chloride at high concentrations. In nrt1.1 nitrate transport mutants, plant Na + accumulation was partially defective, which suggests that NRT1.1 either partially mediates or modulates the nitrate-dependent Na + transport. Arabidopsis plants exposed to an osmotic potential of -1.0 MPa (400 mOsm) for 24 h showed high water loss and wilting in sorbitol or Na/MES, where Na + could not be accumulated. In contrast, in NaCl the plants that accumulated Na + lost a low amount of water, and only suffered transitory wilting. We discuss that in Arabidopsis plants exposed to high NaCl concentrations, root Na + uptake and tissue accumulation fulfil the primary function of osmotic adjustment, even if these processes lead to long-term toxicity. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Some observations on the carburization of type 316 stainless steel foil in a low carbon activity sodium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorley, A.W.; Jeffcoat, P.J.

    1982-01-01

    Work currently being undertaken to establish the equilibrium composition of carbides which form in stainless steel foils during their exposure to low carbon activity sodium environment is described. The time it takes the carbon to reach equilibrium during exposure to sodium of different carbon activity is discussed. The lowest carbon activity measureable in test loops where the sodium is just above carburizing to stainless steel is reported. Analytical techniques are used to determine the composition of the carbide and the austenite matrix and hence estimate the carbon activity of the equilibrium structure. This provides a comparison with carbon activity values determined by alternative methods such as the Harwell Carbon Meter and nickel tab techniques

  9. Effects of sodium carbonate pretreatment on the chemical compositions and enzymatic saccharification of rice straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linfeng; Cao, Jie; Jin, Yongcan; Chang, Hou-min; Jameel, Hasan; Phillips, Richard; Li, Zhongzheng

    2012-11-01

    The effects of sodium carbonate (Na(2)CO(3)) pretreatment on the chemical compositions and enzymatic saccharification of rice straw were investigated. The enzymatic digestibility of rice straw is enhanced after pretreatment since pretreated solids show significant delignification with high sugar availability. During pretreatment, an increasing temperature and Na(2)CO(3) charge leads to enhanced delignification, whereas an increased degradation of polysaccharides as well, of which xylan acts more susceptible than glucan. The sugar recovery of enzymatic hydrolysis goes up rapidly with the total titratable alkali (TTA) increasing from 0% to 8%, and then it reaches a plateau. The highest sugar recovery of rice straw after pretreatment, 71.7%, 73.2%, and 76.1% for total sugar, glucan, and xylan, respectively, is obtained at 140°C, TTA 8% and cellulase loading of 20 FPU/g-cellulose. In this condition, the corresponding delignification ratio of pretreated solid is 41.8%, while 95% of glucan and 76% of xylan are conserved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Some conditions affecting the definition of design basis accidents relating to sodium/water reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, P.R.

    1984-01-01

    The possible damaging effects of large sodium/water reactions on the steam generator, IHX and secondary circuit are considered. The conditions to be considered in defining the design basis accidents for these components are discussed, together with some of the assumptions that may be associated with design assessments of the scale of the accidents. (author)

  11. Inactivation of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus by Citric Acid and Sodium Carbonate with Deicers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jang-Kwan; You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Su-Mi; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Ko, Young-Joon; Seo, Min-Goo; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Byounghan

    2015-01-01

    Three out of five outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) since 2010 in the Republic of Korea have occurred in the winter. At the freezing temperatures, it was impossible to spray disinfectant on the surfaces of vehicles, roads, and farm premises because the disinfectant would be frozen shortly after discharge and the surfaces of the roads or machines would become slippery in cold weather. In this study, we added chemical deicers (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, sodium chloride, calcium chloride, ethyl alcohol, and commercial windshield washer fluid) to keep disinfectants (0.2% citric acid and 4% sodium carbonate) from freezing, and we tested their virucidal efficacies under simulated cold temperatures in a tube. The 0.2% citric acid could reduce the virus titer 4 logs at −20°C with all the deicers. On the other hand, 4% sodium carbonate showed little virucidal activity at −20°C within 30 min, although it resisted being frozen with the function of the deicers. In conclusion, for the winter season, we may recommend the use of citric acid (>0.2%) diluted in 30% ethyl alcohol or 25% sodium chloride solvent, depending on its purpose. PMID:26319879

  12. Inactivation of foot-and-mouth disease virus by citric acid and sodium carbonate with deicers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jang-Kwan; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Su-Mi; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Ko, Young-Joon; Seo, Min-Goo; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Byounghan

    2015-11-01

    Three out of five outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) since 2010 in the Republic of Korea have occurred in the winter. At the freezing temperatures, it was impossible to spray disinfectant on the surfaces of vehicles, roads, and farm premises because the disinfectant would be frozen shortly after discharge and the surfaces of the roads or machines would become slippery in cold weather. In this study, we added chemical deicers (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, sodium chloride, calcium chloride, ethyl alcohol, and commercial windshield washer fluid) to keep disinfectants (0.2% citric acid and 4% sodium carbonate) from freezing, and we tested their virucidal efficacies under simulated cold temperatures in a tube. The 0.2% citric acid could reduce the virus titer 4 logs at -20°C with all the deicers. On the other hand, 4% sodium carbonate showed little virucidal activity at -20°C within 30 min, although it resisted being frozen with the function of the deicers. In conclusion, for the winter season, we may recommend the use of citric acid (>0.2%) diluted in 30% ethyl alcohol or 25% sodium chloride solvent, depending on its purpose. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Eliminating radium from uranium mill acid effluent with barium chloride-sodium carbonate precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Jiayuan

    1998-01-01

    The eliminating radium procedure, barium chloride-sodium carbonate-sand filtering, being used, radium can be eliminated to 3.7 x 10 -2 Bq/L order of magnitude from uranium mill acid effluents which contain 3.7 Bq/L Ra and pH 6∼9 when Ba 2+ is added by 3∼5 mg per litre, Na 2 CO 3 5mg. The radium elimination rate is more than 90%

  14. One-step microwave synthesis of photoluminescent carbon nanoparticles from sodium dextran sulfate water solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokorina, Alina A.; Goryacheva, Irina Y.; Sapelkin, Andrei V.; Sukhorukov, Gleb B.

    2018-04-01

    Photoluminescent (PL) carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) have been synthesized by one-step microwave irradiation from water solution of sodium dextran sulfate (DSS) as the sole carbon source. Microwave (MW) method is very simple and cheap and it provides fast synthesis of CNPs. We have varied synthesis time for obtaining high luminescent CNPs. The synthesized CNPs exhibit excitation-dependent photoluminescent. Final CNPs water solution has a blue- green luminescence. CNPs have low cytotoxicity, good photostability and can be potentially suitable candidates for bioimaging, analysis or analytical tests.

  15. Room temperature synthesis of glycerol carbonate catalyzed by spray dried sodium aluminate microspheres

    OpenAIRE

    Sreerangappa, Ramesh; Debecker, Damien P.

    2017-01-01

    Nanostructured NaAlO2 microspheres are produced from an aqueous solution, by a one-pot spray drying route. The obtained solids are composed of spherical aggregates of sodium aluminate with small crystallite size and strong surface basicity. This makes them highly active catalysts in the base-catalyzed synthesis of glycerol carbonate from glycerol and dimethyl carbonate. The new catalyst does not leach and is recyclable. NaAlO2 microspheres outcompete commercially available NaAlO2 as well as o...

  16. Recent Progress in Design of Biomass-Derived Hard Carbons for Sodium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Górka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sodium ion batteries (SIBs have attracted lots of attention over last few years due to the abundance and wide availability of sodium resources, making SIBs the most cost-effective alternative to the currently used lithium ion batteries (LIBs. Many efforts are underway to find effective anodes for SIBs since the commercial anode for LIBs, graphite, has shown very limited capacity for SIBs. Among many different types of carbons, hard carbons—especially these derived from biomass—hold a great deal of promise for SIB technology thanks to their constantly improving performance and low cost. The main scope of this mini-review is to present current progress in preparation of negative electrodes from biomass including aspects related to precursor types used and their impact on the final carbon characteristics (structure, texture and composition. Another aspect discussed is how certain macro- and microstructure characteristics of the materials translate to their performance as anode for Na-ion batteries. In the last part, current understanding of factors governing sodium insertion into hard carbons is summarized, specifically those that could help solve existing performance bottlenecks such as irreversible capacity, initial low Coulombic efficiency and poor rate performance.

  17. Clinical findings and effect of sodium hydrogen carbonate in patients with glutathione synthetase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Mehmet; Ünal, Özlem; Kavurt, Sumru; Türk, Emrecan; Mungan, Neslihan Önenli

    2016-04-01

    Glutathione synthetase (GS) deficiency is a rare inborn error of glutathione (GSH) metabolism manifested by severe metabolic acidosis, hemolytic anemia, neurological problems and massive excretion of pyroglutamic acid (5-oxoproline) in the urine. The disorder has mild, moderate, and severe clinical variants. We aimed to report clinical and laboratory findings of four patients, effect of sodium hydrogen carbonate treatment and long-term follow up of three patients. Urine organic acid analysis was performed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Molecular genetic analysis was performed in three patients, mutation was found in two of them. Enzyme analysis was performed in one patient. Clinical and laboratory findings of four patients were evaluated. One patient died at 4 months old, one patient's growth and development are normal, two patients have developed intellectual disability and seizures in the long term follow up period. Three patients benefited from sodium hydrogen carbonate treatment. The clinical picture varies from patient to patient, so it is difficult to predict the prognosis and the effectiveness of treatment protocols. We reported long term follow up of four patients and demonstrated that sodium hydrogen carbonate is effective for treatment of chronic metabolic acidosis in GS deficieny.

  18. Integrated carbon nanospheres arrays as anode materials for boosted sodium ion storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangjia Tang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing cost-effective advanced carbon anode is critical for innovation of sodium ion batteries. Herein, we develop a powerful combined method for rational synthesis of free-standing binder-free carbon nanospheres arrays via chemical bath plus hydrothermal process. Impressively, carbon spheres with diameters of 150–250 nm are randomly interconnected with each other forming highly porous arrays. Positive advantages including large porosity, high surface and strong mechanical stability are combined in the carbon nanospheres arrays. The obtained carbon nanospheres arrays are tested as anode material for sodium ion batteries (SIBs and deliver a high reversible capacity of 102 mAh g−1 and keep a capacity retention of 95% after 100 cycles at a current density of 0.25 A g−1 and good rate performance (65 mAh g−1 at a high current density of 2 A g−1. The good electrochemical performance is attributed to the stable porous nanosphere structure with fast ion/electron transfer characteristics.

  19. Effect of ion concentrations on uranium absorption from sodium carbonate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traut, D.E.; El Hazek, N.M.T.; Palmer, G.R.; Nichols, I.L.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of various ion concentrations on uranium absorption from a sodium carbonate solution by a strong-base, anion resin was investigated in order to help assure an adequate uranium supply for future needs. The studies were conducted to improve the recovery of uranium from in situ leach solutions by ion exchange. The effects of carbonate, bicarbonate, chloride, and sulfate ions were examined. Relatively low (less than 5 g/l) concentrations of chloride, sulfate, and bicarbonate were found to be detrimental to the absorption of uranium. High (greater than 10 g/l) carbonate concentrations also adversely affected the uranium absorption. In addition, the effect of initial resin form was investigated in tests of the chloride, carbonate, and bicarbonate forms; resin form was shown to have no effect on the absorption of uranium

  20. High quality bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass over alumina-supported sodium carbonate

    KAUST Repository

    Imran, Ali; Bramer, Eddy A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Brem, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    Performance of a novel alumina-supported sodium carbonate catalyst was studied to produce a valuable bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass. Post treatment of biomass pyrolysis vapor was investigated in a catalyst fixed

  1. Heat transfer in a sodium-to-sodium heat exchanger under conditions of combined force and free convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.D.; Axcell, B.P.; Johnston, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical investigation of heat transfer in a vertical tube and annulus, countercurrent flow heat exchanger is reported. The working fluid was liquid sodium. Included in the range of conditions covered were those which are of interest in connection with the low flow rate operation of fast reactor intermediate heat exchanger systems. The heat transfer process ranged from that of pure forced convection to combined forced and free convection. By changing the direction of fluid flow or the direction of heat flow four different configurations were studied. In two cases the convection process was buoyancy aided and in the other two it was buoyancy opposed. Results are presented showing the influence of flow rate and temperature difference on overall heat transfer coefficient for each case. A theoretical model of turbulent flow and heat transfer incorporating influences of buoyancy was used to produce results for the range of conditions covered in the experiments. The predictions of overall heat transfer coefficient were found to be in reasonable general agreement with the measurements. It was clear from these calculations that the influence of buoyancy on heat transfer stemmed largely, under the conditions of the present experiment, from the modification of the convection process due to the distortion of the velocity field. This led to an enhancement of the heat transfer for the buoyancy-aided process and an impairment for the buoyancy-opposed process. The contribution of the turbulent diffusion of heat was relatively small. (author)

  2. Comparison of the use of sodium carbonate (washing soda crystals) and apomorphine for inducing emesis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, E; Hosgood, G; Smart, L

    2016-12-01

    To describe the use of sodium carbonate and apomorphine in a historical cohort of dogs, compare the occurrence of emesis and report any adverse effects recorded. This historical, observational study included information from medical records of dogs that received an emetic agent. The occurrence of emesis with apomorphine or sodium carbonate was calculated and the association between emesis and agent was explored, with the odds ratio and 95% confidence interval (CI) reported. A non-inferiority analysis of the occurrence of emesis for sodium carbonate was performed against an equivalence range of ±7% of the estimated occurrence of emesis with apomorphine. Owners were emailed a short survey about their dog's health after their visit to the hospital for induced emesis. Records for 787 dogs seen from January 2007 to December 2013 were included. For apomorphine, 382/392 dogs showed emesis (97%, 95% CI 95-100%). For sodium carbonate, 320/395 dogs showed emesis (81%, 95% CI 77-85%), which fell below the equivalence range for apomorphine (97 ± 7%, 90-100%) and was considered inferior. The odds ratio of emesis with apomorphine to sodium carbonate was 9.0 (95% CI 4.6-17.6). Of 18 responses to the survey, 5 reported abnormalities after emesis (3 with sodium carbonate, 2 with apomorphine). The occurrence of emesis with sodium carbonate was high but inferior to apomorphine. However, the advantages of sodium carbonate, including less expense and ease of accession compared with apomorphine, make it a viable choice in emergency medicine. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  3. A study of ideal conditions for sodium purification in diffusion type cold trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, L.M.

    1993-08-01

    The ideal conditions for sodium purification in diffusion type cold traps are studied. It is known that the temperature profile along axial direction (x) of the trap must follow the condition (∂ T/∂ x) 2 ≤ 0 , in order to avoid crystals deposition on the wall and the consequent premature plugging. In the present work it is showed that (∂ T/∂ x) 2 ≤ 0 condition is necessary but not sufficient. A temperature profile which satisfies both conditions is found and its practical obtention is presented. (L.C.J.A.)

  4. [Effect of sodium carbonate assisted hydrothermal process on heavy metals stabilization in medical waste incinerator fly ash].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian; Li, Xiao-dong; Chi, Yong; Yan, Jian-hua

    2010-04-01

    A sodium carbonate assisted hydrothermal process was induced to stabilize the fly ash from medical waste incinerator. The results showed that sodium carbonate assisted hydrothermal process reduced the heavy metals leachability of fly ash, and the heavy metal waste water from the process would not be a secondary pollution. The leachability of heavy metals studied in this paper were Cd 1.97 mg/L, Cr 1.56 mg/L, Cu 2.56 mg/L, Mn 17.30 mg/L, Ni 1.65 mg/L, Pb 1.56 mg/L and Zn 189.00 mg/L, and after hydrothermal process with the optimal experimental condition (Na2CO3/fly ash dosage = 5/20, reaction time = 8 h, L/S ratio = 10/1) the leachability reduced to < 0.02 mg/L for Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and 0.05 mg/L for Zn, according to GB 5085.3-2007. Meanwhile, the concentrations of heavy metals in effluent after hydrothermal process were less than 0.8 mg/L. The heavy metals leachability and concentration in effluent reduced with prolonged reaction time. Prolonged aging can affect the leachability of metals as solids become more crystalline, and heavy metals transferred inside of crystalline. The mechanism of heavy metal stabilization can be concluded to the co precipitation and adsorption effect of aluminosilicates formation, crystallization and aging process.

  5. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride under sulfate reducing conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Best, Jappe H. de; Salminen, E.; Doddema, Hans J.; Janssen, Dick B.; Harder, Wim

    1998-01-01

    The removal of carbon tetrachloride under sulfate reducing conditions was studied in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor. Carbon tetrachloride, up to a concentration of 30 µM, was completely converted. Chloroform and dichloromethane were the main transformation products, but part of the carbon

  6. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride under sulfate reducing conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Best, JH; Salminen, E; Doddema, HJ; Janssen, DB; Harder, W

    1997-01-01

    The removal of carbon tetrachloride under sulfate reducing conditions was studied in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor. Carbon tetrachloride, up to a concentration of 30 mu M, was completely converted. Chloroform and dichloromethane were the main transformation products, but part of the carbon

  7. Inhibition effect of fatty amides with secondary compound on carbon steel corrosion in hydrodynamic condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, I. M.; Jai, J.; Daud, M.; Hashim, Md A.

    2018-03-01

    The inhibition effect demonstrates an increase in the inhibition performance in presence of a secondary compound in the inhibited solution. This study introduces fatty amides as corrosion inhibitor and oxygen scavenger, namely, sodium sulphite as a secondary compound. The main objective is to determine the synergistic inhibition effect of a system by using fatty amides together with sodium sulphite in hydrodynamic condition. The synergistic inhibition of fatty amides and sodium sulphite on corrosion of carbon steel in 3.5 wt% sodium chloride solution had been studied using linear polarization resistance method and scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Electrochemical measurement was carried out using rotating cylinder electrode at different flow regimes (static, laminar, transition and turbulent). Linear polarization resistance experiments showed the changes in polarization resistance when the rotation speed increased. It found that, by addition of fatty amides together with sodium sulphite in test solution, the inhibition efficiency increased when rotation speed increased. The results collected from LPR experiment correlated with results from SEM-EDX. The results showed inhibition efficiency of system was enhanced when fatty amides and oxygen scavengers were present together.

  8. Sodium phthalamates as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel in aqueous hydrochloric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, Eugenio A.; Olivares, Octavio; Likhanova, Natalya V.; Dominguez-Aguilar, Marco A.; Nava, Noel; Guzman-Lucero, Diego; Corrales, Monica

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → N-Alkyl-sodium phthalamates as corrosion inhibitors for industry in acidic medium. → Compounds behaved as mixed type inhibitors and followed Langmuir adsorption isotherm. → Efficiencies were proportional to aliphatic chain length and inhibitor concentration. → Iron complexes and chelates with phthalamates contributed to carbon steel protection. - Abstract: Three compounds of N-alkyl-sodium phthalamates were synthesized and tested as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel in 0.5 M aqueous hydrochloric acid. Tests showed that inhibitor efficiencies were related to aliphatic chain length and dependent on concentration. N-1-n-tetradecyl-sodium phthalamate displayed moderate efficiency against uniform corrosion, 42-86% at 25 deg. C and 25-60% at 40 o C. Tests indicated that compounds behave as mixed type inhibitors where molecular adsorption on steel followed Langmuir isotherm, whereas thermodynamic suggested that a physisorption process occurred. XPS analysis confirmed film formation on surface, where Fe +2 complexes and Fe +2 chelates with phthalamates prevented steel from further corrosion.

  9. An Evaluation of Carbon Steel Corrosion Under Stagnant Seawater Conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Jason

    2004-01-01

    Corrosion, of 1020 carbon steel coupons in, natural seawater over a six-month period was more aggressive under stagnant anaerobic conditions than stagnant aerobic conditions as measured by weight loss...

  10. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of sodium and potassium cyanide as a forensic signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, Helen W; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Janszen, Derek B; Carman, April

    2012-01-01

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. Upon analysis, a few of the cyanide samples displayed nonhomogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of the 65 cyanide samples, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Tests of a sodium bonded type control element of 'Monju' with the actual conditions. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Jungo; Tanaka, Masako; Ikarimoto, Iwao

    2004-03-01

    This report provides a summary of the following three experimental and analytical results conducted on the sodium bonded double porous-plug type control element: the pretest of retention of the absorber in the double C-type shroud tube (the ASMI test); the stress analysis of the double C-type shroud tube; and the long-term submersion test of the sodium bonded type control element. The objective of the ASMI test and the stress analysis is to define the shroud tube's bottom structure. First, simulating the absorber shroud mechanical interaction (ASMI), we checked the function of absorber holding of the double C-type shroud tube. Second, we conducted the stress analysis, changing the distance between the end plug of the tube and the bottom end of the absorber, to determine proper position of the absorber. In addition, we conducted the long-term submersion test of the control element on which sodium residues had been left, and confirmed that no trouble occurred even though the element was submerged for a long time. The results of the above tests and analysis are as follows: (1) On the conditions that the end plug of the shroud tube was fitted from outside of the double C-type shroud tube was double-layered, we checked through the ASMI test that no absorber leaked and the holding property was secured even though the absorber be powdery. (2) The stress analysis showed that the structural integrity was satisfied when the distance between the end plug of the tube and the bottom end of the absorber was 40 mm or longer, and that the stress in the shroud tube was within the elastic range when the distance was 50 mm or longer. From these results, we could assure the structure integrity of 50 mm distance case. (3) The result of the long-term submersion test showed that no trouble occurred when the sodium bonded type control rod assembly (control element) is stored under water with sodium residues after cleaning in the sodium cleansing facility, the temperature increase and the

  12. Synthesis of carbon-13 and carbon-14 labeled paldimycin tri-sodium salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsi, R.S.P.; Witz, D.F.; Visser, J.; Stolle, W.T.; Ditto, C.L.

    1989-01-01

    Carbon-14 labeled paldimycin trisodium salt was prepared by addition of N-acetyl-L-cysteine to [ 14 C]paulomycin, the radioactive antibiotic produced by fermentation of Streptomyces paulus in the presence of L-methionine labeled with carbon-14 in the S-methyl group. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of paulomycin produced when the fermentation was carried out in the presence of L-[S-methyl- 13 C]methionine showed that the isotope incorporation had occurred specifically at the methoxy group of ring C, i.e., the 2-deoxy sugar portion of paulomycin. With sustained slow feed of labeled precursors during the optimum antibiotic production period, carbon-14 isotope yields of up to 17.5% with specific activity of up to 11.4 μCi per milligram of paulomycin, and carbon-13 isotope yields of up to 24% with 17-fold isotope enrichment over natural abundance, were achieved. (author)

  13. Reduction of deoxynivalenol in barley by treatment with aqueous sodium carbonate and heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, David; House, James D; Nyachoti, C Martin

    2005-11-01

    Naturally contaminated lots of Canadian barley containing either 18.4 or 4.3 microg/g deoxynivalenol (DON) were heated at 80 degrees C, with small amounts of water or 1 M sodium carbonate solution to study the rate of DON reduction. Samples were heated in sealed polypropylene containers for periods of up to 8 days. In the 18.4 microg/g DON barley, rapid reductions were observed: with no solutions added, DON declined to 14.7 microg/g after 1 day, and to 4.9 microg/g after 8 days solely due to heat; with water at 10 mL/100 g barley, DON levels reached 3.7 microg/g after 8 days; with 1 M sodium carbonate solution added at 10 mL/100 g barley, DON declined to 4.7 microg/g after 1 day, and to 0.4 microg/g after 8 days; with 20 mL/100 g barley, DON declined to 1.4 microg/g after 1 day and to near-zero levels after 8 days. In the 4.3 microg/g DON barley, more gradual reductions were evident: with no solutions added, DON declined to 2.9 microg/g after 8 days solely due to heat; with water at 10 mL/100 g barley, DON levels reached 2.3 microg/g after 8 days; with 1 M sodium carbonate solution added at 10 mL/100 g barley, DON declined to 2.7 microg/g after 1 day, and to near-zero levels after 8 days; with 20 mL/100 g barley, DON declined to 1.4 microg/g after 1 day and to near-zero levels after 3, 5 and 8 days.

  14. Synthesis of carbon-14-labeled sodium palmoxirate and its coenzyme A ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaner, L.E.; Hoerr, D.C.

    1986-04-01

    Synthetic procedures for the preparation of carbon-14-labeled sodium palmoxirate (TDGA), labeled either in the carboxyl position or in the tetradecyl hydrocarbon chain, are described. In addition, the synthesis of the coenzyme A ester of TDGA-14C with a specific activity of 51 mCi/mmol is reported. The coenzyme A ester was prepared by formation of the acyl chloride with oxalyl chloride followed by reaction with coenzyme A (CoA) in a borate-buffered tetrahydrofuran solution. Purification methods and analytical and stability data are reported for the compounds.

  15. Reactive extraction of carboxylic acids from apolar hydrocarbons using aqueous solutions of sodium hydrogen carbonate with back-recovery using carbon dioxide under pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuzmanovic, B.; Kuipers, N.J.M.; de Haan, A.B.; Kwant, Gerard

    2005-01-01

    A combination of using an aqueous solution of sodium hydrogen carbonate for forward-extraction of carboxylic acids from a dilute apolar organic solvent, and carbon dioxide under pressure for its back-recovery, is studied. Used in combination, these two steps might provide a technique for the

  16. The Effect of DNA and Sodium Cholate Dispersed Single-Walled Carbon Nano tubes on the Green Algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.M.; Cox, Z.; Dolash, B.D.; Sooter, L.J.; Williams, R.M.; Taylor, H.K.; Thomas, J.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing use of single-walled carbon nano tubes (SWCNTs) will lead to their increased release into the environment. Previous work has shown negative effects of SWCNT on growth and survival of model organisms. The aim of the current study was to determine the effect of SWCNT well-dispersed by either DNA or sodium cholate (SC) on the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in stagnant water conditions. Growth measurements were taken up to ten days for algae treated with varied levels of DNA:SWCNT or SC:SWCNT or controls, and chlorophyll content after 10 days was determined. Results show no effect on either growth or chlorophyll content of algae at any concentration or duration. This is in contradiction to prior work showing toxicity of SWCNT to environmental model organisms.

  17. Scalable and sustainable synthesis of carbon microspheres via a purification-free strategy for sodium-ion capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijie; Wang, Rutao; Zhang, Yabin; Jin, Dongdong; Zhang, Li

    2018-03-01

    Sodium-based energy storage receives a great deal of interest due to the virtually inexhaustible sodium reserve, while the scalable and sustainable strategies to synthesize carbon-based materials with suitable interlayer spaces and large sodium storage capacities are yet to be fully investigated. Carbon microspheres, with regular geometry, non-graphitic characteristic, and stable nature are promising candidates, yet the synthetic methods are usually complex and energy consuming. In this regard, we report a scalable purification-free strategy to synthesize carbon microspheres directly from 5 species of fresh juice. As-synthesized carbon microspheres exhibit dilated interlayer distance of 0.375 nm and facilitate Na+ uptake and release. For example, such carbon microsphere anodes have a specific capacity of 183.9 mAh g-1 at 50 mA g-1 and exhibit ultra-stability (99.0% capacity retention) after 10000 cycles. Moreover, via facile activation, highly porous carbon microsphere cathodes are fabricated and show much higher energy density at high rate than commercial activated carbon. Coupling the compelling anodes and cathodes above, novel sodium-ion capacitors show the high working potential up to 4.0 V, deliver a maximum energy density of 52.2 Wh kg-1, and exhibit an acceptable capacity retention of 85.7% after 2000 cycles.

  18. Passivation condition of carbon steel in bentonite/sand mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Naoki; Kawakami, Susumu

    2002-03-01

    It is essential to understand the corrosion type of carbon steel under the repository conditions for the lifetime assessment of carbon steel overpack used for geological isolation of high-level radioactive waste. According to the previous study, carbon steel is hard to passivate in buffer material assuming a chemical condition range of groundwater in Japan. However, concrete support will be constructed around the overpack in the case of repository in the soft rock system and groundwater having a higher pH may infiltrate to buffer material. There is a possibility that the corrosion type of carbon steel will be influenced by the rise of the pH in groundwater. In this study, anodic polarization experiments were performed to understand the passivation condition of carbon steel in buffer material saturated with water contacted with concrete. An ordinary concrete an a low-alkalinity concrete were used in the experiment. The results of the experiments showed that the carbon steel can passivate under the condition that water having pH > 13 infiltrate to the buffer material assuming present property of buffer material. If the low-alkalinity concrete is selected as the support material, passivation can not occur on carbon steel overpack. The effect of the factors of buffer material such as dry density and mixing ratio of sand on the passivation of carbon steel was also studied. The results of the study showed that the present property of buffer material is enough to prevent passivation of carbon steel. (author)

  19. Hydrogen substituted graphdiyne as carbon-rich flexible electrode for lithium and sodium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianjiang; Wang, Ning; Cui, Zili; Du, Huiping; Fu, Lin; Huang, Changshui; Yang, Ze; Shen, Xiangyan; Yi, Yuanping; Tu, Zeyi; Li, Yuliang

    2017-10-27

    Organic electrodes are potential alternatives to current inorganic electrode materials for lithium ion and sodium ion batteries powering portable and wearable electronics, in terms of their mechanical flexibility, function tunability and low cost. However, the low capacity, poor rate performance and rapid capacity degradation impede their practical application. Here, we concentrate on the molecular design for improved conductivity and capacity, and favorable bulk ion transport. Through an in situ cross-coupling reaction of triethynylbenzene on copper foil, the carbon-rich frame hydrogen substituted graphdiyne film is fabricated. The organic film can act as free-standing flexible electrode for both lithium ion and sodium ion batteries, and large reversible capacities of 1050 mAh g -1 for lithium ion batteries and 650 mAh g -1 for sodium ion batteries are achieved. The electrode also shows a superior rate and cycle performances owing to the extended π-conjugated system, and the hierarchical pore bulk with large surface area.

  20. Amorphous Red Phosphorus Embedded in Sandwiched Porous Carbon Enabling Superior Sodium Storage Performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Liu, Zheng; Zhong, Xiongwu; Cheng, Xiaolong; Fan, Zhuangjun; Yu, Yan

    2018-03-01

    The red P anode for sodium ion batteries has attracted great attention recently due to the high theoretical capacity, but the poor intrinsic electronic conductivity and large volume expansion restrain its widespread applications. Herein, the red P is successfully encapsulated into the cube shaped sandwich-like interconnected porous carbon building (denoted as P@C-GO/MOF-5) via the vaporization-condensation method. Superior cycling stability (high capacity retention of about 93% at 2 A g -1 after 100 cycles) and excellent rate performance (502 mAh g -1 at 10 A g -1 ) can be obtained for the P@C-GO/MOF-5 electrode. The superior electrochemical performance can be ascribed to the successful incorporation of red P into the unique carbon matrix with large surface area and pore volume, interconnected porous structure, excellent electronic conductivity and superior structural stability. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. EFFECTS OF SODIUM AND CALCIUM IN LIGNITE ON THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON PRODUCTS; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwin S. Olson; Kurt E. Eylands; Daniel J. Stepan

    2001-01-01

    New federal drinking water regulations have been promulgated to restrict the levels of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in finished public water supplies. DBPs are suspected carcinogens and are formed when organic material is partially oxidized by disinfectants commonly used in the water treatment industry. Additional federal mandates are expected in the near future that will also affect public water suppliers with respect to DBPs. These new federal drinking water regulations may require public water suppliers to adjust treatment practices or incorporate additional treatment operations into their existing treatment trains. Many options have been identified, including membrane processes, granular activated carbon, powered activated carbon (PAC), enhanced coagulation and/or softening, and alternative disinfectants (e.g., chlorine dioxide, ozone, and chloramines). Of the processes being considered, PAC appears to offer an attractive benefit-to-cost advantage for many water treatment plants, particularly small systems (those serving fewer than 10,000 customers). PAC has traditionally been used by the water treatment industry for the removal of compounds contributing to taste and odor problems. PAC also has the potential to remove naturally occurring organic matter (NOM) from raw waters prior to disinfection, thus controlling the formation of regulated DBPs. Many small water systems are currently using PAC for taste and odor control and have the potential to use PAC for controlling DBPs. Activated carbons can be produced from a variety of raw materials, including wood, peat, coconut husks, and numerous types of coal. The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been working on the development of a PAC product to remove NOM from surface water supplies to prevent the formation of carcinogenic DBPs during chlorination. During that study, the sodium and calcium content of the lignites showed a significant effect on the sorption capacity of the activated carbon

  2. Measurement of carbon activity in sodium by Fe-Mn 20% alloy, and by strainless austenitic steel 304L and 316L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberlin, C.; Saint Paul, P.; Baque, P.; Champeix, L.

    1980-01-01

    Precise knowledge of carbon activity in sodium used as coolant in fast breeder reactors, is essential for continuous survey of carburization-decarburization processes. Carbon activity can be periodically surveyed by measuring the carbon concentration or by hot trap like metal alloy strip placed in sodium loop. In fact, in equilibrium, activity of carbon in sodium is equal to the activity in metal alloy. Thus if the relation between concentration of carbon and it activity in the alloy is known, it is possible to estimate the activity of carbon in sodium. Materials to be used should have high solubility in carbon at the needed temperature. They should quickly attain equilibrium with sodium and they should not contain impurities that can affect the results. Materials chosen according to these criteria were Fe-Mn 20%, stainless austenitic steel AISI 304L and 316L

  3. Study of the ideal vitrification conditions of sodium containing waste after oxidation on a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitfour, B.; Rahier, A.

    1997-08-01

    The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN has patented a new process for the treatment of metallic sodium. This process is fully integrated since it allows to vitrify easily the mixture resulting from the oxidation step. To ensure the link between the treatment and the conditioning, the vitrification conditions have been studied. It is confirmed that an adequate control of the temperature decrease during the vitrification is essential to obtain a product whose area is well known and controlled. Also, the release of Cs and Co has been examined through leaching tests. The study has led to the choice of adequate composition ranges for SiO 2 , Na 2 O, Al 2 O 3 , B 2 O 3 and CaO. Further studies will be carried out to assess the possible use of vitro-crystalline materials for long term conditioning. vitro-crystalline materials for long term conditioning

  4. Solution chemistry of carbonate minerals and its effects on the flotation of hematite with sodium oleate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Yin, Wan-zhong; Xue, Ji-wei; Yao, Jin; Fu, Ya-feng; Liu, Qi

    2017-07-01

    The effects of carbonate minerals (dolomite and siderite) on the flotation of hematite using sodium oleate as a collector were investigated through flotation tests, supplemented by dissolution measurements, solution chemistry calculations, zeta-potential measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. The results of flotation tests show that the presence of siderite or dolomite reduced the recovery of hematite and that the inhibiting effects of dolomite were stronger. Dissolution measurements, solution chemistry calculations, and flotation tests confirmed that both the cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) and CO3 2- ions dissolved from dolomite depressed hematite flotation, whereas only the CO3 2- ions dissolved from siderite were responsible for hematite depression. The zeta-potential, FTIR spectroscopic, and XPS analyses indicated that Ca2+, Mg2+, and CO3 2- (HCO3 -) could adsorb onto the hematite surface, thereby hindering the adsorption of sodium oleate, which was the main reason for the inhibiting effects of carbonate minerals on hematite flotation.

  5. Studies on the kinetics of UO2 dissolution in carbonate-bicarbonate medium using sodium hypochlorite as oxidant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, J.N.; Bhattacharya, K.; Swami, R.G.; Tangri, S.K.; Mukherjee, T.K.

    1996-01-01

    The dissolution of UO 2 in carbonate-bicarbonate solutions containing sodium hypochlorite as an oxidant has been investigated. The effect of temperature, sodium hypochlorite concentration and stirring speed was examined. In the temperature range of 303 to 318 K, the leaching reaction displayed linear kinetics. Apparent activation energy obtained from the differential approach was found to be 57 kJ mol -1 . This relatively high activation energy value indicates a chemically controlled behavior of UO 2 dissolution. The order of reaction with respect to sodium hypochlorite concentration was found to be unity. (author). 18 refs., 6 figs

  6. Manipulating Adsorption-Insertion Mechanisms in Nanostructured Carbon Materials for High-Efficiency Sodium Ion Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Shen [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Hubei Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Power Sources, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 China; Xiao, Lifen [College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 China; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Sushko, Maria L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Han, Kee Sung [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Shao, Yuyan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Yan, Mengyu [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 China; Liang, Xinmiao [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Science, Wuhan 430071 China; Mai, Liqiang [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 China; Feng, Jiwen [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Science, Wuhan 430071 China; Cao, Yuliang [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Hubei Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Power Sources, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 China; Ai, Xinping [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Hubei Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Power Sources, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 China; Yang, Hanxi [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Hubei Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Power Sources, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 China; Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2017-05-12

    Hard carbon is one of the most promising anode materials for sodium-ion batteries, but the low coulombic efficiency is still a key barrier. In this paper we synthesized a series of nanostructured hard carbon materials with controlled architectures. Using a combination of in-situ XRD mapping, ex-situ NMR, EPR, electrochemical techniques and simulations, an “adsorption-intercalation” (A-I) mechanism is established for Na ion storage. During the initial stages of Na insertion, Na ions adsorb on the defect sites of hard carbon with a wide adsorption energy distribution, producing a sloping voltage profile. In the second stage, Na ions intercalate into graphitic layers with suitable spacing to form NaCx compounds similar to the Li ion intercalation process in graphite, producing a flat low voltage plateau. The cation intercalation with a flat voltage plateau should be enhanced and the sloping region should be avoided. Guided by this knowledge, non-porous hard carbon material has been developed which has achieved high reversible capacity and coulombic efficiency to fulfill practical application.

  7. Selfwelding, friction and wear behaviour of special materials in sodium under corroding conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstedt, H.U.; Mattes, K.; Wild, E.

    1975-11-01

    Control rod guides and fuel element duct load pads have to be fabricated from materials exhibiting optimum slide behaviour. Galling or self-welding under static conditions should not be tolerated. Given bearing clearances have to be maintained constant and loop contamination, caused by wear particles, have to be prevented. Since high friction between contacting pads may impose severe limitations on core compaction, for the duct load pads a maximum friction coefficient of 0.5 is acceptable. The effect of sodium corrosion should not impair the friction and wear behaviour of the materials applied. This report covers the work performed to optain appropriate mechanical design data. (orig.) [de

  8. Application of sodium carbonate prevents sulphur poisoning of catalysts in automated total mercury analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLagan, David S.; Huang, Haiyong; Lei, Ying D.; Wania, Frank; Mitchell, Carl P. J.

    2017-07-01

    Analysis of high sulphur-containing samples for total mercury content using automated thermal decomposition, amalgamation, and atomic absorption spectroscopy instruments (USEPA Method 7473) leads to rapid and costly SO2 poisoning of catalysts. In an effort to overcome this issue, we tested whether the addition of powdered sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) to the catalyst and/or directly on top of sample material increases throughput of sulphur-impregnated (8-15 wt%) activated carbon samples per catalyst tube. Adding 5 g of Na2CO3 to the catalyst alone only marginally increases the functional lifetime of the catalyst (31 ± 4 g of activated carbon analyzed per catalyst tube) in relation to unaltered catalyst of the AMA254 total mercury analyzer (17 ± 4 g of activated carbon). Adding ≈ 0.2 g of Na2CO3 to samples substantially increases (81 ± 17 g of activated carbon) catalyst life over the unaltered catalyst. The greatest improvement is achieved by adding Na2CO3 to both catalyst and samples (200 ± 70 g of activated carbon), which significantly increases catalyst performance over all other treatments and enables an order of magnitude greater sample throughput than the unaltered samples and catalyst. It is likely that Na2CO3 efficiently sequesters SO2, even at high furnace temperatures to produce Na2SO4 and CO2, largely negating the poisonous impact of SO2 on the catalyst material. Increased corrosion of nickel sampling boats resulting from this methodological variation is easily resolved by substituting quartz boats. Overall, this variation enables an efficient and significantly more affordable means of employing automated atomic absorption spectrometry instruments for total mercury analysis of high-sulphur matrices.

  9. Early Jurassic Carbon and Sodium Sequestration in a CAMP basalt flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, K. A.; Puffer, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    The initial HTQ-type CAMP Orange Mountain Basalt flow, as well as related pillowed flows and the overlying Preakness flows, locally underwent substantial and well documented albitization, chloritization, and sulphate, carbonate, and zeolite mineralization. Layers representing at least 25 vol % of the Orange Mountain Basalt have undergone a major net increase in sodium and carbon content and a major redistribution of magnesium and calcium. Most alteration occurred during the development of a widespread early Jurassic geothermal system similar to the active system of Iceland. In both cases alteration was controlled by active circulation of basin brines through vesicular layers during rapid burial at temperatures that were kept elevated by recurring magmatism. Whole rock Na2O levels typically increased from 2.2 wt. % in unaltered layers to 3.2 wt. % in vesicular layers, and commonly reached levels exceeding 5 wt. %. The environmental implications of the removal of such massive amounts of sodium from the geothermal system on the chlorine budget and the salt content of Early Jurassic lakes are currently being evaluated. Massive amounts of carbon sequestration from the geothermal system may have mitigated an increased burden on the early Jurassic atmosphere where geothermal CO2 may have otherwise been vented at hot springs or solfataras. Calcite amygdules typically account for 5 to 10 vol. % of the vesiculated layers amounting to 66 to 132 kg of CO2 per m3 of basalt. If 25 vol. % of the 160 thick Orange Mountain Basalt is vesiculated that would equate to about 2640 to 5280 kg of CO2 per m2 of basalt. The full extent of calcite enrichment across the entire CAMP province, however, has not yet been determined.

  10. Turning into carbonate the residual sodium left in BN-350 circuits may alleviate concerns over their long term safe confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmani, L

    2000-01-01

    After the coolant is drained from the reactor vessel and from the primary and secondary circuits of the BN-350 nuclear power plant, what sodium is left in ponds and films may amount to hundreds of kilograms. For the long term safe storage period which is to follow, preliminary safety analyses (e.g. derived from those made for French sodium cooled reactors) might show that the risks incurred through loss of leaktightness are significant. The ingress of moisture into the circuits would generate, by reaction with the sodium, two undesirable products : sodium hydroxide and hydrogene. Even when considering that water would enter the circuits progressively, so that the heat of the reaction does not give rise to over-pressure, some main risk factors remain. The most promising solution to this challenge appears to be the carbonation of the sodium residues, by progressive diffusion of an appropriate association of carbon dioxyde and water vapour through the inert gaseous medium which fills the circuits. The desired product is porous sodium hydrogenocarbonate

  11. Carbonic acid ionization and the stability of sodium bicarbonate and carbonate ion pairs to 200 °C - A potentiometric and spectrophotometric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefánsson, Andri; Bénézeth, Pascale; Schott, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    Carbonic acid ionization and sodium bicarbonate and carbonate ion pair formation constants have been experimentally determined in dilute hydrothermal solutions to 200 °C. Two experimental approaches were applied, potentiometric acid-base titrations at 10-60 °C and spectrophotometric pH measurements using the pH indicators, 2-napthol and 4-nitrophenol, at 25-200 °C. At a given temperature, the first and second ionization constants of carbonic acid (K1, K2) and the ion pair formation constants for NaHCO(aq)(K) and NaCO3-(aq)(K) were simultaneously fitted to the data. Results of this study compare well with previously determined values of K1 and K2. The NaHCO(aq) and NaCO3-(aq) ion pair formation constants vary between 25 and 200 °C having values of logK=-0.18 to 0.58 and logK=1.01 to 2.21, respectively. These ion pairs are weak at low-temperatures but become increasingly important with increasing temperature under neutral to alkaline conditions in moderately dilute to concentrated NaCl solutions, with NaCO3-(aq) predominating over CO32-(aq) in ⩾0.1 M NaCl solution at temperatures above 100 °C. The results demonstrate that NaCl cannot be considered as an inert (non-complexing) electrolyte in aqueous carbon dioxide containing solutions at elevated temperatures.

  12. Studies Conducted of Sodium Carbonate Contaminant Found on the Wing Leading Edge and the Nose Cap of the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Palou, Jaime J.

    2003-01-01

    In early 2001, three of the space shuttle orbiters were found to have a sodium carbonate contaminant on the wing leading edge and nose cap. These parts are made of a reinforced carbon/carbon material protected by silicon carbide (SiC) and a glass coating. The glass coating is known as Type A and is primarily sodium silicate with particles of SiC. NASA Glenn Research Center's Environmental Durability Branch was asked to determine the chemistry of this deposit formation and assess any possible detrimental effects. At low temperatures, the reverse reaction is favorable. Previous studies of the corrosion of glass show that carbon dioxide in the presence of water does form sodium carbonate on sodium silicate glass (ref. 1). It is quite likely that a similar scenario exists for the orbiter wing leading edge. All three orbiters that formed sodium carbonate were exposed to rain. This formation of sodium carbonate was duplicated in the laboratory. The Type A glass, which coats the wing leading edge and nose cap, was made in a freestanding form and exposed to water in two separate experiments. In one set of experiments, the coating was placed in a petri dish filled with water. As the water evaporated, sodium carbonate formed. In another case, water was slowly dripped on the coating and sodium carbonate formed. The sodium carbonate was detected by chemical analysis and, in some cases, xray diffraction showed a hydrated sodium carbonate. The next step was to examine possible detrimental effects of this sodium carbonate. There are three likely scenarios for the sodium carbonate deposit: (1) it may be removed with a simple rinse, (2) it may remain and flow back into the Type A glass after heating during reentry, or (3) it may remain and flow onto unprotected SiC and/or other parts after heating during reentry. The effect of case 1 is to remove the Na2O constituent from the Type A glass, thus decreasing its effectiveness as a sealant. Even so, overall, it is probably the best

  13. Unusual Passivation Ability of Superconcentrated Electrolytes toward Hard Carbon Negative Electrodes in Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Koji; Yamada, Yuki; Watanabe, Eriko; Wang, Jianhui; Sodeyama, Keitaro; Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Hirata, Kazuhisa; Kawase, Takeo; Yamada, Atsuo

    2017-10-04

    The passivation of negative electrodes is key to achieving prolonged charge-discharge cycling with Na-ion batteries. Here, we report the unusual passivation ability of superconcentrated Na-salt electrolytes. For example, a 50 mol % sodium bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide (NaFSA)/succinonitrile (SN) electrolyte enables highly reversible Na + insertion into a hard carbon negative electrode without any electrolyte additive, functional binder, or electrode pretreatment. Importantly, an anion-derived passivation film is formed via preferential reduction of the anion upon charging, which can effectively suppress further electrolyte reduction. As a structural characteristic of the electrolyte, most anions are coordinated to multiple Na + cations at high concentration, which shifts the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals of the anions downward, resulting in preferential anion reduction. The present work provides a new understanding of the passivation mechanism with respect to the coordination state of the anion.

  14. Changes in bone sodium and carbonate in metabolic acidosis and alkalosis in the dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnell, James M.

    1971-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis and alkalosis were produced in adult dogs over 5- to 10-day periods. Midtibial cortical bone was analyzed for calcium, sodium, phosphorus, and carbonate. In acidosis bone CO3/Ca decreased 9.5% and bone Na/Ca decreased 6.3%. In alkalosis bone CO3/Ca increased 3.1% and bone Na/Ca increased 3.0%. Previous attempts to account for changes in net acid balance by summation of extra- and intracellular acid-base changes have uniformly resulted in about 40-60% of acid gained or lost being “unaccounted for.” If it is assumed that changes in tibial cortex reflect changes in the entire skeletal system, changes in bone CO3= are sufficiently large to account for the “unaccounted for” acid change without postulating changes in cellular metabolic acid production. PMID:5540172

  15. Three-dimensional iron sulfide-carbon interlocked graphene composites for high-performance sodium-ion storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Wei; Sun, Hongyu; Shangguan, Huihui

    2018-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) carbon-wrapped iron sulfide interlocked graphene (Fe7S8@C-G) composites for high-performance sodium-ion storage are designed and produced through electrostatic interactions and subsequent sulfurization. The iron-based metal–organic frameworks (MOFs, MIL-88-Fe) interact with...

  16. High quality bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass over alumina-supported sodium carbonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali Imran, A.; Bramer, Eduard A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Brem, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    Performance of a novel alumina-supported sodium carbonate catalyst was studied to produce a valuable bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass. Post treatment of biomass pyrolysis vapor was investigated in a catalyst fixed bed reactor at the downstream of the pyrolysis

  17. Effect of Sodium Carbonate Concentrations on the Formation and Mechanism of Regenerated Silk Fibroin Nanofibers by Electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Dou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Degumming is the first process for the preparation of all silk-based products. In this paper, effect of sodium carbonate concentrations for silk degumming on the formation of electrospun silk fibroin nanofibers was investigated and the reason for the silk electrospinning process was explained for the first time by differences from the microstructure of regenerated silk fibroin. With increasing the sodium carbonate concentration, microstructure both in the aqueous solutions and in the electrospinning solutions transformed from nanofibrils to nanoparticles, leading to obvious changes on rheological property; electrospinning solutions with nanofibrils behaved like the native silk dope and owned remarkably higher viscosity than the solutions with nanoparticles showing very low viscosity. More interestingly, nanofibrils favored the formation of silk nanofibers with ease, and even nanofibers could be electrospun at concentration 2%. However, nanoparticles were completely unable to generate nanofibers at high spinning concentration 8%. Importance of sodium carbonate concentrations is heavily emphasized for impacting the microstructure types and further influencing the electrospinning performance of regenerated silk. Hence, sodium carbonate concentrations provide a controllable choice for the preparation of silk-based electrospun biomaterials with desired properties.

  18. Continuing assessment of the 5 day sodium carbonate-ammonium nitrate extraction assay as an indicator test for silicon fertilizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The five day sodium carbonate-ammonium nitrate extraction assay has been proposed by the AAFPCO as a standard test to identify fertilizers that provide plant-available Si. A single-lab validation test was previously performed; however, the analysis lacked any correlation to a grow-out study. To do...

  19. Autophagy induction under carbon starvation conditions is negatively regulated by carbon catabolite repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Atsuhiro; Koizumi, Michiko; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2017-12-01

    Autophagy is a conserved process in which cytoplasmic components are sequestered for degradation in the vacuole/lysosomes in eukaryotic cells. Autophagy is induced under a variety of starvation conditions, such as the depletion of nitrogen, carbon, phosphorus, zinc, and others. However, apart from nitrogen starvation, it remains unclear how these stimuli induce autophagy. In yeast, for example, it remains contentious whether autophagy is induced under carbon starvation conditions, with reports variously suggesting both induction and lack of induction upon depletion of carbon. We therefore undertook an analysis to account for these inconsistencies, concluding that autophagy is induced in response to abrupt carbon starvation when cells are grown with glycerol but not glucose as the carbon source. We found that autophagy under these conditions is mediated by nonselective degradation that is highly dependent on the autophagosome-associated scaffold proteins Atg11 and Atg17. We also found that the extent of carbon starvation-induced autophagy is positively correlated with cells' oxygen consumption rate, drawing a link between autophagy induction and respiratory metabolism. Further biochemical analyses indicated that maintenance of intracellular ATP levels is also required for carbon starvation-induced autophagy and that autophagy plays an important role in cell viability during prolonged carbon starvation. Our findings suggest that carbon starvation-induced autophagy is negatively regulated by carbon catabolite repression. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Carbonic acid salts at 25 or 45 degrees C to control loquat decay under shelf life conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinu, M G; D'Hallewin, G; Dore, A; Serusi, A; Venditti, T; Agabbio, M

    2005-01-01

    Generally recognised as save compounds (G.R.A.S) are attractive substitutes to synthetic chemicals in postharvest control diseases. They meet safety requirements, are cheap and able to be integrated with other disease control technologies. Among G.R.A.S compounds, carbonic acid salts have been investigated on carrots, bell pepper, melons, sweet cherries and their efficacy was also evaluated when combined with biological control agents. Moreover, the possibility to use sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate to prevent P. digitatum an P. italicum spread on Citrus fruit was studied since the begin of the 20th century. We explored the possibility to extend the use of carbonate-bicarbonate salts on loquat fruit in order to control the pathogens and to extend postharvest life. Loquat is a very perishable fruit, susceptible to decay, mechanical damage, moisture and nutritional losses during its postharvest life. We tested the combined effect of temperature and sodium or potassium carbonate-bicarbonate and ammonium carbonate. The fruit was dipped in the salt solutions at variable concentrations (0.5, 1 and 2% w/v) at 25 or 45 degrees C for two minutes and than stored under shelf life conditions (25 degrees C and 70% RH). Decay, weight loss, pH, titrable acidity and sugar content were detected after twelve days. Preliminary data show that the combined treatments were effective in decay control depending on salts. Best results were obtained with 2% potassium and sodium carbonate solution at 25 degrees C. Weight losses were related to treatment temperature and salts concentrations whereas, no differences were detected in the chemical parameters compared to the control.

  1. Effect of preparation conditions on properties and permeability of chitosan-sodium hexametaphosphate capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, N; Hunkeler, D

    2001-01-01

    Capsules were obtained by interpolymer complexation between chitosan (polycation) and sodium hexametaphosphate (SMP, oligoanion). The effect of the preparation conditions on the capsule characteristics was evaluated. Specifically, the influence of variables such as pH, ionic strength, reagent concentration, and additives on the capsule permeability properties was investigated using dextran as a model permeant. The capsule membrane permeability was found to increase by decreasing the chitosan/SMP ratio as well as adding mannitol to the oligoanion recipient bath. Increasing the ionic strength or the pH of the initial chitosan solution was also found to enhance the membrane permeability, moving the membrane exclusion limit to higher values. Generally, the capsules prepared tinder all tested conditions had a relatively low permeability which rarely exceeded a molecular cut-off of 40 kD based on dextran standards. Furthermore, the diffusion rate showed a strong temporal dependence, indicating that the capsules prepared under various conditions exhibit different apparent pore size densities on the surface. The results indicated that, in order to obtain the desired capsule mass-transfer properties, the preparation conditions should be carefully considered and adjusted. Adding a polyol as well as low salt amount (less than 0.15%) is preferable as a means of modulating the diffusion characteristics, without disturbing the capsule mechanical stability.

  2. The effect of steam cycle conditions upon the economics and design of a sodium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philpott, E.F.; Pounder, F.; Willby, C.R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper studies the effect of variation of steam and feedwater conditions upon the economics, design and layout of a sodium-cooled fast reactor. The parameters investigated are steam temperature and pressure, feedwater temperature, and boiler recirculation ratio. The paper also includes an assessment of the effects of associating the fast reactor with saturated steam cycle conditions. (author)

  3. Glycolysis of carbon fiber-epoxy unidirectional mat catalysed by sodium hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaini, Mariana Binti Mohd; Badri, Khairiah Haji

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to recycle carbon fibre-epoxy (CFRP) composite in woven sheet/ mat form. The CFRP was recycled through glycolysis with polyethlyene glycol (PEG 200) as the solvent. The CFRP was loaded into the solvent at a ratio of 4:1 (w/w). PEG200 was diluted with water to a ratio of 80:20 (v/v). This reaction was catalysed by sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution with varying concentrations at 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9% (w/v). The glycolysis was conducted at 180-190 °C. The recovered CF (rCF) was analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) while the degraded solution was analysed using FTIR and the epoxy content was determined. The FTIR spectrum of the rCF exhibited the disappearance of the COC peak belonged to epoxy and supported by the SEM micrographs that showed clear rCF. On the other hand, the analysed filtrate detected the disappearance of oxygen peak element in the EDX spectrum for all rCF samples. This gave an indication that the epoxy resin has been removed from the surface of the carbon fiber.

  4. Glycolysis of carbon fiber-epoxy unidirectional mat catalysed by sodium hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaini, Mariana Binti Mohd [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Badri, Khairiah Haji [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Polymer Research Center, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43 (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    This study was conducted to recycle carbon fibre-epoxy (CFRP) composite in woven sheet/ mat form. The CFRP was recycled through glycolysis with polyethlyene glycol (PEG 200) as the solvent. The CFRP was loaded into the solvent at a ratio of 4:1 (w/w). PEG200 was diluted with water to a ratio of 80:20 (v/v). This reaction was catalysed by sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution with varying concentrations at 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9% (w/v). The glycolysis was conducted at 180-190 °C. The recovered CF (rCF) was analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) while the degraded solution was analysed using FTIR and the epoxy content was determined. The FTIR spectrum of the rCF exhibited the disappearance of the COC peak belonged to epoxy and supported by the SEM micrographs that showed clear rCF. On the other hand, the analysed filtrate detected the disappearance of oxygen peak element in the EDX spectrum for all rCF samples. This gave an indication that the epoxy resin has been removed from the surface of the carbon fiber.

  5. Desorption of Reactive Red 198 from activated carbon prepared from walnut shells: effects of temperature, sodium carbonate concentration and organic solvent dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Alimohamadi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of temperature, different concentrations of sodium carbonate,and the dose of organic solvent on the desorption of Reactive Red 198 dye from dye-saturated activated carbon using batch and continuous systems. The results of the batch desorption test showed 60% acetone in water as the optimum amount. However, when the concentration of sodium carbonate was raised, the dye desorption percentage increased from 26% to 42% due to economic considerations; 15 mg/L of sodium carbonate was selected to continue the processof desorption. Increasing the desorption temperature can improve the dye desorption efficiency.According to the column test results, dye desorption concentration decreased gradually with the passing of time. The column test results showed that desorption efficiency and the percentage of dye adsorbed decreased; however, it seemed to stabilize after three repeated adsorption/desorption cycles. The repeated adsorption–desorption column tests (3 cycles showed that the activated carbon which was prepared from walnut shell was a suitable and economical adsorbent for dye removal.

  6. Conditionings for boron-carbon plasma facing wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Tomoaki; Yamauchi, Yuji; Yamashina, Toshiro

    1994-01-01

    For plasma facing material with components of boron and carbon, the method of conditionings due to He discharge cleaning and baking is considered. The conditioning time required to suppress the hydrogen recycling is discussed. It is shown that the hydrogen trapped by the boron can be relatively easily removed only by the baking at 300degC or only by He discharge cleaning with current density of 0.1 mA/cm 2 . It is not easy to remove the hydrogen trapped by the carbon by the baking since the temperature required becomes 500degC. The current density required also becomes high, 1 mA/cm 2 , for the reduction of the hydrogen trapped by the carbon. (author)

  7. Effects of carbonization conditions on properties of bamboo pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijia Liu; Zehui Jiang; Zhiyong Cai; Benhua Fei; Yan Yu; Xing' e Liu

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo is a biomass material and has great potential as a bio-energy resource of the future in China. Bamboo pellets were successfully manufactured using a laboratory pellet mill in preliminary work. This study was therefore carried out to investigate the effect of carbonization conditions (temperature and time) on properties of bamboo pellets and to evaluate product...

  8. Sodium bicarbonate supplementation improves severe-intensity intermittent exercise under moderate acute hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Sanjoy K; Gough, Lewis A; Sparks, S Andy; McNaughton, Lars R

    2018-03-01

    Acute moderate hypoxic exposure can substantially impair exercise performance, which occurs with a concurrent exacerbated rise in hydrogen cation (H + ) production. The purpose of this study was therefore, to alleviate this acidic stress through sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 ) supplementation and determine the corresponding effects on severe-intensity intermittent exercise performance. Eleven recreationally active individuals participated in this randomised, double-blind, crossover study performed under acute normobaric hypoxic conditions (FiO 2 % = 14.5%). Pre-experimental trials involved the determination of time to attain peak bicarbonate anion concentrations ([HCO 3 - ]) following NaHCO 3 ingestion. The intermittent exercise tests involved repeated 60-s work in their severe-intensity domain and 30-s recovery at 20 W to exhaustion. Participants ingested either 0.3 g kg bm -1 of NaHCO 3 or a matched placebo of 0.21 g kg bm -1 of sodium chloride prior to exercise. Exercise tolerance (+ 110.9 ± 100.6 s; 95% CI 43.3-178 s; g = 1.0) and work performed in the severe-intensity domain (+ 5.8 ± 6.6 kJ; 95% CI 1.3-9.9 kJ; g = 0.8) were enhanced with NaHCO 3 supplementation. Furthermore, a larger post-exercise blood lactate concentration was reported in the experimental group (+ 4 ± 2.4 mmol l -1 ; 95% CI 2.2-5.9; g = 1.8), while blood [HCO 3 - ] and pH remained elevated in the NaHCO 3 condition throughout experimentation. In conclusion, this study reported a positive effect of NaHCO 3 under acute moderate hypoxic conditions during intermittent exercise and therefore, may offer an ergogenic strategy to mitigate hypoxic induced declines in exercise performance.

  9. Dissolution of barite for the analysis of strontium isotopes and other chemical and isotopic variations using aqueous sodium carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, G.N.; Simmons, E.C.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    A simple procedure for preparing barite samples for chemical and isotopic analysis is described. Sulfate ion, in barite, in the presence of high concentrations of aqueous sodium carbonate, is replaced by carbonate. This replacement forms insoluble carbonates with the cations commonly in barite: Ba, Sr, Ca and Pb. Sulfate is released into the solution by the carbonate replacement and is separated by filtration. The aqueous sulfate can then be reprecipitated for analysis of the sulfur and oxygen isotopes. The cations in the carbonate phase can be dissolved by acidifying the solid residue. Sr can be separated from the solution for Sr isotope analysis by ion-exchange chromatography. The sodium carbonate used contains amounts of Sr which will affect almost all barite 87Sr 86Sr ratios by less than 0.00001 at 1.95?? of the mean. The procedure is preferred over other techniques used for preparing barite samples for the determination of 87Sr 86Sr ratios because it is simple, rapid and enables simultaneous determination of many compositional parameters on the same material. ?? 1985.

  10. Validation of red cell sodium-lithium countertransport measurement--influence of different loading conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besch, W; Schläger, D; Brahm, J

    1995-01-01

    Increased sodium-lithium countertransport in erythrocytes from patients with long-standing type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus has been considered as an early marker of nephropathy. Since the activity and kinetics of the sodium-lithium countertransport may critically depend on loading co...

  11. Evaluation of intubating conditions after rocuronium bromide in adults induced with propofol or thiopentone sodium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moazzam Md Shahnawaz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aims of present study were to compare the propofol and rocuronium with thiopentone and rocuronium in terms of clinically satisfactory intubating conditions and to co-relate intubating conditions with degree of paralysis in adductor pollicis muscle using train of four ratio (TOFR. The intubating conditions were evaluated after rocuronium bromide 0.6 mg kg−1 at 60 s. Materials and Methods : 60 patients of ASA grades I-II of either sex, age 18-50 years, undergoing various elective surgical procedures were randomly divided into two groups, propofol rocuronium (PR group and thiopentone rocuronium (TR group of 30 patients in each. In the PR group, patients received propofol 2.5 mg kg−1 and rocuronium 0.6 mg kg−1 ; in TR group, patients received thiopentone 5 mg kg−1 and rocuronium 0.6 mg kg−1 . In all patients the intubating conditions were evaluated by the observer at 60 s. TOFR was measured at the time of intubation by an assistant. Results : In the PR group the number of the patients placed in intubating conditions grades I, II, III and IV were 40%, 36.67%, 13.33% and 10% and their mean TOFR were 31.8±17.9%, 61.8±;14.6%, 61.7±27.9%, and 78.3±5.7% respectively. While in theTR group the number of patients placed in intubating condition grade I, II, and III were 60%, 26.67%, and 13.33% and their mean TOFR , 41.2±28.3%, 68.0±10.9% and 78.7±6.8%, respectively. There was no patient in grade lV in theTR group. Conclusion : The clinical intubating conditions and degree of paralysis of adductor pollicis muscle after rocuronium 0.6 mg kg−1 at 60 s in adults induced with propofol or thiopentone sodium are comparable.

  12. Uranium recovery by leaching with sodium carbonate at high temperature and pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, E.; Koefoed, S.; Lundgaard, T.

    1983-11-01

    The principal uranium bearing mineral in Greenland steenstrupine is a complex sodium REE phosphosilicate in which Fe, Mn, Th, U are minor constituents. The Na 2 CO 3 extractant is used for specially acidconsuming ores. However, steenstrupine is decomposed by Na 2 CO 3 only at temperatures above 220degC, so the leaching must be carried out under pressure. Laboratory tests have shown the optimal temperature to be 260degC and the leach liquor composition120 g/l of NaHCO 3 and 20 g/l of Na 2 CO 3 . Addition of oxygen is necessary as uranium will not dissolve in carbonate unless it is brought in its highest state of oxidation. According to the laboratory tests it may be estimated that 1 kg of ore suspended in 1 l of leach liquor and ground to 80% minus 200 mesh can be extracted in 20-40 minutes. On the basis of data obtained a process was suggested in which the ore is ground with carbonate leach liquor to a suitable suspension which is fed to an autoclave with a retentiontime of 20 minutes at 260degC. The residue is filtered off and the liquor reused for grinding and ex- traction. The demand for a reaction temperature near 300degC, a pressure up to 120 atm. and a continuos operation favours a tubular flow autoclave with so narrow a bore that the turbulence provides the mechanical agitation of the suspension. From the mined material it appears that more than 80% of the uranium can be extracted in the pipe autoclave. Some samples give off the obtainable uranium in 20 minutes. The precipitated yellow cake is contaminated with more Na and Si than admitted by international standards. (EG)

  13. THE STIMULATING EFFECT OF LASER RED LIGHT, FAR RED LIGHT AND SODIUM CARBONATE AT THE INITIAL STAGES OF BARLEY ONTOGENESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Dudin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Modern ecological state of the environment and human unhealthy diet cause many diseases. A healthy diet is the one that contains adequate amounts of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, macronutrients and micronutrients. Photosynthesis i. e. the process by which plants produce organic compounds from carbon dioxide and water, is the source of life, the source of evolution and proliferation of life forms on the Earth. Thus, the juice made from sprouted barley provides physiologically active chlorophyll, macronutrients and micronutrients, vitamins А, В2 , В3 , В5 , В6 , В8 , Е and К. It is well known that light from a red laser with a wavelength of 638.2 nm has a stimulating action on the germination energy, germination ability and productivity of seeds, and on the crop yields. Therefore, this research is of primary importance today. The research result produced a sharp decline in plant vigor and germinating capacity of barley when soaking in 1n sodium carbonate solution, as well as changes in the ratio of potassium-sodium balance in plants. Thus at lower concentrations of sodium carbonate and 0.1 n sodium increasing of pigment content in barley is observed on the seventh day. The red laser light has a similar stimulating action: the chlorophyll content of barley plants increased after the red laser treatment of barley seeds. However, the chlorophyll contents were depressed when the seeds were exposed to far red light with wavelengths of 754±10 nm. Using these factors, one can manage the content of chlorophyll and sodium-potassium balance in the initial stages of barley ontogenesis in the technology of barley juice or the powder for a healthy and proper human diet.

  14. The Sodium Process Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P.; McDermott, M.D.; Price, J.R.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Wells, P.B.

    1998-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) has approximately 680,000 liters of raw sodium stored in facilities on site. As mandated by the State of Idaho and the US Department of Energy (DOE), this sodium must be transformed into a stable condition for land disposal. To comply with this mandate, ANL-W designed and built the Sodium Process Facility (SPF) for the processing of this sodium into a dry, sodium carbonate powder. The major portion of the sodium stored at ANL-W is radioactively contaminated. The sodium will be processed in three separate and distinct campaigns: the 290,000 liters of Fermi-1 primary sodium, the 50,000 liters of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) secondary sodium, and the 330,000 liters of the EBR-II primary sodium. The Fermi-1 and the EBR-II secondary sodium contain only low-level of radiation, while the EBR-II primary sodium has radiation levels up to 0.5 mSv (50 mrem) per hour at 1 meter. The EBR-II primary sodium will be processed last, allowing the operating experience to be gained with the less radioactive sodium prior to reacting the most radioactive sodium. The sodium carbonate will be disposed of in 270 liter barrels, four to a pallet. These barrels are square in cross-section, allowing for maximum utilization of the space on a pallet, minimizing the required landfill space required for disposal

  15. The Sodium Process Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P. McDermott, M.D.; Price, J.R.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Wells, P.B.

    1998-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) has approximately 680,000 liters of raw sodium stored in facilities on site. As mandated by the State of Idaho and the US Department of Energy (DOE), this sodium must be transformed into a stable condition for land disposal. To comply with this mandate, ANL-W designed and built the Sodium Process Facility (SPF) for the processing of this sodium into a dry, sodium carbonate powder. The major portion of the sodium stored at ANL-W is radioactively contaminated. The sodium will be processed in three separate and distinct campaigns: the 290,000 liters of Fermi-1 primary sodium, the 50,000 liters of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) secondary sodium, and the 330,000 liters of the EBR-II primary sodium. The Fermi-1 and the EBR-II secondary sodium contain only low-level of radiation, while the EBR-II primary sodium has radiation levels up to 0.5 mSv (50 mrem) per hour at 1 meter. The EBR-II primary sodium will be processed last, allowing the operating experience to be gained with the less radioactive sodium prior to reacting the most radioactive sodium. The sodium carbonate will be disposed of in 270 liter barrels, four to a pallet. These barrels are square in cross-section, allowing for maximum utilization of the space on a pallet, minimizing the required landfill space required for disposal.

  16. Carbon-supported cobalt catalyst for hydrogen generation from alkaline sodium borohydride solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Dongyan; Liu, Xinmin; Cao, Changqing; Guo, Qingjie [College of Chemical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Dai, Ping [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061 (China)

    2008-08-01

    Low cost transition metal catalysts with high performance are attractive for the development of on-board hydrogen generation systems by catalytic hydrolysis of sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) in fuel cell fields. In this study, hydrogen production from alkaline NaBH{sub 4} via hydrolysis process over carbon-supported cobalt catalysts was studied. The catalytic activity of the supported cobalt catalyst was found to be highly dependent on the calcination temperatures. The hydrogen generation rate increases with calcination temperatures in the range of 200-400 C, but a high calcination temperature above 500 C led to markedly decreased activity. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that the catalysts experience phase transition from amorphous Co-B to crystalline cobalt hydroxide with increase in calcination temperatures. The reaction performance is also dependent on the concentration of NaBH{sub 4}, and the hydrogen generation rate increases for lower NaBH{sub 4} concentrations and decreases after reaching a maximum at 10 wt.% of NaBH{sub 4}. (author)

  17. Evaluation of cardiovascular toxicity of carbon nanotubes functionalized with sodium hyaluronate in oral regenerative medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joviano-Santos, J.V.; Sá, M.A.; De Maria, M.L.A.; Almeida, T.C.S. [Departamento de Morfologia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Geraldo, V.; Oliveira, S.; Ladeira, L.O. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Ferreira, A.J. [Departamento de Morfologia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-05-23

    It has been demonstrated that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) associated with sodium hyaluronate (HY-CNTs) accelerate bone repair in the tooth sockets of rats. Before clinical application of HY-CNTs, it is important to assess their biocompatibility. Moreover, cardiac toxicity may be caused by the translocation of these particles to the blood stream. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible changes in cardiovascular function in male Wistar rats whose tooth sockets were treated with either CNTs or HY-CNTs (100 μg/mL, 0.1 mL). Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored in conscious rats 7 days after treatment. Cardiac function was evaluated using the Langendorff perfusion technique. The data showed no changes in blood pressure or heart rate in rats treated with either CNTs or HY-CNTs, and no significant changes in cardiac function were found in any of the groups. To confirm these findings, experiments were conducted in rats injected intraperitoneally with a high concentration of either CNTs or HY-CNTs (0.75 mg/kg). The same parameters were analyzed and similar results were observed. The results obtained 7 days following injection indicate that the administration of low concentrations of CNTs or HY-CNTs directly into tooth sockets did not cause any significant change in cardiovascular function in the rats. The present findings support the possibility of using these biocomposites in humans.

  18. Carbon nanotubes functionalized with sodium hyaluronate restore bone repair in diabetic rat sockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, M A; Andrade, V B; Mendes, R M; Caliari, M V; Ladeira, L O; Silva, E E; Silva, G A B; Corrêa-Júnior, J D; Ferreira, A J

    2013-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of sodium hyaluronate (HY) and carbon nanotubes functionalized with HY (HY-CNT) on bone repair in the tooth sockets of diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (50 mg kg(-1) i.v.), and the sockets were divided into normal control, diabetic control, diabetic treated with HY (1%), and diabetic treated with HY-CNT (100 μg ml(-1)) groups. The sockets were analyzed according to the percentage of bone formation and the number of cell nuclei. The percentage of bone trabeculae was lower in diabetic control animals (11.16 ± 5.10% vs 41.92 ± 6.34% in normal animals) after 14 days. Treating diabetic animals with HY or HY-CNT significantly increased the percentage of neoformed trabeculae (HY: 29.43 ± 3.29%; HY-CNT: 36.90 ± 3.07%). Moreover, the sockets of diabetic animals had an increased number of cell nuclei and HY or HY-CNT reduced this parameter. Our results indicate that HY and HY-CNT restore bone repair in the tooth sockets of diabetic rats, suggesting that these biomaterials are potential adjuvant therapies for the management of diabetes. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Uranium recovery by leaching with sodium carbonate at high temperature and pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, E.; Koefoed, S.; Lundgaard, T.

    1990-09-01

    An alkaline rock from the Ilimaussaq instrusion, SW Greenland, was proposed as a source of uranium. Its principal uranium bearing mineral, Steenstrupine, is a complex sodium REE phosphosilicate in which Fe, Mn, Th and U are minor constituents. A special feature of this ore body is the content of water soluble minerals: NaF (Villiaumite), Na 2 Si 2 O 5 (Natrosilite) and an organic substance which displays the characteristics of humus. Sulfides are sparse, the most important one being ZnS (Sphalerite) of which the content is generally less than 0.5%. In the mineral under consideration (Lujavrite) the Steenstrupine is mainly finelay disseminated throughout the rock, yielding a uranium content of 300-400 ppm and thorium content of 800-1000 ppm. Laboratory tests indicated that high temperature carbonate leaching was necessary to decompose Steenstrupine. The optium temperature was shown to be 260 deg. C and the leach liquor composition 120 g/l of NaHCO 3 and 20 g/l of Na 2 C0 3 . Addition of oxygen is necessary. The process was developed to industrial scale in a continuous pipe autoclave with a retention time of 20 min. After filtering on a belt filter, the liquor was recycled several times to obtain a higher U-concentration. By reductive precipitation with iron powder a raw UO 2 was obtained. It was purified after dissolution in HNO 3 . An overall yield of 80% could be obtained. (author) 32 tabs., 13 ills., 24 refs

  20. Evaluation of sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate as a potential catfish egg disinfectant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Brian C

    2009-06-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate (SCP) in improving the hatching success of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus when used as a prophylactic chemotherapeutant during egg incubation. In the first experiment, the efficacy of SCP was evaluated in 379-L aluminum incubation troughs similar to those used in commercial hatcheries. Egg masses treated daily with 254 mg of SCP/L of water had significantly higher mean hatching success than untreated controls, and a pathogen-inhibiting effect was also evident (i.e., no gross infection was observed on the treated egg masses). In the second experiment, the hatching success of egg masses treated daily with 254 mg/L was compared with that of egg masses treated daily with hydrogen peroxide (70 mg/L). The effects of both treatments on the pH, dissolved oxygen, and hydrogen peroxide concentrations in the trough were also examined. Both SCP and hydrogen peroxide significantly improved hatching success. Unlike in the treatment with hydrogen peroxide, water pH increased during the treatment with SCP; however, no negative effects on hatching success were observed. The results of this research suggest that SCP acts similarly to hydrogen peroxide in improving channel catfish hatching success and warrants further research to determine whether it could be a practical and effective alternative for managing catfish egg infections in commercial hatcheries.

  1. Experimental and numerical analysis of sodium-carbonate salt gradient solar-pond performance under simulated solar-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt, Hueseyin; Ozkaymak, Mehmet [Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Technical Education Faculty, 78200 Karabuk (Turkey); Binark, A. Korhan [Marmara University, Technical Education Faculty, 34722 Kuyubasi-Istanbul (Turkey)

    2006-04-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate experimentally and theoretically whether sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) salt is suitable for establishing a salinity gradient in a salt-gradient solar-pond (SGSP). For this purpose, a small-scale prismatic solar-pond was constructed. Experiments were conducted in the laboratory under the incident radiation from two halogen-lamps acting as a solar simulator. Furthermore, a one-dimensional transient mathematical model that describes the heat and mass transfer behaviour of the SGSP was developed. The differential equations obtained were solved numerically using a finite-difference method. It was found from the experiments that the density gradient, achieved using sodium carbonate salt, can suppress convection from the bottom to the surface of the pond. (author)

  2. Influence of sodium carbonate on decomposition of formic acid by pulsed discharge plasma inside bubble in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Takaki, Koichi; Satta, Naoya

    2016-07-01

    The influence of sodium carbonate on the decomposition of formic acid by discharge inside bubbles in water was investigated experimentally. Oxygen or argon gases were injected into the water through a vertically positioned glass tube, in which the high-voltage wire electrode was placed to generate plasmas at low applied voltage. The concentration of formic acid was determined by ion chromatography. In the case of sodium carbonate additive, the pH increased owing to the decomposition of the formic acid. In the case of oxygen injection, the percentage of conversion of formic acid increased with increasing pH because the reaction rate of ozone with formic acid increased with increasing pH. In the case of argon injection, the percentage of conversion was not affected by the pH owing to the high rate loss of hydroxyl radicals.

  3. Comparison of sodium carbonate pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw stem and leaf to produce fermentable sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yongcan; Huang, Ting; Geng, Wenhui; Yang, Linfeng

    2013-06-01

    The specific characteristics of biomass structure and chemical composition of straw stem and leaf may result in different behavior of pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. In this work, sodium carbonate (SC) was employed as a pretreatment to improve the enzymatic digestibility of wheat straw. The chemical composition and enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw stem and leaf (sheath included) were investigated comparatively. Most of the polysaccharides are kept in the solid fractions after SC pretreatment, while the stem has better delignification selectivity than leaf at high temperature. The enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency of wheat straw leaf is significantly higher than that of stem. The maximum total sugar yield from SC pretreated leaf was about 16% higher than stem. The results show that sodium carbonate is of great potential to be used as a pretreatment for the production of bioethanol from straw handling waste in a straw pulp mill with a low feedstock cost. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Experimental and numerical analysis of sodium-carbonate salt gradient solar-pond performance under simulated solar-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurt, Hueseyin; Ozkaymak, Mehmet; Binark, A. Korhan

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate experimentally and theoretically whether sodium carbonate (Na 2 CO 3 ) salt is suitable for establishing a salinity gradient in a salt-gradient solar-pond (SGSP). For this purpose, a small-scale prismatic solar-pond was constructed. Experiments were conducted in the laboratory under the incident radiation from two halogen-lamps acting as a solar simulator. Furthermore, a one-dimensional transient mathematical model that describes the heat and mass transfer behaviour of the SGSP was developed. The differential equations obtained were solved numerically using a finite-difference method. It was found from the experiments that the density gradient, achieved using sodium carbonate salt, can suppress convection from the bottom to the surface of the pond

  5. Reaction of Hydrogen Chloride Gas with Sodium Carbonate and Its Deep Removal in a Fixed-Bed Reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Svoboda, Karel; Pohořelý, Michael; Šyc, Michal; Chen, Po-Ch.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 49 (2014), s. 19145-19158 ISSN 0888-5885 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC14-09692J Grant - others:NSC(TW) 102WBS0300011 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : hot fuel gas purification * hydrogen chloride gas * active sodium carbonate Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.587, year: 2014

  6. Effect of Calcium Nitrate and Sodium Nitrite on the Rebar Corrosion of Medium Carbon Steel in Seawater and Cassava Fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Adamu, M; Umoru, LE; Ige, OO

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitors are regularly used as one of the principal prevention and control techniques in reinforcement corrosion. Hence this study investigates the effect of calcium nitrate and sodium nitrite inhibitors on the rebar corrosion of medium carbon steel in seawater and cassava fluid with a view to determining inhibitive potentials of the different inhibitors in the two media. Gravimetric and voltametric techniques were employed in this study and a total of forty-five corrosion coupons of differ...

  7. Efficiency of Sodium Polyacrylate to Improve Durability of Concrete under Adverse Curing Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvir Manzur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional external curing process requires supply of large amount of water in addition to mixing water as well as strict quality control protocol. However, in a developing country like Bangladesh, many local contractors do not have awareness and required knowledge on importance of curing which often results in weaker concrete with durability issues. Moreover, at times it is difficult to maintain proper external curing process due to nonavailability of water and skilled laborer. Internal curing can be adopted under such scenario since this method is simple and less quality intensive. Usually, naturally occurring porous light weight aggregates (LWA are used as internal curing agent. However, naturally occurring LWA are not available in many countries like Bangladesh. Under these circumstances, Super Absorbent Polymer (SAP can be utilized as an alternative internal curing agent. In this study, sodium polyacrylate (SP as SAP has been used to produce internally cured concrete. Desorption isotherm of SP has been developed to investigate its effectiveness as internal curing agent. Test results showed that internally cured concrete with SP performed better in terms of both strength and durability as compared to control samples when subjected to adverse curing conditions where supply of additional water for external curing was absent.

  8. Morphological alteration, lysosomal membrane fragility and apoptosis of the cells of Indian freshwater sponge exposed to washing soda (sodium carbonate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Ray, Mitali; Dutta, Manab Kumar; Acharya, Avanti; Mukhopadhyay, Sandip Kumar; Ray, Sajal

    2015-12-01

    Washing soda is chemically known as sodium carbonate and is a component of laundry detergent. Domestic effluent, drain water and various anthropogenic activities have been identified as major routes of sodium carbonate contamination of the freshwater ecosystem. The freshwater sponge, Eunapius carteri, bears ecological and evolutionary significance and is considered as a bioresource in aquatic ecosystems. The present study involves estimation of morphological damage, lysosomal membrane integrity, activity of phosphatases and apoptosis in the cells of E. carteri under the environmentally realistic concentrations of washing soda. Exposure to washing soda resulted in severe morphological alterations and damages in cells of E. carteri. Fragility and destabilization of lysosomal membranes of E. carteri under the sublethal exposure was indicative to toxin induced physiological stress in sponge. Prolonged exposure to sodium carbonate resulted a reduction in the activity of acid and alkaline phosphatases in the cells of E. carteri. Experimental concentration of 8 mg/l of washing soda for 192 h yielded an increase in the physiological level of cellular apoptosis among the semigranulocytes and granulocytes of E. carteri, which was suggestive to possible shift in apoptosis mediated immunoprotection. The results were indicative of an undesirable shift in the immune status of sponge. Contamination of the freshwater aquifers by washing soda thus poses an alarming ecotoxicological threat to sponges. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ionophore-based optical nanosensors incorporating hydrophobic carbon dots and a pH-sensitive quencher dye for sodium detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galyean, A A; Behr, M R; Cash, K J

    2018-01-21

    Nanosensors present a biological monitoring method that is biocompatible, reversible, and nano-scale, and they offer many advantages over traditional organic indicators. Typical ionophore-based nanosensors incorporate nile-blue derivative pH indicators but suffer from photobleaching while quantum dot alternatives pose a potential toxicity risk. In order to address this challenge, sodium selective nanosensors containing carbon dots and a pH-sensitive quencher molecule were developed based on an ion-exchange theory and a decoupled recognition element from the pH indicator. Carbon dots were synthesized and integrated into nanosensors containing a pH-indicator, an analyte-binding ligand (ionophore), and a charge-balancing additive. These nanosensors are ion-selective against potassium (selectivity coefficient of 0.4) and lithium (selectivity coefficient of 0.9). Reversible nanosensor response to sodium is also demonstrated. The carbon dot nanosensors are resistant to changes in optical properties for at least 12 h and display stable selectivity to physiologically-relevant sodium (alpha = 0.5 of 200 mM NaCl) for a minimum of 6 days.

  10. Correction of Hemodynamics with Hypertonic Sodium Chloride Solution in Critical Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Zhbannikov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the capabilities of small-volume hypertonic infusion in the context of early goal-directed therapy for critical conditions in surgical patients.Subjects and methods. Twenty-nine patients (SAPS II 47.5±6.81 scores operated on for generalized peritonitis (n=24 or severe concomitant injury with damages to chest and/or abdominal organs (n=5 who had the clinical and laboratory signs of a systemic inflammatory reaction were intravenously injected 4 ml/kg of 7.5% of hypertonic sodium chloride solution (HS and colloidal solution, followed by infusion and, if indicated, inotropic maintenance of hemodynamics for 6 hours in order to achieve the goal vales of mean blood pressure (BP, central venous pressure (CVP, central venous blood oxygen saturation (ScvO2, and diuresis. Plasma concentrations of sodium, chlorine, and lactate, acid-base balance, and osmotic blood pressure were monitored.Results. The patients were found to have infusion therapy-refractory critical arterial hypotension, low ScvO2, and oliguria before small-volume circulation maintenance. In all the patients, HS infusion originally caused a rapid rise in BP up to the goal value, with its further colloid infusion maintenance requiring additional dopamine infusion in 12 patients and red blood cell transfusion in 3. This could stabilize over 6 hours BP at the required level in 25 patients, in 9 of whom CVP only approximated the goal value. All the patients were found to have a significant increase in ScvO2 up to an average of 68% in response to HP infusion after 30—60 minutes; in 14 out of them ScvO2 exceeded 70%. By hour 6, ScvO2 stabilized at its goal level in 23 (79% examinees. Administration of HS caused a significantly increased diuresis. In patients with recovered renal function, the observed hypernatremia, hyperchloremia with hyperchloremic acidosis were transient.Conclusion. The results of the study show it possible to include small-volume hypertonic infusion at

  11. Modelling with response surface methodology of the effects of egg yolk, egg white and sodium carbonate on some textural properties of beef patties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlak, Ozgür; Zorba, Omer; Kurt, Sükrü

    2014-04-01

    This study was accomplished to determine the effects of egg yolk, egg white and sodium carbonate on textural properties of beef patties by using Central Composite Design of Response Surface Methodology. Meat patties were prepared using beef, lamb tail fat and spices. Effects of addition of egg yolk powder (0-1%), egg white powder (0-1%) and sodium carbonate (0-1%) on textural properties were studied by using a texture analyzer. The TPA and cutting force tests were measured in the samples. Effects of sodium carbonate were found to be significant (P  0.05). The levels of sodium carbonate up to 0.72% improved the textural properties of beef patties.

  12. Comparison of sodium carbonate-oxygen and sodium hydroxide-oxygen pretreatments on the chemical composition and enzymatic saccharification of wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Wenhui; Huang, Ting; Jin, Yongcan; Song, Junlong; Chang, Hou-Min; Jameel, Hasan

    2014-06-01

    Pretreatment of wheat straw with a combination of sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) or sodium hydroxide (NaOH) with oxygen (O2) 0.5MPa was evaluated for its delignification ability at relatively low temperature 110°C and for its effect on enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency. In the pretreatment, the increase of alkali charge (as Na2O) up to 12% for Na2CO3 and 6% for NaOH, respectively, resulted in enhancement of lignin removal, but did not significantly degrade cellulose and hemicellulose. When the pretreated solid was hydrolyzed with a mixture of cellulases and hemicellulases, the sugar yield increased rapidly with the lignin removal during the pretreatment. A total sugar yield based on dry matter of raw material, 63.8% for Na2CO3-O2 and 71.9% for NaOH-O2 was achieved under a cellulase loading of 20FPU/g-cellulose. The delignification efficiency and total sugar yield from enzymatic hydrolysis were comparable to the previously reported results at much higher temperature without oxygen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Microbiologically induced corrosion of carbon steel under continuous flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunaru, Mariana; Dragomir, Maria; Voicu, Anca

    2008-01-01

    Microbiologically induced corrosion is the label generally applied to corrosion involving the action of bacteria on metal surfaces. While different combinations of bacterial species, materials and chemical constituents are interrelated factors, stagnant water is the factor most often mentioned in reported cases. This paper presents the results obtained regarding the testing of microbiologically induced corrosion of carbon steel under continuous flow conditions in the presence of iron-oxidizing bacteria. The tests were performed on coupons of SA106gr.B exposed both in stagnant conditions and in flow conditions. The surfaces of these coupons were studied by metallographic technique, while the developed biofilms were analysed using microbiological technique. The correlation of all the results which were obtained emphasized that the minimizing the occurrence of stagnant or low-flow conditions can prove effective in reducing the risk of microbiologically induced corrosion in plant cooling-water systems. (authors)

  14. Synthesis of sodium caseinate-calcium carbonate microspheres and their mineralization to bone-like apatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhewu; Liang, Guobin; Jin, Lin; Wang, Zhenling; Xing, Chao; Jiange, Qing; Zhang, Zhiguang

    2014-06-01

    Phosphoproteins can induce and stabilize calcium carbonate (CaCO3) vaterite, which has desirable features for high reactivity. The purpose of this study was to synthesize bioactive CaCO3 microspheres for bone regeneration. Sodium caseinate (NaCas)-containing CaCO3 microspheres, with the crystal phase of vaterite, were synthesized by fast precipitation in an aqueous solution of CaCl2, Na2CO3, and 2 mg/mL of NaCas. The uniform microspheres exhibited rougher surfaces and lower negative charges than CaCO3 particles without NaCas addition. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) of the microspheres showed characteristic peaks or bands corresponding to phosphate and hydroxyl groups. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) curves exhibited approximately 5% weight loss below 600 °C due to the decomposition of NaCas. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images showed lath-like hydroxyapatite (HAp) on the surface after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C for 5 and 10 days. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) revealed that the agglomerates were composed of Ca, C, O, P, Na, and Mg elements, and the Ca/P ratios ranged from 1.53 to 1.56. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns exhibited peaks characteristic of hydroxyapatite. The results of this study demonstrated that the addition of NaCas induced the formation of vaterite microspheres which possesses an enhanced apatite formation after soaking in SBF at 37 °C for 5 and 10 days. These NaCas-CaCO3 microspheres may be a potential biomaterial for bone regeneration.

  15. Effect of sodium carbonate solution on self-setting properties of tricalcium silicate bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiguang Huan; Jiang Chang

    2008-11-01

    In this study, the effects of sodium carbonate (Na(2)CO(3) ) solution with different concentrations (10, 15, 20, and 25 wt%) as liquid phase on the setting time and compressive strength of tricalcium silicate bone cements are investigated. The in vitro bioactivity and degradability of the resultant Ca(3)SiO(5)-Na(2)CO(3) solution paste was also studied. The results indicate that as the concentration of Na(2)CO(3) solution varies from 0 to 25 wt%, the initial and final setting time of the cement decrease significantly from 90 to 20 min and from 180 to 45 min, respectively. After setting for 24 h, the compressive strength of Ca(3)SiO(5)-Na(2)CO(3) solution paste reaches 5.1 MPa, which is significantly higher than that of Ca( 3)SiO(5)-water cement system. The in vitro bioactivity of the cements is investigated by soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 7 days. The results show that the Ca(3)SiO(5)-Na(2)CO( 3) solution bone cement has a good bioactivity and can degrade in Ringer's solution. The results indicate that Na(2)CO(3) solution as a liquid phase significantly improves the self-setting properties of Ca( 3)SiO(5) cement as compared to water. The Ca(3)SiO( 5) cement paste prepared using Na(2)CO(3) solution shows good bioactivity and moderate degradability, and the Ca(3)SiO( 5)-Na(2)CO(3) solution system may be used as degradable and bioactive bone defect filling materials.

  16. Influence of concentration, time and method of application of citric acid and sodium citrate in root conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAVASSIM, Rodrigo; LEITE, Fábio Renato Manzolli; ZANDIM, Daniela Leal; DANTAS, Andrea Abi Rached; RACHED, Ricardo Samih Georges Abi; SAMPAIO, José Eduardo Cezar

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to establish the parameters of concentration, time and mode of application of citric acid and sodium citrate in relation to root conditioning. Material and Methods A total of 495 samples were obtained and equally distributed among 11 groups (5 for testing different concentrations of citric acid, 5 for testing different concentrations of sodium citrate and 1 control group). After laboratorial processing, the samples were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. A previously calibrated and blind examiner evaluated micrographs of the samples. Non-parametric statistical analysis was performed to analyze the data obtained. Results Brushing 25% citric acid for 3 min, promoted greater exposure of collagen fibers in comparison with the brushing of 1% citric acid for 1 minute and its topical application at 1% for 3 min. Sodium citrate exposed collagen fibers in a few number of samples. Conclusion Despite the lack of statistical significance, better results for collagen exposure were obtained with brushing application of 25% citric acid for 3 min than with other application parameter. Sodium citrate produced a few number of samples with collagen exposure, so it is not indicated for root conditioning. PMID:22858707

  17. Influence of concentration, time and method of application of citric acid and sodium citrate in root conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Cavassim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to establish the parameters of concentration, time and mode of application of citric acid and sodium citrate in relation to root conditioning. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 495 samples were obtained and equally distributed among 11 groups (5 for testing different concentrations of citric acid, 5 for testing different concentrations of sodium citrate and 1 control group. After laboratorial processing, the samples were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. A previously calibrated and blind examiner evaluated micrographs of the samples. Non-parametric statistical analysis was performed to analyze the data obtained. RESULTS: Brushing 25% citric acid for 3 min, promoted greater exposure of collagen fibers in comparison with the brushing of 1% citric acid for 1 minute and its topical application at 1% for 3 min. Sodium citrate exposed collagen fibers in a few number of samples. CONCLUSION: Despite the lack of statistical significance, better results for collagen exposure were obtained with brushing application of 25% citric acid for 3 min than with other application parameter. Sodium citrate produced a few number of samples with collagen exposure, so it is not indicated for root conditioning.

  18. MoS{sub 2}/cotton-derived carbon fibers with enhanced cyclic performance for sodium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510641 (China); Yang, Yan [School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China); Liu, Jiangwen; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Liu, Jun; Hu, Renzong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510641 (China); Yang, Lichun, E-mail: mslcyang@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510641 (China); Zhu, Min [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510641 (China)

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • MoS{sub 2} nanosheets vertically grow on cotton-derived carbon microfibers. • The carbon fibers facilitate charge transfer and structure stabilization. • The MoS{sub 2}/CDCFs exhibit enhanced cyclic performance for reversible Na{sup +} storage. - Abstract: Carbon fibers derived from bio-template are low cost and environmental benign, therefore have attracted much attention in energy storage materials. In this work, we successfully fabricated MoS{sub 2}/cotton-derived carbon fibers (MoS{sub 2}/CDCFs) via hydrothermal route followed by carbonization process. In the composite of MoS{sub 2}/CDCFs, MoS{sub 2} nanosheets vertically grow on the carbon fibers which offer fast ways for electron transfer and at the same time act as robust support to buffer the volume changes of MoS{sub 2} nanosheets during discharge/charge cycles. As anode materials for sodium-ion batteries, MoS{sub 2}/CDCFs exhibit good rate performance and markedly enhanced cyclic stability due to the conductive support of CDCFs. At a current density of 0.1 A g{sup −1}, the MoS{sub 2}/CDCFs-1 shows an initial reversible capacity of 504.9 mAh g{sup −1}, and maintains 444.5 mAh g{sup −1} after 50 cycles. Even when the current density increases to 0.5 A g{sup −1}, it maintains 323.1 mAh g{sup −1} after 150 cycles, which is much higher than the capacity retention of 149.6 mAh g{sup −1} for the bare MoS{sub 2} nanosheets. The improved electrochemical performance verifies the effective strategy of using cotton as carbon source to construct hierarchical composites for sodium-ion batteries.

  19. The anodic dissolution of SIMFUEL (UO2) in slightly alkaline sodium carbonate/bicarbonate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keech, P.G.; Goldik, J.S.; Qin, Z.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion of nuclear fuel under waste disposal conditions is likely to be influenced by the bicarbonate/carbonate content of the groundwater since it increases the solubility of the U VI corrosion product, [UO 2 ] 2+ . As one of the half reactions involved in the corrosion process, the anodic dissolution of SIMFUEL (UO 2 ) has been studied in bicarbonate/carbonate solutions (pH 9.8) using voltammetric and potentiostatic techniques and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The reaction proceeds by two consecutive one electron transfer reactions (U IV → U V → U VI ). At low potentials (≤250 mV (vs. SCE) the rate of the first electron transfer reaction is rate determining irrespective of the total carbonate concentration. At potentials >250 mV (vs. SCE) the formation of a U VI O 2 CO 3 surface layer begins to inhibit the dissolution rate and the current becomes independent of potential indicating rate control by the chemical dissolution of this layer.

  20. Carbon Quantum Dot Surface-Engineered VO2 Interwoven Nanowires: A Flexible Cathode Material for Lithium and Sodium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogun, Muhammad-Sadeeq; Luo, Yang; Lyu, Feiyi; Wang, Fuxin; Yang, Hao; Li, Haibo; Liang, Chaolun; Huang, Miao; Huang, Yongchao; Tong, Yexiang

    2016-04-20

    The use of electrode materials in their powdery form requires binders and conductive additives for the fabrication of the cells, which leads to unsatisfactory energy storage performance. Recently, a new strategy to design flexible, binder-, and additive-free three-dimensional electrodes with nanoscale surface engineering has been exploited in boosting the storage performance of electrode materials. In this paper, we design a new type of free-standing carbon quantum dot coated VO2 interwoven nanowires through a simple fabrication process and demonstrate its potential to be used as cathode material for lithium and sodium ion batteries. The versatile carbon quantum dots that are vastly flexible for surface engineering serve the function of protecting the nanowire surface and play an important role in the diffusion of electrons. Also, the three-dimensional carbon cloth coated with VO2 interwoven nanowires assisted in the diffusion of ions through the inner and the outer surface. With this unique architecture, the carbon quantum dot nanosurface engineered VO2 electrode exhibited capacities of 420 and 328 mAh g(-1) at current density rate of 0.3 C for lithium and sodium storage, respectively. This work serves as a milestone for the potential replacement of lithium ion batteries and next generation postbatteries.

  1. Preparation of Carbon-Chitosan-Polyvinyl Chloride (CC-PVC) Material and its Application to Electrochemical Degradation of Methylene Blue in Sodium Chloride Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyanto; Prawidha, A. D.

    2018-01-01

    Electrochemical degradation of methylene blue using Carbon-Chitosan-Polyvinyl Chloride (CC-PVC) electrode in sodium chloride have been done. The aim of this work was to degradation of methylene blue using Carbon-Chitosan-Polyvinyl Chloride (CC-PVC). Carbon chitosan composite electrode was preparing by Carbon and Chitosan powder and PVC in 4 mL tetrahydrofuran (THF) solvent and swirled flatly to homogeneous followed by drying in an oven at 100 °C for 3 h. The mixture was placed in stainless steel mould and pressed at 10 ton/cm2. Sodium chloride was used electrolyte solution. The effects of the current and electrolysis time were investigated using spectrophotometer UV-Visible. The experimental results showed that the carbon-chitosan composite electrode have higher effect in the electrochemical degradation of methylene blue in sodium chloride. Based on UV-visible spectra analysis shows current and electrolysis time has high effect to degradation of methylene blue in sodium chloride. Chitosan and polyvinyl chloride can strengthen the bond between the carbons so that the material has the high stability and conductivity. As conclusions is Carbon-Chitosan-Polyvinyl Chloride (CC-PVC) electrode have a high electrochemical activity for degradation of methylene blue in sodium chloride.

  2. Three-Dimensional SnS Decorated Carbon Nano-Networks as Anode Materials for Lithium and Sodium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Zhou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional (3D SnS decorated carbon nano-networks (SnS@C were synthesized via a facile two-step method of freeze-drying combined with post-heat treatment. The lithium and sodium storage performances of above composites acting as anode materials were investigated. As anode materials for lithium ion batteries, a high reversible capacity of 780 mAh·g−1 for SnS@C composites can be obtained at 100 mA·g−1 after 100 cycles. Even cycled at a high current density of 2 A·g−1, the reversible capacity of this composite can be maintained at 610 mAh·g−1 after 1000 cycles. The initial charge capacity for sodium ion batteries can reach 333 mAh·g−1, and it retains a reversible capacity of 186 mAh·g−1 at 100 mA·g−1 after 100 cycles. The good lithium or sodium storage performances are likely attributed to the synergistic effects of the conductive carbon nano-networks and small SnS nanoparticles.

  3. Fractional ablative carbon dioxide laser followed by topical sodium stibogluconate application: A treatment option for pediatric cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilerowicz, Yuval; Koren, Amir; Mashiah, Jacob; Katz, Oren; Sprecher, Eli; Artzi, Ofir

    2018-05-01

    Leishmaniasis is a protozoan zoonotic parasitic infection with cutaneous, mucocutaneous, and visceral manifestations. Israel is endemic for cutaneous leishmaniasis, which is a self-limited disease but is associated with scarring, which is often a source of psychological and social burden for patients. Scars can be especially devastating for children and teenagers. A wide range of physical and medical approaches is used to treat cutaneous leishmaniasis, among which intralesional injections of sodium stibogluconate rank among the most frequently used. Unfortunately, despite being effective, this therapeutic modality can be very painful. Fractional ablative laser creates a controlled mesh-like pattern of tissue ablation in the skin that promotes dermal remodeling and collagen production while at the same time facilitating enhanced delivery of topically applied medications. Patients were treated with fractional ablative carbon dioxide laser followed by immediate topical application of sodium stibogluconate. All children were diagnosed with cutaneous leishmaniasis prior to treatment initiation.. Ten children were treated. One leishmania tropica-positive girl failed to respond. The other nine patients achieved clinical cure and demonstrated good to excellent final cosmesis. Self-rated patient satisfaction and tolerance were high No adverse effects were observed or reported during treatment. Fractional ablative carbon dioxide laser followed by topical sodium stibogluconate application appears to be a safe and promising treatment for cutaneous leishmaniasis infection in children. Future controlled studies are required to validate these findings and compare this technique with traditional approaches. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Hydrothermal carbonization of biomass waste under low temperature condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putra Herlian Eriska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the use of banana peel for energy purposes was investigated. Banana peel is a lignocellulosic waste since it is the most widely produced and consumed fruit in Indonesia. Among the others, hydrothermal carbonization (HTC was chosen as alternative themochemical process, suitable for high moisture biomass. Through a 1 L stirred reactor, hydrothermal treatments were performed under low temperature condition (190, 210 and 230 °C, residence times (30 and 60 min, and biomass to water ratio (1:3, 1:5, and 1:10. Three of product were collected from the process with primary material balance. Solid phase (hydrochar was evaluated in terms of calorific value, proximate and ultimate analysis. The results suggested that the hydrothermal carbonization of banana peel gave high heating value (HHV of 20.09 MJ/kg for its char after dried naturally.

  5. Potential use of the facultative halophyte Chenopodium quinoa Willd. as substrate for biogas production cultivated with different concentrations of sodium chloride under hydroponic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcios, Ariel E; Weichgrebe, Dirk; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2016-03-01

    This project analyses the biogas potential of the halophyte Chenopodium quinoa Willd. In a first approach C. quinoa was grown with different concentrations of NaCl (0, 10 and 20 ppt NaCl) and the crop residues were used as substrate for biogas production. In a second approach, C. quinoa was grown with 0, 10, 20 and 30 ppt NaCl under hydroponic conditions and the fresh biomass was used as substrate. The more NaCl is in the culture medium, the higher the sodium, potassium, crude ash and hemicellulose content in the plant tissue whereas the calcium, sulfur, nitrogen and carbon content in the biomass decrease. According to this study, it is possible to produce high yields of methane using biomass of C. quinoa. The highest specific methane yields were obtained using the substrate from the plants cultivated at 10 and 20 ppt NaCl in both experiments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Removal of Uranium and Associated Contaminants from Aqueous Solutions Using Functional Carbon Nanotubes-Sodium Alginate Conjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Allaboun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of hydrophilic/hydrophobic beads from functional carbon nanotubes (CNTs conjugated with sodium alginate was investigated. Glutaraldehyde was used as a coupling agent and Ca2+ as a crosslinking agent. The formed conjugate comprises two-dimensional sheets of sodium alginate bounded to long tufts of functional CNT tails of micro-size geometry. Detailed characterization of the conjugates was performed using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and its first derivative (DTG, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, and scanning electron microscope (SEM techniques. Different ratios of the conjugate were successfully prepared and used as biodegradable environmentally friendly sorbents. Removal of U6+, V3+, Cr3+, Mo3+, Pb2+, Mn2+, Cu2+, Ti4+ and Ni2+ from aqueous solutions using the synthesized biosorbent was experimentally demonstrated. Maximum metal uptake of 53 mg/g was achieved using the % Functional CNTs = 33 sample.

  7. Study of lithium extraction from brine water, Bledug Kuwu, Indonesia by the precipitation series of oxalic acid and carbonate sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulistiyono, Eko; Lalasari, Latifa Hanum; Mayangsari, W.; Prasetyo, A. B.

    2018-05-01

    Lithium is one of the key elements in the development of batteries for electric car applications. Currently, the resources of the world's lithium are derived from brine water and lithium mineral based on spodumene rock. Indonesia which is located in the area of the ring of fire, has potential brine water resources in some area, such as brine water from Bledug Kuwu, Central Java that used in this research. The purposes of this research are to characterize brine water, Bledug Kuwu and to investigate the influence of chemical solvents on Li, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Al, B ion precipitation from brine water. This research was done with 2 times the process of chemical precipitation that runs series as follows: 5 liters of brine water were chemically precipitated using 400 ml of 12.43 N oxalic acid and followed by chemical precipitation using 400 mL of 7.07 N sodium carbonate solutions. Evaporation and filtration processes were also done twice in an effort to separate white precipitate and filtrate. The filtrate was analyzed by ICP-OES and white precipitates (salts) were analyzed by SEM, XRD, and XRF. The result shows that oxalate precipitation process extracted 32.24% Al, 23.42% B, 22.43% Ca, 14.26% Fe, 3.21 % K, 9.86% Na and 14.26% Li, the following process by carbonate precipitation process extracted 98.86% Mg, 73% Ca, 22.53% Li, 82.04% Al, 14.38% B, 12.50% K, 2.27% Na. There is 63.21% lithium is not extracted from the series process. The SEM analysis shows that the structure of granules on the precipitated salts by oxalic acid form gentle cubic-shaped solid. In the other hand, oxalate precipitation followed by sodium carbonate has various particle sizes and the shape of crystals is fragments, prism and cube look like magnesium carbonate, calcium chloride, and calcite's crystal respectively. This is in accordance with XRD analysis that phases of whewellite (CaC2O4.H2O), disodium oxalate (Na2C2O4), magnesite (MgCO3), calcium lithium aluminum (Al1.19 Ca1Li0.81), dolomite (CaCO3

  8. REDUCTION OF PLUTONIUM TO Pu$sup +3$ BY SODIUM DITHIONITE IN POTASSIUM CARBONATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D.R.; Hoekstra, H.R.

    1958-12-16

    Plutonium values are reduced in an alkaline aqueous medlum to the trlvalent state by means of sodium dlthionite. Plutonlum values are also separated from normally assoclated contaminants by metathesizing a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate containing plutonium with a hydroxide solution, performing the metathesis in the presence of about 0.2 M sodium dithionite at a temperature of between 40 and 90 icient laborato C.

  9. PEDOGENIC CARBONATE δ13C AND ENVIRONMENTAL PRECIPITATION CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Catoni

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon isotopic analysis is a useful tool for investigating paleoenvironments, as the pedogenic carbonate δ13C is related to δ13CSOM and to the proportions of C3/C4 plants. In this work we interpreted the paleoenvironmental conditions at the time of carbonate precipitation in soils formed under different climates and during different geological ages. Samples were taken from a Bk (PR1, Holocene and from two Bkm horizons (PR2 and PR3, Pleistocene. When the mean δ13C plant values and the most plausible paleotemperatures were used in the evaluation, PR1 showed a lower percentage of C4 plants (48% than Pleistocene soils (~53%, in agreement with paleoclimate changes. When instead the δ13C values of current plants were used for PR1, C4 plants ranged from 59 (12°C to 66% (18°C, suggesting two possible interpretations: either plant species changed during the Holocene, or the plant mean values normally used in the literature are not suitable for Pleistocene reconstructions

  10. Inhibitive effect of N,N'-Dimethylaminoethanol on carbon steel corrosion in neutral sodium chloride solution, at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassoune Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition of carbon steel corrosion in neutral sodium chloride solution by N,N'- Dimethylaminoethanol (DMEA, at different temperatures, was investigated using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS techniques. The results obtained confirm that DMEA is a good organic corrosion inhibitor for carbon steel in 0.5M of NaCl (concentration encountered in the Mediterranean seawater, over the whole range of temperatures studied. The inhibition efficiency (IE% increases with increasing DMEA concentration; it reaches highest value for a concentration around 0.125 mol.L-1. Potentiodynamic polarization data show that, the compound studied in this research predominantly act as anodic-type inhibitor. The EIS study reveals that the addition of DMEA decreases the corrosion rate of carbon steel in neutral sodium chloride solution, due to the fact that the inhibitor molecules are strongly adsorbed on the active sites following Langmuir isotherm, thus leading to the formation of a stable protective film on the steel surface which is able to keep the metal/solution interface in a passive state. Furthermore, the values of the activation parameters, i.e. ΔHa and Ea obtained in this study indicate that the adsorption process of DMEA is endothermic and could be mainly attributed to chemisorption, respectively.

  11. Rational design of Sn/SnO{sub 2}/porous carbon nanocomposites as anode materials for sodium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaojia [Tianjin International Joint Research Centre of Surface Technology for Energy Storage Materials, College of Physics and Materials Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Li, Xifei, E-mail: xfli2011@hotmail.com [Tianjin International Joint Research Centre of Surface Technology for Energy Storage Materials, College of Physics and Materials Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Center for Advanced Energy Materials and Devices, Xi’an University of Technology, Xi’an 710048 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education), Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Fan, Linlin; Yu, Zhuxin; Yan, Bo; Xiong, Dongbin; Song, Xiaosheng; Li, Shiyu [Tianjin International Joint Research Centre of Surface Technology for Energy Storage Materials, College of Physics and Materials Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Adair, Keegan R. [Nanomaterials and Energy Lab., Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Li, Dejun, E-mail: dejunli@mail.tjnu.edu.cn [Tianjin International Joint Research Centre of Surface Technology for Energy Storage Materials, College of Physics and Materials Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Sun, Xueliang, E-mail: xsun9@uwo.ca [Nanomaterials and Energy Lab., Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Tianjin International Joint Research Centre of Surface Technology for Energy Storage Materials, College of Physics and Materials Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Sn/SnO{sub 2}/porous carbon nanocomposites are rationally designed via a facile strategy. • The porous carbon mitigates the volume change and poor conductivity of Sn/SnO{sub 2}. • The nanocomposites exhibit the enhanced sodium storage performance. - Abstract: Sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) have successfully attracted considerable attention for application in energy storage, and have been proposed as an alternative to lithium ion batteries (LIBs) due to the abundance of sodium resources and low price. Sn has been deemed as a promising anode material in SIBs which holds high theoretical specific capacity of 845 mAh g{sup −1}. In this work we design nanocomposite materials consisting of porous carbon (PC) with SnO{sub 2} and Sn (Sn/SnO{sub 2}/PC) via a facile reflux method. Served as an anode material for SIBs, the Sn/SnO{sub 2}/PC nanocomposite delivers the primary discharge and charge capacities of 1148.1 and 303.0 mAh g{sup −1}, respectively. Meanwhile, it can preserve the discharge capacity approximately of 265.4 mAh g{sup −1} after 50 cycles, which is much higher than those of SnO{sub 2}/PC (138.5 mAh g{sup −1}) and PC (92.2 mAh g{sup −1}). Furthermore, the Sn/SnO{sub 2}/PC nanocomposite possesses better cycling stability with 77.8% capacity retention compared to that of SnO{sub 2}/PC (61.88%) over 50 cycles. Obviously, the Sn/SnO{sub 2}/PC composite with excellent electrochemical performance shows the great possibility of application in SIBs.

  12. Thermal stability and oxidizing properties of mixed alkaline earth-alkali molten carbonates: A focus on the lithium-sodium carbonate eutectic system with magnesium additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frangini, Stefano; Scaccia, Silvera

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • TG/DSC analysis was conducted on magnesium-containing eutectic Li/Na eutectic carbonates. • Magnesium influence on the oxygen solubility properties of carbonate was also experimentally determined at 600 °C and 650 °C. • A reproducible partial decarbonation process in premelting region caused formation of magnesium oxycarbonate-like phases. • The acidobase buffering action of magnesium oxycarbonate species could explain the high basic/oxidizing properties of such carbonate melts. • A general correlation between thermal instability in premelting region and basic/oxidizing melt properties was established. - Abstract: A comparative study on thermal behavior and oxygen solubility properties of eutectic 52/48 lithium/sodium carbonate salt containing minor additions of magnesium up to 10 mol% has been made in order to determine whether a general correlation between these two properties can be found or not. Consecutive TG/DSC heating/cooling thermal cycles carried out under alternating CO 2 and N 2 gas flows allowed to assign thermal events observed in the premelting region to a partial decarbonation process of the magnesium-alkali mixed carbonates. The observed decarbonation process at 460 °C is believed to come from initial stage of thermal decomposition of magnesium carbonate resulting in the metastable formation of magnesium oxycarbonate-like phases MgO·2MgCO 3 , in a similar manner as previously reported for lanthanum. Reversible formation and decomposition of the magnesium carbonate phase has been observed under a CO 2 gas atmosphere. The intensity of the decomposition process shows a maximum for a 3 mol% MgO addition that gives also the highest oxygen solubility, suggesting therefore that instability thermal analysis in the premelting region can be considered as providing an effective measure of the basicity/oxidizing properties of alkali carbonate melts with magnesium or, in more general terms, with cations that are strong modifiers of

  13. Inhibition of photosynthesis by sodium fluoride. I. The sodium fluoride-induced carbon dioxide burst from Chlorella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, N I; Gaffron, H

    1958-01-01

    An attempt has been made to investigate the influence of fluorine compounds on the mechanism of photosynthesis using the acid-tolerant alga, Chlorella. Experimental results have verified that a burst of CO/sub 2/ expelled by NaF and the chlorophyll concentration. Contrary to the findings of another researcher, the amount of CO/sub 2/ released can be varied at will according to the conditions chosen. The yield when expressed in equivalence to the chlorophyll present in the algae may vary from values of zero to more than four. A simple experiment proved that in its precursor form, the CO/sub 2/ released by NaF is not a substrate for the photochemical reaction. The source appears to be some organic acid whose decarboxylation can be inhibited by cyanide, and it is more closely linked to respiration and fermentation than to photosynthesis. The authors observed that the effects can vary from a strong inhibition to no inhibition at all, even in cases where a CO/sub 2/ gush was evident.

  14. Lithium and sodium ion capacitors with high energy and power densities based on carbons from recycled olive pits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajuria, Jon; Redondo, Edurne; Arnaiz, Maria; Mysyk, Roman; Rojo, Teófilo; Goikolea, Eider

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we are presenting both lithium and sodium ion capacitors (LIC and NIC) entirely based on electrodes designed from recycled olive pit bio-waste derived carbon materials. On the one hand, olive pits were pyrolized to obtain a low specific surface area semigraphitic hard carbon to be used as the ion intercalation (battery-type) negative electrode. On the other hand, the same hard carbon was chemically activated with KOH to obtain a high specific surface area activated carbon that was further used as the ion-adsorption (capacitor-type) positive electrode. Both electrodes were custom-made to be assembled in a hybrid cell to either build a LIC or NIC in the corresponding Li- and Na-based electrolytes. For comparison purposes, a symmetric EDLC supercapacitor cell using the same activated carbon in 1.5 M Et4NBF4/acetonitrile electrolyte was also built. Both LIC and NIC systems demonstrate remarkable energy and power density enhancement over its EDLC counterpart while showing good cycle life. This breakthrough offers the possibility to easily fabricate versatile hybrid ion capacitors, covering a wide variety of applications where different requirements are demanded.

  15. Temperature conditions in an LMFBR power plant from primary sodium to steam circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, M.; Chaumont, J.M.; Mougniot, J.C.; Recolin, J.; Acket.

    1977-01-01

    The optimization analysis which is presented is based on an evaluation of the tender prior to contracting Super Phenix. Process constraints are reviewed: fuel limitations, turbine, steam generators; parameter selection involves major temperatures (primary ΔT 0 , steam generator water inlet temperature, turbine steam inlet temperature) or minor temperature (secondary sodium); countervailing mechanisms include upward and downward tendencies. The optimum values obtained by the method represent a coherent balanced set of parameters. So, the most significant tendency revealed by an optimization of investment costs involves the advantages of a hot system with a steam temperature above 515 0 C, but the hot temperature range is very limited (3 0 C between the hot primary sodium temperature and the steam temperature) while the cold temperatures cover a much wide range. The tolerance range within which each critical temperature may be selected without exceeding a certain cost margin per KWh is given

  16. Chemical conversion of cisplatin and carboplatin with histidine in a model protein crystallized under sodium iodide conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanley, Simon W. M.; Helliwell, John R., E-mail: john.helliwell@manchester.ac.uk [University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-29

    Crystals of HEWL with cisplatin and HEWL with carboplatin grown in sodium iodide conditions both show a partial chemical transformation of cisplatin or carboplatin to a transiodoplatin (PtI{sub 2}X{sub 2}) form. The binding is only at the N{sup δ} atom of His15. A further Pt species (PtI{sub 3}X) is also seen, in both cases bound in a crevice between symmetry-related protein molecules. Cisplatin and carboplatin are platinum anticancer agents that are used to treat a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine in hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) showed a partial chemical conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high sodium chloride concentration used in the crystallization conditions. Also, the co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin in sodium bromide conditions resulted in the partial conversion of carboplatin to the transbromoplatin form, with a portion of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate (CBDC) moiety still present. The results of the co-crystallization of HEWL with cisplatin or carboplatin in sodium iodide conditions are now reported in order to determine whether the cisplatin and carboplatin converted to the iodo form, and whether this took place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin in NaCl conditions or to transbromoplatin in NaBr conditions as seen previously. It is reported here that a partial chemical transformation has taken place to a transplatin form for both ligands. The NaI-grown crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1} with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The chemically transformed cisplatin and carboplatin bind to both His15 residues, i.e. in each asymmetric unit. The binding is only at the N{sup δ} atom of His15. A third platinum species is also seen in both conditions bound in a crevice between symmetry-related molecules. Here, the platinum is bound to three I atoms identified based on their anomalous difference electron densities

  17. Use of sodium carbonate as a binder in ceramic tile compositions; Uso del carbonato sodico como ligante en composiciones de baldosas ceramicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quereda, F.; Sanchez, E.; Garcia-Ten, J.; Gozalbo, A.; Beltran, V.; Sanchez, J.; Sales, J.

    2010-07-01

    This study analyses, first, the influence of sodium carbonate content on the behaviour of the ceramic tile body composition during the different manufacturing process stages (preparation of the suspension, pressing, and firing), as well as on unfired tile mechanical strength. It has been verified that sodium carbonate can be used as a binder in ceramic tile compositions, since small percentages considerably enhance dry tile mechanical strength. It has furthermore been determined that for each composition there is an optimum addition content, with high increased mechanical strength (up to 70%), without this noticeably affecting the rheological behaviour of the suspension to be spray dried. These results are currently being patented (patent application P200930148). Once the binding effect of sodium carbonate had been verified, it was sought to establish its action mechanism. For this purpose, drops of mixtures of a standard ceramic composition and increasing quantities of sodium carbonate were prepared. The drops were rapidly dried and the granules were characterised by scanning electron microscopy. It was thus verified that the most likely sodium carbonate action mechanism was formation of solid bridges by crystallisation. (Author)

  18. Sodium Oxybate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or give your sodium oxybate to anyone else; selling or sharing it is against the law. Store ... dehydrogenase deficiency (an inherited condition in which certain substances build up in the body and cause retardation ...

  19. Carbonation by fluid-rock interactions at high-pressure conditions: Implications for carbon cycling in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Francesca; Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Beyssac, Olivier; Martinez, Isabelle; Ague, Jay J.; Chaduteau, Carine

    2016-07-01

    Carbonate-bearing lithologies are the main carbon carrier into subduction zones. Their evolution during metamorphism largely controls the fate of carbon, regulating its fluxes between shallow and deep reservoirs. Recent estimates predict that almost all subducted carbon is transferred into the crust and lithospheric mantle during subduction metamorphism via decarbonation and dissolution reactions at high-pressure conditions. Here we report the occurrence of eclogite-facies marbles associated with metasomatic systems in Alpine Corsica (France). The occurrence of these marbles along major fluid-conduits as well as textural, geochemical and isotopic data indicating fluid-mineral reactions are compelling evidence for the precipitation of these carbonate-rich assemblages from carbonic fluids during metamorphism. The discovery of metasomatic marbles brings new insights into the fate of carbonic fluids formed in subducting slabs. We infer that rock carbonation can occur at high-pressure conditions by either vein-injection or chemical replacement mechanisms. This indicates that carbonic fluids produced by decarbonation reactions and carbonate dissolution may not be directly transferred to the mantle wedge, but can interact with slab and mantle-forming rocks. Rock-carbonation by fluid-rock interactions may have an important impact on the residence time of carbon and oxygen in subduction zones and lithospheric mantle reservoirs as well as carbonate isotopic signatures in subduction zones. Furthermore, carbonation may modulate the emission of CO2 at volcanic arcs over geological time scales.

  20. A high energy and power sodium-ion hybrid capacitor based on nitrogen-doped hollow carbon nanowires anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongdong; Ye, Chao; Chen, Xinzhi; Wang, Suqing; Wang, Haihui

    2018-04-01

    The sodium ion hybrid capacitor (SHC) has been attracting much attention. However, the SHC's power density is significantly confined to a low level due to the sluggish ion diffusion in the anode. Herein, we propose to use an electrode with a high double layer capacitance as the anode in the SHC instead of insertion anodes. To this aim, nitrogen doped hollow carbon nanowires (N-HCNWs) with a high specific surface area are prepared, and the high capacitive contribution during the sodium ion storage process is confirmed by a series of electrochemical measurements. A new SHC consisting of a N-HCNW anode and a commercial active carbon (AC) cathode is fabricated for the first time. Due to the hybrid charge storage mechanism combining ion insertion and capacitive process, the as-fabricated SHC strikes a balance between the energy density and power density, a energy density of 108 Wh kg-1 and a power density of 9 kW kg-1 can be achieved, which overwhelms the electrochemical performances of most reported AC-based SHCs.

  1. The sodium process facility at Argonne National Laboratory - West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P.; McDermott, M.D.; Price, J.R.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Wells, P.B.

    1997-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W) has approximately 680,000 liters (180,000 gallons) of raw sodium stored in facilities on site. As mandated by the State of Idaho and the United States Department of Energy (DOE), this sodium must be transformed into a stable condition for land disposal. To comply with this mandate, ANL-W designed and built the Sodium Process Facility (SPF) for the processing of this sodium into a dry, sodium carbonate powder. The major portion of the sodium stored at ANL-W is radioactively contaminated. The SPF was designed to react elemental sodium to sodium carbonate through two-stages involving caustic process and carbonate process steps. The sodium is first reacted to sodium hydroxide in the caustic process step. The caustic process step involves the injection of sodium into a nickel reaction vessel filled with a 50 wt% solution of sodium hydroxide. Water is also injected, controlling the boiling point of the solution. In the carbonate process, the sodium hydroxide is reacted with carbon dioxide to form sodium carbonate. This dry powder, similar in consistency to baking soda, is a waste form acceptable for burial in the State of Idaho as a non-hazardous, radioactive waste. The caustic process was originally designed and built in the 1980s for reacting the 290,000 liters (77,000 gallons) of primary sodium from the Fermi-1 Reactor to sodium hydroxide. The hydroxide was slated to be used to neutralize acid products from the PUREX process at the Hanford site. However, changes in the DOE mission precluded the need for hydroxide and the caustic process was never operated. With the shutdown of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), the necessity for a facility to react sodium was identified. In order to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, the sodium had to be converted into a waste form acceptable for disposal in a Sub-Title D low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. Sodium hydroxide is a RCRA

  2. Corrosion of carbon steel under waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, G.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion of carbon steel has been studied in the United Kingdom under granitic groundwater conditions, with pH between 5 and 10 and possibly substantial amounts of Cl - , SO 4 2- and HCO 3 - /CO 3 2- . Corrosion modes considered include uniform corrosion under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions; passive corrosion; localized attack in the form of pitting or crevice corrosion; and environmentally assisted cracking - hydrogen embrittlement or stress corrosion cracking. Studies of these processes are being carried out in order to predict the metal thicknesses required to give container lifetimes of 500 to 1000 years. A simple uniform corrosion model predicts a corrosion rate of around 13.4 μm/a at 20C, rising to 69 μm/a at 50C and 208 μm/a at 90C. A radiation dose of 10 5 rad/h and a G-value of 2.8 for the production of oxidizing species would account for an increase in corrosion rate of 7 μm/a. This model overestimates slightly the results actually achieved for experimental samples exposed for two years, the difference being due to a protective film formed on the samples. These corrosion rates predict that the container must be 227 mm thick to withstand uniform corrosion; however, they predict very high levels of hydrogen production. Conditions will be favourable for localized or pitting corrosion for about 125 years, leading to a maximum penetration of 160 mm. Since the exposure environment cannot be predicted precisely, one cannot state that stress corrosion cracking is impossible. Thus the container must be stress relieved. Other corrosion mechanisms such as microbial corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement are not considered significant

  3. Study of photosensitization reaction progress in a 96 well plate with photosensitizer rich condition using Talaporfin sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Emiyu; Takahashi, Mei; Arai, Tsunenori

    2013-02-01

    To quantitatively investigate photosensitization reaction in vitro against myocardial cells with photosensitizer rich condition in solution using Talaporfin sodium in the well of a 96 well plate, we studied photosensitization reaction progress in this well. We have proposed non-thermal conduction block of myocardium tissue using the photosensitization reaction with laser irradiation shortly after Talaporfin sodium injection. In above situation, the photosensitizer is located outside the myocardial cells in high concentration. To understand interaction of the photosensitization reaction in which the photosensitizer distributes outside cells, the photosensitization reaction progress in the well was studied. Talaporfin sodium (799.69 MW) solution and a 663 nm diode laser were used. The photosensitizer solution concentrations of 12.5-37.5 μM were employed. The photosensitizer fluorescence with 0.29 W/cm2 in irradiance, which was optimized in previous cell death study, was measured during the laser irradiation until 40 J/cm2. The photosensitizer solution absorbance and dissolved oxygen pressure after the laser irradiation were also measured. We found that the photosensitization reaction progress had 2 distinctive phases of different reaction rate: rapid photosensitization reaction consuming dissolved oxygen and gentle photosensitization reaction with oxygen diffusion from the solution-air boundary. The dissolved oxygen pressure and photosensitizer solution absorbance were 30% and 80% of the initial values after the laser irradiation, respectively. Therefore, oxygen was rate-controlling factor of the photosensitization reaction in the well with the photosensitizer rich condition. In the oxygen diffusion phase, the oxygen pressure was maintained around 40 mmHg until the laser irradiation of 40 J/cm2 and it is similar to that of myocardium tissue in vivo. We think that our 96 well plate in vitro system may simulate PDT in myocardial tissue with photosensitization reaction

  4. Biomass carbon micro/nano-structures derived from ramie fibers and corncobs as anode materials for lithium-ion and sodium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Qiang; Zhang, Zhenghao; Yin, Shengyu; Guo, Zaiping; Wang, Shiquan; Feng, Chuanqi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ramie fibers and corncobs are used as precursors to prepare the biomass carbons. • The ramie fiber carbon (RFC) took on morphology of 3D micro-rods. • The corncob carbon (CC) possessed a 2D nanosheets structure. • Both RFC and CC exhibited outstanding electrochemical performances in LIBs and SIBs systems. - Abstract: Three-dimensional (3D) rod-like carbon micro-structures derived from natural ramie fibers and two-dimensional (2D) carbon nanosheets derived from corncobs have been fabricated by heat treatment at 700 °C under argon atomsphere. The structure and morphology of the as-obtained ramie fiber carbon (RFC) and corncob carbon (CC) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique. The electrochemical performances of the biomass carbon-based anode in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) were investigated. When tested as anode material for lithium ion batteries, both the RFC microrods and CC nanosheets exhibited high capacity, excellent rate capability, and stable cyclability. The specific capacity were still as high as 489 and 606 mAhg −1 after 180 cycles when cycled at room temperature in a 3.0–0.01 V potential (vs. Li/Li + ) window at current density of 100 mAg −1 , respectively, which are much higher than that of graphite (375 mAhg −1 ) under the same current density. Although the anodes in sodium ion batteries showed poorer specific capability than that in lithium-ion batteries, they still achieve a reversible sodium intercalation capacity of 122 and 139 mAhg −1 with similar cycling stability. The feature of stable cycling performance makes the biomass carbon derived from natural ramie fibers and corncobs to be promising candidates as electrodes in rechargeable sodium-ion batteries and lithium-ion batteries.

  5. Biomass carbon micro/nano-structures derived from ramie fibers and corncobs as anode materials for lithium-ion and sodium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Qiang; Zhang, Zhenghao [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Yin, Shengyu [College of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Wuhan Technology and Business University, Wuhan 430065 (China); Guo, Zaiping [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Institute for Superconducting & Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Wang, Shiquan [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Feng, Chuanqi, E-mail: cfeng@hubu.edu.cn [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Ramie fibers and corncobs are used as precursors to prepare the biomass carbons. • The ramie fiber carbon (RFC) took on morphology of 3D micro-rods. • The corncob carbon (CC) possessed a 2D nanosheets structure. • Both RFC and CC exhibited outstanding electrochemical performances in LIBs and SIBs systems. - Abstract: Three-dimensional (3D) rod-like carbon micro-structures derived from natural ramie fibers and two-dimensional (2D) carbon nanosheets derived from corncobs have been fabricated by heat treatment at 700 °C under argon atomsphere. The structure and morphology of the as-obtained ramie fiber carbon (RFC) and corncob carbon (CC) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique. The electrochemical performances of the biomass carbon-based anode in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) were investigated. When tested as anode material for lithium ion batteries, both the RFC microrods and CC nanosheets exhibited high capacity, excellent rate capability, and stable cyclability. The specific capacity were still as high as 489 and 606 mAhg{sup −1} after 180 cycles when cycled at room temperature in a 3.0–0.01 V potential (vs. Li/Li{sup +}) window at current density of 100 mAg{sup −1}, respectively, which are much higher than that of graphite (375 mAhg{sup −1}) under the same current density. Although the anodes in sodium ion batteries showed poorer specific capability than that in lithium-ion batteries, they still achieve a reversible sodium intercalation capacity of 122 and 139 mAhg{sup −1} with similar cycling stability. The feature of stable cycling performance makes the biomass carbon derived from natural ramie fibers and corncobs to be promising candidates as electrodes in rechargeable sodium-ion batteries and lithium-ion batteries.

  6. The effect of sage, sodium erythorbate and a mixture of sage and sodium erythorbate on the quality of turkey meatballs stored under vacuum and modified atmosphere conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpińska-Tymoszczyk, M

    2010-12-01

    1. The combined effect of sage (S), sodium erythorbate (SE), a mixture of sage and sodium erythorbate (MIX) and vacuum packaging (VP) and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on the quality of cooked turkey meatballs stored at 4°C was investigated. The physicochemical properties (colour, MDA, AV, pH, water activity), microbiological quality characteristics (counts of mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria, fungi, coliforms and Clostridium sp.) and flavour attributes of meatballs were determined. 2. The values of the colour parameters L*, a* and b* were affected by the additives and packaging method. The colour of meatballs was better protected by sodium erythorbate than by sage or a mixture of sage and sodium erythorbate. The additives effectively stabilised lipids against oxidation and slowed down hydrolytic changes in turkey meatballs. Sage and a mixture of sage and sodium erythorbate showed stronger antioxidant properties than sodium erythorbate added alone. Products with additives were characterised by better sensory quality than control samples. Sage and MIX prevented the growth of mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria. All additives inhibited the growth of coliforms. 3. MAP was more effective than VP in maintaining the microbial and sensory quality stability of cooked turkey meatballs. However, VP appears to be a better method as regards the maintaining of lipid stability in turkey meatballs.

  7. Experimental study and phenomenological modeling of the hydrolysis of tritiated sodium: influence of experimental conditions on the tritium distribution in the effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassery, Aurelien

    2014-01-01

    Within the framework of the decommissioning of fast reactors, several processes are under investigation regarding sodium disposal. One of them rests on the implementation of the sodium-water reaction (SWR), in a controlled and progressive way, to remove residual sodium containing impurities such as sodium hydrides, sodium oxides and tritiated sodium hydrides. Such a hydrolysis releases some amount of energy and produces a liquid effluent, composed of a solution of soda, and a gaseous effluent, composed of hydrogen, steam and an inert gas. The tritium, originally into the sodium as a soluble (T - ) or precipitate form (NaT), will be distributed between the liquid and gaseous effluent, and according to two chemical forms, the tritium hydride HT and the tritiated water HTO. HTO being 10,000 times more radio-toxic than HT, a precise knowledge of the mechanisms governing the distribution of tritium is necessary in order to estimate the exhaust gas releases and design the process needed to treat the off-gas before its release into the environment. An experimental study has been carried out in order to determine precisely the phenomena involved in the hydrolysis. The influence of the experimental conditions on the tritium distribution has been tested. The results of this study leaded to a phenomenological description of the tritiated sodium hydrolysis that will help to predict the composition of the effluents, regarding tritium. (author) [fr

  8. Study of new complexes of uranium and comba radical. I.- Complexes defective in sodium carbonate; Estudio de nuevos complejos entre el uranio y el radical CDMBA. I. Complejos con defectos de carbonato sodico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera Palomino, J; Galiano Sedano, J A; Parellada Bellod, R; Bellido Gonzalez, A

    1975-07-01

    Some complexes formed in presence of defect of sodium carbonate with respect to the stoichiometric ratio (U): (C0{sub 3}) = 1:3 are studied. This ratio corresponds to the main complex which is responsible for the uranium extraction with CDMBAC organic solutions and from U(VI) aqueous solutions with an excess of sodium carbonate. (Author) 10 refs.

  9. Microwave assisted synthesis of cyclic carbonates from olefins with sodium bicarbonates as the C1 source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jie; Mao, Xianwen; Jamison, Timothy F; Hatton, T Alan

    2014-03-25

    An effective transformation of alkenes into cyclic carbonates has been achieved using NaHCO3 as the C1 source in acetone-water under microwave heating, with selectivities and yields significantly surpassing those obtained using conventional heating.

  10. Effects of Jerusalem Artichoke Powder and Sodium Carbonate as Phosphate Replacers on the Quality Characteristics of Emulsified Chicken Meatballs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Burcu; Serdaroğlu, Meltem

    2018-02-01

    Today incorporation of natural ingredients as inorganic phosphate replacers has come into prominence as a novel research topic due to health concerns about phosphates. In this study, we aimed to investigate the quality of emulsified chicken meatballs produced with Jerusalem artichoke powder (JAP), either alone or in combination with sodium carbonate (SC) as sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) replacers. The results showed that naturally dried JAP showed favorable technological properties in terms of water-oil binding and gelling. Emulsion batters formulated with JAP-SC mixture showed lower jelly and fat separation, higher water-holding capacity and higher emulsion stability than control samples with STPP. In final product, incorporation of JAP-SC mixture increased moisture and reduced lipid and energy values, and kept the pH value similar to control. Added JAP lead to increments in b* values whereas decreases L* values. Cook yield was similar to control in phosphate-free samples formulated with JAP-SC mix. Either low or medium ratios of JAP in combination with SC managed to protect most of the sensory parameters, while sensory scores tend to decrease in samples containing high levels of JAP. Addition of JAP to formulations presented samples that have equivalent behavior to phosphates in terms of lipid oxidation. In conclusion, our study confirms that utilization of JAP in combination with SC had promising effects as phosphate replacers by presenting natural solutions and providing equivalent quality to standard phosphate containing products.

  11. An Amorphous Carbon Nitride Composite Derived from ZIF-8 as Anode Material for Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jing-Min; Chen, Jia-Jia; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Bin-Bin; Zang, Jun; Zheng, Ming-Sen; Dong, Quan-Feng

    2015-06-08

    An composite comprising amorphous carbon nitride (ACN) and zinc oxide is derived from ZIF-8 by pyrolysis. The composite is a promising anode material for sodium-ion batteries. The nitrogen content of the ACN composite is as high as 20.4 %, and the bonding state of nitrogen is mostly pyridinic, as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The composite exhibits an excellent Na(+) storage performance with a reversible capacity of 430 mA h g(-1) and 146 mA h g(-1) at current densities of 83 mA g(-1) and 8.33 A g(-1) , respectively. A specific capacity of 175 mA h g(-1) was maintained after 2000 cycles at 1.67 A g(-1) , with only 0.016 % capacity degradation per cycle. Moreover, an accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC) test demonstrates the excellent thermal stability of the composite, with a low self heating rate and high onset temperature (210 °C). These results shows its promise as a candidate material for high-capacity, high-rate anodes for sodium-ion batteries. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Transport activity of the sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1 is enhanced by different isoforms of carbonic anhydrase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Schueler

    Full Text Available Transport metabolons have been discussed between carbonic anhydrase II (CAII and several membrane transporters. We have now studied different CA isoforms, expressed in Xenopus oocytes alone and together with the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter 1 (NBCe1, to determine their catalytic activity and their ability to enhance NBCe1 transport activity. pH measurements in intact oocytes indicated similar activity of CAI, CAII and CAIII, while in vitro CAIII had no measurable activity and CAI only 30% of the activity of CAII. All three CA isoforms increased transport activity of NBCe1, as measured by the transport current and the rate of intracellular sodium rise in oocytes. Two CAII mutants, altered in their intramolecular proton pathway, CAII-H64A and CAII-Y7F, showed significant catalytic activity and also enhanced NBCe1 transport activity. The effect of CAI, CAII, and CAII mutants on NBCe1 activity could be reversed by blocking CA activity with ethoxyzolamide (EZA, 10 µM, while the effect of the less EZA-sensitive CAIII was not reversed. Our results indicate that different CA isoforms and mutants, even if they show little enzymatic activity in vitro, may display significant catalytic activity in intact cells, and that the ability of CA to enhance NBCe1 transport appears to depend primarily on its catalytic activity.

  13. Voltammetric Determination of Ivabradine Hydrochloride Using Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Modified Electrode in Presence of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Kamal Attia

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A new sensitive sensor was fabricated for the determination of ivabradine hydrochloride (IH based on modification with multiwalled carbon nanotubes using sodium dodecyl sulfate as micellar medium to increase the sensitivity. Methods: The electrochemical behavior of IH was studied in Britton-Robinson buffer (pH: 2.0-11.0 using cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry. Results: The voltammetric response was linear over the range of 3.984 x 10-6-3.475 x 10-5 mol L-1. The limits of detection and quantification were found to be 5.160 x 10-7 and 1.720 x 10-6 mol L-1, respectively. Conclusion: This method is suitable for determination of IH in tablets and plasma.

  14. Voltammetric Determination of Ivabradine Hydrochloride Using Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Modified Electrode in Presence of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Ali Kamal; Abo-Talib, Nisreen Farouk; Tammam, Marwa Hosny

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: A new sensitive sensor was fabricated for the determination of ivabradine hydrochloride (IH) based on modification with multiwalled carbon nanotubes using sodium dodecyl sulfate as micellar medium to increase the sensitivity. Methods: The electrochemical behavior of IH was studied in Britton-Robinson buffer (pH: 2.0-11.0) using cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry. Results: The voltammetric response was linear over the range of 3.984 x 10 -6 -3.475 x 10 -5 mol L -1 . The limits of detection and quantification were found to be 5.160 x 10 -7 and 1.720 x 10-6 mol L -1 , respectively. Conclusion: This method is suitable for determination of IH in tablets and plasma.

  15. Sustained release of simvastatin from hollow carbonated hydroxyapatite microspheres prepared by aspartic acid and sodium dodecyl sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Wang, Yinjing; Zhao, Xu; Li, Yi; Yang, Tao; Zhang, Xue; Wu, Xiaoguang

    2017-06-01

    Hollow carbonated hydroxyapatite (HCHAp) microspheres as simvastatin (SV) sustained-release vehicles were fabricated through a novel and simple one-step biomimetic strategy. Firstly, hollow CaCO 3 microspheres were precipitated through the reaction of CaCl 2 with Na 2 CO 3 in the presence of aspartic acid and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Then, the as-prepared hollow CaCO 3 microspheres were transformed into HCHAp microspheres with a controlled anion-exchange method. The HCHAp microspheres were 3-5μm with a shell thickness of 0.5-1μm and were constructed of short needle nanoparticles. The HCHAp microspheres were then loaded with SV, exhibiting excellent drug-loading capacity and sustained release properties. These results present a new material synthesis strategy for HCHAp microspheres and suggest that the as-prepared HCHAp microspheres are promising for applications in drug delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Physicochemical properties, firmness, and nanostructures of sodium carbonate-soluble pectin of 2 Chinese cherry cultivars at 2 ripening stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lifen; Chen, Fusheng; An, Hongjie; Yang, Hongshun; Sun, Xiaoyang; Guo, Xingfeng; Li, Lite

    2008-08-01

    Firmness and physicochemical properties of 2 Chinese cherry (Prunus pseudocerasus L.) cultivars (soft cultivar "Caode" and crisp cultivar "Bende") at unripe and ripe stages were investigated, and the qualitative and quantitative information about sodium carbonate-soluble pectin (SSP) nanostructures was determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The lengths and widths of the cherry SSPs are very regular: almost all of the widths and lengths of SSP single molecules are composed of several basic units. The widths of the SSP chains are 37, 47, 55, and 61 nm, and the lengths are 123, 202, and 380 nm in both cultivars. The results show that the firmer cherry groups (crisp fruit) contain more percentages of wide and short SSP chains than soft fruit, and the unripe groups contain more percentages of wide and long SSP chains than corresponding ripe groups. They indicate that those nanostructural characteristics of SSP are closely related with firmness of the Chinese cherries in each cultivar.

  17. Cleaning of Sodium in the Cold Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Ho; Jeong, Ji Young; Kim, Jong Man; Choi, Byung Hae; Nam, Ho Yun

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of a cleaning process is to remove the residual sodium adhering to the component walls once it has been properly drained. It is necessary to clean and decontaminate a component, especially the large components of the primary coolant system; such as the intermediate heat exchangers and the primary pump. Improper and inadequate cleaning has in a number of cases resulted in problems in the storage, handling, and reuse of components. Several types of failures due to improper cleaning procedures have been defined in the past. Inadequate and incomplete removal of sodium results in residues which may contain metallic sodium and alkaline compounds such as sodium hydroxide, sodium oxide, sodium carbonate, and various types of alcoholates. Reinsertion of components containing these compounds into a high-temperature sodium system can result in either the intergranular penetration characteristic of a high- oxygen sodium or an accelerated corrosion due to oxygen. The methods used for cleaning sodium equipment depend on the condition and types of equipment to be cleaned and whether the equipment is to be reused. Cleaning methods are needed that will avoid a deleterious local overheating, material surface degradation or deposits, chemical, physical, or mechanical damage, and external effects. This paper discusses a steam-nitrogen gas cleaning method for the routine applications that permits the reuse of the cold trap in sodium

  18. Characterization of Sodium Carbonate (Na2CO3) Treated Rice Husk Activated Carbon and Adsorption of Lead from Car Battery Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanum, F.; Bani, O.; Izdiharo, A. M.

    2017-03-01

    The use of rice husk as adsorbent would not only reduce its disposal problems, but would also produce value-added products, such as activated carbon derived from rice husk. This study aimed to determine the optimum carbonization temperature for activated carbon production from rice husk and its adsorption performance on Pb in car battery wastewater. In this study, activated carbon was produced by carbonizing rice husk 400-600 °C for 90-150 minutes followed by chemical activation using 5% Na2CO3 and sieving to 100 meshes. Lead adsorption was measured using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Results suggested that highest carbon yield of 47.75% was obtained for carbonization at 500 °C for 150 minutes. At that condition, produced activated carbon contained 3.35% moisture, 30.86% ash, 18.04% volatile matter. The adsorption capacity was found to be 0.6007 mg lead/g adsorbent with % adsorpsi 58.08%

  19. Effect of powder processing conditions on the electromechanical properties of lithium doped potassium sodium niobate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensur-Alkoy, E.; Berksoy-Yavuz, A.

    2016-07-01

    Lithium doped potassium sodium niobate ceramics with (K0.50−x/2Na0.50−x/2Lix)NbO3 composition where x=0.04 and 0.07 were fabricated by solid state calcination and pressureless sintering methods. However, two different powder processing and calcination routes were used in this study and their effect on the structural and electrical properties were investigated and discussed. The routes were namely loose calcination and compact calcination. A general trend of decreasing grain size was observed in the sintered ceramics prepared from these powders. The most drastic effect was observed on the electromechanical properties of the samples, where the maximum strain of 7% lithium modified sample under an E-field of 50kV/cm was increased from 0.09% to 0.12% by changing processing route. Furthermore, hysteretic behavior of the strain was found to decrease. This tendency was also valid for ferroelectric hysteresis property, with remnant polarization (2Pr) increasing from 23μC/cm2 to 46μC/cm2. The improvements observed in the electrical properties were discussed on the basis of chemical homogeneity and uniform ionic distribution. (Author)

  20. Textural characterization and chemistry of activated coal obtained starting from stone of African palm at different conditions of temperature and carbonization time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Claudia Marcela; Briceno, Nelson; Baquero, Maria Cristina; Giraldo, Liliana; Moreno, Juan Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Activated carbons are obtained starting from stone of African palm, by means of chemical activation with k 2 CO 3 and thermal activation with CO 2 . The initial material undergoes different conditions of carbonization temperature 600, 750 and 900 Celsius degrades and different times of carbonization 1.0; 1.5; 2.0 and 2.5 hours, with the objective of observing how these conditions affect the porosity of the material. It is observed a low development of the porosity in the carbons carbonized to 900 Celsius degrade and activated chemically. The acidity and basicity are determined for each one of the activated carbons obtained for titration with solutions 0.05 m of sodium hydroxide and of hydrochloric acid respectively. The samples activated chemically present bigger contents of acid groups, for the experimental conditions of work? Than the samples obtained by thermal activation for the activated carbons thermally activated, the values for acid and basic groups are low-between 0,20 and 0,72 meq g-l

  1. In vitro study of the effect of a dentifrice containing 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, and sodium monofluorophosphate on acid-softened enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rege, Aarti; Heu, Rod; Stranick, Michael; Sullivan, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the possible mode of action of a dentifrice containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate (Pro-Argin Technology), and sodium monofluorophosphate in delivering the benefits of preventing acid erosion and rehardening acid-softened enamel. The surfaces of acid-softened bovine enamel specimens were evaluated after application of a dentifrice containing 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, and sodium monofluorophosphate in vitro. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Electronic Spectrometry for Chemical Analysis (ESCA), and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) were used to characterize the enamel surfaces. Exposure of pristine enamel surfaces to citric acid resulted in clear roughening of the surface. Multiple applications of a dentifrice containing 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, and sodium monofluorophosphate to the surface of the enamel resulted in the disappearance of the microscopic voids observed by SEM as a function of treatment applications. The ESCA analysis demonstrated that both the nitrogen and carbonate levels increased as the number of treatments increased, which provides evidence that arginine and calcium carbonate were bound to the surface. Observance of arginine's signature mass fragmentation pattern by SIMS analysis confirmed the identity of arginine on the enamel surface. A series of in vitro experiments has demonstrated a possible mode of action by which a dentifrice containing 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, and sodium monofluorophosphate delivers the benefits of preventing acid erosion and rehardening acid-softened enamel. The combination of arginine and calcium carbonate adheres to the enamel surface and helps to fill the microscopic gaps created by acid, which in turn helps repair the enamel and provides a protective coating against future acid attacks.

  2. The influence of activating agents on the performance of rice husk-based carbon for sodium lauryl sulfate and chrome (Cr) metal adsorptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneli; Safitri, Z. F.; Pangestika, A. W.; Fauziah, F.; Wahyuningrum, V. N.; Astuti, Y.

    2017-02-01

    This research aims to study the influence of activating agents to produce rice husk based-carbon with high adsorption capacity and efficiency for either hazardous organic molecules or heavy metals which are unfriendly for the environment. Firstly, rice husk was burned by pyrolysis at different temperatures to produce rice husk-based carbon. To improve its ability as an adsorbent, carbon was treated with activating agents, namely, H3PO4 and KOH at room and high temperature (420 °C). The performance of carbon was then tested by contacting it with surfactant (SLS). Finally, the surfactant-modified active carbon was applied for chrome metal removal. The result shows that activation of carbon using phosphate acid (H3PO4) was more effective than potassium hydroxide (KOH) conducted at high temperature to adsorb sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and chrome metal with the adsorption capacity 1.50 mgg-1 and 0.375 mgg-1, respectively.

  3. Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Sodium and Potassium Forms of STI Zeolite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zukal, Arnošt; Zones, S. I.; Kubů, Martin; Davis, T. M.; Čejka, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 8 (2012), s. 675-681 ISSN 2192-6506 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0604 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : adsorption * carbon dioxide * zeolites Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  4. Pyrolytic Carbon Nanosheets for Ultrafast and Ultrastable Sodium-Ion Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Se Youn; Kang, Minjee; Choi, Jaewon; Lee, Min Eui; Yoon, Hyeon Ji; Kim, Hae Jin; Leal, Cecilia; Lee, Sungho; Jin, Hyoung-Joon; Yun, Young Soo

    2018-04-01

    Na-ion cointercalation in the graphite host structure in a glyme-based electrolyte represents a new possibility for using carbon-based materials (CMs) as anodes for Na-ion storage. However, local microstructures and nanoscale morphological features in CMs affect their electrochemical performances; they require intensive studies to achieve high levels of Na-ion storage performances. Here, pyrolytic carbon nanosheets (PCNs) composed of multitudinous graphitic nanocrystals are prepared from renewable bioresources by heating. In particular, PCN-2800 prepared by heating at 2800 °C has a distinctive sp 2 carbon bonding nature, crystalline domain size of ≈44.2 Å, and high electrical conductivity of ≈320 S cm -1 , presenting significantly high rate capability at 600 C (60 A g -1 ) and stable cycling behaviors over 40 000 cycles as an anode for Na-ion storage. The results of this study show the unusual graphitization behaviors of a char-type carbon precursor and exceptionally high rate and cycling performances of the resulting graphitic material, PCN-2800, even surpassing those of supercapacitors. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. One-dimensional coaxial Sb and carbon fibers with enhanced electrochemical performance for sodium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mengnan; Kong, Xiangzhong; Yang, Hulin; Zhu, Ting; Liang, Shuquan; Pan, Anqiang

    2018-01-01

    Antimony (Sb) has been intensively investigated as a promising anode material for sodium ion batteries (SIBs) in recent years. However, bulk Sb particles usually suffer from excessive volume expansion thus leading to dramatic capacity decay after cycling. To address this issue, Sb has been uniformly decorated on Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) derived carbon nanofibers (PCFs) via a simple chemical deposition strategy to form a one-dimensional (1D) core-shell nanostructure of Sb@PCFs. PCFs were first derived from electrospun PAN fibers and treated with subsequent calcination. The PCFs constructed an interwoven carbon network were later employed for Sb deposition, which can effectively alleviate aggregation or further cracking of Sb nanoparticles occurred in electrochemical kinetic process. The as-obtained Sb@PCFs nanocomposites demonstrated excellent cycling stability with good rate performances. This carefully designed core-shell nanostructure of antimony nanoparticles wrapped PCFs are responsible for good electrochemical Na-ion storage. Moreover, the 1D nanostructure manage to pave pathways for fast ions transfer during charge-discharge, which could extra contribute to the enhanced SIBs performances.

  6. Study of Activated Carbons by Pyrolysis of Mangifera Indica Seed (Mango in Presence of Sodium and Potassium Hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Moreno-Piraján

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbons (ACs were prepared by pyrolysis of seeds mango in presence of sodium and potassium hydroxide (chemical activities. Seeds mango from Colombian Mango cultives were impregnated with aqueous solutions of NaOH and KOH following a variant of the incipient wetness method. Different concentrations were used to produce impregnation ratios of 3:1 (weight terms. Activation was carried out under argon flow by heating to 823 K with 1 h soaking time. The porous texture of the obtained ACs was characterized by physical adsorptions of N2 at 77 K and CO2 at 273 K. The impregnation ration and hydroxide type had a strong influence on the pore structure of these ACs, which could be easily controlled by simply varying the proportion of the hydroxides used in the activation. Thus, the development of porosity for precursors with low structural order (high reactivity is better with NaOH than KOH, whereas the opposite is observed for the highly ordered ones. Variable adsorption capacities and porosity distributions can be achieved depending on the activating agent selected. In general, KOH produces activated carbons with narrower micropore distributions than those prepared by NaOH.

  7. Phase equilibrium condition of marine carbon dioxide hydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Shi-Cai; Liu, Chang-Ling; Ye, Yu-Guang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► CO 2 hydrate phase equilibrium was studied in simulated marine sediments. ► CO 2 hydrate equilibrium temperature in NaCl and submarine pore water was depressed. ► Coarse-grained silica sand does not affect CO 2 hydrate phase equilibrium. ► The relationship between equilibrium temperature and freezing point was discussed. - Abstract: The phase equilibrium of ocean carbon dioxide hydrate should be understood for ocean storage of carbon dioxide. In this paper, the isochoric multi-step heating dissociation method was employed to investigate the phase equilibrium of carbon dioxide hydrate in a variety of systems (NaCl solution, submarine pore water, silica sand + NaCl solution mixture). The experimental results show that the depression in the phase equilibrium temperature of carbon dioxide hydrate in NaCl solution is caused mainly by Cl − ion. The relationship between the equilibrium temperature and freezing point in NaCl solution was discussed. The phase equilibrium temperature of carbon dioxide hydrate in submarine pore water is shifted by −1.1 K to lower temperature region than that in pure water. However, the phase equilibrium temperature of carbon dioxide hydrate in mixture samples of coarsed-grained silica sand and NaCl solution is in agreement with that in NaCl solution with corresponding concentrations. The relationship between the equilibrium temperature and freezing point in mixture samples was also discussed.

  8. Production of radioactive sodium under working conditions for investigation into petroleum boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostin, Yu.I.; Gulin, Yu.A.; Sokolov, Yu.I.; Zhuvagin, I.G.

    1976-01-01

    Because it is advisable to use short-lived isotopes in monitoring the condition of boreholes, procedures are proposed for preparing 0.1-0.5 mC of Na 24 (half-life is 14.9 hr.) during a cycle under production conditions. It is recommended that baking soda should be used as activation material and an ampule polonium and beryllium neutron source with an activity of about 15 to 20 mC should be used as a source. Each operation uses 80 kg of baking soda and the activation lasts 30 to 50 hr

  9. Formation of the Imidazolinone Ring Under Mild Conditions in the Presence of Sodium Hydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anibal J. Mocchi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Substituted imidazolinones containing heterocyclic carboxylic acids as substituents and possessing herbicidal properties were synthesized by cyclization of 2-amino-2,3-dimethylbutyramide with heterocyclic ethyl dicarboxylates under mild conditions. The use of NaH as base leads to a significant increase in the reaction rate and allows the preparation of the target compounds in high yields.

  10. A comparative clinical study investigating the efficacy of a test dentifrice containing 8% strontium acetate and 1040 ppm sodium fluoride versus a marketed control dentifrice containing 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, and 1450 ppm sodium monofluorophosphate in reducing dentinal hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Nathan; Mason, Stephen; Jeffery, Peter; Welton, Helen; Tobin, Maira; O'Shea, Caoimhe; Browne, Mairead

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this clinical study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy in reducing dentin hypersensitivity of an 8% strontium acetate, 1040 ppm sodium fluoride dentifrice to a marketed control 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, 1450 ppm sodium monofluorophosphate dentifrice after twice-daily brushing for two, four, and eight weeks. This was a randomized, examiner-blind, two-arm parallel group, eight-week longitudinal clinical study with seventy-nine subjects, stratified based on baseline tooth sensitivity (Schiff score, Yeaple). Subjects brushed with either an 8% strontium acetate-based dentifrice or a marketed 8% arginine calcium carbonate dentifrice twice daily for approximately one minute. At screening, baseline, weeks two, four, and eight, subjects' tooth sensitivity was determined through both evaporative (Schiff and Visual Analogue Scale [VAS]) and tactile stimuli (Yeaple probe). Subject assessments using each stimulus were performed by the same examiner throughout the study. Seventy-seven subjects completed this clinical study. Both subject groups exhibited significant cumulative reductions from baseline to Days 14, 28, and 56 in dentin hypersensitivity as measured by Schiff, Yeaple, and VAS (for the 8% strontium acetate group, p carbonate group, p = 0.0031 for Yeaple at Day 14, p = 0.0015 for VAS at Day 14, and p 0.05) were observed between treatments for any of the time points and measures except for tactile sensitivity at Day 56, for which the 8% strontium acetate-based dentifrice was statistically superior (p = 0.0391) to the control 8% arginine calcium carbonate dentifrice. The 8% strontium acetate, 1040 ppm sodium fluoride dentifrice provided significant reductions in dentin hypersensitivity (p carbonate dentifrice showed no significant differences (p > 0.05) apart from tactile (Yeaple) sensitivity at week 8, where the 8% strontium acetate-based dentifrice showed significant improvement over the control (p = 0.0391).

  11. Computational Recreation of Carbon Dioxide Hydrates at Habitable Planetary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio, J. M.; Izquierdo-Ruiz, F.; Prieto-Ballesteros, O.

    2017-12-01

    Gas clathrate hydrates are proposed as constituents of the icy moons of the giant planets in the Solar System [1]. Carbon dioxide has been detected on the surface of the moons of Jupiter, supposedly originated by internal degasification. In Ganymede, an aqueous ocean is proposed to exist under a thick ice crust in coexistence with several forms of ice, with pressure reaching up to 1.3 GPa [2]. Due to the limited available data on these systems under these conditions, we propose a combination of computational and experimental studies to describe microscopically and macroscopically the structural and chemical behavior of CO2@H2O polymorphs. This will allow us to understand how their presence affects the geophysical structure and activity and their impact on the habitability of the icy moon. A transition from the sI cubic structure to a high pressure phase at around 0.7 GPa has been found for CO2@H2O. In spite of different attempts to characterize the new structure, a definite answer has not been provided yet. A MH-III Filled Ice Structure type was proposed after neutron diffraction experiments in contrast with an alternative structure similar to the hexagonal C0 type for H2 hydrates [3]. It has an estimated hydration level ratio up to 2H2O:1CO2 and 6 water molecules per unit cell. In the figure below, our optimized unit cell based on this hexagonal C0 structure is displayed. Ab initio calculations using the XDM approximation to include van der Waals effects are performed in our search for the pressure evolution of the equilibrium geometries of the C0-CO2@H2O phase and those of a close related structure to this one called Ih-C0, with 8 water molecules per unit cell. We obtain occupation energies at different hydration ratios, densities, equations of state parameters, and stability energies with respect to decomposition. Raman and IR frequencies are also computed in the 0-2 GPa range. High pressure experiments are also being done in a newly designed chamber able to

  12. Pitting corrosion of lead in sodium carbonate solutions containing NO3- ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Mohammed A.; Abdel Rehim, Sayed S.

    2004-01-01

    Pitting corrosion of Pb in Na 2 CO 3 solutions (pH=10.8) containing NaNO 3 as a pitting corrosion agent has been studied using potentiodynamic anodic polarization, cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques, complemented with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examinations of the electrode surface. In the absence of NO 3 - , the anodic voltammetric response exhibits three anodic peaks prior to oxygen evolution. The first anodic peak A 1 corresponds to the formation of PbCO 3 layer and soluble Pb 2+ species in solution. The second anodic peak A 2 is due to the formation of PbO beneath the carbonate layer. Peak A 2 is followed by a wide passive region which extends up to the appearance of the third anodic peak A 3 . The later is related to the formation of PbO 2 . Addition of NO 3 - to the carbonate solution stimulates the anodic dissolution through peaks A 1 and A 2 and breaks down the dual passive layer prior to peak A 3 . The breakdown potential decreases with an increase in nitrate concentration, temperature and electrode rotation rate, but increases with an increase in carbonate concentration and potential scan rate. Successive cycling leads to a progressive increase in breakdown potential. The current/time transients show that the incubation time for passivity breakdown decreases with increasing the applied anodic potential, nitrate concentration and temperature

  13. Electrochemical Performance of Electrospun carbon nanofibers as free-standing and binder-free anodes for Sodium-Ion and Lithium-Ion Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Juan; Shi, Zhi-qiang; Wang, Cheng-yang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Electrospun carbon nanofiber webs were prepared by pyrolysis of polyacrylonitrile. • The webs as binder-free and current collector-free electrodes for SIBs and LIBs. • Different layer spacing and pore size for Li and Na lead different electrochemical behavior. • Electrochemical performances of the electrodes were high. - Abstract: A series of hard carbon nanofiber-based electrodes derived from electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers (PAN-CNFs) have been fabricated by stabilization in air at about 280 °C and then carbonization in N 2 at heat treatment temperatures (HTT) between 800 and 1500 °C. The electrochemical performances of the binder-free, current collector-free carbon nanofiber-based anodes in lithium-ion batteries and sodium-ion batteries are systematically investigated and compared. We demonstrate the presence of similar alkali metal insertion mechanisms in both cases, but just the differences of the layer spacing and pore size available for lithium and sodium ion lead the discharge capacity delivered at sloping region and plateau region to vary from the kinds of alkali elements. Although the anodes in sodium-ion batteries show poorer rate capability than that in lithium-ion batteries, they still achieve a reversible sodium intercalation capacity of 275 mAh g −1 and similar cycling stability due to the conductive 3-D network, weakly ordered turbostratic structure and a large interlayer spacing between graphene sheets. The feature of high capacity and stable cycling performance makes PAN-CNFs to be promising candidates as electrodes in rechargeable sodium-ion batteries and lithium-ion batteries

  14. Removal of sodium from the component of the sodium purification loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Ho; Jeong, Kyung Chai; Jeong, Ji Young; Kim, Jong Man; Choi, Byung Hae; Nam, Ho Yun

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of a cleaning process is to remove the residual sodium adhering to the component walls once it has been properly drained. It is necessary to clean and decontaminate a component, especially the large components of the primary coolant system; such as the intermediate heat exchangers and the primary pump. Improper and inadequate cleaning has in a number of cases resulted in problems in the storage, handling, and reuse of components. Several types of failures due to improper cleaning procedures have been defined in the past. Inadequate and incomplete removal of sodium results in residues which may contain metallic sodium and alkaline compounds such as sodium hydroxide, sodium oxide, sodium carbonate, and various types of alcoholates. Reinsertion of components containing these compounds into a high-temperature sodium system can result in either the intergranular penetration characteristic of a high-oxygen sodium or an accelerated corrosion due to oxygen. The methods used for cleaning sodium equipment depend on the condition and types of equipment to be cleaned and whether the equipment is to be reused. Cleaning methods are needed that will avoid a deleterious local overheating, material surface degradation or deposits, chemical, physical, or mechanical damage, and external effects. This paper discusses a steam-nitrogen gas cleaning method for the routine applications that permits the reuse of the cold trap in sodium

  15. Polarization characteristics of RTO anodes in the conditions of sodium chlorate preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehberil', V.I.; Fedotova, N.S.; Novikov, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    By the method of polarization curves plotting in galvanostatic conditions in chloride-chlorate solutions of different compositions at different pH and temperatures it is shown that critical potential for oxide ruthenium-titanium anodes at current density less than 0.7 A/cm 2 is reached in solutions with NaCl concentration 50 g/l and low. The mechanism of potential transition to supercritical range is considered on the basis of ruthenium-water system analysis. (author)

  16. Structural and surface functionality changes in reticulated vitreous carbon produced from poly(furfuryl alcohol) with sodium hydroxide additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oishi, Silvia Sizuka, E-mail: silviaoishi@uol.com.br [LAS, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Av. dos Astronautas 1758, São José dos Campos, SP 12227-010 (Brazil); Botelho, Edson Cocchieri [Departamento de Materiais e Tecnologia, Univ Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Av. Doutor Ariberto Pereira da Cunha 333, Guaratinguetá, SP 12516-410 (Brazil); Rezende, Mirabel Cerqueira [Instituto de Ciência e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), Rua Talim 330, São José dos Campos, SP 12231-280 (Brazil); Ferreira, Neidenêi Gomes [LAS, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Av. dos Astronautas 1758, São José dos Campos, SP 12227-010 (Brazil)

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) was processed from poly(furfuryl alcohol) with different amounts of NaOH. • A correlation between microstructure and surface functionalities was proposed. • The structural ordering was mainly influenced by the cured PFA polymerization degree and carboxylic acid content on RVC surface. - Abstract: The use of sodium hydroxide to neutralize the acid catalyst increases the storage life of poly(furfuryl alcohol) (PFA) resin avoiding its continuous polymerization. In this work, a concentrated sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH) was added directly to the PFA resin in order to minimize the production of wastes generated when PFA is washed with diluted basic solution. Thus, different amounts of this concentrated basic solution were added to the resin up to reaching pH values of around 3, 5, 7, and 9. From these four types of modified PFA two sample sets of reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) were processed and heat treated at two different temperatures (1000 and 1700 °C). A correlation among cross-link density of PFA and RVC morphology, structural ordering and surface functionalities was systematically studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. The PFA neutralization (pH 7) led to its higher polymerization degree, promoting a crystallinity decrease on RVC treated at 1000 °C as well as its highest percentages of carboxylic groups on surface. A NaOH excess (pH 9) substantially increased the RVC oxygen content, but its crystallinity remained similar to those for samples from pH 3 and 5 treated at 1000 °C, probably due to the reduced presence of carboxylic group and the lower polymerization degree of its cured resin. Samples with pH 3 and 5 heat treated at 1000 and 1700 °C can be considered the most ordered which indicated that small quantities of NaOH may be advantageous to minimize continuous

  17. Contribution to the simultaneous determination of several light elements in alkalin metals by gamma photon and charged particle activation. Application to carbon and nitrogen determination in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bock, Patrice.

    1976-10-01

    A new γ activation method for the simultaneous determination of carbon and nitrogen in sodium is described. It makes use of the nuclear reactions: 12 C(γ,n) 11 C and 14 N(γ,n) 13 N. The process used to separate carbone-11 and nitrogen-13 from sodium with a view to their radio-activity determination is based on vacuum dissolution of the sample in a mixture of oxidizing and acid fused salts. The oxidized carbon is trapped as CO 2 on soda asbestos and the nitrogen as N 2 on molecular sieve at -196 deg C. The efficiency of the technique is estimated by means of tracer tests and by proton activation. The relative influence of competitive nuclear reactions on elements close to the above two impurities, or even on the matrix itself, is examined. The method described has a theoretical detection limit of some 10 -8 g.g -1 for the two elements in question and mean concentrations of 0.3+-0.1x10 -6 g.g -1 carbon and 1.0+-0.5x10 -6 g.g -1 nitrogen have in fact been measured in a batch of 0.5 g sodium samples [fr

  18. Effect of Sodium Sulfide on Ni-Containing Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jian Feng; Paul A. Lindahl

    2004-07-28

    OAK-B135 The structure of the active-site C-cluster in CO dehydrogenase from Carboxythermus hydrogenoformans includes a {mu}{sup 2}-sulfide ion bridged to the Ni and unique Fe, while the same cluster in enzymes from Rhodospirillum rubrum (CODH{sub Rr}) and Moorella thermoacetica (CODH{sub Mt}) lack this ion. This difference was investigated by exploring the effects of sodium sulfide on activity and spectral properties. Sulfide partially inhibited the CO oxidation activity of CODH{sub Rr} and generated a lag prior to steady-state. CODH{sub Mt} was inhibited similarly but without a lag. Adding sulfide to CODH{sub Mt} in the C{sub red1} state caused the g{sub av} = 1.82 EPR signal to decline and new features to appear, including one with g = 1.95, 1.85 and (1.70 or 1.62). Removing sulfide caused the g{sub av} = 1.82 signal to reappear and activity to recover. Sulfide did not affect the g{sub av} = 1.86 signal from the C{sub red2} state. A model was developed in which sulfide binds reversibly to C{sub red1}, inhibiting catalysis. Reducing this adduct causes sulfide to dissociate, C{sub red2} to develop, and activity to recover. Using this model, apparent K{sub I} values are 40 {+-} 10 nM for CODH{sub Rr} and 60 {+-} 30 {micro}M for CODH{sub Mt}. Effects of sulfide are analogous to those of other anions, including the substrate hydroxyl group, suggesting that these ions also bridge the Ni and unique Fe. This proposed arrangement raises the possibility that CO binding labilizes the bridging hydroxyl and increases its nucleophilic tendency towards attacking Ni-bound carbonyl.

  19. Looking for carbonates in the deep Earth: an experimental approach at extreme conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chariton, S.; Bykova, E.; Bykov, M.; Cerantola, V.; Vasiukov, D.; Stekiel, M.; Aprilis, G.; Kupenko, I.; Ismailova, L.; Chumakov, A. I.; Winkler, B.; McCammon, C. A.; Dubrovinsky, L. S.

    2017-12-01

    There is a long list of natural and experimental evidence to support a key role for carbonates in the deep carbon cycle. As potential carriers of carbon in subducted slabs with the possibility to influence redox conditions, carbonates have deservedly been the focus of many high pressure and high temperature experimental studies over the past decade. "How long do they survive after subduction? What form do they transform to? How do they react with their surroundings?" are all important questions. We use many tools to search for carbonates in the deep Earth. Using laser heated diamond anvil cells to generate pressures and temperatures over 100 GPa and 2500 K along with the advanced technology provided by synchrotron facilities, we have been able to study in situ the behavior of various carbonate minerals at conditions of the Earth's mantle. We have particularly focused our interest on transition metal carbonates (Fe, Mn, Co, Zn, Ni)CO3 in order to study the crystal chemistry of calcite-type carbonates using single crystal X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Our results show new high-pressure carbonate structures, including either CO3-3or CO4-4 units, that often coexist with complex metal oxides. Combined with carbonate stability fields from the surface to the lower mantle, we investigated the possibility to detect carbonates from seismic data. We determined the elastic wave velocities of plausible carbonate mineral compositions in the (Mg-Fe)CO3 system using Nuclear Inelastic Scattering. Our results show the strong anisotropic behavior of carbonates that could explain anisotropic anomalies observed at transition zone depths and confirm the presence of carbonate reservoirs. The effect of carbonate composition and Fe2+ spin transition, which is completed above 50 GPa, are also well demonstrated. More new carbonate phases and their seismic signatures await to be discovered, and thus experiments continue.

  20. The diffusivity of cesium, strontium, carbon and nickel in concrete and mixtures of sodium bentonite and crushed rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Penttilae-Hiltunen, P.; Rantanen, J.

    1986-07-01

    The engineering barriers suggested to be used for the disposal of low and intermediate level wastes in Finland are concrete and crushed rock or mixtures of crushed rock and bentonite. In the repository the barriers are saturated by groundwater and radionuclides may be released by diffusion through the barries. For safety analysis, the mechanisms by which the nuclides migrate and corresponding parameters should be known. In this study diffusion measurements on different types of concrete and mixtures of sodium bentonite and crushed rock were carried out. Radioactive isotopes of cesium, strontium, carbon and nickel were used as tracers. The apparent diffusivities (Dsub(a)) were evaluated on the basis of the measurements. The apparent diffusivity of cesium in concretes was 10 -14 ...10 -15 m 2 /s. Strontium was mainly sorbed on cement where it diffuses slowly. Part of strontium propably penetrates in the rock ballast by diffusion. The diffusivities of carbon and nickel in the concrete was low. The upper limit was evaluated to be Dsub(a) -14 m 2 /s. The diffusivity of cesium in the mixtures of crushed rock and bentonite varies between 0.5x10 -12 and 7x10 -12 m 2 /s. Cesium was mainly sorbed on the rock. The diffusivity of strontium was 2x10 -11 ...2x10 -12 m 2 /s. Strontium was mainly sorbed on bentonite. The diffusion of the sorbed ions (surface diffusion) seems to be a additional migration mechanism in the case of cesium and strontium in the mixture of bentonite and crushed rock. The diffusivity of carbon in the mixtures of crushed rock and bentonite was 6x10 -11 ...4x10 -12 m 2 /s. No sorption was found in the case of carbon. The measured Dsub(a) of nickel in the mixtures of crushed rock and bentonite was 4x10 -14 ...2x10 -15 m 2 /s. The experimental arrangement was not, however, in the stationary state and the more correct values would propably be 10 -13 ...10 -14 m 2 /s. No surface diffusion was found in the case of nickel. (author)

  1. Inhibition treatment of the corrosion of lead artefacts in atmospheric conditions and by acetic acid vapour: use of sodium decanoate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocca, E.; Rapin, C.; Mirambet, F.

    2004-01-01

    The efficiency of linear sodium decanoate, CH 3 (CH 2 ) 8 COONa (noted NaC 10 ), as corrosion inhibitor of lead was determined by electrochemical techniques in two corrosive mediums: ASTM D1384 standard water and acetic acid-enriched solutions. Best results were obtained with 0.05 mol l -1 of NaC 10 solution. In these conditions, the inhibition efficiency can be estimated of 99.9%. The corrosion inhibition effect was confirmed by cyclic atmospheric tests in a climatic chamber in two different conditions: water saturated vapour, and acid acetic enriched vapour simulating the atmosphere in the wooden displays in museums. Surface analyses by SEM and X-ray diffraction indicate that the metal protection is due to the formation of a protective layer mainly composed of lead decanoate Pb(C 10 ) 2 (metallic soap). This inhibition treatment was applied on objects of metallic cultural heritage: gallo-roman sarcophagus in lead. Electrochemical methods confirm the efficiency of treatment on archaeological materials. In conclusion, this inhibitor treatment seems to be very promising against the atmospheric corrosion and the corrosion by organic acid vapour in museums

  2. Study on chemical buffering property of GMZ sodium bentonite under atmospheric condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Zhijian

    2012-01-01

    At present, the deep geological disposal is regarded as the most reasonable and effective way to safely disposal the high-level radioactive wastes in the world. The conceptual model of HLW geological disposal in China is based on a multi-barrier system that combines an isolating geological environment with an engineered barrier system. The buffer is one of the engineered barrier materials and GMZ Na-bentonite is selected as the basic material. One of the most important functions related to buffer is the chemical buffering, which means buffering the changes in pore water chemistry. This paper presents the experiments of GMZ-1 Na-bentonite reacted with distilled water under atmospheric condition. The batch tests and results discussion are reported. Na and Mg in batch test solution are co-provided by interlayer cations of montmorillonite and solids dissolution, K and Ca are provided by dissolution of solids. The result is a pre-requisite for predicting near-field nuclide migration and assesses the long-term stability of the engineered barrier materials. (author)

  3. Microwave-assisted activated carbon from cocoa shell as adsorbent for removal of sodium diclofenac and nimesulide from aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saucier, Caroline; Adebayo, Matthew A.; Lima, Eder C.; Cataluña, Renato; Thue, Pascal S.; Prola, Lizie D.T.; Puchana-Rosero, M.J.; Machado, Fernando M.; Pavan, Flavio A.; Dotto, G.L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Microwave-assisted cocoa shell activated carbon was prepared and characterized. • The anti-inflammatories, diclofenac and nimesulide, were adsorbed onto MWCS-1.0. • Adsorption maximum values are 63.47 (diclofenac) and 74.81 mg g −1 (nimesulide). • General order kinetic model suitably explained the adsorption process. • MWCS-1.0 was effectively used for treatment of simulated hospital effluents. - Abstract: Microwave-induced chemical activation process was used to prepare an activated carbon from cocoa shell for efficient removal of two anti-inflammatories, sodium diclofenac (DFC) and nimesulide (NM), from aqueous solutions. A paste was obtained from a mixture of cocoa shell and inorganic components; with a ratio of inorganic: organic of 1 (CSC-1.0). The mixture was pyrolyzed in a microwave oven in less than 10 min. The CSC-1.0 was acidified with a 6 mol L −1 HCl under reflux to produce MWCS-1.0. The CSC-1.0 and MWCS-1.0 were characterized using FTIR, SEM, N 2 adsorption/desorption curves, X-ray diffraction, and point of zero charge (pH pzc ). Experimental variables such as initial pH of the adsorbate solutions and contact time were optimized for adsorptive characteristics of MWCS-1.0. The optimum pH for removal of anti-inflammatories ranged between 7.0 and 8.0. The kinetic of adsorption was investigated using general order, pseudo first-order and pseu do-second order kinetic models. The maximum amounts of DCF and NM adsorbed onto MWCS-1.0 at 25 °C are 63.47 and 74.81 mg g −1 , respectively. The adsorbent was tested on two simulated hospital effluents. MWCS-1.0 is capable of efficient removal of DCF and NM from a medium that contains high sugar and salt concentrations

  4. The sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe2 (slc4a5) expressed in human renal proximal tubules shows increased apical expression under high-salt conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildea, John J; Xu, Peng; Carlson, Julia M; Gaglione, Robert T; Bigler Wang, Dora; Kemp, Brandon A; Reyes, Camellia M; McGrath, Helen E; Carey, Robert M; Jose, Pedro A; Felder, Robin A

    2015-12-01

    The electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe2) is encoded by SLC4A5, variants of which have been associated with salt sensitivity of blood pressure, which affects 25% of the adult population. NBCe2 is thought to mediate sodium bicarbonate cotransport primarily in the renal collecting duct, but NBCe2 mRNA is also found in the rodent renal proximal tubule (RPT). The protein expression or function of NBCe2 has not been demonstrated in the human RPT. We validated an NBCe2 antibody by shRNA and Western blot analysis, as well as overexpression of an epitope-tagged NBCe2 construct in both RPT cells (RPTCs) and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. Using this validated NBCe2 antibody, we found NBCe2 protein expression in the RPT of fresh and frozen human kidney slices, RPTCs isolated from human urine, and isolated RPTC apical membrane. Under basal conditions, NBCe2 was primarily found in the Golgi, while NBCe1 was primarily found at the basolateral membrane. Following an acute short-term increase in intracellular sodium, NBCe2 expression was increased at the apical membrane in cultured slices of human kidney and polarized, immortalized RPTCs. Sodium bicarbonate transport was increased by monensin and overexpression of NBCe2, decreased by NBCe2 shRNA, but not by NBCe1 shRNA, and blocked by 2,2'-(1,2-ethenediyl)bis[5-isothiocyanato-benzenesulfonic acid]. NBCe2 could be important in apical sodium and bicarbonate cotransport under high-salt conditions; the implication of the ex vivo studies to the in vivo situation when salt intake is increased remains unclear. Therefore, future studies will examine the role of NBCe2 in mediating increased renal sodium transport in humans whose blood pressures are elevated by an increase in sodium intake. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  5. High quality bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass over alumina-supported sodium carbonate

    KAUST Repository

    Imran, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Performance of a novel alumina-supported sodium carbonate catalyst was studied to produce a valuable bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass. Post treatment of biomass pyrolysis vapor was investigated in a catalyst fixed bed reactor at the downstream of the pyrolysis reactor. In-situ catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapor was conducted in an entrained flow pyrolysis reactor by feeding a premixed feedstock of the catalyst and biomass. Na2CO3/gamma-Al2O3 was very effective for de-oxygenation of the pyrolysis liquid and oxygen content of the bio-oil was decreased from 47.5 wt.% to 16.4 wt.%. An organic rich bio-oil was obtained with 5.8 wt.% water content and a higher heating value of 36.1 MJ/kg. Carboxylic acids were completely removed and the bio-oil had almost a neutral pH. This bio-oil of high calorific low, low water and oxygen content may be an attractive fuel precursor. In-situ catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapor produced a very similar quality bio-oil compared to post treatment of pyrolysis vapors, and shows the possible application of Na2CO3/gamma-Al2O3 in a commercial type reactor system such as a fluidized bed reactor. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A comparative study on production of stable carbon nano tube dispersions using gum arabic and sodium dodecyl sulphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashmi, W.; Ismail, A.F.; Jameel, A.T.; Yusof, F.; Khalid, M.; Mubarak, N.M.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Improvements on the stability of carbon nano tube (CNT)-water suspensions are necessary to enhance the performance of CNT nano fluids. CNTs are usually packed into crystalline ropes that form strong networks due to Van der Waals attraction. Aggregation of these CNTs is obstacle to most of the applications which diminished its special properties. Thus, this paper aims to produce stable CNT dispersion using Gum Arabic (GA) and Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) as dispersants. The CNT concentration is varied from 0.01-0.1 wt% while the concentration of dispersants is varied from 1-12 wt%, respectively. This work gives detailed information on effect of CNT concentration, dispersant concentration and sonication time on stability of CNT dispersions. UV-Vis Spectrophotometer was used to measure the concentration of CNTs with respect to sedimentation time. CNT-GA suspensions were found to be more stable compared to CNT-SDS suspensions. The homogeneous suspension of CNT-GA is stable for several months. (author)

  7. The quantitative monitoring of mechanochemical reaction between solid L-tartaric acid and sodium carbonate monohydrate by terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohong; Liu, Guifeng; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhang, Zengyang; Wei, Yongbo; Liu, Min; Wen, Wen; Zhou, Xingtai

    2011-11-01

    The solid-state reaction of chiral tartaric acid and alkali carbonate was studied by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The sodium tartrate dihydrate was synthesized with high efficiency by mechanical grinding in the solid-state without waste that is particularly sustainable and environmentally benign. Distinct THz absorptions were observed for reactants and products. It indicates that THz spectroscopy is sensitive to different materials and crystal structures. The characteristic THz absorption peak at 1.09 THz of L (+)-Tartaric acid was selected for quantitative analysis. The reaction kinetics could be expressed by the Second-order equation and the Jander equation, which is consistent with a three-dimensional diffusion mechanism. The combination of multi-techniques including synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction (SRXRPD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate the grinding process and presented supporting evidences. The results demonstrate that THz spectroscopy technique has great potential applications in process monitoring and analysis in pharmaceutical and chemical synthesis industry.

  8. Ultrafast atomic process in X-ray emission by using inner-shell ionization method for sodium and carbon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira; Tajima, Toshiki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1998-07-01

    An ultrafast inner-shell ionization process with X-ray emission stimulated by high-intensity short-pulse X-ray is studied. Carbon and sodium atoms are treated as target matter. It is shown that atomic processes of the target determine the necessary X-ray intensity for X-ray laser emission as well as the features of X-ray laser such as wavelength and duration time. The intensity also depends on the density of initial atoms. Furthermore, we show that as the intensity of X-ray source becomes high, the multi-inner-shell ionization predominates, leading to the formation of hollow atoms. As the density of hollow atoms is increased by the pumping X-ray power, the emission of X-rays is not only of significance for high brightness X-ray measurement but also is good for X-ray lasing. New classes of experiments of pump X-ray probe and X-ray laser are suggested. (author)

  9. Impregnation of sodium titanate onto DMAPAA-grafted fiber under mild reaction conditions and its strontium removal performance from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Mizuki; Kono, Michitaka; Goto, Shun-ichi; Kawai-Noma, Shigeko; Umeno, Daisuke; Saito, Kyoichi; Fujiwara, Kunio; Sugo, Takanobu

    2015-01-01

    Sodium titanate was impregnated onto a commercially available 6-nylon fiber by means of radiation-induced graft polymerization of dimethyaminopropyl acrylamide (DMAPAA) and subsequent chemical modifications. A peroxo complex of titanium anions was bound onto the DMAPAA-grafted fiber before the bound titanium species was converted to sodium titanate through precipitation with sodium hydroxide. Impregnation percentage of sodium titanate of the fiber was constant at 20% in the range of sodium hydroxide concentration in a mixture of methanol and water at a volume fraction of methanol of 80% of 0.001 to 1 M, whereas the removal percentage of strontium from seawater leveled off at 80% above a sodium hydroxide concentration in water of 0.1 M. Determination of adsorption isotherms in seawater demonstrates that the sodium-titanate-impregnated fiber with an impregnation percentage of 10% exhibited 2.6-fold higher amount of strontium adsorbed in seawater per g of sodium titanate (8.8 mg-Sr/g) than a commercially available granular adsorbent for strontium, SrTreat ® (3.4 mg-Sr/g). (author)

  10. Effect of mixed vs single brine composition on salt weathering in porous carbonate building stones for different environmental conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Menéndez, B.; Petráňová, Veronika

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 210, August (2016), s. 124-139 ISSN 0013-7952 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : salt weathering * limestone * environmental conditions * sodium chloride * sodium sulphate * calcium sulphate * salt mixture Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 2.569, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013795216301879

  11. The Dissolution of Synthetic Na-Boltwoodite in Sodium Carbonate Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilton, Eugene S.; Liu, Chongxuan; Yantasee, Wassana; Wang, Zheming; Moore, Dean A.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Zachara, John M.

    2006-01-01

    Uranyl silicates such as uranophane and Na-boltwoodite appear to control the solubility of uranium in the contaminated sediments at the US Department of Energy Hanford site (Liu et al., 2004). Consequently, the solubility of synthetic Na-boltwoodite was determined over a wide range of bicarbonate concentrations, from circumneutral to alkaline pH, that are representative of porewater and groundwater compositions at the Hanford site. Results show that Na-boltwoodite dissolution was nearly congruent and its solubility increased with increasing bicarbonate concentration. Calculated solubility constants varied by nearly 2 log units from low bicarbonate (no added NaCO3) to 50 mmol/L bicarbonate. However, the solubility constants only vary by 0.5 log units from 0 added bicarbonate to 1.2 mmol/L bicarbonate, where logKsp = 5.39-5.92 and the average logKsp = 5.63. No systematic trend in logKsp was apparent over this range in bicarbonate concentrations. LogKsp values trended down with increasing bicarbonate concentration, where logKsp = 4.06 at 50 mmol/L bicarbonate. We conclude that the calculated solubility constants at high bicarbonate are compromised by an incomplete or inaccurate uranyl-carbonate speciation model

  12. Sodium fire protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, C.; Kale, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    Results of experiments carried out with sodium fires to develop extinguishment techniques are presented. Characteristics, ignition temperature, heat evolution and other aspects of sodium fires are described. Out of the powders tested for extinguishment of 10 Kg sodium fires, sodium bi-carbonate based dry chemical powder has been found to be the best extinguisher followed by large sized vermiculite and then calcium carbonate powders distributed by spray nozzles. Powders, however, do not extinguish large fires effectively due to sodium-concrete reaction. To control large scale fires in a LMFBR, collection trays with protective cover have been found to cause oxygen starvation better than flooding with inert gas. This system has an added advantage in that there is no damage to the sodium facilities as has been in the case of powders which often contain chlorine compounds and cause stress corrosion cracking. (M.G.B.)

  13. Carbon materials for syngas conditioning and tar removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero Millán, Lina María; Sierra Vargas, Fabio Emiro

    2017-01-01

    Within the framework of worldwide energy context, the development of technologies and processes for energy production form renewable and non-conventional sources is a priority. According to this, gasification is an interesting process that converts different kinds of organic materials in fuel gases. The main issue related with this process is the fact that the producer gas contains also contaminants and tars that are undesirable for the gas usage in internal combustion motors or turbines. The present work aims to analyze the actual state of the existing methods to remove tars form gasification fuel gases, emphasizing the use of different kinds of carbon materials. (author)

  14. Activated carbons as potentially useful non-nutritive additives to prevent the effect of fumonisin B1 on sodium bentonite activity against chronic aflatoxicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge, María Del Pilar; Magnoli, Alejandra Paola; Bergesio, Maria Virginia; Tancredi, Nestor; Magnoli, Carina E; Chiacchiera, Stella Maris

    2016-06-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and fumonisin B1 (FB1) are mycotoxins that often co-occur in feedstuffs. The ingestion of AFB1 causes aflatoxicosis in humans and animals. Sodium bentonite (NaB), a cheap non-nutritive unselective sequestering agent incorporated in animal diets, can effectively prevent aflatoxicosis. Fumonisins are responsible for equine leukoencephalomalacia and porcine pulmonary oedema, and often have subclinical toxic effects in poultries. Fumonisin B1 and aflatoxin B1 are both strongly adsorbed in vitro on sodium bentonite. Co-adsorption studies, carried out with a weight ratio of FB1 to AFB1 that mimics the natural occurrence (200:1), showed that FB1 greatly decreases the in vitro ability of NaB to adsorb AFB1. The ability of two activated carbons to adsorb FB1 was also investigated. Both carbons showed high affinity for FB1. A complex behaviour of the FB1 adsorption isotherms with pH was observed. In vitro results suggest that under natural contamination levels of AFB1 and FB1, a mixture of activated carbon and sodium bentonite might be potentially useful for prevention of sub-acute aflatoxicosis.

  15. Combined effect of glycation and sodium carbonate-bicarbonate buffer concentration on IgG binding, IgE binding and conformation of ovalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-juan; Gao, Jin-yan; Chen, Hong-bing

    2013-10-01

    Ovalbumin (OVA) is a major allergen in hen egg. During thermal processing, reducing sugars contained in the hen egg white might easily undergo glycation with OVA, but few studies have been conducted on its corresponding immunoreactivity changes. The aim of the present study was to assess changes of the antigenicity, potential allergenicity and conformation of OVA after glycation in a wet-thermal processing system under different concentrations of sodium carbonate-bicarbonate buffer. IgE binding of the glycated OVA was increased after glycation, and the higher the sodium carbonate-bicarbonate buffer concentration, the higher the IgE binding capacity. The increase in IgE binding of OVA corresponded well with the disruption of the disulfide bond, which exposed the epitopes initially buried. Antigenicity of the glycated OVA was increased, and the amount of the increase varied among samples treated under different buffer concentrations. Glycation increased the allergenic potential for OVA, with the amount of increase varying with different sodium carbonate-bicarbonate buffer concentrations. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Radio-contaminant behaviour in the cover-gas space and the containment building of a sodium-cooled fast reactor in accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathe, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    experiments chosen in the literature. The mass of oxide aerosols produced by a sodium spray fire can involve more than 60% of the ejected sodium. Then, we develop the numerical simulation STARK based on the Cooper model that model the physico-chemical transformations of the aerosols. However, this model has never been validated and the literature does not permit to do so. In these conditions, we designed and performed our own experiment to obtain the missing values of parameters that govern the Cooper model. The Cooper model has been improved with the results of this experimental study, ESSTIA, and we present a modified Cooper model that improves the accuracy of Cooper model to investigate the transformation of the sodium aerosols. The last part of the manuscript deals with the interaction between sodium aerosols (hydroxide) and a key fission product (iodine). We use density functional theory numerical simulation (the VASP code) to discover the affinities that can be identified. The results will facilitate simulation of the source term evolution because the sodium aerosols will interact with this FP. All the data and numerical simulations presented here will contribute to implementation of models in the future SFR SA numerical simulation of the IRSN, ASTEC-Na. (author)

  17. Sodium butyrate into the insular cortex during conditioned taste-aversion acquisition delays aversive taste memory extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Jaramillo, Luis; Reyes-López, Julian; Miranda, María Isabel

    2014-04-16

    Histone acetylation is one mechanism that promotes gene expression, and it increases during learning of various tasks. Specifically, novel taste consumption produces an increased acetylation of histone lysine residues in the insular cortex (IC), where protein synthesis is crucial during memory consolidation of conditioned taste aversion (CTA). However, the role of this elevated histone acetylation during CTA learning has not been examined directly. Thus, the present study investigated the effects of sodium butyrate (NaBu), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, injected into the IC during CTA acquisition. Male Wistar rats, IC bilaterally implanted, were injected 60 min before saccharine presentation, with a total volume of 0.5 µl of NaBu solution (100, 500, and 10 µg/0.5 µl) or saline; 30 min later animals were injected intraperitoneally with lithium chloride, a malaise-inducing drug. The next day, CTA retrieval was tested. No effects of NaBu were observed during acquisition or retrieval, but during extinction trials, a significant delay in aversive memory extinction was observed in the group injected with the lowest NaBu dose. This result indicates that NaBu in the IC strengthens CTA and delays aversive memory extinction, and suggests that histone acetylation could increase long-term taste-aversive memory strength.

  18. Polyurethane foam loaded with sodium dodecylsulfate for the extraction of 'quat' pesticides from aqueous medium: Optimization of loading conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinhal, Jonas O; Lima, Claudio F; Cassella, Ricardo J

    2016-09-01

    The cationic herbicides paraquat, diquat and difenzoquat are largely used in different cultures worldwide. With this, there is an intrinsic risk of environmental contamination when these herbicides achieve natural waters. The goal of this work was to propose a novel and low-cost sorbent for the removal of the cited herbicides from aqueous medium. The proposed sorbent was prepared by loading polyurethane foam with sodium dodecylsulfate. The influence of several parameters (SDS concentration, HCl concentration and shaking time) on the loading process was investigated. The results obtained in this work demonstrated that all studied variables influenced the loading process, having significant effect on the extraction efficiency of the resulted PUF-SDS. At optimized conditions, the PUF was loaded by shaking 200mg of crushed foam with 200mL of a solution containing 5.0×10(-3)molL(-1) SDS and 0.25molL(-1) HCl, for 30min. The obtained PUF-SDS was efficient for removing the three herbicides from aqueous medium, achieving extraction percentages higher than 90%. The sorption process followed a pseudo second-order kinetics, which presented excellent predictive capacity of the amount of herbicide retained with time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Basic visualization experiments on eutectic reaction of boron carbide and stainless steel under sodium-cooled fast reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamano, Hidemasa; Suzuki, Tohru; Kamiyama, Kenji; Kudo, Isamu

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes basic visualization experiments on eutectic reaction and relocation of boron carbide (B 4 C) and stainless steel (SS) under a high temperature condition exceeding 1500degC as well as the importance of such behaviors in molten core during a core disruptive accident in a Generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (750 MWe class) designed in Japan. At first, a reactivity history was calculated using an exact perturbation calculation tool taking into account expected behaviors. This calculation indicated the importance of a relocation behavior of the B 4 C-SS eutectic because its behavior has a large uncertainty in the reactivity history. To clarify this behavior, basic experiments were carried out by visualizing the reaction of a B 4 C pellet contacted with molten SS in a high temperature-heating furnace. The experiments have shown the eutectic reaction visualization as well as freezing and relocation of the B 4 C-SS eutectic in upper part of the solidified test piece due to the density separation. (author)

  20. Modelling the carbon cycle of grassland in the Netherlands under various management strategies and environmental conditions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol-van Dasselaar, van den A.; Lantinga, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    A simulation model of the grassland carbon cycle (CCGRASS) was developed to evaluate the long-term effects of different management strategies and various environmental conditions on carbon sequestration in a loam soil under permanent grassland in the Netherlands. The model predicted that the rate of

  1. Enhanced glucose yield and structural characterization of corn stover by sodium carbonate pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ilgook; Rehman, Muhammad Saif Ur; Han, Jong-In

    2014-01-01

    Na2CO3 was employed as an efficient yet cheap alkaline catalyst for the pretreatment of corn stover. To systematically obtain an optimal condition, the effects of critical pretreatment parameters including Na2CO3 concentration (2-6%), temperature (120-160 °C), and reaction time (10-30 min) on glucose yield were evaluated in lab-scale using response surface methodology. The best conditions were found to be Na2CO3 of 4.1%, temperature of 142.6 °C, and reaction time of 18.0 min, under which glucose yield reached to 267.5 g/kg biomass. Physical properties, based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imagery, surface area, pore volume and size, and crystallinity of pretreated corn stover, were examined. The Na2CO3 pretreatment apparently damaged the surface and altered structural features of corn stover, which resulted in the enhancement of enzymatic of hydrolysis. These results evidently support that Na2CO3 is indeed a robust and feasible catalyst for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An ultrasensitive and selective electrochemical sensor for determination of estrone 3-sulfate sodium salt based on molecularly imprinted polymer modified carbon paste electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Han; Wang, Yuli; Zhang, Lu; Tian, Liping; Luo, Jun; Zhao, Na; Han, Yajie; Zhao, Feilang; Ying, Xue; Li, Yingchun

    2017-11-01

    A highly sensitive and selective electrochemical sensor based on carbon paste electrode (CPE) modified with molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) has been developed for the determination of estrone 3-sulfate sodium salt (ESS). MIPs were prepared in polar medium via bulk polymerization and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. Cyclic voltammetry was performed to the study preparation process and binding behavior of the MIP-modified CPE (MIP/CPE) toward ESS. The conditions for preparing MIPs and MIP/CPE as well as ESS detection were optimized. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the detection linear range for ESS is 4 × 10 -12 to 6 × 10 -9  M with a limit of detection of 1.18 × 10 -12  M (S/N = 3). In addition, the sensor exhibits high binding affinity toward ESS over its structural analogues with excellent repeatability and stability. The fabricated MIP/CPE was then successfully employed to detect ESS in pregnant mare urine (PMU) without any pretreatment, and the average recoveries were from 99.6 to 104.9% with relative standard deviation less than 3.0%. High-performance liquid chromatography was adopted as a reference to validate the established approach in detecting ESS and their results showed good agreement. The as-prepared sensor has high potential to be a decent tool for on-site determination of ESS in PMU in a fast and convenient manner. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. SnSe/carbon nanocomposite synthesized by high energy ball milling as an anode material for sodium-ion and lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhian; Zhao, Xingxing; Li, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A homogeneous nanocomposite of SnSe and carbon black was synthesised by high energy ball milling and empolyed as an anode material for sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) and lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The nanocomposite anode exhibits excellent electrochemical performances in both SIBs and LIBs. - Highlights: • A homogeneous nanocomposite of SnSe and carbon black was fabricated by high energy ball milling. • SnSe and carbon black are homogeneously mixed at the nanoscale level. • The SnSe/C anode exhibits excellent electrochemical performances in both SIBs and LIBs. - Abstract: A homogeneous nanocomposite of SnSe and carbon black, denoted as SnSe/C nanocomposite, was fabricated by high energy ball milling and empolyed as a high performance anode material for both sodium-ion batteries and lithium-ion batteries. The X-ray diffraction patterns, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy observations confirmed that SnSe in SnSe/C nanocomposite was homogeneously distributed within carbon black. The nanocomposite anode exhibited enhanced electrochemical performances including a high capacity, long cycling behavior and good rate performance in both sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) and lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). In SIBs, an initial capacitiy of 748.5 mAh g −1 was obtained and was maintained well on cycling (324.9 mAh g −1 at a high current density of 500 mA g −1 in the 200 th cycle) with 72.5% retention of second cycle capacity (447.7 mAh g −1 ). In LIBs, high initial capacities of approximately 1097.6 mAh g −1 was obtained, and this reduced to 633.1 mAh g −1 after 100 cycles at 500 mA g −1

  4. A study of the condition for the passivation of carbon steel in bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Naoki; Morimoto, Masataka; Honda, Akira

    1999-01-01

    It is important to study the corrosion behavior of materials to be used for overpack for high-level radioactive waste disposal. Carbon steel is one of the candidate materials. The type of corrosion on carbon steel depends on whether the carbon steel is passivated or not. In this study, the condition for the passivation of carbon steel was studied using bentonite as the buffer material. Anodic polarization in bentonite and the measurements of pH of porewater in bentonite was measured. The results of these experiments showed that the possibility of passivation is small in highly compacted bentonite in groundwater in Japan. Therefore, localized corrosion on carbon steel due to the breakdown of passive film is unlikely in bentonite. In other words, general corrosion seems to be the most probable type of corrosion under repository condition in Japan. (author)

  5. Continuing Assessment of the 5-Day Sodium Carbonate-Ammonium Nitrate Extraction Assay as an Indicator Test for Silicon Fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellner, Wendy; Friedrich, Russell L; Kim, Sujin; Sturtz, Douglas; Frantz, Jonathan; Altland, James; Krause, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The 5-day sodium carbonate-ammonium nitrate extraction assay (5-day method) has been recognized by the American Association of Plant Food Control Officials as a validated test method to identify fertilizers or beneficial substances that provide plant-available silicon (Si). The test method used the molybdenum blue colorimetric assay to quantify percentage Si; however, laboratories may use inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) for elemental analysis. To examine the use of either colorimetric or ICP-OES methods for Si determination, the 5-day method was performed on the following Si-containing compounds; wollastonite, sand, biochar, and a basic oven furnace (BOF) slag. Grow-out studies using Zinnia elegans were also performed using varying rates of the wollastonite, biochar, and BOF slag. Our results show using the 5-day method, wollastonite had the highest extracted amounts of silicic acid (H4SiO4) at 4% followed by biochar (2%), BOF slag (1%), and sand (0%). Extraction values calculated using either the molybdenum blue colorimetric assay or ICP-OES for detection of the H4SiO4 had a significant correlation, supporting the application of either detection method for this type of analysis. However, when extracted values were compared to amounts of Si taken up by the plants, the 5-day method overestimated both wollastonite and biochar. While this method is a valid indicator test for determining a soluble Si source, other plant species and methods should be perused to potentially provide more quantitative analyses for plant-available Si content of all materials.

  6. Ketoprofen-loaded Eudragit RSPO microspheres: an influence of sodium carbonate on in vitro drug release and surface topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Sachin S; Hase, Dinesh P; Bankar, Manish M; Patil, Arun T; Gaikwad, Naresh J

    2009-05-01

    Eudragit RSPO microspheres containing ketoprofen as model drug, prepared by solvent evaporation technique using acetone-liquid paraffin (heavy) solvent system were examined. Depending upon polymer concentration in the internal phase, microspheres of particle mean diameter (122.8, 213.6 and 309.5 μm) were obtained. The influence of surface washing of microspheres with n-hexane, i.e. untreated microspheres (UM) on the drug content, drug release and surface topology of microspheres were compared to those of microspheres washed with sodium carbonate, i.e. treated microspheres (TM) in order to make the non-encapsulated surface drug soluble. The significant reduction in encapsulation efficiency (p < 0.001) and drug content (p < 0.001) after treatment, in combination with the small crystalline peaks observed during XRD testing and lack of melting endotherm observed in DSC testing, suggests that the washing process actually removes a significant amount of drug (p < 0.001) from the surface and encapsulated near to the surface of the microsphere polymer matrix. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination revealed that the removal of surface drug did not affect the size of microspheres but the topology of treated smallest microspheres was modified. The ketoprofen release profiles were examined in phosphate buffer pH 7.4, using USPXXIII paddle type dissolution apparatus. In general both UM and TM result in biphasic release patterns, but the initial burst effect (first release phase) of TM was lower than that of UM. The second release phase did not change for the bigger size but increased for the smallest microspheres, probably owing to the modification of matrix porosity.

  7. Initial reaction between CaO and SO2 under carbonating and non-carbonating conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Martin Hagsted; Wedel, Stig; Pedersen, Kim H.

    2015-01-01

    The initial kinetics of the CaO/SO2 reaction have been investigated for reaction times shorter than 1s and in the temperature interval between 450 and 600°C under both carbonating and non-carbonating conditions (0-20 vol% CO2) to clarify how recirculating CaO influences the emission of SO2 from...... showed that the CaO conversion with respect to SO2 declined when the CO2 concentration was increased. Under all conditions, larger specific surface areas of CaO gave higher reaction rates with SO2. Higher temperatures had a positive effect on the reaction between SO2 and CaO under non......-carbonating conditions, but no or even a negative effect under carbonating conditions. The results led to the conclusion that SO2 released from raw meal in the upper stages of the preheater does not to any significant extent react with CaO recirculating in the preheater tower....

  8. Self-doped carbon architectures with heteroatoms containing nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur as high-performance anodes for lithium- and sodium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Mingjie; Yu, Wenhua; Shi, Jing; Liu, Wei; Chen, Shougang; Wang, Xin; Wang, Huanlei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •Self-doped carbon architectures with nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur are derived from Carrageen. •The obtained carbon materials exhibit excellent electrochemical property. •The strategy provides a one-step synthesis route to design advanced anodes for batteries. -- Abstract: Nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur tridoped porous carbons have been successfully synthesized from natural biomass algae-Carrageen by using a simultaneous carbonization and activation procedure. The doped carbons with sponge-like interconnected architecture, partially ordered graphitic structure, and abundant heteroatom doping perform outstanding features for electrochemical energy storage. When tested as lithium-ion battery anodes, a high reversible capacity of 839 mAh g −1 can be obtained at the current density of 0.1 A g −1 after 100 cycles, while a high capacity of 228 mAh g −1 can be maintained at 10 A g −1 . Tested against sodium, a high specific capacity of 227 can be delivered at 0.1 A g −1 after 100 cycles, while a high capacity of 109 mAh g −1 can be achieved at 10 A g −1 . These results turn out that the doped carbons would be potential anode materials for lithium- and sodium-ion batteries, which can be achieved by a one-step and large-scale synthesis route. Our observation indicates that heteroatom doping (especially sulfur) can significantly promote ion storage and reduce irreversible ion trapping to some extent. This work gives a general route for designing carbon nanostructures with heteroatom doping for efficient energy storage.

  9. Microwave-assisted activated carbon from cocoa shell as adsorbent for removal of sodium diclofenac and nimesulide from aqueous effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saucier, Caroline [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, P.O. Box 15003, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Adebayo, Matthew A. [Department of Chemical Sciences, Ajayi Crowther University, Oyo, Oyo State (Nigeria); Lima, Eder C., E-mail: eder.lima@ufrgs.br [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, P.O. Box 15003, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Cataluña, Renato [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, P.O. Box 15003, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Thue, Pascal S. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, P.O. Box 15003, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Ngaoundere, P.O. Box 455, Ngaoundere (Cameroon); Prola, Lizie D.T.; Puchana-Rosero, M.J. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, P.O. Box 15003, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Machado, Fernando M. [Technology Development Center, Federal University of Pelotas (UFPEL), Pelotas (Brazil); Pavan, Flavio A. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Pampa (UNIPAMPA), Bagé, RS (Brazil); Dotto, G.L. [Chemical Engineering Department, Federal University of Santa Maria (UFSM), Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2015-05-30

    Highlights: • Microwave-assisted cocoa shell activated carbon was prepared and characterized. • The anti-inflammatories, diclofenac and nimesulide, were adsorbed onto MWCS-1.0. • Adsorption maximum values are 63.47 (diclofenac) and 74.81 mg g{sup −1} (nimesulide). • General order kinetic model suitably explained the adsorption process. • MWCS-1.0 was effectively used for treatment of simulated hospital effluents. - Abstract: Microwave-induced chemical activation process was used to prepare an activated carbon from cocoa shell for efficient removal of two anti-inflammatories, sodium diclofenac (DFC) and nimesulide (NM), from aqueous solutions. A paste was obtained from a mixture of cocoa shell and inorganic components; with a ratio of inorganic: organic of 1 (CSC-1.0). The mixture was pyrolyzed in a microwave oven in less than 10 min. The CSC-1.0 was acidified with a 6 mol L{sup −1} HCl under reflux to produce MWCS-1.0. The CSC-1.0 and MWCS-1.0 were characterized using FTIR, SEM, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption curves, X-ray diffraction, and point of zero charge (pH{sub pzc}). Experimental variables such as initial pH of the adsorbate solutions and contact time were optimized for adsorptive characteristics of MWCS-1.0. The optimum pH for removal of anti-inflammatories ranged between 7.0 and 8.0. The kinetic of adsorption was investigated using general order, pseudo first-order and pseu do-second order kinetic models. The maximum amounts of DCF and NM adsorbed onto MWCS-1.0 at 25 °C are 63.47 and 74.81 mg g{sup −1}, respectively. The adsorbent was tested on two simulated hospital effluents. MWCS-1.0 is capable of efficient removal of DCF and NM from a medium that contains high sugar and salt concentrations.

  10. Molecular Simulation Models of Carbon Dioxide Intercalation in Hydrated Sodium Montmorillonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myshakin, Evgeniy [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Saidi, Wissam [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Romanov, Vyacheslav [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Cygan, Randall [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jordan, Kenneth [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Guthrie, George [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-22

    In this study, classical molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory (DFT)-based molecular dynamics are used to elucidate the process of CO2 intercalation into hydrated Na-montmorillonite at P-T conditions relevant to geological formations suitable for CO2 storage. Of particular interest are the structural and transport properties of interlayer species after CO2 intercalation. The conducted simulations allowed the research team to quantify expansion/contraction of smectite as a function of CO2 and H2O compositions. The resulting swelling curves can be used to gauge the amount of stored CO2, compare it to the experiment, and estimate changes in geomechanical properties of the storage formation. The obtained results showed that the infrared signal of the asymmetric stretch vibration of CO2 molecule is extremely sensitive to the solvent environment. The extent of the frequency shift relative to the gas-phase value can be used to probe hydration level in the interlayer with intercalated CO2. Interaction of supercritical CO2 with brine in deep geological formations promotes an increase of hydrophobicity of clay surfaces. As a result of wettability alteration, estimated diffusion constants of CO2 and H2O increase with the increased CO2 load; this can contribute to faster migration of CO2 throughout the formation.

  11. The anodic dissolution of SIMFUEL (UO{sub 2}) in slightly alkaline sodium carbonate/bicarbonate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keech, P.G.; Goldik, J.S.; Qin, Z. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond St, London ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Shoesmith, D.W., E-mail: dwshoesm@uwo.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond St, London ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2011-09-30

    The corrosion of nuclear fuel under waste disposal conditions is likely to be influenced by the bicarbonate/carbonate content of the groundwater since it increases the solubility of the U{sup VI} corrosion product, [UO{sub 2}]{sup 2+}. As one of the half reactions involved in the corrosion process, the anodic dissolution of SIMFUEL (UO{sub 2}) has been studied in bicarbonate/carbonate solutions (pH 9.8) using voltammetric and potentiostatic techniques and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The reaction proceeds by two consecutive one electron transfer reactions (U{sup IV} {yields} U{sup V} {yields} U{sup VI}). At low potentials ({<=}250 mV (vs. SCE) the rate of the first electron transfer reaction is rate determining irrespective of the total carbonate concentration. At potentials >250 mV (vs. SCE) the formation of a U{sup VI}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} surface layer begins to inhibit the dissolution rate and the current becomes independent of potential indicating rate control by the chemical dissolution of this layer.

  12. Carbon Nanotubes Preserve Normal Phenotypes Under Cancer-Promoting Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wailes, Elizabeth; Levi-Polyachenko, Nicole

    2015-03-01

    Tumor-associated fibroblasts and cancer cells have long been known to create a feedback loop that further stimulates the cancer. While this has been explored from a molecular biology standpoint, little is known about the physical relationship of the cell types even though both sets of cells are known to be mechanosensitive. Indeed, for both fibroblasts and cancer, mechanical signals can make the difference between a normal or pathological cell. To evaluate this relationship and test if it can be manipulated to favor normal cells, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal microscopy was performed on fibroblast and breast cancer cell co-cultures with a collagen gel matrix to simulate the extracellular matrix. Pathological behavior was encouraged through the addition of transforming growth factor beta (TGF- β) . In a separate group, this behavior was discouraged through the doping of the collagen gel with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). Significant differences were observed both in the elastic moduli of each cell type and the cancer cells' propensity to migrate through the gel as a model for metastasis. These results shed new light on how cancer progresses and promote the further investigation of nano-mechanical solutions to cancer.

  13. For a conditional financing of low carbon risky projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meunier, Guy; Ponssard, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Subsidies are extensively used for promoting the deployment of green technologies (renewables, clean development mechanism, electric vehicles...). Such policies may generate high windfall profits: some of the projects that benefited from the subsidies would have been undertaken anyway. The paper formalizes this situation using a simple principal agent framework under adverse selection. The agent may invest or not and obtain some private benefit in case of success. The principal observes both the investment and the eventual success, which generates a social benefit. Under some conditions it is shown that a subsidy paid conditional on failure (and not on success) limits the windfall profit while encouraging a large portfolio of projects to be invested. The relevance of this policy is discussed in the context of facilitating investment for infrastructure for fuel cell electric vehicles. (authors)

  14. Concentrated aqueous sodium chloride solution in clays at thermodynamic conditions of hydraulic fracturing: Insight from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, Martin; Lísal, Martin

    2018-06-01

    To address a high salinity of flow-back water during hydraulic fracturing, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and study the thermodynamics, structure, and diffusion of concentrated aqueous salt solution in clay nanopores. The concentrated solution results from the dissolution of a cubic NaCl nanocrystal, immersed in an aqueous NaCl solution of varying salt concentration and confined in clay pores of a width comparable to the crystal size. The size of the nanocrystal equals to about 18 Å which is above a critical nucleus size. We consider a typical shale gas reservoir condition of 365 K and 275 bar, and we represent the clay pores as pyrophyllite and Na-montmorillonite (Na-MMT) slits. We employ the Extended Simple Point Charge (SPC/E) model for water, Joung-Cheatham model for ions, and CLAYFF for the slit walls. We impose the pressure in the normal direction and the resulting slit width varies from about 20 to 25 Å when the salt concentration in the surrounding solution increased from zero to an oversaturated value. By varying the salt concentration, we observe two scenarios. First, the crystal dissolves and its dissolution time increases with increasing salt concentration. We describe the dissolution process in terms of the number of ions in the crystal, and the crystal size and shape. Second, when the salt concentration reaches a system solubility limit, the crystal grows and attains a new equilibrium size; the crystal comes into equilibrium with the surrounding saturated solution. After crystal dissolution, we carry out canonical MD simulations for the concentrated solution. We evaluate the hydration energy, density profiles, orientation distributions, hydrogen-bond network, radial distribution functions, and in-plane diffusion of water and ions to provide insight into the microscopic behaviour of the concentrated aqueous sodium chloride solution in interlayer galleries of the slightly hydrophobic pyrophyllite and hydrophilic Na-MMT pores.

  15. Vacuolar H+ -ATPase c protects glial cell death induced by sodium nitroprusside under glutathione-depleted condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Yu Jeong; Lee, Seong-Beom; Lee, Hwa Ok; Son, Min Jeong; Kim, Ho-Shik; Kwon, Oh-Joo; Jeong, Seong-Whan

    2011-08-01

    We examined the role of the c subunit (ATP6L) of vacuolar H(+) -ATPase and its molecular mechanisms in glial cell death induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP). ATP6L siRNA-transfected cells treated with SNP showed a significant increase in cytotoxicity under glutathione (GSH)-depleted conditions after pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine, but reduction of ATP6L did not affect the regulation of lysosomal pH in analyses with lysosomal pH-dependent fluorescence probes. Photodegraded SNP and ferrous sulfate induced cytotoxicity with the same pattern as that of SNP, but SNAP and potassium cyanide did not show activity. Pretreatment of the transfected cells with deferoxamine (DFO) reduced ROS production and significantly inhibited the cytotoxicity, which indicates that primarily iron rather than nitric oxide or cyanide from SNP contributes to cell death. Involvement of apoptotic processes in the cells was not shown. Pretreatment with JNK or p38 chemical inhibitor significantly inhibited the cytotoxicity, and we also confirmed that the MAPKs were activated in the cells by immunoblot analysis. Significant increase of LC3-II conversion was observed in the cells, and the conversions were inhibited by cotransfection of the MAPK siRNAs and pretreatment with DFO. Introduction of Atg5 siRNA inhibited the cytotoxicity and inhibited the activation of MAPKs and the conversion of LC3. We finally confirmed autophagic cell death and involvement of MAPKs by observation of autophagic vacuoles via electron microscopy. These data suggest that ATP6L has a protective role against SNP-induced autophagic cell death via inhibition of JNK and p38 in GSH-depleted glial cells. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Corrosion performance of advanced structural materials in sodium.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Li, M.; Rink, D.L. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-05-16

    Test Facility, and Clinch River Breeder Reactor. Among the nonmetallic elements discussed, oxygen is deemed controllable and its concentration in sodium can be maintained in sodium for long reactor life by using cold-trap method. It was concluded that among the cold-trap and getter-trap methods, the use of cold trap is sufficient to achieve oxygen concentration of the order of 1 part per million. Under these oxygen conditions in sodium, the corrosion performance of structural materials such as austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels will be acceptable at a maximum core outlet sodium temperature of {approx}550 C. In the current sodium compatibility studies, the oxygen concentration in sodium will be controlled and maintained at {approx}1 ppm by controlling the cold trap temperature. The oxygen concentration in sodium in the forced convection sodium loop will be controlled and monitored by maintaining the cold trap temperature in the range of 120-150 C, which would result in oxygen concentration in the range of 1-2 ppm. Uniaxial tensile specimens are being exposed to flowing sodium and will be retrieved and analyzed for corrosion and post-exposure tensile properties. Advanced materials for sodium exposure include austenitic alloy HT-UPS and ferritic-martensitic steels modified 9Cr-1Mo and NF616. Among the nonmetallic elements in sodium, carbon was assessed to have the most influence on structural materials since carbon, as an impurity, is not amenable to control and maintenance by any of the simple purification methods. The dynamic equilibrium value for carbon in sodium systems is dependent on several factors, details of which were discussed in the earlier report. The current sodium compatibility studies will examine the role of carbon concentration in sodium on the carburization-decarburization of advanced structural materials at temperatures up to 650 C. Carbon will be added to the sodium by exposure of carbon-filled iron tubes, which over time will enable

  17. Corrosion performance of advanced structural materials in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Li, M.; Rink, D.L.

    2012-01-01

    Clinch River Breeder Reactor. Among the nonmetallic elements discussed, oxygen is deemed controllable and its concentration in sodium can be maintained in sodium for long reactor life by using cold-trap method. It was concluded that among the cold-trap and getter-trap methods, the use of cold trap is sufficient to achieve oxygen concentration of the order of 1 part per million. Under these oxygen conditions in sodium, the corrosion performance of structural materials such as austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels will be acceptable at a maximum core outlet sodium temperature of ∼550 C. In the current sodium compatibility studies, the oxygen concentration in sodium will be controlled and maintained at ∼1 ppm by controlling the cold trap temperature. The oxygen concentration in sodium in the forced convection sodium loop will be controlled and monitored by maintaining the cold trap temperature in the range of 120-150 C, which would result in oxygen concentration in the range of 1-2 ppm. Uniaxial tensile specimens are being exposed to flowing sodium and will be retrieved and analyzed for corrosion and post-exposure tensile properties. Advanced materials for sodium exposure include austenitic alloy HT-UPS and ferritic-martensitic steels modified 9Cr-1Mo and NF616. Among the nonmetallic elements in sodium, carbon was assessed to have the most influence on structural materials since carbon, as an impurity, is not amenable to control and maintenance by any of the simple purification methods. The dynamic equilibrium value for carbon in sodium systems is dependent on several factors, details of which were discussed in the earlier report. The current sodium compatibility studies will examine the role of carbon concentration in sodium on the carburization-decarburization of advanced structural materials at temperatures up to 650 C. Carbon will be added to the sodium by exposure of carbon-filled iron tubes, which over time will enable carbon to diffuse through iron and

  18. Conditions for forming composite carbon nanotube-diamond like carbon material that retain the good properties of both materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Wei, E-mail: wei.ren@helsinki.fi; Avchaciov, Konstantin; Nordlund, Kai [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Iyer, Ajai; Koskinen, Jari [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16200, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I. [NanoMaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 15100, 00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2015-11-21

    Carbon nanotubes are of wide interest due to their excellent properties such as tensile strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but are not, when placed alone on a substrate, well resistant to mechanical wear. Diamond-like carbon (DLC), on the other hand, is widely used in applications due to its very good wear resistance. Combining the two materials could provide a very durable pure carbon nanomaterial enabling to benefit from the best properties of both carbon allotropes. However, the synthesis of high-quality diamond-like carbon uses energetic plasmas, which can damage the nanotubes. From previous works it is neither clear whether the quality of the tubes remains good after DLC deposition, nor whether the DLC above the tubes retains the high sp{sup 3} bonding fraction. In this work, we use experiments and classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanisms of DLC formation on various carbon nanotube compositions. The results show that high-sp{sup 3}-content DLC can be formed provided the deposition conditions allow for sidewards pressure to form from a substrate close beneath the tubes. Under optimal DLC formation energies of around 40–70 eV, the top two nanotube atom layers are fully destroyed by the plasma deposition, but layers below this can retain their structural integrity.

  19. Degradation modes of austenitic and ferritic–martensitic stainless steels in He–CO–CO2 and liquid sodium environments of equivalent oxygen and carbon chemical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulsoy, G.; Was, G.S.; Pawel, S.J.; Busby, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is to explore possible thermodynamic correlations between the degradation modes of austenitic and ferritic–martensitic alloys observed in high temperature He–CO–CO 2 environments with oxygen and carbon chemical potentials equivalent to that in a liquid sodium environment containing 2–5 molppm oxygen and 0.02–0.2 molppm carbon at temperatures 500–700 °C. Two He–CO–CO 2 environments (Pco/Pco 2 = 1320, Pco = 1980 molppm, and Pco/Pco 2 = 9, Pco = 13.5 molppm) were selected to test alloys NF616 and 316L at 700 and 850 °C. Upon exposure to He environments at 850 °C, 316L samples exhibited thick surface Cr 2 O 3 scales and substantial internal oxidation; however at 700 °C no significant internal oxidation was observed. NF616 samples exhibited relatively thinner surface Cr 2 O 3 scales compared to 316L samples at both temperatures. NF616 samples exposed to liquid sodium at 700 °C and He–Pco/Pco 2 = 9 at 850 °C showed decarburization. No surface oxide formation was observed on the sample exposed to the Na environment. Results obtained from He exposure experiments provide insight into what may occur during long exposure times in a sodium environment

  20. Degradation modes of austenitic and ferritic–martensitic stainless steels in He–CO–CO{sub 2} and liquid sodium environments of equivalent oxygen and carbon chemical potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulsoy, G., E-mail: gulsoy@umich.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Was, G.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Pawel, S.J.; Busby, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The objective of this work is to explore possible thermodynamic correlations between the degradation modes of austenitic and ferritic–martensitic alloys observed in high temperature He–CO–CO{sub 2} environments with oxygen and carbon chemical potentials equivalent to that in a liquid sodium environment containing 2–5 molppm oxygen and 0.02–0.2 molppm carbon at temperatures 500–700 °C. Two He–CO–CO{sub 2} environments (Pco/Pco{sub 2} = 1320, Pco = 1980 molppm, and Pco/Pco{sub 2} = 9, Pco = 13.5 molppm) were selected to test alloys NF616 and 316L at 700 and 850 °C. Upon exposure to He environments at 850 °C, 316L samples exhibited thick surface Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales and substantial internal oxidation; however at 700 °C no significant internal oxidation was observed. NF616 samples exhibited relatively thinner surface Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales compared to 316L samples at both temperatures. NF616 samples exposed to liquid sodium at 700 °C and He–Pco/Pco{sub 2} = 9 at 850 °C showed decarburization. No surface oxide formation was observed on the sample exposed to the Na environment. Results obtained from He exposure experiments provide insight into what may occur during long exposure times in a sodium environment.

  1. Micro-syntheses for the use of carbon 13 or carbon 14. Micro-preparations of methyl alcohol, methyl iodide, and sodium acetate labeled in the methyl group; Microsyntheses pour l'emploi de carbone 13 ou de carbone 14. Micropreparations d'alcool methylique, d'iodure de methyle et d'acetate de sodium marque sur le groupement methyle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baret, C; Pichat, L

    1951-11-01

    Apparatus and technique are described in detail for (1) reduction of CO{sub 2} to CH{sub 3}OH with LiAlH{sub 4}, (2) conversion of the methanol to CH{sub 3}I by HI, (3) formation of the Mg Grignard reagent, and (4) addition of inactive CO{sub 2} to form CH{sub 3}COOH. All these operations have been carried out on 0.005 moles. Methyl-labeled Na acetate has been prepared in 67% yield based on the Ba{sup 14}CO{sub 3} used as starting material. (author) [French] Description detaillee d'une technique deja connue pour la reduction du gaz carbonique en alcool methylique par LiAlH{sub 4}. Conversion du methanol en iodure de methyle. Ce dernier transforme en reactif de Grigard, et carbonate, fournit de l'acide acetique. Toutes ces operations on ete effectuees sur 5 x 10{sup -3} moles. La methode a ete appliquee a la synthese d'acetate de sodium marque par le groupement methyle par {sup 14}C avec un rendement global de 67% base sur le carbonate de baryum radioactif mis en oeuvre. (auteurs)

  2. In situ Microscopic Observation of Sodium Deposition/Dissolution on Sodium Electrode

    OpenAIRE

    Yuhki Yui; Masahiko Hayashi; Jiro Nakamura

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical sodium deposition/dissolution behaviors in propylene carbonate-based electrolyte solution were observed by means of in situ light microscopy. First, granular sodium was deposited at pits in a sodium electrode in the cathodic process. Then, the sodium particles grew linearly from the electrode surface, becoming needle-like in shape. In the subsequent anodic process, the sodium dissolved near the base of the needles on the sodium electrode and the so-called ?dead sodium? broke a...

  3. Enhanced osteoconductivity of sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite by system instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang Cho, Jung; Um, Seung-Hoon; Su Yoo, Dong; Chung, Yong-Chae; Hye Chung, Shin; Lee, Jeong-Cheol; Rhee, Sang-Hoon

    2014-07-01

    The effect of substituting sodium for calcium on enhanced osteoconductivity of hydroxyapatite was newly investigated. Sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite was synthesized by reacting calcium hydroxide and phosphoric acid with sodium nitrate followed by sintering. As a control, pure hydroxyapatite was prepared under identical conditions, but without the addition of sodium nitrate. Substitution of calcium with sodium in hydroxyapatite produced the structural vacancies for carbonate ion from phosphate site and hydrogen ion from hydroxide site of hydroxyapatite after sintering. The total system energy of sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite with structural defects calculated by ab initio methods based on quantum mechanics was much higher than that of hydroxyapatite, suggesting that the sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite was energetically less stable compared with hydroxyapatite. Indeed, sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite exhibited higher dissolution behavior of constituent elements of hydroxyapatite in simulated body fluid (SBF) and Tris-buffered deionized water compared with hydroxyapatite, which directly affected low-crystalline hydroxyl-carbonate apatite forming capacity by increasing the degree of apatite supersaturation in SBF. Actually, sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite exhibited markedly improved low-crystalline hydroxyl-carbonate apatite forming capacity in SBF and noticeably higher osteoconductivity 4 weeks after implantation in calvarial defects of New Zealand white rabbits compared with hydroxyapatite. In addition, there were no statistically significant differences between hydroxyapatite and sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite on cytotoxicity as determined by BCA assay. Taken together, these results indicate that sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite with structural defects has promising potential for use as a bone grafting material due to its enhanced osteoconductivity compared with hydroxyapatite. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Sodium carbonate revisted

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dušek, Michal; Chapuis, G.; Meyer, M.; Petříček, Václav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 59, - (2003), s. 337-352 ISSN 0108-7681 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0916 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : structure determination * modulated crystal of Na 2 CO 3 * incommensurate and commensurate phases Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.643, year: 2003

  5. Facile synthesis of water-soluble carbon nano-onions under alkaline conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaber Hashem Gaber Ahmed

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbonization of tomatoes at 240 °C using 30% (w/v NaOH as catalyst produced carbon onions (C-onions, while solely carbon dots (C-dots were obtained at the same temperature in the absence of the catalyst. Other natural materials, such as carrots and tree leaves (acer saccharum, under the same temperature and alkaline conditions did not produce carbon onions. XRD, FTIR, HRTEM, UV–vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence analyses were performed to characterize the as-synthesized carbon nanomaterials. Preliminary tests demonstrate a capability of the versatile materials for chemical sensing of metal ions. The high content of lycopene in tomatoes may explain the formation of C-onions in alkaline media and a possible formation mechanism for such structures was outlined.

  6. Effects of ocean acidification and hydrodynamic conditions on carbon metabolism and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fluxes in seagrass populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Luis G; Jiménez-Ramos, Rocío; Hernández, Ignacio; Bouma, Tjeerd J; Brun, Fernando G

    2018-01-01

    Global change has been acknowledged as one of the main threats to the biosphere and its provision of ecosystem services, especially in marine ecosystems. Seagrasses play a critical ecological role in coastal ecosystems, but their responses to ocean acidification (OA) and climate change are not well understood. There have been previous studies focused on the effects of OA, but the outcome of interactions with co-factors predicted to alter during climate change still needs to be addressed. For example, the impact of higher CO2 and different hydrodynamic regimes on seagrass performance remains unknown. We studied the effects of OA under different current velocities on productivity of the seagrass Zostera noltei, using changes in dissolved oxygen as a proxy for the seagrass carbon metabolism, and release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in a four-week experiment using an open-water outdoor mesocosm. Under current pH conditions, increasing current velocity had a positive effect on productivity, but this depended on shoot density. However, this positive effect of current velocity disappeared under OA conditions. OA conditions led to a significant increase in gross production rate and respiration, suggesting that Z. noltei is carbon-limited under the current inorganic carbon concentration of seawater. In addition, an increase in non-structural carbohydrates was found, which may lead to better growing conditions and higher resilience in seagrasses subjected to environmental stress. Regarding DOC flux, a direct and positive relationship was found between current velocity and DOC release, both under current pH and OA conditions. We conclude that OA and high current velocity may lead to favourable growth scenarios for Z. noltei populations, increasing their productivity, non-structural carbohydrate concentrations and DOC release. Our results add new dimensions to predictions on how seagrass ecosystems will respond to climate change, with important implications for the

  7. Effects of ocean acidification and hydrodynamic conditions on carbon metabolism and dissolved organic carbon (DOC fluxes in seagrass populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis G Egea

    Full Text Available Global change has been acknowledged as one of the main threats to the biosphere and its provision of ecosystem services, especially in marine ecosystems. Seagrasses play a critical ecological role in coastal ecosystems, but their responses to ocean acidification (OA and climate change are not well understood. There have been previous studies focused on the effects of OA, but the outcome of interactions with co-factors predicted to alter during climate change still needs to be addressed. For example, the impact of higher CO2 and different hydrodynamic regimes on seagrass performance remains unknown. We studied the effects of OA under different current velocities on productivity of the seagrass Zostera noltei, using changes in dissolved oxygen as a proxy for the seagrass carbon metabolism, and release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC in a four-week experiment using an open-water outdoor mesocosm. Under current pH conditions, increasing current velocity had a positive effect on productivity, but this depended on shoot density. However, this positive effect of current velocity disappeared under OA conditions. OA conditions led to a significant increase in gross production rate and respiration, suggesting that Z. noltei is carbon-limited under the current inorganic carbon concentration of seawater. In addition, an increase in non-structural carbohydrates was found, which may lead to better growing conditions and higher resilience in seagrasses subjected to environmental stress. Regarding DOC flux, a direct and positive relationship was found between current velocity and DOC release, both under current pH and OA conditions. We conclude that OA and high current velocity may lead to favourable growth scenarios for Z. noltei populations, increasing their productivity, non-structural carbohydrate concentrations and DOC release. Our results add new dimensions to predictions on how seagrass ecosystems will respond to climate change, with important

  8. Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon in a heathland under future climatic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selsted, Merete Bang

    on ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon in a heathland under future climatic conditions, shows that extended summer drought in combination with elevated temperature will ensure permanent dryer soil conditions, which decreases carbon turnover, while elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations will increase...... carbon turnover. In the full future climate scenario, carbon turnover is over all expected to increase and the heathland to become a source of atmospheric CO2. The methodology of static chamber CO2 flux measurements and applying the technology in a FACE (free air CO2 enrichment) facility is a challenge...... on the atmospheric CO2 concentration. Photosynthesis and respiration run in parallel during measurements of net ecosystem exchange, and these measurements should therefore be performed with care to both the atmospheric CO2 concentration and the CO2 soil-atmosphere gradient....

  9. Development of a prototype regeneration carbon dioxide absorber. [for use in EVA conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, P. S.; Baker, B. S.

    1977-01-01

    A prototype regenerable carbon dioxide absorber was developed to maintain the environmental quality of the portable life support system. The absorber works on the alkali metal carbonate-bicarbonate solid-gas reaction to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The prototype sorber module was designed, fabricated, and tested at simulated extravehicular activity conditions to arrive at optimum design. The unit maintains sorber outlet concentration below 5 mm Hg. An optimization study was made with respect to heat transfer, temperature control, sorbent utilization, sorber life and regenerability, and final size of the module. Important parameters influencing the capacity of the final absorber unit were identified and recommendations for improvement were made.

  10. Retention of elemental 131I by activated carbons under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.

    1984-09-01

    Under simulated accident conditions (maximum temperature: 130 0 C) no significant difference was found in the retention of I-131 loaded as elemental iodine, by various fresh and aged commercial activated carbons. In all the cases, the I-131 passing through deep beds of activated carbon was in a non-elemental form. It is concluded that a minimum retention of 99.99% for elemental radioiodine, as required by the RSK guidelines for PWR accident filters, can be equally well achieved with various commercial activated carbons. (orig.) [de

  11. Shift in aggregation, ROS generation, antioxidative defense, lysozyme and acetylcholinesterase activities in the cells of an Indian freshwater sponge exposed to washing soda (sodium carbonate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Ray, Mitali; Ray, Sajal

    2016-09-01

    Washing soda, chemically identified as anhydrous sodium carbonate, is a popular cleaning agent among the rural and urban populations of India which often contaminates the freshwater ponds and lakes, the natural habitat of sponge Eunapius carteri. Present investigation deals with estimation of cellular aggregation, generation of ROS and activities of antioxidant enzymes, lysozyme and acetylcholinesterase in the cells of E. carteri under the environmentally realistic concentrations of washing soda. Prolonged treatment of washing soda inhibited the degree of cellular aggregation. Experimental exposure of 8 and 16mg/l of sodium carbonate for 48h elevated the physiological level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the agranulocytes, semigranulocytes and granulocytes of E. carteri, whereas, treatment of 192h inhibited the ROS generation in three cellular morphotypes. Activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were recorded to be inhibited under prolonged exposure of washing soda. Washing soda mediated inhibition of ROS generation and depletion in the activities of antioxidant enzymes were indicative to an undesirable shift in cytotoxic status and antioxidative defense in E. carteri. Inhibition in the activity of lysozyme under the treatment of sodium carbonate was suggestive to a severe impairment of the innate immunological efficiency of E. carteri distributed in the washing soda contaminated habitat. Washing soda mediated inhibition in the activity of acetylcholinesterase indicated its neurotoxicity in E. carteri. Washing soda, a reported environmental contaminant, affected adversely the immunophysiological status of E. carteri with reference to cellular aggregation, oxidative stress, antioxidative defense, lysozyme and acetylcholinesterase activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cellulase activity and dissolved organic carbon release from lignocellulose macrophyte-derived in four trophic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Bottino

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Considering the importance of lignocellulose macrophyte-derived for the energy flux in aquatic ecosystems and the nutrient concentrations as a function of force which influences the decomposition process, this study aims to relate the enzymatic activity and lignocellulose hydrolysis in different trophic statuses. Water samples and two macrophyte species were collected from the littoral zone of a subtropical Brazilian Reservoir. A lignocellulosic matrix was obtained using aqueous extraction of dried plant material (≈40 °C. Incubations for decomposition of the lignocellulosic matrix were prepared using lignocelluloses, inoculums and filtered water simulating different trophic statuses with the same N:P ratio. The particulate organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon (POC and DOC, respectively were quantified, the cellulase enzymatic activity was measured by releasing reducing sugars and immobilized carbon was analyzed by filtration. During the cellulose degradation indicated by the cellulase activity, the dissolved organic carbon daily rate and enzyme activity increased. It was related to a fast hydrolysable fraction of cellulose that contributed to short-term carbon immobilization (ca. 10 days. After approximately 20 days, the dissolved organic carbon and enzyme activity were inversely correlated suggesting that the respiration of microorganisms was responsible for carbon mineralization. Cellulose was an important resource in low nutrient conditions (oligotrophic. However, the detritus quality played a major role in the lignocelluloses degradation (i.e., enzyme activity and carbon release.

  13. Cellulase activity and dissolved organic carbon release from lignocellulose macrophyte-derived in four trophic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottino, Flávia; Cunha-Santino, Marcela Bianchessi; Bianchini, Irineu

    2016-01-01

    Considering the importance of lignocellulose macrophyte-derived for the energy flux in aquatic ecosystems and the nutrient concentrations as a function of force which influences the decomposition process, this study aims to relate the enzymatic activity and lignocellulose hydrolysis in different trophic statuses. Water samples and two macrophyte species were collected from the littoral zone of a subtropical Brazilian Reservoir. A lignocellulosic matrix was obtained using aqueous extraction of dried plant material (≈40°C). Incubations for decomposition of the lignocellulosic matrix were prepared using lignocelluloses, inoculums and filtered water simulating different trophic statuses with the same N:P ratio. The particulate organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon (POC and DOC, respectively) were quantified, the cellulase enzymatic activity was measured by releasing reducing sugars and immobilized carbon was analyzed by filtration. During the cellulose degradation indicated by the cellulase activity, the dissolved organic carbon daily rate and enzyme activity increased. It was related to a fast hydrolysable fraction of cellulose that contributed to short-term carbon immobilization (ca. 10 days). After approximately 20 days, the dissolved organic carbon and enzyme activity were inversely correlated suggesting that the respiration of microorganisms was responsible for carbon mineralization. Cellulose was an important resource in low nutrient conditions (oligotrophic). However, the detritus quality played a major role in the lignocelluloses degradation (i.e., enzyme activity) and carbon release. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Photon mass energy absorption coefficients from 0.4 MeV to 10 MeV for silicon, carbon, copper and sodium iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oz, H.; Gurler, O.; Gultekin, A.; Yalcin, S.; Gundogdu, O.

    2006-01-01

    The absorption coefficients have been widely used for problems and applications involving dose calculations. Direct measurements of the coefficients are difficult, and theoretical computations are usually employed. In this paper, analytical equations are presented for determining the mass energy absorption coefficients for gamma rays with an incident energy range between 0.4 MeV and 10 MeV in silicon, carbon, copper and sodium iodide. The mass energy absorption coefficients for gamma rays were calculated, and the results obtained were compared with the values reported in the literature.

  15. Photon mass energy absorption coefficients from 0.4 MeV to 10 MeV for silicon, carbon, copper and sodium iodide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oz, H.; Gurler, O.; Gultekin, A. [Uludag University, Bursa (Turkmenistan); Yalcin, S. [Kastamonu University, Kastamonu (Turkmenistan); Gundogdu, O. [University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    The absorption coefficients have been widely used for problems and applications involving dose calculations. Direct measurements of the coefficients are difficult, and theoretical computations are usually employed. In this paper, analytical equations are presented for determining the mass energy absorption coefficients for gamma rays with an incident energy range between 0.4 MeV and 10 MeV in silicon, carbon, copper and sodium iodide. The mass energy absorption coefficients for gamma rays were calculated, and the results obtained were compared with the values reported in the literature.

  16. Proteins involved in flor yeast carbon metabolism under biofilm formation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-García, Jaime; García-Martínez, Teresa; Moreno, Juan; Mauricio, Juan Carlos

    2015-04-01

    A lack of sugars during the production of biologically aged wines after fermentation of grape must causes flor yeasts to metabolize other carbon molecules formed during fermentation (ethanol and glycerol, mainly). In this work, a proteome analysis involving OFFGEL fractionation prior to LC/MS detection was used to elucidate the carbon metabolism of a flor yeast strain under biofilm formation conditions (BFC). The results were compared with those obtained under non-biofilm formation conditions (NBFC). Proteins associated to processes such as non-fermentable carbon uptake, the glyoxylate and TCA cycles, cellular respiration and inositol metabolism were detected at higher concentrations under BFC than under the reference conditions (NBFC). This study constitutes the first attempt at identifying the flor yeast proteins responsible for the peculiar sensory profile of biologically aged wines. A better metabolic knowledge of flor yeasts might facilitate the development of effective strategies for improved production of these special wines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Approach to corrosion mechanisms for a carbon steel in a solution of sodium chloride at 3 pc and its inhibition by means of organic molecules. Compared benefit of the use of stationary and transient electrochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duprat, Michel

    1981-01-01

    Within the context of an increased use of seawater as coolant in various industrial installations, this research thesis had two main objectives: the search for inhibitor organic compounds with optimal efficiency, and a better understanding of the mechanisms of corrosion inhibition by the best compounds within the considered organic compounds. After having reported a bibliographical study on carbon steel corrosion in seawater or in a sodium chloride solution at 3 pc, and on the inhibition of this corrosion, the author presents the experimental conditions (materials and methods). He reports the use of stationary and un-stationary electrochemical methods for the study of the steel-solution interface without inhibitor in order to get a better knowledge of corrosion electrochemical processes and to determine more precisely the corrosion rate. The last part addresses the study of the same interface but in presence of various inhibitors

  18. Enhanced cyclic stability of SnS microplates with conformal carbon coating derived from ethanol vapor deposition for sodium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Liu, Jiangwen; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Yuan, Bin; Yang, Lichun; Zhu, Min

    2018-04-01

    Carbon coated SnS microplates (SnS@C MPs) were prepared via a facile chemical vapor deposition method using SnS2 nanoflakes as precursor and ethanol vapor as carbon source. The carbon coating restrains the growth of SnS during the heat treatment. Furthermore, it improves the electronic conductivity as well as accommodates volume variations of SnS during the sodiation and desodiation processes. Therefore, the rate capability and cycle performance of the SnS@C MPs as anode materials for sodium-ion batteries are remarkably enhanced compared with the bare SnS and the SnS2 precursor. At current densities of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1 and 2 A g-1, the optimized SnS@C MPs exhibit stable capacities of 602.9, 532.1, 512.2, 465.9 and 427.2 mAh g-1, respectively. At 1 A g-1, they show a reversible capacity of 528.8 mAh g-1 in the first cycle, and maintain 444.7 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles, with capacity retention of 84.1%. The carbon coating through chemical vapor deposition using ethanol vapor as carbon sources is green, simple and cost-effective, which shows great promise to improve the reversible Na+ storage of electrode materials.

  19. LABORATORY STUDY FOR THE REDUCTION OF CHROME (VI) TO CHROME (III) USING SODIUM METABISULFITE UNDER ACIDIC CONDITIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DUNCAM JB; GUTHRIE MD; LUECK KJ; AVILA M

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the results from RPP-PLAN-32738, 'Test Plan for the Effluent Treatment Facility to Reduce Chrome(VI) to Chrome(I1I) in the Secondary Waste Stream', using sodium metabisulfite. Appendix A presents the report as submitted by the Center for Laboratory Sciences (CLS) to CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The CLS carried out the laboratory effort under Contract Number 21065, release Number 30. This report extracts the more pertinent aspects of the laboratory effort

  20. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to carbonate and bicarbonate salts of sodium and potassium and maintenance of normal bone (ID 331, 1402) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    claims in relation to carbonate and bicarbonate salts of sodium and potassium and maintenance of normal bone. The scientific substantiation is based on the information provided by the Member States in the consolidated list of Article 13 health claims and references that EFSA has received from Member...... States or directly from stakeholders. The food constituents that are the subject of the health claim are carbonate and bicarbonate salts of sodium and potassium. The Panel considers that carbonate and bicarbonate salts of sodium and potassium are sufficiently characterised. The claimed effects are “acid...... the dietary intake of carbonate or bicarbonate salts of sodium or potassium and maintenance of normal bone....

  1. Optimal heat rejection pressure in transcritical carbon dioxide air conditioning and heat pump systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Shengming; Jakobsen, Arne

    1998-01-01

    Due to the urgent need for environmentally benign refrigerants, the use of the natural substance carbon dioxide in refrigeration systems has gained more and more attention. In systems such as automobile air-conditioners and heat pumps, owing to the relatively high heat rejection temperatures, the...... dioxide air conditioning or heat pump systems and for intelligent controlling such systems.......Due to the urgent need for environmentally benign refrigerants, the use of the natural substance carbon dioxide in refrigeration systems has gained more and more attention. In systems such as automobile air-conditioners and heat pumps, owing to the relatively high heat rejection temperatures......, the cycles using carbon dioxide as refrigerant will have to operate in the transcritical area. In a transcritical carbon dioxide system, there is an optimal heat rejection pressure that gives a maximum COP. In this paper, it is shown that the value of this optimal heat rejection pressure mainly depends...

  2. Biomass waste carbon materials as adsorbents for CO2 capture under post-combustion conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa M Calvo-Muñoz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of porous carbon materials obtained from biomass waste have been synthesized, with different morphologies and structural properties, and evaluated as potential adsorbents for CO2 capture in post-combustion conditions. These carbon materials present CO2 adsorption capacities, at 25 ºC and 101.3 kPa, comparable to those obtained by other complex carbon or inorganic materials. Furthermore, CO2 uptakes under these conditions can be well correlated to the narrow micropore volume, derived from the CO2 adsorption data at 0 ºC (VDRCO2. In contrast, CO2 adsorption capacities at 25 ºC and 15 kPa are more related to only pores of sizes lower than 0.7 nm. The capacity values obtained in column adsorption experiments were really promising. An activated carbon fiber obtained from Alcell lignin, FCL, presented a capacity value of 1.3 mmol/g (5.7 %wt. Moreover, the adsorption capacity of this carbon fiber was totally recovered in a very fast desorption cycle at the same operation temperature and total pressure and, therefore, without any additional energy requirement. Thus, these results suggest that the biomass waste used in this work could be successfully valorized as efficient CO2 adsorbent, under post-combustion conditions, showing excellent regeneration performance.

  3. Factors affecting stress assisted corrosion cracking of carbon steel under industrial boiler conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong

    Failure of carbon steel boiler tubes from waterside has been reported in the utility boilers and industrial boilers for a long time. In industrial boilers, most waterside tube cracks are found near heavy attachment welds on the outer surface and are typically blunt, with multiple bulbous features indicating a discontinuous growth. These types of tube failures are typically referred to as stress assisted corrosion (SAC). For recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry, these failures are particularly important as any water leak inside the furnace can potentially lead to smelt-water explosion. Metal properties, environmental variables, and stress conditions are the major factors influencing SAC crack initation and propagation in carbon steel boiler tubes. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were conducted under boiler water conditions to study the effect of temperature, oxygen level, and stress conditions on crack initation and propagation on SA-210 carbon steel samples machined out of boiler tubes. Heat treatments were also performed to develop various grain size and carbon content on carbon steel samples, and SSRTs were conducted on these samples to examine the effect of microstructure features on SAC cracking. Mechanisms of SAC crack initation and propagation were proposed and validated based on interrupted slow strain tests (ISSRT). Water chemistry guidelines are provided to prevent SAC and fracture mechanics model is developed to predict SAC failure on industrial boiler tubes.

  4. Report of sodium cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murai, Hitoshi; Shima, Akira; Oba, Toshisaburo; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki

    1975-01-01

    The damage of components for LMFBRs due to sodium cavitation is serious problem. This report summarizes the following items, (1) mechanism of the incipience of sodium cavitation, (2) damage due to sodium cavitation, (3) detection method for sodium cavitation, and (4) estimation method for sodium cavitation by the comparison with water cavitation. Materials were collected from the reports on liquid metal cavitation, sodium cavitation and water cavitation published from 1965 to now. The mechanism of the incipience of sodium cavitation cavitation parameters (mean location, distributed amount or occurrence aspect and stability), experiment of causing cavitation with Venturi tube, and growth of bubbles within superheated sodium. The sodium cavitation damage was caused by magnetostriction vibration method and with Venturi tube. The state of damage was investigated with the cavitation performance of a sodium pump, and the damage was examined in view of the safety of LMFBR plants. Sodium cavitation was detected with acoustic method, radiation method, and electric method. The effect of physical property of liquid on incipient cavitation was studied. These are thermodynamic effect based on quasistatic thermal equilibrium condition and the effect of the physical property of liquid based on bubble dynamics. (Iwase, T.)

  5. N/S Co-Doped 3 D Porous Carbon Nanosheet Networks Enhancing Anode Performance of Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lei; Lai, Yanqing; Hu, Hongxing; Wang, Mengran; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Peng; Fang, Jing; Li, Jie

    2017-10-12

    A facile and scalable method is realized for the in situ synthesis of N/S co-doped 3 D porous carbon nanosheet networks (NSPCNNs) as anode materials for sodium-ion batteries. During the synthesis, NaCl is used as a template to prepare porous carbon nanosheet networks. In the resultant architecture, the unique 3 D porous architecture ensures a large specific surface area and fast diffusion paths of both electrons and ions. In addition, the import of N/S produces abundant defects, increased interlayer spacings, more active sites, and high electronic conductivity. The obtained products deliver a high specific capacity and excellent long-term cycling performance, specifically, a capacity of 336.2 mA h g -1 at 0.05 A g -1 , remaining as large as 214.9 mA h g -1 after 2000 charge/discharge cycles at 0.5 A g -1 . This material has great prospects for future applications of scalable, low-cost, and environmentally friendly sodium-ion batteries. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Synthesis and electrochemical probing of water-soluble poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate-co-acrylic acid)-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Feipeng; Yang Yingkui; Xie Xiaolin; Wu Kangbing; Gan Tian; Liu Lang

    2008-01-01

    Water-soluble poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate-co-acrylic acid)-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT-g-P(SSS-co-AA)) with core-shell nanostructure were successfully synthesized by in situ free radical copolymerization of sodium 4-strenesulfonate (SSS) and acrylic acid (AA) in the presence of MWNTs terminated with vinyl groups; their structure was characterized by FTIR, 1 H NMR, Raman, TGA and TEM. The results showed that the thickness and content of the copolymer layer grafted onto the MWNT surface are about 7-12 nm and 82.3%, respectively. The P(SSS-co-AA) covalently grafted on MWNTs provides MWNT-g-P(SSS-co-AA) with good hydrophilicity and solubility in water. Then a novel MWNT-g-P(SSS-co-AA)-modified glassy carbon electrode was fabricated by coating; its electrochemical properties were evaluated by electrochemical probe of K 3 [Fe(CN) 6 ], and its catalytic behaviors to the electrochemical oxidation processes of dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) were investigated. Since the MWNT-g-P(SSS-co-AA)-modified electrode possesses strong electron transfer capability, high electrochemical activity and catalytic ability, it can be used in sensitive, selective, rapid and simultaneous monitoring of biomolecules

  7. Exploratory randomised controlled clinical study to evaluate the comparative efficacy of two occluding toothpastes - a 5% calcium sodium phosphosilicate toothpaste and an 8% arginine/calcium carbonate toothpaste - for the longer-term relief of dentine hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Claire; Mason, Stephen; Cooke, Jonathan

    2017-05-01

    To compare the longer-term clinical efficacy of two occlusion-technology toothpastes - a 5% calcium sodium phosphosilicate (CSPS) toothpaste and a commercially available 8% arginine/calcium carbonate toothpaste - in relieving dentine hypersensitivity (DH). Efficacy was also compared with that of a regular fluoride toothpaste control. This was an exploratory, randomised, examiner-blind, parallel-group, 11-week, controlled study in healthy adults with self-reported and clinically diagnosed DH. After an acclimatisation period, subjects were randomised to one of three study treatments with which they brushed their teeth twice daily. Sensitivity was assessed at baseline and after 1, 2, 4, 6 and 11 weeks treatment in response to evaporative (air) and tactile stimuli (measured by the Schiff Sensitivity Scale/visual analogue scale and tactile threshold, respectively). A total of 135 subjects were randomised to treatment. The two occlusion-technology toothpastes performed similarly over the 11-week treatment period. All study treatments showed statistically significant reductions from baseline in DH at all timepoints for all measures (pcarbonate anti-sensitivity toothpaste provided similar benefits. Improvements in DH continued throughout the 11-week study. Dentine hypersensitivity (DH) is a common and painful condition. Twice-daily use of a 5% calcium sodium phosphosilicate toothpaste reduces DH within 1-2 weeks of initiating use. Ongoing, twice daily use of the sensitivity toothpastes evaluated in this study was associated with continued, clinically significant improvements in DH. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of carbon diffusion in heat treatment of H13 tool steel under different atmospheric conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Ramezani, Maziar; Pasang, Timotius; Chen, Zhan; Neitzert, Thomas; Au, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Although the cost of the heat treatment process is only a minor portion of the total production cost, it is arguably the most important and crucial stage on the determination of material quality. In the study of the carbon diffusion in H13 steel during austenitization, a series of heat treatment experiments had been conducted under different atmospheric conditions and length of treatment. Four austenitization atmospheric conditions were studied, i.e., heat treatment without atmospheric contro...

  9. Targeting sodium channels in cardiac arrhythmia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remme, Carol Ann; Wilde, Arthur A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for proper electrical conduction in the heart. During acquired pathological conditions and inherited sodium channelopathies, altered sodium channel function causes conduction disturbances and ventricular arrhythmias. Although the clinical,

  10. Optimization of Synthesis Condition for Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron Immobilization on Granular Activated Carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mines, Paul D.; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus; Hwang, Yuhoon

    2016-01-01

    economical loss, but also potential risk to human health and environment. Thus, the immobilization onto coarse or structured support is essential. In this study, two representative processes for nZVI immobilization on granular activated carbon (GAC) were evaluated, and optimized conditions for synthesizing...

  11. Content of carbon monoxide in the tissues of rats intoxicated with carbon monoxide in various conditions of acute exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokal, J.A.; Majka, J.; Palus, J.

    1984-12-01

    Tissue carbon monoxide (CO) content was investigated in rats severely intoxicated with CO under various exposure conditions: 1% CO for 4 min, 0.4% CO for 40 min and 0.12% CO for 12 h. Extravascular CO was determined in the heart and skeletal muscles immediately after termination of exposure, and carboxymyoglobin (MbCO) percent saturation was calculated. Total brain CO was estimated immediately after termination of exposure and after the time periods of restitution. After the same exposure conditions, MbCO percent saturation was higher in the heart than in skeletal muscle. In both types of muscle, saturation on myoglobin (Mb) with CO depended on blood carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) level and not on the duration of exposure. The time course of CO elimination was the same for blood and brain, irrespective of CO exposure conditions. The results obtained showed that acute CO intoxication induced by long duration exposures did not involve CO accumulation in the tissues.

  12. Carbon Dioxide Nucleation as a Novel Cleaning Method for Sodium Alginate Fouling Removal from Reverse Osmosis Membranes desalination

    KAUST Repository

    Alnajjar, Heba

    2017-05-01

    The use of Reverse osmosis (RO) membranes have been significantly increasing in water desalination, and the main operational obstacle in RO desalination plants is membrane fouling. Among other solutes, dissolved biopolymers, such as polysaccharides can lead to severe membrane fouling especially with the addition of calcium ions because of the complexation formation between the surface of membrane and foulants materials. However, this complexation can also take place in the feed bulk, resulting in foulants aggregates formation. Although there are some physical techniques that can maintain the membrane performance without reducing its lifetime, only chemical cleanings are still commonly used in RO plants. In this study, a novel cleaning method is proposed to restore the membrane performance by removing the deposited foulants without reducing the membrane lifetime. The cleaning method is based on using water saturated with dissolved CO2 gas, and its principle is based on producing spontaneous CO2 bubbles due to local pressure difference leading to nucleation of bubbles throughout the membrane surface, especially at nucleation sites, which improve the cleaning efficiency. Alginic acid sodium salt was used as a model of polysaccharides foulants in presence of different concentrations of NaCl and calcium ions aiming to enhance membrane fouling, and then CO2 cleaning solution efficiency, in terms flux recovery (FR), was tested under different operating conditions and compared to other cleaning methods. Average FR of 20%±3, 25%±3 and 80%±3 for MilliQ water, a cleaning solution at pH4, and CO2 solution at 6 bar, 0.17 m/s, and 23 ̊C ±0.2 for 6 minutes were obtained, respectively. The efficiency of this novel cleaning method was also compared to direct osmosis overnight, and the average flux was comparable (about 60%±3), though that the cleaning time was significantly different. Various calcium concentrations (0-10 mM) were added in the alginate solution to study the

  13. Honeycomb-inspired design of ultrafine SnO2@C nanospheres embedded in carbon film as anode materials for high performance lithium- and sodium-ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Xiang; Jiang, Jianjun; Ruan, Yunjun; Li, Zhishan; Zhang, Yi; Sun, Jianwu; Wang, Chundong

    2017-08-01

    Tin oxide (SnO2) has been considered as one of the most promising anodes for advanced rechargeable batteries due to its advantages such as high energy density, earth abundance and environmental friendly. However, its large volume change during the Li-Sn/Na-Sn alloying and de-alloying processes will result in a fast capacity degradation over a long term cycling. To solve this issue, in this work we design and synthesize a novel honeycomb-like composite composing of carbon encapsulated SnO2 nanospheres embedded in carbon film by using dual templates of SiO2 and NaCl. Using these composites as anodes both in lithium ion batteries and sodium-ion batteries, no discernable capacity degradation is observed over hundreds of long term cycles at both low current density (100 mA g-1) and high current density (500 mA g-1). Such a good cyclic stability and high delivered capacity have been attributed to the high conductivity of the supported carbon film and hollow encapsulated carbon shells, which not only provide enough space to accommodate the volume expansion but also prevent further aggregation of SnO2 nanoparticles upon cycling. By engineering electrodes of accommodating high volume expansion, we demonstrate a prototype to achieve high performance batteries, especially high-power batteries.

  14. Effects of sodium bicarbonate concentration on growth, photosynthesis, and carbonic anhydrase activity of macroalgae Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis, Gracilaria vermiculophylla, and Gracilaria chouae (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Sui, Zhenghong; Wang, Jinguo; Hu, Yiyi; Kang, Kyoung Ho; Hong, Hye Ran; Niaz, Zeeshan; Wei, Huihui; Du, Qingwei; Peng, Chong; Mi, Ping; Que, Zhou

    2016-06-01

    There is potential for bicarbonate to improve crop yields and economic efficiency of marine algae. However, few studies have focused on the effect of bicarbonate on the growth, photosynthesis, and enzyme activity associated with carbon utilization, especially in commercial macroalgae. Here, the addition of bicarbonate (up to 420 mg L(-1)) to macroalgal cultures has been evaluated for Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis, Gracilaria vermiculophylla, and Gracilaria chouae with respect to growth rate, photosynthetic activity, carbonic anhydrase activity, and biochemical composition. The results showed that the effects of NaHCO3 on growth, chlorophyll a, phycoerythrin, photosynthetic oxygen evolution, photochemical parameters of PSI and PSII, carbonic anhydrase activity, and nitrogen content were significant (P 336 mg L(-1) for Gp. lemaneiformis and >420 mg L(-1) for the other two species). Moreover, species-specific differences induced by supplementation with bicarbonate were discovered during culture. Optimal concentrations of NaHCO3 used in this study were 252 mg L(-1) for Gp. lemaneiformis and 336 mg L(-1) for G. vermiculophylla and G. chouae. These results suggest that an adequate supplementation of sodium bicarbonate is a viable strategy for promoting growth and photosynthetic activity in some macroalgae as well as for improving biochemical composition. The study will help to accelerate the growth rate of algae and improve the quality of thalli, and will also be useful for enhancing the understanding of carbon utilization in macroalgae.

  15. Changes in the solid state of anhydrous and hydrated forms of sodium naproxen under different grinding and environmental conditions: Evidence of the formation of new hydrated forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Censi, Roberta; Rascioni, Riccardo; Di Martino, Piera

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the solid state change of the anhydrous and hydrate solid forms of sodium naproxen under different grinding and environmental conditions. Grinding was carried out manually in a mortar under the following conditions: at room temperature under air atmosphere (Method A), in the presence of liquid nitrogen under air atmosphere (Method B), at room temperature under nitrogen atmosphere (Method C), and in the presence of liquid nitrogen under nitrogen atmosphere (Method D). Among the hydrates, the following forms were used: a dihydrate form (DSN) obtained by exposing the anhydrous form at 55% RH; a dihydrate form (CSN) obtained by crystallizing sodium naproxen from water; the tetrahydrate form (TSN) obtained by exposing the anhydrous form at 75% RH. The metastable monohydrate form (MSN), previously described in the literature, was not used because of its high physical instability. The chemical stability during grinding was firstly assessed and proven by HPLC. Modification of the particle size and shape, and changes in the solid state under different grinding methods were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray powder diffractometry and thermogravimetry, respectively. The study demonstrated the strong influence of starting form, grinding and environmental conditions on particle size, shape and solid state of recovered sodium naproxen forms. In particular, it was demonstrated that in the absence of liquid nitrogen (Methods A and C), either at air or at nitrogen atmosphere, the monohydrate form (MSN) was obtained from any hydrates, meaning that these grinding conditions favored the dehydration of superior hydrates. The grinding process carried out in the presence of liquid nitrogen (Method B) led to further hydration of the starting materials: new hydrate forms were identified as one pentahydrate form and one hexahydrate form. The hydration was caused by the condensation of the atmospheric water on sodium naproxen

  16. Abiotic synthesis of organic compounds from carbon disulfide under hydrothermal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushdi, Ahmed I; Simoneit, Bernd R T

    2005-12-01

    Abiotic formation of organic compounds under hydrothermal conditions is of interest to bio, geo-, and cosmochemists. Oceanic sulfur-rich hydrothermal systems have been proposed as settings for the abiotic synthesis of organic compounds. Carbon disulfide is a common component of magmatic and hot spring gases, and is present in marine and terrestrial hydrothermal systems. Thus, its reactivity should be considered as another carbon source in addition to carbon dioxide in reductive aqueous thermosynthesis. We have examined the formation of organic compounds in aqueous solutions of carbon disulfide and oxalic acid at 175 degrees C for 5 and 72 h. The synthesis products from carbon disulfide in acidic aqueous solutions yielded a series of organic sulfur compounds. The major compounds after 5 h of reaction included dimethyl polysulfides (54.5%), methyl perthioacetate (27.6%), dimethyl trithiocarbonate (6.8%), trithianes (2.7%), hexathiepane (1.4%), trithiolanes (0.8%), and trithiacycloheptanes (0.3%). The main compounds after 72 h of reaction consisted of trithiacycloheptanes (39.4%), pentathiepane (11.6%), tetrathiocyclooctanes (11.5%), trithiolanes (10.6%), tetrathianes (4.4%), trithianes (1.2%), dimethyl trisulfide (1.1%), and numerous minor compounds. It is concluded that the abiotic formation of aliphatic straight-chain and cyclic polysulfides is possible under hydrothermal conditions and warrants further studies.

  17. Influence of carbonization conditions on the development of different types of optical anisotropy in cokes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, J W; Reynolds, M J; Shaw, F H

    1975-01-01

    The vitrain components of a series of coal samples were carbonized at temperatures from 400 to 1000/sup 0/C at different rates of heating ranging from 0.5 to 10/sup 0/K/min and utilizing soaking times up to 24 hr. Polished specimens prepared from the carbonized products were examined microscopically under polarized light in order to determine the proportions of the various types of optical anisotropy present in them. The variations in heating rate and soaking time were found to exert little significant influence on the anisotropy developed in high-temperature cokes. But in semicokes produced at carbonization temperatures within the plastic range the influence of the carbonization conditions was much more pronounced with the effects being interrelated. Decreasing the heating rate or increasing the soaking time led to the optical anisotropy generally becoming detectable at lower carbonization temperatures. Fast heating rates caused an increase in the rate of transformation of the fine-grain mosaic anisotropy into coarser-grained types of anisotropy and increased soaking time led to enhanced anisotropic development in the semicokes produced at temperatures within the plastic range. The type of anisotropy developed in cokes is closely related to the release of volatile matter and the plasticity developed during carbonization and the conclusion is drawn that the balance between these factors controls the extent of the anisotropic development.

  18. Effects of sodium caseinate concentration and storage conditions on the oxidative stability of oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O' Dwyer, Sandra P; O' Beirne, David; Eidhin, Deirdre Ní; O' Kennedy, Brendan T

    2013-06-01

    The oxidative stability of various oils (sunflower, camelina and fish) and 20% oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions, were examined. The mean particle size decreased from 1179 to 325 nm as sodium caseinate (emulsifier) concentration was increased from 0.25% to 3% in O/W emulsions (Psodium caseinate concentration increased, and similarly decreased as microfluidisation pressure increased (P<0.05). Increasing storage temperature of the emulsions from 5 to 60°C, resulted in lower detectable lipid oxidation products during storage (P<0.05). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. LABORATORY STUDY FOR THE REDUCTION OF CHROME (VI) TO CHROME (III) USING SODIUM METABISULFITE UNDER ACIDIC CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNCAM JB; GUTHRIE MD; LUECK KJ; AVILA M

    2007-07-18

    This report describes the results from RPP-PLAN-32738, 'Test Plan for the Effluent Treatment Facility to Reduce Chrome(VI) to Chrome(I1I) in the Secondary Waste Stream', using sodium metabisulfite. Appendix A presents the report as submitted by the Center for Laboratory Sciences (CLS) to CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The CLS carried out the laboratory effort under Contract Number 21065, release Number 30. This report extracts the more pertinent aspects of the laboratory effort.

  20. Can environmental conditions trigger cyanobacterial surfaces and following carbonate formation: implication for biomineralization and biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, C.; Dittrich, M.; Zhu, T.

    2015-12-01

    In this presentation we will give an overview what kind of the factors may trigger carbonate formations at the cell surfaces under a variety of environmental conditions. As examples, we will present the results from our recent studies on formation of calcium carbonates, dolomites and bio-cements. The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in the Synechococcuscell envelope are recognized key players in the nucleation of carbonates in marine and freshwater environments. Yet, little is known about a nutrient contents control over the molecular composition of Synechococcus cell envelope, and consequently, biomineralization. In the first study, we investigated how a variation of the phosphorus (P) in the growth media can lead to changes in the surface reactivity of the cells and impact their ability to form carbonates. The objective of the second study is to gain insights into the spatial distribution of cyanobacterial EPS and dolomite from different sediment layers of Khor Al-Adaid sabkha (Qatar). Here, we characterized microbial mats on molecular level in respect of organic and inorganic components using in-situ 2D Raman spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) were used. Additionally, 2D chemical maps of sediment layers documented spectral characterizations of minerals and organic matter of microbial origins at high spatial resolution. Finally, we will show the results from the experiments with auto-phototrophic cyanobacteria Gloeocapsa PCC73106, which habitat on the monument surfaces, towards its application for bio-concrete, a product of microbial carbonate precipitation. We studied the biomineralization in biofilm forming Gloeocapsa PCC73106 on the concrete surface as a pre-requirement for microbial carbonate precipitation. Biomineralization on the concrete surface by live cells and killed cells were compared with that under the abiotic condition. Our experiments allow us to conclude that environmental conditions play a significant role in the control of

  1. Effect of carbon dioxide on the rate of iodine vapor absorption by aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Wataru; Adachi, Motonari; Miyake, Yoshikazu

    1978-01-01

    There is always carbon dioxide in the atmosphere as an impurity. Since this is an acid gas similar to iodine, each absorption rate seems to be affected by the other due to the coexistence of these two. Experiments have been conducted to clarify the absorption rate and absorption mechanism of iodine in the simultaneous absorption of iodine and carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide coexisting with gas phases as an impurity decreases the absorption rate of iodine in the removal by washing with water of iodine mixed in the air. The first cause of this is that the diffusion coefficient of iodine in gas phase decreases with the carbon dioxide content in the gas phase. The second cause is that coexistent carbon dioxide is an acid gas, dissociates by dissolving into the absorbing solution, increases hydrogen ion concentration together with the formation of negative ions of bicarbonate and carbonate, and reduces hydroxyl ion concentration as a result. It is more important that existence of iodine has a catalytic effect to the rate of basic catalytic hydrolysis of carbon dioxide simultaneously dissolved in water phase, and accelerates this reaction rate. The mechanism of catalytic effect of iodine for the hydrolysis of carbon dioxide can not be clarified in detail only by this experiment, but the simultaneous absorption rate of iodine and carbon dioxide can be explained satisfactorily. (Wakatsuki, Y

  2. Quantitative proteomic analyses of the microbial degradation of estrone under various background nitrogen and carbon conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhe; Chen, Yinguang; Li, Xu

    2017-10-15

    Microbial degradation of estrogenic compounds can be affected by the nitrogen source and background carbon in the environment. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. The objective of this study was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of estrone (E1) biodegradation at the protein level under various background nitrogen (nitrate or ammonium) and carbon conditions (no background carbon, acetic acid, or humic acid as background carbon) by a newly isolated bacterial strain. The E1 degrading bacterial strain, Hydrogenophaga atypica ZD1, was isolated from river sediments and its proteome was characterized under various experimental conditions using quantitative proteomics. Results show that the E1 degradation rate was faster when ammonium was used as the nitrogen source than with nitrate. The degradation rate was also faster when either acetic acid or humic acid was present in the background. Proteomics analyses suggested that the E1 biodegradation products enter the tyrosine metabolism pathway. Compared to nitrate, ammonium likely promoted E1 degradation by increasing the activities of the branched-chain-amino-acid aminotransferase (IlvE) and enzymes involved in the glutamine synthetase-glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase (GS-GOGAT) pathway. The increased E1 degradation rate with acetic acid or humic acid in the background can also be attributed to the up-regulation of IlvE. Results from this study can help predict and explain E1 biodegradation kinetics under various environmental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Kinetics of carbonate dissolution in CO2-saturated aqueous system at reservoir conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Crawshaw, John P.; Maitland, Geoffrey; Trusler, J. P. Martin

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, carbon capture and storage (CCS) has emerged as a key technology for limiting anthropogenic CO2 emissions while allowing the continued utilisation of fossil fuels. The most promising geological storage sites are deep saline aquifers because the capacity, integrity and injection economics are most favourable, and the environmental impact can be minimal. Many rock-fluid chemical reactions are known to occur both during and after CO2 injection in saline aquifers. The importance of rock-fluid reactions in the (CO2 + H2O) system can be understood in terms of their impact on the integrity and stability of both the formation rocks and cap rocks. The chemical interactions between CO2-acidified brines and the reservoir minerals can influence the porosity and permeability of the formations, resulting in changes in the transport processes occurring during CO2 storage. Since carbonate minerals are abundant in sedimentary rocks, one of the requirements to safely implement CO2 storage in saline aquifers is to characterise the reactivity of carbonate minerals in aqueous solutions at reservoir conditions. In this work, we reported measurements of the intrinsic rate of carbonate dissolution in CO2-saturated water under high-temperature high-pressure reservoir conditions extending up to 373 K and 14 MPa. The rate of carbonate dissolution in CO2-free HCl(aq) was also measured at ambient pressure at temperatures up to 353 K. Various pure minerals and reservoir rocks were investigated in this study, including single-crystals of calcite and magnesite, and samples of dolomite, chalks and sandstones. A specially-designed batch reactor system, implementing the rotating disc technique, was used to obtain the intrinsic reaction rate at the solid/liquid interface, free of mass transfer effects. The effective area and mineralogy of the exposed surface was determined by a combination of surface characterisation techniques including XRD, SEM, EDX and optical microscopy. The

  4. Fires of sodium installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, L.; Tlalka, R.

    1984-01-01

    A survey is presented of the literature dealing with fires of sodium installations between 1974 and 1981. Also described are three experimental fires of ca 50 kg of sodium in an open area, monitored by UJV Rez. The experimental conditions of the experiments are described and a phenomenological description is presented of the course of the fires. The experiments showed a relationship between wind velocity in the area surrounding the fire and surface temperature of the sodium flame. Systems analysis methods were applied to sodium area, spray and tube fires. (author)

  5. Annular sodium flowsensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, W.C.; Brewer, J.; Forster, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a unique eddy-current type liquid sodium flowsensor, designed as a joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory and Kaman Instrumentation Corp. Test results are included for operation of the flowsensor mounted on a sodium test loop whose configuration simulates the actual operating conditions, except for the magnetic field of the ALIP

  6. Evaluation of ammonia modified and conventionally activated biomass based carbons as CO2 adsorbents in postcombustion conditions

    OpenAIRE

    González Plaza, Marta; García López, Susana; Rubiera González, Fernando; Pis Martínez, José Juan; Pevida García, Covadonga

    2011-01-01

    Low cost carbons obtained from biomass residues, olive stones and almond shells, were evaluated as CO2 adsorbents in postcombustion conditions (low CO2 partial pressure). These carbons were prepared from biomass chars by means of two different methods: physical activation with CO2 and amination. All the prepared carbons present a high CO2 adsorption capacity at 303 K, although carbons developed from almond shells show a superior CO2/N2 selectivity (lower N2 adsorption) than those obtained fro...

  7. Photosynthate consumption and carbon turnover in the rhizosphere depending on plant species and growth conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauerbeck, D.R.; Helal, H.M.; Nonnen, S.; Allard, J.-l.

    1982-01-01

    The root tissue which can be isolated from soils represents only part of the total plant carbon incorporation. Between 20 and 40% of the photosynthetic production of plants is expended for root growth and root metabolism. This indicates a striking turnover of energy in the rhizosphere, because relatively litle root-derived organic matter remains there until harvest time. Plant species and variety, soil conditions and temperature were shown to be the most decisive factors governing the assimilate consumption of plant root systems. A special technique is described which enables to study how this extensive turnover affects the surrounding soil depending on its proximity to the roots. Plant-derived carbon can be detected up to 20mm away from the roots. A priming effect has been found on the decomposition of soil organic matter. This explains why, in spite of the rhizo-deposition mentioned, no net-accumulation of carbon in the rhizosphere has been found. (Author) [pt

  8. Absorption of nicotine and carbon monoxide from passive smoking under natural conditions of exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, M J; Russell, M A; Feyerabend, C

    1983-01-01

    Seven non-smokers were exposed to tobacco smoke under natural conditions for two hours in a public house. Measures of nicotine and cotinine in plasma, saliva, and urine and expired air carbon monoxide all showed reliable increases. The concentrations of carbon monoxide and nicotine after exposure averaged 15.7% and 7.5% respectively of the values found in heavy smokers. Although the increase in expired air carbon monoxide of 5.9 ppm was similar to increases in smokers after a single cigarette, the amount of nicotine absorbed was between a tenth and a third of the amount taken in from one cigarette. Since this represented a relatively extreme acute natural exposure, any health risks of passive smoking probably depend less on quantitative factors than on qualitative differences between sidestream and mainstream smoke. PMID:6648864

  9. Evaluation of sampling methods for measuring exposure to volatile inorganic acids in workplace air. Part 2: Sampling capacity and breakthrough tests for sodium carbonate-impregnated filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demange, Martine; Oury, Véronique; Rousset, Davy

    2011-11-01

    In France, the MétroPol 009 method used to measure workplace exposure to inorganic acids, such as HF, HCl, and HNO3, consists of a closed-face cassette fitted with a prefilter to collect particles, and two sodium carbonate-impregnated filters to collect acid vapor. This method was compared with other European methods during the development of a three-part standard (ISO 21438) on the determination of inorganic acids in workplace air by ion chromatography. Results of this work, presented in a companion paper, led to a need to go deeper into the performance of the MétroPol 009 method regarding evaluation of the breakthrough of the acids, both alone and in mixtures, interference from particulate salts, the amount of sodium carbonate required to impregnate the sampling filter, the influence of sampler components, and so on. Results enabled improvements to be made to the sampling device with respect to the required amount of sodium carbonate to sample high HCl or HNO3 concentrations (500 μL of 5% Na2CO3 on each of two impregnated filters). In addition, a PVC-A filter used as a prefilter in a sampling device showed a propensity to retain HNO3 vapor so a PTFE filter was considered more suitable for use as a prefilter. Neither the material of the sampling cassette (polystyrene or polypropylene) nor the sampling flowrate (1 L/min or 2 L/min) influenced the performance of the sampling device, as a recovery of about 100% was achieved in all experiments for HNO3, HCl, and HF, as well as HNO3+HF and HNO3+HCl mixtures, over a wide range of concentrations. However, this work points to the possibility of interference between an acid and salts of other acids. For instance, interference can occur through interaction of HNO3 with chloride salts: the stronger the acid, the greater the interference. Methods based on impregnated filters are reliable for quantitative recovery of inorganic volatile acids in workplace atmosphere but are valuable only in the absence of interferents.

  10. Cropland versus Gariga schrubland on soil organic carbon storage under Mediterranen climatic condition of Sicily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, A.; Gristina, L.; Santoro, A.; Poma, I.

    2009-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) pool is the largest among the terrestrial pool and it plays a key role to mitigate climate change. The restoration of SOC pool represents a potential sink for atmospheric CO2. Land use is one of the most important factors controlling organic carbon content. The main land uses throughout the Mediterranean are croplands (olive, wheat and vineyards) and scrublands. The land abandonment or the reclamation of land is changing the cover of scrubland and cropland. This will change the carbon cycle. The aim of this work is determining the direction and magnitude of soil organic change associated with land use change under Mediterranean Climatic Conditions. Using both historic record and land cover crop maps we estimated the effect of land cover change on the stock carbon from 1972 to 2008 in Sicily. A system of paired plots was established on Mollic Gypsiric cambisol and Gypsiric cambisol on agriculture and rangeland land uses. The study sites were selected at the natural reserve "Grotta di S. Ninfa", in the West of Sicily. Soil samples (24) were taken at 20 and 40 cm depth, air dried and sieved at 2 mm. Dry aggregate size fractions selected were >1000 µm, 1000-500 µm, 500-250 µm, 250-63 µm, 63-25 µm and <25 µm. The results show that gariga increase the organic matter in soil, mainly on the organic horizon. Key worlds: Land use change, Soil organic Carbon , Mediterranean, aggregates, gariga, cropland.

  11. Sodium fluxes in sweet pepper exposed to varying sodium concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom-Zandstra, M.; Vogelzang, S.A.; Veen, B.W.

    1998-01-01

    The sodium transport and distribution of sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) under saline conditions were studied after transferring the plants to a sodium-free nutrient solution. Sodium stress up to 60 mM did not affect the growth of sweet pepper, as it appears able to counteract the unfavourable

  12. Carbon with Expanded and Well-Developed Graphene Planes Derived Directly from Condensed Lignin as a High-Performance Anode for Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Dohyeon; Hwang, Jieun; Chang, Wonyoung; Kim, Jaehoon

    2018-01-10

    In this study, we demonstrate that lignin, which constitutes 30-40 wt % of the terrestrial lignocellulosic biomass and is produced from second generation biofuel plants as a cheap byproduct, is an excellent precursor material for sodium-ion battery (NIB) anodes. Because it is rich in aromatic monomers that are highly cross-linked by ether and condensed bonds, the lignin material carbonized at 1300 °C (C-1300) in this study has small graphitic domains with well-developed graphene layers, a large interlayer spacing (0.403 nm), and a high micropore surface area (207.5 m 2 g -1 ). When tested as an anode in an NIB, C-1300 exhibited an initial Coulombic efficiency of 68% and a high reversible capacity of 297 mA h g -1 at 50 mA g -1 after 50 cycles. The high capacity of 199 mA h g -1 at less than 0.1 V with a flat voltage profile and an extremely low charge-discharge voltage hysteresis (sugar-derived carbons and a low-temperature carbonized sample (900 °C), the reasons for the excellent performance of C-1300 were determined to result from facilitated Na + -ion transport to the graphitic layer and the microporous regions that penetrate through the less defective and enlarged interlayer spacings.

  13. Kinetic of formation for single carbon dioxide and mixed carbon dioxide and tetrahydrofuran hydrates in water and sodium chloride aqueous solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabil, K.M.; Duarte, A.R.C.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Ahmad, M.M.; Yusup, S.; Omar, A.A.; Peters, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory-scale reactor system is built and operated to measure the kinetic of formation for single and mixed carbon dioxide-tetrahydrofuran hydrates. The T-cycle method, which is used to collect the kinetic data, is briefly discussed. For single carbon dioxide hydrate, the induction time

  14. Evaluation of carbon diffusion in heat treatment of H13 tool steel under different atmospheric conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Ramezani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although the cost of the heat treatment process is only a minor portion of the total production cost, it is arguably the most important and crucial stage on the determination of material quality. In the study of the carbon diffusion in H13 steel during austenitization, a series of heat treatment experiments had been conducted under different atmospheric conditions and length of treatment. Four austenitization atmospheric conditions were studied, i.e., heat treatment without atmospheric control, heat treatment with stainless steel foil wrapping, pack carburization heat treatment and vacuum heat treatment. The results showed that stainless steel foil wrapping could restrict decarburization process, resulting in a constant hardness profile as vacuum heat treatment does. However, the tempering characteristic between these two heat treatment methods is different. Results from the gas nitrided samples showed that the thickness and the hardness of the nitrided layer is independent of the carbon content in H13 steel.

  15. Ultrathin molybdenum diselenide nanosheets anchored on multi-walled carbon nanotubes as anode composites for high performance sodium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhian; Yang, Xing; Fu, Yun; Du, Ke

    2015-11-01

    Ultrathin molybdenum diselenide nanosheets are decorated on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) via a one-step hydrothermal method. Uniform MoSe2 nanosheets are firmly anchored on MWCNT according to the characterizations of scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM). When evaluated as anodes for sodium storage, the MoSe2@MWCNT composites deliver a reversible specific capacity of 459 mAh g-1 at a current of 200 mA g-1 over 90 cycles, and a specific capacity of 385 mAh g-1 even at a current rate of 2000 mAh g-1, which is better than the MoSe2 nanosheets. The enhanced electrochemical performance of the MoSe2@MWCNT composites can be ascribed to the synergic effects of MoSe2 nanosheets and MWCNT. The high capacity and good rate performance reveal that the MoSe2@MWCNT composites are very promising for applications in sodium-ion batteries.

  16. Effect of carbonization conditions on CO2 gasification reactivity of biocarbon

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Liang; Alsaker, Nicolai Etwin; Skreiberg, Øyvind; Hovd, Benedicte

    2017-01-01

    Substituting fossil reductants with biocarbon is a promising way for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and increase sustainability of the metallurgical industry. Biocarbon can be produced from a wide range of raw biomass materials and carbonization conditions. Studies on the properties of biomass biocarbon are critical for further efficient utilization of the biocarbon in metallurgical industries. The purpose of this study was to study the impact of pyrolysis temperature and calcination treat...

  17. Topological and Energetic Conditions for Lithographic Production of Carbon Nanotubes from Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Fülep

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Density Functional Based Tight-Binding (DFTB molecular dynamics (MD simulations were performed for producing carbon nanotubes from graphene nanoribbons. The constant temperature simulations were controlled with the help of Nosé-Hoover thermostat. In our systematic study we obtained critical curvature energies and determined topological conditions for nanotube production from two parallel graphene nanoribbons. We obtained linear relationship between the curvature energy and the square of the curvature.

  18. Surface chemistry of pyrite during the pre-processing for the flotation in alkaline sodium carbonate medium during uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neudert, A.; Sommer, H.; Schubert, H.

    1991-01-01

    It is often necessary during processing of uranium ore to flotate pyrite at sodium carbonate alkaline pH value caused by the subsequent hydrometallurgical process stages. It was found out by ESCA analyses that the pyrite surface changes chemically prior to the addition of flotation agents. FeS 2 becomes FeO within a few hours in the case of storage in process water; limonite and/or geothite result from pyrite. The copper ions of the activator CuSO 4 are exclusively monovalent on the pyrite surface. The resulting heavy metal xanthogenate is Cu(I) xanthogenate. Conclusions are derived for the flotation practice for the intensification of the reagent regime. (orig./HP) [de

  19. A green and efficient method to produce graphene for electrochemical capacitors from graphene oxide using sodium carbonate as a reducing agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuhong; Huang, Shuo; Zhang, Mei; Jia, Mengqiu; Hu, Dong

    2013-03-01

    The green and efficient synthesis of graphene using sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) as a chemical reducing agent was studied. Extensive characterization confirmed the formation of graphene from graphene oxide using a Na2CO3 solution. The C/O atomic ratio of the as-prepared graphene has increased from 2.48 to 8.15 after reduction as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The conductivity of as-prepared graphene sheets is as high as 10 S m-1. After electrochemical measurements, gravimetric capacitances of 228 and 166 F g-1 at current densities of 5 and 25 mA cm-2, respectively, were obtained with KOH electrolyte.

  20. The dismantling of fast reactors: sodium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Berte, M.; Serpante, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Fast reactors require a coolant that does not slow down neutrons so water can not be used. Metallic sodium has been chosen because of its outstanding neutronic and thermal properties but sodium reacts easily with air and water and this implies that sodium-smeary components can not be considered as usual nuclear wastes. A stage of sodium neutralizing is necessary in the processing of wastes from fast reactors. Metallic sodium is turned into a chemically stable compound: soda, carbonates or sodium salts. This article presents several methods used by Framatome in an industrial way when dismantling sodium-cooled reactors. (A.C.)

  1. Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon in a heathland under future climatic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang Selsted, M

    2010-07-15

    Global change is a reality. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels are rising as well as mean global temperature and precipitation patterns are changing. These three environmental factors have separately and in combination effect on ecosystem processes. Terrestrial ecosystems hold large amounts of carbon, why understanding plant and soil responses to such changes are necessary, as ecosystems potentially can ameliorate or accelerate global change. To predict the feedback of ecosystems to the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations experiments imitating global change effects are therefore an important tool. This work on ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon in a heathland under future climatic conditions, shows that extended summer drought in combination with elevated temperature will ensure permanent dryer soil conditions, which decreases carbon turnover, while elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations will increase carbon turnover. In the full future climate scenario, carbon turnover is over all expected to increase and the heathland to become a source of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The methodology of static chamber CO{sub 2} flux measurements and applying the technology in a FACE (free air CO{sub 2} enrichment) facility is a challenge. Fluxes of CO{sub 2} from soil to atmosphere depend on a physical equilibrium between those two medias, why it is important to keep the CO{sub 2} gradient between soil and atmosphere unchanged during measurement. Uptake to plants via photosynthesis depends on a physiological process, which depends strongly on the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration. Photosynthesis and respiration run in parallel during measurements of net ecosystem exchange, and these measurements should therefore be performed with care to both the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration and the CO{sub 2} soil-atmosphere gradient. (author)

  2. Silica-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes impregnated with polyethyleneimine for carbon dioxide capture under the flue gas condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min-Sang; Park, Soo-Jin, E-mail: sjpark@inha.ac.kr

    2015-03-15

    In this study, silica-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes impregnated with polyethyleneimine (PEI) were prepared via a two-step process: (i) hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and (ii) impregnation of PEI. The adsorption properties of CO{sub 2} were investigated using CO{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms at 298 K and thermogravimetric analysis under the flue gas condition (15% CO{sub 2}/85% N{sub 2}). The results obtained in this study indicate that CO{sub 2} adsorption increases after impregnation of PEI. The increase in CO{sub 2} capture was attributed to the affinity between CO{sub 2} and the amine groups. CO{sub 2} adsorption–desorption experiments, which were repeated five times, also showed that the prepared adsorbents have excellent regeneration properties. - Graphical abstract: Fabrication and CO{sub 2} adsorption process of the S-MWCNTs impregnated with PEI. - Highlights: • Silica coated-MWCNT impregnated with PEI was synthesized. • Amine groups of PEI gave CO{sub 2} affinity sites on MWCNT surfaces. • The S-MWCNT/PEI(50) exhibited the highest CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity.

  3. Effects of curing conditions on the structure of sodium carboxymethyl starch/mineral matrix system: FT-IR investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarska, Karolina; Grabowska, Beata; Bobrowski, Artur; Cukrowicz, Sylwia

    2018-04-24

    Strength properties of the microwave cured molding sands containing binders in a form of the aqueous solution of sodium carboxymethyl starch (CMS-Na) are higher than the same molding composition cured by conventional heating. Finding the reason of this effect was the main purpose in this study. Structural changes caused by both physical curing methods of molding sands systems containing mineral matrix (silica sand) and polymer water-soluble binder (CMS-Na) were compared. It was shown, by means of the FT-IR spectroscopic studies, that the activation of the polar groups in the polymer macromolecules structure as well as silanol groups on the mineral matrix surfaces was occurred in the microwave radiation. Binding process in microwave-cured samples was an effect of formation the hydrogen bonds network between hydroxyl and/or carbonyl groups present in polymer and silanol groups present in mineral matrix. FT-IR studies of structural changes in conventional and microwave cured samples confirm that participation of hydrogen bonds is greater after microwave curing than conventional heating. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Chemical sensors for monitoring non-metallic impurities in liquid sodium coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, Rajesh; Jayaraman, V.; Rajan Babu, S.; Sridharan, R.; Gnanasekaran, T.

    2011-01-01

    Liquid sodium is the coolant of choice for fast breeder reactors. Liquid sodium is highly compatible with structural steels when the concentration of dissolved non-metallic impurities such as oxygen and carbon are low. However, when their concentrations are above certain threshold limits, enhanced corrosion and mass transfer and carburization of the steels would occur. The threshold concentration levels of oxygen in sodium are determined by thermochemical aspects of various ternary oxides of Na-M-O systems (M alloying elements in steels) which take part in corrosion and mass transfer. Dissolved carbon also influences these threshold levels by establishing relevant carbide equilibria. An event of steam leak into sodium at the steam generator, if undetected at its inception itself, can lead to extensive wastage of the tubes of the steam generator and prolonged shutdown. Air ingress into the argon cover gas and leak of hydrocarbon oil used as cooling fluids of the shafts of the centrifugal pumps of sodium are the sources of oxygen and carbon impurities in sodium. Continuous monitoring of the concentration of dissolved hydrogen, carbon and oxygen in sodium coolant will help identifying their ingress at inception itself. An electrochemical hydrogen sensor based on CaHBr-CaBr 2 hydride ion conducting solid electrolyte has been developed for detecting the steam leak during normal operating conditions of the reactor. A nickel diffuser based sensor system using thermal conductivity detector (TCD) and Pd-doped tin oxide thin film sensor has been developed for use during low power operations of the reactor or during its start up. For monitoring carbon in sodium, an electrochemical sensor with molten Na 2 CO 3 -LiCO 3 as the electrolyte and pure graphite as reference electrode has been developed. Yttria Doped Thoria (YDT) electrolyte based oxygen sensor is under development for monitoring dissolved oxygen levels in sodium. Fabrication, assembly, testing and performance of

  5. GAPDH-mediated posttranscriptional regulations of sodium channel Scn1a and Scn3a genes under seizure and ketogenic diet conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guo-Wang; Lu, Ping; Zeng, Tao; Tang, Hui-Ling; Chen, Yong-Hong; Liu, Shu-Jing; Gao, Mei-Mei; Zhao, Qi-Hua; Yi, Yong-Hong; Long, Yue-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    Abnormal expressions of sodium channel SCN1A and SCN3A genes alter neural excitability that are believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of epilepsy, a long-term risk of recurrent seizures. Ketogenic diet (KD), a high-fat and low-carbohydrate treatment for difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children, has been suggested to reverse gene expression patterns. Here, we reveal a novel role of GAPDH on the posttranscriptional regulation of mouse Scn1a and Scn3a expressions under seizure and KD conditions. We show that GAPDH binds to a conserved region in the 3' UTRs of human and mouse SCN1A and SCN3A genes, which decreases and increases genes' expressions by affecting mRNA stability through SCN1A 3' UTR and SCN3A 3' UTR, respectively. In seizure mice, the upregulation and phosphorylation of GAPDH enhance its binding to the 3' UTR, which lead to downregulation of Scn1a and upregulation of Scn3a. Furthermore, administration of KD generates β-hydroxybutyric acid which rescues the abnormal expressions of Scn1a and Scn3a by weakening the GAPDH's binding to the element. Taken together, these data suggest that GAPDH-mediated expression regulation of sodium channel genes may be associated with epilepsy and the anticonvulsant action of KD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of Formulation Conditions Allowing Double Emulsions Stabilized by PGPR and Sodium Caseinate to Be Used as Capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nollet, Maxime; Laurichesse, Eric; Besse, Samantha; Soubabère, Olivier; Schmitt, Véronique

    2018-02-27

    Water-in-oil-in-water (W 1 /O/W 2 ) double emulsions stabilized by polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR), a lipophilic food grade small polymer, and sodium caseinate, a hydrophilic milk protein, were developed to encapsulate vitamin B12, a model hydrophilic substance easy to titrate. Using rheology, sensitive to drop size evolution and water fluxes, static light scattering, and microscopy both giving the evolution of drops' size and vitamin B12 titration assessing the encapsulation, we were able to detect independently the double emulsion drop size, the encapsulation loss, and the flux of water as a function of time. By differentiating the PGPR required to cover the W 1 -droplets' surface from PGPR in excess in the oil phase, we built a PGPR-inner droplet volume fraction diagram highlighting the domains where the double emulsion is stable toward encapsulation and/or water fluxes. We demonstrated the key role played by nonadsorbed PGPR concentration in the intermediate sunflower oil phase on the emulsion stability while, surprisingly, the inner droplet volume fraction had no effect on the emulsion stability. At low PGPR concentration, a release of vitamin B12 was observed and the leakage mechanism of coalescence between droplets and oil-water interface of the oily drops (also called globules hereafter), was identified using confocal microscopy. For high enough PGPR content, the emulsions were stable and may therefore serve as efficient capsules without need of an additional gelling, thickening, complexion or interface rigidifying agent. We generalized these results with the encapsulation of an insecticide: Cydia pomonella granulovirus used in organic arboriculture.

  7. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO(sub 2) as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates, through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO(sub 2) stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests conducted at LSU indicated that exposure of sorbent to water vapor prior to contact with carbonation gas does not significantly increase the reaction rate. Calcined fine mesh trona has a greater initial carbonation rate than calcined sodium bicarbonate, but appears to be more susceptible to loss of reactivity under severe calcination conditions. The Davison attrition indices for Grade 5 sodium bicarbonate, commercial grade sodium carbonate and extra fine granular potassium carbonate were, as tested, outside of the range suitable for entrained bed reactor testing. Fluidized bed testing at RTI indicated that in the initial stages of reaction potassium carbonate removed 35% of the carbon dioxide in simulated flue gas, and is reactive at higher temperatures than sodium carbonate. Removals declined to 6% when 54% of the capacity of the sorbent was exhausted. Carbonation data from electrobalance testing was correlated using a shrinking core reaction model. The activation energy of the reaction of sodium carbonate with carbon dioxide and water vapor was determined from nonisothermal thermogravimetry

  8. Environmental Conditions Influencing Sorption of Inorganic Anions to Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Studied by Column Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzelder, Florian; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2017-05-02

    Sorption to carbon-based nanomaterials is typically studied in batch experiments. An alternative method offering advantages to study sorption is column chromatography. Sorbent packed columns are used and sorption data are determined by relating sorbate retention to that of a nonretarded tracer. We have now for the first time applied this technique to study the influence of environmental conditions on sorption of inorganic anions (bromide, nitrite, nitrate, and iodide) to multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Deuterium oxide was used as nonretarded tracer. Sorption isotherms were best described by the Freundlich model. Sorption increased in the order bromide 4.5 the surface charge was negative, but sorption was still detectable at pH 6 and 9. Consequently, other forces than electrostatic attraction contributed to sorption. These forces may include H-bonding as indicated by sorption enthalpy determined by variation of column temperature. Overall, column chromatography represents a promising alternative in sorption studies to reveal sorbent properties.

  9. Recycling of carbon fibre reinforced composites using water in subcritical conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yuyan, E-mail: liuyy@hit.edu.cn [Harbin Institute of Technology, No.92 Xidazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Shan Guohua; Meng Linghui [Harbin Institute of Technology, No.92 Xidazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2009-09-15

    In this paper, a method of chemical recycling of thermosetting epoxy composite was discussed. Water was used to be reaction medium and the decomposition of carbon fibre reinforced epoxy composites was studied. Experiments were devised in order to identify the significant process parameters that affect fibre reinforced composite recovery potential including temperature, time, catalyst, feedstock, and pressure. Experiments were performed in a batch-type reactor without stirring. Under the condition that the temperature was 260 deg. C and the ratio of resin and water was 1:5 g/mL, the decomposition rate could reach 100 wt.% and the carbon fibres were obtained. The results from the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) measurements showed that the fibres were clean and no cracks or defects were found. The average tensile strength of the reclaimed fibres was about 98.2% than that of the virgin fibres.

  10. Condition of granulating titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent and its adsorption for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyai, Yoshitaka; Kitamura, Takao; Katoh, Shunsaku; Miyazaki, Hidetoshi

    1979-01-01

    The powdery titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent was granulated, and the strength and uranium adsorptivity of the granulated adsorbent were studied in relation to its granulating condition. By use of polyvinylalcohol (PVA) with degree of polymerization above 2,000 as binder, the granular adsorbent with as much the same strength as commercial granular activated carbon was obtained. Addition of PVA did not affect the amount of adsorbed uranium in equilibrium, but decreased the adsorption rate. Effect of granule size between 2-5 mm on the uranium adsorption rate was that the uranium adsorption rate changed proportionally to surface area of assumed sphere. As a test for practical use, 5 times repetitions of adsorption and desorption were carried out on the same granular adsorbent. During this repetition the adsorbent containing formalized PVA revealed smaller weight loss than non-treated adsorbent. The amount of adsorbed uranium decreased with increasing repetition times, and reason of this was discussed. (author)

  11. Modeling nanoscale gas sensors under realistic conditions: Computational screening of metal-doped carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Lastra, Juan Maria; Mowbray, Duncan; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2010-01-01

    We use computational screening to systematically investigate the use of transition-metal-doped carbon nanotubes for chemical-gas sensing. For a set of relevant target molecules (CO, NH3, and H2S) and the main components of air (N2, O2, and H2O), we calculate the binding energy and change in condu......We use computational screening to systematically investigate the use of transition-metal-doped carbon nanotubes for chemical-gas sensing. For a set of relevant target molecules (CO, NH3, and H2S) and the main components of air (N2, O2, and H2O), we calculate the binding energy and change...... the change in the nanotube resistance per doping site as a function of the target molecule concentration assuming charge transport in the diffusive regime. Our analysis points to Ni-doped nanotubes as candidates for CO sensors working under typical atmospheric conditions....

  12. Evaluation of a dentifrice containing 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, and sodium monofluorophosphate to prevent enamel loss after erosive challenges using an intra-oral erosion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, R; Rege, A; Corby, P; Klaczany, G; Allen, K; Hershkowitz, D; Godder, B; Wolff, M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the ability of a dentifrice containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate (Pro-Argin' Technology), and 1450 ppm fluoride as sodium monofluorophosphate (MFP) to prevent enamel loss from an erosive acid challenge in comparison to a silica-based dentifrice with 1450 ppm fluoride as MFP using an intra-oral erosion model. The intra-oral clinical study used a double blind, two-treatment, crossover design. A palatal retainer was used to expose the enamel specimens to the oral environment during the five-day treatment period. The retainer was designed to house three partially demineralized bovine enamel samples. The study population was composed of 24 adults, ages 18 to 70 years. The study consisted of two treatment periods, with a washout period lasting seven (+/- three) days preceding each treatment phase. A silica-based dentifrice without fluoride was used during the washout period. The Test Dentifrice used in this study contained 8% arginine and calcium carbonate (Pro-Argin Technology), and 1450 ppm fluoride as sodium monofluorophosphate (MFP). The Control Dentifrice was silica-based and contained 1450 ppm fluoride as MFP. The treatment period lasted five days, during which the panelists wore the retainer 24 hours a day (except during meals and the ex vivo acid challenges) and brushed with their assigned product while wearing the retainer. The panelists brushed once in the morning and once in the evening each day for one minute, followed by a one-minute swish with the slurry and a rinse with 15 ml of water. The panelists brushed only their teeth and not the specimens directly. There were four ex vivo challenges with 1% citric acid dispersed throughout the day: two in the morning, one in the afternoon, and one in the evening. Mineral loss was monitored by a quantitative light fluorescence (QLF) technique. Twenty-three of 24 subjects successfully completed the study. The one subject who did not complete the study did so for

  13. Evaluation of a dentifrice containing 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, and sodium monofluorophosphate to repair acid-softened enamel using an intra-oral remineralization model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, R; Rege, A; Corby, P; Klaczany, G; Allen, K; Hershkowitz, D; Goldder, B; Wolff, M

    2014-01-01

    An intra-oral remineralization study was conducted to compare the ability of a dentifrice containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate (Pro-Argin Technology), and 1450 ppm fluoride as sodium monofluorophosphate (MFP) to remineralize acid-softened bovine enamel specimens compared to a silica-based dentifrice with 1450 ppm fluoride as MFP. The intra-oral clinical study employed a double blind, two-treatment, crossover design, and used an upper palatal retainer to expose the enamel specimens to the oral environment during product use and periods of remineralization. The retainer was designed to house three partially demineralized bovine enamel samples. The study population was comprised of 30 adults, ages 18 to 70 years. The study consisted of two treatment phases with a washout period lasting seven (+/- three) days preceding each treatment phase. A silica-based dentifrice without fluoride was used during the washout period. The Test Dentifrice used in this study contained 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, and 1450 ppm fluoride as sodium monofluorophosphate (MFP). The Control Dentifrice was silica-based and contained 1450 ppm fluoride as MFP. The treatment period consisted of a three-day lead-in period with the assigned product. The panelists brushed two times per day during the three-day lead-in period with the assigned product. On the fourth day, the panelists began brushing with the assigned product with the retainer in their mouth. The panelists brushed for one minute, followed by a one-minute swish with the slurry and a rinse with 15 ml of water in the morning, in the afternoon, and night with the retainer in the mouth. The panelists brushed only their teeth and not the specimens directly. Changes in mineral content before and after treatment were measured using a Knoop microhardness tester. The results of the study showed that percent remineralization values for the Test Dentifrice and Control Dentifrice were 14.99% and 8.66%, respectively. A statistical analysis

  14. The Eocene Arctic Azolla bloom: environmental conditions, productivity and carbon drawdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speelman, E N; Van Kempen, M M L; Barke, J; Brinkhuis, H; Reichart, G J; Smolders, A J P; Roelofs, J G M; Sangiorgi, F; de Leeuw, J W; Lotter, A F; Sinninghe Damsté, J S

    2009-03-01

    Enormous quantities of the free-floating freshwater fern Azolla grew and reproduced in situ in the Arctic Ocean during the middle Eocene, as was demonstrated by microscopic analysis of microlaminated sediments recovered from the Lomonosov Ridge during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 302. The timing of the Azolla phase (approximately 48.5 Ma) coincides with the earliest signs of onset of the transition from a greenhouse towards the modern icehouse Earth. The sustained growth of Azolla, currently ranking among the fastest growing plants on Earth, in a major anoxic oceanic basin may have contributed to decreasing atmospheric pCO2 levels via burial of Azolla-derived organic matter. The consequences of these enormous Azolla blooms for regional and global nutrient and carbon cycles are still largely unknown. Cultivation experiments have been set up to investigate the influence of elevated pCO2 on Azolla growth, showing a marked increase in Azolla productivity under elevated (760 and 1910 ppm) pCO2 conditions. The combined results of organic carbon, sulphur, nitrogen content and 15N and 13C measurements of sediments from the Azolla interval illustrate the potential contribution of nitrogen fixation in a euxinic stratified Eocene Arctic. Flux calculations were used to quantitatively reconstruct the potential storage of carbon (0.9-3.5 10(18) gC) in the Arctic during the Azolla interval. It is estimated that storing 0.9 10(18) to 3.5 10(18) g carbon would result in a 55 to 470 ppm drawdown of pCO2 under Eocene conditions, indicating that the Arctic Azolla blooms may have had a significant effect on global atmospheric pCO2 levels through enhanced burial of organic matter.

  15. Controlling the site density of multiwall carbon nanotubes via growth conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, M. P.; Overmyer, D. L.; Kaatz, F. H.

    2004-06-01

    We present two complementary methods for controlling the site density of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) directly as a function of growth conditions from 1011to107CNTs/cm2. Several potential applications require significant spacing between individual CNTs. The first method shows that the site density varies with the heat of formation of the hydrocarbon gas used during CNT growth by thermal chemical vapor deposition. The second method demonstrates that the site density decreases with increasing residual stress of the metal catalyst/diffusion barrier layers. These methods are combined for wide-range control of CNT site density.

  16. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride by Pseudomonas sp. strain KC under denitrification conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criddle, C.S.; DeWitt, J.T.; Grbic-Galic, D.; McCarty, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    A denitrifying Pseudomonas sp. (strain KC) capable of transforming carbon tetrachloride (CT) was isolated from groundwater aquifer solids. Major products of the transformation of 14 C-labeled CT by Pseudomonas strain KC under denitrification conditions were 14 CO 2 and an unidentified water-soluble fraction. Little or no chloroform was produced. Addition of dissolved trace metals, notably, ferrous iron and cobalt, to the growth medium appeared to enhance growth of Pseudomonas strain KC while inhibiting transformation of CT. It is hypothesized that transformation of CT by this organism is associated with the mechanism of trace-metal scavenging

  17. Amorphous MoS3 Infiltrated with Carbon Nanotubes as an Advanced Anode Material of Sodium-Ion Batteries with Large Gravimetric, Areal, and Volumetric Capacities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Hualin [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Wang, Lu [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Deng, Shuo [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Zeng, Xiaoqiao [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL 60439 USA; Nie, Kaiqi [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Duchesne, Paul N. [Department of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax NS B3H 4R2 Canada; Wang, Bo [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Liu, Simon [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 Canada; Zhou, Junhua [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Zhao, Feipeng [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Han, Na [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Zhang, Peng [Department of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax NS B3H 4R2 Canada; Zhong, Jun [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Sun, Xuhui [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Li, Youyong [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Li, Yanguang [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Lu, Jun [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL 60439 USA

    2016-11-17

    The search for earth-abundant and high-performance electrode materials for sodium-ion batteries represents an important challenge to current battery research. 2D transition metal dichalcogenides, particularly MoS2, have attracted increasing attention recently, but few of them so far have been able to meet expectations. In this study, it is demonstrated that another phase of molybdenum sulfide—amorphous chain-like MoS3—can be a better choice as the anode material of sodium-ion batteries. Highly compact MoS3 particles infiltrated with carbon nanotubes are prepared via the facile acid precipitation method in ethylene glycol. Compared to crystalline MoS2, the resultant amorphous MoS3 not only exhibits impressive gravimetric performance—featuring excellent specific capacity (≈615 mA h g-1), rate capability (235 mA h g-1 at 20 A g-1), and cycling stability but also shows exceptional volumetric capacity of ≈1000 mA h cm-3 and an areal capacity of >6.0 mA h cm-2 at very high areal loadings of active materials (up to 12 mg cm-2). The experimental results are supported by density functional theory simulations showing that the 1D chains of MoS3 can facilitate the adsorption and diffusion of Na+ ions. At last, it is demonstrated that the MoS3 anode can be paired with an Na3V2(PO4)3 cathode to afford full cells with great capacity and cycling performance.

  18. Preparation of a Si/SiO2 -Ordered-Mesoporous-Carbon Nanocomposite as an Anode for High-Performance Lithium-Ion and Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lingxing; Liu, Renpin; Han, Lei; Luo, Fenqiang; Chen, Xi; Wang, Jianbiao; Qian, Qingrong; Chen, Qinghua; Wei, Mingdeng

    2018-04-03

    In this work, an Si/SiO 2 -ordered-mesoporous carbon (Si/SiO 2 -OMC) nanocomposite was initially fabricated through a magnesiothermic reduction strategy by using a two-dimensional bicontinuous mesochannel of SiO 2 -OMC as a precursor, combined with an NaOH etching process, in which crystal Si/amorphous SiO 2 nanoparticles were encapsulated into the OMC matrix. Not only can such unique porous crystal Si/amorphous SiO 2 nanoparticles uniformly dispersed in the OMC matrix mitigate the volume change of active materials during the cycling process, but they can also improve electrical conductivity of Si/SiO 2 and facilitate the Li + /Na + diffusion. When applied as an anode for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), the Si/SiO 2 -OMC composite displayed superior reversible capacity (958 mA h g -1 at 0.2 A g -1 after 100 cycles) and good cycling life (retaining a capacity of 459 mA h g -1 at 2 A g -1 after 1000 cycles). For sodium-ion batteries (SIBs), the composite maintained a high capacity of 423 mA h g -1 after 100 cycles at 0.05 A g -1 and an extremely stable reversible capacity of 190 mA h g -1 was retained even after 500 cycles at 1 A g -1 . This performance is one of the best long-term cycling properties of Si-based SIB anode materials. The Si/SiO 2 -OMC composites exhibited great potential as an alternative material for both lithium- and sodium-ion battery anodes. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Growth of carbon fibres, sheets and tubes on diamond films under high power plasma etching conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalpando, I. [Centro de Investigacion de los Recursos Naturales, Antigua Normal Rural, Salaices, Lopez, Chihuahua (Mexico); John, P.; Wilson, J. I. B., E-mail: isaelav@hotmail.com [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Riccarton, Edinburgh, EH14-4AS (United Kingdom)

    2017-11-01

    The application of diamond as a plasma facing material for fusion reactors can be limited by unknown reactions between diamond and the chamber materials transported by the plasma. Transformation of diamond to other structures can cause problems such as contamination of the plasma with loose particles or retention of gases. We have seen that diamond thin films are eroded under hydrogen plasma etching, but if silicon is present the growth of various carbon structures on diamond films is observed. We have produced carbon with different morphologies on diamond films including fibres, sheets with flower-like shapes and tubes and proposed growth mechanisms based on the results of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Sample surfaces contain silicon and are oxidised having COO and CO groups as seen by XP S analysis. Raman analyses revealed a spectrum typical for graphite combined with that from diamond that remains on the surface after hydrogen bombardment. The results of this sturdy show the experimental conditions in which carbon fibres, sheets and tubes are produced under high-power hydrogen etching of diamond films and open the possibility to other applications such as catalysts, sensors and the production of electrodes. (Author)

  20. Imitation of deuterium plasma interaction with the surface of carbon materials in gaseous divertor conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korshunov, S.N. E-mail: sinet@nfi.kiae.ru; Guseva, M.I.; Gureev, V.M.; Danelyan, L.S.; Khripunov, B.I.; Kolbasov, B.N.; Kulikauskas, V.S.; Litnovsky, A.M.; Martynenko, Yu.V.; Petrov, V.B.; Zatekin, V.V

    2003-03-01

    The experiments on simulation of gas divertor conditions were done in the LENTA facility under interaction of a plasma flow with neutral gas. The samples of carbon materials were exposed in a steady-state deuterium plasma (ion energy 5 eV, ion flux 5x10{sup 21} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, fluence 10{sup 26} m{sup -2}) at 1470 K (MPG-8) and at 1320 K (SEP NB31). Heavy deuterocarbon molecules (C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, C{sub 2}D{sub 4}, C{sub 2}D{sub 6}) were observed in mass spectra of the discharge. This fact and high erosion yields show the presence of chemical erosion. Deuterium accumulation in carbon materials was studied by elastic recoil detection analysis. The integral deuterium content is 6x10{sup 18} m{sup -2} in SEP NB31 and 1.95x10{sup 19} m{sup -2} in MPG-8. The profiles of C and Mo atom distributions in deposited layer on Mo collector is 'X'-like. Carbon atoms distribution in deposited layer on Si is uniform. The integral deuterium content in co-deposited layers is 1.4x10{sup 21} m{sup -2} on Si and 4.8x10{sup 20} m{sup -2} on Mo. A globular structure of co-deposited layer on Mo collector was found.

  1. Growth of carbon fibres, sheets and tubes on diamond films under high power plasma etching conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villalpando, I.; John, P.; Wilson, J. I. B.

    2017-01-01

    The application of diamond as a plasma facing material for fusion reactors can be limited by unknown reactions between diamond and the chamber materials transported by the plasma. Transformation of diamond to other structures can cause problems such as contamination of the plasma with loose particles or retention of gases. We have seen that diamond thin films are eroded under hydrogen plasma etching, but if silicon is present the growth of various carbon structures on diamond films is observed. We have produced carbon with different morphologies on diamond films including fibres, sheets with flower-like shapes and tubes and proposed growth mechanisms based on the results of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Sample surfaces contain silicon and are oxidised having COO and CO groups as seen by XP S analysis. Raman analyses revealed a spectrum typical for graphite combined with that from diamond that remains on the surface after hydrogen bombardment. The results of this sturdy show the experimental conditions in which carbon fibres, sheets and tubes are produced under high-power hydrogen etching of diamond films and open the possibility to other applications such as catalysts, sensors and the production of electrodes. (Author)

  2. Carbon and water fluxes and footprints in tropical agricultural systems under rainfed and irrigated conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. S.; Lathuilliere, M. J.; Morillas, L.; Dalmagro, H. J.; D'Acunha, B.; Kim, Y.; Suarez, A.; Couto, E. G.

    2017-12-01

    In this talk, we will summarize results obtained using three tropical agricultural water observatories in Guanacaste, Costa Rica and Mato Grosso, Brazil. These flux towers and associated sensors enable detailed assessments of carbon use and water use efficiencies for crops under rain-fed and irrigated conditions. In addition to directly assessing water consumption from crops via eddy covariance, determination of water footprints and water use efficiencies using sensors and integrating it with remotely sensed data make it possible to (i) evaluate and compare different irrigation systems used in the study regions (drip, pivot and flood irrigation), (ii) assess the effect of irrigation over the local water balance to identify vulnerabilities associated with intensive water extraction for irrigation, and (iii) study the effect of inter-annual water availability fluctuations on crop water use. We conclude by comparing volumetric water footprints for crops, their carbon footprints, and water and carbon use efficiencies of crops produced under business-as-usual and alternative soil and water management scenarios.

  3. Determination of antihypertensive drug moexipril hydrochloride based on the enhancement effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate at carbon paste electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Ali K

    2010-04-15

    Herein, an electrochemical differential pulse voltammetric method was developed for the determination of moexipril hydrochloride based on the enhancement effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The oxidation process has been carried out in Britton-Robinson buffer. Moexipril hydrochloride exhibits a well-defined irreversible oxidation peak over the entire pH range (2-11). The peak current varied linearly over the range from 4.0 x 10(-7) to 5.2 x 10(-6) mol L(-1). The limits of detection and quantification were 6.87 x 10(-8) mol L(-1) and 2.29 x 10(-7) mol L(-1), respectively. The recovery was found in the range from 99.65% to 100.76%. The relative standard deviation was found in the range from 0.429% to 0.845%. The proposed method possesses high sensitivity, accuracy and rapid response. Finally, this method was successfully used to determine moexipril hydrochloride in tablets. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sodium alginate: A promising biopolymer for corrosion protection of API X60 high strength carbon steel in saline medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obot, I B; Onyeachu, Ikenna B; Kumar, A Madhan

    2017-12-15

    Sodium alginate (SA), a polysaccharide biopolymer, has been studied as an effective inhibitor against the corrosion of API X60 steel in neutral 3.5% NaCl using gravimetric and electrochemical techniques (OCP, EIS and EFM). The inhibition efficiency of the SA increased with concentration but was lower at higher temperature (70°C). Electrochemical measurements showed that the SA shifted the steel corrosion potential to more positive value and reduced the kinetics of corrosion by forming an adsorbed layer which mitigated the steel surface wetting, based on contact angle measurement. SEM-EDAX was used to confirm the inhibition of SA on API X60 steel surfaces. The SA adsorbs on the steel surface through a physisorption mechanism using its carboxylate oxygen according to UV-vis and ATR-IR measurements, respectively. This phenomena result in decreased localized pitting corrosion of the API X60 steel in 3.5% NaCl solution. Theoretical results using quantum chemical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations provide further atomic level insights into the interaction of SA with steel surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. About assessment of carbon accumulation potential in the Kazakhstan soils under conditions of transition to ecological farming systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, Yu.M.

    1997-01-01

    Processes of carbon oxidation of soil humus as well as possible adsorption of CO 2 from atmosphere and its bonding in soils in capacity of organic forms under condition of transition to ecological farming systems are considered. (author)

  6. Measurement and analysis of polarization curves of mild steel in sodium carbonate/bicarbonate solution under erosion-corrosion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Q. [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China). Research Institute of Surface Engineering

    2002-06-01

    The polarization curves of mild steel in de-aerated 0.5 and mol NaHCO{sub 3} + 0.5 mol Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution with and without erodent particles of 300 g/L of 100 {mu}m alumina have been measured using a rotating cylinder electrode (RCE) apparatus over the range of rotation speeds fro 0 to 4,000 r/min. The results show that the mild steel in the de-aerated slurry exhibits classical active/passive polarization behavior. The speed of cylinder rotation has a great effect in the presence of particles on the active dissolution current density. The erosion-corrosion process is severely erosion-dominated for the mild steel. However, the poor corrosion resistance of the mild steel in such turbulent slurries is also significant, especially at lower than 4 m/s. 19 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Low sodium diet (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for you. Look for these words on labels: low-sodium, sodium-free, no salt added, sodium-reduced, ... for you. Look for these words on labels: low-sodium, sodium-free, no salt added, sodium-reduced, ...

  8. Optimization of microwave-assisted rubberwood sawdust based activated carbon preparation conditions for methylene blue removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasri, Azduwin; Ahmad, Mohd Azmier

    2017-10-01

    Optimum preparation conditions of rubberwood sawdust based activated carbon (RSAC) for methylene blue (MB) dye removal was studied. RSAC was produced by applying physiochemical activation method by using potassium hydroxide as a chemical agent which accompanied by carbon dioxide gasification under microwave heating. The effects of microwave power, irradiation time and impregnation ratio on two types of responses namely MB removal and RSAC yield using the center composite design (CCD) were also included in this study. The preparation variables correlation for responses was developed by two quadratic models. Optimum preparation conditions of RSAC were obtained at microwave power, irradiation time and IR of 354 W, 4.5 minutes and 0.98, respectively, which resulted MB removal and yield of 83.79% and 28%, respectively. The average pore diameter, surface area and total pore volume of optimized RSAC were 4.12 nm, 796.33 m2/g and 0.4219 cm3/g, respectively. This sample was found to has well-developed pores on its surface and can be a promising adsorbent for MB removal from aqueous solution.

  9. Fabrication of calcite blocks from gypsum blocks by compositional transformation based on dissolution-precipitation reactions in sodium carbonate solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kunio; Kawachi, Giichiro; Tsuru, Kanji; Yoshimoto, Ayami

    2017-03-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) has been used as a bone substitute, and is a precursor for carbonate apatite, which is also a promising bone substitute. However, limited studies have been reported on the fabrication of artificial calcite blocks. In the present study, cylindrical calcite blocks (ϕ6×3mm) were fabricated by compositional transformation based on dissolution-precipitation reactions using different calcium sulfate blocks as a precursor. In the dissolution-precipitation reactions, both CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O and CaSO 4 transformed into calcite, a polymorph of CaCO 3 , while maintaining their macroscopic structure when immersed in 1mol/L Na 2 CO 3 solution at 80°C for 1week. The diametral tensile strengths of the calcite blocks formed using CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O and CaSO 4 were 1.0±0.3 and 2.3±0.7MPa, respectively. The fabrication of calcite blocks using CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O and CaSO 4 proposed in this investigation may be a useful method to produce calcite blocks because of the self-setting ability and high temperature stability of gypsum precursors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of sodium on the creep-rupture behavior of type 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Chopra, O.K.; Kassner, T.F.

    1976-01-01

    Uniaxial creep-rupture data have been obtained for Type 304 stainless steel in the solution-annealed condition and after exposure to a flowing sodium environment at temperatures of 700, 650, and 600 0 C.The specimens were exposed to sodium for time periods between 120 and 5012 h to produce carbon penetration depths of approximately 0.010, 0.020, and 0.038 cm in the steel. Results showed that, as the depth of carbon penetration and the average carbon concentration in the steel increase, the rupture life increases and the minimum creep rate decreases. Creep correlations that relate rupture life, minimum creep rate, and time-to-tertiary creep were developed for the steel in both the solution-annealed and sodium-exposed conditions. Isochronous stress-creep strain curves and results on the calculations of the stress levels for 1 percent creep strain and long-term rupture life are also presented. 11 fig

  11. Evolution of carbon steel corrosion in feedwater conditions reproduce by the Fortrand loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaunay, Sophie; Bescond, Aurelien; Mansour, Carine; Bretelle, Jean-Luc

    2012-09-01

    Fouling and tubes support plate blockage of steam generators (SG) are major problems in the secondary circuit of pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants. Corrosion products (CP) responsible of these phenomena are mainly constituted of magnetite. Limit the amount of these CP, generated in the feedwater system and transported to SG, constitutes one way to limit fouling and blockage of SGs. This work requires the understanding of CP behaviour in the feedwater system conditions. A specific experimental circulating water loop, FORTRAND, was built at EDF to follow the formation, the transport and the deposition of iron oxides in representative conditions of the secondary circuit feedwater system. The test section operating at high temperature (up to 250 deg. C) is made in carbon steel and includes three removable segments while all the other parts of the loop are made in stainless steel. First results confirm the formation of iron oxides on carbon steel and stainless steel surface in the conditions of PWR secondary circuits. The surface characterizations show that magnetite is the corrosion product formed on carbon steel and stainless steel at 220 deg. C and goethite is formed at room temperature on stainless steel. The aim of the most recent tests performed in FORTRAND loop was to follow the evolution of corrosion in the feedwater conditions. Tests were performed in one-phase flow conditions at 150 L.h -1 with a linear velocity of 0.82 m/s at 220 deg. C in morpholine/ammonia/hydrazine medium, at pH 25C equal to 9.2. To conduct this study, a removable segment constituted by ten tubes was added to the loop. Several tests were performed to follow the deposit thickness, the iron lost in solution and the oxide morphology with time from two to nine hundred sixty hours. Chemical conditions were controlled and the reproducibility of the results was confirmed by the observation of three tubes at each test. SEM pictures present kinetics with three steps: after the first hours the

  12. Evidence for CO2 reactive adsorption on nanoporous S- and N-doped carbon at ambient conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandosz, Teresa J. [City College of New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Seredych, Mykola [City College of New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique [Univ. of Malaga (Spain). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry; Cheng, Yongqiang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemical and Engineering Materials Division; Daemen, Luke L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemical and Engineering Materials Division; Ramírez-Cuesta, Anibal J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemical and Engineering Materials Division

    2015-10-08

    CO2 interactions with nanoporous S- and N-doped polymer-derived carbon and commercial wood-based carbon were investigated in a broad range of conditions. The results showed that during CO2 adsorption nitrogen and sulfur species as well as water were released from the carbon surface as a result of chemical reactions of the surface groups with CO2. Inelastic neutron scattering experiments provided the unprecedented ability to characterize very small amounts of CO2 and H2O and revealed for the first time their physical/chemical status in the confined space of nanoporous carbons. The results obtained suggest that the reactivity of the carbon surface should be considered when CO2 storage media are chosen and when CO2 is used as a probe to determine the microporosity of carbon materials.

  13. Effects of Climatic Conditions and Management Practices on Agricultural Carbon and Water Budgets in the Inland Pacific Northwest USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Jinshu; Waldo, Sarah; Pressley, Shelley N.; Russell, Eric S.; O'Keeffe, Patrick T.; Pan, William L.; Huggins, David R.; Stöckle, Claudio O.; Brooks, Erin S.; Lamb, Brian K.

    2017-12-01

    Cropland is an important land cover influencing global carbon and water cycles. Variability of agricultural carbon and water fluxes depends on crop species, management practices, soil characteristics, and climatic conditions. In the context of climate change, it is critical to quantify the long-term effects of these environmental drivers and farming activities on carbon and water dynamics. Twenty site-years of carbon and water fluxes covering a large precipitation gradient and a variety of crop species and management practices were measured in the inland Pacific Northwest using the eddy covariance method. The rain-fed fields were net carbon sinks, while the irrigated site was close to carbon neutral during the winter wheat crop years. Sites growing spring crops were either carbon sinks, sources, or neutral, varying with crops, rainfall zones, and tillage practices. Fluxes were more sensitive to variability in precipitation than temperature: annual carbon and water fluxes increased with the increasing precipitation while only respiration increased with temperature in the high-rainfall area. Compared to a nearby rain-fed site, irrigation improved winter wheat production but resulted in large losses of carbon and water to the atmosphere. Compared to conventional tillage, no-till had significantly lower respiration but resulted in slightly lower yields and water use efficiency over 4 years. Under future climate change, it is expected that more carbon fixation by crops and evapotranspiration would occur in a warmer and wetter environment.

  14. Simultaneous determination of copper, cobalt, and mercury ions in water samples by solid-phase extraction using carbon nanotube sponges as adsorbent after chelating with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate prior to high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zhou, Jia-Bin; Wang, Xia; Wang, Zhen-Hua; Zhao, Ru-Song

    2016-06-01

    Recently, a sponge-like material called carbon nanotube sponges (CNT sponges) has drawn considerable attention because it can remove large-area oil, nanoparticles, and organic dyes from water. In this paper, the feasibility of CNT sponges as a novel solid-phase extraction (SPE) adsorbent for the enrichment and determination of heavy metal ions (Co(2+), Cu(2+), and Hg(2+)) was investigated for the first time. Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) was used as the chelating agent and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for the final analysis. Important factors which may influence extraction efficiency of SPE were optimized, such as the kind and volume of eluent, volume of DDTC, sample pH, flow rate, etc. Under the optimized conditions, wide range of linearity (0.5-400 μg L(-1)), low limits of detection (0.089~0.690 μg L(-1); 0.018~0.138 μg), and good repeatability (1.27~3.60 %, n = 5) were obtained. The developed method was applied for the analysis of the three metal ions in real water samples, and satisfactory results were achieved. All of these findings demonstrated that CNT sponges will be a good choice for the enrichment and determination of target ions at trace levels in the future.

  15. Kinetics of sodium borohydride direct oxidation and oxygen reduction in sodium hydroxide electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatenet, Marian; Micoud, Fabrice; Roche, Ivan; Chainet, Eric

    2006-01-01

    The direct oxidation of sodium borohydride in concentrated sodium hydroxide medium has been studied by cyclic and linear voltammetry, chronoamperometry and chronopotentiometry for silver and gold electrocatalysts, either bulk and polycrystalline or nanodispersed over high area carbon blacks. Gold and silver yield rather complete utilisation of the reducer: around 7.5 electrons are delivered on these materials, versus 4 at the most for platinum as a result of the BH 4 - non-negligible hydrolysis taking place on this latter material. The kinetic parameters for the direct borohydride oxidation are better for gold than for silver. A strong influence of the ratio of sodium hydroxide versus sodium borohydride is found: whereas the theoretical stoichiometry does forecast that eight hydroxide ions are needed for each borohydride ion, our experimental results prove that a larger excess hydroxide ion is necessary in quasi-steady state conditions. When the above-mentioned ratio is unity (1 M NaOH and 1 M NaBH 4 ), the tetrahydroborate ions direct oxidation is limited by the hydroxide concentration, and their hydrolysis is no longer negligible. The hydrolysis products are probably BH 3 OH - ions, for which gold displays a rather good oxidation activity. Additionally, silver, which is a weak BH 4 - oxidation electrocatalyst, exhibits the best activity of all the studied materials towards the BH 3 OH - direct oxidation. Finally, carbon-supported gold nanoparticles seem promising as anode material to be used in direct borohydride fuel cells

  16. Hidden Sodium

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-03-04

    In this podcast, learn about reducing sodium intake by knowing what to eat and the main sources of sodium in the diet. It's important for a healthy lifestyle.  Created: 3/4/2013 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/4/2013.

  17. Dietary sodium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Niels

    2015-01-01

    The 2013 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report "Sodium Intake in Populations: Assessment of Evidence" did not support the current recommendations of the IOM and the American Heart Association (AHA) to reduce daily dietary sodium intake to below 2,300 mg. The report concluded that the population...

  18. Modelling aqueous solubility of sodium chloride in clays at thermodynamic conditions of hydraulic fracturing by molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moučka, Filip; Svoboda, Martin; Lísal, Martin

    2017-06-28

    To address the high salinity of flow-back water during hydraulic fracturing, we have studied the equilibrium partitioning of NaCl and water between the bulk phase and clay pores. In shale rocks, such a partitioning can occur between fractures with a bulk-like phase and clay pores. We use an advanced Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) technique based on fractional exchanges of dissolved ions and water molecules. We consider a typical shale gas reservoir condition of a temperature of 365 K and pressure of 275 bar, and we represent clay pores by pyrophyllite and Na-montmorillonite slits of a width ranging from about 7 to 28 Å, covering clay pores from dry clay to clay pores with a bulk-like layer in the middle of the pore. We employ the Joung-Cheatham model for ions, SPC/E model for water and CLAYFF for the clay pores. We first determine the chemical potentials for NaCl and water in the bulk phase using Osmotic Ensemble Monte Carlo simulations. The chemical potentials are then used in GCMC to simulate the adsorption of ions and water molecules in the clay pores, and in turn to predict the salt solubility in confined solutions. Besides the thermodynamic properties, we evaluate the structure and in-plane diffusion of the adsorbed fluids, and ion conductivities.

  19. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-10-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbent being used in this project is sodium carbonate which is converted to sodium bicarbonate, ''baking soda,'' through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Sodium bicarbonate is regenerated to sodium carbonate when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. Testing conducted previously confirmed that the reaction rate and achievable CO{sub 2} capacity of sodium carbonate decreased with increasing temperature, and that the global rate of reaction of sodium carbonate to sodium bicarbonate increased with an increase in both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O concentrations. Energy balance calculations indicated that the rate of heat removal from the particle surface may determine the reaction rate for a particular particle system. This quarter, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) were conducted which indicated that calcination of sodium bicarbonate at temperatures as high as 200 C did not cause a significant decrease in activity in subsequent carbonation testing. When sodium bicarbonate was subjected to a five cycle calcination/carbonation test, activity declined slightly over the first two cycles but was constant thereafter. TGA tests were also conducted with two other potential sorbents. Potassium carbonate was found to be less active than sodium carbonate, at conditions of interest in preliminary TGA tests. Sodium carbonate monohydrate showed negligible activity. Testing was also conducted in a 2-inch internal diameter quartz fluidized-bed reactor system. A five cycle test demonstrated that initial removals of 10 to 15 percent of the carbon dioxide in a simulated flue gas could be achieved. The carbonation reaction proceeded at temperatures as low as 41 C. Future work by TGA and in fixed

  20. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO(sub 2) as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbent being used in this project is sodium carbonate which is converted to sodium bicarbonate, ''baking soda,'' through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Sodium bicarbonate is regenerated to sodium carbonate when heated, producing a nearly pure CO(sub 2) stream after condensation of water vapor. Testing conducted previously confirmed that the reaction rate and achievable CO(sub 2) capacity of sodium carbonate decreased with increasing temperature, and that the global rate of reaction of sodium carbonate to sodium bicarbonate increased with an increase in both CO(sub 2) and H(sub 2)O concentrations. Energy balance calculations indicated that the rate of heat removal from the particle surface may determine the reaction rate for a particular particle system. This quarter, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) were conducted which indicated that calcination of sodium bicarbonate at temperatures as high as 200 C did not cause a significant decrease in activity in subsequent carbonation testing. When sodium bicarbonate was subjected to a five cycle calcination/carbonation test, activity declined slightly over the first two cycles but was constant thereafter. TGA tests were also conducted with two other potential sorbents. Potassium carbonate was found to be less active than sodium carbonate, at conditions of interest in preliminary TGA tests. Sodium carbonate monohydrate showed negligible activity. Testing was also conducted in a 2-inch internal diameter quartz fluidized-bed reactor system. A five cycle test demonstrated that initial removals of 10 to 15 percent of the carbon dioxide in a simulated flue gas could be achieved. The carbonation reaction proceeded at temperatures as low as 41 C. Future work by TGA and in fixed-bed, fluidized-bed, and transport

  1. Reactions of solid CaSO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and formation of sodium carbonate sulfate double salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jinsheng; Wu, Yinghai; Anthony, Edward J. [CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Natural Resources Canada, 1 Haanel Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1M1 (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    High-temperature chemical reactions in mixtures of solid CaSO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were investigated in order to explore the mechanisms of enhanced sulfur capture by limestones doped with Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in fluidized bed combustion. Drastic weight loss of the mixtures was observed in a thermogravimetric analyzer near the melting temperature of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, indicating chemical reaction. X-ray diffraction analysis for a mixture of the solids following a heat treatment at 850 C revealed the existence of two sodium carbonate sulfate double salts that have not been reported before for the present system. The formation of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in the melt of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} appears to precede the formation of the double salts. The two double salts are believed to have high porosity and specific surface area similar to those of a better-known double salt, burkeite. The implications of these findings for the enhancement of limestone sulfation by Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} are also discussed. (author)

  2. Reactions of solid CaSO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and formation of sodium carbonate sulfate double salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jinsheng [CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Natural Resources Canada, 1 Haanel Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1M1 (Canada)]. E-mail: jiwang@nrcan.gc.ca; Wu Yinghai [CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Natural Resources Canada, 1 Haanel Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1M1 (Canada); Anthony, Edward J. [CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Natural Resources Canada, 1 Haanel Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1M1 (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    High-temperature chemical reactions in mixtures of solid CaSO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were investigated in order to explore the mechanisms of enhanced sulfur capture by limestones doped with Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in fluidized bed combustion. Drastic weight loss of the mixtures was observed in a thermogravimetric analyzer near the melting temperature of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, indicating chemical reaction. X-ray diffraction analysis for a mixture of the solids following a heat treatment at 850 deg. C revealed the existence of two sodium carbonate sulfate double salts that have not been reported before for the present system. The formation of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in the melt of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} appears to precede the formation of the double salts. The two double salts are believed to have high porosity and specific surface area similar to those of a better-known double salt, burkeite. The implications of these findings for the enhancement of limestone sulfation by Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} are also discussed.

  3. Treatment of simulated wastewater containing Reactive Red 195 by zero-valent iron/activated carbon combined with microwave discharge electrodeless lamp/sodium hypochlorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jie; Xu, Zhen; Li, Qing-Shan; Chen, Song; An, Shu-Qing; Zeng, Qing-Fu; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2010-01-01

    A comparative study of treatment of simulated wastewater containing Reactive Red 195 using zero-valent iron/activated carbon (ZVI/AC), microwave discharge electrodeless lamp/sodium hypochlorite (MDEL/NaClO) and the combination of ZVI/AC-MDEL/NaClO was conducted. The preliminary results showed the two steps method of ZVI/AC-MDEL/NaClO had much higher degradation efficiency than both single steps. The final color removal percentage was nearly up to 100% and the chemical oxygen demand reduction percentage was up to approximately 82%. The effects of operational parameters, including initial pH value of simulated wastewater, ZVI/AC ratio and particle size of ZVI were also investigated. In addition, from the discussion of synergistic effect between ZVI/AC and MEDL/NaClO, we found that in the ZVI/AC-MEDL/NaClO process, ZVI/AC could break the azo bond firstly and then MEDL/NaClO degraded the aromatic amine products effectively. Reversing the order would reduce the degradation efficiency.

  4. Hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride using chemically modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes with pyridinium based ionic liquid and decorated with highly dispersed Mn nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnappan, Amutha; Puguan, John Marc C.; Chung, Wook-Jin; Kim, Hern

    2015-10-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/Ionic liquid (IL)/Mn nanohybrids are synthesized and their catalytic activity is examined for hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride (NaBH4). Transmission electron microscopy reveals that Mn nanoparticles well-distributed on the MWCNTs surface. Energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the presence of Mn and Ni atom in the nanohybrids. The nanohybrids exhibit excellent catalytic lifetime and gives the total turnover number of 18496 mol H2/mol catalyst in the hydrolysis of NaBH4, which can be attributed to the presence of Mn atom and IL containing nickel halide anion. It is worthy of note that a very small amount of catalyst is used for this hydrolysis reaction. The activation energy is found to be 40.8 kJ/mol by MWCNTs/IL/Mn nanohybrids from the kinetic study of the hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of NaBH4. The improved hydrogen generation rate, lower activation energy, and less expensive make the nanohybrids promising candidate as catalyst for the hydrogen generation from NaBH4 solution. The nanohybrids are easy to prepare, store and yet catalytically active. The recycling process is very simple and further purification is not tedious.

  5. Voltammetric determination of sudan ii in food samples at graphene modified glassy carbon electrode based on the enhancement effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, X.; Chen, M.; Chao, M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Herein, a novel electrochemical method was de veloped for the determination of Sudan II based on the electrochemical catalytic activity of graphene modified glassy carbon electrode (GME) and the enhancement effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). In a pH 6.0 phosphate buffer solution, Sudan II exhibited a pair of well-defined quasi reversible redox peaks at the GME in the presence of 5.0x10/sup -5/ mol L/sup 1/ SDS. The oxidation peak current of Sudan II was linearly proportional to its concentration in a range from 4.0x10/sup -8/ to 4.0x10/sup -6/ mol L/sup 1/, with a linear regression equation of ipa (A) = 3.35 c + 5.96 x 10/sup -6/, r = 0.9988 and a detection limit of 8.0x10/sup -9/ mol L/sup 1/. The recoveries from the standards fortified blank samples were in the range of 94.7% to 97.5% with RSD lower than 4.0%. The novel method has been successfully used to determine Sudan II in food products with satisfactory results. (author)

  6. Selective extraction of chromium(VI) using a leaching procedure with sodium carbonate from some plant leaves, soil and sediment samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elci, Latif, E-mail: elci@pamukkale.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Pamukkale University, 20017 Denizli (Turkey); Divrikli, Umit; Akdogan, Abdullah; Hol, Aysen; Cetin, Ayse [Department of Chemistry, Pamukkale University, 20017 Denizli (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Department of Chemistry, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2010-01-15

    Speciation of chromium in some plant leaves, soil and sediment samples was carried out by selective leaching of Cr(VI) using a sodium carbonate leaching procedure. Total chromium from the samples was extracted using aqua regia and oxidative acid digestion, respectively. The concentrations of chromium species in the extracts were determined using by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Uncoated graphite furnace tubes were used as an atomizer. Due to the presence of relatively high amounts of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in the resulting samples, the possible influences of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} on the absorbance signals were checked. There is no interference of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} on the chromium absorbance up to 0.1 mol L{sup -1} Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. A limit of detection (LOD) for determination of Cr(VI) in 0.1 Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution by GFAAS was found to be 0.93 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The procedure was applied to environmental samples. The relative standard deviation, R.S.D. as precision for 10 replicate measurements of 20 {mu} L{sup -1} Cr in processed soil sample was 4.2%.

  7. Mesoporous-activated carbon prepared from chitosan flakes via single-step sodium hydroxide activation for the adsorption of methylene blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrakchi, F; Ahmed, M J; Khanday, W A; Asif, M; Hameed, B H

    2017-05-01

    In this work, mesoporous-activated carbon (CSAC) was prepared from chitosan flakes (CS) via single-step sodium hydroxide activation for the adsorption of methylene blue (MB). CSAC was prepared using different impregnation ratios of NaOH:CS (1:1, 2:1, 3:1, and 4:1) at 800°C for 90min. The adsorption performance of CSAC was evaluated for MB at different adsorption variables, such MB initial concentrations (25-400mg/L), solution pH (3-11), and temperature (30-50°C). The adsorption isotherm data of CSAC-MB were well fitted to Langmuir model with a maximum adsorption capacity 143.53mg/g at 50°C. Best representation of kinetic data was obtained by the pseudo-second order model. CSAC exhibited excellent adsorption uptake for MB and can potentially be used for other cationic dyes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Selective extraction of chromium(VI) using a leaching procedure with sodium carbonate from some plant leaves, soil and sediment samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elci, Latif; Divrikli, Umit; Akdogan, Abdullah; Hol, Aysen; Cetin, Ayse; Soylak, Mustafa

    2010-01-15

    Speciation of chromium in some plant leaves, soil and sediment samples was carried out by selective leaching of Cr(VI) using a sodium carbonate leaching procedure. Total chromium from the samples was extracted using aqua regia and oxidative acid digestion, respectively. The concentrations of chromium species in the extracts were determined using by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Uncoated graphite furnace tubes were used as an atomizer. Due to the presence of relatively high amounts of Na(2)CO(3) in the resulting samples, the possible influences of Na(2)CO(3) on the absorbance signals were checked. There is no interference of Na(2)CO(3) on the chromium absorbance up to 0.1 mol L(-1) Na(2)CO(3). A limit of detection (LOD) for determination of Cr(VI) in 0.1 Na(2)CO(3) solution by GFAAS was found to be 0.93 microg L(-1). The procedure was applied to environmental samples. The relative standard deviation, R.S.D. as precision for 10 replicate measurements of 20 microL(-1) Cr in processed soil sample was 4.2%.

  9. Restraining Sodium Volatilization in the Ferric Bauxite Direct Reduction System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentao Hu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Direct reduction is an emerging utilization technology of ferric bauxite. However, it requires much more sodium carbonate than ordinary bauxite does. The volatilization is one of the most significant parts of sodium carbonate consumption, as reported in previous studies. Based on the new direct reduction method for utilization of ferric bauxite, this paper has systematically investigated factors including heating temperature, heating time, and sodium carbonate dosage influencing sodium volatilization. For the purpose of reducing sodium volatilization, the Box–Benhken design was employed, and the possibility of separating iron and sodium after direct reduction was also investigated.

  10. Anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel under unsaturated conditions in a nuclear waste deep geological repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwong, G.; Wang, St.; Newman, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Anaerobic corrosion behaviour of carbon steel in humid conditions, but not submerged in aqueous solution, was studied based on hydrogen generation. Initial tests monitored the hydrogen evolution from carbon steel in a high humidity environment (≥ 75% RH) at near-ambient temperature (30 C) using a high sensitivity pressure gauge system (sensitivity of 0.01 μm.a -1 ). The presence of hydrogen in test runs that showed no, or minimal, pressure increase was confirmed by a solid-state potentiometric hydrogen sensor which has the capability of detecting hydrogen partial pressure as low as 10 -6 bar or a corrosion rate of 1.5 * 10 -4 μm.a -1 . Preliminary results indicate that a corrosion rate as high as 0.2 μm.a -1 can be sustained for steel coated with salt at 100% RH. Higher corrosion rates (as high as 0.8 μm.a -1 ) were obtained in less humid environment (71% RH). Without a salt deposit, pickled steel in humid environment (as high as 100% RH) also showed detectable corrosion for a period up to 800 hours, during which 0.8 kPa of hydrogen was accumulated prior to the apparent arrest of corrosion, representing a metal loss of 3 nm. Corrosion scales are also identified with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as by mass change monitoring using a quartz crystal microbalance. Corrosion mechanisms and prediction for longer-term exposure will be discussed. Results will be useful in predicting long-term carbon steel corrosion behaviour and improving the current knowledge of hydrogen gas evolution in a deep geological repository for nuclear waste. (authors)

  11. Earth system model simulations show different feedback strengths of the terrestrial carbon cycle under glacial and interglacial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adloff, Markus; Reick, Christian H.; Claussen, Martin

    2018-04-01

    In simulations with the MPI Earth System Model, we study the feedback between the terrestrial carbon cycle and atmospheric CO2 concentrations under ice age and interglacial conditions. We find different sensitivities of terrestrial carbon storage to rising CO2 concentrations in the two settings. This result is obtained by comparing the transient response of the terrestrial carbon cycle to a fast and strong atmospheric CO2 concentration increase (roughly 900 ppm) in Coupled Climate Carbon Cycle Model Intercomparison Project (C4MIP)-type simulations starting from climates representing the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and pre-industrial times (PI). In this set-up we disentangle terrestrial contributions to the feedback from the carbon-concentration effect, acting biogeochemically via enhanced photosynthetic productivity when CO2 concentrations increase, and the carbon-climate effect, which affects the carbon cycle via greenhouse warming. We find that the carbon-concentration effect is larger under LGM than PI conditions because photosynthetic productivity is more sensitive when starting from the lower, glacial CO2 concentration and CO2 fertilization saturates later. This leads to a larger productivity increase in the LGM experiment. Concerning the carbon-climate effect, it is the PI experiment in which land carbon responds more sensitively to the warming under rising CO2 because at the already initially higher temperatures, tropical plant productivity deteriorates more strongly and extratropical carbon is respired more effectively. Consequently, land carbon losses increase faster in the PI than in the LGM case. Separating the carbon-climate and carbon-concentration effects, we find that they are almost additive for our model set-up; i.e. their synergy is small in the global sum of carbon changes. Together, the two effects result in an overall strength of the terrestrial carbon cycle feedback that is almost twice as large in the LGM experiment as in the PI experiment

  12. Carbonation processes of basalts and ultra-basic rocks in subsurface conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daval, D.

    2009-01-01

    formation of a thin (∼ 40 nm) passivating layer of amorphous silica as soon as the fluid becomes saturated with respect to amorphous silica. The chemical profile of magnesium across the silica coating suggests that olivine weathering can only carry on through solid-state diffusion, which slows down the process by more than 5 orders of magnitude. The reasons why carbonation of olivine and wollastonite are so different could involve either the specific role of calcium on the structure of the silica layer, or a competition between the hydrolysis rate of minerals and the rate of condensation of silanol groups within the silica layer. Another parameter responsible for overestimations of carbonation rates can arise from the inaccurate knowledge of the dependence of silicate dissolution rate (r) on the distance from equilibrium (ΔG r ). For example, over a wide range of ΔG r (∼ 60 - 75 kJ.mol -1 ), we measured experimentally (at 90 C and pH 5) that diopside dissolution rates are far slower (≥ 1 order of magnitude) than those predicted by the use of transition state theory (TST)-based relation. Because this kind of relations is implemented into geochemical codes, they can be the source of dramatic overestimations of the true carbonation rates. Such overestimations were calculated and corrected by coupling the geochemical code with a new kinetic module. To accurately model the weathering rate of silicates in nominally under-saturated solutions, the intrinsic effect of CO 2 on silicate dissolution rates was determined. At far from equilibrium conditions, for a given pH, the dissolution rate of serpentine minerals is enhanced under high pCO 2 . This effect can be ascribed to the formation of a surface complex involving HCO 3 - ligands, which could in turn promote the dissolution rate of serpentines. The last part of our work dealt with the weathering of ferrous-bearing silicates which could generate hydrogen, in competition with carbonation, and lead in turn to the formation

  13. Role of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in improving wear properties of polypropylene (PP) in dry sliding condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashok Gandhi, R.; Palanikumar, K.; Ragunath, B.K.; Paulo Davim, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Role of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on wear behaviour of polypropylene (PP) is evaluated. ► Effect of applied pressure and composition against a steel counter face is investigated. ► Microstructure and worn surfaces of samples are observed by scanning electron microscope. ► The wear phenomenon has been discussed based on wear losses and worn surfaces. ► The coefficient of friction (μ) and sliding time for PP and PP/CNT blend is investigated. - Abstract: Polymers are widely used for sliding couples against metals and other materials. Polypropylene is a polymer used in variety of applications includes packaging, laboratory equipments, automotive components, etc. Polypropylene is often desirable automotive material due to its low cost, colorability, chemical resistance and UV stability. In addition the range of potential polypropylene uses is nearly unlimited through the use of modifiers, additives and fillers. In the present work, the sliding wear of polypropylene (PP) and carbon nanotube (CNT) blends are evaluated as a function of applied load and composition against a steel counter face in dry condition. The addition of CNT in PP in wear performance is investigated and presented in detail. Microstructure and worn surfaces of samples were observed by scanning electron microscope. The wear phenomenon has been discussed based on wear losses and worn surfaces

  14. Defect induced tuning of photoluminescence property in graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets through synthesis conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, D. [School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Banerjee, D., E-mail: nilju82@gmail.com [School of Materials Science Engineering Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah (India); Pahari, D. [School of Materials Science Engineering Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah (India); Ghorai, U.K. [Department of Industrial Chemistry & Swami Vivekananda Research centre, Ramakrishna Mission Vidyamandira, Belur Math, Howrah 711202 (India); Sarkar, S.; Das, N.S. [School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Chattopadhyay, K.K., E-mail: kalyan_chattopadhyay@yahoo.com [School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Thin Film and Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2017-05-15

    Synthesis of layered sheet like graphitic carbon nitride by pyrolysis of urea at different temperatures has been reported. The proper phase formation has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction study whereas field emission scanning and transmission electron microscope characterized the morphology of the material. Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy revealed the presence of different bonds in the sample. Thermal gravimetric analysis has been used to study the thermal stability of the material. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis further revealed the elemental composition of carbon and nitrogen in a proper stoichiometric ratio. Excitation dependent photoluminescence spectra of the as prepared samples have been studied in detail. It has been shown that synthesis condition can tailor the amount of defects present in the synthesized samples that in turn can change the photoluminescence properties of the material. The fluorescence spectra of the as prepared samples have been used to detect copper ions present in the sample. It has also been shown that the presence of defects which is mainly N-H functional groups can change the decay characteristics of the carrier in these samples which in turn changes the PL spectra.

  15. Wear Behavior of Medium Carbon Steel with Biomimetic Surface Under Starved Lubricated Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihui; Shao, Feixian; Liang, Yunhong; Lin, Pengyu; Tong, Xin; Ren, Luquan

    2017-07-01

    Friction and wear under starved lubrication condition are both key life-related factors for mechanical performance of many structural parts. In this paper, different surface morphologies on medium carbon steel were fabricated using laser, inspired by the surface coupling effect of biological system. The friction and sliding wear behaviors of biomimetic specimens (characterized by convex and concave units on the specimen surface) were studied under starved lubrication condition. The stress distribution on different sliding surfaces under sliding friction was studied using finite element method. The results showed that the tribological performance of studied surfaces under starved lubrication condition depended not only on the surface morphology but also on the structure of biomimetic units below surface (subsurface structure). The friction coefficient of biomimetic surface was effectively reduced by the concave unit depth, while the refined microstructure with higher hardness led to the much better wear resistance. In addition to lubricant reserving and wear debris trapping effect derived from the surface concave morphology, it was believed that the well-formed subsurface structure of biomimetic units could carry much heavy loads against tribopair, which enhanced the function of surface topography and resulted in complementary lubrication in the wear contact area. The uniform stress distribution on the entire biomimetic surface also played an important role in stabilizing the friction coefficient and reducing the wear cracks.

  16. Carbon monoxide - hydrogen combustion characteristics in severe accident containment conditions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-03-01

    uncertainty in calculating burning velocity is high for the range of mixtures relevant to containment accident conditions, the gap in knowledge is significant. - Large-scale data on combustion pressure development in closed and vented vessels is unavailable to validate predictions of combustion models applicable to CO-H 2 -H 2 O-CO 2 -air mixtures, resulting in significant uncertainties in predicted pressure loads from ignition. - Experimental data on the detonation cell sizes (detonability) of CO-H 2 mixtures is unavailable to validate theoretical models. Since detonability is one aspect that appears sensitive to CO addition to the containment atmosphere, there are implications for reactor safety assessments. - Theoretical studies indicate that addition of steam and CO 2 reduces the detonation sensitivity of CO-H 2 mixtures (i.e., increases the cell widths) in agreement with experimental studies in H2,. - The effect of carbon dioxide addition on cell width appears to depend on hydrogen stoichiometry for lean hydrogen-air mixtures (the most relevant case) the cell size decreases as the CO concentration increases. For rich mixtures, the opposite is true. - The present results indicate that the cell widths for a hydrogen-carbon monoxide-air-steam mixture can be deduced from the measured (or calculated) cell widths for a corresponding hydrogen-air-steam mixture but supporting data in CO-H 2 mixtures are lacking

  17. Chip formation in turning S45C medium carbon steel in cryogenic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaharah A. Ghani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the tribology issue regarding the chip formation in machining medium carbon steel (S45C using a coated and uncoated carbide tools. The machining parameters under investigation were cutting speed, feed rate, and depth of cut under dry and cryogenic cutting condition using coated and uncoated carbide tools. The chip shape was largely depended on the combination of machining parameters, especially at high depth of cut and feed rate; the favorable chip was produced. Larger value of shear angle results in smaller shear plane area that provides benefits of lower cutting force needed to shear off the chips and lower cutting temperature being generated during the machining process.

  18. Effects of deposition conditions on the properties of pyrolytic carbon deposited in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowden, Richard Andrew; Hunn, John D.; Nunn, Stephen D.; Kercher, Andrew K.; Price, Jeffery R.; Jellison, Gerald Earle Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The high-density, isotropic pyrolytic carbon layer beneath the silicon carbide (IPyC) plays a key role in the irradiation performance of coated particle fuel. The IPyC layer protects the kernel from reactions with chlorine during deposition of the SiC layer, provides structural support for the SiC layer, and protects the SiC from fission products and carbon monoxide. The process conditions used by the Germans to deposit the IPyC coating produced a highly isotropic, but somewhat permeable IPyC coating. The permeability of the IPyC coating was acceptable for use with the dense German UO 2 kernels, but may not be suitable when coating UCO kernels. The UCO kernels are typically more porous and thus have a larger surface area than UO 2 kernels. The lower density and the higher surface area of UCO kernels could make them more susceptible to attack by HCl gas during the silicon carbide (SiC) coating process, which could result in heavy metal dispersion into the buffer and IPyC coatings and a higher level of as-manufactured SiC defects. The relationship between IPyC deposition conditions, permeability, and anisotropy must be understood and the appropriate combination of anisotropy and permeability for particle fuel containing UCO kernels selected. A reference set of processing conditions have been determined from review of historical information and results of earlier coating experiments employing 350 and 500 (micro)m UO 2 kernels. It was decided that a limited study would be conducted, in which only coating gas fraction (CGF) and temperature would be varied. Coatings would be deposited at different rates and with a range of microstructures. Thickness, density, porosity and anisotropy would be measured and permeability evaluated using a chlorine leach test. The results would be used to select the best IPyC coating conditions for use with the available natural enrichment uranium carbide/uranium oxide (NUCO) kernels. The response plots from the investigation of the

  19. The energetic conditions determining the active dissolution of carbon steel during electrocoagulation in sulfate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerónimo-López, Carlos; Vazquez-Arenas, Jorge; Picquart, Michel; González, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the active dissolution of carbon steel under rotating conditions, necessary for continuous dosing of metal cation in electrocoagulation. A reaction mechanism is proposed for its dissolution in 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 M Na 2 SO 4 , using electrochemical and chemical techniques (Raman, SEM). A continuous dissolution region was obtained from the potentiodynamic study, as a result of the competition between the rate of electrochemical reactions and the rate at which energetic conditions are imposed on the electrode. On the other hand, the dissolution of carbon steel underwent active, transition and passivation regions in potentiostatic and galvanostatic techniques, which respectively shifted to higher current densities and more positive potentials as the electrolyte concentration (Na 2 SO 4 ) was increased. In general, the increase of Na 2 SO 4 concentration promotes the iron dissolution and tightens the active region. The results revealed that the Na 2 SO 4 concentration, the Fe(II)/Fe(III) interface concentration, and the time of perturbation influence the occurrence and evolution of the Green Rust Sulphate (NaFe 6 II Fe 3 III (OH) 18 (SO 4 ) 2 ) intermediary, a precursor which hinders electrocoagulation through passive film formation. Scanning Electronic Microscopy and Raman spectroscopy showed that in the active dissolution region, the films grown potentiostatically are porous and contain α-FeOOH, δ-FeOOH, and Fe 3 O 4 as the dominant species. In the transition region, these films become less porous and include α-FeOOH, Fe 3 O 4 , α-Fe 2 O 3 , γ-Fe 2 O 3 , while γ-FeOOH was identified in the passive region

  20. Thermo-mechanical Properties of Upper Jurassic (Malm) Carbonate Rock Under Drained Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Liang; Blöcher, Guido; Milsch, Harald; Zimmermann, Günter; Sass, Ingo; Huenges, Ernst

    2018-01-01

    The present study aims to quantify the thermo-mechanical properties of Neuburger Bankkalk limestone, an outcrop analog of the Upper Jurassic carbonate formation (Germany), and to provide a reference for reservoir rock deformation within future enhanced geothermal systems located in the Southern German Molasse Basin. Experiments deriving the drained bulk compressibility C were performed by cycling confining pressure p c between 2 and 50 MPa at a constant pore pressure p p of 0.5 MPa after heating the samples to defined temperatures between 30 and 90 °C. Creep strain was then measured after each loading and unloading stage, and permeability k was obtained after each creep strain measurement. The drained bulk compressibility increased with increasing temperature and decreased with increasing differential pressure p d = p c - p p showing hysteresis between the loading and unloading stages above 30 °C. The apparent values of the indirectly calculated Biot coefficient α ind containing contributions from inelastic deformation displayed the same temperature and pressure dependencies. The permeability k increased immediately after heating and the creep rates were also temperature dependent. It is inferred that the alteration of the void space caused by temperature changes leads to the variation of rock properties measured under isothermal conditions while the load cycles applied under isothermal conditions yield additional changes in pore space microstructure. The experimental results were applied to a geothermal fluid production scenario to constrain drawdown and time-dependent effects on the reservoir, overall, to provide a reference for the hydromechanical behavior of geothermal systems in carbonate, and more specifically, in Upper Jurassic lithologies.

  1. Phase equilibrium conditions of semi-calthrate hydrates of (tetra-n-butyl ammonium chloride + carbon dioxide)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zhi-Gao; Jiao, Li-Jun; Zhao, Zhi-Gui; Wang, Gong-Liang; Huang, Hai-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbon dioxide hydrate stability zone was enlarged with the help of TBAC. • Carbon dioxide uptake into TBAC semi-clathrate hydrates is confirmed. • Equilibrium pressure of hydrate decreased with the increase of TBAC mass concentration. • The addition of TBAC reduces the formation pressures of carbon dioxide hydrate by 2.5 MPa. - Abstract: In the present work, hydrate equilibrium conditions for (tetra-n-butyl ammonium chloride (TBAC) + carbon dioxide + water) mixtures were investigated. Tetra-n-butyl ammonium chloride was reported to form a semi-clathrate hydrate. The experiments were carried out within the TBAC mass fraction range of (0.05 to 0.3). The experimental results showed that the presence of TBAC decreased the formation pressure of carbon dioxide double hydrate within the experimental temperature range. Moreover, pressure reduction was dependent on the TBAC concentration

  2. Development of core hot spot evaluation method for decay heat removal by natural circulation under transient conditions in sodium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Doda, Norihiro; Kamide, Hideki; Watanabe, Osamu; Ohkubo, Yoshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Toward the commercialization of fast reactors, a design study of Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) is being performed. In this design study, the adoption of decay heat removal system operated by fully natural circulation is being examined from viewpoints of economic competitiveness and passive safety. This paper describes a new evaluation method of core hot spot under transient conditions from forced to natural circulation operations that is necessary for confirming feasibility of the fully natural circulation decay heat removal system. The new method consists of three analysis steps in order to include effects of thermal hydraulic phenomena particular to the natural circulation decay heat removal, e.g., flow redistribution in fuel assemblies caused by buoyancy force, and therefore it enables more rational hot spot evaluation rather than conventional ones. This method was applied to a hot spot evaluation of loss-of-external-power event and the result was compared with those by conventional 1D and detailed 3D simulations. It was confirmed that the proposed method can estimate the hot spot with reasonable degree of conservativeness. (author)

  3. Effects of methionine source, arginine: lysine ratio and sodium chloride level in the diets of grower broilers reared under high-temperature conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Montanhini Neto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of methionine sources (DL-methionine 99% powder (DLM or methionine hydroxy analog liquid 88% (HMTBA, arginine:lysine (Arg:Lys ratio and sodium chloride (NaCl content in the diet of broilers on their performance, carcass yield, serum biochemistry, duodenal mucosal morphology, and immune response. Birds were kept under high temperature conditions during the grower phase and were inoculated or not with an antigen. The use of HMTBA promoted better live performance and carcass yield than the use of DLM. Diets with 1.05 Arg:Lys ratio resulted in better live performance, higher carcass and breast meat yields, longer villi, shallower crypts, and stronger immune response when broilers were challenged than the 1.40 ratio. The dietary supplementation of 6.0 g NaCl/kg promoted better growth performance and carcass weight than 2.0 g NaCl/kg. There was no influence of the different methionine sources or NaCl concentrations on any evaluated intestinal morphology parameter or immune response, nor of any interactions between these sources of variation.

  4. Effect of Sodium Chloride on α-Dicarbonyl Compound and 5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furfural Formations from Glucose under Caramelization Conditions: A Multiresponse Kinetic Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocadağlı, Tolgahan; Gökmen, Vural

    2016-08-17

    This study aimed to investigate the kinetics of α-dicarbonyl compound formation in glucose and glucose-sodium chloride mixture during heating under caramelization conditions. Changes in the concentrations of glucose, fructose, glucosone, 1-deoxyglucosone, 3-deoxyglucosone, 3,4-dideoxyglucosone, 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (HMF), glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and diacetyl were determined. A comprehensive reaction network was built, and the multiresponse model was compared to the experimentally observed data. Interconversion between glucose and fructose became 2.5 times faster in the presence of NaCl at 180 and 200 °C. The effect of NaCl on the rate constants of α-dicarbonyl compound formation varied across the precursor and the compound itself and temperature. A decrease in rate constants of 3-deoxyglucosone and 1-deoxyglucosone formations by the presence of NaCl was observed. HMF formation was revealed to be mainly via isomerization to fructose and dehydration over cyclic intermediates, and the rate constants increase 4-fold in the presence of NaCl.

  5. Two-carbon metabolites, polyphenols and vitamins influence yeast chronological life span in winemaking conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orozco Helena

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viability in a non dividing state is referred to as chronological life span (CLS. Most grape juice fermentation happens when Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells have stopped dividing; therefore, CLS is an important factor toward winemaking success. Results We have studied both the physical and chemical determinants influencing yeast CLS. Low pH and heat shorten the maximum wine yeast life span, while hyperosmotic shock extends it. Ethanol plays an important negative role in aging under winemaking conditions, but additional metabolites produced by fermentative metabolism, such as acetaldehyde and acetate, have also a strong impact on longevity. Grape polyphenols quercetin and resveratrol have negative impacts on CLS under winemaking conditions, an unexpected behavior for these potential anti-oxidants. We observed that quercetin inhibits alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities, and that resveratrol performs a pro-oxidant role during grape juice fermentation. Vitamins nicotinic acid and nicotinamide are precursors of NAD+, and their addition reduces mean longevity during fermentation, suggesting a metabolic unbalance negative for CLS. Moreover, vitamin mix supplementation at the end of fermentation shortens CLS and enhances cell lysis, while amino acids increase life span. Conclusions Wine S. cerevisiae strains are able to sense changes in the environmental conditions and adapt their longevity to them. Yeast death is influenced by the conditions present at the end of wine fermentation, particularly by the concentration of two-carbon metabolites produced by the fermentative metabolism, such as ethanol, acetic acid and acetaldehyde, and also by the grape juice composition, particularly its vitamin content.

  6. Efficient and facile one pot carboxylation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes by using oxidation with ozone under mild conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naeimi, Hossein; Mohajeri, Ali; Moradi, Leila; Rashidi, Ali Morad

    2009-01-01

    Graphical abstract: In this work, oxidation of carbon nanotubes with ozone in the presence of hydrogen peroxide was studied. The reactions were performed under clean and mild conditions and oxidized products with high concentration of oxygenated groups were yielded. The reaction products were characterized with attenuated total reflectance (ATR), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), back titration, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the dispersion behavior of the oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was also studied. The results confirmed the presence of high concentrations of oxidative groups on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) treated by the method of the present work.

  7. Sodium Azide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Exposure to a large amount of sodium azide by any route may cause these other health effects as well: Convulsions Low blood pressure Loss of consciousness Lung injury Respiratory failure leading to death Slow heart rate ...

  8. Steady-State Growth under Inorganic Carbon Limitation Conditions Increases Energy Consumption for Maintenance and Enhances Nitrous Oxide Production in Nitrosomonas europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellbye, Brett L; Giguere, Andrew; Chaplen, Frank; Bottomley, Peter J; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A

    2016-06-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea is a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that oxidizes ammonia (NH3) to obtain energy for growth on carbon dioxide (CO2) and can also produce nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhouse gas. We interrogated the growth, physiological, and transcriptome responses of N. europaea to conditions of replete (>5.2 mM) and limited inorganic carbon (IC) provided by either 1.0 mM or 0.2 mM sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) supplemented with atmospheric CO2 IC-limited cultures oxidized 25 to 58% of available NH3 to nitrite, depending on the dilution rate and Na2CO3 concentration. IC limitation resulted in a 2.3-fold increase in cellular maintenance energy requirements compared to those for NH3-limited cultures. Rates of N2O production increased 2.5- and 6.3-fold under the two IC-limited conditions, increasing the percentage of oxidized NH3-N that was transformed to N2O-N from 0.5% (replete) up to 4.4% (0.2 mM Na2CO3). Transcriptome analysis showed differential expression (P ≤ 0.05) of 488 genes (20% of inventory) between replete and IC-limited conditions, but few differences were detected between the two IC-limiting treatments. IC-limited conditions resulted in a decreased expression of ammonium/ammonia transporter and ammonia monooxygenase subunits and increased the expression of genes involved in C1 metabolism, including the genes for RuBisCO (cbb gene cluster), carbonic anhydrase, folate-linked metabolism of C1 moieties, and putative C salvage due to oxygenase activity of RuBisCO. Increased expression of nitrite reductase (gene cluster NE0924 to NE0927) correlated with increased production of N2O. Together, these data suggest that N. europaea adapts physiologically during IC-limited steady-state growth, which leads to the uncoupling of NH3 oxidation from growth and increased N2O production. Nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, is an important process in the global nitrogen cycle. This process is generally dependent on ammonia

  9. The various sodium purification techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courouau, J.L.; Masse, F.; Rodriguez, G.; Latge, C.; Redon, B.

    1997-01-01

    In the framework of sodium waste treatment, the sodium purification phase plays an essential role in the chain of operations leading to the transformation of the active sodium, considered as waste, into a stable sodium salt. The objectives of the purification operations are: To keep a low impurity level, particularly a low concentration in oxygen and hydrogen, in order to allow its transfer to a processing plant, and in order to avoid risks of plugging and/or corrosion in sodium facilities; To reduce the sodium activity in order to limit the dose rate close to the facilities, and in order to reduce the activity of the liquid and gaseous effluents. After a recall of the different kind of impurities that can be present in sodium, and of the different purification methods that could be associated with, the following points are highlighted: (i) Oxygen and hydrogen purification needs, and presentation of some selection criteria for a purification unit adapted to a sodium processing plant, as well as 2 cold trap concepts that are in accordance with these criteria: PSICHOS and PIRAMIDE. (ii) Tritium reduction in a bulk of liquid sodium by swamping, isotopic exchange, or permeation throughout a membrane. (iii) Caesium trapping on carbonaceous matrix. The main matrices used at present are R.V.C. (Reticulated Vitreous Carbon) and Actitex/Pica products. Tests in the laboratory and on an experimental device have demonstrated the performances of these materials, which are able to reduce sodium activity in Cs 134 and Cs 137 to very low values. The sodium purification processes as regards to the hydrogen, oxygen and caesium, that are aimed at facilitating the subsequent treatment of sodium, are therefore mastered operations. Regarding the operations associated with the reduction of the tritium activity, the methods are in the process of being qualified, or to be qualified. (author)

  10. Sodium sampling and impurities determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Docekal, J.; Kovar, C.; Stuchlik, S.

    1980-01-01

    Samples may be obtained from tubes in-built in the sodium facility and further processed or they are taken into crucibles, stored and processed later. Another sampling method is a method involving vacuum distillation of sodium, thus concentrating impurities. Oxygen is determined by malgamation, distillation or vanadium balance methods. Hydrogen is determined by the metal diaphragm extraction, direct extraction or amalgamation methods. Carbon is determined using dry techniques involving burning a sodium sample at 1100 degC or using wet techniques by dissolving the sample with an acid. Trace amounts of metal impurities are determined after dissolving sodium in ethanol. The trace metals are concentrated and sodium excess is removed. (M.S.)

  11. Validation of nonlinear FEA models of a thin-walled elbow under extreme loading conditions for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watakabe, Tomoyoshi; Wakai, Takashi; Jin, Chuanrong; Usui, Yoshiya; Sakai, Shinkichi; Ooshika, Junji; Tsukimori, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    For the purpose of confirming failure modes and safety margin, some studies on the ultimate strength of thin-walled piping components for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) under extreme loading conditions such as large earthquakes have been reported these several years. Nonlinear finite element analysis has been applied in these studies to simulate buckling and yielding with large deformation, whose accuracy is dependent on the element type, the mesh size, the elasto-plastic model and so on. It is important to check the validation of a finite element model for nonlinear analysis especially under extreme loading conditions. This paper presents static and dynamic analyses of a thin-walled elbow with large deformation under large seismic loading, and discusses the validation of the FEA models comparing with experimental results. The finite element analysis models in this study are generated by shell elements for a stainless steel pipe elbow of diameter-to-thickness ratio 59:1 similar to the main pipe of SFRs, which is used for shaking table tests. At first, a static analysis is carried out for an in-plane monotonic bending test, in order to confirm that the shell element is appropriate to the large deformation analysis and the material parameters are proper for the strain level in the experiments. And then, a dynamic in-plane bending test with the maximum acceleration of 11.7G is simulated by the nonlinear FEA with stiffness-proportional damping. The influence of mesh sizes on results is investigated, to determine proper mesh sizes and reduce the computational cost. Finally, comparing the results of the FEM analyses with those of experiments, it is concluded that the appropriately generated FEA models are effective and give accurate results for nonlinear analyses of the thin-walled elbow under large seismic loading. (author)

  12. Conditions determining the oxidation of carbon monoxide and of hydrogen by Hydrogenomonas carboxydovorans. [Hydogenomonas carboxydovorans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kistner, A

    1954-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Hydrogenomonas, which are widely distributed in soil, have in common the ability to grow autotrophically by oxidizing hydrogen with simultaneous reduction of carbon dioxide, and heterotrophically on common nutrient media. A survey of the literature shows that this ability is due to a specific hydrogen activating enzyme system, a hydrogenase. Apparently in most species this enzyme has a typically adaptive character to such a degree that cells grown in the absence of hydrogen as a rule do not produce it in measurable quantities. Also the ability to produce the hydrogenase under suitable conditions may be lost. Experimental studies were conducted to investigate the behavior of Hydrogenomonas carboxydovorans in this respect, and in addition, to determine whether or not the ability to oxidize CO should be considered an adaptive property. The stock culture was maintained in a mineral medium with an atmosphere of 80% CO and 20% O/sub 2/. Ways in which the culture conditions influenced the behavior of resting cells of H. carboxydovorans in the presence of H, CO, and lactate were investigated. Also studied was what would happen, if either H or CO were offered to the bacteria simultaneously with lactate.

  13. Effects of machining conditions on the specific cutting energy of carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, A. I.; Syahmi, A. Z.; Naquib, M.; Lih, T. C.; Mansor, A. F.; Khalil, A. N. M.

    2017-10-01

    This article presents an approach to evaluate the effects of different machining conditions on the specific cutting energy of carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites (CFRP). Although research works in the machinability of CFRP composites have been very substantial, the present literature rarely discussed the topic of energy consumption and the specific cutting energy. A series of turning experiments were carried out on two different CFRP composites in order to determine the power and specific energy constants and eventually evaluate their effects due to the changes in machining conditions. A good agreement between the power and material removal rate using a simple linear relationship. Further analyses revealed that a power law function is best to describe the effect of feed rate on the changes in the specific cutting energy. At lower feed rate, the specific cutting energy increases exponentially due to the nature of finishing operation, whereas at higher feed rate, the changes in specific cutting energy is minimal due to the nature of roughing operation.

  14. Microcosm studies on iron and arsenic mobilization from aquifer sediments under different conditions of microbial activity and carbon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Mengyu; Xie, Zuoming; Wang, Yanxin; Xie, Xianjun

    2009-05-01

    Microcosm experiments were conducted to understand the mechanism of microbially mediated mobilization of Fe and As from high arsenic aquifer sediments. Arsenic-resistant strains isolated from aquifer sediments of a borehole specifically drilled for this study at Datong basin were used as inoculated strains, and glucose and sodium acetate as carbon sources for the experiments. In abiotic control experiments, the maximum concentrations of Fe and As were only 0.47 mg/L and 0.9 μg/L, respectively. By contrast, the maximum contents of Fe and As in anaerobic microcosm experiments were much higher (up to 1.82 mg/L and 12.91 μg/L, respectively), indicating the crucial roles of microbial activities in Fe and As mobilization. The observed difference in Fe and As release with different carbon sources may be related to the difference in growth pattern and composition of microbial communities that develop in response to the type of carbon sources.

  15. The influence of sodium fires on LMFBRs safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justin, F [DSN/Centre de Fontenay-aux-Roses, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    1979-03-01

    In a sodium cooled reactor, sodium fires are accidental conditions to be taken into account in safety analysis. For the various sodium categories, fire conditions, associated risks, safety analysis objectives and detailed corresponding issues are indicated, An experimental research program can be deduced from these considerations. This report covers the following: safety analysis methodology; primary sodium fires; secondary sodium fires; auxiliary sodium fires, and related experimental research programs.

  16. The influence of sodium fires on LMFBRs safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Justin, F.

    1979-01-01

    In a sodium cooled reactor, sodium fires are accidental conditions to be taken into account in safety analysis. For the various sodium categories, fire conditions, associated risks, safety analysis objectives and detailed corresponding issues are indicated, An experimental research program can be deduced from these considerations. This report covers the following: safety analysis methodology; primary sodium fires; secondary sodium fires; auxiliary sodium fires, and related experimental research programs

  17. Microporous metal-organic framework with potential for carbon dioxide capture at ambient conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiang, S.C.; He, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Wu, H.; Zhou, W.; Krishna, R.; Chen, B.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and separation are important industrial processes that allow the use of carbon dioxide for the production of a range of chemical products and materials, and to minimize the effects of carbon dioxide emission. Porous metal-organic frameworks are promising materials to achieve

  18. Biodegradability of carbon nanotube/polymer nanocomposites under aerobic mixed culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Duc C; Goodwin, David G; Frank, Benjamin P; Bouwer, Edward J; Fairbrother, D Howard

    2018-10-15

    The properties and commercial viability of biodegradable polymers can be significantly enhanced by the incorporation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The environmental impact and persistence of these carbon nanotube/polymer nanocomposites (CNT/PNCs) after disposal will be strongly influenced by their microbial interactions, including their biodegradation rates. At the end of consumer use, CNT/PNCs will encounter diverse communities of microorganisms in landfills, surface waters, and wastewater treatment plants. To explore CNT/PNC biodegradation under realistic environmental conditions, the effect of multi-wall CNT (MWCNT) incorporation on the biodegradation of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) was investigated using a mixed culture of microorganisms from wastewater. Relative to unfilled PHA (0% w/w), the MWCNT loading (0.5-10% w/w) had no statistically significant effect on the rate of PHA matrix biodegradation. Independent of the MWCNT loading, the extent of CNT/PNC mass remaining closely corresponded to the initial mass of CNTs in the matrix suggesting a lack of CNT release. CNT/PNC biodegradation was complete in approximately 20 days and resulted in the formation of a compressed CNT mat that retained the shape of the initial CNT/PNC. This study suggests that although CNTs have been shown to be cytotoxic towards a range of different microorganisms, this does not necessarily impact the biodegradation of the surrounding polymer matrix in mixed culture, particularly in situations where the polymer type and/or microbial population favor rapid polymer biodegradation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Electrochemical characterization of LiFePO{sub 4}/poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate)-multi walled carbon nanotube composite cathode material for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Van Hiep; Wang, Wan Lin; Jin, En Mei; Gu, Hal-Bon, E-mail: hbgu@chonnam.ac.kr

    2013-08-25

    Highlights: •LiFePO{sub 4}/PSS–MWCNT successfully prepared by a hydrothermal method. •LiFePO{sub 4}/PSS(2.5%)–MWCNT(2.5%) shows the best electrochemical performances. •PSS stacks and forms a layer about 3–6 nm around the surface of LiFePO{sub 4} particles. •The electronic conductivity of LiFePO{sub 4}/PSS(2.5%)–MWCNT(2.5%) is 6.3 × 10{sup −3} S cm{sup −1}. -- Abstract: LiFePO{sub 4} is a promising cathode material for lithium ion batteries and is prepared by a hydrothermal method. However, its practical application is limited due to its poor conductivity. In order to improve the electronic conductivity, we added poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) and multi walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) in LiFePO{sub 4}. In the results, PSS stacks and forms a layer about 3–6 nm around the surface of LiFePO{sub 4} particles. MWCNT provides pathways for electron transport. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and galvanostatic discharge testing results indicate that LiFePO{sub 4}/PSS–MWCNT composite exhibits higher discharge capacity than pure LiFePO{sub 4}. LiFePO{sub 4}/PSS(2.5%)–MWCNT(2.5%) shows the best discharge capacity of 144 mAh g{sup −1} at 2nd cycle, and high electronic conductivity of 6.3 × 10{sup −3} S cm{sup −1}.

  20. Physiological response of Crocosphaera watsonii to enhanced and fluctuating carbon dioxide conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary R Gradoville

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of elevated pCO2 on cultures of the unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacterium Crocosphaera watsonii WH8501. Using CO2-enriched air, cultures grown in batch mode under high light intensity were exposed to initial conditions approximating current atmospheric CO2 concentrations (∼ 400 ppm as well as CO2 levels corresponding to low- and high-end predictions for the year 2100 (∼ 750 and 1000 ppm. Following acclimation to CO2 levels, the concentrations of particulate carbon (PC, particulate nitrogen (PN, and cells were measured over the diurnal cycle for a six-day period spanning exponential and early stationary growth phases. High rates of photosynthesis and respiration resulted in biologically induced pCO2 fluctuations in all treatments. Despite this observed pCO2 variability, and consistent with previous experiments conducted under stable pCO2 conditions, we observed that elevated mean pCO2 enhanced rates of PC production, PN production, and growth. During exponential growth phase, rates of PC and PN production increased by ∼ 1.2- and ∼ 1.5-fold in the mid- and high-CO2 treatments, respectively, when compared to the low-CO2 treatment. Elevated pCO2 also enhanced PC and PN production rates during early stationary growth phase. In all treatments, PC and PN cellular content displayed a strong diurnal rhythm, with particulate C:N molar ratios reaching a high of 22:1 in the light and a low of 5.5:1 in the dark. The pCO2 enhancement of metabolic rates persisted despite pCO2 variability, suggesting a consistent positive response of Crocosphaera to elevated and fluctuating pCO2 conditions.

  1. What moves the European carbon market? Insights from conditional jump models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronwald, Marc; Ketterer, Janina [Munich Univ. (Germany). Ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research

    2012-04-15

    This paper is concerned with carbon price volatility and the underlying causes of large price movements in the European emissions trading market. Based on the application of a combined jump-GARCH model the behavior of EUA prices is characterized. The jump- GARCH model explains the unsteady carbon price movement well and, moreover, shows that between 40 and 60 percent of the carbon price variance are triggered by jumps. Information regarding EUA supply and news from international carbon markets are identified as important drivers of these price spikes. These results can lead regulators the way if smoother carbon prices are desired.

  2. Earth system model simulations show different feedback strengths of the terrestrial carbon cycle under glacial and interglacial conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Adloff

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In simulations with the MPI Earth System Model, we study the feedback between the terrestrial carbon cycle and atmospheric CO2 concentrations under ice age and interglacial conditions. We find different sensitivities of terrestrial carbon storage to rising CO2 concentrations in the two settings. This result is obtained by comparing the transient response of the terrestrial carbon cycle to a fast and strong atmospheric CO2 concentration increase (roughly 900 ppm in Coupled Climate Carbon Cycle Model Intercomparison Project (C4MIP-type simulations starting from climates representing the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM and pre-industrial times (PI. In this set-up we disentangle terrestrial contributions to the feedback from the carbon-concentration effect, acting biogeochemically via enhanced photosynthetic productivity when CO2 concentrations increase, and the carbon–climate effect, which affects the carbon cycle via greenhouse warming. We find that the carbon-concentration effect is larger under LGM than PI conditions because photosynthetic productivity is more sensitive when starting from the lower, glacial CO2 concentration and CO2 fertilization saturates later. This leads to a larger productivity increase in the LGM experiment. Concerning the carbon–climate effect, it is the PI experiment in which land carbon responds more sensitively to the warming under rising CO2 because at the already initially higher temperatures, tropical plant productivity deteriorates more strongly and extratropical carbon is respired more effectively. Consequently, land carbon losses increase faster in the PI than in the LGM case. Separating the carbon–climate and carbon-concentration effects, we find that they are almost additive for our model set-up; i.e. their synergy is small in the global sum of carbon changes. Together, the two effects result in an overall strength of the terrestrial carbon cycle feedback that is almost twice as large in the LGM experiment

  3. CARBON-RICH GIANT PLANETS: ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY, THERMAL INVERSIONS, SPECTRA, AND FORMATION CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madhusudhan, Nikku [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Mousis, Olivier [Institut UTINAM, CNRS-UMR 6213, Observatoire de Besancon, BP 1615, F-25010 Besancon Cedex (France); Johnson, Torrence V. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Lunine, Jonathan I., E-mail: nmadhu@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2011-12-20

    The recent inference of a carbon-rich atmosphere, with C/O {>=} 1, in the hot Jupiter WASP-12b motivates the exotic new class of carbon-rich planets (CRPs). We report a detailed study of the atmospheric chemistry and spectroscopic signatures of carbon-rich giant (CRG) planets, the possibility of thermal inversions in their atmospheres, the compositions of icy planetesimals required for their formation via core accretion, and the apportionment of ices, rock, and volatiles in their envelopes. Our results show that CRG atmospheres probe a unique region in composition space, especially at high temperature (T). For atmospheres with C/O {>=} 1, and T {approx}> 1400 K in the observable atmosphere, most of the oxygen is bound up in CO, while H{sub 2}O is depleted and CH{sub 4} is enhanced by up to two or three orders of magnitude each, compared to equilibrium compositions with solar abundances (C/O = 0.54). These differences in the spectroscopically dominant species for the different C/O ratios cause equally distinct observable signatures in the spectra. As such, highly irradiated transiting giant exoplanets form ideal candidates to estimate atmospheric C/O ratios and to search for CRPs. We also find that the C/O ratio strongly affects the abundances of TiO and VO, which have been suggested to cause thermal inversions in highly irradiated hot Jupiter atmospheres. A C/O = 1 yields TiO and VO abundances of {approx}100 times lower than those obtained with equilibrium chemistry assuming solar abundances, at P {approx} 1 bar. Such a depletion is adequate to rule out thermal inversions due to TiO/VO even in the most highly irradiated hot Jupiters, such as WASP-12b. We estimate the compositions of the protoplanetary disk, the planetesimals, and the envelope of WASP-12b, and the mass of ices dissolved in the envelope, based on the observed atmospheric abundances. Adopting stellar abundances (C/O = 0.44) for the primordial disk composition and low-temperature formation conditions

  4. Preparation of Ultra-fine Calcium Carbonate by a Solvent-free ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The treatment of calcium chloride with sodium carbonate under solvent-free conditions with a supersonic airflow and at a low heating temperature leads to the synthesis of ultra-fine calcium carbonate. The reaction not only involves mild conditions, a simple operation, and high yields but also gives a high conversion rate.

  5. Novel ionically crosslinked acrylamide-grafted poly(vinyl alcohol)/sodium alginate/sodium carboxymethyl cellulose pH-sensitive microspheres for delivery of Alzheimer's drug donepezil hydrochloride: Preparation and optimization of release conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Emine; Şanlı, Oya

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the graft copolymer, poly(vinyl alcohol)-grafted polyacrylamide (PVA-g-PAAm), was synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and elemental analysis. Microspheres of PVA-g-PAAm/sodium alginate (NaAlg)/sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (NaCMC) were prepared by the emulsion-crosslinking method and used for the delivery of an Alzheimer's drug, donepezil hydrochloride (DP). The release of DP increased with the increase in drug/polymer ratio (d/p) and PVA-g-PAAm/NaAlg/NaCMC ratio, while it decreased with the increase in the extent of crosslinking. The optimum DP release was obtained as 92.9% for a PVA-g-PAAm/NaAlg/NaCMC ratio of 1/2/1, d/p ratio of 1/8, and FeCl3 concentration of 7% (w/v).

  6. Total-body sodium and sodium excess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aloia, J.F.; Cohn, S.H.; Abesamis, C.; Babu, T.; Zanzi, I.; Ellis, K.

    1980-01-01

    Total-body levels of sodium (TBNa), chlorine (TBCI), calcium (TBCa), and potassium (TBK) were measured by neutron activation and analysis of results by whole body counting in 66 postmenopausal women. The relationship between TBNa, and TBCl, TBK, and TBCa on the one hand, and height and weight on the other, were found to compare with those previously reported. The hypothesis that TBNa and TBCl are distributed normally could not be rejected. The sodium excess (Na/sub es/) is defined as the sodium that is present in excess of that associated with the extracellular fluid (chlorine) space; the Na/sub es/ approximates nonexchangeable bone sodium. In these 66 postmenopausal women, and in patients with different endocrinopathies previously described, the values on Na/sub es/ did not differ from the normal values except in the thyrotoxicosis patients, where they were decreased. A close relationship between Na/sub es/ and TBCa was maintained in the endocrinopathies studied. This relationship was found in conditions accompanied by either an increment or a loss of skeletal mass. It appears that the NA/sub es/ value is primarily dependent upon the calcium content of bone

  7. Chemical constraints governing the origin of metabolism: the thermodynamic landscape of carbon group transformations under mild aqueous conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2002-01-01

    The thermodynamics of organic chemistry under mild aqueous conditions was examined in order to begin to understand its influence on the structure and operation of metabolism and its antecedents. Free energies (deltaG) were estimated for four types of reactions of biochemical importance carbon-carbon bond cleavage and synthesis, hydrogen transfer between carbon groups, dehydration of alcohol groups, and aldo-keto isomerization. The energies were calculated for mainly aliphatic groups composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The energy values showed (1) that generally when carbon-carbon bond cleavage involves groups from different functional group classes (i.e., carboxylic acids, carbonyl groups, alcohols, and hydrocarbons), the transfer of the shared electron-pair to the more reduced carbon group is energetically favored over transfer to the more oxidized carbon group, and (2) that the energy of carbon-carbon bond transformation is primarily determined by the functional group class of the group that changes oxidation state in the reaction (i.e., the functional group class of the group that donates the shared electron-pair during cleavage, or that accepts the incipient shared electron-pair during synthesis). In contrast, the energy of hydrogen transfer between carbon groups is determined by the functional group class of both the hydrogen-donor group and the hydrogen-acceptor group. From these and other observations we concluded that the chemistry involved in the origin of metabolism (and to a lesser degree modern metabolism) was strongly constrained by (1) the limited redox-based transformation energy of organic substrates that is readily dissipated in a few energetically favorable irreversible reactions; (2) the energy dominance of a few transformation half-reactions that determines whether carbon-carbon bond transformation (cleavage or synthesis) is energetically favorable (deltaG +3.5 kcal/mol); and (3) the dependence of carbon group transformation energy on the

  8. Identification of impurities in sodium and its purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbotin, B.I.; Voltchkov, L.G.; Kozlov, F.A.; Zagorulko, Yu.I.; Kuznetsov, E.K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents some investigation results on sodium technology. In particular, a description is given of a calculation method for evaluation of sodium-cover gas-impurities equilibrium compositions as well as experimental results on development of methods for sodium sampling, equipment for non-metallic impurities (oxygen, hydrogen, carbon) constant control in sodium. The investigation results on sodium purification with cold traps are presented

  9. Permafrost conditions in peatlands regulate magnitude, timing, and chemical composition of catchment dissolved organic carbon export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olefeldt, David; Roulet, Nigel T

    2014-10-01

    Permafrost thaw in peatlands has the potential to alter catchment export of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and thus influence downstream aquatic C cycling. Subarctic peatlands are often mosaics of different peatland types, where permafrost conditions regulate the hydrological setting of each type. We show that hydrological setting is key to observed differences in magnitude, timing, and chemical composition of DOC export between permafrost and nonpermafrost peatland types, and that these differences influence the export of DOC of larger catchments even when peatlands are minor catchment components. In many aspects, DOC export from a studied peatland permafrost plateau was similar to that of a forested upland catchment. Similarities included low annual export (2-3 g C m(-2) ) dominated by the snow melt period (~70%), and how substantial DOC export following storms required wet antecedent conditions. Conversely, nonpermafrost fens had higher DOC export (7 g C m(-2) ), resulting from sustained hydrological connectivity during summer. Chemical composition of catchment DOC export arose from the mixing of highly aromatic DOC from organic soils from permafrost plateau soil water and upland forest surface horizons with nonaromatic DOC from mineral soil groundwater, but was further modulated by fens. Increasing aromaticity from fen inflow to outlet was substantial and depended on both water residence time and water temperature. The role of fens as catchment biogeochemical hotspots was further emphasized by their capacity for sulfate retention. As a result of fen characteristics, a 4% fen cover in a mixed catchment was responsible for 34% higher DOC export, 50% higher DOC concentrations and ~10% higher DOC aromaticity at the catchment outlet during summer compared to a nonpeatland upland catchment. Expansion of fens due to thaw thus has potential to influence landscape C cycling by increasing fen capacity to act as biogeochemical hotspots, amplifying aquatic C cycling, and

  10. Carbon Dioxide Concentrations and Temperatures within Tour Buses under Real-Time Traffic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chun-Fu; Chen, Ming-Hung; Chang, Feng-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    This study monitored the carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and temperatures of three 43-seat tour buses with high-passenger capacities in a course of a three-day, two-night school excursion. Results showed that both driver zones and passenger zones of the tour buses achieved maximum CO2 concentrations of more than 3000 ppm, and maximum daily average concentrations of 2510.6 and 2646.9 ppm, respectively. The findings confirmed that the CO2 concentrations detected in the tour buses exceeded the indoor air quality standard of Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (8 hr-CO2: 1000 ppm) and the air quality guideline of Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department (1 hr-CO2: 2500 ppm for Level 1 for buses). Observations also showed that high-capacity tour bus cabins with air conditioning system operating in recirculation mode are severely lacking in air exchange rate, which may negatively impact transportation safety. Moreover, the passenger zones were able to maintain a temperature of between 20 and 25°C during travel, which effectively suppresses the dispersion of volatile organic compounds. Finally, the authors suggest that in the journey, increasing the ventilation frequency of tour bus cabin, which is very beneficial to maintain the travel safety and enhance the quality of travel.

  11. Measurements of mixtures with carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions using commercial high pressure equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Luciana L.P.R. de; Rutledge, Luis Augusto Medeiros; Moreno, Eesteban L.; Hovell, Ian; Rajagopal, Krishnaswamy [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (LATCA-EQ-UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica. Lab. de Termodinamica e Cinetica Aplicada

    2012-07-01

    There is a growing interest in studying physical properties of binary and multicomponent fluid mixtures with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) over an extended range of temperature and pressure. The estimation of properties such as density, viscosity, saturation pressure, compressibility, solubility and surface tension of mixtures is important in design, operation and control as well as optimization of chemical processes especially in extractions, separations, catalytic and enzymatic reactions. The phase behaviour of binary and multicomponent mixtures with supercritical CO{sub 2} is also important in the production and refining of petroleum where mixtures of paraffin, naphthene and aromatics with supercritical fluids are often encountered. Petroleum fluids can present a complex phase behaviour in the presence of CO{sub 2}, where two-phase (VLE and LLE) and three phase regions (VLLE) might occur within ranges of supercritical conditions of temperature and pressure. The objective of this study is to develop an experimental methodology for measuring the phase behaviour of mixtures containing CO{sub 2} in supercritical regions, using commercial high-pressure equipment. (author)

  12. Seasonal carbon storage and growth in Mediterranean tree seedlings under different water conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Pérez, Virginia; Castro-Díez, Pilar; Joffre, Richard

    2009-09-01

    In all Mediterranean-type ecosystems, evergreen and deciduous trees differing in wood anatomy, growth pattern and leaf habit coexist, suggesting distinct adaptative responses to environmental constraints. This study examined the effects of summer water stress on carbon (C) storage and growth in seedlings of three coexisting Mediterranean trees that differed in phenology and wood anatomy characteristics: Quercus ilex subsp. ballota (Desf.) Samp., Quercus faginea Lam. and Pinus halepensis L. Seedlings were subjected to two levels of watering during two consecutive summers and achieved a minimum of -0.5 and -2.5 MPa of predawn water potential in the control and water stress treatment, respectively. Both Quercus species concentrated their growth in the early growing season, demanding higher C in early spring but replenishing C-stores in autumn. These species allocated more biomass to roots, having larger belowground starch and lipid reserves. Quercus species differed in seasonal storage dynamics from P. halepensis. This species allocated most of its C to aboveground growth, which occurred gradually during the growing season, leading to fewer C-reserves. Soluble sugar and starch concentrations sharply declined in August in P. halepensis, probably because reserves support respiration demands as this species closed stomata earlier under water stress. Drought reduced growth of the three species, mainly in Q. faginea and P. halepensis, but not C-reserves, suggesting that growth under water stress conditions is not limited by C-availability.

  13. Carbon Dioxide Concentrations and Temperatures within Tour Buses under Real-Time Traffic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chun-Fu; Chen, Ming-Hung; Chang, Feng-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    This study monitored the carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and temperatures of three 43-seat tour buses with high-passenger capacities in a course of a three-day, two-night school excursion. Results showed that both driver zones and passenger zones of the tour buses achieved maximum CO2 concentrations of more than 3000 ppm, and maximum daily average concentrations of 2510.6 and 2646.9 ppm, respectively. The findings confirmed that the CO2 concentrations detected in the tour buses exceeded the indoor air quality standard of Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (8 hr-CO2: 1000 ppm) and the air quality guideline of Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department (1 hr-CO2: 2500 ppm for Level 1 for buses). Observations also showed that high-capacity tour bus cabins with air conditioning system operating in recirculation mode are severely lacking in air exchange rate, which may negatively impact transportation safety. Moreover, the passenger zones were able to maintain a temperature of between 20 and 25°C during travel, which effectively suppresses the dispersion of volatile organic compounds. Finally, the authors suggest that in the journey, increasing the ventilation frequency of tour bus cabin, which is very beneficial to maintain the travel safety and enhance the quality of travel. PMID:25923722

  14. Tribological behavior of diamond-like carbon: effects of preparation conditions and annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grill, A.; Patel, V.; Meyerson, B.

    1991-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are characterized by, among other properties, very low friction coefficients, high wear resistance, and high corrosion resistance. Depending upon the testing environment, the coefficient of friction can be as low as 0.01. As-deposited films are wear resistant in vacuum as well as in atmospheric ambient. This paper will discuss the general tribological behavior, in different environments, of DLC films deposited under a variety of conditions, and proposed mechanisms explaining the very low friction coefficients observed. The specific properties of DLC films deposited from acetylene by r.f. plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition will then be presented. The films were deposited at substrate temperatures between 100degC and 250degC, at various substrate biases. The films were annealed in vacuum at temperatures up to 590degC. The tribological properties of the as-deposited as well as annealed DLC films will be presented as a function of the deposition parameters. The observed behavior will be discussed and related to other physical properties of the films. (orig.)

  15. Influence of the initial state of carbon nanotubes on their colloidal stability under natural conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwyzer, Irene; Kaegi, Ralf; Sigg, Laura; Magrez, Arnaud; Nowack, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    The colloidal stability of dry and suspended carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the presence of amphiphilic compounds (i.e. natural organic matter or surfactants) at environmentally realistic concentrations was investigated over several days. The suspensions were analyzed for CNT concentration (UV-vis spectroscopy), particle size (nanoparticle tracking analysis), and CNT length and dispersion quality (TEM). When added in dry form, around 1% of the added CNTs remained suspended. Pre-dispersion in organic solvent or anionic detergent stabilized up to 65% of the added CNTs after 20 days of mild shaking and 5 days of settling. The initial state of the CNTs (dry vs. suspended) and the medium composition hence are critical determinants for the partitioning of CNTs between sediment and the water column. TEM analysis revealed that single suspended CNTs were present in all suspensions and that shaking and settling resulted in a fractionation of the CNTs with shorter CNTs remaining predominantly in suspension. - Highlights: → Individually suspended CNTs are present under environment relevant conditions. → The number of suspended CNTs varies depending on the medium composition. → Surfactants at environmental concentrations have no suspending effect on dry CNTs. → Pre-dispersed CNTs are more stable in suspension than dry CNTs. - The colloidal stability of CNTs varies a lot depending on the initial state of the CNTs (dry vs. pre-dispersed), the applied dispersant for pre-suspension, and the composition of the medium.

  16. Adsorption of organic contaminants by graphene nanosheets, carbon nanotubes and granular activated carbons under natural organic matter preloading conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersan, Gamze; Kaya, Yasemin; Apul, Onur G; Karanfil, Tanju

    2016-09-15

    The effect of NOM preloading on the adsorption of phenanthrene (PNT) and trichloroethylene (TCE) by pristine graphene nanosheets (GNS) and graphene oxide nanosheet (GO) was investigated and compared with those of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT), and two coal based granular activated carbons (GACs). PNT uptake was higher than TCE by all adsorbents on both mass and surface area bases. This was attributed to the hydrophobicity of PNT. The adsorption capacities of PNT and TCE depend on the accessibility of the organic molecules to the inner regions of the adsorbent which was influenced from the molecular size of OCs. The adsorption capacities of all adsorbents decreased as a result of NOM preloading due to site competition and/or pore/interstice blockage. However, among all adsorbents, GO was generally effected least from the NOM preloading for PNT, whereas there was not observed any trend of NOM competition with a specific adsorbent for TCE. In addition, SWCNT was generally affected most from the NOM preloading for TCE and there was not any trend for PNT. The overall results indicated that the fate and transport of organic contaminants by GNSs and CNTs type of nanoadsorbents and GACs in different natural systems will be affected by water quality parameters, characteristics of adsorbent, and properties of adsorbate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Compaction of granular carbonates under conditions relevant to diagenesis and fault sealing. Geologica Ultraiectina (332)

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, X.

    2010-01-01

    Carbonate reservoir rocks contain more than 60% of the world’s oil reserves and 40% of its gas reserves. The evolution of the reservoir quality, i.e. their porosity and permeability, is for a large part controlled by compaction due to pressure solution (chemical compaction). Pressure solution also forms an efficient mechanism of fault sealing in carbonate rocks. Moreover, during hydrocarbons production, and after injection of CO2 into carbonate reservoirs, pressure solution may lead to vertic...

  18. The Curing Agent Sodium Nitrite, Used in the Production of Fermented Sausages, Is Less Inhibiting to the Bacteriocin-Producing Meat Starter Culture Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1174 under Anaerobic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verluyten, Jurgen; Messens, Winy; De Vuyst, Luc

    2003-01-01

    Curvacin A is a listericidal bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1174, a strain isolated from fermented sausage. The response of this strain to an added curing agent (sodium nitrite) in terms of cell growth and bacteriocin production was investigated in vitro by laboratory fermentations with modified MRS broth. The strain was highly sensitive to nitrite; even a concentration of 10 ppm of curing agent inhibited its growth and both volumetric and specific bacteriocin production. A meat simulation medium containing 5 ppm of sodium nitrite was tested to investigate the influence of the gas phase on the growth and bacteriocin production of L. curvatus LTH 1174. Aerating the culture during growth had no effect on biomass formation, but the oxidative stress caused a higher level of specific bacteriocin production and led to a metabolic shift toward acetic acid production. Anaerobic conditions, on the other hand, led to an increased biomass concentration and less growth inhibition. Also, higher maximum volumetric bacteriocin activities and a higher level of specific bacteriocin production were obtained in the presence of sodium nitrite than in fermentations under aerobic conditions or standard conditions of air supply. These results indicate that the inhibitory effect of the curing agent is at least partially masked under anaerobic conditions. PMID:12839751

  19. The curing agent sodium nitrite, used in the production of fermented sausages, is less inhibiting to the bacteriocin-producing meat starter culture Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1174 under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verluyten, Jurgen; Messens, Winy; De Vuyst, Luc

    2003-07-01

    Curvacin A is a listericidal bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1174, a strain isolated from fermented sausage. The response of this strain to an added curing agent (sodium nitrite) in terms of cell growth and bacteriocin production was investigated in vitro by laboratory fermentations with modified MRS broth. The strain was highly sensitive to nitrite; even a concentration of 10 ppm of curing agent inhibited its growth and both volumetric and specific bacteriocin production. A meat simulation medium containing 5 ppm of sodium nitrite was tested to investigate the influence of the gas phase on the growth and bacteriocin production of L. curvatus LTH 1174. Aerating the culture during growth had no effect on biomass formation, but the oxidative stress caused a higher level of specific bacteriocin production and led to a metabolic shift toward acetic acid production. Anaerobic conditions, on the other hand, led to an increased biomass concentration and less growth inhibition. Also, higher maximum volumetric bacteriocin activities and a higher level of specific bacteriocin production were obtained in the presence of sodium nitrite than in fermentations under aerobic conditions or standard conditions of air supply. These results indicate that the inhibitory effect of the curing agent is at least partially masked under anaerobic conditions.

  20. Interface conditions for fast-reaction fronts in wet porous mineral materials: the case of concrete carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntean, A.; Böhm, M.

    2009-01-01

    Reaction–diffusion processes, where slow diffusion balances fast reaction, usually exhibit internal loci where the reactions are concentrated. Some modeling and simulation aspects of using kinetic free-boundary conditions to drive fast carbonation reaction fronts into unsaturated porous cement-based

  1. Carbon and Nitrogen dynamics in forest soils depending on light conditions and tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselinovic, Bojana; Hager, Herbert

    2013-04-01

    Climate change mitigation actions under the Kyoto Protocol apply among other decreases of CO2-emissions and/or increases of carbon (C) stocks. As soils represent the second biggest C-reservoir on Earth, an exact estimation of the stocks and reliable knowledge on C-dynamics in forest soils is of high importance. Anyhow, here, the accurate GHG-accounting, emission reductions and increase in C stocks is hampered due to lack of reliable data and solid statistical methods for the factors which influence C-sequestration in and its release from these systems. In spite of good progress in the scientific research, these factors are numerous and diverse in their interactions. This work focuses on influence of the economically relevant tree species - Picea abies, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus spp. - and light conditions on forest floor and mineral soil C and N dynamics in forest soils. Spruce monocultures have been widely used management practices in central European forests during the past century. Such stands are in lower altitudes and on heavy and water logged soils unstable and prone to disturbances, especially to windthrows. We hypothesize that windthrow areas loose C & N and that the establishment of the previous nutrient stocks is, if at all, only possible to be reached over the longer periods of time. We research also how the increased OM depletion affects the change of C & N stocks in forest floor vs. mineral soil. Conversion of such secondary spruce monocultures to site adequate beech and oak forests may enable higher stocks allocated predominantly as stable organic carbon and as plant available nitrogen. For this purpose sites at 300-700 m altitude with planosols were chosen in the region of the Northern Alpine Foothills. A false chronosequence approach was used in order to evaluate the impacts of the tree species and change in light conditions on dynamic of C & N in the forest floor and mineral soil, over the period 0-100 (for oak 120 y.) years. The C- and N

  2. Carbonate precipitation under bulk acidic conditions as a potential biosignature for searching life on Mars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernández-Remolar, David C.; Preston, Louisa J.; Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Izawa, Matthew R.M.; Huang, L.; Southam, Gordon; Banerjee, Neil R.; Osinski, Gordon R.; Flemming, Roberta; Gómez-Ortíz, David; Prieto-Ballesteros, Olga; Rodríguez, Nuria; Amils, Ricardo; Darby Dyar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent observations of carbonate minerals in ancient Martian rocks have been interpreted as evidence for the former presence of circumneutral solutions optimal for carbonate precipitation. Sampling from surface and subsurface regions of the low-pH system of Río Tinto has shown, unexpectedly, that

  3. 21 CFR 522.1145 - Hyaluronate sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hyaluronate sodium. 522.1145 Section 522.1145 Food... Hyaluronate sodium. (a)(1) Specifications. Each milliliter of sterile aqueous solution contains 10 milligrams of hyaluronate sodium. (2) Sponsor. See 000009 in § 510.600(c). (3) Conditions of use—(i) Amount...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1748 - Sodium caseinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium caseinate. 582.1748 Section 582.1748 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1748 Sodium caseinate. (a) Product. Sodium caseinate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  5. 21 CFR 182.1748 - Sodium caseinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium caseinate. 182.1748 Section 182.1748 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1748 Sodium caseinate. (a) Product. Sodium caseinate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  6. Methods for the sodium cooled fast reactor fire safety provisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryaznov, B.V.; Dergachev, N.P.

    1983-01-01

    Problems of fire safety provision on NPPs with sodium cooled fast reactor are under discussion. Methods of sodium leak localization, measures eliminating sodium flaring up during leaks and main means of sodium fire extinguishing are considered. An extinguishing of sodium flaring up is performed by means of sodium temperatUre decrease and by limitation of hydrogen access to the flaring up surface. A conclusion is made that the most effective methods of extinguishing are the following: self-extinguishing (due to hydrogen burning out in a limiting volume); extinguishing by a gas mixture of nitrogen and carbonic acid (initial filling and blowing of rooms during sodium flaring up); extinguishing by special powders

  7. In vitro adhesion of staphylococci to diamond-like carbon polymer hybrids under dynamic flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soininen, Antti; Levon, Jaakko; Katsikogianni, Maria; Myllymaa, Katja; Lappalainen, Reijo; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Kinnari, Teemu J; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Missirlis, Yannis

    2011-03-01

    This study compares the ability of selected materials to inhibit adhesion of two bacterial strains commonly implicated in implant-related infections. These two strains are Staphylococcus aureus (S-15981) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 35984). In experiments we tested six different materials, three conventional implant metals: titanium, tantalum and chromium, and three diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings: DLC, DLC-polydimethylsiloxane hybrid (DLC-PDMS-h) and DLC-polytetrafluoroethylene hybrid (DLC-PTFE-h) coatings. DLC coating represents extremely hard material whereas DLC hybrids represent novel nanocomposite coatings. The two DLC polymer hybrid films were chosen for testing due to their hardness, corrosion resistance and extremely good non-stick (hydrophobic and oleophobic) properties. Bacterial adhesion assay tests were performed under dynamic flow conditions by using parallel plate flow chambers (PPFC). The results show that adhesion of S. aureus to DLC-PTFE-h and to tantalum was significantly (P DLC-PDMS-h (0.671 ± 0.001 × 10(7)/cm(2) and 0.751 ± 0.002 × 10(7)/cm(2) vs. 1.055 ± 0.002 × 10(7)/cm(2), respectively). No significant differences were detected between other tested materials. Hence DLC-PTFE-h coating showed as low susceptibility to S. aureus adhesion as all the tested conventional implant metals. The adherence of S. epidermidis to biomaterials was not significantly (P DLC-PTFE-h films could be used as a biomaterial coating without increasing the risk of implant-related infections.

  8. Soil Organic Carbon in Mangrove Ecosystems with Different Vegetation and Sedimentological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naohiro Matsui

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A large number of studies have been conducted on organic carbon (OC variation in mangrove ecosystems. However, few have examined its relationship with soil quality and stratigraphic condition. Mangrove OC characteristics would be explicitly understood if those two parameters were taken into account. The aim of this study was to examine mangrove OC characteristics qualitatively and quantitatively after distinguishing mangrove OC from other OC. Geological survey revealed that the underground of a mangrove ecosystem was composed of three layers: a top layer of mangrove origin and two underlying sublayers of geologic origin. The underlying sublayers were formed from different materials, as shown by X-ray fluorescence analysis. Despite a large thickness exceeding 700 cm in contrast to the 100 cm thickness of the mangrove mud layer, the sublayers had much lower OC stock. Mangrove mud layer formation started from the time of mangrove colonization, which dated back to between 1330 and 1820 14C years BP, and OC stock in the mangrove mud layer was more than half of the total OC stock in the underground layers, which had been accumulating since 7200 14C years BP. pH and redox potential (Eh of the surface soils varied depending on vegetation type. In the surface soils, pH correlated to C% (r = −0.66, p < 0.01. C/N ratios varied widely from 3.9 to 34.3, indicating that mangrove OC had various sources. The pH and Eh gradients were important factors affecting the OC stock and the mobility/uptake of chemical elements in the mangrove mud layer. Humic acids extracted from the mangrove mud layer had relatively high aliphatic contents, in contrast with the carboxylic acid rich sublayers, indicating that humification has not yet progressed in mangrove soil.

  9. An analysis of the influence of production conditions on the development of the microporous structure of the activated carbon fibres using the LBET method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Mirosław

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents the results of the research on the application of the new analytical models of multilayer adsorption on heterogeneous surfaces with the unique fast multivariant identification procedure, together called LBET method, as a tool for analysing the microporous structure of the activated carbon fibres obtained from polyacrylonitrile by chemical activation using potassium and sodium hydroxides. The novel LBET method was employed particularly to evaluate the impact of the used activator and the hydroxide to polyacrylonitrile ratio on the obtained microporous structure of the activated carbon fibres.

  10. The Formation of Carbide-Free Bainite in High-Carbon High-Silicon Steel under Isothermal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshchenko, N. A.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Mirzaev, D. A.; Buldashev, I. V.

    2017-12-01

    It is shown that a carbide-free bainite structure can be formed in high-carbon steel of the Fe-Si-Mn-Cr-V system using a traditional furnace facility. The structural aspects of bainitic transformation developing under isothermal conditions at 300°C have been studied by the methods of X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Orientation relationships between crystalline lattices of γ and α phases have been established. A superequilibrium carbon concentration in the bainite α phase has been determined.

  11. Test Your Sodium Smarts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You may be surprised to learn how much sodium is in many foods. Sodium, including sodium chloride ... foods with little or no salt. Test your sodium smarts by answering these 10 questions about which ...

  12. Development of sodium technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Sung Tai; Nam, H. Y.; Choi, Y. D.

    2000-05-01

    pressure transient transferred to the IHX will be analyzed. The experimental data will be used for the primary verification of SPIKE code. The verified SPIKE code will be applied to the design of KALIMER secondary ststem an used to analyze the safety of equipment in sodium-water reaction. The hydrogen detector showed the characteristics of hydrogen leak detection delay. In the development of acoustic leak detection technology, considering the design conditions of the KALIMER steam generator, we predicted the limitation of water leak detection, the selection of acoustic sensor, and the construction of the DSP instrument. The experimental and simulated results on the frequencies of acoustic signal according to the leak level were compared

  13. Development of sodium technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Sung Tai; Nam, H Y; Choi, Y D [and others

    2000-05-01

    of pressure propagation and gas flow, and pressure transient transferred to the IHX will be analyzed. The experimental data will be used for the primary verification of SPIKE code. The verified SPIKE code will be applied to the design of KALIMER secondary ststem an used to analyze the safety of equipment in sodium-water reaction. The hydrogen detector showed the characteristics of hydrogen leak detection delay. In the development of acoustic leak detection technology, considering the design conditions of the KALIMER steam generator, we predicted the limitation of water leak detection, the selection of acoustic sensor, and the construction of the DSP instrument. The experimental and simulated results on the frequencies of acoustic signal according to the leak level were compared.

  14. Electrochemical characterization of tenoxicam using a bare carbon paste electrode under stagnant and forced convection conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzmán-Hernández, D.S.; Ramírez-Silva, M.T.; Palomar-Pardavé, M.; Corona-Avendaño, S.; Galano, Annia; Rojas-Hernández, A.; Romero-Romo, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Tenoxicam electrochemical oxidation was studied from aqueous solution with a CPE. ► Both stagnant and forced convection conditions were considered. ► We found tenoxicam electrochemical oxidation is a mass transfer-controlled process. ► An EC mechanism was found where the electrodic and chemical kinetics are fast. ► It was found that in this case n = 2 and E 1/2 = 0.770 V. ► Calculated D was 4.09 × 10 −6 cm 2 s −1 which compares with theoretically estimated. - Abstract: From potentiostatic current transients and voltammetry studies, carried out under both stagnant and forced convection conditions, the tenoxicam electrochemical behavior on a bare carbon paste rotating disk electrode was assessed in an aqueous solution (pH = 0.403). It was found that tenoxicam's electrochemical oxidation is a mass transfer-controlled process where a current peak is clearly formed at around 0.74 V when the potential scan was varied in the positive direction. However, when the potential was switched to the negative direction, up to the initial potential value, no reduction peak was formed. Tenoxicam's electrochemical oxidation follows an EC mechanism where the electrodic and chemical kinetics are fast. From sample-current voltammetry both the number of electrons, n, that tenoxicam losses during its electro-oxidation and its half-wave potential, E 1/2 , were determined to be 2 and 0.770 V vs. Ag/AgCl, respectively. Moreover, from differential pulse voltammetry plots it was confirmed that effectively in this case n = 2. Considering 2 electrons and both the Randles-Sevcik and Cotrell equations, the tenoxicam's diffusion coefficient, D, was determined to be (3.745 ± 0.077) × 10 −6 and (4.116 ± 0.086) × 10 −6 cm 2 s −1 , respectively. From linear sweep voltammetry plots recorded under forced convection conditions, it was found that Levich's equation describes adequately the limiting current recorded as a function of the electrode rotation rate, from

  15. Impact of a sodium carbonate spray combined with professional oral hygiene procedures in patients with Sjögren's syndrome: an explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambino, Alessio; Broccoletti, Roberto; Cafaro, Adriana; Cabras, Marco; Carcieri, Paola; Arduino, Paolo G

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to make an initial estimation on the effects of a sodium bicarbonate and xylitol spray (Cariex ® ), associated with non-surgical periodontal therapy, in participants with primary Sjögren's syndrome. Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a multisystem autoimmune disease that predominantly involves salivary and lachrymal glands, with the clinical effect of dry eyes and mouth. A prospective cohort of 22 women and two men has been evaluated. They were randomized into three groups (eight patients each): Group A) those treated once with non-surgical periodontal therapy, education and motivation to oral hygiene, associated with the use of Cariex ® ; Group B) treated only with Cariex ® ; Group C) treated only with non-surgical periodontal therapy, education and motivation to oral hygiene. Clinical variables described after treatment were unstimulated whole salivary flow, stimulated whole salivary flow, salivary pH, reported pain (using Visual Analogue Scale) and the Periodontal Screening and Recording index. Salivary flow rate improved in all groups, but the difference was statistically significant only in those treated with Cariex ® , alone or in combination with periodontal therapy. Gingival status improved in participants who underwent periodontal non-surgical therapy while remained unchanged in those only treated with Cariex ® . Reported pain decreased in all groups, showing the best result in participants treated with periodontal therapy together with Cariex ® . We propose a practical approach for improving gingival conditions and alleviating oral symptoms in patients with SS. Future randomized and controlled trials are however required to confirm these results as well as larger population, and also assessing other parameters due to oral dryness, possible oral infections and more comprehensive periodontal indices. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Polymerization of sodium methacrylate induced by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvan S, A.

    1998-01-01

    This work has two objectives, first: it is pretended to localize the lines of carbon links in its IR spectra, and second: following the polymerization of sodium methacrylate according to that it is irradiated with gamma rays. (Author)

  17. Public Review Draft: A Method for Assessing Carbon Stocks, Carbon Sequestration, and Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes in Ecosystems of the United States Under Present Conditions and Future Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Bernknopf, Richard; Clow, David; Dye, Dennis; Faulkner, Stephen; Forney, William; Gleason, Robert; Hawbaker, Todd; Liu, Jinxun; Liu, Shu-Guang; Prisley, Stephen; Reed, Bradley; Reeves, Matthew; Rollins, Matthew; Sleeter, Benjamin; Sohl, Terry; Stackpoole, Sarah; Stehman, Stephen; Striegl, Robert G.; Wein, Anne; Zhu, Zhi-Liang; Zhu, Zhi-Liang

    2010-01-01

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), Section 712, authorizes the U.S. Department of the Interior to develop a methodology and conduct an assessment of the Nation's ecosystems focusing on carbon stocks, carbon sequestration, and emissions of three greenhouse gases (GHGs): carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. The major requirements include (1) an assessment of all ecosystems (terrestrial systems, such as forests, croplands, wetlands, shrub and grasslands; and aquatic ecosystems, such as rivers, lakes, and estuaries), (2) an estimation of annual potential capacities of ecosystems to increase carbon sequestration and reduce net GHG emissions in the context of mitigation strategies (including management and restoration activities), and (3) an evaluation of the effects of controlling processes, such as climate change, land use and land cover, and wildlfires. The purpose of this draft methodology for public review is to propose a technical plan to conduct the assessment. Within the methodology, the concepts of ecosystems, carbon pools, and GHG fluxes used for the assessment follow conventional definitions in use by major national and international assessment or inventory efforts. In order to estimate current ecosystem carbon stocks and GHG fluxes and to understand the potential capacity and effects of mitigation strategies, the method will use two time periods for the assessment: 2001 through 2010, which establishes a current ecosystem GHG baseline and will be used to validate the models; and 2011 through 2050, which will be used to assess future potential conditions based on a set of projected scenarios. The scenario framework is constructed using storylines of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report Emission Scenarios (SRES), along with initial reference land-use and land-cover (LULC) and land-management scenarios. An additional three LULC and land-management mitigation scenarios will be constructed for each

  18. Preparation of ultra-fine calcium carbonate by a solvent-free reaction using supersonic airflow and low temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Yan-Hua; Ma, Dong-Mei; Peng, Ru-Fang; Chu, Shi-Jin

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of calcium chloride with sodium carbonate under solvent-free conditions with a supersonic airflow and at a low heating temperature leads to the synthesis of ultra-fine calcium carbonate. The reaction not only involves mild conditions, a simple operation, and high yields but also gives a high conversion rate.

  19. Growth kinetics of vertically aligned