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Sample records for sociology social work

  1. Sociology and Social Work in Nigeria: Characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the evolution of sociology and social work in Nigeria and examines the current characteristics and areas of convergences and divergences in both fields. It was only in the 1960s that universities in Nigeria began to offer degree programmes in sociology with the. first sub-department and full department ...

  2. Evidence and research designs in applied sociology and social work research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgsbro, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    it had to be repeated all over again. This article tries to answer this question by reviewing the considerations in the history of applied sociology and its relevance for recent social work research. The ambition of delivering a research that has an impact on social work practice is not unique, neither...... of applied sociology and discusses its contributions to understanding questions of validity, evidence, methodology, practical relevance of research and scientific legitimacy in the areas of research which aim at contributing to the practical development of social services for marginalized people. By doing...... this, hopefully the history of applied sociology may prevent deeper mistakes, illusions and misleading in the development of social work research today....

  3. Implementation of Writing across the Curriculum (WAC) Learning Approaches in Social Work and Sociology Gerontology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the goals and methods of the international Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) movement in higher education, and WAC-enriched learning approaches that the author used in teaching a social work gerontology practice course and a sociological theories of aging course. The author's in-class, low-stakes, nongraded writing…

  4. Rereading "The Jack-Roller:" Hidden Histories in Sociology and Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Ian

    2009-01-01

    I revisit one of the iconic Chicago School studies, Clifford Shaw's "The Jack-Roller". A naive reading of Shaw's book leaves the reader with a sense of having been inducted into a melange of what we now know as "sociology" and "social work," but which to Shaw seems a coherent stance. I suggest that this is close to the heart of how things were,…

  5. 'Introducing Michael Gove to Loïc Wacquant': Why Social Work Needs Critical Sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Garrett, Paul

    2016-06-01

    In 2013, Michael Gove, then Secretary of State for Education and Health in the UK coalition government, criticised social workers for laying insufficient emphasis on the 'agency' of individuals and for being too preoccupied with social and economic inequalities. Such a perspective, which is not unique to Gove, needs to be countered by reaffirming the significance of an expansively critical sociology for social work. In this context, the thematic concerns of the French theorist, Loïc Wacquant, illuminates key aspects of social work engagement with clients which Gove and his ideological associates appear intent on ignoring. The issues raised have significant political resonances given the pending UK General Election taking place in May 2015.

  6. Social History and Historical Sociology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Knöbl

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with exchanges and misunderstandings between the German school of social history (most prominently represented by scholars from the University of Bielefeld (such as Hans-Ulrich Wehler and Anglo-American trends in historical sociology (exemplified by the works of Barrington Moore, Theda Skocpol and Michael Mann. The social historians tended to dismiss historical sociology as too dependent on modernization theory, without taking into account the critique of that tradition by authors who brought processes of state formation and revolutionary change into the debate. On the other side, mainstream historical sociology worked with assumptions that limited its ability to change the terms and directions of sociological discourse, and to assimilate lessons from history. Among these inbuilt biases, organizational realism and materialism – particularly pronounced in the work of Michael Mann – stand out as particularly important. The paper closes with arguments in favour of bringing more history into historical sociology, with particular emphasis on three sets of problems. There is a need for more historical approaches to differentiation, less dependent on functionalist premises than the hitherto prevalent paradigm. A more explicit thematization of temporality in history and society would, among other things, help to clarify issues linked to the notion of path dependency. Finally, a reconsideration of the models and types of explanation in historical sociology would place more emphasis on their interpretive dimension.

  7. Social History and Historical Sociology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Knöbl

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with exchanges and misunderstandings between the German school of social history (most prominently represented by scholars from the University of Bielefeld (such as Hans-Ulrich Wehler and Anglo-American trends in historical sociology (exemplified by the works of Barrington Moore, Theda Skocpol and Michael Mann. The social historians tended to dismiss historical sociology as too dependent on modernization theory, without taking into account the critique of that tradition by authors who brought processes of state formation and revolutionary change into the debate. On the other side, mainstream historical sociology worked with assumptions that limited its ability to change the terms and directions of sociological discourse, and to assimilate lessons from history. Among these inbuilt biases, organizational realism and materialism - particularly pronounced in the work of Michael Mann - stand out as particularly important. The paper closes with arguments in favour of bringing more history into historical sociology, with particular emphasis on three sets of problems. There is a need for more historical approaches to differentiation, less dependent on functionalist premises than the hitherto prevalent paradigm. A more explicit thematization of temporality in history and society would, among other things, help to clarify issues linked to the notion of path dependency. Finally, a reconsideration of the models and types of explanation in historical sociology would place more emphasis on their interpretive dimension.

  8. Sociological interpretation of social problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Katsora

    2015-04-01

    The article considers such sociological approaches to social problems as social pathology, social disorganization, functional and critical approaches, the approach of value conflict, constructionsite approach and the approach of «labelling». Each approach has its own peculiarities of consideration of social problems, that is related with the historical period in which it arose and settled down, and the views of members of a particular sociological approach to social problems. Also, the article discusses the main advantages and disadvantages of sociological approaches to dealing the social problems.

  9. ‘Introducing Michael Gove to Loïc Wacquant’: Why Social Work Needs Critical Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Garrett, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, Michael Gove, then Secretary of State for Education and Health in the UK coalition government, criticised social workers for laying insufficient emphasis on the ‘agency’ of individuals and for being too preoccupied with social and economic inequalities. Such a perspective, which is not unique to Gove, needs to be countered by reaffirming the significance of an expansively critical sociology for social work. In this context, the thematic concerns of the French theorist, Loïc Wacquant, illuminates key aspects of social work engagement with clients which Gove and his ideological associates appear intent on ignoring. The issues raised have significant political resonances given the pending UK General Election taking place in May 2015. PMID:27559203

  10. Sociological theory and social reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Díez Nicolás

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper pretends to demonstrate the complementary relations between three relatively recent sociological theories, each one of which explains a different aspect of the same social object: the origin, diffusion and change of social and cultural values, aiming at demonstrating that there is not such a thing as a sociological theory that explains all, but rather diverse theories that offer partial explanations of social reality. To that effect, and on the basis of the necessary relationship between theory and research, three different theories are evaluated separately: Hawley’s and Duncan’s theory of the social ecosystem, Galtung’s centre-periphery theory, and Inglehart’s theory of values’ change in modern-industrial societies, offering theoretical and empirical evidence of their complementary relations, based on Spanish and international data. Social ecosystem and centre-periphery theories show a high level of generalization (through space and time and a high level of abstraction, though both can easily operationalize their main concepts through valid and reliable indicators. The theory of values’ change, however, though showing a high level of generalization, is limited in time to the historical period after World War II, and also shows a high level of abstraction. Centre-periphery theory and values’ change theory use individual and collective units of analysis, but social ecosystem theory only uses collective units, by definition. The three theories lead to the conclusion that ‘security’ values will gain a growing importance in present societies.

  11. Collaborative learning in communities : 6th International conference on sociology and social work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, E.; de Kreek, M.; Huber, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    As the state retracts further in the Netherlands, the role of civil society increases. Only now the impact becomes visible due to changing arrangements in the social domain. Since enormous cuts in the welfare budgets have been implemented; creative innovations by civil initiatives are much needed to

  12. Social inequality: philosophical and sociological reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sh. Victorov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Social inequality is the phenomena that is hypothetically the base for first human communities genesis. Modern model for capitalist society as market relations form fails to satisfy the needs of society’s social development, and strongly requires to create new social knowledge structure and new approach for inequality sociology theory development. Our study conceptual logic comprises routine, philosophic and ideological reflexions analysis to create new social inequality definition in the context of new sociologic knowledge structure. Social inequality is the one of key problems in global sociology; the need is obvious to extract social inequality into separate discipline. Inequality sociology target is the decision of theoretical and practical problems in the formation of comprehensive knowledge about inequality phenomena in modern community, and in the development of common and specialized theoretical-methodological base for inequality study.

  13. Sociological social workers: a history of the present?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, Ian Frank

    2015-01-01

    I argue that there is a submerged cluster of people who, at one or other stage of their careers, took positions in relation to social problems, social work practice, modes of understanding, and research practice that reflected and anticipated ? knowingly or not ? something we might call a Chicago......-enriched sociological social work. They are Harriett Bartlett, Stuart Queen, Ada Sheffield, Erle Fisk Young and Pauline Young. Several of the themes that emerge from a review of their work are today, as then, as much sociology as social work. In closing, I consider three questions. How can we generally explain...

  14. Latin american sociology's contribution to sociological imagination: analysis, criticism, and social commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Vicente Tavares-dos-Santos

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper tackles the role played by sociology in the analysis of the transformation processes in the Latin American societies, in following the construction process of both State and Nation, and in questioning the social issues in Latin America. Six periods of sociology in Latin America and in the Caribbean Islands are analyzed: (i sociology's intellectual inheritance; (ii the authoritative-teaching sociology; (iii the "scientific sociology" period and the configuration of the "critical sociology"; (iv the institutional crisis, consolidation of the "critical sociology", and the diversification of sociology; (v the sociology of authoritarianism, of democracy, and of exclusion; and (vi the institutional consolidation and the worldization of sociology in Latin America (from the year 2000 on. It can be said that the distinctive features of the sociological knowledge in the continent have been: internationalism, hybridism, critical approach to the processes and conflicts in the Latin American societies, and social commitment on the part of the sociologist.

  15. Pure sociology and social geometry as an example of formal sociological theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škorić Marko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes pure sociology and social geometry of Donald Black as an example of formal sociological theory. Starting with the importance of formal and analytical theory in sociology, we present the bold theoretical strategy and/or the paradigm of the sociology of behavior of social life. The examples of pure sociology and social geometry concerning law, violence and homosexuality are presented as well. A review and critique of pure sociology as a scientific formal theory is offered in the end.

  16. The Sociological Imagination and Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hironimus-Wendt, Robert J.; Wallace, Lora Ebert

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we maintain that sociologists should deliberately teach social responsibility as a means of fulfilling the promise that C. Wright Mills envisioned. A key aspect of the sociological imagination includes a sense of social responsibility, but that aspect is best learned through a combination of experience and academic knowledge.…

  17. Teaching the Sociology of Gender and Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffre, Patti; Anderson, Cynthia; Bird, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes two teaching strategies from our workshop, "Teaching the Sociology of Gender and Work," that can help students understand the mechanisms and consequences of workplace gender inequality at the macro- and micro-levels. Cynthia Anderson's class project uses wage and sex composition data that allows students to learn actively how…

  18. A sociological examination of international placement learning by British social work students in children’s services in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Ashencaen Crabtree

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses research findings into a study of UK student learning on international social work placements in Malaysia in collaboration with two Malaysian universities: Universiti Sains Malaysia and Universiti Malaysia Sarawak. The discussion focuses on those placements taking place in children’s services: residential care and community-based support programmes. The aim of the study was to explore how social work students adapt to unfamiliar learning situations in new cultural contexts with the goal of increasing cultural competence. Data were drawn from formal but anonymised student learning exercises as a non-assessed requirement of this particular placement. Findings indicated a wide range of responses towards social work practice with vulnerable children in the Malaysian context in terms of student constructions of care and abuse. Subject to an analytical schema, the collision or adaptation of otherwise normative professional and personal values are examined in detail.

  19. Social kapital og økonomisk sociologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2003-01-01

    Hvad er social kapital? Vi søger at besvare dette spørgsmål i en tværvidenskabelig tilgang, som forener økonomi og sociologi. Dette sker i tre dele. Det generelle økonomiske udgangspunkt er hentet fra New Institutional Economics (NIE) med dets fokus på asymmetrisk information og deraf følgende...

  20. Sociology, Hypocrisy, and Social Order

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ANBR

    influence of the US fought the former Soviet Union because it regarded communism as an affront .... that they will bring up policies that will make Africans poorer. Ghana ... social and economic rights for people of colour. So much .... are levelled against the former President and his friends over use/misuse of public funds in ...

  1. Durkheim's Sociology of Education: Interpretations of Social Change Through Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Marc A.

    1976-01-01

    Three questions are examined: (1) Why have contemporary American educators generally ignored Durkheim's sociology of education? (2) What were Durkheim's contributions to the sociology of education as his analysis related to social change through education? and (3) What is the relationship between Durkheim's sociology of education, social change,…

  2. Sociological Theory and Social Reality [ENG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN DÍEZ NICOLÁS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper pretends to demonstrate the complementary relations between three relatively recent sociological theories, each one of which explains a different aspect of the same social object: the origin, diffusion and change of social and cultural values, aiming at demonstrating that there is not such a thing as a sociological theory that explains all, but rather diverse theories that offer partial explanations of social reality. To that effect, and on the basis of the necessary relationship between theory and research, three different theories are evaluated separately: Hawley?s and Duncan?s theory of the social ecosystem, Galtung?s centre-periphery theory, and Inglehart?s theory of values? change in modern-industrial societies, offering theoretical and empirical evidence of their complementary relations, based on Spanish and international data. Social ecosystem and centre-periphery theories show a high level of generalization (through space and time and a high level of abstraction, though both can easily operationalize their main concepts through valid and reliable indicators. The theory of values? change, however, though showing a high level of generalization, is limited in time to the historical period after World War II, and also shows a high level of abstraction. Centre-periphery theory and values? change theory use individual and collective units of analysis, but social ecosystem theory only uses collective units, by definition. The three theories lead to the conclusion that ?security? values will gain a growing importance in present societies.

  3. Revising laboratory work: sociological perspectives on the science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobér, Anna

    2017-09-01

    This study uses sociological perspectives to analyse one of the core practices in science education: schoolchildren's and students' laboratory work. Applying an ethnographic approach to the laboratory work done by pupils at a Swedish compulsory school, data were generated through observations, field notes, interviews, and a questionnaire. The pupils, ages 14 and 15, were observed as they took a 5-week physics unit (specifically, mechanics). The analysis shows that the episodes of laboratory work could be filled with curiosity and exciting challenges; however, another picture emerged when sociological concepts and notions were applied to what is a very common way of working in the classroom. Laboratory work is characterised as a social activity that is expected to be organised as a group activity. This entails groups becoming, to some extent, `safe havens' for the pupils. On the other hand, this way of working in groups required pupils to subject to the groups and the peer effect, sometimes undermining their chances to learn and perform better. In addition, the practice of working in groups when doing laboratory work left some pupils and the teacher blaming themselves, even though the outcome of the learning situation was a result of a complex interplay of social processes. This article suggests a stronger emphasis on the contradictions and consequences of the science subjects, which are strongly influenced by their socio-historical legacy.

  4. Social Change and Sport: A Sociological Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yılmaz KAPLAN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to discuss the relation between social change and sports from a sociological point of view. This study is descriptive in its aim, periodic (discussion in the length of time it covers and theoretical based on literature in its techniqu e. “Social change” is a value judgement - free concept which does not indicate a direction but determines the new situation, the difference occurring in the society compared to the former era or situation. Every society changes in time; however, it cou ld at times be „‟positive‟‟ (in the direction of development, progress, etc... and „‟negative‟‟ at other times (in the direction of regress, deconstruction, etc.... As a social institution, sport, while affecting some social institutions (family, edu cation, economics, politics, religion, communication, healthcare, law, is also affected by them. The process of social change has affected, moreover, has determined sports. As a social event, phenomenon, and institution, sports gains its meaning in the society that it takes place; and it both gets affected by the changes in the society and affects these changes there. It could be the „‟reason‟‟ and the „‟result‟‟ of social changes. Radical changes in the sports and even in the rules of branche s of sports are made depending on the changing social needs, preferences and expectations. Although there isn‟t an obligatory relation between „‟social progress‟‟ and „‟sports‟‟ theoretically, it can be said that the process of social progress contributes to sports and vice versa.

  5. Teaching Writing in Sociology: A Social Constructionist Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Leon; Holt, Mara

    1990-01-01

    Provides an overview of the "social constructionist" approach to teaching composition in sociology courses. Describes a course that is team taught by the authors and is based on the social constructionist paradigm. Stresses that sociological writing is a special type of discourse that can be taught most effectively by sociologists who…

  6. READING OUR SOCIAL WORDS: UTILIZING NOVELS IN TEACHING SOCIOLOGY COURSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd. Ghofur

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the assignments used to analyze the novel using sociological concepts as well as the general outcomes. Students report enjoying the book and they are less hesitant to dig into difficult issues such as alcoholism, violence, sexuality, racism, and other forms of inequality. The ability to examine events on both macro- and microlevels improves over the course of the semester and students often integrate examples from the novels into class discussion and other assignments. The use of cultural artifacts such as film, poetry, music, or novels in sociology courses is certainly not a new phenomenon. As with other instructors, one of my main goals of using these types of materials, including novels, is to encourage active learning by students, as they are often comfortable working with these materials and can relate them to their own lives. Students are able to use their creativity and enhance their critical thinking skills when using cultural artifacts as tools of understanding sociological concepts. Novels in particular, offer a unique means to cover a wider range of social issues than can often be addressed in an introduction to sociology course. Another challenge of the course itself is to explore the complexities of diversity in society. Due to the pace of the course, students often maintain some sort of emotional or intellectual distance from the issues we examine, often discussing social issues as being outside of or disconnected from their own reality. Novels help to humanize the topics we cover as students often feel a connection with one or more main characters, which then helps them to apply the characters’ experiences to their own lives.

  7. Classical sociology and cosmopolitanism: a critical defence of the social.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bryan S

    2006-03-01

    It is frequently argued that classical sociology, if not sociology as a whole, cannot provide any significant insight into globalization, primarily because its assumptions about the nation-state, national cultures and national societies are no longer relevant to a global world. Sociology cannot consequently contribute to a normative debate about cosmopolitanism, which invites us to consider loyalties and identities that reach beyond the nation-state. My argument considers four principal topics. First, I defend the classical legacy by arguing that classical sociology involved the study of 'the social' not national societies. This argument is illustration by reference to Emile Durkheim and Talcott Parsons. Secondly, Durkheim specifically developed the notion of a cosmopolitan sociology to challenge the nationalist assumptions of his day. Thirdly, I attempt to develop a critical version of Max Weber's verstehende soziologie to consider the conditions for critical recognition theory in sociology as a necessary precondition of cosmopolitanism. Finally, I consider the limitations of some contemporary versions of global sociology in the example of 'flexible citizenship' to provide an empirical case study of the limitations of globalization processes and 'sociology beyond society'. While many institutions have become global, some cannot make this transition. Hence, we should consider the limitations on as well as the opportunities for cosmopolitan sociology.

  8. Actor-networking ceta-sociality, or, what is sociological about contemporary whales?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blok, Anders

    2007-01-01

    -network theory (ANT) allows for the inclusion of non-human ‘actants' (like whales) into the fabric of sociality. In the ontology of ANT, sociality emerges as semiotic-material configurations of humans, animals and technologies. Starting from a critical review of the work by Adrian Franklin on growing......-denser networks of humans and non-humans, sociology is in need of theoretical reconfiguration. Towards this end, some prospects and limitations for ecologising sociology are set out, suggesting how sociology might come to contribute to the project of living in a hybrid world....

  9. Fifty years of sociological leadership at Social Science and Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Stefan; Tietbohl, Caroline

    2018-01-01

    In this review article, we examine some of the conceptual contributions of sociology of health and illness over the past fifty years. Specifically, we focus on research dealing with medicalization, the management of stigma, research on adherence and compliance, and patient-doctor interaction. We show how these themes that originated within sociology, diffused in other disciplines. Sociology in Social Science and Medicine started as an applied research tradition but morphed into a robust, stand-alone social science tradition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Understanding Teachers' Pedagogical Choice: A Sociological Framework Combining the Work of Bourdieu and Giddens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Understanding teachers' pedagogical choice provides a new insight into the influences on student achievement. This paper presents a sociological framework developed from the work of Pierre Bourdieu and Anthony Giddens that identify the complex social interactions which surround teacher's work. The framework examines teachers' potential to act…

  11. Theories of social mobility in the history of sociological thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Baturenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article evolution of theories of social mobility in the history of social thought from the classical period of development until the end of the XX century is analyzed. The author describes the main directions of theoretical interest of research of this problem and their peculiar features. The main questions raised by classics of the sociological theory were actual during all XX century, and empirical research of a problem of social mobility resulted in concentration of attention of scientists on more specific questions, in particular such as studying of professional career, reproduction of the social statuses that promoted emergence of separate discipline in the western sociology, so-called to “sociology of a course of life”, investigating biographic mobility.

  12. About the Phenomenological Statute of Social Issues: The Beginning of a Pure Sociology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Belvedere

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is part of a forthcoming book on the problems of social phenomenology, based on readings of the work of Alfred Schutz and his significance for contemporary social theory. Here, we will concentrate on the preliminary problems of a pure sociology. We will investigate the meaning of the categorial act according to Husserl, aiming to enlighten the fundamental question of the ontological statute of social issues. We will notice that a longstanding sociological tradition, which begins with Durkheim and continues until Schutz, has faced this issue in an unfruitful way. We will see, in both works, a “Kantian dilemma” which we believe would find solution in the Husserlian conception of the categorial act. We hope to make, with this work, a modest contribution to a future pure sociology.

  13. SOCIAL MEASUREMENT OF YOUTH’S HEALTH: DESIGNING OF INDICATORS OF COMPLEX SOCIOLOGICAL RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitalii Valeriyevich Kulish

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article is devoted to solving the problem of social measurement of modern youth’s health. The subject of the analysis is the content of the concept, characteristics and indicators of the social health of young people, which enable using sociological research’ methods to measure a given status of the younger generation in contemporary Russian society. The purpose of this work is to define the theoretical and methodological foundations of the sociological analysis of the young people social health and to substantiate its main indicators in the tools of complex sociological research. Methodology of the study. The basis of the research is formed by the system approach, the complex approach, the logical-conceptual method and general scientific methods of research: comparative analysis, system analysis, construction of social indicators, modeling. Results. The social health of young people is defined through the category “status” and is considered as an integrated indicator of the social quality of the younger generation. It is substantiated that the social health of youth is a status of socio-demographic community in which it is able not only to adapt to the changing conditions of the social environment but is also ready to transform actively the surrounding reality, having the potential to resist destructive social phenomena and processes. The main indicators that allow measuring the social health of young people by sociological methods are determined: adaptability in the social environment, social activity in all spheres of public life, social orientation and significance of activity, behavior regulativity by social norms and universal values, creativity of thinking and behavior, readiness for social integration and self-development. A system of social indicators and indicators for conducting a sociological study of social health in historical memory, value orientations and everyday practices of young people has been developed.

  14. Back to Class and Status: Or Why a Sociological View of Social Inequality Should Be Reasserted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Goldthorpe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Of late, issues of social inequality have assumed a new political centrality in many western societies. However, in much discussion of these issues, sociological approaches to the analysis of social inequality have been disregarded, especially in the work of economists and epidemiologists. The main features of the sociological approach are the emphasis given to inequality in a relational rather than a merely attributional sense, and to the distinction between social class and social status as two qualitatively different forms of social stratifi cation. Two cases serve to illustrate the limitations and dangers that result from neglecting the conceptual and empirical work undertaken by sociologists: the study of intergenerational social mobility by economists and the study of the consequences of social inequality for health and related social problems by epidemiologists.

  15. The challenge of the social sciences: The impact of Sociology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The challenge of the social sciences: The impact of Sociology among first year students. JF Graaff. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Article Metrics. Metrics Loading ... Metrics powered by PLOS ALM

  16. Methodology for studying social advertising: A sociological aspect

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    S B Kalmykov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the author’s dynamic processual methodology for the sociological study of social advertising that combines the multiversion paradigmatic approach, legitimization procedures, methodological principles of interconnection, multilevel analysis and the principles of sociological data formalization developed by P. Lazarsfeld. The author explains the multi-stage strategy of the methodology and the research procedures that provide new sociological knowledge about the processes of social advertising. The first stage involves analysis of the social advertising as a number of institutional, communicative, socio-cultural and socio-technological processes. The second stage consists of the development of the substantive aspects of social advertising dynamics and its dependence on the features of different socio-demographic groups. The third stage of the methodology includes a comparative analysis of the social advertising theoretical and empirical aspects and the subsequent assessment of its fundamental and applied capabilities. The author identifies two types of research practices: the first one consists of three levels of complexity - the first one is to design the social advertising categories and concepts; the second one requires a higher level of generalization; the third one supposes justification of the universal categorization and the social advertising conceptualization for different social areas as well as a comparative analysis of the theory of the social advertising impact developed by O.O. Savel’eva with the research results for the aims of the promotion of the sociology of advertising. The article concludes with the demonstration of the proposed methodology universality for different spheres of social reality.

  17. Sociology of education, comparative education and social problems: A Polish comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelazkiewicz, Marek

    1981-12-01

    The interaction and co-operation between the sociology of education and comparative education may lead to the realisation of the three basic functions of science: descriptive, explanatory and operative. A presentation of these issues is difficult because of the blurring of lines of division between related scientific disciplines. In the past two decades, Polish sociology has developed without experiencing any serious inner conflicts. Two basic orientations — empirical and humanistic — have co-existed, and the Marxist approach has gradually become more firmly established. The sociological approach applied to the sciences can be viewed as first, the adoption of sociological concepts and theories; and secondly, the application of the methods and techniques used in sociological research. The history of the relationship between the sociology of education and comparative education goes back to the works of J. Chałasiński in the 'thirties: he approached the school as a social institution functioning in a system of social relations and social groups, such as classes, vocational groups, nations and states. The application and impact of the sociological approach is evident in the methodological foundations of pedagogy — as e.g., in the work of Muszyński in 1975 — and also in many specific fields of comparative education. The so-called humanistic orientation and the descriptive function have predominated over empirical studies and the explanatory function in these areas. The 1973 Report of the Committee of Experts, on the state of education in Poland, was the result of co-operation between sociologists end educationists. This enterprise brought about the actualisation of the operative function of both scientific disciplines. However, the situation in Poland today raises new questions needing to be answered.

  18. Social inequalities in post-reform Russia: A sociological diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M K Gorshkov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers social inequality as a key feature of the development of the contemporary society and social sciences. On the one hand, it is an objective and progressive process without which successful (creative development of society and individual is impossible; on the other hand, it may lead to dramatic social stratification, provoke a growth of social tensions, and destabilize society. In the Russian scientific discourse the social inequalities and their consequences are explained with the help of two concepts - social-stratification structure, i.e. a multidimensionally organized social space in which social groups differ in terms of possession of power, property and social status; and social strata , i.e. social-economic groups occupying different and unequal places in the macro-social system. The author uses a wide range of empirical (statistical and sociological data to present the picture of social model in the contemporary Russian society focusing on the dramatic stratification in terms of wealth and the income gap (the decile ratio widening to a critical mark; interpreting the Russian data in the international context (the current and optimum decile ratio in different countries; identifying statistical and sociological indicators for measuring different aspects of social inequality (for instance, the differentiation of incomes as the deviation of the actual income distribution from absolutely equal; emphasizing regional differences in social inequalities in Russia; and discussing possible mechanisms and means of mitigating social inequalities. The second part of the article presents the results of the national sociological research conducted by the experts of the Institute of Sociology and underlies some other dimensions of social inequalities as gender relations and an access to modern computer technologies and telecommunications and their correct use. The author concludes that the high level of social-economic and other types

  19. Status Convergence: A Sociological Investigation of Undocumented Students' Legal and Collegiate Social Statuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Alejandra; Alleman, Nathan F.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the role of college in how undocumented students make meaning of their identity through the concept of status ownership. Using a sociological framework that drew upon Kaufman and Feldman's (2004) work, this study calls attention to the social context in the college experience and offers insight into this student…

  20. Book Review of: "The Social Context View of Sociology "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Schmidt

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Readers seeking coherent sociological explanations for social inequality and oppression also will be disappointed in the book's content. The authors' focus on structural influences on social experiences glosses over experiences of oppression and inequality important to Marxist, feminist, and other 'conflict theory' traditions. However, The authors offer a book that will satisfy those who seek a book that is easily readable, replete with examples, and offers a coherent structurally focused overview of sociology. The authors draw on Marvin Olsen's (1968 nine layers of social organization to provide a framework for exploring major issues and institutions. The authors’ teaching experience shows in their ability to pace the material and use their model's levels of analysis to organize each chapter.

  1. Sociological study and provisions for social reasonability of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sappa, N.N.; Mordovenko, D.N.

    1993-01-01

    Aspects of sociologic investigations into the problems of nuclear power conducted in different countries are considered. Annual large-scale analysis allows one to follow the dynamics and define trend in the public opinion and to form respectively the strategy of work with the public

  2. Ciencias Sociales, Sociología y pobreza en Guatemala Social Sciences, Sociology, and poverty in Guatemala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar S. G. Mendoza

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Desde una perspectiva de la sociología del conocimiento de Karl Mannheim se puede comprender el estado del arte de los estudios de pobreza en Guatemala en un escenario entre 1980 y 2004. La justificación del trabajo se debe a la ausencia de una investigación que trate de entender el desarrollo del tema en las Ciencias Sociales en Guatemala y que demuestre su importancia a través de experiencias teóricas y metodológicas. Se puede decir que la investigación sobre la pobreza no ha sido sistemática ni continua debido al proceso social y político que ha vivido el país, no obstante se afirma con toda certeza que existe un corpus bibliográfico heterogéneo y considerable entre 1980-2004. La investigación tuvo como objetivo realizar un balance de las tendencias teóricas y metodológicas de los estudios en los últimos 20 años. Debo apuntar que la bibliografía sobre pobreza es bastante amplia e inevitablemente mereció seleccionar una muestra de los trabajos más representativos e innovadores, no sólo en las dos décadas analizadas, sino también en sus temas. No se puede entender los estudios de pobreza alejados de la Ciencias Sociales y de los procesos históricos, políticos, económicos y sociales de Guatemala y la relación con otros campos de conocimiento en Centroamérica y América Latina.From the perspective of Karl Mannheim's sociology of knowledge, it is possible to understand the state of the art of poverty studies in Guatemala between 1980 and 2004. This work is justified by the lack of investigations looking into the development of Social Sciences in Guatemala and it demonstrates its importance through theoretical and methodological experiences. Investigation on poverty can be said to have been neither systematic nor continued, due to the social and political process the country has undergone. Nevertheless, it can also be sustained that there is a heterogeneous and considerable bibliographic corpus between 1980-2004. This

  3. Goffman's Dramaturgical Sociology: Developing a Meaningful Theoretical Context and Exercise Involving "Embarrassment and Social Organization."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David K.

    2003-01-01

    Depicts a useful participatory exercise in teaching Erving Goffman's dramaturgical sociology by drawing upon his essay about embarrassment and social organization. Argues the need to devise new ways to involve students in sociological theorists' insights. (Author/KDR)

  4. The social service as part of social protection: sociology management aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Meschan

    2015-06-01

    The main directions of improving the management of social maintenances on the basis of sociology and management approach, improve the regulatory framework; Approval social standards; introduce a mechanism of social order as a form of cross­sector partnership for social development of the social services.

  5. Actor-networking ceta-sociality, or, what is sociological about contemporary whales?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blok, Anders

    2007-01-01

    theory (ANT) allows for the inclusion of non-human ‘actants' (like whales) into the fabric of sociality. In the ontology of ANT, sociality emerges as semiotic-material configurations of humans, animals and technologies. Starting from a critical review of the work by Adrian Franklin on growing......In contemporary urban Euro-American societies, whales have become hugely popular and iconic creatures, arousing controversies more intense than most other instances of animal politics. How to account sociologically, however, for the dramatic social transformation of whales, from natural resource...... to near-sacrosanct agent, is far from self-evident. This article advocates a change of theoretical perspective, inspired by the work of actor-network theorists Bruno Latour and Michel Callon. Rather than focussing solely on the ‘humanity' of human-animal relations, as does most of sociology, actor-network...

  6. Mindful Social Work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debaene, Raf

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Mindfulness gets growing attention in the education and practice of social work. It is seen as an important source of inspiration for social work and as a counterbalance for the rationalization of social work. Hick states that mindfulness “is an orientation to our everyday experiences that can be cultivated by means of various exercises and practices. By opening up in a particular way to their internal and external experiences, social workers and clients are better able to understand what is happening to them in both a psychological and sociological sense. With this understanding, people are better able to see the variety of ways in which they can respond. Habitual reactions are more easily avoided, and inner peace and balance are developed” (Hick 2009: 1. Despite this praise of mindfulness as an important source of inspiration and the expectation that its popularity might expand in the next century, it is argued in this essay by Raf Debaene that mindfulness, although possibly very useful in some settings, had very little to do with social work.

  7. Study on sociological approach to resolve maintenance related social problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Takayuki

    2007-01-01

    This study proposes a sociological approach to resolve maintenance related social problems. As a result of consideration, the followings were found. (1) In general, solutions to some kinds of questions can be deduced from basic laws using some theories or methodologies in the field of the natural science or engineering. The approach to resolve maintenance related social problems is similar to the approach in the natural science or engineering. (2) The points of view based on fundamental human rights, market principles and community principles, and so on, are very important in resolving maintenance related social problems and can be placed as theories or tools for resolution. (3) If such theories or tools for resolving maintenance related social problems as described above are systematically prepared, it is estimated that it becomes very much easier to resolve maintenance related social problems. (author)

  8. Sociology of Social Documentary Photography in Forming Social Movements and its Effect on Iran Islamic Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Rahman Setayesh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Photography is taken as one of the modern disciplines of the art world. Social documentary photography, with its realistic, impartial and truthful nature, is aimed at keeping a record of social events. It is a document of an event happened in front of the camera which may symbolize history and identity of a society. As a science, sociology has emerged concurrently. Sociology of art is aimed at introducing the art or style of a given era which has been created by a given society. Reflection and formation are two significant approaches of sociology of art. It is aimed to highlight the effect of sociology of photography in forming social movements especially Iran Islamic revolution.

  9. Rescuing from oblivion: social characteristics and career destinations of early British 'sociology' graduates, 1907-39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husbands, Christopher T

    2015-12-01

    Those students who were among the first sociology graduates in the UK barely feature in standard histories of the discipline, which all have an intellectual and institutional focus. This article remedies this neglect by researching the social backgrounds and later careers of sociology graduates from the London School of Economics and Political Science [LSE] and Bedford College for Women from the first such graduate in 1907 until those graduating in the 1930s. Data for this exercise were compiled from a variety of sources. The more important are: UK censuses, especially that of 1911; various civil registration records; archived student files; and, for the graduates who entered university teaching, issues of the Yearbook of the Universities of the Empire [later the Commonwealth Universities' Yearbook]. The dataset includes all identified graduates in the BSc(Econ), Special Subject Sociology, degree from 1907 to 1935 and all in the BA (Honours) in Sociology degree from 1925 to 1939. LSE sociology graduates tended to be older and to have more cosmopolitan backgrounds, with fathers more likely than for Bedford College graduates to come from commercial rather than professional backgrounds. Both institutions' graduates' careers tended to the Civil Service and local government. LSE graduates gravitated to education, especially to higher education if male, whilst those of Bedford College went into welfare work, countering a stereotype from some previous literature that especially women graduates were heavily constrained to follow careers in schoolteaching. The article also gives comparisons with the social-class profile and career destinations of several cohorts of postwar sociology graduates, noting a number of similarities. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2015.

  10. [Sociology of health, social ecology and media democracy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julesz, Máté

    2012-05-27

    The correlation of the sociology of health, social ecology and media democracy is demonstrated in the study. In societies of today, the role of the media is unquestionable in disseminating information relating to health and the environment. According to Paragraph (1) of Article XXI of the Hungarian Constitution of 2011, everyone has the right to a healthy environment. An environmentalist media democracy may forward environmental justice, environmental education, and environmentalist economy, etc. All these are required in order to establish a society where the healthy environment is an objective value.

  11. Looking for Work: The Coverage of Work in Canadian Introductory Sociology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Shane Michael; Quirke, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the textual coverage of the topic of work in Canadian English--language introductory sociology textbooks. Our findings are based on a content analysis of 21 Canadian texts published between 2008 and 2012. We found that only 12 of 21 textbooks included a chapter on work, suggesting that work occupies a peripheral position in…

  12. Social Studies Student Teachers' Levels of Understanding Sociology Concepts within Social Studies Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatekin, Kadir

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at investigating social studies student teachers' levels of understanding sociology concepts within social studies curriculum. Study group of the research consists of 266 teacher candidates attending the Department of Social Studies, Faculty of Education, Kastamonu University during 2012 to 2013 education year. A semi-structured…

  13. [Disciplinary organization of medical sociology--a contribution to the dialogue with social medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegrist, J

    1996-10-01

    According to Karl Popper scientific disciplines are characterized by a body of observational knowledge, a specific methodology and terminology and a set of more or less successful theories. This article tries to delineate the disciplinary structure of medical sociology in terms of five important areas of knowledge: 1. sociology of health lifestyles (prevention); 2. sociology of patients careers (rehabilitation); 3. sociology of client-professional interaction (diagnosis, therapy); 4. sociological (social epidemiological) studies of causes of health and disease; 5. sociology of health care systems. It is argued that intensified exchange according to these areas between the academic disciplines of medical sociology and social medicine is needed to generate a significant impact on future training and research both in medicine and in public health.

  14. Scientific Discovery in Deep Social Space: Sociology without Borders

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph Michalski

    2008-01-01

    Globalization affords an excellent opportunity to develop a genuinely universal, scientific sociology. In recent decades the politicization of the discipline has undermined the central mission of sociology: scientific discovery and explanation. The paper identifies several intellectual shifts that will facilitate the expansion and communication of such a science in an emerging global village of sociological analysts: 1) breaking with classical sociology to build upon innovative theoretical id...

  15. [Pierre Bourdieu and health: a sociological analysis of Actes de la Recherche en Sciences Sociales].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagner, Miguel Angelo

    2008-07-01

    This study aimed to highlight, illustrate, describe, and comment on the presence of the health category in the work of Pierre Bourdieu, by underlining the themes traditionally related to the sociology of the body. After a systematic analysis of his work in the sociology of medicine and health, the article also addresses the main vehicle for his line of thought, namely Actes de la Recherche en Sciences Sociales, viewed here as the prime channel for most of the research taking Bourdieu's "genetic structuralism" as the main theoretical reference. We analyze the articles published from 1975 to 2001, from the thematic and theoretical/conceptual perspective, by comparing the changes appearing in this journal in opposition to the model previously adopted by the Revue Française de Sociologie.

  16. A sociological stance on fatigue and tiredness: Social inequalities, norms and representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loriol, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Fatigue is complex, representing simultaneously a physiological, psychological and social phenomenon. The sociological approach attempts to understand the experience of fatigue and its characterization at diverse periods and in various social contexts. After giving a sociological history of different forms of fatigue through the ages (acedia, melancholy, neurasthenia, chronic fatigue syndrome, etc.), this article proposes a social epidemiology of fatigue in the current period. Objectification of working and living conditions allows us to illustrate social inequalities in fatigue and exhaustion, but seems to contradict dominant social representations of fatigue today. It invites a critical discussion of contemporary theories of fatigue (such those of Alain Ehrenberg or Byung-Chul Han), which consider that fatigue is a condition of modern man, overwhelmed by his freedom. More modestly, analysis of the fatigue presented here rests on the capacity to be able to find a good balance between too much investment in work or life (which is exhausting) and not enough investment (which leads to boredom and lack of self-fulfillment). This balance depends on fragile and specific social norms in different professional or social circles and cannot be defined a priori. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Sociological Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Charles; Middleton, Mike

    This monograph examines sociological perspectives and their applications. It is intended to help the college student coming to sociology for the first time to recognize that there are several perspectives within sociology and to disentangle the mass of terms associated with each. The first distinctive sociological perspective came from the work of…

  18. Big and broad social data and the sociological imagination: A collaborative response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Housley

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we reflect on the disciplinary contours of contemporary sociology, and social science more generally, in the age of ‘big and broad’ social data. Our aim is to suggest how sociology and social sciences may respond to the challenges and opportunities presented by this ‘data deluge’ in ways that are innovative yet sensitive to the social and ethical life of data and methods. We begin by reviewing relevant contemporary methodological debates and consider how they relate to the emergence of big and broad social data as a product, reflexive artefact and organizational feature of emerging global digital society. We then explore the challenges and opportunities afforded to social science through the widespread adoption of a new generation of distributed, digital technologies and the gathering momentum of the open data movement, grounding our observations in the work of the Collaborative Online Social Media ObServatory (COSMOS project. In conclusion, we argue that these challenges and opportunities motivate a renewed interest in the programme for a ‘public sociology’, characterized by the co-production of social scientific knowledge involving a broad range of actors and publics.

  19. Applying Sociology through Social Marketing: Student Reflections on an Intimate Violence Awareness Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzog, Jodie; Williams, Renee

    2007-01-01

    Introducing students to sensitive social issues like intimate violence in lower level courses can spark their sociological imaginations motivating them to do further research in order to gain reflective knowledge about such topics. In order to promote two course objectives: (1) recognizing and applying sociological concepts and theories, and (2)…

  20. Teaching for Social Justice: Motivations of Community College Faculty in Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sonia; Blount, Stacye; Dickinson, Charles A.; Better, Alison; Vitullo, Margaret Weigers; Tyler, Deidre; Kisielewski, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This article evaluates the reasons for career choice and job satisfaction among community college faculty who teach sociology, in relation to a social justice motivation for teaching. Using closed- and open-ended response data from a 2014 national survey of community college sociology faculty, this study finds that a preponderance of faculty do…

  1. Social Realism and the Problem of the Problem of Knowledge in the Sociology of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Rob

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines from a Social Realist perspective a set of issues in the sociology of education regarding the problem of knowledge. It focuses upon the issue of relativism associated with the constructionist approach that since the time of the New Sociology of Education in the 1970s has constituted in different forms the dominant perspective…

  2. Vertical Relationships on the Workplace and their Influence on Employee's Work Motivation: Sociology Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Krösslová, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Subject of this bachelor's thesis is "Vertical relationships at the workplace and theirs influence on employee's work motivation". In the theoretical part, I defined key words, such as: Motivation, vertical and horizontal relationships, work sociology etc. I also stated concepts, related to work sociology and motivation. Practical part deals with the qualitative research (case study), which relates to vertical relationships on workplace as one of the key points of work motivation. That resear...

  3. The idea of philosophical sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernilo, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    This article introduces the idea of philosophical sociology as an enquiry into the relationships between implicit notions of human nature and explicit conceptualizations of social life within sociology. Philosophical sociology is also an invitation to reflect on the role of the normative in social life by looking at it sociologically and philosophically at the same: normative self-reflection is a fundamental aspect of sociology's scientific tasks because key sociological questions are, in the last instance, also philosophical ones. For the normative to emerge, we need to move away from the reductionism of hedonistic, essentialist or cynical conceptions of human nature and be able to grasp the conceptions of the good life, justice, democracy or freedom whose normative contents depend on more or less articulated conceptions of our shared humanity. The idea of philosophical sociology is then sustained on three main pillars and I use them to structure this article: (1) a revalorization of the relationships between sociology and philosophy; (2) a universalistic principle of humanity that works as a major regulative idea of sociological research, and; (3) an argument on the social (immanent) and pre-social (transcendental) sources of the normative in social life. As invitations to embrace posthuman cyborgs, non-human actants and material cultures proliferate, philosophical sociology offers the reminder that we still have to understand more fully who are the human beings that populate the social world. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2014.

  4. Public Sociology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    by the media? Does the choice of public sociology mean the relinquishment of scientific integrity and critical conviction? These questions will also be addressed in this book - together with a host of others related to the topic of public sociology.   The chapters included in this book are all manuscripts......What is the role of sociology in society? How can - and should - sociology contribute with insights relevant and useful to the outside world? Is sociology attuned to accommodate the demands of the wider public and of surrounding society? Who benefits from the knowledge produced and provided...... by sociology? What are the social implications and cultural effects of the knowledge sociology provides and creates? All of these questions, and many others, concern and centre on sociology's relationship to the surrounding society, in short to the ‘public'. All of these questions - and many others...

  5. Computer-Assisted Instruction in Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Walter H.

    After a discussion of the need for analyzing knowledge bases in the areas of psychology, Freudian concepts, child development, and the sociology of students entering a master's program in social work, this report examines concepts of simulation, straight line, and branching in computerized teaching, the diagnostic evaluation possibilities of…

  6. Sociology, Basis for the Secondary-School Subject of Social Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieke Meijs

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reformulates the question of ‘sociology, who needs it’ in two ways, The first question we address is that of the reason why the educational system itself did not come to sociology for help in their long quest for a clear-cut content of the subject. The second question is why sociology did not adopt the orphaned subject of social studies back in 1960. The answer to the first question lies in the vulnerability of a subject that is dependent for its continued existence on the political leanings of the day. This led to a new goal for the subject almost every decade: from social education in the sixties and social and political education in the seventies, to a focus on citizenship education in the nineties. Although the objective was renamed on several occasions, the prescriptive viewpoint is recognizable in each. This perspective is difficult to reconcile with a social science content. The answer to the second questions points towards Dutch social scientists with a strong focus on academic sociology and not for critical, policy or public sociology. This choice was also made in order to win the competition with psychologists and for the discipline to get rid of the poor image it had acquired in the 1960s. The new subject social sciences, with a strong focus on science made it possible for sociology to become the pillar of this new subject.

  7. Defining the public, defining sociology: hybrid science-public relations and boundary-work in early American sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael S

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, I examine how scientific disciplines define their boundaries by defining the publics with whom they engage. The case study is an episode in the development of early American sociology. In response to the dual challenge of credibility set up by the conflict between religious Baconian science and secular positivist science, key actors engaged in specific strategies of boundary-work to create their desired "sociological public"--a hybrid form of science-public relations that appealed to hostile university scientists while excluding a supportive religious audience from participation in the production of scientific knowledge. Using this case, I offer two specific insights. First I illustrate how, in the pursuit of scientific credibility, actors engage in boundary-work to differentiate audiences, not just practitioners. Such defining of publics is constitutive of scientific disciplines in their formative stage. Second, I demonstrate how audience boundaries can be redefined through the capture of existing boundary objects. Specifically, the removal of informational content in key boundary objects creates durable boundaries that are difficult to overcome.

  8. Peculiarities of medical sociology: application of social theories in analyzing health and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminskas, Raimundas; Darulis, Zilvinas

    2007-01-01

    To reveal the peculiarities of medical sociology introducing the application of social theories in analyzing public health and medicine. Comparative and descriptive analysis of scientific references found and current situation. During the last decade of the 20th century, the discussions about the sociology of health and medicine as separate discipline and its practical applications became more active. Main factors determined the growing importance of discipline were institutionalization of medicine and health care, changing patterns in doctor-patient relationships, different health perceptions, understanding of the influence of social factors on health, cardinal changes in the area of health technologies, consumeristic attitude towards health, appearance of market relationships within health care, and other global phenomena. In sociology, usual social theories such as structural functionalism, conflict, symbolic interaction, poststructuralism, feminist often attempt to explain the changes within health care. There is a relation of medical sociology and other types of sociology having common areas with medicine and health being analyzed in the article; social theories and their application in the field of health and medicine are being introduced attempting to explain the ongoing social changes in both Lithuania and the world. More and more attention in various areas of medical activities is being paid to the social aspects (both individual and society levels) of these activities, and there is a shift from applied sociology towards medical one. Despite the cessations of the development of medical sociology as separate branch of sciences, the researches of recent years are demonstrating obvious approaching modern research issues and methods, which do exist in contemporary world. Such tendencies show the prompt approaching of the academic community of Lithuania the general scientific standards which are dominating in the globalization-effected world.

  9. Meet the Authors of "Social Context View of Sociology" by Marty Zusman, David Knox and Tracie Gardner:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marty E. Zusman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Social Context View of Sociology by Marty E. Zusman, David Knox, and Tracie Gardner (2009 is an introductory sociology textbook published by Carolina University Press (ISBN 978-1-59460-572-7. The purpose of writing The Social Context View of Sociology was to provide a unique perspective of the social world. More importantly, to avoid what we consider the sometimes confusing introduction of the discipline (by standard textbooks into diverse frameworks, we presented a basic typology.

  10. Formulation of work stress in 1960-2000: analysis of scientific works from the perspective of historical sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väänänen, Ari; Anttila, Erkko; Turtiainen, Jussi; Varje, Pekka

    2012-09-01

    During the latter part of the 20th century, work stress became an important societal issue and a huge amount of scientific attention went to studying it. This paper examines the process of formulating and defining the concept of work stress in the occupational health sciences and in industrial and organizational psychology from the early 1960s to the late 1990s. The empirical material of the study encompasses 108 scientific articles, books, book chapters, 'state of the art' reviews, book reviews, and written conference presentations. The data are analysed in the frameworks of historical sociology, critical psychology, and the anthropology of knowledge. We argue that work stress as a life-structuring concept gained ground in psychosocial and occupational health sciences (and also in lay understanding) in the 1960s simultaneously with the rise of social reformist movements that called for fundamental changes emphasizing democratic and human-orientated work organizations and socially responsible values. With the passing of time, however, the focus on structural improvement of work life waned and the emphasis shifted towards the apolitical occupational health aspects of work stress. Researchers with a psychological orientation emphasized micro-level characteristics as factors affecting work stress, whereas stress-orientated epidemiologists turned to the study of specific occupational stress models and/or risk factors. The emergence and development of work stress research can be seen as a chain of attempts to define and identify new risks and experiences occurring in work life. The process, driven by a gradual shift from industrial environments towards organizational frameworks characterized by social and psychological dimensions, reflected the overall shift towards modern democratic work life and the information society in which employees' emotions and well-being became an issue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Social responsibility of ukrainian media as a subject of sociological annalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Nazarenko

    2016-06-01

    In terms of fundamental transformations of modern Ukrainian society problem of social responsibility requires deep analysis. Her study of a new one and requires investigation. Continuing our study will be useful for further sociological analysis of problems of social responsibility in the context of media.

  12. Interface Methods Renegotiating relations between digital social research, STS and the sociology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marres, N.; Gerlitz, C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a distinctive approach to methods development in digital social research called ‘interface methods’. We begin by discussing various methodological confluences between digital media, social studies of science and technology (STS) and sociology. Some authors have posited

  13. Sociologie filmique et travail The Filmic Sociology and the World of Work Sociología fílmica y trabajo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Sebag

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cet article définit les grandes lignes de la sociologie filmique en les appliquant au travail. À la fois outils d’investigation et d’expression, la caméra puis le cinéma requièrent une maîtrise de l’écriture cinématographique pour que le documentaire sociologique advienne. À partir de deux de ses réalisations, l’une sur le travail ouvrier et l’autre sur le travail de manager, l’auteur montre comment le cinéma dit autrement ce qu’exprime l’imprimé. La co-production des savoirs entre réalisateur et personnage des films apparaît comme l’un des enjeux de la sociologie filmique, en particulier à partir des entretiens dont les sociologues ont alors à inventer de nouvelles utilisations. Enfin, les questions de distanciation et de point de vue posés à la sociologie en général traversent cet article puisqu’elles se posent ici avec acuité : la caméra montre indirectement le point de vue duquel le cinéaste regarde le social et le montage vient affiner ses choix. En annexe, quatorze propositions indiquent les orientations que pourraient emprunter la sociologie filmique.This article defines the main contours of the filmic sociology by applying them to the world of work. As tools of investigation and expression, cameras (and cinema as a whole require a mastery of cinematographic writing in order that sociological documentaries might exist. Based on two of these productions – one involving blue collar work and the other managerial work – the author demonstrates the difference between what cinematographic expression and the printed word communicate. The co-production of knowledge between the director of a film and the characters therein is depicted as one of the main challenges facing the filmic sociology, particularly where this entails interviews with new uses that sociologists have yet to invent. Otherwise, the article deals with the « distanciation » and point of view issues that preoccupy sociology in

  14. An approach from the sociology of the body to social movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Patricio Sossa Rojas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article has as aim articulate two somewhat separate perspectives of the sociological current debate:The sociology of the social movements and the sociology of the body. In this respect, we look to problematized three things. First, why the relevance of the category body, especially the nude, as form and / or resource in the protests. Second, from the thought of Foucault how the social thing interferes in the body, in phenomena as personal as sexuality or family. Finally, from the tensions outlined in section two, we discuss how this gives rise to movements that have claims related to the body, and what theory of social movements is the best to explain it.

  15. [Non-reciprocal social exchange is a health risk: a medical sociological research model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegrist, J

    2002-02-01

    Contrary to a reductionist disease concept prevailing in molecular medicine, a systemic disease concept is emphasised in this sociopsychosomatic approach towards analysing disease as a result of disturbed social exchange among people. More precisely, violations of the norms of social reciprocity in core social roles in adult life, in particular in the work role, are assumed to trigger stressful experience with adverse long-term consequences for health. The model of effort-reward imbalance at work provides an illustrative case of nonreciprocal social exchange. It defines distinct conditions in which an imbalance between high efforts spent and low rewards received in turn is maintained by the workers. In this model social rewards are analysed in terms of money, esteem and promotion prospect including job security. The contribution summarises results from 6 international prospective and cross-sectional epidemiological investigations testing the model of effort-reward imbalance at work with regard to different health indicators (especially coronary heart disease, hypertension, depression, alcohol dependence). In all instances an elevated risk of illness is observed among those who experience non-reciprocal social exchange in terms of effort-reward imbalance at work, compared to people who are free from this type of stressful experience. Results are derived from logistic regression analysis adjusting for the effects of potential confounders. In view of this evidence the medical sociological approach outlined here may be helpful in contrasting a reductionist concept of disease with a systemic concept centred around the sociopsychosomatic aspects of human health and disease. Copyright 2002 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg

  16. Social Work Agonistes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoesz, David

    2008-01-01

    Social work should be founded on a powerful network of diverse practitioners applying the social sciences to advance social welfare today. Instead, social work education operates under the guise of identity politics, reserving its highest appointments for the politically correct and members of under-represented groups, with little concern for…

  17. Philosophy, history and sociology of science: interdisciplinary relations and complex social identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, Hauke

    2014-12-01

    Sociology and philosophy of science have an uneasy relationship, while the marriage of history and philosophy of science has--on the surface at least--been more successful I will take a sociological look at the history of the relationships between philosophy and history as well as philosophy and sociology of science. Interdisciplinary relations between these disciplines will be analysed through social identity complexity theory in oider to draw out some conclusions on how the disciplines interact and how they might develop. I will use the relationships between the disciplines as a pointer for a more general social theory of interdisciplinarity which will then be used to sound a caution on how interdisciplinary relations between the three disciplines might be managed.

  18. The social construction of facts and artefacts: or How the sociology of science and the sociology of technology might benefit each other

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinch, Trevor J.; Bijker, Wiebe E.

    1984-01-01

    The need for an integrated social constructivist approach towards the study of science and technology is outlined. Within such a programme both scientific facts and technological artefacts are to be understood as social constructs. Literature on the sociology of science, the science-technology

  19. Globalizing Policy Sociology in Education: Working with Bourdieu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingard, Bob; Rawolle, Shaun; Taylor, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    This paper uses Bourdieu to develop theorizing about policy processes in education and to extend the policy cycle approach in a time of globalization. Use is made of Bourdieu's concept of social field and the argument is sustained that in the context of globalization the field of educational policy has reduced autonomy, with enhanced cross-field…

  20. Children's Work Under Market Conditions. (Findings of a Sociological Survey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashchenko, G. M.; Plotkin, M. M.; Shirinskii, V. I.

    1997-01-01

    Reports on the results of a survey of more than 1200 Russian adolescents concerning the conflict between work and education commitments. Reveals that almost one in four students work parttime, mainly in unskilled jobs, to purchase fashionable goods. Discusses implications and possible responses to this situation. (MJP)

  1. Sociology of Hidden Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Moradi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the concept of hidden curriculum in the sociological theories and wants to explain sociological aspects of formation of hidden curriculum. The main question concentrates on the theoretical approaches in which hidden curriculum is explained sociologically.For this purpose it was applied qualitative research methodology. The relevant data include various sociological concepts and theories of hidden curriculum collected by the documentary method. The study showed a set of rules, procedures, relationships and social structure of education have decisive role in the formation of hidden curriculum. A hidden curriculum reinforces by existed inequalities among learners (based on their social classes or statues. There is, in fact, a balance between the learner's "knowledge receptions" with their "inequality proportion".The hidden curriculum studies from different major sociological theories such as Functionalism, Marxism and critical theory, Symbolic internationalism and Feminism. According to the functionalist perspective a hidden curriculum has a social function because it transmits social values. Marxists and critical thinkers correlate between hidden curriculum and the totality of social structure. They depicts that curriculum prepares learners for the exploitation in the work markets. Symbolic internationalism rejects absolute hegemony of hidden curriculum on education and looks to the socialization as a result of interaction between learner and instructor. Feminism theory also considers hidden curriculum as a vehicle which legitimates gender stereotypes.

  2. Social Determinants of Health - contributions from European Health and Medical Sociology Determinantes sociales de la salud - Contribuciones de la sociología médica y de la salud europea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Siegrist

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available

    A major domain of recent research in health or medical sociology is concerned with social determinants of health, and more specifically with the explanation of social inequalities in health. Substantial input to this research was provided by European medical sociologists and social epidemiologists. In this article, I give a short review of the current state of art in explaining the social gradient of health, pointing to five complementary approaches: social selection, health care provision, early life deprivation, unhealthy lifestyles, and material and psychosocial stressors/resources in adult life. This latter explanation is discussed in more detail with regard to health-adverse working and employment conditions. New scientific evidence on the influence of poor quality of work on physical and mental health is presented, with particular reference to two sociological models of stressful work, demand control and effort-reward imbalance. Moreover, their contribution towards explaining unequal adult health is discussed in the frame of two hypotheses, the mediation and the effect modification hypothesis. In conclusion, substantial sociological input and progress of the sub-specialty of health or medical sociology was achieved in recent past, and this new knowledge is already being applied in various contexts of health and social policy.

    Uno de los principales temas de las investigaciones recientes de la sociología médica o de la salud tiene que ver con los determinantes de la salud, o más específicamente con las inequidades sociales en salud. Sociólogos de la medicina o epidemiólogos sociales europeos han realizado sustanciales aportes al respecto. En este artículo realizo una breve revisión del actual estado de la cuestión sobre el gradiente social en salud, teniendo como referencia cinco aproximaciones complementarias: selección social, provisión de servicios de salud, penurias en los primeros años de vida, estilos de vida poco

  3. Team Dynamics. Essays in the Sociology and Social Psychology of Sport Including Methodological and Epistemological Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenk, Hans

    This document contains nine essays on the sociology and social psychology of team dynamics, including methodological and epistemological issues involved in such study. Essay titles are: (1) Conflict and Achievement in Top Athletic Teams--Sociometric Structures of Racing Eight Oar Crews; (2) Top Performance Despite Internal Conflict--An Antithesis…

  4. Seventh Grade Social Studies. A Program in Sociology and American History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Patricia; And Others

    GRADES OR AGES: Seventh grade. SUBJECT MATTER: Sociology and American history. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide covers five units: "Biological Basis of Human Behavior,""How We Become Human,""The Family and Other Socializing Institutions,""Man's Behavior in Groups and Crowds," and "Minority Group Problems." The presentation of the…

  5. Co-­Teaching Social Research Methods in a Joint Sociology/Anthropology Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthei, Jennifer; Isler, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    In the course of developing and co-­teaching Social Research Methods (SRM), an interdisciplinary, upper-­division undergraduate course at the University of Illinois at Springfield (UIS), the authors discovered that this type of partnership is ripe ground for exploring integration of anthropology and sociology on epistemological and methodological…

  6. Social Theory, Sacred Text, and Sing-Sing Prison: A Sociology of Community-Based Reconciliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Victoria Lee

    2002-01-01

    Examines the sociological component of the urban community-based professional education programs at New York Theological Seminary offered at Sing-Sing Prison. Explores the simultaneous use of social theory and sacred texts as teaching tools and intervention strategies in the educational and personal transformation processes of men incarcerated for…

  7. Sociological, Postmodern, and New Realism Perspectives in Social Constructionism: Implications for Literacy Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruby, George G.

    2001-01-01

    Offers an historical definition of social constructionism, a review of its conceptual bases, and an exploration of its epistemological implications. Describes a history comprised of three paradigmatically distinct waves: a sociological, a postmodern, and an emerging third wave grounded in new realism or neonaturalism. Suggests potential uses of…

  8. Social Issues and Problem-Based Learning in Sociology: Opportunities and Challenges in the Undergraduate Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglitis, Daina S.; Buntman, Fran L.; Alexander, Dameon V.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the use of problem-based learning (PBL) in the undergraduate sociology classroom. PBL shifts students from the role of passive listeners and learners to active knowledge builders and communicators through the use of concise and engaging social problem cases. PBL creates opportunities for building substantive area knowledge,…

  9. Social Problems in Athletics; Essays in the Sociology of Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, Daniel M., Ed.

    This book is an outgrowth of a conference on "Sport and Social Deviance," attended by people interested in the newly emerging interdisciplinary area concerned with the social scientific analysis of sport, play, and games. This anthology, which has contributions from many different authors, is intended to provide social scientists, physical…

  10. Behaviour change and social blinkers? The role of sociology in trials of self-management behaviour in chronic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Bie Nio; Rogers, Anne; Kennedy, Anne; Bower, Peter; Sanders, Tom; Morden, Andrew; Cheraghi-Sohi, Sudeh; Richardson, Jane C; Stevenson, Fiona

    2014-02-01

    Individual-focused self-management interventions are one response to both an ageing society and the purported increase in chronic conditions. They tend to draw on psychological theories in self-management interventions, but over-reliance on these theories can reinforce a narrow focus on specified attitudinal and behavioural processes, omitting aspects of living with a chronic condition. While advances have been made in health behaviour change theory and practice, scant attention has been paid to the social, with the question of social context remaining under-theorised and under-explored empirically. This is particularly noticeable in trials of behaviour change interventions for self-management. The common sociological critique is that these ignore context and thus no explanation can be given as to why, for whom and under what circumstances a treatment works. Conversely, sociologists are criticised for offering no positive suggestions as to how context can be taken into account and for over-emphasising context with the risk of inhibiting innovation. This article provides an overview of these issues and provides examples of how context can be incorporated into the rigid method of trials of self-management for chronic conditions. We discuss modifications to both trial interventions and design that make constructive use of the concept of context. © 2014 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2014 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Ethnic Problems in Sociological Work in Market Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    N E Aimautova; Leniungo ZhB Onzimba; O A Trykina

    2013-01-01

    The article considers some problems arising when a sociologist renders services to the customer; a general description of a modern sociologist's activities is given where their results can be seen as “goods”. The work of a sociologist fulfilled to order, is seen as something providing for managerial activities. At the same time, the sociologist taking the order either defines his individual position, or he does not. There may exist different limitations for the sociologist's self-identificati...

  12. Ethnic Problems in Sociological Work in Market Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N E Aimautova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers some problems arising when a sociologist renders services to the customer; a general description of a modern sociologist's activities is given where their results can be seen as “goods”. The work of a sociologist fulfilled to order, is seen as something providing for managerial activities. At the same time, the sociologist taking the order either defines his individual position, or he does not. There may exist different limitations for the sociologist's self-identification in a situation of ethical conflict in relation to interaction with the customer: political and general life views, philosophical and academic approaches, moral and ethical principles and values, situational characteristics etc.

  13. Social Climate Change: A Sociology of Environmental Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Manning

    2003-01-01

    Democracy demands that public policy ultimately reflect evolving social thought. However, in the nonmarket realm of public land management, and environmental policy more broadly, where price signals that drive the free-market economy are generally lacking, this requires a concerted effort on the part of social science to measure and monitor societal values and related...

  14. Social Work and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlert, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Interest has grown in the past few years about the place of social work in science. Questions remain, such as whether social work should be considered a science, and if so, where it fits into the constellation of sciences. This article attempts to shed light on these questions. After briefly considering past and present constructions of science…

  15. Existential Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald F. Krill

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The existential impact upon social work began in the 1960’s with the emphasis upon freedom, responsibility and a sense of the absurd. It affirmed human potential while faulting the deterministic thinking that was popular with psychological theorists at that time. It was open to the prospects of spirituality, but was less than optimistic concerning great progress among social institutions. It was a forerunner to the strengths-based social work programs of our present day.

  16. Requerimientos laborales para Ciencias Sociales: Una mirada a sociología y trabajo social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Iturrieta-Olivares

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo tiene como finalidad describir algunos de los requerimientos del mercado laboral chileno para las profesiones de las ciencias sociales, en particular para la sociología y el trabajo social. En el entendido que las profesiones son dinámicas, interactúan entre ellas y se influyen mutuamente, intentando mantener sus jurisdicciones laborales y agregar otras nuevas, se desarrolló una investigación empírica, enmarcada en el paradigma explicativo con enfoque cuanti-cualitativo, para conocer las actuales tendencias sobre la superposición de los límites profesionales entre tales profesiones. De manera que, luego de revisar avisos de ofertas laborales, y hacer encuestas a empleadores, sociólogos y trabajadores sociales en ejercicio, además de entrevistar a estos últimos, es posible concluir que ambas profesiones confluyen en el campo de la intervención social directa, compartiendo requisitos referidos al tiempo y tipo de experiencia; al nivel de estudios; y los conocimientos exigidos por el mercado laboral. A partir de esta realidad se insta a las instituciones de educación superior del país y a los órganos del Estado chileno competentes en esta materia, a regular la oferta formativa para trabajadores sociales, y a definir de modo perentorio, concreto y exhaustivo, los campos laborales, áreas de desempeño y perfiles profesionales de cada una de estas carreras, ello con el afán de tener profesionales que se sientan retribuidos e integrados y de la necesaria cohesión social del país.

  17. Ice, Ice, Baby? A Sociological Exploration of Social Egg Freezing

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, K.

    2016-01-01

    Social egg freezing is a fertility preservation strategy which enables women to preserve a number of healthy unfertilised eggs for potential future use when faced with the threat of age-related fertility decline. The overall aim of this thesis was to explore how women understand, construct and experience social egg freezing in the context of debates surrounding reproductive ‘choice’ and ‘delayed motherhood’. The study sought to provide insights into how women perceive the risks and benefi...

  18. The Sociology and Social Science of ‘Evil’: Is the Conception of Pedophilia ‘Evil’?

    OpenAIRE

    Javaid, A

    2015-01-01

    This paper approaches 'evil' from sociological and social science perspectives, using them to increase our insight into the concept of 'evil' since they have long neglected direct analyses of 'evil'. For example, sociology has focused on questions of the good, treating its other as an absence or a residual category. Durkheim suggested to avoid using common sense categorisations, without exploring their social construction as social fact. Therefore, because 'evil' is a common sense conception,...

  19. The social nature of health and illness--evolution of research approaches in Polish classical medical sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piątkowski, Włodzimierz; Skrzypek, Michał

    2012-01-01

    The cognitive identity of medical sociology has developed in a historical perspective in the context of a specific double frame of reference comprising medicine and general sociology. The purpose of this study is to reconstruct the process of the development of the subdiscipline's research specificity in Poland, drawing attention to the general-sociological context of the conceptualization of basic interpretive and analytical sociomedical categories. In this aspect, the presented study is based on the analysis of Polish sociomedical and general-sociological research published from the early 1960s until 1989. The purpose of the study is also to describe in this perspective the structure of the research field of contemporary Western medical sociology, which was a major point of reference in this process. A look at the chronology of how the scientific identity of medical sociology developed in Poland from a historical perspective shows the gradual balancing-out of the subdiscipline's medical references, typical of the early stage of its development, and manifested in the implementation of research projects for the requirements of doctors, through consistently developed and cultivated connections with general sociology manifested in complementing the knowledge of society with aspects related to health and illness. A sine qua non condition for undertaking this scope of research was to work out strictly sociological formulations of these concepts, which was accomplished as a result of the successful reception of general sociology by the subdiscipline in question. The contemporary understanding of the research field of Polish medical sociology defined by Magdalena Sokołowska and developed as part of the 'school of medical sociology', which she initiated, is characterized by the maintenance of close relations with general sociology (affiliations of sociomedical departments in academic sociological institutions, etc.), and at the same time, by partnership cooperation with

  20. Sociology of Jurisprudential and Social Aspects of Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Barfi

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available This research analyzes the issue from the jurisprudential and social aspects. The social aspect focuses on the existing viewpoints regarding the grounds for addiction and also looks into the jurisprudential decrees by Shiite and Sunni jurisprudents regarding opium, hashish and tobacco. In other words, the research focuses on the impacts of jurisprudential decrees on social issues and vice-versa. The research in order to offer strong proof for subjects under discussion conducts documental studies and extracts jurisprudential, historical and scientific texts. In all, this research promotes one’s knowledge about the chronology of drugs including opiates, hashish and tobacco, their side effects, reasons behind drug addiction and jurisprudential decrees in this regard from the viewpoint of jurisprudents. From the viewpoint of social philosophy it raises the thought that there is a dialectic relationship between the thought and the environment and necessitates the need for changes in jurisprudential thoughts. As far as is applied aspect is concerned, it offers solutions for preventing drug addiction.

  1. Environmental sociology as the broadest framework for a research of the globalizing social reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pušić Ljubinko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The all-encompassing processes of globalization have contributed in a large measure to the confusion within scholarly attempts to decode its comprehensiveness, its causes, and its scope. The premise of this article is that the environment is a relevant sociological concept and a tool for the most complex and the most complete understanding of the impact that global processes have on social reality. We can also see that environmental sociology, as a distinct and very young - though well established - sub-discipline of sociology is a very suitable epistemological framework for testing the elements of globalization. This article considers the relationship between environmental sociology and the five common foundational sub-processes that define globalization and sustainable development. Those sub-processes are defined as political, economic, ecological, technological, and cultural. Furthermore, this article articulates the basis of the quest for the lowest common denominator within both theoretical and practical aspects of these sub-processes. In that sense, the question of the plausibility of the idea of sustainable development - as the intersection of the aforementioned sub-processes - is addressed.

  2. Social Work Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Social work research has gathered a greater transparency and clarity of identity in North American and parts of Europe. Furthermore, the rapid emergence of social work research in other European countries, China, India, Japan and elsewhere in Asia and Pacific Rim countries, and gradually in South...... America, has created a need for a collection that can contribute to both shaping and making accessible key and sometimes hard-to-access sources. This four-volume collection answers this need, bringing together key literature in a single resource and structuring it into thematic volumes to enable clear...... understanding of the different aspects involved in the research. Volume One: Historical Trajectories, Purposes and Key Concepts Volume Two: Key Decisions about Research Strategy Volume Three: The Practice of Social Work Research Volume Four: The Contexts of Social Work Research...

  3. WORK EXPERIENCE INTERNSHIP THROUGH THE EYES OF TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY STUDENTS (ON THE MATERIALS OF SOCIOLOGICAL RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandr Yu. Myagkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to study the problem of efficiency of work experience internship in a technical university and its role in the education of future professionals (problem has been investigated in the framework of the research project «Monitoring of social well-being and problems of professional adaptation of ISPEU students».Methods. While carrying out of sociological research, selection of respondents was occurred on the multistage combined (serially-nested model of sample among students I, III and V courses of six faculties of full-time course of ISPEU. The complex of questions (its answers show features of professional identity of the future experts on initial (I course, intermediate (III course and finishing (V course stages of their professional formation has been developed to find out the dynamics of process of professional adaptation of students from the first to the fifth year. The information was processed with application of program and analytical complex SPSS. The comparative analysis to a gender sign of degree of satisfaction/dissatisfaction has been undertaken by the work experience internship organization on the side of high school and the accepting enterprises.Results. The level of graduates’ satisfaction with the work experience internship is revealed that works on an estimation by students of quality of preparation in high school, the relation to a received speciality and success in the future profession. The data on a self-estimation of readiness of students to work experience internship is cited. Criteria of successful work experience internship are formulated.Scientific novelty. The given researches carried out by the authors, prove that work experience internship positively influences professional consciousness of students and promote formation of steady positive installations for professional job. However, work experience internship in its institutional forms is functional and appears to be the effective

  4. In search of the kingdom: the social gospel, settlement sociology, and the science of reform in America's progressive era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joyce E; Maclean, Vicky M

    2012-01-01

    This critical narrative history examines the development of sociology in the United States during what has come to be labeled as the Progressive Era, roughly the years from the 1890s to World War I. Despite the label, this era was defined as much by social problems associated with industrialization, urbanization, and immigration as by the growth of its cities and the wealth of its capitalists. We explore the roots of American sociology in the transition of protestant theology from Calvinism to its reformation in the social gospel, the simultaneous development of settlement houses, and the "creation" of sociology as the science of reform. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The sociology of late secularization: social divisions and religiosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Steve

    2016-12-01

    At the start of the twentieth century the religious differed from the religiously indifferent largely in being religious. Now they differ in a number of other social and demographic characteristics that reduce interaction between the two populations further than simple numbers would require. That some of the main carriers of religion are immigrants or adherents of recently imported faiths reinforces the sense that religion is what other people do. In the context of the stock of religious knowledge being depleted and religion-taken-too-seriously being unpopular, the narrow demographic base of the religious makes conversion unlikely and thus makes the reversal of secularization unlikely. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2016.

  6. Another sociology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carleheden, Mikael

    1998-01-01

    contributing dianostics of the social pathologies of the modern state. Such an approach can find inspiration in classical sociology, but it is also important to realize that, today, we are living in another modernity. A liberation from social technology must thus include a liberation from objectivistic methods....

  7. SOCIAL PORTRAIT OF RURAL TEACHERS: THE RESULTS OF A COMPARATIVE SOCIOLOGICAL STUDY COUNTRY AND CITY TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila Alexandrovna Amirova

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of application of the comparative sociological study of rural and urban schools. The characteristic of a social portrait of the rural teacher. The basic social problems, an assessment of social well-being of rural and urban teachers. Purpose. The authors aimed to identify specific problems of the rural school for making sound management decisions in the field of social educational policy. Methodology. A comparative type of applied sociological research is realized by applying such methodological approaches as structural and functional analysis and its variety – typological analysis [2; 3; 5]. Results. In summary, the social portrait of a rural educator is characterized by the following social characteristics. He lives mostly in his own house. One member of his family has, mainly, 12-18 or more square meters of living space. Entrepreneurship and tutoring are poorly distributed in rural areas. In comparison with urban teachers, rural teachers are more oriented to vocational training, rather than to the formation of spiritual and intellectual culture of students. This is the practicality of the rural educator. Employment in the subsidiary farm is also the reason for the greater practicality of the rural teacher and his relatively low spiritual activity. In rural educational institutions the level of collectivism is higher, but the desire for individual achievements is lower. Practical implications. The management of social processes at the level of a rural school can be implemented in the form of social planning, drawing up of social programs, social projects aimed at solving social problems of a rural teacher and optimizing the development of a rural school.

  8. A Multiparadigmatic Approach to Religion in Social Work Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon E. Singletary

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The attention given to faith-based human services in the past decade has created interest in pedagogical models of the ethical integration of spirituality, religion and social work practice. Following a discussion of philosophical, theoretical, and theological perspectives, this paper explores different sociological paradigms of knowledge and practice that may be of value when seeking to utilize spiritual and religious content into social work education. The implications of this article relate to educational settings that seek to incorporate content on religion and spirituality in social work education as well as to social work practice in religious organizations.

  9. SOCIAL CHANGE – BETWEEN THE CLASSICAL SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES AND THE SOCIOLOGICALTHEORIES IN THE XXTH CENTURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela MOTOI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article we have presented the most important theories about social change from the perspective of comparative analysis (XIXth and XXth century. Thus, in the first part of the article, we have presented the classical perspectives on social change, which belong to some famous sociologists from the XIXth century, Who have approached this issue: Auguste Comte, Emile Durkheim, Alexis de Tocqueville, Max Weber, or Karl Marx. The common point of these theories is that they all understand social change as a social progress. This idea is no longer found in the twentieth century, where the theoretical approaches to social change are equally varied. Thus, the second part of the article presents the theories of change from four sources: the ‘Chicago School’ (William Ogburn and William I. Thomas; the neo-evolutionary theory of Robert Nisbet; the French Sociology perspective (Pierre Bourdieu and Raymond Boudon and, finally, a more actual perspective, that of Anthony Giddens.

  10. Social strategies that work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskorski, Mikołaj Jan

    2011-11-01

    Although most companies have collected lots of friends and followers on social platforms such as Facebook, few have succeeded in generating profits there. That's because they merely port their digital strategies into social environments by broadcasting their commercial messages or seeking customer feedback. To succeed on social platforms, says Harvard Business School's Piskorski, businesses need to devise social strategies that are consistent with users' expectations and behavior in these venues--namely, people want to connect with other people, not with companies. The author defines successful social strategies as those that reduce costs or increase customers' willingness to pay by helping people establish or strengthen relationships through doing free work on a company's behalf. Citing successes at Zynga, eBay, American Express, and Yelp, Piskorski shows that social strategies can generate profits by helping people connect in exchange for tasks that benefit the company such as customer acquisition, marketing, and content creation. He lays out a systematic way to build a social strategy and shows how a major credit card company he advised used the method to roll out its own strategy.

  11. Empathy in Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Karl; Englander, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    A dominant conceptualization of empathy in social work practice and education, provided by Karen Gerdes and Elizabeth Segal, relies heavily on the simulation theory adopted directly from the cognitive neurosciences. The aim was to critically challenge such a view by reporting on some recent empirical findings from the field in which professional…

  12. The Missing Memory of Canadian Sociology: Reflexive Government and "the Social Science".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    The modest literature on the history of Canadian Sociology takes the appearance of a named academic discipline as its object. Canadian Sociology is held to have had some precursors in the 1880s, but really to appear only in the 1920s. It is described as a foreign import and as an activity first of intellectual speculation and moral reform. Observational and analytic practice are absent before 1880. The activities of state agents and government departments in the social field are not discussed. This article offers a richer account through an examination of the larger field from which Sociology was extracted, "the social science," which was practiced actively in colonial Canada from the early nineteenth century. The social science shaped and was itself shaped by colonial conditions. The article outlines three interrelated moments in social science to carry its claims: inventory-making, the emergence of "population-thinking," and "reflexive government." Attending to the social science underlines the complex and convoluted relations of sociology with state power. Les rares oeuvrages académiques portant sur l'histoire de la sociologie canadienne prend pour objet l'apparition du terme sociologie> dans le contexte universitaire. Dans cet optique, ils signalent certains précurseurs de la sociologie canadienne dès les années 1880, mais en fait ils affirment que cette discipline n'apparaît que dans les années 1920. Cette discipline est présentée comme une importation académique et, d'abord et avant tout, comme de la spéculation intellectuelle et comme un projet de réforme morale. D'après cette vision, les pratiques d'observation et d'analyse sociales ne semblent pas exister avant 1880, et les acteurs politiques et administratifs sont absents du terrain. Notre article propose un examen plus riche du vaste champ duquel la sociologie académique fut arrachée: activement pratiquée au Canada à l'époque coloniale dès le début du XIXe siècle. La science sociale

  13. "Working Lives": The Use of Auto/Biography in the Development of a Sociological Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Carol; Stirling, John; Wray, David

    2015-01-01

    This article critically evaluates the attempt of the authors to develop a sociological imagination within first-year undergraduate students studying the discipline of sociology at a British university. Through a sociological analysis of biography and autobiography (of both teachers and students), we attempted to create a quality of mind that would…

  14. Syringe sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitellone, Nicole

    2015-06-01

    In this article I consider the impact of social epistemologies for understanding the object of the syringe. My aim is to examine the process through which the syringe transforms from an injecting device to a tool of social and political inquiry. Paying particular attention to the uses of Foucault, Becker, Bourdieu, Freud and Latour in empirical studies of injecting heroin use, I examine the sociology of the syringe through the lens of habit and habitus, discourse and deviance, mourning and melancholia, attachment and agencement. In pursuing the theory behind the object my goal is to address a sociological object in the making. In so doing I show how the syringe has been significant for social research, social theory, and sociology. It is the difference the object makes that this article seeks to describe. In tracing the epistemology of the syringe I show how the object is important not just for knowledge of addiction but sociology itself. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2015.

  15. Youth work as Social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Bechmann

    2009-01-01

    omhandler dansk social arbejde generelt, men særligt med vægt på en diskussion af ungdomsbegrebet, den stadigt mere populære opdeling mellem frivilligt og professionelt socialt arbejde samt "professionaliseringen" af hverdagslivets socialiet. Mange af bidragene fra antologien kan ses som indgående i en...

  16. Sociology as a Vocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Frank J.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the meaning of practicing sociology, claiming to "commit a social science" still makes sense. Accepts Max Weber's arguments that sociology clarifies human affairs and is oriented to certain virtues. Suggests, however, that sociology is a passion as well as a profession, something Weber recognized but did not elaborate. (NL)

  17. The social conditions of instrumental action: Problems in the sociological understanding of rational choice theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Sciberras de Carvalho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article critically analyzes new sociological approaches to the rational choice theory which - beyond examining political or economic practices - link the notion of instrumental rationality to social issues and themes. The article begins by highlighting the issue of trust, indicating the functionality of certain social arrangements in collective problem-solving. The paper goes on to demonstrate that problems emerge with the theory when it attempts to explain the feasibility of social norms in impersonal, comprehensive contexts. Thus, the fundamental point that appears to be missing from rational choice theory is the perception that individual decisions and instrumental conduct itself incorporate dispositions that in a sense are beyond the actors' control.

  18. Uso de redes sociales académicas por investigadores de Sociología en México

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Domínguez, Néstor Daniel; Lujano-Vilchis, Ivonne

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of the use of academic social networks by researchers in the area of Sociology of the National System of Researchers (SNI) in Mexico.*Paper presented at the 4th Latin American and Caribbean Congress of Social Sciences, Universidad de Salamanca, Spain.Análisis sobre el uso de redes sociales académicas por parte de investigadores adscritos al área de Sociología dentro del Sistema Nacional de Investigadores (SNI) en México. *Trabajo presentado en el 4º Congreso Latinoamericano y Caribe...

  19. Sociología del arte y análisis de redes sociales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Azam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Este texto introduce el número dedicado al arte y las redes sociales explorando los diferentes aspectos de la (inarticulación entre la sociología del arte y el análisis de redes sociales. Aún cuando en las investigaciones fundadoras del campo de investigación de la sociología del arte atribuyen un lugar central a las interacciones y relaciones entre los distintos actores que estructuran este “campo” o “mundo social”, las investigaciones que utilizan las herramientas del análisis de redes sociales son casi inexistentes. Al contrario, el análisis de redes sociales no ha prestado atención más que someramente a las actividades artísticas. Algunos elementos, como lo mostramos en el artículo, sugieren que un encuentro hubiera sido posible a pesar de todo. Avanzamos la hipótesis de que esta ignorancia mutua es, en parte, debida a las aproximaciones metodológicas privilegiadas por cada uno de estos campos de investigación. Por otra parte, actualmente se esbozan acercamientos tanto por parte del mundo del arte como por parte del mundo científico. En un contexto de interés creciente y generalizado por las redes sociales, los artistas se apropian el interés heurístico de los grafos mientras que los investigadores trabajan expresamente la dimensión estética de las visualizaciones. En el cruce de estos dos universos emergen obras que articulan las problemáticas sociológicas y utilizan las técnicas de análisis de redes sociales. Con un objetivo paralelo, este número propone artículos de jóvenes investigadores que demuestran empíricamente la articulación fértil entre sociología del arte y análisis de redes sociales.

  20. Sociology, Music Education, and Social Change: The Prospect of Addressing Their Relations by Attending to Some Central, Expanded Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Geir

    2014-01-01

    Studies on sociology and music education are important because they can enlighten how music education relates to social change. By studying how music education changes and is changed by society we enable ourselves to describe how it can contribute to the understanding of social change generally. This may lay the ground for us in contributing to…

  1. The history of sociology as a field of research and some recent trends in Brazilian social thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, João Marcelo Ehlert

    2017-01-01

    The article lays the foundation for a dialog between scholars of Brazilian social thought and historians of sociology as a discipline. In order to achieve this objective, I analyze recent developments in the field of the history of sociology, highlighting the incorporation of historiographic methods and the emergence of a transnational approach, which points toward a global history of the discipline. I criticize the Eurocentric limits of this field and argue that recent research trends in the area of Brazilian social thought can help overcome this limitation. Finally, I briefly analyze the obstacles that impede this dialog and indicate possible strategies for overcoming them.

  2. The order of social sciences: sociology in dialogue with neighbouring disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Bögenhold

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Comparing sociology with economics, psychology or history shows that borderlines between disciplines have become fluent and always newly oscillating. Economists, especially prominent positions awarded with Nobel prizes, are increasingly discussing items as motivation, rationality, norms or culture which belong to the domain of sociology. Sociology should acknowledge this kind of ‘imperialism’ and claim own competencies.

  3. Military Social Work: Opportunities and Challenges for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Nikki R.

    2015-01-01

    Military social work is a specialized field of practice spanning the micro-macro continuum and requiring advanced social work knowledge and skills. The complex behavioral health problems and service needs of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans highlight the need for highly trained social work professionals who can provide militarily relevant and…

  4. Quantifying social norms: by coupling the ecosystem management concept and semi-quantitative sociological methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D.; Xu, H.

    2012-12-01

    Over recent decades, human-induced environmental changes have steadily and rapidly grown in intensity and impact to where they now often exceed natural impacts. As one of important components of human activities, social norms play key roles in environmental and natural resources management. But the lack of relevant quantitative data about social norms greatly limits our scientific understanding of the complex linkages between humans and nature, and hampers our solving of pressing environmental and social problems. In this study, we built a quantified method by coupling the ecosystem management concept, semi-quantitative sociological methods and mathematical statistics. We got the quantified value of social norms from two parts, whether the content of social norms coincide with the concept of ecosystem management (content value) and how about the performance after social norms were put into implementation (implementation value) . First, we separately identified 12 core elements of ecosystem management and 16 indexes of social norms, and then matched them one by one. According to their matched degree, we got the content value of social norms. Second, we selected 8 key factors that can represent the performance of social norms after they were put into implementation, and then we got the implementation value by Delph method. Adding these two parts values, we got the final value of each social norms. Third, we conducted a case study in Heihe river basin, the second largest inland river in China, by selecting 12 official edicts related to the river basin ecosystem management of Heihe River Basin. By doing so, we first got the qualified data of social norms which can be directly applied to the research that involved observational or experimental data collection of natural processes. Second, each value was supported by specific contents, so it can assist creating a clear road map for building or revising management and policy guidelines. For example, in this case study

  5. Piketty's challenge for sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Mike

    2014-12-01

    This paper argues that Piketty's book should not simply be seen as that of an economist, but that it contains significant resources for sociologists to draw upon. These are firstly, this approach to social science and his use of visualizations which chime closely with recent claims about the power of description. Secondly I consider his conceptualization of time and history - which in rebutting epochal arguments about the speed of contemporary change allows for a much better appreciation of the 'long durée'; and finally his conceptualization of social classes and privilege through his elaboration of a sociology of accumulation and inheritance. In all these ways, Piketty's work assists in developing an account of elites and wealth which should be highly productive for future sociology. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2014.

  6. Internationalism in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    Internationalism is the study of social work programs and philosophies in other countries. Knowledge of social work in other cultures provides valuable insight into dealing with cross-cultural and ethnic relationships in one's own country. (Editor/PG)

  7. Can the sociology of social problems help us to understand and manage 'lifestyle drift'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Gemma; Malbon, Eleanor; Crammond, Brad; Pescud, Melanie; Baker, Philip

    2017-08-01

    Lifestyle drift is increasingly seen as a barrier to broad action on the social determinants of health. The term is currently used in the population health literature to describe how broad policy initiatives for tackling inequalities in health that start off with social determinants (upstream) approach drift downstream to largely individual lifestyle factors, as well as the general trend of investing a the individual level. Lifestyle drift occurs despite the on-going efforts of public health advocates, such as anti-obesity campaigners, to draw attention to the social factors which shape health behavior and outcomes. In this article, we explore whether the sociology of social problems can help understand lifestyle drift in the context of obesity. Specifically, we apply Jamrozik and Nocella's residualist conversion model to the problem of obesity in order to explore whether such an approach can provide greater insight into the processes that underpin lifestyle drift and inform our attempts to mitigate it. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Tolerance as Understood by Young Russian and German Volunteers in Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorskaia, L. E.

    2008-01-01

    In 2006 the author and her colleagues carried out the sociological survey "Tolerance in Volunteer Social Work." They sought to determine the attitudes that young Russian and German volunteers of social work have when it comes to tolerance as a concept, a trait of personality, a principle of life and activity. They studied the various…

  9. Current trends in Uruguayan Social Work: an aging profession?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica de Martino Bermúdez

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This article synthesizes some reflections about the future of Social Work as a profession in Uruguay, based on the identification of certain problems that are of concern to the authors. Although they work in different professional activities and at different educational levels, the three share a certain perspective about tendencies observed in Social Work in Uruguay and believe they have some responses. Based on a dialog with the Sociology of Professions and theories of Pierre Bourdieu, the authors demonstrate that Social Work as a "field" as understood by this author, is clearly in an aging process that is expressed in a professional "habitus" that has little harmony with its social-historical time. In light of questions about the responsibility of the academic sector in the reproduction of this "habitus" and about the challenges to the profile of the students of Social Work, the authors map analyses and propose certain lines of interpretation.

  10. The enigma of the social relationship: prolegomena to a realist relational sociology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierpaolo Donati

    2018-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives an outline of relational sociology, which understands and explains society and human existence as “relationally constituted”, i.e. as constituted by social relations. Modern and postmodern sociological mainstreams see relations as an emanation of the individual, whereas in reality individual’s identity depends on relations. The fallacy of individualism is due to the fact that current social theories avoid addressing what the author calls “the enigma of the relationship”, i.e. an order of reality able to unite the diff erent ones while preserving, and even promoting, their differences. This new approach understands relations as a sui generis reality that cannot be reduced to the terms of the relations, their qualities and properties, because the relation is “emergent”. Thus, it overcomes the fallacies of subjectivism and objectivism in understanding the nature of social reality and can make visible the enigma of its relational constitution. This approach stems from a new social (relational ontology, according to which substance and relation are co-principles of being. Such an ontology, in turn, needs to refer to a specifi c “theological matrix”, since every society depends on a kind of “symbolic code” that determines the uniqueness of its structures and sociocultural dynamics. Symbolic codes always have religious origins where “religion” broadly means the ultimate latent values of society. Within the framework of Western thinking, three symbolic codes or theological matrices can be observed, depending on how the diff erence between the Self and the Other is interpreted, namely dialectical, binary and relational. Within the dialectical symbolic code, the distinction between the Self and the Other is understood as a point of constant confl ict, discussion and negotiation: the theory of J. Habermas serves as a good example of this code. The binary matrix, presented by N. Luhmann, understands the diff erence

  11. Sociology Back to the Publics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Marinus R.R.

    2007-01-01

    This article is a reading of the `new sociology' that is mainly identified with the works of C. Wright Mills and Alvin Gouldner. Its main argument is that during the past 40 years the new sociology gave back a public face to sociology. This distinguishes it from the `old sociology' that had not been

  12. Las aportaciones de la sociología española a la responsabilidad social empresarial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanco, Antonio

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Conclusion 39 of the European Summit in Lisbon in 2000, the European Council makes a special plea to the sense of social responsibility of companies being such as a voluntary integration in their strategy and actions of their social, economic and environmental concerns, which arise from the interactions between the organizations and their groups of interests. Different international proposals, European and spanish, support the practice of the business responsibility. In Spain, a Forum of Expertise of this matter coordinated by the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs has recognized “the importance of a new sensibility of the companies about social affairs”. This makes us question if Sociology has also shown interest for this new “sensibility” of the business organizations and which the degree of presence is in corporate social responsibility being also an object of study in the academic field of Sociology. Therefore, the presence of this subject in the research as well as the syllabus of the studies of Sociology in Spain is studied.

    En la Conclusión 39 de la Cumbre Europea de Lisboa del año 2000, el Consejo Europeo hace un llamamiento especial al sentido de responsabilidad social de las empresas, entendiendo por tal la integración voluntaria en su estrategia y acciones de preocupaciones sociales, económicas y medioambientales que surgen de la interacción de las organizaciones con sus grupos de interés. Diferentes propuestas internacionales, europeas y españolas respaldan la práctica de la responsabilidad empresarial y, en España, el Foro de Expertos en la materia coordinado por el Ministerio de Trabajo y Asuntos Sociales ha reconocido el “ascenso de una nueva sensibilidad en las empresas sobre lo social”. Esto nos lleva a cuestionarnos si la Sociología también ha mostrado interés por esta nueva “sensibilidad” de las organizaciones empresariales y cuál es el grado de presencia de la responsabilidad

  13. Sociology of Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agustin, Oscar Garcia

    Sociology of Discourse takes the perspective that collective actors like social movements are capable of creating social change from below by creating new institutions through alternative discourses. Institutionalization becomes a process of moving away from existing institutions towards creating...

  14. Repercussions of Teaching Training in the Sociology of Work in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez-Martinez, Claudio-Rafael; Giron, Graciela; Zapata-Landeros, Magali; Ayòn-Bañuelos, Antonio; Morfin-Otero, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The labour markets in Mexico are characterised by uncertainty in terms of the lack of work contracts social protection, unemployment, high level of self-employed workers independently and micro-businesses, low income levels, the involuntary part-time working and low levels of unionisation. They all indicate that the labour situation currently…

  15. Una aproximación desde la sociología del cuerpo a los movimientos sociales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Sossa Rojas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo tiene como objetivo articular dos perspectivas algo separadas en el debate sociológico actual: la sociología de los movimientos sociales y la sociología del cuerpo. En este sentido, buscamos problematizar tres cosas. Primero, por qué la relevancia de la categoría cuerpo,sobre todo, del desnudo, como forma y/o recurso en las protestas. Segundo, a partir de Foucault problematizar cómo lo social se inmiscuye en el cuerpo, en fenómenos como la sexualidad o la familia. Por último, a partir de las tensiones señaladas en el punto dos, se discute cómo esto da origen a movimientos que tienen demandas relacionadas al cuerpo, y qué teoría de los movimientos sociales es la mejor para explicarlos.

  16. Convergence and divergence in Distinction. A social critique of the judgment of taste and Peasant society in the colombian Andes: a sociological study of saucío

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Camilo Melo Bustos

    2018-01-01

    understand such complex and diffuse categories as lifestyles reflected in music, home decoration/utensils and all types of material and symbolic inventory. With this base, the authors were able to understand the configuration of all type of social relations and the positioning of individuals and agents. Although the geospatial and epistemological places are different, both works are sociologically all-encompassing, as each is a form of understanding the rural world and the urban one by questioning the way in which society and community recognize themselves.

  17. Heterogeneous Teacher Recruitment and Social Studies Didactics: Bringing the Sociology of Education Back In

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AndreaSzukala

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article contributes to a newer debate in teacher education research regarding the professionalization for the work in multicultural urban classrooms. In a social studies didactics’ perspective teacher-learnermismatch seems to be an important factor influencing the ability to construct meaningful social studies learning environments – and thus represents an important challenge for the education of future teachers in our domain. But what are the social origins of diverse teacher professional identities in the social studies domain? This article refers to a biographicalnarrative study on teacher students from very heterogeneous backgrounds exploring their basic beliefs and attitudes towards becoming a social studies teacher.

  18. Bookreview: Noortje MARRES DIGITAL SOCIOLOGY: THE REIN-VENTION OF SOCIAL RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier CALLEJO GALLEGO

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Decir que el libro aquí abordado es sobre métodos -digitales, en este caso- es que-darse en uno de los márgenes de sus inten-ciones. La propuesta de Marres va más allá, lo que queda especialmente manifies-to en la primera parte del libro; páginas que pueden considerarse realizadas bajo el paraguas del debate que abrieron Savage y Burrows (2007 en la sociología británi-ca cuando nombraron a las cosas por su nombre: “The Coming Crisis of Empirical Sociology” (trabajo continuado en Rup-pert, Law y Savage, 2013. Tal vez su gran aportación al respecto es esa, hacer despe-gar en la esfera pública del sistema de la ciencia -revistas científicas, libros, confe-rencias- lo que se comentaba en los pasi-llos de las universidades y, sobre todo, los centros privados de investigación social.

  19. Trust-Based Access Control Model from Sociological Approach in Dynamic Online Social Network Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungjoo

    2014-01-01

    There has been an explosive increase in the population of the OSN (online social network) in recent years. The OSN provides users with many opportunities to communicate among friends and family. Further, it facilitates developing new relationships with previously unknown people having similar beliefs or interests. However, the OSN can expose users to adverse effects such as privacy breaches, the disclosing of uncontrolled material, and the disseminating of false information. Traditional access control models such as MAC, DAC, and RBAC are applied to the OSN to address these problems. However, these models are not suitable for the dynamic OSN environment because user behavior in the OSN is unpredictable and static access control imposes a burden on the users to change the access control rules individually. We propose a dynamic trust-based access control for the OSN to address the problems of the traditional static access control. Moreover, we provide novel criteria to evaluate trust factors such as sociological approach and evaluate a method to calculate the dynamic trust values. The proposed method can monitor negative behavior and modify access permission levels dynamically to prevent the indiscriminate disclosure of information. PMID:25374943

  20. Trust-Based Access Control Model from Sociological Approach in Dynamic Online Social Network Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungsoo Baek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been an explosive increase in the population of the OSN (online social network in recent years. The OSN provides users with many opportunities to communicate among friends and family. Further, it facilitates developing new relationships with previously unknown people having similar beliefs or interests. However, the OSN can expose users to adverse effects such as privacy breaches, the disclosing of uncontrolled material, and the disseminating of false information. Traditional access control models such as MAC, DAC, and RBAC are applied to the OSN to address these problems. However, these models are not suitable for the dynamic OSN environment because user behavior in the OSN is unpredictable and static access control imposes a burden on the users to change the access control rules individually. We propose a dynamic trust-based access control for the OSN to address the problems of the traditional static access control. Moreover, we provide novel criteria to evaluate trust factors such as sociological approach and evaluate a method to calculate the dynamic trust values. The proposed method can monitor negative behavior and modify access permission levels dynamically to prevent the indiscriminate disclosure of information.

  1. Gene by Social-Context Interactions for Number of Sexual Partners Among White Male Youths: Genetics-informed Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guang; Tong, Yuying; Cai, Tianji

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we set out to investigate whether introducing molecular genetic measures into an analysis of sexual partner variety will yield novel sociological insights. The data source is the white male DNA sample in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Our empirical analysis has produced a robust protective effect of the 9R/9R genotype relative to the Any10R genotype in the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1). The gene-environment interaction analysis demonstrates that the protective effect of 9R/9R tends to be lost in schools in which higher proportions of students start having sex early or among those with relatively low levels of cognitive ability. Our genetics-informed sociological analysis suggests that the “one size” of a single social theory may not fit all. Explaining a human trait or behavior may require a theory that accommodates the complex interplay between social contextual and individual influences and genetic predispositions. PMID:19569400

  2. Sociology through Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes how photography can inspire and cultivate sociological mindfulness. One set of assignments uses self-portraiture to highlight the complexity of visual representations of social identity. Another uses photography to guide sociological inquiry. Both sets of assignments draw on the Literacy Through Photography methodology,…

  3. L'idée de `science sociales' | Mbembe | African Sociological Review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Sociological Review / Revue Africaine de Sociologie. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 2 (1999) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  4. Physical Education, Sociology, and Sociology of Sport: Points of Intersection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, George H.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the rise of sociology and physical education (PE), discussing linkages that initially existed and the separation that transpired between them. Also examines connections between social theory and PE before the sociology of sport was formally developed. Details the rise of sociology of sport, highlighting roles of physical educators. (SM)

  5. Determinateness and Indeterminateness in Schumpeter's Economic Sociology: The Origin of Social Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Yagi, Kiichiro

    2008-01-01

    This article traces Schumpeter's texts that fit his definition of "economic sociology" given in the introductory chapter of History of Economic Analysis (1954). The findings are as follows: (1) Since his early years, Schumpeter had a vision of "socio–cultural development" that was characterized by a general interdependence and a distinction between statics and dynamics. (2) Schumpeter adopted the term "evolution" to describe the historical change in his economic sociology. Moreover, he would ...

  6. Perfiles Latinoamericanos: Regional sociology, connected sociologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Arteaga Botello

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The landscape of sociology published in the 48 numbers of the Perfiles Latinoamericanos magazineis analyzed. The diversity of topics, perspectives, and methodologies of the articles define aseries of fields of reflection around civil society, collective action, subjectivities and social identities,cities, media, violence, and theory. The essay suggests how the sociology that is producedin Latin America is not isolated but connected with international debates. It converges forms ofdoing theory and research with resonances on a global scale.

  7. Social Symbolic Work in Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Benedikte

    ‘the good organisation’ may offer a supportive organisational framework for social symbolic work, thus promoting regional development in peripheral and poorly developed regions. Exploring what qualifies as a ‘good organisation’, the paper identifies three key elements: management, motivation......This paper reports on a research project that explores social symbolic work. The social symbolic work in question seeks to introduce education in entrepreneurship into the school curriculum in a remote part of Greenland – in order to contribute to regional development. The paper investigates how...

  8. Mapping the field of medical sociology: a comparative analysis of journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Clive

    2008-07-01

    A comparative keyword analysis of the content of nine leading journals is used to suggest potential new directions for medical sociology. The major British and American journals in sociology and medical sociology tend to publish authors based in their own countries, contrasting with the internationalism of other social science disciplines relevant to health, although Sociology of Health and Illness is an exception to this. Medical sociology journals on both sides of the Atlantic focus on individual experience more than general sociology journals, which focus more on social systems levels of analysis. While journal contents reveal British medical sociology to be relatively atheoretical when compared with British general sociology journals, American medical sociology appears relatively apolitical on the same comparison with American general journals. American journals of sociology publish more quantitative studies than their British equivalents, more studies concerning race and other social divisions in American society, and less work drawing on social constructionist perspectives or that is engaged with social theory. Analysis of health and health care at societal and global levels and a deeper engagement with the political and public issues that concern non-sociologists represents a possible future for a medical sociology that is internationally relevant and outward looking.

  9. Social Work and Lived Citizenship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warming, Hanne; Fahnøe, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Warming and Fahnøe offers, through introduction of the sensitising concept of lived citizenship and a socio-spatial perspective, a much needed renewal of the rights and strength based approach to social work practice and research towards an almost anthropological understanding of the social...... of meaning and power as (re-) producing practices through which clients experience and negotiate rights, responsibilities, participation, identity and belonging, and thereby of dynamics of inclusion and exclusion related to social work....... situation of vulnerable groups. Indeed, they show how the concept of lived citizenship, and four supporting concepts (disciplinary versus inclusive identity shaping; intimate citizenship; space; community governance) enables contextualized analyses of the complexities of social work as a social space...

  10. El objeto de la sociología. Hecho social y consecuencias no intencionadas de la acción

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMILIO LAMO DE ESPINOSA

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available La definición del objeto de la sociología ha oscilado entre versiones objetivistas (el hecho social de Durkheim o versiones nominalistas (la teoría de la acción de Weber. A partir del dato de que el extrañamiento de la sociedad forma parte de la experiencia cotidiana de los actores, se trata de fundamentar este extrañamiento en las consecuencias no queridas de la acción, distinguiendo así entre acción y acto resultante. La función de la sociología es restablecer la transparencia colectiva en un mundo cuya diversificación hace que los actores no sepan lo que producen.

  11. Telehealth: Implications for Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Dawn; Clancy, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    The use of modern information technology to deliver health services to remote locations presents both opportunities and problems for social workers. This article examines how communication technology such as e-mail and video conferencing affect social work practice. Issues are raised about the ethical, legal, and client relationship…

  12. Methodology of 'The Sociology of Science' through analysis of nuclear power plant accidents. Social practice activity in 13 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Kiyoshi

    2002-01-01

    The technology of light water reactor will continue as a realistic energy technology for about half century at least from now on. The social agreement is necessary to continue nuclear power generation. Nuclear community must renew the conventional thought partially and have to approach the thought close to the value judgment in another social coordinate. 'The Sociology of Science' on the atomic energy shall be such contents that be able to contribute to the unify or to attaches both coordinates as near as possible. (author)

  13. Mobile sociology. 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urry, John

    2010-01-01

    This article seeks to develop a manifesto for a sociology concerned with the diverse mobilities of peoples, objects, images, information, and wastes; and of the complex interdependencies between, and social consequences of, such diverse mobilities. A number of key concepts relevant for such a sociology are elaborated: 'gamekeeping', networks, fluids, scapes, flows, complexity and iteration. The article concludes by suggesting that a 'global civil society' might constitute the social base of a sociology of mobilities as we move into the twenty-first century.

  14. Professional 'imperialism' and resistance: Social Work in the Filippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jem Price

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The sociology of professions has traditionally attempted to increase our understanding of categorisations of different occupations by reference to taxonomic hierarchies, as well as the identification and exploration of characteristics that warrant 'professional status'. In may cases, this explorations take the forms of historical accounts of professional activity. Rarely, however, has the literature on professions explored processes of professionalization in devoliping, post-colonial contexts. This article contributes to this body of literature in the study of professions in a number of ways. Firstly, it 'maps' the growth of social work in the Filippines, placing this account within a broader discussions of social work as an internationality activity (Harrison & Melville, 2010; Lyons, 2006 and identifying some of the key forms and features of social work in the Filippines. Consideration is given to the degree of professionalisation of social work within the country by exploring professional organisation, regulation and education.  In doing this, the article offers a critical overview of the nature and preoccupations of social work in the Filippines and celebrates the invaluable contributions it makes to the country and its people. The article argue that the forms social work takes and the settings in wich it happens reflect both contemporay societal and environmental factors as well as the global development of social work.  In this sense, the article considers the impact of Roman Catholicism as well as the orientation of social work in relation to some enduring tensions and debates around the profession's purpose and potential. Key to the professional forms that social work takes in the Filippines is the contribution of 'indigenous' social work knowledge base wich is explored, alongside a comentary on social work education and training in the country. 

  15. Paradigm Shift in Game Theory: Sociological Re-Conceptualization of Human Agency, Social Structure, and Agents’ Cognitive-Normative Frameworks and Action Determination Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom R. Burns

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to present some of the initial work of developing a social science grounded game theory—as a clear alternative to classical game theory. Two distinct independent initiatives in Sociology are presented: One, a systems approach, social systems game theory (SGT, and the other, Erving Goffman’s interactionist approach (IGT. These approaches are presented and contrasted with classical theory. They focus on the social rules, norms, roles, role relationships, and institutional arrangements, which structure and regulate human behavior. While strategic judgment and instrumental rationality play an important part in the sociological approaches, they are not a universal or dominant modality of social action determination. Rule following is considered, generally speaking, more characteristic and more general. Sociological approaches, such as those outlined in this article provide a language and conceptual tools to more adequately and effectively than the classical theory describe, model, and analyze the diversity and complexity of human interaction conditions and processes: (1 complex cognitive rule based models of the interaction situation with which actors understand and analyze their situations; (2 value complex(es with which actors operate, often with multiple values and norms applying in interaction situations; (3 action repertoires (rule complexes with simple and complex action alternatives—plans, programs, established (sometimes highly elaborated algorithms, and rituals; (4 a rule complex of action determination modalities for actors to generate and/or select actions in game situations; three action modalities are considered here; each modality consists of one or more procedures or algorithms for action determination: (I following or implementing a rule or rule complex, norm, role, ritual, or social relation; (II selecting or choosing among given or institutionalized alternatives according to a rule or principle; and (III

  16. African Journal of Social Work

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... The African Journal of Social Work is an international refereed journal that serves as a forum ... Experiences of female academics in Ghana: negotiation and strengths as strategies for ... The influence of work-life balance on employees' commitment among bankers in ...

  17. [Pierre Bourdieu: sociology as a "symbolic revolution"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suaud, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The article combines two objectives: understand the genesis and development of the sociology of Bourdieu in connection with his social and intellectual positioning. The sociology of Bourdieu is a theory of Action which reconciles the double requirement of objectification and taking account of the practical logic bound by social agents. From the character both objective and subjective of social space, he analyzes how different institutions (firstly School) are doing that mental structures match the objective structures of society. By making acceptable reality and registering it in the body, these instances contribute to reproduce social divisions and participate in the work of domination. Gradually, Bourdieu develops a general theory about Power, which leads to a sociology of State. But he refuses any sociological fatalism. Because he perceived homologies between the sociologist and the artist facing the social order, each in their own way, he devoted two researches to Flaubert and Manet, seized in the same enterprise of aesthetic subversion he described as a 'symbolic revolution'. In many aspects, the sociology of Bourdieu opens ways of looking for an objectification of caregivers and their practices.

  18. In Praise of Sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Raewyn

    2017-08-01

    This reflection on the relevance of sociology starts with the different forms of social knowledge, and some autobiographical reflection on my engagement with the discipline. A research-based social science is made urgent by the prevalence of distortion and pseudoscience in the public realm. However, the research-based knowledge formation is embedded in a global economy of knowledge that centers on a privileged group of institutions and produces major imbalances on a world scale. Sociological data collection has important uses in policy and public discussion. But data need to be embedded in a larger project of understanding the world; this is what gives excitement to the work. Sociology has a potential future of marginality or triviality in the neoliberal economy and its university system. There are better trajectories into the future-but they have to be fought for. Cette réflexion sur l'utilité de la sociologie commence avec les différentes formes de savoir social, ainsi que quelques réflexions biographiques sur mon engagement avec la discipline. Le besoin d'une science sociale orientée vers la recherche est devenue nécessaire suite à la prédominance de la distorsion et de la pseudoscience dans la sphère publique. Par contre, ce savoir centré sur la recherche est lié à une économie globale de la connaissance qui est proche d'un groupe privilégié d'institutions et produit des déséquilibres majeurs au niveau mondial. La collecte de données sociologiques a une grande utilité en politique et dans les discussions publiques. Mais ces données doivent être liées à un projet plus large de compréhension du monde ; c'est ce qui rend ce travail excitant. La sociologie risque la marginalisation ou la trivialité dans une économie néo-libérale et son système universitaire. Il existe de meilleures trajectoires pour l'avenir - mais elles doivent être défendues. © 2017 Canadian Sociological Association/La Société canadienne de sociologie.

  19. [Psychological theory and implicit sociology.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sévigny, R

    1983-01-01

    This text is based on the hypothesis that every theory on the psychology of personality must inevitably, in one manner or another, have a sociological referent, that is to say, it must refer to a body of knowledge which deals with a diversity of social contexts and their relations to individuals. According to this working hypothesis, such a sociology is implicit. This text then discusses a group of theoretical approaches in an effort to verify this hypothesis. This approach allows the extrication of diverse forms or diverse expressions of this implicit sociology within this context several currents are rapidly explored : psychoanalysis, behaviorism, gestalt, classical theory of needs. The author also comments on the approach, inspired by oriental techniques or philosophies, which employs the notion of myth to deepen self awareness. Finally, from the same perspective, he comments at greater length on the work of Carl Rogers, highlighting the diverse form of implicit sociology. In addition to Carl Rogers, this text refers to Freud, Jung, Adler, Reich, Perls, Goodman, Skinner as well as to Ginette Paris and various analysts of Taoism. In conclusion, the author indicates the significance of his analysis from double viewpoint of psychological theory and practice.

  20. Metaphor of society (a sociological essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennadii Vasil’evich Osipov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The essay by Academician G.V. Osipov, who is the patriarch of Russian sociology, is dedicated to one of the most cognitive topics of modern sociology – identification of sociological metaphor as such and its application in research projects. This topic is avant-garde for the world sociological thought, and in Russia such kind of research is making its first steps. However, its future importance is difficult to overestimate. Sociological metaphor, if a methodology for its application is developed, can provide scientists with qualitatively new synthetic research tools. It can also bring together scientific structures and artifacts on the space of interdisciplinary and inter-subject borderland and give them qualitatively new intellectual and sensuous (system and mental technological capabilities for learning the surrounding world. The advantage of the following essay can be found in the fact that it is based on the objective analysis of the real embodiment of social metaphor in the work of art – a pictorial triptych “The Mystery of the 21st Century”. This is the first such experience in domestic sociological and artistic-painting practice. The authors of the final product are a scientist of great scientific and life experience and a young artist, who received in-depth sociological training and defended his Ph.D. in Sociology dissertation. But the main result of their collaboration is a product that combines scientific (sociological knowledge and insight and intuitive-creative artistic perception in a qualitatively new perception of the world and world outlook

  1. Toward a neighborhood resource-based theory of social capital for health: can Bourdieu and sociology help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpiano, Richard M

    2006-01-01

    Within the past several years, a considerable body of research on social capital has emerged in public health. Although offering the potential for new insights into how community factors impact health and well being, this research has received criticism for being undertheorized and methodologically flawed. In an effort to address some of these limitations, this paper applies Pierre Bourdieu's (1986) [Bourdieu, P. (1986). Handbook of theory and research for the sociology of education (pp. 241-258). New York: Greenwood] social capital theory to create a conceptual model of neighborhood socioeconomic processes, social capital (resources inhered within social networks), and health. After briefly reviewing the social capital conceptualizations of Bourdieu and Putnam, I attempt to integrate these authors' theories to better understand how social capital might operate within neighborhoods or local areas. Next, I describe a conceptual model that incorporates this theoretical integration of social capital into a framework of neighborhood social processes as health determinants. Discussion focuses on the utility of this Bourdieu-based neighborhood social capital theory and model for examining several under-addressed issues of social capital in the neighborhood effects literature and generating specific, empirically testable hypotheses for future research.

  2. Agriculture vs. social sciences: subject classification and sociological conceptualization of rural tourism in Scopus and Web of Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan HOČEVAR

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture and consumptive function of countryside (rural areas are connected which should be reflected in scientific research. In order to test relationships, we selected the topic of rural tourism (also agritourism, agrotourism, agricultural tourism considering sociological conceptualization (social sciences, sociology and methodological approaches of information sciences (bibliometrics, scientometrics in describing fields of science or scientific disciplines. We ascertained scatter of information in citation databases (Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar. Functionalities were evaluated, affecting search precision and recall in information retrieval. We mapped documents to Scopus subject areas as well as Web of Science (WOS research areas and subject categories, and related publications (journals. Databases do not differ substantially in mapping this topic. Social sciences (including economics or business occupy by far the most important place. The strongest concentration was found in tourism-related journals (consistent with power laws. Agriculture-related publications are rare, accounting for some 10 % of documents. Interdisciplinarity seems to be weak. Results point to poor inclusion of emerging social topics in agricultural research whereby agriculture may lose out in possible venues of future research.

  3. Workers' Self-management, Recovered Companies and the Sociology of Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozarow, Daniel; Croucher, Richard

    2014-10-01

    We analyse how far Argentina's worker-recovered companies (WRCs) have sustained themselves and their principles of equity and workers' self-management since becoming widespread following the country's 2001-2 economic crisis. Specialist Spanish-language sources, survey data and documents are analysed through four key sociological themes. We find that the number of WRCs has increased in Argentina, and that they represent a viable production model. Further, they have generally maintained their central principles and even flourished. This occurred despite the global economic crisis, legal and financial pressures to adopt capitalist practices and management structures, the risk of market absorption and state attempts to coopt, demobilise and depoliticise the movement. We argue that today they function as a much-needed international beacon of an alternative vision for labour and that integration of their experience has potential to revitalise the field.

  4. Workers’ Self-management, Recovered Companies and the Sociology of Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croucher, Richard

    2014-01-01

    We analyse how far Argentina’s worker-recovered companies (WRCs) have sustained themselves and their principles of equity and workers’ self-management since becoming widespread following the country’s 2001–2 economic crisis. Specialist Spanish-language sources, survey data and documents are analysed through four key sociological themes. We find that the number of WRCs has increased in Argentina, and that they represent a viable production model. Further, they have generally maintained their central principles and even flourished. This occurred despite the global economic crisis, legal and financial pressures to adopt capitalist practices and management structures, the risk of market absorption and state attempts to coopt, demobilise and depoliticise the movement. We argue that today they function as a much-needed international beacon of an alternative vision for labour and that integration of their experience has potential to revitalise the field. PMID:25419009

  5. Social Work Experience and Development in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibin, Wang

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the experience and limitations of government-run social work and the nonprofessional nature of social work, and suggests that the rapid development of social work and its professionalization are the inevitable results of the reform in the system. The author maintains that under market socialism, social work requires the…

  6. From political economy to sociology: Francis Galton and the social-scientific origins of eugenics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renwick, Chris

    2011-09-01

    Having coined the word 'eugenics' and inspired leading biologists and statisticians of the early twentieth century, Francis Galton is often studied for his contributions to modern statistical biology. However, whilst documenting this part of his work, historians have frequently neglected crucial aspects of what motivated Galton to establish his eugenics research programme. Arguing that his work was shaped more by social than by biological science, this paper addresses these oversights by tracing the development of Galton's programme, from its roots in a debate about political economy to his appeals for it to be taken up by sociologists. In so doing, the paper not only returns Galton's ideas to their original context but also provides a reason to reflect on the place of the social sciences in history-of-science scholarship.

  7. Sociology of Drug Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    In this article which is a review of sociological ideas and studies of drug abusers in social situation, drug addiction steps (particularly alcohol, heroin and cocaine consumption) are revised and some explanations are made. Also, the role of some sociological ideas in drug addiction is considered in which Anomie Theory reads: "because of such duality, the individuals who are not satisfied with their role are in hurt." According to this theory, drug users choose seclusion and neglecting usual...

  8. Quantitative Methodology in Sociology: The Last Twenty-five Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuessler, Karl F.

    1980-01-01

    Argues that recent work in research methods in sociology consists largely of adapting methods developed elsewhere (statistics, demography, economics) for answering relatively simple questions about social change. These questions reflect practical as well as theoretical concerns. Discusses social indicators, social forecasting, cohort, occupational…

  9. Faith and Social Character Education of Sociological Education Perspective: an Implementation of Classroom Management in Islamic School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subiyantoro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This model of education is developed from Carl Rogers’s indirect instruction in the process of learning Core Competence I (faith dimension and Core Competence II (social dimension, channeled through school culture in sociology dimension using Looking Glass Self theory from Cooley and Three Self Elements theory from Freud. Research and Development method is employed to reveal: characteristic of faith and social dimensions in the students of State Islamic School (MAN Wates 1in indirect instruction; which effective education model should be applied in the students’ faith and social character education. The measurement before and after treatment is conducted using observation and in-depth interview methods towards teachers and students with students’ faith and social characteristic measurement scale instrument. The analysis uses data reduction, data display, and verification. The result shows thatin a learning faith and social character educationportrait, teachers find it difficult to relate material and skill being taught with faith and social character education being ddeveloped. The in-class education model proposed includes inculcating, facilitating, modeling, and skill developing. The increase of character motivates teachers to improve their competence in buiding faith and social dimensions of the students.

  10. Deleuze, art and social work

    OpenAIRE

    Crociani-Windland, L.

    2017-01-01

    This article outlines the value of Deleuze’s philosophy to social work in offering a different understanding of the constitution of reality and being human and the importance of the visual by way of artistic and craft activities. The key concepts derived from Deleuze’s work and outlined in the article concern the idea of the ‘virtual’ as relevant to the concept of ‘a life’ and ‘difference and repetition’ as a way of conceptualising an anti-essentialist post-modern view of identity as fragment...

  11. Social Work in the Engaged University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elisa M.; Pyles, Loretta

    2013-01-01

    This article identifies the importance of educating social work students and enlisting social work faculty to embrace the university-community engagement arena as a critical subfield of community practice. Through the lens of social work knowledge, values, and skills, the authors present three case studies of social workers who are working in the…

  12. Medical sociology for whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaska, N L

    1977-12-01

    This article defines the role of a medical sociologist in a medical institution concerned with health care delivery. The role in applied research and teaching is also discussed. The distinction is made between sociology in medicine and sociology of medicine. Five broad areas of research included under the category of sociology of medicine are the consumer of health care; the social, cultural, and economic enviroments as they relate to health and illness; health and illness behavior; patient education; and the evaluation of services provided to the consumer. Research methodologies utilized by sociologists are briefly presented, and research issues of concern in the sociology of medicine are outlined. The knowledge and information provided by a medical sociologist are supplemental to the physician's practice and are expressed ultimately as a benefit for the patient.

  13. John Foran’s sociology of revolution: From historical sociology to the sociological imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Yu Karasyev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers J. Foran’s sociology of revolution through the stages of evolution of his theoretical and methodological views and the works representing them. The trajectory of Foran’s sociology of revolution reflects in many respects the development of the contemporary comparative and historical sociology of revolution: from the fundamental historical research of a few classical cases to the quantitative study of an extremely wide range of examples and after that to the prediction of the ‘revolution-like’ events’ in future. According to Foran, there are three ways to consider the future of revolutions: 1 the analysis of the revolutions of the past, 2 the look into the future in terms of the existing theories, 3 the sources of sociological imagination. These three methods correspond to three stages in Foran’s sociology of revolution: after conducting the historical study of the situation and revolutions in Iran, the comparative analysis of 39 revolution events in the Third World countries and then an attempt to imagine patterns of future revolutions on the example of Zapatistas’ revolution in Mexico in 1994 and the struggle for global justice at the beginning of the XXI century. Despite the evolution of the subject and methodology of the theory, the concept ‘political culture of opposition’ remained the central category of Foran’s model. This complex notion describes such social process when under the influence of material and discursive elements the revolutionaries found out some common discourse that prescribed them to participate in collective actions to change their societies. Thus, Foran states that revolutions are the product of both structural conditions and human agency and the latter is due to both political-economic and cultural reasons. The cultural-structural character of Foran’s approach makes it relevant for the study of contemporary revolutionary events.

  14. The social logic of boxing in black Chicago. Towards a sociology of pugilism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc J. D. Wacquant

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dedicated to the memory of Aaron, Spanish manchild and gym buddy, whom the ring could not save from the street. This paper benefited from the reactions, critical comments and encouragement of a number of colleagues, among whom Pierre Bourdieu, Rogers Brubaker, Dan Chambliss, Lynn S. Chancer, Rick Fantasia, Harvey Molotch, Bill Wilson, and members of the Center for European Sociology in Paris. My gratitude also goes to my colleagues in the "sweet science" who taught me much more than how to throw a left jab, and to the friends and family who supported me morally during this strenuous project (with special mention to Elizabeth Bonamour du Tartre for a major on-site assist. This research was made possible in part by the financial support of the Maison des sciences de l'homme, a Lavoisier Fellowship from the French governement, and the Milton Fund of Harvard University.

  15. Las ciencias sociales: convergencias disciplinarias y conocimiento de fronteras. El caso de la sociología

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cèsar Manzanos Bilbao

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo el autor aborda los criterios que otorgan validez a la realidad social, mismos que constituyen uno de los núcleos del debate epistemológico contemporáneo de la sociología. A lo largo de su trabajo, el autor se plantea las siguientes preguntas, las cuales se tornan el eje de su reflexión: ¿quiénes construyen la realidad social?; ¿cuáles son las definiciones dominantes?; ¿cómo se materializan, universalizan y moldean las definiciones elevadas al rango de científicas y las formas de organización e interacción social establecidas y normalizadas? Al contrastar los puntos de vista de diversos autores y de una sólida argumentación, el autor da cuenta de nuevas claves estructurales que podrían orientar a los futuros modelos de organización en el ámbito de las transformaciones sociales mediante novedosas formas de consenso.

  16. 2016 Hans O. Mauksch Address: Are Introduction to Sociology and Social Problems Morphing into Each Other? What Syllabi Can Tell Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowney, Kathleen S.; Price, Anne M.; Gonzalez Guittar, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Given that so many college students take Introduction to Sociology or Social Problems or both, we wondered about the amount of content overlap in these courses. We designed a study that used content analysis of syllabi from these courses in order to measure the amount of convergence between the two classes. In our sample, nearly 70 percent of the…

  17. Using a Social Science--Fictional Play to Teach about Global Capitalism and Macro-Structural Systems in Introduction to Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelak, Cynthia Fabrizio; Duncan, Stacey

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the use of a social science-fictional play to teach macro-structural concepts related to global capitalism and surplus labor in a small and large Introduction to Sociology course. Relying on a cross-disciplinary and critical pedagogical approach that combines theory and practice to empower students to develop a critical…

  18. Introduction: why a Sociology of Pandemics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingwall, Robert; Hoffman, Lily M; Staniland, Karen

    2013-02-01

    Infectious disease has re-emerged as a public health threat in an increasingly globalised era, adding trans-national actors to traditional national and local government actors. This special issue showcases new sociological work in response to this challenge. The contributors have investigated the social construction of new and re-emerging diseases; the development of surveillance systems, public health governance; the impact of scientific/technical modalities on uncertainty and risk, the interplay of infectious disease, public health and national security concerns, and public and media responses. The case studies range broadly across North America, Europe and Asia and define new agendas for medical sociologists and public health policymakers. © 2012 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2012 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Social Working Memory: Neurocognitive networks and plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Meghan Leigh

    2014-01-01

    The social world is incredibly complex and the ability to keep track of various pieces of social information at once is imperative for success as a social species. Yet, how humans manage social information in mind has to date remained a mystery. On the one hand, psychological models of working memory, or the ability to maintain and manipulate information in mind, suggest that managing social information in mind would rely on generic working memory processes. However, recent research in social...

  20. The sociology of scientific work the fundamental relationship between science and society

    CERN Document Server

    Vinck, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    More than ever before, science and technology play a significant role in modern society as evidenced by the development of nanotechnologies and the controversies surrounding GMOs and climate change. This book comprehensively explores the flourishing field of science and technology studies and examines its creation, development and interaction with contemporary society. Dominique Vinck examines the various relationships between science and society including the emergence of sciences, the dynamics of innovation and technical democracy. He also investigates the principal social mechanisms of science and technology such as institutions, organizations, exchanges between researchers and the construction of scientific knowledge, expertise and innovation. The book provides a thorough overview of the field and reviews the major theoretical and methodological approaches as well as the current state of research on a range of topics. This original book will strongly appeal to students and researchers in the social scie...

  1. A theoretical dialogue on monitoring and valuation approaches, social capital, and the sociology of economics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weaver, Paul; Kemp, René

    2014-01-01

    Different forms of monitoring/measuring of social innovation are needed to respond to the evaluation concerns and questions of different stakeholders and the evaluation needs that arise at different stages in the process of social innovation. The established social innovation measurement paradigm,

  2. The problem of creative activity in of social work research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilka L.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Current Latvian research in the area of social work is not characteristic of a creative and innovative methodological approach. The methodological conservatism derived from general sociology is particularly affecting students in doctoral studies. This proposes a question: should, in the name of scientific novelty, we support research in which the PhD student aims to get rid of his personality behind the shield of authority, sometimes even general sociology textbook truths? Or should we encourage bold challenges to methodological schematism, in which the researcher takes a pose of truly creative research and avoids becoming a representative of scientific marginality lacking one’s personality? The subject of creative activity – the researcher in social work – can best express oneself in the level of philosophic wisdom, identifying only the main guidelines of his creative processes and allowing a large headspace for one’s creative quests. A scientist, also one interested in the problems of social work, can ascertain his/her uniqueness by relying on the concept that any researcher has embarked on an individual journey, circulating on different orbits around one central idea. If the distance between such central idea and the researcher’s activities is increasing, this signifies of either a creatively productive reevaluation of the researcher’s position, or the death of the research process in having lost the original idea. On the other hand, continuous approach towards the central idea either means that the researcher is consistent and determined in his creative research, or there is complete lack of scientific novelty in cases when borrowed foreign ideas are worshipped.

  3. Indigenous People in a Landscape of Risk: Teaching Social Work Students about Socially Just Social Work Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Hilary; Congress, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    The need for social justice in social work practice is particularly apparent in work with indigenous populations. In spite of the social work profession's commitment to social justice, social workers have often done significant harm in their work with indigenous peoples. Social work educators are ideally positioned to close this gap between social…

  4. Family as an agent of socialization in the transitional society: Sociological aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrijević Srboljub D.

    2014-01-01

    Considering the family as an agent of socialization in the transitional society it is necessary to start from the knowledge that the family is the first in the hierarchy of social values. It is also the fundamental social unit and the area of community, which has an enormous role in the life of every individual and in every social system. It is necessary to add the fact that the family as a social group is irreplaceable corner where a man is formed as a person, accomplishes himself and in tha...

  5. The Future of Global Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Potocky-Tripodi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the social work within the context of internationalism and globalization. Based on an examination of published documents on international social work in the past decade, the authors make an evidence-based projection of what is likely to occur in the future of global social work. Finally, the authors make a social work values-based projection of what should occur.

  6. Social Justice, Education and School Social Work in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadir, Ural; Aktan, Mehmet Can

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on welfare state, social justice and school social work interaction. In this paper, these three concepts' reflections in Turkey were mentioned. Researchers aimed to discuss how school social work (which is brought to the agenda recently) is important in the provision of social justice in Turkish public service delivery. [For the…

  7. Status of Women in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Izumi; Anastas, Jeane W.; McPhail, Beverly M.; Colarossi, Lisa G.

    2008-01-01

    This invited study sought to determine the current status of women in social work education for the special section of the "Journal of Social Work Education." Analysis of the latest data available indicate that gender differences remain pervasive across many aspects of social work education, including pay, rank, job duties, and tenure.…

  8. The Financial Literacy of Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindle, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    The financial literacy of social work students has become the focus of curriculum development and research, but no study to date has attempted to assess the financial knowledge possessed by social work students. This study addressed that gap by assessing the level of objective financial knowledge reported by social work student respondents…

  9. Does Social Work Have a Signature Pedagogy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earls Larrison, Tara; Korr, Wynne S.

    2013-01-01

    This article contributes to discourse on signature pedagogy by reconceptualizing how our pedagogies are understood and defined for social work education. We critique the view that field education is social work's signature pedagogy and consider what pedagogies are distinct about the teaching and learning of social work. Using Shulman's…

  10. Social Work Science and Knowledge Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jeanne C.; Reed, Martena

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This article advances understanding of social work science by examining the content and methods of highly utilized or cited journal articles in social work. Methods: A data base of the 100 most frequently cited articles from 79 social work journals was coded and categorized into three primary domains: content, research versus…

  11. Back to Hegel? On Gillian Rose's critique of sociological reason.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Brian W

    2017-08-22

    Thirty-five years ago, Gillian Rose articulated a significant critique of classical sociological reason, emphasizing its relationship to its philosophical forebears. In a series of works, but most significantly in her Hegel contra Sociology, Rose worked to specify the implications of sociology's failure, both in its critical Marxist and its 'scientific' forms, to move beyond Kant and to fully come to terms with the thought of Hegel. In this article, I unpack and explain the substance of her criticisms, developing the necessary Hegelian philosophical background on which she founded them. I argue that Rose's attempted recuperation of 'speculative reason' for social theory remains little understood, despite its continued relevance to contemporary debates concerning the nature and scope of sociological reason. As an illustration, I employ Rose to critique Chernilo's recent call for a more philosophically sophisticated sociology. From the vantage point of Rose, this particular account of a 'philosophical sociology' remains abstract and rooted in the neo-Kantian contradictions that continue to characterize sociology. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  12. "Ghosts of Sociologies Past": Settlement Sociology in the Progressive Era at the Chicago School of Civics and Philanthropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Vicky M.; Williams, Joyce E.

    2012-01-01

    This embedded case study of the Chicago School of Civics and Philanthropy (CSCP) illustrates the development of disciplinary boundaries during a transitional period of professionalization in the social sciences, particularly for the fields of sociology and social work. Drawing on archival data (e.g., reports, scholarly and autobiographical…

  13. Analysis of major risk factors affecting those working in the agrarian sector (based on a sociological survey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krekoten, Olena M; Dereziuk, Anatolii V; Ihnaschuk, Olena V; Holovchanska, Svitlana E

    Issues related to labour potential, its state and problems have consistently been a focus of attention for the International Labour Organisation (ILO). Its respective analysis shows that labour potential problems remain unresolved in many countries of the world. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), adverse working conditions are among major factors of occupational disease development in Europe and the reason for disabilities of economically active population during 2.5% of their lifetime. The aim of the present study is to identify and analyse major risk factors, which have a bearing on people working in agriculture in the course of exercising their occupation, with account of forms of ownership of agricultural enterprises. Carried out was a cross-sectional study involving a sociological survey of 412 respondents - those working in agriculture - who made up the primary group and the control group. The study revealed 21 risk factors, 9 of which were work-related. A modified elementary cybernetic model of studying impact efficiency was developed with the view of carrying out a structural analysis of the sample group and choosing relevant methodological approaches. It has been established that harmful factors related to working environment and one's lifestyle are decisive in the agrarian sector, particularly for workers of privately owned businesses. For one out of three respondents harmful working conditions manifested themselves as industrial noise (31.7±3.4), vibration (29.0±2.1) trunk bending and constrained working posture (36.6±3.4). The vast majority of agricultural workers (91.6±2.5) admitted they could not afford proper rest during their annual leave; male respondents abused alcohol (70.6±3.0) and smoking (41.4±2.0 per 100 workers). The research established the structure of risk factors, which is sequentially represented by the following groups: behavioral (smoking, drinking of alcohol, rest during annual leave, physical culture), working

  14. Phenomenological sociology in the framework of contemporary methodological debates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Ivanova

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The article provides a review of the pivotal doctrines in the sphere of social sciences and humanities methodology, namely positivism (O. Comte, H. Spenser et al and antipositivism (W. Dilthey, H. Rickert et al. In terms of E. Husserl's late philosophy as well as the works of M. Merleau-Ponty and A. Schutz the article provides the analysis of one of the prominent schools of the contemporary social theory - phenomenological sociology which is highlighted as the non-classical strategy of the philosophical methodology of social sciences and humanities opposing both Comte's objectivism as well as the sociological «subjectivism» of Neo-Kantianism.

  15. Social Networks in the Labour Market--The Sociology of Job Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Edgar

    1989-01-01

    Reviews literature on nature of social networks in labor market and their implications for job search strategies of dislocated workers. Suggests issues for further research: (1) how the job search changes as unemployment increases; (2) the role of social networks in the labor market; and (3) claims about security and conditions of jobs found…

  16. The Sociological Study of the Effect of Family Structure on Social Health of Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naima Mohammadi

    Full Text Available Social health depends on different social and cultural factors. One of the most important suppliers of individual’s health is family structures and relations. In recent years due to functional changes in polygamous structure, there are threats against social health of men in Sarbaz city. In this research, to compare the rate of social health of men in polygamous and monogamous families in Sarbaz city we use a standard questionnaire of Shapiro & Keyes (2007. The population of this study consisted of 300 males who are residents of this city. They selected by using cluster sampling method. Gathered data were analyzed using SPSS software version 22. Findings from independent T-Test revealed that the average of social Coherence, Integration, Contribution and Actualization between men in polygamous families were significantly lower than monogamous. Based on these findings, we can conclude however a lot of traditional social customs were useful, functional and compatible and provide social acceptance, but today have become dysfunctional and threated social health of family members and community system face with crisis.

  17. Working Paper on Social capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen Hanan, Anne

    This paper outlines the major schools within social capital theory. Contemporary authors such as Coleman, Putnam and Bourdieu are elaborated on. The paper also presents a non-exhaustive review on studies of social capital. Furthermore, a criticial discussion on social capital is reviewed, before...

  18. Gino Germani y la Biblioteca de Psicología Social y Sociología de Paidós

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Arbeláez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo realiza un análisis de la labor editorial desarrollada por Gino Germani en la Biblioteca de Psicología Social y Sociología de Paidós, con el fin de ver cómo, por medio de ésta, Germani, al poner en circulación toda una gama de textos (por primera vez traducidos a lengua hispana de carácter interdisciplinar, empírico y anglosajón, logra constituir en América Latina un público lector especializado en ciencias sociales que tendrá empatía con su propuesta de una renovación intelectual de la sociología. Lo cual hace que, doce años después de iniciado su proyecto editorial, con la edición de su libro La sociología científica, él y su texto se sitúen en el centro de atención de la disciplina en América Latina y se conviertan en una referencia obligada de esta nueva orientación sociológica en la región, la sociología científica.

  19. Can sociology help to improve nursing practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, David

    The first in a five-part series on sociology offers an overview of the debate about the relationship between sociology and nursing. Although sociological education is currently limited within nurse education, there is a long-held argument for its relevance. With a growing emphasis on preventative and public healthcare, sociology may yet prove its usefulness. Subsequent articles cover four of the key social factors affecting health.

  20. Contribuições da Sociologia na América Latina à imaginação sociológica: análise, crítica e compromisso social Sociology's contribution in Latin America to sociological imagination: analysis, critique, and social commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Vicente Tavares-dos-Santos

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O artigo aborda o papel desempenhado pela Sociologia na análise dos processos de transformação das sociedades latino-americanas, no acompanhamento do processo de construção do Estado e da Nação, na problematização das questões sociais na América Latina. São analisados seis períodos na Sociologia na América Latina e no Caribe: I a herança intelectual da Sociologia ; II a sociologia da cátedra; III O período da "Sociologia Científica" e a configuração da "Sociologia Crítica"; IV a crise institucional, a consolidação da "Sociologia Crítica" e a diversificação da sociologia; V a sociologia do autoritarismo, da democracia e da exclusão; VI a consolidação institucional e a mundialização da sociologia da América Latina (desde o ano de 2000, podendo-se afirmar que os traços distintivos do saber sociológico no continente foram: o internacionalismo, o hibridismo, a abordagem crítica dos processos e conflitos das sociedades latino-americanas e o compromisso social do sociólogo.The article focuses on the role played by Sociology in the analysis of processes of change in Latin American societies, in the process of construction of Nation and State, in the debate of social issues in Latin America and the Caribbean. Six periods in Sociology in Latin America and the Caribbean are examined: I sociology's intellectual legacy; II sociology as a cathedra; III the period of "Scientific Sociology"; IV the institutional crisis, the consolidation of "Critical Sociology", and the diversifying of sociology; V sociology of authoritarianism, democracy and exclusion; VI institutional consolidation and globalization of Latin American sociology (since 2000. It may be said that the distinctive features of sociological knowledge in the continent were: internationalism, hybridism, the critical approach to processes and conflicts of Latin American societies, and the sociologist social commitment.

  1. Social aspects of revitalization of rural areas. Implementation of the rural revival programme in lodzkie voivodeship. Assumptions for sociological research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Jeziorska-Biel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Essential elements of the process of rural renovation programme are: stimulating activity of local communities, cooperation for development, while preserving social identity, cultural heritage and natural environment. Implementing a rural revival programme in Poland: Sectoral Operational Programme “The Restructuring and Modernisation of the Food Sector and the Development of Rural Areas in 2004-2006” (action 2.3 “Rural renovation and protection and preservation of cultural heritage” evokes criticism. A wide discussion is carried amongst researchers, politicians, social activists, and local government practitioners. The main question remains: “is rural renovation process in Poland conducted in accordance with the rules in European countries or it is only a new formula of rural modernisation with the use of European funds?” The authors are joining the discussion and in the second part of the article they are presenting the assumption of sociological research. The aim of the analysis is to grasp the essence of revitalization of rural areas located in Łódzkie voivodeship, and analyse the question of specificity of rural Revival Programmes. What is the scope and manner of use of local capital? If so, are the results obtained from implementing a rural revival programme in 2004-2006 within the scope of sustainable development? What activities are predominant in the process of project implementation? Is it rural modernisation, revitalization of the rural areas, barrier removal and change in Infrastructure, or creation of social capital and subjectivity of the local community? Has the process of rural renovation in Łódzkie voivodeship got the so called “social face” and if so, to what extent? The major assumption is that rural renovation programme in Łódzkie voivodeship relates more to revitalization material aspects than “spirituality”.

  2. Sociología de la profesión de graduado social

    OpenAIRE

    Real Villarreal, Mariano Ángel

    2002-01-01

    El análisis actual sobre las profesiones se centra en su relación con la estructura social, las organizaciones y la política, de tal manera que las tendencias más recientes están configurando su estudio sobre la base del conocimiento abstracto y de su utilización por el Estado en la definición y solución de problemas sociales, lo que garantiza su proyecto de expansión profesional y el mantenimiento de sus posiciones de poder y privilegio. En el Graduado Social confluyen dos tradic...

  3. Sociological perspectives for the study of nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Cruz-Doimeadios

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to explain the society-nature relationship from the disciplines Environmental Sociologyand Cultural Sociology which reveal the arranging function of culture in the orientation of the everyday social doing with respect to the management of novel because it, passes over the thesis that Sociology of Culture states, which is centered in the role of the institucional component a as regulator of the social doing so as to stop the deterioration of the natural spaces. The result consist of the systematization of the theoretical grounds of the disciplines the allow to understand the meaning of culture in social organization around the individuals and groups doing on the nature as objest of analysis.

  4. Family as an agent of socialization in the transitional society: Sociological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Srboljub D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the family as an agent of socialization in the transitional society it is necessary to start from the knowledge that the family is the first in the hierarchy of social values. It is also the fundamental social unit and the area of community, which has an enormous role in the life of every individual and in every social system. It is necessary to add the fact that the family as a social group is irreplaceable corner where a man is formed as a person, accomplishes himself and in that way satisfies human needs, which otherwise can be met only in the family. It is a universal human community, which plays an important role in the development of the man in society, not only the man as an individual, but also society as a whole. Studying the family as one of the oldest primary social groups within which biological, emotional, economic, educational - cultural and communication relationships, are realited, a number of theorists and researchers have found out that the family has not yet been sufficiently explored and there are many ambiguous and unresolved questions as well as problems behind us. In this respect the family has proved to be a constant movement in time and space, with a tan.gle of action and at the same time sensitive to the new changes in its internal and external relations in a global society. There are various factors in the development of socialization among children, which affect socialization, but it is rightly said that the family is the social environment where is the person developed, and that it is the most important factor in the socialization of society. Many family theorists say that it is a heterogeneous environment, i.e. society at large, where many social phenomena aresdved such as: love, hate, rivalry and solidarity, humanity and selfishness. A child in a family environment emulates all these habits so that graduallyit acquires certain social habits, and thus it also gains a certain attitude towards the society

  5. The Science of Social Work and Its Relationship to Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastas, Jeane W.

    2014-01-01

    As John Brekke has observed, social work does not use the word "science" to define itself, suggesting a need to articulate a science of social work. This article discusses the science of social work and its relationship to social work practice in the United States, arguing that a "rapprochement" between practice and science…

  6. Military Social Work as an Exemplar in Teaching Social Work Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, James G.; Carlson, Joan; Evans, Pinkie

    2015-01-01

    This article is for social work educators unfamiliar with military social work and receptive to a number of exemplars to enhance teaching strategies within their courses. Because examples of military social work are directly tied to the Council on Social Work Education competencies, this article offers a number of suggested teaching strategies…

  7. Enterprise Social Media at Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrby, Signe; Jensen, Tina Blegind; Avital, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of IT-enabled collaborative tools such as Enterprise Social Media (ESM) has brought new forms of organizational collaboration to the forefront. We introduce social fabric as a theoretical frame to reveal how ESM can become part-and-parcel of the social environment in which...... organizational members interact and collaborate. Drawing on Bruno Latour’s cartography of controversies, we present novel empirical insights from a case study of the ESM platform Yammer in an IT consultancy company. Our analysis uncovers four threads of the social fabric: ‘public-private context’, ‘social......-professional content’, ‘praise-reprimands giving ratio’ and ‘noise-news perception' that characterize the interactions between the organizational members and how collaboration is woven on the respective ESM platform. The findings show that delineating the emerging threads of the social fabric can help tracing...

  8. Sociology: a view from the diaspora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Richard

    2010-12-01

    From the vantage point of criminology, one of sociology's main export subject areas, the present and future of sociology appear a good deal more promising than John Holmwood's essay on the discipline's misfortune would suggest. Sociology remains in high demand by students and faculty hiring remains strong, even in its more critical sub-fields, such as race and ethnicity, sex and gender, and social inequality. Holmwood is correct that sociology is vulnerable to external pressures to demonstrate its relevance to social practice, but those pressures come from left-wing social movements as well as from centres of power. He is also correct that external pressures contribute to internal disagreement, but sociology has been at war with itself since the 1960s, with little evident decline in its academic standing or intellectual vitality. Those of us on the discipline's diaspora, who depend on sociology for both support and light, must remain hopeful about sociology's continued good fortune.

  9. Social responsibility in French engineering education: a historical and sociological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Christelle; Derouet, Antoine

    2013-12-01

    In France, some institutions seem to call for the engineer's sense of social responsibility. However, this call is scarcely heard. Still, engineering students have been given the opportunity to gain a general education through courses in literature, law, economics, since the nineteenth century. But, such courses have long been offered only in the top ranked engineering schools. In this paper, we intend to show that the wish to increase engineering students' social responsibility is an old concern. We also aim at highlighting some macro social factors which shaped the answer to the call for social responsibility in the French engineering "Grandes Ecoles". In the first part, we provide an overview of the scarce attention given to the engineering curriculum in the scholarly literature in France. In the second part, we analyse one century of discourses about the definition of the "complete engineer" and the consequent role of non technical education. In the third part, we focus on the characteristics of the corpus which has been institutionalized. Our main finding is that despite the many changes which occurred in engineering education during one century, the "other formation" remains grounded on a non academic "way of knowing", and aims at increasing the reputation of the schools, more than enhancing engineering students' social awareness.

  10. [Margot Jefferys: the British voice of medical sociology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Everardo Duarte

    2011-03-01

    Margot Jefferys (1916-1999) was not only the person who introduced medical sociology into Great Britain, but also the researcher and professor who, during thirty years, exerted the most deep influence on the teaching of health social sciences either in undergraduate or especially graduate studies, since the beginning of her career, in 1953, at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. In addition to create a global panorama concerning the Jefferys' works, this study highlights two texts, which are situated into the field we are researching: the history of health sociology. The first one, published in 1991, discusses the relationships between epidemiology and sociology; and the second, published in 1996, discusses the field of medical sociology. Both texts are a series of considerations regarding the Jefferys' thought and the more recent questions of the field in Great Britain.

  11. Encountering social work through STS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    housing areas. The Danish state and its municipalities diligently track and monitor the statistics of social housing areas. Using “parameters of marginalization” such as ethnicity, income, unemployment and education, topographical depictions of social issues in certain areas are constituted and used...

  12. Social Maturation: Work Group Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Michael D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Each of the seven factors that affect adolescent social development is presented together with a description of potentially important research, service, and policy initiatives within each topic area. The factors are self-esteem, peer group, parenting, family, services, enforced dependency, and positive sexual socialization. (CT)

  13. Sociological perspectives on self-help groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, L; Rasmussen, J M

    2001-01-01

    and significance of self-help groups. FINDINGS: New empirical sociological evidence shows that health care professionals - nurses, psychologists, social workers - have become an integrated part and thus essential actors in self-help groups within as well as outside the framework of the formal health care system...... that it is necessary to introduce new aspects and themes for discussion in the health care debate and the work that goes beyond the predominantly individual orientated treatment and care function....

  14. Economics and sociology: Between cooperation and intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Stojanović Božo

    2007-01-01

    In social sciences two opposing tendencies act simultaneously: the growth of specialization and the need for synthesis. Similar tendencies are noticeable when economics and sociology are in question. The need for these two sciences to cooperate was noticed a long time ago. However, an increasingly intensive exchange has been achieved only recently, particularly in the explanation of individual and group behavior. The works of Mancur Olson are a good example how the results of economics can be...

  15. ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY: BETWEN COOPERATION AND INTOLERANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Božo Stojanović

    2007-01-01

    In social sciences two opposing tendencies act simultaneously: the growth of specialisation and the need for synthesis. Similar tendencies are noticable when economics and sociology are in question. The need for these two sciences to cooperate was noticed a long time ago. However, an incresingly intensive exchange has been achieved only recently, particularly in the explanation of individual and group behavior. The works of Mancur Olson are a good example how the results of economics can be i...

  16. The political responsibility of Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Zamanillo Peral

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The intention of this article is to try to recover a critical dialog between the politics and the social work. In this paper it argued that the politics is a dimension of the identity of the social work of which we cannot avoid. In this way, the politics and the social work, are doubly tied. On the one hand, the political power exercise corresponds to every citizen of the polis. And, on the other hand, the social work is narrowly tied to the social politics by means of its object of study. Our arguments it’s construct from a diagnosis of the social reality and professional that is held in this specific relationship. We claim to contribute with elements of analyses that help, not only to understand, but also answering politically as professionals of the social work and as citizen in the society.

  17. Regional Sociological Research Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Vladimirovich Morev

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the experience of the Institute of Socio-Economic Development of Territories of RAS in conducting sociological research on the territory of the Vologda Oblast and the Northwestern Federal District. It describes the historical aspects of formation of the system for public opinion monitoring and examines its theoretical and methodological foundations. The author of the article analyzes the structure of monitoring indicators and provides a brief interpretation of research findings that reflect social wellbeing and social perception trends. In addition, the paper analyzes people’s attitude toward the activities of federal and regional authorities, trends in social well-being, consumer sentiment and also the complex indicator – the index of public sentiment in the region – developed by ISEDT RAS researchers. The results of sociological studies carried out at ISEDT RAS correlate with the dynamics of the all-Russian public opinion polls conducted by the Institute of Sociology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Russian Public Opinion Research Center (VCIOM, Levada-Center, etc. They indicate that Russian society gradually adapts to new conditions of life after the collapse of the USSR. Besides, opinion polls show the most important features of the post-Soviet Russian history at its present stage; they are associated with the intensification of international political relations, the consequences of the “Crimean spring” and the new challenges Russia’s economy is facing now. The article concludes that as global community, of which Russian society is part, is evolving, sociological knowledge begins to play an increasingly important role in administration and national security; this is associated with the greater importance attached to intangible development factors. Therefore, a necessary prerequisite for administration effectiveness in all its stages is to implement the results of sociological research on social

  18. The Relationship of Social Pedagogy and Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blahoslav Kraus

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the development of the relationship between social work and social pedagogy at the end of the 20th century in the Czech Republic and compares this relationship to the one in neighbouring countries (Germany, England, France, Switzerland, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Poland, Slovakia, Russia, Lithuania. The article further deals with various concepts of this relationship (including identification, differentiation, and convergent principle. It also compares the paradigms of social pedagogy and social work (autonomy, similarities and differences mainly in epistemological terms. Series of paradigms appear in both social work and social pedagogy during their development. A prevailing tendency towards the multi-paradigmatism can be seen. Furthermore, the article discusses the differences in professional aspirations within both fields and the number of job opportunities for the fields graduates. A conclusion of the article is dedicated to the professional career within social pedagogy and social work regarding the real life situation in both fields.

  19. Dialogical communication and empowering social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natland, Sidsel

    2015-01-01

    How to succeed in facilitating for empowering processes within social work practice is a central topic in both theoretical discussions and regarding its principles in practice. With a particular focus on how dialogical communication can play a part in order to practice empowering social work, through this text the author frames HUSK as a project facilitating the underpinning humanistic approaches in social work. Dialogical communication and its philosophical base is presented and recognized as a means to achieve empowering social work as well as highlighting the importance of the humanistic approach. The author also underscores how HUSK projects in themselves were enabled because of the required collaboration between service users, professionals, and researchers that signified HUSK. This is pinpointed as having potential for a future research agenda as well as pointing at how the outcomes of the projects may impact future social work practice when the goal is to conduct empowering social work.

  20. Administrative corruption from sociology perspective and the relationship between administrative corruption and social security

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsen Zarei Jlyany; Gholam Reza Sharafi; Mustafa Tavani; Mansour Haghighatian; Moslem Tavani

    2014-01-01

    certain principles Observance and non- Observance on organizing a social system will have Indisputable effect at the Organization. And administrative systems are not exempt from this, also the selection of the Administration components and also How to Place the components together can affect its performance. Meanwhile, the government's role in the prevalence or no-prevalence, the extent type and the way of administrative corruption influence, in this article, researchers wants to explore the ...

  1. Speaking sociologically with big data: symphonic social science and the future for big data research

    OpenAIRE

    Halford, Susan; Savage, Mike

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have seen persistent tension between proponents of big data analytics, using new forms of digital data to make computational and statistical claims about ‘the social’, and many sociologists sceptical about the value of big data, its associated methods and claims to knowledge. We seek to move beyond this, taking inspiration from a mode of argumentation pursued by Putnam (2000), Wilkinson and Pickett (2009) and Piketty (2014) that we label ‘symphonic social science’. This bears bot...

  2. One Hundred Years of Sociological Solitude?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbaut, Ruben G.

    2005-01-01

    This Cuban-born author presents a narrative on the social events in the United States that marked his life as he embarked on a career in the field of sociology in the 1960s and 70s. He advocates for sociologists' awareness of social realities and the evolution of sociological studies from a socially-conscious perspective.

  3. REFLECTIVE SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION IN SUPPORT OF SOCIALLY JUST SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE: THE EXPERIENCE OF SOCIAL WORK STUDENTS AT A UNIVERSITY IN SOUTH AFRICA

    OpenAIRE

    Esau, Merlene; Keet, Anneline

    2014-01-01

    Social justice and human dignity are core components of social work principles and ethics; therefore social work education should lead to socially just practice. Social workers’ ability to practise in a socially just manner relies significantly on their ability to reflect on the influence of their personal and professional socialisation and the structural inequalities that influence the lives of service users. In order to achieve a deep sense of social justice, social workers should be educat...

  4. Teaching Clinical Social Work under Occupation: Listening to the Voices of Palestinian Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaliari, Efrosini; Berzoff, Joan; Byers, David S.; Fareed, Anan; Berzoff-Cohen, Jake; Hreish, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    The authors were invited to teach clinical social work in the Palestinian West Bank. In order to teach, we designed a study exploring how 65 Palestinian social work students described the psychological and social effects of working under occupation. Students described social stressors of poverty, unemployment, lack of infrastructure, violence,…

  5. A critical Social Work project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Montaño

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary social transformations, operated by the neoliberal program under the command of financial capital, bring new challenges to the group of citizens and men and women who live by the sale of their labor power. Social workers, individually and collectively, are not separate from this reality. The profession was characterized by its confrontation with these challenges and its questioning and analysis of its role in society, in its attempt to assume more critical profiles and commitments to the interests of workers and the subaltern sectors. An example of this is the “Reconceptualization Movement” and the later attempt to define na “Alternative Social Service” concerned with the meaning of its practice, with the process of critical knowledge, with a criticism of capitalism and its situations of social injustice. The current challenges include overcoming earlier weaknesses, collectively constructing an ethicalpolitical professional project that can competently and committedly confront, at the heart of progressive social forces, the conditions in which workers live (with or without employment as well as other subaltern populations.

  6. The sociologist and the state. An assessment of Pierre Bourdieu's sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinkel, Willem

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides an assessment of Pierre Bourdieu's sociology based on a reading of his posthumously published lectures on the state in Sur l'État. It argues that the state was a foundational element in Bourdieu's rendition of the symbolic order of everyday life. As such, the state becomes equally pivotal in Bourdieu's sociology, the applicability of which rests on the existence of the state, which stabilizes the social fields and their symbolic action that constitute the object of sociology. The state, which Bourdieu considers a 'meta'-ordering principle in social life, ensures that sociology has a well-ordered object of study, vis-à-vis which it can posit itself as 'meta-meta'. The state thus functions as an epistemic guarantee in Bourdieu's sociology. A critical analysis of Bourdieu's sociology of the state offers the chance of a more fundamental overall assessment of Bourdieu's conception of sociology that has relevance for any critical sociological perspective that rests on the assumption of a meta-social entity, such as the state in Bourdieu's work, as a final ordering instance. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2015.

  7. A Challenge to the Social Work Profession? The Rise of Socially Engaged Art and a Call to Radical Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Chul

    2017-10-01

    In this era of neoliberalism, social work in the United States is arguably overly professionalized and privatized, and has almost lost its activists roots in working for social justice. Radical social work rooted in macro-level community-based practice has been in crisis over the past three decades. The rise of socially engaged art has become more prominent in the United States even as social work has strayed away from its basic tenets such as community practice, advocacy, and social action. How should the social work profession interpret the rise of socially engaged art-already a trend in the art world-whose modality and purpose resembles radical social work? By comparing and contrasting the similarities and differences between radical social work and socially engaged art, this article examines the possibility of consilience between the two and the implications for the social work profession. © 2017 National Association of Social Workers.

  8. Problems With Sociology Education in Turkey on Its 100th Anniversary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytul Kasapoglu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Although sociology education began a century ago in Turkey, sociology is considered a scientific discipline rather than a profession in which graduates can earn money. The primary aim of this article is to identify the essence of this problem in sociology education based on students’ and sociologists’ views. To achieve the study objectives, a phenomenological study based on standpoint theory was designed and conducted with 25 students and 20 working sociologists. The findings reveal that sociology education is quite far removed from being considered a professional education. Theoretical courses without field studies are not in accordance with the requirements of both the public and private sectors. Students and sociologists are quite romantic regarding what sociology is and what sociologists do. Students mostly begin the study of sociology involuntarily and without a clear understanding of the discipline. Sometimes students find themselves in a paradox or dilemma: Although the knowledge and skills they have developed during their sociology education enable students to express themselves effectively and understand social events more comprehensively, the risk of unemployment is a severe threat. Even if they are employed, graduates are disappointed because they are not prepared to conduct the tasks that their jobs demand. Students assess these activities as social work and thus inappropriate. To solve the problems of sociology as a profession in society and as an academic field in the university, both problems must be clearly defined and programs must be carefully reconfigured to meet the demands of both society and sociologists.

  9. Catalyzing Innovation in Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traube, Dorian E.; Begun, Stephanie; Okpych, Nathanael; Choy-Brown, Mimi

    2017-01-01

    Social innovation is defined by novelty and improvement. This definition requires social work practice to be more effective or efficient than preexisting alternatives. Practice innovation is accomplished by leveraging technical, social, and economic factors to generate novel interventions, diffusion or adoption of the interventions into broader…

  10. Recognition and Judgement in Social Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Søren

    2009-01-01

    to recognition. In the first part, I outline the normative ideal and show its relevance for practical social work on the basis of social clients' experiences of disrespect. In the second, I expalin the concept of judgement and criticise the prevailing forms of judgement to be found in the social institutions...

  11. Promoting gender sensitivity in social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ann-Karina Eske

    2016-01-01

    on personal notes from teaching gender and social diversity to social work students. In this context, two main obstacles are identified: anti-feminism and individualization. These obstacles can be addressed productively. First by bringing students’ gendered experiences and social categorisations into play...

  12. Catalytic models developed through social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    of adolescents placed in out-of-home care and is characterised using three situated cases as empirical data. Afterwards the concept of catalytic processes is briefly presented and then applied in an analysis of pedagogical treatment in the three cases. The result is a different conceptualisation of the social......The article develops the concept of catalytic processes in relation to social work with adolescents in an attempt to both reach a more nuanced understanding of social work and at the same time to develop the concept of catalytic processes in psychology. The social work is pedagogical treatment...

  13. 'Blue' social capital and work performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøn, Sisse; Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase

    2012-01-01

    (Progoulaki & Roe 2011). This challenges social capital on board, i.e. the resources inherent in network cooperation associated with norms of reciprocity and trust (Putnam 2000: 19). Fragmentizing ‘blue’ social capital should however be restored, because work performance depends on the quality of cooperation...... findings suggest that a balance between three types of social capital – bonding, bridging and linking – is needed to achieve a high-performance work system (Gittell et al. 2010). Hence, main actors within the shipping sector should take ‘blue’ social capital into account in order to increase work...... efficiency and economic performance....

  14. Advancing Social Work Education for Health Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Robert H.; Ruth, Betty J.; Cox, Harold; Maramaldi, Peter; Rishel, Carrie; Rountree, Michele; Zlotnik, Joan; Marshall, Jamie

    2017-01-01

    Social work education plays a critical role in preparing social workers to lead efforts that improve health. Because of the dynamic health care landscape, schools of social work must educate students to facilitate health care system improvements, enhance population health, and reduce medical costs. We reviewed the existing contributions of social work education and provided recommendations for improving the education of social workers in 6 key areas: aging, behavioral health, community health, global health, health reform, and health policy. We argue for systemic improvement in the curriculum at every level of education, including substantive increases in content in health, health care, health care ethics, and evaluating practice outcomes in health settings. Schools of social work can further increase the impact of the profession by enhancing the curricular focus on broad content areas such as prevention, health equity, population and community health, and health advocacy. PMID:29236540

  15. Sociología y alimentación

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz Méndez, Cecilia

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available This work presents briefly the relationship between sociology and food matters. In the first place, we point out some of the reasons by which we might explain why sociology has only lately started to systematically tackle this aspect of social life and we also point out what conditions have brought about this recent interest of this discipline in food. Secondly, we include an outline of the attention paid to food by some of the most important sociology scholars. Then we present an outline of the main theories underlying food sociology (and anthropology and we end up with a proposal to define the field of food sociology, starting from the analysis of the content of some of the most important current works on the sociology of food.

    En este trabajo, se exponen las relaciones entre la sociología y el fenómeno alimentario. En primer lugar, se apuntan algunas de las razones que podrían explicar el retraso con que la sociología se ha ocupado de forma sistemática de este ámbito de la vida social y las condiciones que han despertado el interés reciente de esta disciplina por el fenómeno alimentario. En segundo lugar, se presenta un esquema de la atención prestada por los clásicos de la sociología a la alimentación, de modo que se pueda contrastar la naturaleza de esta atención con el análisis sociológico actual. En tercer lugar, se presenta un esquema de las principales orientaciones teóricas que han marcado la sociología (y la antropología de la alimentación, para terminar con una propuesta de definición del campo de la sociología de la alimentación a partir de la consideración de los contenidos de algunos textos actuales de este campo de estudio.

  16. social work and human rights in zimbabwe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    The place of the social work profession on the human rights arena is beyond doubt. .... Human Rights and the Media Institute of Southern Africa. THE NEXUS ..... Becket, C.; 2006 Ethics and values in social work 3rd Edition. Basingstoke: ...

  17. Epistemological Development in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Meger, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Epistemological development is an important factor in facilitating learner identity and developing critical thinking aptitudes. This qualitative action research study explored undergraduate social work students' epistemological beliefs about knowledge, how knowledge is constructed, and implications for social work education. Data collection…

  18. The Evaluation of Occupational Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Googins, Bradley; Godfrey, Joline

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of occupational social work from its beginnings in welfare capitalism, through the human relations movement in the 1930s and 1940s, and into the occupational alcoholism programs and employee assistance programs of the last decade is surveyed. A broad definition of occupational social work is offered. (Author)

  19. Toward Transgender Affirmative Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ashley; Craig, Shelley L.; McInroy, Lauren B.

    2016-01-01

    Social work has professional and academic standards consistent with transgender affirmative education and practice. Nevertheless, a growing body of research suggests that transgender issues are largely absent from social work education, resulting in practitioners who are uninformed or biased against transgender issues. The present study expands…

  20. Leadership in Social Work: Where Are We?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, W. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the status of leadership in social work, with an emphasis on unique functions and challenges leaders face in the field. Included in this review is a consideration of the concept of leadership as distinct from management, a historical review of the development of leadership as a specialty within social work, and…

  1. Social Work Faculty and Mental Illness Stigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Amy C.; Fulambarker, Anjali; Kondrat, David C.; Holley, Lynn C.; Kranke, Derrick; Wilkins, Brittany T.; Stromwall, Layne K.; Eack, Shaun M.

    2017-01-01

    Stigma is a significant barrier to recovery and full community inclusion for people with mental illnesses. Social work educators can play critical roles in addressing this stigma, yet little is known about their attitudes. Social work educators were surveyed about their general attitudes about people with mental illnesses, attitudes about practice…

  2. Interprofessional leadership training in MCH social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecukonis, Edward; Doyle, Otima; Acquavita, Shauna; Aparicio, Elizabeth; Gibbons, Maya; Vanidestine, Todd

    2013-01-01

    The need to train health social workers to practice interprofessionally is an essential goal of social work education. Although most health social workers have exposure to multidisciplinary practice within their field work, few social work education programs incorporate interprofessional learning as an integrated component of both course work and field experiences (McPherson, Headrick, & Moss, 2001; Reeves, Lewin, Espin, & Zwaranstein, 2010; Weinstein, Whittington, & Leiba, 2003). In addition, little is written about the kinds of curricula that would effectively promote interdisciplinary training for social work students. These findings are particularly puzzling since there is increasing and compelling evidence that interdisciplinary training improves health outcomes (IOM, 2001). This article describes a social work education program that incorporates an Interprofessional education and leadership curriculum for Maternal and Child Health Social Work (MCHSW) at the University of Maryland's School of Social Work. The University of Maryland's Interprofesisonal Training Model is described along with the components needed to formulate an interdisciplinary learning experience. Various outcomes and lessons learned are discussed.

  3. Exploring social class differences at work

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    This paper is part of a wider project that investigates how organisational and individual factors within the workplace contribute to social class differences and inequality by examining the relative impact of objective and subjective indicators of social class on explicit (e.g. salary, promotions) and implicit (e.g. career satisfaction, quality of working life, stress and well-being) career and work outcomes. \\ud There is increasing recognition that social class differences play a crucial rol...

  4. Annie Marion MacLean: “the mother of contemporary etnography” and pioneer in sociology distance learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia García Dauder

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The article introduces Anne Marion MacLean into the United States' scientific sociology at its very origins (1892, when the Department of Sociology of the Chicago University was created. It also puts MacLean in a network called "Women's School of Chicago", and the forgotten contributions of these social sciences' pioneers, submitted to the American Journal of Sociology, are analyzed. Two MacLean's key contributions are highlighted: the correspondence courses in teaching sociology and her research by means of participant observation in workplaces focusing on women's work.

  5. Social Work or Relief Work? A Crisis in Professional Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhikari Harasankar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Social work is a sharing and caring profession based on scientific methods. This problem solving profession makes people self-reliant and self-dependent when he/she is in any sorts of crises. Thus, it differs from relief work, social services or social welfare delivered during emergence crises. This paper examined the application of professional social work as relief work, which did not bring any change among the beneficiaries; rather it set their mind as opportunist. For this purpose, the programme sponsored by the government of India and implemented by nongovernmental organizations for rehabilitation of the street children (i.e., pavements and slums dwellers, children of sex workers, and so forth of Metro cities like Kolkata had priority. This evaluative study assessed the progress and changes among 500 street children who were the beneficiaries for 10 years of the programme, selected according to their parental residents/occupation through stratified sampling. Interviews, case studies and group interaction were used to collect data on various aspects, i.e. personal background, education, and occupation of these children. It revealed that after almost 10 years of services, the problem of children was static. Firstly, service delivery system was as relief work. The methods of social work were not implied while the professionals were in implementation. On the other hand, the scope of monitoring and evaluation of the programme by government was suspended due to several reasons. Definitely, the politicalization in human development would be restricted. The problems of suffering would be root out and it should not be a continued process.

  6. editorial note african social work to tackling emerging social problems

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    In Malawi, social work training started with a community development certificate in 1964 and later a certificate in social welfare in 1978. .... that his main motivation for writing these memoirs was to recognise those who worked with and helped ...

  7. Social Work, Structured Fun and the Jokes of Social Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mik-Meyer, Nanna

    The topic of social work does not normally inspire laughter. So it is perhaps not surprising that research into the culture of social work rarely pursues its humorous aspect—the role of irony and laughter, for example. But if Michael Mulkay (1988) is right in suggesting that the domain of humor...

  8. The Military, War and Society: The Need for Critical Sociological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sociology offers a distinctive way of seeing and explaining the social world within which we live, as well as the events and institutions that shape it. Given this, it is surprising that the study of war by sociologists has been largely at the margins of the discipline. This has not always been the case, if one reflects on the work of ...

  9. Social Work Education and Global Issues: Implications for Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Beverly L.

    2011-01-01

    If social workers are to become more effectively involved in international organizations and global issues, the international dimension of social work education must be strengthened. Educational programs for social workers around the world give only limited attention to social issues that extend beyond national boundaries. Schools of social work…

  10. Working memory capacity in generalized social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Nader; Bomyea, Jessica

    2011-05-01

    Research suggests that understanding complex social cues depends on the availability of cognitive resources (e.g., Phillips, Channon, Tunstall, Hedenstrom, & Lyons, 2008). In spite of evidence suggesting that executive control functioning may impact anxiety (e.g., Eysenck, Derakshan, Santos, & Calvo, 2007), relatively few studies have examined working memory in individuals with generalized social phobia. Moreover, few studies have examined the role of threat-relevant content in working memory performance in clinically anxious populations. To this end, the present study assessed working memory capacity (WMC) in individuals with generalized social phobia and nonanxious controls using an operation span task with threat-relevant and neutral stimuli. Results revealed that nonanxious individuals demonstrated better WMC than individuals with generalized social phobia for neutral words but not for social threat words. Individuals with generalized social phobia demonstrated better WMC performance for threat words relative to neutral words. These results suggest that individuals with generalized social phobia may have relatively enhanced working memory performance for salient, socially relevant information. This enhanced working memory capacity for threat-relevant information may be the result of practice with this information in generalized social phobia.

  11. Business in Social Work Education: A Historically Black University's Social Work Entrepreneurship Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Paul; Muhammad, Omar; Estreet, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The destabilization of the current economy has sparked increased interest in entrepreneurship, especially for underrepresented minority social work students. The entrepreneurial thinking of these social work students entering social work programs at historically Black colleges and universities needs to be fostered in a learning environment. This…

  12. Social Relations at Work and Incident Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishtiak-Ahmed, Kazi; Hansen, Åse Marie; Garde, Anne Helene

    2018-01-01

    Objective: We investigated whether social relations at work were associated with incident dementia in old age. Methods: One thousand five hundred seventy-two occupationally active men from the Copenhagen Male Study Cohort were followed from 1986 to 2014. Participants underwent a clinical examinat......Objective: We investigated whether social relations at work were associated with incident dementia in old age. Methods: One thousand five hundred seventy-two occupationally active men from the Copenhagen Male Study Cohort were followed from 1986 to 2014. Participants underwent a clinical....... Conclusions: Our data partially support that social relations at work are associated with incident dementia....

  13. Corporate social responsibility, decent work and global framework agreements: a textile industry case study

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline da Graça Jacques; Maria João Nicolau dos Santos; Maria Soledad Etcheverry Orchard

    2016-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7984.2016v15n33p160 The article discusses how the notion of decent work proposed by the International Labour Organization (ILO) is present on corporate social responsibility programs since the development of global commodity chains. Based on Economic Sociology Theory, discusses the formation of the International Framework Agreements (IFA) involving the union leadership and enterprises to create decent work in the supply chains. The empirical focus was the...

  14. Federalism and social justice: implications for social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhorst, Donald M

    2002-07-01

    Federalism is a system of government that divides power between two or more levels of government. During the current conservative political climate in the United States, power has shifted increasingly from the federal government to states, a move that has implications for the achievement of social justice. Consequently, it is now necessary for social workers to engage in political activity at the state and local levels, in addition to the federal level, to promote social justice. Implications for social work policy practice, research, and education for advancing social justice within the federal system of government are explored.

  15. Social Work Education Canada’s North : Capacity Building through Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Durst

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Faculty of Social Work program at the University of Regina is a broker for two social work programs north of the 60th parallel reaching the northern residents of both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal ancestry. In addition, for over 30 years, the University of Regina partners with the First Nations University of Canada where a specialized Bachelor of Indian Social Work is offered and now a Master of Aboriginal Social Work. This paper presents the background to the Northern Human Service/BSW program at Yukon College in Whitehorse, Yukon and the Certificate of Social Work at the Aurora College in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories.

  16. The Temperance Movement and Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdach, Allison D.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines a forgotten episode in social work history: the involvement of the profession in the temperance movement in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Though some notable social workers such as Jane Addams, Robert A. Woods, and Representative Jeannette Rankin (the first woman elected to the U.S. Congress), championed the…

  17. NURTURING PROFESSIONAL SOCIAL WORK IN MALAWI

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    indigenous approaches, local socio-economic conditions and cultural underpinnings would ... practice. The definition stresses that use of theories and recognition of .... management, hospital social work, rural and urban development planning,.

  18. social work and human rights in zimbabwe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    ... a few cases of human rights breaches were selected from reports and academic ..... retroviral drugs lost contact with their suppliers during and after operation .... Becket, C.; 2006 Ethics and values in social work 3rd Edition. Basingstoke: ...

  19. Social Work Intervention Focused on Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-19

    Study Focus: 30-day Rehospitalizations Among At-risk Older Adults Randomized to a Social Work-driven Care Transitions Intervention; Heart Disease; Diabetes; Hypertension; Cancer; Depression; Asthma; Chronic Heart Failure; Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Stroke

  20. On sociological catastrophe analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, L.

    1974-01-01

    The present paper deals with standard terms of sociological catastrophe theory hitherto existing, collective behaviour during the catastrophe, and consequences for the empiric catastrophe sociology. (RW) [de

  1. Toward a Sociology of Environmental Flows: A New Agenda for Twenty-First-Century Environmental Sociology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, A.P.J.; Spaargaren, G.

    2006-01-01

    The emerging sociology of networks and flows, as it can be found in the works of Castells and Urry among others, offers promising perspectives for environmental sociology in rethinking its principle object of study: nature and environment. The sociology of flow perspective takes us beyond the

  2. Committing Canadian sociology: developing a Canadian sociology and a sociology of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Ralph

    2014-05-01

    This paper is a slightly revised version of the author's "Outstanding Career Award Lecture" presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association in Victoria, British Columbia on June 6, 2013. The paper distinguishes between Canadian Sociology and the Sociology of Canada. The former involves the explanatory stance that one takes to understanding Canada. The latter addresses the significant social dimensions that underlie Canadian social organization, culture, and behavior. I make a case for a Canadian Sociology that focuses on the unique features of Canadian society rather than adopting a comparative perspective. I also argue that there is a continuing need within the Sociology of Canada to address the issues of staples development. However, I argue that "new" staples analysis must have a directional change from that of the past, in that social processes now largely determine the pattern of staples development. Moreover, new staples analysis must include issues that were never part of earlier staples analysis, such as issues of environmental impacts and of staples depletion under conditions, such as climate change. The paper concludes by analyzing four factors that provide the dominant social contexts for analyzing modern staples development: (1) the rise of neoliberal government, (2) the implementation of globalization and its social consequences, (3) the assumption of aboriginal rights and entitlement, and (4) the rise of environmentalism. These factors were generally not considered in earlier staples approaches. They are critical to understanding the role of staples development and its impact on Canada in the present time.

  3. Economics and sociology: Between cooperation and intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Božo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In social sciences two opposing tendencies act simultaneously: the growth of specialization and the need for synthesis. Similar tendencies are noticeable when economics and sociology are in question. The need for these two sciences to cooperate was noticed a long time ago. However, an increasingly intensive exchange has been achieved only recently, particularly in the explanation of individual and group behavior. The works of Mancur Olson are a good example how the results of economics can be inspiring for the research in other sciences, particularly sociology and political science. Applying the results he got by analyzing the logic of collective action, Olson managed to attain significant insight concerning the functioning of economics and society as a whole.

  4. Toward a Buddhist Sociology: Theories, Methods, and Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Janine

    2012-01-01

    This article explores potential links between Buddhism and sociology, highlighting the many commonalities between sociology and Buddhism, with an emphasis on ways that Buddhist thought and practice may contribute to the field of sociology. What could Buddhism offer to our understanding of social institutions, social problems, and to the dynamics…

  5. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SOCIAL WELL-BEING OF THE POPULATION IN THE COMPANY TOWNS OF THE ARCTIC REGION (ACCORDING TO THE RESULTS OF SOCIOLOGICAL RESEARCH IN NOVODVINSK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Vladimirovna Kashkina

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the article is theoretical understanding of contemporary social processes in the company towns of the Arctic zone, and their impact on social well-being of the population.The articlepresents a theoretical analysis of the concept of “social well-being” and “company towns”, as well as an overview of the situation in today’s single-industry towns. Single-industry town, characterized by the presence of the main enterprise and original social environment, creates a special social space, which has a particular impact on the social well-being of the population in comparison with the classical city. Object of research: social wellbeing of the population of single-industry town. Subject of study: the impact of the social space of single-industry city on the social well-being of the population. Objective: to present the influence of particular social space single-industry city in modern society on the social well-being of different social groups single-industry town, and to identify changes in the dynamics of social well-being of the population in Novodvinsk 35 years. The article analyzes the results of the sociological study of social well-being of the population in the company towns of the Arctic region as an example of Novodvinsk.The main methods used in the study have become historical, systemic, socio-psychological, stratification, allowing to reveal the specifics of social well-being of the population. The empirical study was carried out using a questionnaire, content analysis, mass of research, testing, analysis, focus groups. The empirical study was carried out using questionnaires, mass research, focus group analysis, print media content analysis, archival documents. A mass study related to quantitative methods is used to interview a large number of respondents. The focus group method is a qualitative method of collecting information in a group of respondents from 8 to 10 people. The essence of the method is that the

  6. Sociology of Drug Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article which is a review of sociological ideas and studies of drug abusers in social situation, drug addiction steps (particularly alcohol, heroin and cocaine consumption are revised and some explanations are made. Also, the role of some sociological ideas in drug addiction is considered in which Anomie Theory reads: "because of such duality, the individuals who are not satisfied with their role are in hurt." According to this theory, drug users choose seclusion and neglecting usual social aims as well as competitive situations. Association of Differentiation Theory claims that drug use behavior is a learned behavior and the first learning occurs in a friendly small group (i.e. youngsters. Social Control theory believes that one can predict normal and abnormal behaviors through the rate of individuals' social commitments. Internal and external controls also determine commitment rate. Micro-cultural theory considers drug use as a compatibility with abnormal micro-culture rules. Symbolic Mutual Action Believes that the etiquettes which society attribute to individuals/behaviors determine their acquired social reactions rather than any inherited acquisition.

  7. Miedo al crimen, desigualdad y cambio social en México reflexiones a la luz de Durkheim y la Sociología de las emociones/Fear of crime, inequality and social change in Mexico reflextions in the light of Durkheim and the sociology of emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Foust Rodríguez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Este ensayo tiene el doble propósito de ser caja de resonancia de las intuiciones durkheimianas sobre la importancia de las emociones tanto en la sociología como en la socialidad misma, así como brindar una oportunidad para imaginar veredas para la investigación sobre las repercusiones sociales y políticas del miedo al crimen en México. En la primera parte expondremos algunas de las pistas que Durkheim ofreció en la línea de nuestros propósitos; en la segunda, amplificaremos esas pistas en la sociología de las emociones, particularmente con ayuda de Turner (2007; en la tercera parte retomaremos estas notas para explorar algunas ideas que pueden ayudar a hacer florecer la investigación sobre miedo al crimen, la desigualdad y el cambio social en México.

  8. [For a sociology of intervention in mental health.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhéaume, J; Sévigny, R

    1988-01-01

    Mental health workers develop a solid understanding of social phenomenon, which gives them direction and on which they are able to base their interventions. This is what the authors call the "implicit sociology" ("sociologie implicite") of workers. The article describes the principal elements of this special knowledge through information gathered from workers in clinical environments, private practice and "alternative" organizations. The authors focus on the idea workers make of health/mental handicaps, of their clientele, of their involvement, of the organizational and societal context of their work, of their "role" in society. Finally, the authors show how a sociological approach can help improve one's understanding of how to deal with mental health.

  9. Zamyšlení nad soudobou českou sociologií

    OpenAIRE

    Musil, Jiri

    2002-01-01

    The following comments compare the present orientations of Czech sociology with recent developments in European sociology. The analysis of sociology in Europe shows that the attention of European sociologists has shifted to social theory & social philosophy, sociology of culture, media, gender & feminism, political sociology, nationalism, ethnicity, & racism. Czech sociology, in the opinion of the author, still does not pay sufficient attention to such pressing issues of Czech society as nati...

  10. Theoretical Issues in Clinical Social Group Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Elizabeth; Wodarski, John S.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews relevant issues in clinical social group practice including group versus individual treatment, group work advantages, approach rationale, group conditions for change, worker role in group, group composition, group practice technique and method, time as group work dimension, pretherapy training, group therapy precautions, and group work…

  11. Socially sustainable work organizations and systems thinking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kira, M.; Eijnatten, van F.M.

    2010-01-01

    This Research Note seeks to add to the body of knowledge concerning social sustainability in work organizations, especially within the context of new challenges and threats in contemporary, post-industrial working life. Moreover, the intention is to explore the added value of the complexity lens in

  12. The Long Gone Promises of Social Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Linda Lundgaard

    2005-01-01

    ambivalence towards influencing case administrative work, which can be interpreted as an adequate defence mechanism. The article then introduces the concept of individualisation that reflects the dialectic processes of subjectivity and objectivity and leads to a contextualised analysis of social work....

  13. Phenomenological sociology in the framework of contemporary methodological debates

    OpenAIRE

    A S Ivanova

    2010-01-01

    The article provides a review of the pivotal doctrines in the sphere of social sciences and humanities methodology, namely positivism (O. Comte, H. Spenser et al) and antipositivism (W. Dilthey, H. Rickert et al). In terms of E. Husserl's late philosophy as well as the works of M. Merleau-Ponty and A. Schutz the article provides the analysis of one of the prominent schools of the contemporary social theory - phenomenological sociology which is highlighted as the non-classical strategy of the ...

  14. Strengthening the Signature Pedagogy of Social Work: Conceptualizing Field Coordination as a Negotiated Social Work Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Kenta; Todd, Sarah; Eagle, Brooke; Morris, Brenda

    2018-01-01

    Although field education is considered the signature pedagogy of social work, the work of field coordinators appear to remain peripheral to other aspects of social work education, such as coursework and research. In this article, we suggest that field coordination requires a far more complex set of knowledge and skills than merely matching…

  15. N.I. LAPIN’S SOCIOLOGY OF ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Kravchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Soviet period, sociology of organizations was not a leading trend, as used in its conceptual apparatus, the depth and thoroughness of the study of the problems is not always impressed by the ideological authorities. Much more loyal looked sociology of work, to prove the superiority of socialism over capitalism. But this feature makes it possible to consider it not outdated set of fundamental knowledge, based on which we can move forward boldly. A prominent contribution to the development of the field sociology has made a prominent Russian scientist N.I.Lapin, which modern readers know as a specialist in completely different directions. Over the study of the structure and functioning of organizations, cohesion small working group of brigade forms of work organization, leadership and management styles, formal and informal structure of the relationship, skill mix, professional selection and placement of personnel, labor discipline, organizational innovation, conditions and remuneration, motivation and stimulation, finally, the education of the worker and ideological activities in the workplace in the 1960–80s worked hundreds if not thousands of professionals of various profiles and preparedness: sociologists, psychologists, economists, philosophers, teachers, lawyers, engineers. The methodological basis of sociology of organizations have N.I. Lapin are an innovative approach, the theory of social groups, value-regulatory approach and the three-functional diagram of the organizational structure. 

  16. Measures of Biochemical Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Joel; Marsh, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    In a previous article, the authors introduced a new sub field in sociology that we labeled "biochemical sociology." We introduced the definition of a sociology that encompasses sociological measures, psychological measures, and biological indicators Snell & Marsh (2003). In this article, we want to demonstrate a research strategy that would assess…

  17. Corporate social responsibility, decent work and global framework agreements: a textile industry case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline da Graça Jacques

    2016-11-01

    Organization (ILO is present on corporate social responsibility programs since the development of global commodity chains. Based on Economic Sociology Theory, discusses the formation of the International Framework Agreements (IFA involving the union leadership and enterprises to create decent work in the supply chains. The empirical focus was the multinational Inditex fast fashion retailier. Interviews have been made with social and economic actors in the production chain in Portugal and Brazil. In conclusion, it is emphasized that the new corporate social responsibility tools, such as IFAs, favor the guidelines of decent work. However, the survey revealed that if there are no changes in the management of productive fast fashion retalier chain, the IFA has little effectiveness in reducing sweatshops and precarious labour.

  18. Researching Practice Wisdom in Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Chun-Sing Cheung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Researching practice wisdom in social work Social workers, as skilled helpers who make professional decisions using intuitive actions rather than by following defined rules, deserve better recognition for their practice wisdom. However, since there is a tendency amongst practitioners who adhere to the evidence-based paradigm to disregard practitioners’ knowledge, empirical research on practice wisdom in social work needs to be encouraged. The author argues that the lack of a sound methodology hinders the development of such an invaluable asset for practitioners. It is suggested that a heuristic paradigm that embraces the concepts of tacit knowing, intuition and indwelling will provide a way forward towards recognizing the importance of social workers’ practice wisdom.

  19. A Social Work Model of Empathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E. Gerdes

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a social work model of empathy that reflects the latest interdisciplinary research findings on empathy. The model reflects the social work commitment to social justice. The three model components are: 1 the affective response to another’s emotions and actions; 2 the cognitive processing of one’s affective response and the other person’s perspective; and 3 the conscious decision-making to take empathic action. Mirrored affective responses are involuntary, while cognitive processing and conscious decision-making are voluntary. The affective component requires healthy, neural pathways to function appropriately and accurately. The cognitive aspects of perspective-taking, self-awareness, and emotion regulation can be practiced and cultivated, particularly through the use of mindfulness techniques. Empathic action requires that we move beyond affective responses and cognitive processing toward utilizing social work values and knowledge to inform our actions. By introducing the proposed model of empathy, we hope it will serve as a catalyst for discussion and future research and development of the model. Key Words: Empathy, Social Empathy, Social Cognitive Neuroscience

  20. Information and Communication Technologies in Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Brian E.; Taylor, Harry O.; Glass, Joseph E.; Margerum-Leys, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are electronic tools used to convey, manipulate and store information. The exponential growth of Internet access and ICTs greatly influenced social, political, and economic processes in the United States, and worldwide. Regardless of the level of practice, ICTs will continue influencing the careers of social workers and the clients they serve. ICTs have received some attention in the social work literature and curriculum, but we argue that this level of attention is not adequate given their ubiquity, growth and influence, specifically as it relates to upholding social work ethics. Significant attention is needed to help ensure social workers are responsive to the technological changes in the health care system, including the health care infrastructure and use of technology among clients. Social workers also need ICT competencies in order to effectively lead different types of social change initiatives or collaborate with professionals of other disciplines who are using ICTs as part of existing strategies. This paper also identifies potential pitfalls and challenges with respect to the adoption of ICTs, with recommendations for advancing their use in practice, education, and research. PMID:21691444

  1. Information and Communication Technologies in Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E. Perron

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Information and communication technologies (ICTs are electronic tools used to convey, manipulate and store information. The exponential growth of Internet access and ICTs greatly influenced social, political, and economic processes in the United States, and worldwide. Regardless of the level of practice, ICTs will continue influencing the careers of social workers and the clients they serve. ICTs have received some attention in the social work literature and curriculum, but we argue that this level of attention is not adequate given their ubiquity, growth and influence, specifically as it relates to upholding social work ethics. Significant attention is needed to help ensure social workers are responsive to the technological changes in the health care system, including the health care infrastructure and use of technology among clients. Social workers also need ICT competencies in order to effectively lead different types of social change initiatives or collaborate with professionals of other disciplines who are using ICTs as part of existing strategies. This paper also identifies potential pitfalls and challenges with respect to the adoption of ICTs, with recommendations for advancing their use in practice, education, and research.

  2. A sociological dilemma: Race, segregation and US sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    US sociology has been historically segregated in that, at least until the 1960s, there were two distinct institutionally organized traditions of sociological thought – one black and one white. For the most part, however, dominant historiographies have been silent on that segregation and, at best, reproduce it when addressing the US sociological tradition. This is evident in the rarity with which scholars such as WEB Du Bois, E Franklin Frazier, Oliver Cromwell Cox, or other ‘African American Pioneers of Sociology’, as Saint-Arnaud calls them, are presented as core sociological voices within histories of the discipline. This article addresses the absence of African American sociologists from the US sociological canon and, further, discusses the implications of this absence for our understanding of core sociological concepts. With regard to the latter, the article focuses in particular on the debates around equality and emancipation and discusses the ways in which our understanding of these concepts could be extended by taking into account the work of African American sociologists and their different interpretations of core themes. PMID:25418995

  3. [Where are we in general sociology ?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades, history and social sciences have experienced a kind of merging, and a vast number of specialized domains have emerged. Yet the durkheim - ian register of "general sociology" seems somehow neglected. Firstly, this article analyzes the reasons for this neglect, and secondly, it indicates how, through a long-term reflexivity, one can formulate a new agenda for general sociology.

  4. Statistics and Data Interpretation for Social Work

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenthal, James

    2011-01-01

    "Without question, this text will be the most authoritative source of information on statistics in the human services. From my point of view, it is a definitive work that combines a rigorous pedagogy with a down to earth (commonsense) exploration of the complex and difficult issues in data analysis (statistics) and interpretation. I welcome its publication.". -Praise for the First Edition. Written by a social worker for social work students, this is a nuts and bolts guide to statistics that presents complex calculations and concepts in clear, easy-to-understand language. It includes

  5. The Future of Multicultural Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowena Fong

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Multicultural social work has been evolving over the last forty years despite challenges in limited knowledge, insufficient resources, and inadequate infusion into the curriculum. Discussions continue about appropriate conceptual frameworks, culturally sensitive terms, traditional and indigenous practice approaches and treatments, and relevant outcome measures and evaluation methods. Future directions foster the inclusion of cultural values as strengths. Intersectionality guides practice approaches and systems of care. Service learning requirements, national ethnic resource centers, and ethnic resource centers, and ethnic studies dual degree programs are innovative initiatives yet to be fully integrated into social work curriculum.

  6. Teaching about Faith-Based Organizations in the Social Work Curriculum: Perspectives of Social Work Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Samta P.

    2016-01-01

    Faith-based organizations (FBOs) have an important presence in contemporary civil society and have gained further prominence through their repertoire of social welfare and services. This study engaged social work educators (n = 316) across nine countries to examine their perceptions of including discourses on faith and FBOs in the social work…

  7. Sociological analysis and comparative education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woock, Roger R.

    1981-12-01

    It is argued that comparative education is essentially a derivative field of study, in that it borrows theories and methods from academic disciplines. After a brief humanistic phase, in which history and philosophy were central for comparative education, sociology became an important source. In the mid-50's and 60's, sociology in the United States was characterised by Structural Functionalism as a theory, and Social Survey as a dominant methodology. Both were incorporated into the development of comparative education. Increasingly in the 70's, and certainly today, the new developments in sociology are characterised by an attack on Positivism, which is seen as the philosophical position underlying both functionalism and survey methods. New or re-discovered theories with their attendant methodologies included Marxism, Phenomenological Sociology, Critical Theory, and Historical Social Science. The current relationship between comparative education and social science is one of uncertainty, but since social science is seen to be returning to its European roots, the hope is held out for the development of an integrated social theory and method which will provide a much stronger basis for developments in comparative education.

  8. Imagination and society: the role of visual sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Roberto; Del Re, Emanuela C

    2012-10-01

    The paper presents the field of Visual Sociology as an approach that makes use of photographs, films, documentaries, videos, to capture and assess aspects of social life and social signals. It overviews some relevant works in the field, it deals with methodological and epistemological issues, by raising the question of the relation between the observer and the observed, and makes reference to some methods of analysis, such as those proposed by the Grounded Theory, and to some connected tools for automatic qualitative analysis, like NVivo. The relevance of visual sociology to the study of social signals lies in the fact that it can validly integrate the information, introducing a multi-modal approach in the analysis of social signals.

  9. L’IDENTITÉ: DE LA SOCIOLOGIE AUX SCIENCES SOCIALES / LA IDENTIDAD: DE LA SOCIOLOGÍA A LAS CIENCIAS SOCIALES / IDENTITY: FROM SOCIOLOGY TO SOCIAL SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmine Alaoui

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to explore the notion of identity from different angles: ethnography, sociology, psychology, psychoanalysis, anthropology, geography and urbanism. The aim of this article is not to list the aspects of identity exhaustively, but to give an overview of the main areas that have dealt with territorial identity and propose a typology ranging from personal identity to the territorial identity through the individual and the collective. At the genesis of this paper many questions: What does one mean by identity? What is the relation between identity and territory and can it be a lever of territorial attractiveness? The desire to develop this notion has been spiced up by the sense of urgency manifested by the majority of territories in the continuous search for the valorization of their suffering identity of the”disease" of the century: globalization.

  10. INSTRUMENTAL CONCEPTUALIZATION SUBJECT AREA SOCIOLOGY: SOME POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Maslennikov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines some of the possible ways of integrating the deployment tool conceptualizing domains of sociology on the basis of the machine sets of steps3. Substantiates the urgency of the problem of application of structural constructs of mathematics as a structure-formalism domain of sociology as a combination of theoretical knowledge. Formulated understanding of the sociological dimension in a broad sense of the concept of research as a measurement based on the use of instrumental in conceptualizing the methodology of sociological research. Under instrumental conceptualization refers to the construction of complex conceptual (conceptual schema structurally interconnected relationships between their individual elements, which are the units of the consideration related conceptual integrity, derived from interpretation of the properties “Set” construct. The paper proposes a definition based on the properties set in the scale set by the structure of N. Bourbaki4 relations systems in the data sets under the structural dimension of social phenomena to understand the interpretation of the investigated properties of social phenomena in terms of a construct that lies at the basis of the theoretical model that reflects the diversity of these qualities with the help of conceptual schemes that determine the quality of each as a structure of relations systems (ie, property in these qualities. In conclusion, the article lists presented in a number of publications, some preliminary results of the application of the methodology of conceptualizing instrumental in related disciplines from sociology. These works can perform suggestive role in the knowledge and understanding of methods of problem fields and objectives of the work on the conceptualization of theoretical sociology, using the mathematical theory of forms. 

  11. Quantifying Globalization in Social Work Research: A 10-Year Review of American Social Work Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbényiga, DeBrenna L.; Huang, Lihua

    2014-01-01

    Measured by the prevalence of journal article contributions, geographic coverage, and international collaboration, this literature review found an increasing level of globalization with respect to American social work research and contribution to the social work profession from 2000-2009. Findings suggest changes are needed in global awareness and…

  12. Social Work Values in Human Services Administration: Implications for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Larry D.; Hoefer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The perceived wisdom in the social work education community, based on empirical research from the 1990s and the early part of this century, says that the master of social work (MSW) degree is not competitive with the master of business administration or the master of public administration to obtain top-level administration jobs in nonprofit…

  13. 3. THE NATIONAL ACADEMIC UNCONSCIOUS IN QUESTION. HISTORY OF CONCEPTS, HISTORICAL SEMANTICS, CRITICAL SOCIOLOGY OF LEXICAL USAGE WITHIN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Christin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A few years ago, together with Franz Schultheis, of the University of Saint-Gallen and coordinator of the social sciences network ESSE, we chose to study the international circulation of the categories and concepts that are in use in European social sciences. With the publication of the Dictionnaire des concepts  nomades (“Dictionary of nomadic concepts”, that includes only a small number of quite lengthy entries, what we tried to propose were not ready-made solutions, or vademecums for the comparative academic, but a series of questions, or rather the means to ask crucial questions for anyone who practises history, political science, history of economic ideas, or comparative sociology. We did so with two considerations in mind: one political, and the other academic, both of which I will evoke in turn in this paper.

  14. Social Work as Laboratory for Normative Professionalisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available In most Western countries, the professional status of social workers is instable and insecure. Of course, most Western countries are themselves instable, ridden with feelings of insecurity and in search of reassurance and promises of control. But social work hardly lends itself as a projection screen for visions of professional control and efficiency in the face of insecurity. On the contrary: within the present cultural and political climate, social work connotes primarily with unpopular social problems, with people unable to cope adequately with the competitiveness and the rate of change of post-industrial societies, that is to say: it connotes more with dependency and helplessness then with autonomy and control. Moreover, whereas public discourse in most Western country is dominated by a neo-liberal perspective and the intricate network of economic, managerial, consumerist and military metaphors connected with it, social work still carries with it a legacy of 'progressive politics' increasingly labeled as outdated and inadequate. Although the values of solidarity and social justice connected with this 'progressive heritage' certainly have not faded away completely, the loudest and most popular voices on the level of public discourse keep underscoring the necessity to adapt to the 'realities' of present-day postindustrial societies and their dependence on economic growth, technological innovation and the dynamics of an ever more competitive world-market. This 'unavoidable' adaptation involves both the 'modernization' and progressive diminishment of 'costly' welfare-state arrangements and a radical reorientation of social work as a profession. Instead of furthering the dependency of clients in the name of solidarity, social workers should stimulate them to face their own responsibilities and help them to function more adequately in a world where individual autonomy and economic progress are dominant values. This shift has far

  15. Participatory planning intercultural: Reflections for social work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Gómez Hernández

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the nineties, participatory planning has emerged as a linking strategy for various social, political, economic and cultural sectors that assessed it as a potential for building consensus in the making of local processes forsocial improvement. Similarly, it was legitimized as a setting for practice for professionals trained in the social sciences, mainly Social Work. This article, from a geopolitical and geo-cultural perspective, presents contextual elements that determined the configuration of participatory planning in Latin America. These elements shall be staged in order to redefine diversity and the intercultural perspective that has been linked to this mobilizing strategy, against the institutionalized discourse of development and for the emergence of crisis and ruptures with this social paradigm from other practices and worldviews of life in the territories.

  16. Significant Issues in Rebuilding the Social Work Profession in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Cai

    2013-01-01

    The author traces the origin of social work to the Confucian concept of Great Unity and social organization of traditional Chinese society. While professional social work started in 1921, its development was interrupted in 1952, but the practice of social work never stopped. Social work was revived as a discipline and profession in 1979 and has…

  17. The Evolution of Social Work Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reamer, Frederic G.

    1998-01-01

    Traces the evolution of ethical norms, principles, and standards in social work during four stages in the profession's history: (1) morality period, (2) values period, (3) ethical theory and decision-making period, and (4) ethical standards and risk-management period. Recent developments in the profession include complex conceptual frameworks and…

  18. Social Work, Pastoral Care and Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considine, Tom; Hollingdale, Paul; Neville, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This paper briefly examines the growing interest in developing resilience in the social work curricula as it is seen as a crucial quality necessary to cope with the increasing demands of the profession. The recent research into developing resilience is dominated by a psychological model which emphasises personal qualities. It runs the risk of…

  19. [Work and health: Two social rights].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Blanco, Lucía

    2015-01-01

    Work and health are two concepts whose formulation varies from one society to another depending on unique and temporal appreciation. Updating them to our time involves the challenge to understand their construction as part of consuming organized societies. Political and social processes during the last decades must be analyzed, and so must be the worker subject as a psychophysics unit. Health, as well, ought to be considered a universal right, from where to focus and understand pathological social behaviors impacting the workplace. The subject's social dimension and the health-work relationship are dynamic. And keeping this dynamic involves to continuously review principles, norms and regulations which need to fit reality, and specific communication and language modes, as well as working conditions and environmental aspects. These processes must be considered as taking part in Argentina's social imaginary worth highlighting: a shift in how the State's role is considered, the public policy's sense, the importance of working in a complementary and interdisciplinary way, redesigning the concept of health through the broadening of those under the State's care and considering and building the workplace as a healthy space.

  20. Reflections of Social Work Students on Ad

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    which places many of the black students at a disadvantage as English is an additional ... BICS is the use of language as it occurs in a context which helps to .... problems and social work training allows university teaching and learning to equip ...

  1. Sociale innovatie of work and employment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pot, F.; Dhondt, S.; Oeij, P.

    2012-01-01

    Social innovation of work and employment are prerequisites to achieve the EU2020 objectives of smart, sustainable and inclusive growth. It covers labour market innovation on societal level and workplace innovation on organisational level. This paper focuses on the latter. Workplace innovations are

  2. Social Innovation of Work and Employment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pot, F.D.; Dhondt, S.; Oeij, P.; Franz, H.-W.; Hochgerner, J.; Howaldt, J.

    2012-01-01

    Social innovation of work and employment are prerequisites to achieve the EU2020 objectives of smart, sustainable and inclusive growth. It covers labour market innovation on societal level and workplace innovation on organisational level. This paper focuses on the latter. Workplace innovations are

  3. SOCIAL WORK WITH REFUGEES IN ZIMBABWE Johanne ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    Therefore, this paper provides an overview of the social work practice with refugees. ... Legal statutes that govern refugee protection in Zimbabwe .... More often than not, unaccompanied minors have been forced out of school at a tender age because of the war .... of this strategy is to achieve gender and age equality.

  4. Analytical Sociology: A Bungean Appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Poe Yu-ze

    2012-10-01

    Analytical sociology, an intellectual project that has garnered considerable attention across a variety of disciplines in recent years, aims to explain complex social processes by dissecting them, accentuating their most important constituent parts, and constructing appropriate models to understand the emergence of what is observed. To achieve this goal, analytical sociologists demonstrate an unequivocal focus on the mechanism-based explanation grounded in action theory. In this article I attempt a critical appreciation of analytical sociology from the perspective of Mario Bunge's philosophical system, which I characterize as emergentist systemism. I submit that while the principles of analytical sociology and those of Bunge's approach share a lot in common, the latter brings to the fore the ontological status and explanatory importance of supra-individual actors (as concrete systems endowed with emergent causal powers) and macro-social mechanisms (as processes unfolding in and among social systems), and therefore it does not stipulate that every causal explanation of social facts has to include explicit references to individual-level actors and mechanisms. In this sense, Bunge's approach provides a reasonable middle course between the Scylla of sociological reification and the Charybdis of ontological individualism, and thus serves as an antidote to the untenable "strong program of microfoundations" to which some analytical sociologists are committed.

  5. Apples and Pears: Engaging Social Work Students in Social Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyneke, Roelof P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how an adventure-based activity could help facilitate dialogue and enable a safe process where students could engage in a difficult topic such as diversity without feeling threatened. Method: A qualitative study was used in which 89 social work students who took part in diversity training gave permission that their…

  6. Comparative education and the ?new? sociologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusz, Andrew R.; Parks-Trusz, Sandra L.

    1981-12-01

    The authors examine the impact of the `new' sociologies on comparative education by reviewing five comparative readers published during the past twenty years. While the `new' sociologies have had considerable impact within sociology and the sociology of education, minimal impact is found within comparative education. The authors further show that while critical new sociologies such as Marxism, neo-Marxism, and Critical theory have had some penetration into comparative education, use of the interpretative sociologies such as symbolic interactionism, ethnomethodology, and semiotics has generally been absent. The authors conclude by suggesting that a synthesis of the critical and interpretative modes would prove fruitful for further work in comparative education. The five texts are: Halsey, Floud and Anderson (eds.), Education, Economy and Society (1961); Eckstein and Noah (eds.), Scientific Investigations in Comparative Education (1969); Beck, Perspectives on World Education (1970); Karabel and Halsey (eds.), Power and Ideology in Education (1977); and Altbach and Kelly (eds.), Education and Colonialism (1978).

  7. Perspectives of the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge and Science Education: a study of Education Journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Aparecida Meglhioratti

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that Science Teaching emphasizes the importance of researches in Epistemology and History of Science and also covers social aspects of the scientific construction, there are still relatively very few studies which are systematically based on perspectives from the Sociology of Science or from the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge. In this article, it has been outlined a brief history of the sociological perspectives of scientific knowledge, characterizing them as differentiationist, antidifferentiationist and tranversalist. Then, a bibliographical study was developed in journals Qualis A1 and A2 in the area of “Teaching” of CAPES, with emphasis in Science Teaching, from 2007 to 2016, aiming to understand how the sociological perspectives are present in science education. The search for articles which articulate sociological aspects and Science Education was done through use of search engines emerging from the accomplished historic, among them: Sociology of Science, Sociology of Scientific Knowledge, Ethnography, Laboratory Studies, Strong Program, Scientific Fields, Scientific Ethos, Actor-Network Theory, Social and Technical Networks, Latour, Bloor, Merton and Bourdieu. Through this research, we have identified 46 articles which have approaches with the subject. The articles were investigated by Content Analysis and were organized in the units of analysis: 1 Foundations of the sociology of knowledge; 2 Scientific Ethos; 3 Science Working System; 4 Sociogenesis of knowledge; 5 Strong Program of Sociology of Knowledge; 6 Laboratory studies and scientific practice; 7 Actor-Network Theory; 8 Bourdieusian Rationale; 9 Non-Bourdieusian tranversalist approaches; 10 Notes regarding the Sociology of Science. The units of analysis with the greatest number of articles were "Laboratory Studies and Scientific Practice" and "Actor-Network Theory", both closer to an antidifferentiationist perspective of the sociology of science, in which

  8. A medical social work perspective on rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugl-Meyer, Kerstin Sjögren

    2016-10-12

    This paper introduces a biopsychosocial model for use as a tool by medical social workers and other rehabilitation professionals for the descriptive analysis of the case history and follow-up of patients needing rehabilitative support. The model is based on action theory and emphasizes the demands on evidence-based clarification of the interplay between a subject's contextual life situation, their ability to act in order to realize their goals, and their emotional adaptation. Using clinical experience and literature searches, a standard operations procedure to adequately document the case history in clinical practice is suggested, thus providing strategies through which the work of medical social workers can be based on evidence. Some specific areas of concern for the medical social worker within the rehabilitation of disabled people are highlighted.

  9. Integrating medical and environmental sociology with environmental health: crossing boundaries and building connections through advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Phil

    2013-06-01

    This article reviews the personal and professional processes of developing an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the complex issues of environmental health in their community, political-economic, social science, and scientific contexts. This interdisciplinary approach includes a synthesis of research, policy work, and advocacy. To examine multiple forms of interdisciplinarity, I examine pathways of integrating medical and environmental sociology via three challenges to the boundaries of traditional research: (1) crossing the boundaries of medical and environmental sociology, (2) linking social science and environmental health science, and (3) crossing the boundary of research and advocacy. These boundary crossings are discussed in light of conceptual and theoretical developments of popular epidemiology, contested illnesses, and health social movements. This interdisciplinary work offers a more comprehensive sociological lens for understanding complex problems and a practical ability to join with scientists, activists, and officials to meet public health needs for amelioration and prevention of environmental health threats.

  10. Promoting Election-Related Policy Practice among Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritzker, Suzanne; Burwell, Christianna

    2016-01-01

    Political involvement is an integral component of the social work profession, yet there is no explicit reference to social work participation in election-related activities in either the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics or the Council on Social Work Education Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards. Social work…

  11. Reflexive criteria of sociological research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R T Ubaydullaeva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the sociological criteria of explaining the way of thinking and actions of subjects, their spiritual and moral positions and intellectual forces that form the laws of social life. The author seeks to adapt such categories as ‘meaning of life’, ‘human dignity’, ‘rationality’ etc. for the purposes of sociological analysis by methodological construction of some real life dichotomies such as ‘subjective meaning and social function’, ‘the real and the ideal’, ‘the demanded and the excluded’. Thus, the author studies economic, political and technical processes in terms of both positivity and negativity of social interaction and states that given the increasing differentiation of the society and the contradictory trends of social development the reflexive criteria that take into account the socio-cultural nature of the man help to find one’s own model of development.

  12. Toward Mentoring in Palliative Social Work: A Narrative Review of Mentoring Programs in Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Ying Pin; Karthik, R; Teo, Chia Chia; Suppiah, Sarasvathy; Cheung, Siew Li; Krishna, Lalit

    2018-03-01

    Mentoring by an experienced practitioner enhances professional well-being, promotes resilience, and provides a means of addressing poor job satisfaction and high burnout rates among medical social workers. This is a crucial source of support for social workers working in fields with high risk of compassion fatigue and burnout like palliative care. Implementing such a program, however, is hindered by differences in understanding and application of mentoring practice. This narrative review of mentoring practice in social work seeks to identify key elements and common approaches within successful mentoring programs in social work that could be adapted to guide the design of new mentoring programs in medical social work. Methodology and Data Sources: A literature search of mentoring programs in social work between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2015, using Pubmed, CINAHL, OVID, ERIC, Scopus, Cochrane and ScienceDirect databases, involving a senior experienced mentor and undergraduate and/or junior postgraduates, was carried out. A total of 1302 abstracts were retrieved, 22 full-text articles were analyzed, and 8 articles were included. Thematic analysis of the included articles revealed 7 themes pertaining to the mentoring process, outcomes and barriers, and the characteristics of mentoring relationships, mentors, mentees, and host organizations. Common themes in prevailing mentoring practices help identify key elements for the design of an effective mentoring program in medical social work. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of these findings upon clinical practice in palliative care and on sustaining such a program.

  13. Theorizing practice research in social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uggerhøj, Lars

    2011-01-01

    . To elaborate and define practice research in social work, it is necessary to consider connected approaches and theories. The article will show that practice research is both connected to and can use the theoretical frames of Actual science and Mode 2 knowledge production. To understand and develop research......The article focuses on theories, definitions, interests, possibilities and barriers in practice research in social work. It points out that both practice and research will be influenced by participating in and developing practice research. – and that both parts must and will learn from the process...... closely connected to practice it is necessary to define it in three different ways: practice research, practitioner research and user-controlled research. Examples from different Nordic approaches connected to these definitions will be presented. Although practice and research both need to develop...

  14. Racism, empire and sociology

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Reviews of Gurminder K Bhambra, Connected Sociologies; Peo Hansen and Stefan Jonsson, Eurafrica: The Untold History of European Integration and Colonialism; Wulf D. Hund, Alana Lentin (eds) Racism and Sociology

  15. Introduktion til klassisk sociologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Søren

    Papiret introducerer til en række klassiske sociologer: Comte, Spencer, Weber, Durkheim og Habermas......Papiret introducerer til en række klassiske sociologer: Comte, Spencer, Weber, Durkheim og Habermas...

  16. [A sociological approach to vulnerability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelège, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The term precarity covers many realities. It has become one of those "portmanteau words" which, as a resuIt of being constantly reassessed, is losing its meaning. In order to avoid an overly sectional approach to the mechanisms of social precarity, or exclusion, it is necessary to understand in more general terms the sociological processes around the concept of the social tie and its effects of rupture.

  17. Sociología del cine y Teoría de Redes Sociales. Análisis estructural de los “Europeos de Hollywood”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloé Delaporte

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available La teoría de las redes sociales ofrece una serie de herramientas que pueden aclararel estudio de las sociabilidades artísticas; la formación de sociogramas, principalmente, es de gran utilidad en el marco de las investigaciones en la sociología del cine. En este sentido proponemos un análisis estructural de la comunidad de los directores de cine europeos expatriados enHollywood durante la época clásica del cine americano. Este artículo desarrolla de este modo tres ejemplos de explotación sociométrica de una investigación llevada a cabo previamente sobre esta transferenciacultural, poniendo de relieve la dimensión necesariamente plural del fenómeno.

  18. Suicide Prevention in Social Work Education: How Prepared Are Social Work Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteen, Philip J.; Jacobson, Jodi M.; Sharpe, Tanya L.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of suicide suggests social workers will encounter clients at risk for suicide, but research shows social workers receive little to no training on suicide and suicide prevention and feel unprepared to work effectively with clients at risk. Baseline results from a randomized intervention study of the Question, Persuade, and Refer…

  19. Remembering a sociology of Human Rights

    OpenAIRE

    Levy, Daniel; Sznaider, Natan

    2014-01-01

    A sociology of human rights sounds almost like a contradiction in terms. Sociology is about social groups, about particular experiences, about how people, embedded in space and time, make sense of their lives and give meaning to their world. It deals with power and interest and the social bases of our experiences. On the other hand, human rights are about human beings in general, without temporal or spatial references, not about groups and their boundaries. Human rights are about humanity, lo...

  20. When Worlds Collide: Sociology, Disciplinary Nightmares, and Fromm's Revision of Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Neil

    2017-08-01

    After decades of neglect, sociology is experiencing a revival of interest in psychoanalytic insights, and Erich Fromm's work is uniquely valuable for encouraging dialogue between the two fields. A recipient of a PhD in sociology as a young man in the 1920s, Fromm was a prominent psychoanalytic theorist and clinician, as well as a social researcher and public intellectual in the 1930s, up to his death in 1980. After a historical account of the relative neglect of Fromm in both disciplines, this paper examines the place of his psychoanalytic theory within sociology today as a way of discussing sociology's complicated relationship to psychoanalysis and the insights each field can offer the other.

  1. Influence of sociological determinants in consumer behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Bujari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Consumer behavior belongs within the scope of delicate issues in theoretical marketing concepts of marketing. The main reason for such treatment of specific issues derives from human individuality in the decision making process for purchasing. From the complexity of human nature, arise challenges in their efforts to look at the internal motives of consumers, their psychological elements and conditions, the internal psychological determinants of behavior, but also the influence of culture, social class, family, lifestyle, as external sociological determinants, regardless of the particular autonomous characteristics of being socially exposed to certain environmental impacts that are undoubtedly of great importance to one’s behavior as a consumer. On the other hand, there is a series of hidden motifs for which their oversight is necessary because they are crucial to the decision-making process. Having this in mind, the researchers focused their objectives on analyzing the determinants of consumer behavior in the decision-making process to be marketed. Various sources of data have been used in the analysis and the theoretical processing of the work. Most of them have a secondary character and include domestic contemporary literature and foreign literature related to this issue. The basic concept of this paper, besides the introductory part and the conclusions, is also composed of interrelated parts. Given the analysis of different sociological determinants such as culture, social classes, reference groups and so on we understand their impact and their importance in bringing decisions in the market for personal consumption.

  2. [From sociology in medicine to the sociology of collective health: contributions toward a necessary reflexivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    This text looks at the difference between sociology in medicine (collaborator of health institutions) and the sociology of medicine (independent of health institutions). If consistent, sociology in medicine should become a sociology of medicine. As an example, it is shown how the study of the social determinants of health and illness begins by assuming non-problematically the ontological reality of health and illness, but ends up problematizing the very concept of health-disease, demonstrating that the study of health determinants also requires the study of the determinants of the social construction of disease. The urgent necessity of objectifying collective health itself is argued. By applying sociological tools we can examine the so-called objective factors in the determination of health and disease, the socially constructed nature of these categories of knowledge, and the struggles and power relations that determine whether or not such categories are viable.

  3. Supervision in social work NGOs in Bihor County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Marcela MARC

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a qualitative research which aims at analyzing supervision in the social services provided by NGOs in Bihor County. We used the method of sociological investigation by means of interview and data collection was accomplished through the technique of individual semi-structured interview. The obtained responses demonstrate that individual supervision was mostly used and in most cases the professional supervisor was from outside the organization. The respondents considered that supervision reduces professional stress. The main problems encountered in the implementation of supervision are the lack of financial resources and the association of supervision with bureaucratic control.

  4. 'It is hard for mums to put themselves first': how mothers diagnosed with breast cancer manage the sociological boundaries between paid work, family and caring for the self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine Ruth

    2014-09-01

    This paper aims to increase understanding of how mothers diagnosed with breast cancer while in the paid workforce experience and manage their multiple demands of taking care of themselves, their children and their paid work. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 32 women who were mothers of dependent children and in the paid workforce at the time of their breast cancer diagnosis. The sample includes women living in urban and rural Australia. The study found that after a breast cancer diagnosis, participants tended to prioritise their health and wellbeing over paid work. Yet dominance of gendered identity meant that they tended to place the needs of family, especially children, above their own health and wellbeing. The key factors that influenced mothers' decisions to continue in, return to, or leave paid work after a breast cancer diagnosis included: a change in perspective regarding what was important in their lives; level of support from the workplace and home; the extent to which participating in paid work was a financial necessity; the extent to which their identity was connected to paid work, and; ongoing level of pain or fatigue. The paper concludes that using the sociological concepts of the fateful moment, boundary maintenance and a feminist ethic of care produces a more nuanced understanding of women's participation in paid work after breast cancer than examining paid workforce participation, or unpaid responsibilities and mothering, separately. The nature of the permeability or malleability of boundaries between work, family and taking care of the self affects women's participation in paid work during and/or after breast cancer treatment. Increased boundary permeability or malleability brought about more by cooperation than conflict facilitated positive experiences of re-negotiating boundaries, whereas increased permeability or malleability brought about more by conflict than cooperation created difficulties for women in finding an

  5. Knowledge networking on Sociology: network analysis of blogs, YouTube videos and tweets about Sociology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Cárdenas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available While mainstream scientific knowledge production have been widely studied in recent years with the development of scientometrics and bibliometrics, an emergent number of studies have focused on alternative sources of production and dissemination of knowledge such as blogs, YouTube videos and comments on Twitter. These online sources of knowledge become relevant in fields such as Sociology, where some academics seek to bring the sociological knowledge to the general population. To explore which knowledge on Sociology is produced and disseminated, and how is organized in these online sources, we analyze the knowledge networking of blogs, YouTube videos and tweets on Twitter using network analysis approach. Specifically, the present research analyzes the hyperlink network of the main blogs on Sociology, the networks of tags used to classify videos on Sociology hosted on YouTube, and the network of hashtags linked to #sociología on Twitter. The main results point out the existence of a cohesive and strongly connected community of blogs on Sociology, the very low presence of YouTube videos on Sociology in Spanish, and Sociology on Twitter is linked to others social sciences, classical scholars and social media

  6. Economics of Convention and New Economic Sociology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagd, Søren

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the article is to explore potential common themes in economic sociology and economics of conventions. The article explores two issues raised by economics of conventions that may be of particular importance to economic sociology. First, the explicit exploration of the consequences...... of a plurality of forms of justification, as elaborated in économie de la grandeur. This perspective was recently taken up in economic sociology by David Stark's introduction of the notion ‘sociology of worth'. The second issue, recently suggested by André Orléan, is the need to denaturalize economic theory...... and economic action to demonstrate the social constructed nature of economic action. It is argued that these two issues demonstrate that a fruitful dialogue is indeed possible between economic sociology and economics of convention and should be encouraged....

  7. Do Underachievers Need Sociology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aladin El-Mafaalani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a promising model for using sociological learning to support the education of young people who are socially disadvantaged or display behavioral problems. A great many of these students are trapped in patterns of negative behavior. The goal of the model is to enable these young people to think explicitly about the role they are playing and to encourage them to strike out in a new direction. To this end, Erving Goffman’s sociological insights are used to stage a theatrical performance about school. This approach is informed by the microsociological tradition of proceeding from the concrete to the abstract in order to facilitate inductive learning and self-reflection. Goffman’s theory of social action provides the social-theoretical background for the theatrical action, while also serving as a medium of contrast for the analysis of the individual, interaction, and institution in subsequent reflections about school. In this way, sociological theory not only serves as a theoretical foundation for the lesson, but is also explicitly its subject.Der Aufsatz zeigt eine erfolgversprechende Möglichkeit auf, soziologisches Lernen als Beitrag zur Förderung sozial benachteiligter und verhaltensauffälliger Jugendlicher in der Schule zu implementieren. Die meisten dieser Schüler sind in ihren Handlungsmustern gefangen. Ziel ist es, diesen Jugendlichen die Möglichkeit zu eröffnen, bewusst über ihre Rolle nachzudenken und einen anderen Weg einzuschlagen. Hierfür werden Erkenntnisse aus Erving Goffman‘s Soziologie für ein schulisches Schauspiel genutzt, um ganz im Sinne der mikrosoziologischen Tradition vom Konkreten auf das Abstrakte zu schließen und damit induktives Lernen sowie Selbstreflexion zu ermöglichen. Goffman‘s Theorie sozialen Handelns bildet für das szenische Spiel zunächst das sozialtheoretische Hintergrundrauschen, um schließlich in der Reflexion der sozialen Situation in der Schule als Kontrastmittel f

  8. Principles of Sociology in Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael D.; Andrews, James G.; Larsen, Jordan A.

    2017-01-01

    Systems engineering involves both the integration of the system and the integration of the disciplines which develop and operate the system. Integrating the disciplines is a sociological effort to bring together different groups, often with different terminology, to achieve a common goal, the system. The focus for the systems engineer is information flow through the organization, between the disciplines, to ensure the system is developed and operated with all relevant information informing system decisions. Robert K. Merton studied the sociological principles of the sciences and the sociological principles he developed apply to systems engineering. Concepts such as specification of ignorance, common terminology, opportunity structures, role-sets, and the reclama (reconsideration) process are all important sociological approaches that should be employed by the systems engineer. In bringing the disciplines together, the systems engineer must also be wary of social ambivalence, social anomie, social dysfunction, insider-outsider behavior, unintended consequences, and the self-fulfilling prophecy. These sociological principles provide the systems engineer with key approaches to manage the information flow through the organization as the disciplines are integrated and share their information. This also helps identify key sociological barriers to information flow through the organization. This paper will discuss this theoretical basis for the application of sociological principles to systems engineering.

  9. an overview of military social work: the case of zimbabwe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    work on curriculum adjustment since military social work practice should balance ... Above all, besides ethical dilemmas that are part of social work, the policies .... of positive human healing through purchasing and distributing “Get Well Soon” ...

  10. Extending the Ally Model of Social Justice to Social Work Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Priscilla Ann

    2014-01-01

    Social work students, regardless of their multiple social identities in oppressed and oppressor groups, are called upon to take action against social injustice. This conceptual article introduces the Ally Model of social justice and its alignment with social work values and goals and recommends it to social work educators as a pedagogical tool to…

  11. Hospital Social Work and Spirituality: Views of Medical Social Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Samta P

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on a study of 1,389 medical social workers in 108 hospitals across 12 countries, on their views on spirituality and spiritually sensitive interventions in hospital settings. Results of the logistic regression analyses and structural equation models showed that medical social workers from European countries, United States of America, Canada, and Australia, those had undergone spiritual training, and those who had higher self-reported spiritual experiences scale scores were more likely to have the view that spirituality in hospital settings is for facilitating integral healing and wellness of patients and were more likely to prefer spiritual packages of New Age movements as the form of spiritual program, understand spiritual assessment as assessing the patients' spiritual starting point, to then build on further interventions and were likely to attest the understanding of spiritual techniques as mindfulness techniques. Finally they were also likely to understand the spiritual goals of intervention in a holistic way, that is, as that of integral healing, growth of consciousness and promoting overall well-being of patients vis-à-vis only coping and coming to terms with health adversities. Results of the structural equation models also showed covariances between religion, spirituality training, and scores on the self-reported spiritual experiences scale, having thus a set of compounding effects on social workers' views on spiritual interventions in hospitals. The implications of the results for health care social work practice and curriculum are discussed.

  12. Tracing the Social Work Literature: Exploring Connections to Allied Health through Citation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin Bakker

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Social work is a complex and multidisciplinary field drawing on a wide range of literature in terms of format, age, and discipline. Librarians in both collections and public services must be aware of this diversity in order to serve this rapidly growing field. This study was designed to identify core journals in the social work field, the most commonly cited formats and the age of citations, to assess the use of non-social work journals in the social work literature, and to draw comparisons to results in allied health and social science disciplines. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide librarians supporting social work programs with data which can contribute to their assessment of collections, both for maintenance and accreditation, and which can allow them to have a broader understanding of the field and a more effective approach to instruction. 28,269 citations from 567 source articles were examined. Journal articles were the most commonly cited format (69.90%, followed by books (17.69%. Over 91% of all citations came from materials published after 1990 and over 50% of citations came from materials published in the last ten years. Of the 2,520 journals cited, 32 top journals (1.27% accounted for 6,612 (33.46% of all citations to journals. Of those 32 journals, six were assigned to the field of social work. The remaining core journals came from the fields of psychology, public health, psychiatry, family and gender studies, pediatrics, and medicine. Format distribution and citation age were found to be similar to that of psychology, health care management, health education, and nurse practitioners. There was little similarity with the fields of addictions treatment and sociology. Practical implications for librarians are discussed.

  13. Beyond Words: Comics in the Social Work Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akesson, Bree; Oba, Olufunke

    2017-01-01

    Equipping future social workers to interrogate social justice, human rights, and cultural issues requires a revision of social work education. Culturally relevant teaching is increasingly important in today's globalized world. In this article, we explore the role of comics as a form of social work pedagogy to tackle complex social issues. The…

  14. Sport and Society: An Introduction to Sociology of Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Hilmi

    A theoretical framework for the study of sport sociology is provided in this text. It is intended for students of sport, arts and humanities, sociology, and social psychology. Sport and social organization are discussed first. Three models of societies and six theories of social organization are presented which form the basis of the eclectic…

  15. La producción social de los hábitos alimenticios. Una aproximación desde la sociología del consumo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Entrena-Durán Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Los seres humanos producen socialmente sus hábitos alimenticios, los cuales, por lo tanto, como cualquier otra producción humana, están sujetos al cambio social. El objetivo prioritario de este artículo es aproximarse, desde la sociología del consumo, a las cambiantes circunstancias sociales en las que acontece la producción de tales hábitos a medida que las sociedades se modernizan y globalizan. Particularmente, se muestra como, en las actuales circunstancias de creciente influencia de los medios mundiales de comunicación, las prácticas de producción y las opciones de consumo alimenticio experimentan tendencias hacia su masificación y estandarización planetarias. Sin embargo, se observan diferentes percepciones sociales sobre la alimentación y las opciones con respecto a ella, tal y como corresponde a la diversidad de ideas acerca de la salud y del cuerpo ideal que tienen las personas en función de sus distintas posiciones socioeconómicas y trayectorias de socialización alimentaria.

  16. Practical Application of Sociology in Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael D.; Andrews, James G.; Eckley, Jeri Cassel; Culver, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Systems engineering involves both the integration of the system and the integration of the disciplines which develop and operate the system. Integrating the disciplines is a sociological effort to bring together different groups, who often have different terminology, to achieve a common goal, the system. The focus for the systems engineer is information flow through the organization, between the disciplines, to ensure the system is developed and operated will all relevant information informing system decisions. The practical application of the sociology in systems engineering brings in various organizational development concepts including the principles of planned renegotiation and the application of principles to address information barriers created by organizational culture. Concepts such as specification of ignorance, consistent terminology, opportunity structures, role-sets, and the reclama (reconsideration) process are all important sociological approaches that help address the organizational social structure (culture). In bringing the disciplines together, the systems engineer must also be wary of social ambivalence, social anomie, social dysfunction, and insider-outsider behavior. Unintended consequences can result when these social issues are present. These issues can occur when localized subcultures shift from the overarching organizational culture, or when the organizational culture prevents achievement of system goals. These sociological principles provide the systems engineer with key approaches to manage the information flow through the organization as the disciplines are integrated and share their information and provides key sociological barriers to information flow through the organization. This paper will discuss the practical application of sociological principles to systems engineering.

  17. Integrating Social Work into Undergraduate Education through a Community Action and Social Change Multidisciplinary Minor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards-Schuster, Katie; Ruffolo, Mary C.; Nicoll, Kerri Leyda

    2015-01-01

    Social work education has a long and successful history of developing change agents through bachelor of social work, master's of social work, and PhD programs, but these programs often create boundaries limiting the reach and infusion of social work perspectives. With rapid changes in social, economic, and political contexts, students from all…

  18. Social work practice with LGBT seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratwick, Steve; Jihanian, Lila J; Holloway, Ian W; Sanchez, Marisol; Sullivan, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    The Los Angeles Gay & Lesbian Center began providing services to LGBT seniors in 2008. Since then, the Center's seniors program has grown to over 3,300 clients. It provides a variety of enrichment and support services with the overarching goal of empowering seniors to successfully age in place. This article outlines the service delivery program of the Center's Seniors Services Department and describes its successes and challenges in meeting the needs of diverse LGBT seniors. It offers future directions for social work practice, policy, and research with LGBT older adults.

  19. Facts, theories and ideologies: Viola Klein and Sociology of Scientific Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eulalia Pérez Sedeño

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Several studies on history, philosophy and sociology of science have demonstrated that science is not autonomous and value-neutral and its selfless search of truth is an ideal theoretical myth far from the real practice of science, which is an aggregate of social practices. Viola Klein was a pioneer in studying science using the same instruments and categories utilized in any other social practice. The aim of this work is to highlight her contributions to Sociology of Scientific Knowledge at a moment when this discipline was, at the most, incipient.

  20. Algumas reflexões sobre a qualificação do trabalho a partir da sociologia francesa do pós-guerra Reflections on work qualification from the post-war french sociology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Lobo Baptista Pereira Tartuce

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo procura refletir sobre a pertinência histórica e analítica do conceito de "qualificação do trabalho", em um contexto social que tem demandado a sua substituição pela noção de "competência". Para isso, busca compreendê-lo do ponto de vista teórico, tendo por base o pensamento de Georges Friedmann e Pierre Naville (especialmente o deste último, os pais da sociologia do trabalho na França, no pós-guerra. É nesse país e nesse período que a qualificação começa a adquirir centralidade: ela se torna não apenas um aspecto da prática política e social como, também - e talvez por isso mesmo -, o objeto por excelência da disciplina nascente. Isso significa que a qualificação tem uma história social e interpretativa, e é só por meio dela que se pode decretar ou não o fim de sua vigência analítica. O texto argumenta que as contribuições de Naville, como precursor da chamada visão "relativista" da qualificação - aquela que a concebe como socialmente construída -, são fundamentais para se pensar o debate "qualificação" versus "competência".This paper undertakes a reflection on the historical and analytical pertinence of the concept of work qualification, in a social context that has replaced it by the notion of skill. It thus tries to understand it from the theoretical point of view, based on the thought of Georges Friedmann and Pierre Naville (especially that of the latter, the fathers of sociology of work in post-war France. Qualification began to become central in this country and in this period: it became not only an aspect of the political and social practice but also - and maybe for this very reason -, the object par excellence of this arising subject matter. This means that qualification has a social and interpretative history, and only through it may we decree or not the end of its analytical operationality. The text arguments that the contributions of Naville, the precursor of the so

  1. Explaining drug policy: Towards an historical sociology of policy change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Toby

    2011-11-01

    The goal of seeking to understand the development over time of drug policies is a specific version of the more general intellectual project of finding ways of explaining social change. The latter has been a preoccupation of some of the greatest thinkers within the social sciences of the last 200 years, from Foucault all the way back to the three nineteenth-century pioneers, Marx, Durkheim and Weber. I describe this body of work as 'historical sociology'. In this paper, I outline how a particular approach to historical sociology can be fruitfully drawn upon to understand the development of drug policy, using by way of illustration the example of the analysis of a recent transformation in British drug policy: the rise of the criminal justice agenda. I conclude by arguing that by looking at developments in drug policy in this way, some new insights are opened up. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Developing Ethical Guidelines for Creating Social Media Technology Policy in Social Work Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Shane R. Brady; David A. McLeod; Jimmy A. Young

    2015-01-01

    This paper will discuss social media technology in the context of social work education. While social media technology is prevalent in social work education, most discourse about ethical use of social media in the classroom has taken a prescriptive and overly cautious approach that neglects the context dependent nature that social work educators teach in as well as the overwhelmingly positive potential of social media technology in the classroom. This paper utilizes social constructivist theo...

  3. Civil Society, Democratic Space, and Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelmani Jaysawal

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Civil Society envisages the growth of civilization in a way that the society is in “civilized form.” It has been prominent in Social science since time immemorial. Till 18th century, it was synonymous with the state or political society. It was more or less direct translation of Cicero’s Societas’ Civilis and Aristotle’s Koinonia politike. According to Karl Marx, “Civil Society embraces the whole material intercourse of individuals within a definite stage of development of productive forces.” Civil Society is an arena where modern man legitimately gratifies his self-interest and develops his individuality, but also learns the value of group action, social solidarity which educates him for citizenship and equips him to participate in the political sphere of the state. It provides “networks of civic engagement” within which reciprocity is learned and enforced, trust is generated. An active and diverse civil society plays a valuable role in advancement of democracy. It seeks to ensure that citizen’s interests are taken seriously. The social work intervention may not be democratically envisaged until it is promulgated by civic engagement through Civil Society. Methodology: This is a descriptive study which consists of secondary source of data collection based on reports, books, periodic journals, web-based articles. There have been utilized three case studies for reaching the findings of study. This article will highlight on role of civil society in providing democratic space and assisting social workers to ensure inclusive growth through conglomeration of state and individuals.

  4. The sociology of medical screening: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Natalie; Eborall, Helen

    2012-02-01

    Medical screening raises fundamental issues for sociological inquiry, but at present a well-developed sociology of medical screening is lacking. This special issue on the sociology of screening brings together an exciting collection of new work that tackles medical screening from a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches. In this opening paper, we begin by explaining what we mean by screening, and why we believe screening merits sociological attention. Secondly, we reflect on the sociology of screening to date and provide an introduction for those new to this area. We then provide an overview of the papers in this collection, highlighting links and contrasts between papers. We conclude by reflecting on sociology's potential contribution to wider debates about screening, and propose future research directions. © 2011 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2011 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Economic Sociology and Economics of Convention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagd, Søren

    This paper is part of a larger exploration of the French Economics of Convention tradition. The aim of the paper is to explore potential themes of common interest to economic sociology and Economics of Conventions. The paper is in two parts. First, I summarise the main theoretical features of EC...... the institutional framework of social action. Second, I explore two issues raised by economics of conventions that may be particularly important to consider for economic sociology. The first issue is the explicit exploration of the consequences of a plurality of forms of justification suggested by Luc Boltanski...... and Laurent Thévenot in ‘économie de la grandeur’. This perspective has already been taken up in economic sociology in David Stark’s notion of a ‘Sociology of Worth’. The second issue, recently suggested by André Orléan, is the need to denaturalise economic theory and economic action to demonstrate the social...

  6. The Reflexive Principle of Sociological Theorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R T Ubaidullayeva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article attempts to describe the reflexive principle in theory-making, which integrates the basic modern methodological paradigms and lays the foundation for the development of sociology. On the basis of the theoretical ideas of P. Bourdieu, A. Giddens and P. Ricoeur the author defines the concept of social reflexion and reveals its peculiarities in sociology as compared to reflexion in philosophy. According to the author, the fulfillment of reflexive functions in sociology is connected with the task of analyzing the complex structure of the polysemantic object, considering the specific quality of the subjects and their various trends of development. The presence of the poles — objectivity-subjectivity, rationality-irrationality, consciousness-unconsciousness etc, requires a reproduction of the dichotomies engendering them in social life and development of cognitive methods for their study in sociology.

  7. Brazilian environmental sociology: a provisional review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Leila da Costa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The article aims firstly at the reconstitution and analysis of history within the scope of international environmental sociology situated in the context of contemporary sociology. It also discusses - from the standpoint of literature (Buttel, Dunlap, Hanning, among others - its theoretical-methodological and institutional aspects as well in order to understand the obstacles encountered to legitimate and consolidate a set of problems which, until recently, were not dealt with by social sciences. Secondly, it analyses the Brazilian case. Environmental sociology in Brazil is strongly influenced by American empirical sociology, the precursor of the institutionalization process for the themes. On the other hand, further analysis of this case is relevant to understand the relationship between the scientific sphere, and the creation of environmental policies and social movements.

  8. Political Content in Social Work Education as Reported by Elected Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Shannon R.

    2011-01-01

    As a profession, social work has encouraged its members to run for public office to translate the values and ethics of social work into public policy. This study of 416 elected social workers around the country provides insight into the experiences of these elected social workers in their social work education. The classes, skills, activities,…

  9. CONSTRUCTING SERVICE DISCOURSES IN LITHUANIAN FAMILY SOCIAL WORK

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Motiečienė; Merja Laitinen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, family social work is constructed through the analysis of social service discourses from the social workers’ perspective. Recent research shows how social workers are dealing with complex and fluid issues, as well as the societal uncertainty in their work with families (e.g., Spratt, 2009; Menéndez et al., 2015). Based on earlier studies, it is vital to analyse family social work in different contextual settings. Societal, political and organisational contexts affect the pre...

  10. Trabalho e educação: um olhar sociológico/Work and eduction: a sociological view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Caetano

    Full Text Available Este artigo faz uma reflexão sobre o binômio educação e trabalho, tendo como referência a estratégia de reestruturação do processo produtivo e os programas educacionais implementados no setor da construção. O processo de reestruturação produtiva no setor se inicia em 1983, onde as construtoras foram compelidas a promover alterações na organização do processo de trabalho. É dentro deste cenário que se inserem tanto a estratégia da terceirização, como a alfabetização/qualificação profissional. Portanto, nosso foco de análise incidiu sobre estes dois tipos distintos de iniciativas, que correspondem a dois momentos diferentes na história recente da empresa pesquisada. Para tanto procuramos compreender as mudanças e as implicações nas condições de trabalho, na organização e no conteúdo do trabalho decorrentes da adoção da terceirização. Esta análise se ocupou também dos projetos de alfabetização mantidos nos canteiros de obras, através do confronto entre a visão expressa pelo setor administrativo da construtora pesquisada e pelos trabalhadores acerca do significado, da importância e do papel atribuído à educação. This article is a reflection on the binomial education and work, with reference to the strategy of restructuring the production process and educational programs implemented in the construction sector. The process of restructuring the productive sector is to begin in 1983, where the builders were compelled to promote changes in the organization of the work process. It is within this scenario that would fit both the strategy of outsourcing, such as literacy / professional qualification. So our focus of analysis focused on these two distinct types of initiatives, which correspond to two different times in the recent history of the company searched. For in such a way we look for to understand the changes and the implications in the conditions of work, the organization and the decurrently content

  11. Nutrition and inequalities. A note on sociological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcott, Anne

    2002-09-01

    This article provides an overview of three approaches taken to illuminate the sociological contribution to the field of nutrition and inequalities, in the hope of prompting future researchers to pursue the lines of enquiry suggested. Under the heading of inequalities in food use, the paper first exemplifies the utility of 'political arithmetic', possibly the sociological approach best known in public health. This includes socio-economic patterning in food purchases as well as disadvantage in access, where studies of poverty represent a longstanding focus. A rural/urban dimension has, however, been left dormant. A second approach is illustrated by work on public understandings of nutrition, encompassing primarily small-scale studies of beliefs about nutrition, which emphasise the plurality of lay definitions of diet and health. Lacking are studies which build on this work to uncover the relation to health inequalities. Third to be introduced is sociological work on the social distribution of taste, which illuminates the potential for examining enduring, shared ideas of styles in eating embedded in forms of the social organisation of the home that is associated with different socio-economic levels. The paper ends with comment on practical implications for public health practice and policy designed to reduce inequalities in nutrition.

  12. The Impact of Feminism on Sociology

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvia Walby

    2011-01-01

    The paper investigates the impact of feminism on British sociology over the last 60 years. It focuses on changes in the intellectual content of the discipline, including epistemology, methodology, theory, concepts and the fields of economy, polity, violence and civil society. It situates these changes in the context of changes in gendered organisation of sociology, the rise of women's/gender studies, the ecology of social sciences and societal changes, especially the transformation of the gen...

  13. Nurturing professional social work in Malawi | Kakowa | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Further to this, there is no regulating or coordinating body for social work ... A regulating body of social work in Malawi would enhance development of the ... A reflexive approach where curriculum and practice would inform each other is ...

  14. Innovators and Early Adopters of Distance Education in Social Work

    OpenAIRE

    Jo Ann Coe Regan

    2016-01-01

    This article highlights the innovators and early adopters of distance education in social work. The past, present and future is discussed as it relates to the evolution of technology innovation in social work education.

  15. Broadening engineering education: bringing the community in : commentary on "social responsibility in French engineering education: a historical and sociological analysis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Eddie

    2013-12-01

    Two issues of particular interest in the Irish context are (1) the motivation for broadening engineering education to include the humanities, and an emphasis on social responsibility and (2) the process by which broadening can take place. Greater community engagement, arising from a socially-driven model of engineering education, is necessary if engineering practice is to move beyond its present captivity by corporate interests.

  16. Team Teaching in Social Work: Sharing Power with Bachelor of Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapf, Michael Kim; Jerome, Les; Williams, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Team teaching in social work education usually involves sequential lectures delivered by different instructors--relay or tag-team teaching. Truly collaborative or collegial team teaching involves a committed group of diverse instructors interacting together as equals in the classroom. Having more than one teacher in the classroom confounds…

  17. Health social work in Canada: Five trends worth noting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Stephanie A; Bosma, Harvey

    2018-05-30

    Highlighting a strong human rights and social justice orientation underlying health social work in Canada, this paper describes recent contributions of Canadian health social work practitioners and scholars to five areas identified by Auslander (2001) in a delphi study of health social work in its first century. Five current 'trends' are discussed which correspond with Auslander's themes of professional legitimacy and scope, social causation, dissemination of knowledge, interventions, and cultural appropriateness. These trends are: 1) defining the scope of health social work practice; 2) addressing the social determinants of health; 3) promoting evidence-based practice in health social work; 4) delivering client and family-centered care; and 5) implementing cultural safety and trauma-informed practice. Suggestions are made to further strengthen the position of health social work in Canada.

  18. Sociology of the Prison Classroom: Marginalized Identities and Sociological Imaginations behind Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrotta, Kylie L.; Thompson, Gretchen H.

    2011-01-01

    The authors use sociology of the college classroom to analyze their experiences as feminists teaching sociology courses in the "unconventional setting" of prison. Reflective writing was used to chronicle experiences in the classes. They apply the concepts of doing gender, interaction order, and emotion work to the prison classroom. Based on their…

  19. Science, Innovation, and Social Work: Purpose: Clash or Convergence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Marilyn L.

    2017-01-01

    Social work as a human services profession has been distinctive for its inclusion of research as a required element of practice and instrument in instigating reform. At the present time, the relationship of social work to science and a redefinition of social work as a science have reentered our national dialogue with new force. This expansion of…

  20. An Exploratory Study on Multiple Intelligences and Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matto, Holly; Berry-Edwards, Janice; Hutchison, Elizabeth D.; Bryant, Shirley A.; Waldbillig, Amy

    2006-01-01

    This study surveyed social work educators about the importance of multiple intelligences for social work practice and social work education. The sample consisted of 91 faculty members who responded to an online survey that asked them to rate the importance of 7 intelligences (linguistic, logical-mathematical, musical, bodily-kinesthetic, spatial,…

  1. Adjuncts in Social Work Programs: Good Practice or Unethical?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Social work education programs rely heavily on adjunct instructors, as do most academic institutions. This article adds to existing literature on adjuncts by focusing on the unique issues in social work education, using social work values and ethics as a focus. The benefits and detriments for adjuncts, programs, and students in schools of social…

  2. Sociological concept of morale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Miloš

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The author first discusses the overall unity of the total normative regulation, from which it is separated in the late Roman empire the right, but only in the new century and the morale. There are analyzed the relationship between the moral and ethical reflection and Weber's distinction between pure ethics will (Gesinnungsethik and ethics of responsibility (Verantwortungsethik. The morale is determined by the good as the highest value, as a specific form of social norms but also as a kind of human behavior. These three definitions can be combined in an integrative approach. There are examined the dimensions of moral statements, subjective and objective side of morality, as well as the difference between morale and morality. A general notion of morale can not be defined in substantive but only in formal way . The formal definition is a constituent of general as well as of sociological concept of morale and it is related to morality as a social phenomenon. Its essence is to define the morale by specific norms, the characteristics of the internal and external mandatory (with the pricks of conscience as the most distinctive moral sanction and control exercised by the formal not institutionalized or diffuse society , and in consideration of morality as a social process (actions of people associated moral norms . The basic types of social moral process - being, education, functioning and changing of morale are described. There are briefly analyzed the influence of society to the morale and social function of morale, with special emphasis on the relationship between law and morale.

  3. The Educational Imagination and the Sociology of Education in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Julie

    2013-01-01

    A remarkable feature of the sociology of education is its proliferation under a broad gamut of research themes and topics. Understanding the relationship of education to social reproduction and social change are pivotal to the sociology of education, and have fruitfully informed research in fields such as gender and education, vocational education…

  4. Sociology, medicine and the construction of health-related sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Nelson Filice de; Nunes, Everardo Duarte

    2009-02-01

    Starting from a paper about closing the gap between sociology and medicine in Brazil and the United Kingdom that was published in 1971, a historical update was made with the aim of reflecting on the new shapes of health-related teaching and research within the social and human sciences, in these two countries. The methodology was qualitative and the study was developed using secondary data. The reflections were developed through the authors' immersion in Brazilian and British realities. It was concluded that the interface between sociology and health has expanded, although persistent old difficulties exist in relation to the structure and focus of the healthcare system, medical school power and medical student culture.

  5. Racial Discrimination, Ethnic-Racial Socialization, and Crime: A Micro-Sociological Model of Risk and Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Callie Harbin; Simons, Ronald L.; Gibbons, Frederick X.

    2012-01-01

    Dominant theoretical explanations of racial disparities in criminal offending overlook a key risk factor associated with race: interpersonal racial discrimination. Building on recent studies that analyze race and crime at the micro-level, we specify a social psychological model linking personal experiences with racial discrimination to an…

  6. Sociological investigation Students of Universities' Social-Political Trust in Iran: relying on secondary analysis of some national surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Mahdi Etemadifard

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Social system based on mutual trust among members continues to exist. Social trust in modem era is more important than earlier periods. Subject of current report is focused on the trust of Iranian students in different aspects. Main question in this investigation is about social-political trust of these students (based on trust in Islamic Republic of Iran at the past and present. This matter explored by secondary analysis of data, Relying on secondary analysis of some national surveys. Based on data and consequences of other researches we are going to illustrate the objective aspects of student's trust in current decades. The main sources for data collection at this stage include: All the public surveys conducted in the past four decades, the general data about students and their related assays. Trust students were evaluated on the following dimensions: trust in trade unions and various groups, trust in the clergy, directors of public trust and confidence in judges. Furthermore, the level of political engagement and participation in elections, satisfaction with economic situation, political situation and level of satisfaction with confidence in radio and television news. Reduction of public trust leads to reduced maximum student trust especially in the social and political dimensions.

  7. Social work and power : theoretical background for research

    OpenAIRE

    Švedaitė-Sakalauskė, Birutė; Buzaitytė-Kašalynienė, Jolita

    2014-01-01

    Power and social work are concurrent, because every help (every relation) are always related with power and dependency. A research of phenomenon of power in social work almost hasn’t existed in Lithuania till now. The research could be unfolded on three levels: micro – the level of social work intervention, mezzo – the level of organization of social work, and macro – the level of power of social work profession in the society. The paper aims to discuss fundamental concepts and several theore...

  8. The case for a sociology of dying, death, and bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Neil; Allan, June; Carverhill, Philip A; Cox, Gerry R; Davies, Betty; Doka, Kenneth; Granek, Leeat; Harris, Darcy; Ho, Andy; Klass, Dennis; Small, Neil; Wittkowski, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Dying, death, and bereavement do not occur in a social vacuum. How individuals and groups experience these phenomena will be largely influenced by the social context in which they occur. To develop an adequate understanding of dying, death, and bereavement we therefore need to incorporate a sociological perspective into our analysis. This article examines why a sociological perspective is necessary and explores various ways in which sociology can be of practical value in both intellectual and professional contexts. A case study comparing psychological and sociological perspectives is offered by way of illustration.

  9. Sociological theory and Jungian psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    [[disenchantmentCarl JungpsychoanalysissociologyMax Weber ] In this article I seek to relate the psychology of Carl Jung to sociological theory, specifically Weber. I first present an outline of Jungian psychology. I then seek to relate this as psychology to Weber’s interpretivism. I point to basic methodological compatibilities within a Kantian frame, from which emerge central concerns with the factors limiting rationality. These generate the conceptual frameworks for parallel enquiries into the development and fate of rationality in cultural history. Religion is a major theme here: contrasts of eastern and western religion; the rise of prophetic religion and the disenchantment of modernity. Weber’s categories ‘ascetic’ and ‘mystic’ seem applicable to his own and Jung’s approaches and indeed temperaments, while a shared ironic view of rationality leads to similar visions of the disenchanted modern world. I conclude that Jung is sociologically coherent, but in an entirely different sense from Freud: rather than a constellation of family, socialization, ideology, social continuity, there is an analysis of cultural history against a background of adult normal psychology. I conclude that sociology should acknowledge Jung, but not in terms of over-arching theory. Rather Jungian insights might be used to orient new enquiries, and for reflexive analysis of sociology’s methodological debates.

  10. Shaping a Science of Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekke, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Social workers provide more social services to populations across the life span than any other human service profession, including psychiatry, nursing, and psychology. The scientific methodologies and the scientific knowledge relevant to social services have expanded dramatically in the last 30 years. Using the two indicators of the total number…

  11. Social Pedagogy and Social Work: An analysis of their Relationship from a Socio-pedagogical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Marynowicz-Hetka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A proposal for the relationship between social pedagogy and social work will be made in this manuscript. It is assumed that social work is a certain type of practice cultivated by representatives of the social professions. Social pedagogy can provide an analysis of the field of social work, helping to orient activities within the field and to determine the proper selection of ways of conduct, a kind of a meta-theory. Such an approach enables interaction and cooperation between representatives of multiple disciplines within the humanities and social sciences who are engaged in social work. It also has consequences for the acceptance of multi-faceted and multi-dimensional approaches to activities in the field of social work, which is recognized as an important field for social pedagogues, allowing them to carry out social actions from various perspectives, socio-pedagogical among them. The socio-pedagogical perspective on social work will be analyzed in this article.

  12. Sociology of Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greendorfer, Susan L.

    1985-01-01

    The author describes the issues which created the schism between physical education and sociology. If the subdiscipline of sports sociology is to survive, these misunderstandings must be erased. Current investigations of relevant topics are of interest to both physical educators and coaches and could begin to bridge the gap. (MT)

  13. Mechanisms of overcoming ethical dilemmas in nowadays social work

    OpenAIRE

    MELKONYAN NELLI

    2016-01-01

    In social work, ethical principles have been important in several key respects, with regard to the nature of its mission; the relationships that social workers have with clients, colleagues, and members of the broader society; the methods of intervention that social workers use in their work. So, social work is situated between moral choice and professional ethical behavior, which allows orientating among the variety of moral requirements, evaluating activities taking into consideration moral...

  14. American social work, corrections and restorative justice: an appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumz, Edward J

    2004-08-01

    Social work played an active role in American corrections until the 1980s when the ethic of rehabilitation began to give way to a more conservative doctrine of retribution. Changes in the field of social work, characterized by preference of social workers to work only with certain populations, contributed to social work's diminishment in corrections. Although efforts at rehabilitation continue in corrections, the concept of restorative justice that emphasizes assisting victims, communities, and offenders in dealing with the consequences of crime is gaining acceptance in the field of corrections in the United States and in other countries. This study explored social work's presence in corrections, the decline of that presence, and how the concept of restorative justice can invigorate social work within the field of corrections. Several examples of social work's contemporary efforts to use the concept of restorative justice in the United Kingdom are presented.

  15. The Evolution of Social Welfare and Social Work in Nigeria | Irele ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper focused on the evolution of social welfare and social work in Nigeria. It traced the historical trajectory of social work from the missionary period through the colonial period to the present day. The paper gave a vivid picture of how individuals who were philanthropists contributed to the evolution of social work and ...

  16. Integrating Social Neuroscience and Social Work: Innovations for Advancing Practice-Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matto, Holly C.; Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Throughout the social work profession, there is ongoing interest in building a social science agenda that can address the complex practice-based questions faced by social work professionals today. Methodological innovations and unique funding opportunities have already significantly advanced research on social work practice. Still, there is…

  17. Sociology of religion in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Kees; Sengers, Erik; Blasi, Anthony J.; Giordan, Giuseppe

    In 1960, the Dutch journal of the Catholic Social-Ecclesial Institute (Kaski) Sociaal Kompas became Social Compass. This shift rounded off a period now considered as the heyday of Dutch sociology of religion. Ironically, in those years, Catholic sociologists in particular contested the legitimacy of

  18. Attributions of poverty among social work and non-social work students in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubotina, Olja Druzić; Ljubotina, Damir

    2007-10-01

    To investigate how students in Croatia perceive causes of poverty and to examine the differences in attributions of poverty between students of social work, economics, and agriculture. The study included 365 participants, students of social work (n=143), economics (n=137), and agriculture (n=82). We used the newly developed Attribution of Poverty Scale, consisting of 4 factors, as follows: individual causes of poverty (eg, lack of skills and capabilities, lack of effort, poor money management, alcohol abuse); micro-environmental causes (eg, poor family, region, single parenthood); structural/societal causes (eg, poor economy, consequences of political transition, war); and fatalistic causes (eg, bad luck, fate, God's will). We also used a questionnaire that measured 5 dimensions of students' personal values: humanistic values, family values, striving for self-actualization, traditional values, and hedonistic values. In both questionnaires, items were rated on a 5-point Likert-type scale. Students of all three faculties put most emphasis on structural causes of poverty (mean+/-standard deviation=3.54+/-0.76 on a 1-5 scale), followed by environmental (3.18+/-0.60), individual (2.95+/-0.68), and fatalistic causes (1.81+/-0.74). Social work students perceived individual factors as significantly less important causes of poverty (ANOVA, F-value=12.55, Peconomy and political transition as main causes of poverty in Croatia. Individual factors connected with individual's personal characteristics were considered less important, while luck and fate were considered as least important. Students of social work perceived individual causes to be less important than students of agriculture and economics. Students with strong humanistic and traditional values put more emphasis on external sources of poverty.

  19. Research and production of knowledge in Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldaíza Sposati

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns research paths in the field of Social Work. It begins with the polemic concerning the potential and ability of Social Work as a social practice to produce knowledge. It revives the debate concerning the "war of the sciences" between physicists and mathematicians with social analysts, in which the later do not recognize the scientific dimension of research in the social realm. It analyzes the growth of scientific production in Social Work through dissertations and theses in the Graduate Social Work Program. To do so it comments on the analyses of Iamamoto, Silva and Silva and Carvalho and indicates the need to establish a research policy, orient the epistemic community in Social Work and organize a network of researchers centers.

  20. CONSTRUCTING SERVICE DISCOURSES IN LITHUANIAN FAMILY SOCIAL WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Motiečienė

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, family social work is constructed through the analysis of social service discourses from the social workers’ perspective. Recent research shows how social workers are dealing with complex and fluid issues, as well as the societal uncertainty in their work with families (e.g., Spratt, 2009; Menéndez et al., 2015. Based on earlier studies, it is vital to analyse family social work in different contextual settings. Societal, political and organisational contexts affect the preconditions of social work, but social work also needs to operate within structures (e.g., Pohjola et al., 2014. This paper provides insights into the Lithuanian family social work. The focus is on what kinds of features construct Socialinis darbas su šeima Roberta Motiečienė, Merja Laitinen 12 family social work by analysing social workers’ discourses. This analysis continues the research of Eidukevičiūtė (2013, who analysed family social work practices in transitional Lithuanian society. This researcher aimed to deepen the knowledge about child protection services in Lithuania, the father’s role in child care and the mother’s performance in it. According to Eidukevičiūtė (2013, social workers are still struggling in the field of family social work. This study continues the research tradition in the field of family social work, paying attention to the different contextual settings where family social work is conducted. The Lithuanian government has stated that family policy is a key component of its mandate where (Social Report, 2014. The Council of Social Work plays a very important role in providing guidance on how to implement the government’s policy in the field of family social work. The European Commission Council (2015 provides recommendations for the implementation of the 2015 National Reform Programme, which should concentrate on the people (30% of the total population who are at risk of poverty. The council recommends working on

  1. The institutionalization and professionalization of sociology in Brazil and Argentina. Formation, organization and intervention of sociologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pedro Blois

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, the professional insertions of sociologists in Brazil and Argentina had a remarkable growth. The variety of activities and tasks was certainly wide as the spheres where these professionals were incorporated. Those changes implied a deep redefinition of the sociology scenery, with an increasing number of sociologists working in diverse institutions and social spheres. This article analyses the process of professional differentiation of sociology in Brazil and Argentina in a comparative perspective. Against what could be expected given the different historical trajectories of the discipline in each country, the way in which the sociologists work in the diverse spheres presents strong convergences, characterized by the dominance of a conception of the discipline that rejects the development of sociology as a consulting profession.

  2. Practicing Sociological Imagination through Writing Sociological Autobiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Alem

    2009-01-01

    Sociological imagination is a quality of mind that cannot be adopted by simply teaching students its discursive assumptions. Rather, it is a disposition, in competition with other forms of sensibility, which can be acquired only when it is practiced. Adhering to this important pedagogical assumption, students were assigned to write their…

  3. Social Work Discretion between Professionalism and Managerialism in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skals, Anette

    working with clients who are unfit for work or work market as a result of ill health. In Denmark the local municipal Job Centre is the primary service delivery involved in welfare-to-work. Here values, interest and policies, transformed into rules and regulation, meet the concrete practices of welfare-to-work...... for working in order to helping clients in becoming self-supporting after ill health. As well as examining how social work discretion is made possible in the work organization, the research behind the paper focuses on the issue of new forms of professionalism in social work. In the light of policy changes......Professionalism and managerialism are important and conflicting concepts in the study of professionals working in public service organizations. By focusing on street-level social workers and social work discretion, it is possible to see how welfare-to-work policies are practiced as well as how...

  4. Sociology of Education: Outlines towards a Diagnosis and Thoughts on Some Major Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeck, Unn-Doris Karlsen

    2012-01-01

    Sociology of education in Norway has traditionally been preoccupied with the classic problems related to education and the reproduction of social inequality. As the general social scientific and political focus on inequality decreased, the sociology of education also became less visible. At the same time, the sociology of youth evolved, and…

  5. Social Pedagogical Work with Different Age Groups in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toporkova, Olga; Glebova, Ekaterina; Vysotskaia, Inna V.; Tikhaeva, Victoria V.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: The main objective of the article is to study, analyze and organize the modern German experience in the sphere of social pedagogical and educational work with socially unprotected adults, including youth and the elderly. The retrospective analysis threw light on the background of work with socially unprotected adults in…

  6. The Social Work Ethics Audit: A Risk-Management Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reamer, Frederic G.

    2000-01-01

    Article integrates current knowledge on social work ethics and introduces the concept of a social work ethics audit to aid social workers in their efforts to identify pertinent ethical issues; review and assess the adequacy of their current ethics-related practices; modify their practices as needed; and monitor the implementation of these changes.…

  7. The Place of Political Diversity within the Social Work Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenwald, Mitchell; Wiener, Diane R.; Smith-Osborne, Alexa; Smith, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines political ideology and its implications as a newer diversity variable within social work education. Responding to internal assessments and external critiques of social work education, the dynamics of how diverse political ideologies might manifest in 5 core course concentrations--human behavior in the social environment,…

  8. Nurturing "Critical Hope" in Teaching Feminist Social Work Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Nathe, Ben; Gringeri, Christina; Wahab, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Despite the congruence between critical feminist values and the cardinal values of the social work profession, feminist research in social work has lagged behind its feminist cousins in the social sciences, particularly in terms of critical uses of theory, reflexivity, and the troubling of binaries. This article presents as praxis our reflections…

  9. Prevalence and Predictors of Social Work Student Food Insecurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Rhen; McBeath, Bowen; Brockett, Stephanie; Sorenson, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Food security is an essential component of material wellness and social justice. This study draws on a 2013 survey of 496 students within a school of social work in a Pacific Northwestern U.S. public university to (a) provide the first estimate of the prevalence of food insecurity among social work students and (b) investigate coping strategies…

  10. Graduate Students' Perceptions of Professional Power in Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy-Fazioli, Kimberly; Quijano, Louise M.; Bubar, Roe

    2013-01-01

    The study of ways that professional power is perceived in social work practice is limited. This exploratory qualitative study analyzes second-year MSW students' perceptions of professional power in social work practice. This inquiry is guided by social constructivism and symbolic interactionism perspectives. The authors used constant comparison…

  11. The Sociology of Zygmunt Bauman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Michael Hviid; Poder, Poul

    Zygmunt Bauman is one of the most inspirational and controversial thinkers on the scene of contemporary sociology. For several decades he has provided compelling analyses and diagnoses of a vast variety of aspects of modern and liquid modern living. His work is increasingly popularized, appraised...... life and intellectual trajectory published here for the first time in English. In this postscript aptly entitled "Pro Domo Sua" ("About Myself"), he describes the pushes and pulls that throughout the years have shaped his thinking....

  12. Bruno Latour, actor-networks, and the critique of critical sociology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasić Ivana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the theoretical opus of Bruno Latour and his treatment of the concept of critique. In the first section "actor-network theory" is presented through its key notions (actant, network, translation, associations together with Latour’s theory of modernity. In the second section various aspects of the relation between Latour and critique are discussed - first his own criticism of others (standard sociology and especially "critical", i.e. Bourdieu’s sociology, then the criticisms aimed at his work, to conclude with the political ambivalences of Latour’s attempt to develop an "acritical" social theory. .

  13. Polish Qualitative Sociology: The General Features and Development

    OpenAIRE

    Konecki, Krzysztof Tomasz; Kacperczyk, Anna; Marciniak, Łukasz

    2005-01-01

    Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research,2005, 6(3) The article explores the development of Polish qualitative sociology in Poland by presenting its main intellectual routes and some of the general features of Polish sociology. Romanticism and inductionmethod are crucial elements for the development of this discipline in Poland and contribute to its. unigueness. The role of Florian Znaniecki in creating the Polish qualitative sociology is also underlined.

  14. Company welfare and social work ethics: a space for social work? : A discussion based on cases from Norway and Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Ryen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with company welfare and social work ethics. If social work is concerned with welfare and distributional issues, we would assume company welfare to be an issue of great relevance to social workers, so why do we not come across any social workers in our fieldwork? This calls for the simple question “where do social workers work?” or rather “how come social workers do not work in private companies?” We explore into the combination of social work and private companies with special reference to social work ethics to discuss private companies as a job arena for social workers. We argue that in a sector aiming at profit, social workers may trigger off employees enthusiasm, but employer scepticism. However, by avoiding a less stereotyped notion of private companies, company welfare and social work we claim that certain social work ethical principles would be of joint interest to the involved, but more so in certain contexts than in others.The article consists of six sections. After the introduction, we take a closer look at company welfare followed by a section on social work where we focus on ethical principles and work arenas for social workers. In section four we present our data from some private companies in Norway and Tanzania as a point of departure to our discussion in section five on private companies as a potential job arena for social workers. The complexity of company welfare does not call for simple answers. In the conclusions, section six, we therefore argue that the ethical principles of social work make it an interesting and relevant competence in managing company welfare, though not unproblematic in the homeland of profit. However, contextual complexity invites contextual responses.

  15. Social work - client relationship practice: exploring social worker perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    WENDY ELIZABETH ROLLINS

    2018-01-01

    This thesis explores, using qualitative methodology, the significance of social worker – client relationships for achieving client outcomes in the field of child and family welfare. The study found that social worker – client relationships are critical for achieving outcomes. It is a distinct practice method, informed by relational views about ‘the self’, human development and healing. The social worker, as Relationship Building Agent, is heavily focused on client engagement and building t...

  16. What Works in Education and Social Welfare?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsler, John B.

    2013-01-01

    -up professional strategy. It is subsequently reworked and launched into education and social welfare in moves that largely bypass professionals to serve policy-maker and market needs to enable evidence-based choices among public services. From this perspective, the author argues that education and social welfare...

  17. Moral Philosophy and Social Work Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Amanda

    2009-10-01

    Policies in the United States regarding personal responsibility and deviant behavior often follow an underlying moral philosophy. This paper examines the philosophies in American social policy, and how beliefs about personal responsibility, definitions of deviance and the role of the social welfare system shape current policies.

  18. Moral Philosophy and Social Work Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Reiman, Amanda

    2009-01-01

    Policies in the United States regarding personal responsibility and deviant behavior often follow an underlying moral philosophy. This paper examines the philosophies in American social policy, and how beliefs about personal responsibility, definitions of deviance and the role of the social welfare system shape current policies.

  19. Narrative and the Reconfiguration of Social Work Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi Estey-Burtt

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Commencing with a critique of codes of ethics based on the Statement of Principles of the International Federation of Social Work, we explore how a narrative approach to ethics might better serve the practice of social work. We argue that narrative both addresses some of the problems within current codes—such as their Western assumptions, lack of attention to the political role of the social worker, and the privileging of professional expertise—and aligns well with the values social work, being committed to social justice and diversity. Furthermore, we suggest that narrative, because it can operate at the individual, family, community, social, and discoursal levels can help us think ethically about how we construct narratives about, with, and for individual service users while remaining attentive to wider concerns of social justice. In so doing we are not seeking to construct a new code of ethics but to generate debate as to how social work ethics might be reconfigured.

  20. Sociology of bodies/emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Scribano

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at pointing out that the division between a sociology of the bodies and the emotions is, to say the least, unnecessary. The basic idea that runs through this argument is very simple but needs to be justified: it is not possible to search and reflect on bodies/emotions separately, as if it were any chance of one not referring to the other and viceversa. The strategy of the exposition we have selected is as follows: 1 we outline in an introductory manner the existing approaches in the social studies on bodies and emotions, 2 we point out three kinds of reasons/motives to argue the inadequacy of the categorical/aporetic division of a sociology of the bodies and one of the emotions, 3 we put forward our perspective regarding a sociology of bodies/emotions, and 4 we analize the problem of hunger as an example of our viewpoint. Finally, we invite to reflect on the exposed as a means to open a possible discussion in methodological, theoretical, epistemological and political terms.

  1. Social media and social work education: understanding and dealing with the new digital world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lin; Mishna, Faye; Zhang, Vivian F; Van Wert, Melissa; Bogo, Marion

    2014-10-01

    Accompanying the multiple benefits and innovations of social media are the complex ethical and pedagogical issues that challenge social work educators. Without a clear understanding of the blurred boundaries between public and private, the potentially limitless and unintended audiences, as well as the permanency of the information shared online, social work students who use social media can find themselves in difficult situations in their personal and professional lives. In this article, we present three scenarios that illustrate issues and complexities involving social media use by social work students, followed by a discussion and recommendations for social work educators.

  2. Single Mothers, Social Capital, and Work--Family Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciabattari, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine work-family conflict among low-income, unmarried mothers. Analyzing the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a national sample of nonmarital births, I examine how social capital affects work-family conflict and how both social capital and work-family conflict affect employment. Results show that…

  3. Social Justice and Multiculturalism: Persistent Tensions in the History of US Social Welfare and Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Reisch

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Social justice has been a central normative component of U.S. social welfare and social work for over a century, although the meaning and implications of the term have often been ambiguous. A major source of this ambiguity lies in the conflict between universalist views of social justice and those which focus on achieving justice for specific groups. This conflict has been masked by several long-standing assumptions about the relationship between social justice and multiculturalism – assumptions which have been challenged by recent developments. The assumption that the pursuit of social justice requires the creation of a more egalitarian society has been challenged by the new political-economic realities of globalization. The assumption that the maintenance of individual rights complements the pursuit of social equality has been challenged by racially-based attacks on social welfare benefits and civil rights. Most significantly, the assumption that a socially just society is one in which different groups share a compatible vision of social justice has been challenged by the realities of multiculturalism. This paper explores the evolution of four themes regarding the relationship between social justice and multiculturalism during the past century and discusses their implications for the contemporary demographic and cultural context of the U.S. These themes are: the relationship of cultural diversity to the nation’s values and goals; the contradiction between coerced cultural assimilation and coerced physical and social segregation; the relationship between individual and group identity and rights; and the linkage between “Americanization” and the equal application of justice.

  4. Social working memory: Neurocognitive networks and directions for future research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan L Meyer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Navigating the social world requires the ability to maintain and manipulate information about people’s beliefs, traits, and mental states. We characterize this capacity as social working memory. To date, very little research has explored this phenomenon, in part because of the assumption that general working memory systems would support working memory for social information. Various lines of research, however, suggest that social cognitive processing relies on a neurocognitive network (i.e., the ‘mentalizing network’ that is functionally distinct from, and considered antagonistic with, the canonical working memory network. Here, we review evidence suggesting that demanding social cognition requires social working memory and that both the mentalizing and canonical working memory neurocognitive networks support social working memory. The neural data run counter to the common finding of parametric decreases in mentalizing regions as a function of working memory demand and suggest that the mentalizing network can support demanding cognition, when it is demanding social cognition. Implications for individual differences in social cognition and pathologies of social cognition are discussed.

  5. The sociology of innovation in modern astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edge, D.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes some of the main features of the development of astronomy since 1945, stressing sociological factors, and drawing examples mainly from the history of radio astronomy. Particular attention is given to aspects which appear to distinguish astronomy from other recently-studied sciences - notably, the prevalence of serendipitous discoveries, and the lack of any general resistance from the 'parent' discipline. The work of Kuhn and Hagstrom is used to illuminate these features, and also to indicate how a sociological analysis can be advanced of individual research decisions, and of the nature of disputes within science. Common misconceptions about the nature and scope of sociology are briefly discussed; in particular, it is emphasized that the kind of sociology of science under discussion cannot be normative. (author)

  6. Youth And Social Polarization. An urban sociological study of the life chances of Danish adolescents in 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, David Thore

    2014-01-01

    , but consider my qualitative in-depth lifehistory interviews with 24 respondents from the three neighborhoods (8 respondents from each neighborhood) as my key empirical source. The three neighborhoods differ in key socio-economic characteristics such as income levels, educational levels, housing types...... choices and in this paper I will present some of the preliminary results from my work. To begin with, however, I will present my primary aims in the project, the so-called research questions and let the reader in on matters regarding my research design – that is the methods used in the research process......This paper is about a neighborhood study in Denmark – or to be more accurate; a three- neighborhoods study in Denmark. In this research project I look at three different neighborhoods in the city of Aarhus, the second largest city in Denmark. I use quantitative data1 as objective context variables...

  7. Teaching Note--Incorporating Social Innovation Content into Macro Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Cosner Berzin, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The practice of social innovation offers promising approaches for addressing social issues. Although many social innovation strategies are congruent with macro social work theory and practice, some of the insights and tactics that have emerged in the social innovation field have the potential to strengthen current macro practice. Based on our…

  8. Assessment of Integration of Disability Content into Social Work Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Lydia; McAllister, Carolyn; Neely-Barnes, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Three hundred members of the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) responded to a survey regarding the inclusion of disability content in social work courses and supports needed to increase disability content. Although respondents generally agreed that disability content is important in social work education, its inclusion is inconsistent, with most frequent inclusion in courses on diversity and least frequent inclusion in courses on research. Respondents identified barriers to increasing disability content, including lack of resources for teaching, lack of relevant faculty expertise, and an overcrowded curriculum. Strategies and resources for infusing disability content into social work education are discussed.

  9. Social Policy in Social Work PhD Programs in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, Elizabeth; Gal, John; Weiss-Gal, Idit

    2018-01-01

    While there has been a long-standing concern about the role of policy within social work education and social work practice, most of the emphasis has been on social work education at the BSW and MSW levels. This article examines policy education at the PhD level. It first explores how policy is taught in social work PhD programs in the United…

  10. Social Work in a Developing Continent: The Case of Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Chitereka

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Social work is a professional approach to ameliorating social problems. It is generally understood as a helping profession that utilizes professionally qualified personnel who use its knowledge base to help people tackle their social problems (Mupedziswa, 2005. Nevertheless, in developing countries, social work is a relatively young profession which was influenced by colonialism in its formation. The type of social work practiced in these countries largely mirrors the one that is being practiced in Britain, France and Portugal among others. Utilizing the continent of Africa as a case study, this article argues that social work practice in Africa tends to be curative or remedial in nature and is not adequately addressing people’s problems. It therefore proposes a paradigm shift from remedial to a social development paradigm if it is to make an impact in the 21st century.

  11. Social Work Interventions In The Psycho-Social Management Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal for the Psychological Study of Social Issues ... The paper pointed out that, stress can cause physical and mental illness in the workers and ... and their employees to help them experience reduced symptoms of stress and anxiety ...

  12. Bridging Social Innovation and Social Work: Balancing Science, Values, and Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Cal J.

    2017-01-01

    This article highlights how the social work academy can support innovative research, dissemination, and implementation and is a response to and extension of arguments made by Dr. Marilyn L. Flynn on innovation in social work. It argues that social work researchers need to strike a balance between the often slow and methodical scientific research…

  13. Desarrollos innovativos en la asignatura Métodos y Técnicas de Investigación Social: el caso de los estudios de Sociología Aplicada en la Universidad Pública de Navarra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidal Díaz-de-Rada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Los actuales planes de estudios de los grados de Sociología están aumentando el componente aplicado de la disciplina, orientándolo hacia el estudio científico de la realidad social. Esta situación genera “desajustes” al considerar el tipo de alumnado que se matricula en Sociología, estudiantes con escaso conocimiento estadístico/matemático, al provenir –en su mayor parte– del bachillerato en Humanidades y Ciencias Sociales. Esta exigua formación matemática y el deseo de estudiar carreras “de letras” precisa de una labor formativa que, en sus primeras etapas, debe estar enfocada a eliminar el hechizo mágico de los números para, en un segundo momento, tratar de transmitir la importancia que tienen los indicadores sociales (con información numérica para el conocimiento de la realidad social. En este texto se presentan las estrategias y los recursos pedagógicos utilizados en la Licenciatura en Sociología (Universidad Pública de Navarra, España en la asignatura Métodos y Técnicas de Investigación Social I. En este documento se muestra que el empleo de metodologías activas de enseñanza, concretamente el Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas, ABP, utilizando casos prácticos reales, ha incrementado el número de estudiantes que siguen la asignatura, aumentando también el número de aprobados y mejorando las calificaciones promedio.

  14. Connecting Life Span Development with the Sociology of the Life Course: A New Direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilleard, Chris; Higgs, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The life course has become a topic of growing interest within the social sciences. Attempts to link this sub-discipline with life span developmental psychology have been called for but with little sign of success. In this paper, we seek to address three interlinked issues concerning the potential for a more productive interchange between life course sociology and life span psychology. The first is to try to account for the failure of these two sub-disciplines to achieve any deepening engagement with each other, despite the long-expressed desirability of that goal; the second is to draw attention to the scope for enriching the sociology of the life course through Erik Erikson's model of life span development; and the last is the potential for linking Eriksonian theory with current debates within mainstream sociology about the processes involved in 'individualisation' and 'self-reflexivity' as an alternative entry point to bring together these two fields of work.

  15. The sociological knowledge and problematic behaviors’ prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Serjanaj

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to highlight the importance of sociology knowledge in students attending teaching Master Program, specialists in education, experienced teachers, as well as high school graduates who study sociology in high school. The issues discussed involve not only the role of teacher on recording and straightening such problematic behaviors but even the ways of changing the situation on the future. Phenomena such as: culture, subculture, ethnicity, religion, race and gender diversity, prejudices and discrimination which derive by these kinds of diversities; inequality of social strata, the understanding of social role, cultural norms practicing and their respecting are present in our schools environment. These are reasons why teachers and students must have information about above-mentioned phenomena. Ministry of Education and Sport must add Sociology as a subject of core curricula of high school and teachers programs’ studies.

  16. Audiological rehabilitation in sociological perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    , or they can relate to particular situations. On entering the hearing clinic for the first time, many patients express discomfort when confronted with becoming partners in decision-making concerning the choice of hearing aid type. In the fitting room, the audiologist operates within a dominant medical...... as the 'truth'. By building on a sociological approach to hearing impairment that reaches beyond the medical definition, we see another picture emerging. Some patients embark on the process of getting a hearing aid and come to the hearing aid fitting as a response to social pressure from relatives or colleagues...

  17. Guidelines for Teaching Undergraduate Sport Sociology. Guidance Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Jay; Riemer, Brenda; Sailes, Gary; Harrison, Louis; Pittman, Beverly

    2009-01-01

    Sport sociology is a subdiscipline of sociology that, since the late 1960s, has produced knowledge about sports as social phenomena in a wide range of societies. It may be included as a major specialization area in graduate programs in kinesiology, sports studies and physical education departments, and is widely offered as a single undergraduate…

  18. Pour une Sociologie des Apprentissages (Toward a Sociology of Learning)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcher, Louis

    1977-01-01

    A language, a social practice, cannot be taught or learned apart from determining sociological factors. The effect of this sociological understanding on foreign language methodology, particularly the functional approach, and learner-centered education is discussed. (Text is in French.) (AMH)

  19. Towards a Realist Sociology of Education: A Polyphonic Review Essay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenfell, Michael; Hood, Susan; Barrett, Brian D.; Schubert, Dan

    2017-01-01

    This review essay evaluates Karl Maton's "Knowledge and Knowers: Towards a Realist Sociology of Education" as a recent examination of the sociological causes and effects of education in the tradition of the French social theorist Pierre Bourdieu and the British educational sociologist Basil Bernstein. Maton's book synthesizes the…

  20. The Ethics of Social Work Supervision Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ben-Zion

    1987-01-01

    Charles Levy's classic 1973 article outlined a set of basic value-orientations for supervisors. Attempts to operationalize Levy's principles in order to develop practical guidelines for ethical practice. Discusses problem of "careerism" in social worker supervisors. Recommends supervisors examine ethical implications of their behavior.…

  1. Psychodrama as a Social Work Modality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopik, Debra A.; Cheung, Monit

    2013-01-01

    "Psychodrama" is the process of enacting or reenacting relevant aspects or roles from current and past events to instill hope in clients who are facing life issues. This article examines the outcomes of a five-stage psychodrama treatment through a social worker's direct participation in a partial hospitalization program. Observation notes and…

  2. The Six Languages of Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Martin; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes six languages that scientifically minded and practice-competent social workers need to be fluent in lay language of client, abstract language of theorist, empirical and often quantitative language of researcher, categorical language of information scientist, technical terminology or jargon used by helping professionals, and preferential…

  3. Social inclusion in diverse work settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Wiebren

    2015-01-01

    Het ervaren van sociale inclusie op het werk is essentieel voor het welbevinden en presteren van werknemers. Echter, terwijl inclusie relatief gemakkelijk te bewerkstelligen is wanneer collega’s demografisch gezien op elkaar lijken, is dit moeilijker wanneer collega's sterk van elkaar verschillen.

  4. Value of Gerontology for Occupational Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safford, Florence

    1988-01-01

    As aging affects society increasingly, occupational social workers can benefit from gerontological research and practice in developing programs to help older employees counteract ageism, prepare for retirement, cope with health challenges, and reduce stress in family relations. The workplace is a convenient site for preventive and therapeutic…

  5. Role Integration through the Practice of Social Work with Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherardi, Stacy A; Whittlesey-Jerome, Wanda K.

    2018-01-01

    The current environment for school social work presents great challenges and great opportunities. Amid promising shifts in programs and policies, many school social workers feel marginalized. Despite sustained efforts at definition, the role of the school social worker remains unclear to many outside the field. More important, this role is often…

  6. Social connectedness and the transition from work to retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lancee, B.; Radl, J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Although there are numerous studies on the role of social connections in early working life, research that examines how social connectedness matters in the later stages of a career is scarce. The present study analyzes to what extent social connectedness affects the timing of the

  7. Dementia: sociological and philosophical constructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Daniel H J

    2004-01-01

    This analysis presents a challenge to the biomedical view of dementia as a disease. This view is critiqued from two perspectives: those of sociology and philosophy. Because these domains inform the creation of the medical discourse, their analysis provides an important refinement to the apprehension of the phenomenon of dementia. From the work of Foucault, and in particular his analysis of the historical origins of modern medicine, the sociological construction of dementia is considered. Following this, the philosophical question of Being is discussed, considering particularly the positions of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty. Lastly aspects of dementia nursing that are damaging to those relatives forced to take on the role of primary carer are isolated, in the context of Kitwood's view that it is possible to maintain personhood at the extremes of this condition. It is suggested that this critique of sociological and philosophical foundations of dementia might offer a way of approaching the dismantling of the self and revise current conceptions of dementia care for the better.

  8. Social Work's Role in Medicaid Reform: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Sara S; Wachman, Madeline; Manning, Leticia; Cohen, Alexander M; Seifert, Robert W; Jones, David K; Fitzgerald, Therese; Nuzum, Rachel; Riley, Patricia

    2017-12-01

    To critically analyze social work's role in Medicaid reform. We conducted semistructured interviews with 46 stakeholders from 10 US states that use a range of Medicaid reform approaches. We identified participants using snowball and purposive sampling. We gathered data in 2016 and analyzed them using qualitative methods. Multiple themes emerged: (1) social work participates in Medicaid reform through clinical practice, including care coordination and case management; (2) there is a gap between social work's practice-level and systems-level involvement in Medicaid innovations; (3) factors hindering social work's involvement in systems-level practice include lack of visibility, insufficient clarity on social work's role and impact, and too few resources within professional organizations; and (4) social workers need more training in health transformation payment models and policy. Social workers have unique skills that are valuable to building health systems that promote population health and reduce health inequities. Although there is considerable opportunity for social work to increase its role in Medicaid reform, there is little social work involvement at the systems level.

  9. Renewing Sociology of Education? Knowledge Spaces, Situated Enactments, and Sociological Practice in a World on the Move

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Terri

    2014-01-01

    Sociology of education is caught in a dilemma. The study of education and society that unfolded through the twentieth century produced educational vocabularies that spoke into education policy and practice about inequality and social justice. Now that sociologically informed educational discourse is marginalised by individualistic…

  10. PHENOMENOLOGICAL INTERPRETATION OF BIOETHICAL REALITY (THE SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Nikulina Marina Alekseevna

    2012-01-01

    The interpretation of social reality is a classical problem of sociology, which solution helps perception and understanding of social phenomena. In the article phenomenological interpretation of bioethical reality is shown. Phenomenological sociology, being one of the perspective directions of development of social knowledge, it is characterized by aspiration to show «artificial», that is designed, nature of bioethical reality, its semantic structure, and thus, to «humanize» bioethical realit...

  11. Social Work Practice with Latinos: Key Issues for Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Rich; Negi, Nalini Junko; Iwamoto, Derek Kenji; Rowan, Diana; Shukraft, Allison; Gragg, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The Latino population is the fastest growing group in the United States; thus, it is imperative that social workers and other mental health practitioners be knowledgeable about the current literature on how to effectively serve this population. This article elucidates key issues and knowledge, such as immigration and migration concerns; discusses…

  12. Biosocial Research in Social Work Journals: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Brandy R.; Boutwell, Brian B.; Vaughn, Michael G.; Naeger, Sandra; Dell, Nathaniel

    2018-01-01

    Background: Despite an emphasis on a biopsychosocial understanding of human behavior and the relevance of biosocial research to social work practice, it is unclear whether social work is contributing to biosocial research and knowledge. Methods: Systematic review procedures were employed to locate studies that included biological variables (e.g.,…

  13. Understanding Social Work in the History of Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soydan, Haluk

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this article is to present a theoretical frame of reference for the study and assessment of social work from the perspective of a history of ideas. Method: The study employed an analysis of primary and secondary historical sources. Results: Social work as a practice and research field is embedded in the genesis of modern…

  14. Strength and Motivation: What College Athletes Bring to Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheyett, Anna; Dean, Charlotte; Zeitlin, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    College athletes develop many strengths and skills during their athletic career, such as dedication, ability to work across cultures, leadership, and community building. Social workers need many of these same skills. This study explores the potential transfer of skills from athletics to social work among 15 former college athlete MSW students.…

  15. Reconceptualizing Social Work Behaviors from a Human Rights Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Julie A.

    2018-01-01

    Although the human rights philosophy has relevance for many segments of the social work curriculum, the latest version of accreditation standards only includes a few behaviors specific to human rights. This deficit can be remedied by incorporating innovations found in the social work literature, which provides a wealth of material for…

  16. Applying Indigenous Knowledge to Innovations in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, Amy Locklear

    2017-01-01

    Grounded in an indigenous holistic worldview and borrowing from the four Rs (values of relationships, responsibility, reciprocity, and redistribution), this article supports the inclusion of translational science and the integration of core metacompetencies into social work doctoral education as innovations in the field of social work science. The…

  17. Revitalizing social work education through global and critical awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flem, Aina Lian; Jönsson, Jessica H.; Alseth, Ann Kristin

    2017-01-01

    and critical components in theoretical courses, professional training and field practice in the social work education of the countries in question. It is argued that social work education should move beyond the old division of classical and international/intercultural toward including global and critical...

  18. The Implicit Contract: Implications for Health Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoyd, Judith L. M.

    2010-01-01

    Identifying common patient dynamics is useful for developing social work practice sensitivity in health social work. This article draws on findings from a study of women who terminated desired pregnancies because of fetal anomalies and identifies dynamics that may be applicable to many health settings. Data suggest that women have expectations…

  19. exploring african philosophy: the value of ubuntu in social work

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    This paper looks at the concept of ubuntu, how it has been applied in different fields ... African President Nelson Mandela (Mandela, 1994), in management ... hospitality, generosity, sharing, openness, affirming, available, ..... achievement of social case work. ... Social work with groups utilises the group as a strategy to solve.

  20. 236 Effective Social Work Practice in Lagos: An Emerging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2010-10-17

    Oct 17, 2010 ... social work profession; institutional perspective is the modern approach that is currently put in place, that ... Lagos had for long been in the fore-front of the development of social work in Nigeria .... organization has crises within or without or both; ... newly learnt ways of solving problems, so, learning effective.

  1. Experience of Social Support among Working Mothers: A Concept Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phang, A. Young; Lee, Ki-Hak

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify, categorize, and provide a model for the understanding of social support among Korean working mothers. The participants were interviewed and asked what kind of social support they received that allowed them to maintain work and family life. Using multidimensional scaling and hierarchical clustering analysis…

  2. Collaborative Online Teaching: A Model for Gerontological Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Amy E.; Walsh, Christine A.; Azulai, Anna; Gulbrandsen, Cari; Tong, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Social work students and faculty are increasingly embracing online education and collaborative teaching. Yet models to support these activities have not been adequately developed. This paper describes how a team of instructors developed, delivered, and evaluated an undergraduate gerontological social work course using a collaborative online…

  3. Feminist Self-Identification among Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charter, Mollie Lazar

    2015-01-01

    The literature points to a concerning relationship that social work students have with feminism, including a hesitance to identify as feminist despite endorsing feminist principles. The present study sought to gain a better understanding of how current social work students perceive feminism and whether they self-identify as feminist. In this study…

  4. Shaping Social Work Science: What Should Quantitative Researchers Do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shenyang

    2015-01-01

    Based on a review of economists' debates on mathematical economics, this article discusses a key issue for shaping the science of social work--research methodology. The article describes three important tasks quantitative researchers need to fulfill in order to enhance the scientific rigor of social work research. First, to test theories using…

  5. Change and Deeper Change: Transforming Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkin, Stanley L.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the concept of transformation has become more prevalent in the social work literature; however, its use is quite varied. In this article, I attempt to disentangle some of these uses. I then propose a conceptualization of transformation and discuss its relevance for social work education. In this conceptualization, transformation…

  6. Human Rights Education: Is Social Work behind the Curve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Julie A.; Mathiesen, Sally

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a descriptive assessment of human rights education within schools of social work and law. A review of course titles and descriptions within MSW programs and law programs was conducted for identification of human rights content. The results suggest a dearth of human rights content in social work curricula and a great disparity…

  7. Strict Slaves of Slogans: Response to ''The Social Work Cartel''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, William M.

    2016-01-01

    The corruption of the social work enterprise is not simply episodic but systemic and long-standing including education, research, governance, and practice. Reform is unlikely since the constituency within the field and outside of it that wishes to change the situation is small and ineffective. The corruption of social work reflects the unfortunate…

  8. On the nature and sociology of bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Mark; Dunn, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Much has been written in the last decade about how we should understand the value of the sociology of bioethics. Increasingly the value of the sociology of bioethics is interpreted by its advocates directly in terms of its relationship to bioethics. It is claimed that the sociology of bioethics (and related disciplinary approaches) should be seen as an important component of work in bioethics. In this paper we wish to examine whether, and how, the sociology of bioethics can be defended as a valid and justified research activity, in the context of debates about the nature of bioethics. We begin by presenting and arguing for an account of bioethics that does justice to the content of the field, the range of questions that belong within this field, and the justificatory standards (and methodological orientations) that can provide convincing answers to these questions. We then consider the role of sociology in bioethics and show how and under what conditions it can contribute to answering questions within bioethics. In the final section, we return to the sociology of bioethics to show that it can make only a limited contribution to the field.

  9. Social inclusion in diverse work settings

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, W.S.

    2015-01-01

    Het ervaren van sociale inclusie op het werk is essentieel voor het welbevinden en presteren van werknemers. Echter, terwijl inclusie relatief gemakkelijk te bewerkstelligen is wanneer collega’s demografisch gezien op elkaar lijken, is dit moeilijker wanneer collega's sterk van elkaar verschillen. Dit proefschrift tracht een begrip te creëren van hoe inclusie in demografisch diverse werkomgevingen bewerkstelligd kan worden. Hiertoe is allereerst vastgesteld wat inclusie precies is en hoe dit ...

  10. Making social media work: finding a library voice

    OpenAIRE

    Chatten, Zelda

    2017-01-01

    The social media team at the University of Liverpool Library runs a popular verified Twitter account with over 9,000 followers and is enthusiastically involved in a variety of social media platforms. Since starting a period of sustained improvement, our use of social media has progressed from being a passive channel used to broadcast news and service changes to being an active method of communication in a digital space our users already inhabit. Working collaboratively, the social media team ...

  11. Sociology, Protestant Theology, and the Concept of Modern Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    'scientification' of religion by the emerging disciplines of the humanities and social sciences. In taking the life and work of William Robertson Smith (1846-94) as an example, the article analyzes the transformation of some specific elements of liberal Protestant theology into a set of universal features......This article looks at the intersection between Protestant theology and sociology in the construction of the modern concept of religion. Set against the theoretical background of the functional differentiation of modern society, it identifies the origin of this concept in the discursive...

  12. Adopting a Social Marketing Mind-Set in School Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchemin, Pat; Kelly, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    School social workers often conduct their business behind closed doors because much of their work is confidential. Even when they are not working in their offices, school social workers often blend into the fabric of the school culture, typically working behind the scenes and rarely taking credit for the valuable work they perform. However, if…

  13. Reading Bourdieu: On The Possibility of A Post-Positivist Sociology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Meder

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to quest for an opportunity of post-positivist sociology by focusing on the French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu`s intellectual production and addressing the point on which historical basis Bourdieu`s sociological perspective is established. In this context, in the first part of the article, it is going to be pointed out by which movements (successively structuralism, interactionism and pragmatism criticizing does he arrive at the scientific understanding that tries to overcome the tension between objectivism which looks down on the social and subjectivism which accepts individuals` quotidian life and ideas without questioning. This, in other words, means a construction of a new scientific language becoming hybridized between the structuralist terminology and the phenomenological attitude and damaging the main backbone of mainstream sociology. Bourdieu`s understanding of sociology, whose works are also being read as an eternal argument against positivism, empiricism, structuralism, existentialism, phenomenology, economism, Marxism, methodological individualism and grand narratives, provides a new point of view by criticising subjective and objective forms of knowledge and the essentialist perspective of reality. The concept of habitus being the crucial notion of this Bourdieu based innovative thought is also going to be dealt with in terms of an opportunity of post-positivist sociology

  14. PROBLEMS OF CONSTRUCTING A SOCIOLOGICAL PORTRAIT OF A MODERN STUDENT OF A PROFESSIONAL EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Valerievna Borodina

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article is devoted to the topical problem of training students of secondary vocational education (SVE in demanded and promising professions and specialties, which at the moment is becoming increasingly important in our country. The article analyzes the notions of “social portrait”, “sociological portrait”. The authors aim to reveal their approach to structuring the mechanism of the sociological portraying of a student studying under programs of secondary vocational education. Methodology. The basis of the research is formed by phenomenological, system, generalized methods, modeling, as well as empirical methods. Results. The results of the work are that the authors have revealed new facets of the problem and obtaining objective knowledge about the peculiarities of the professional expectations and preferences of the students of the SVE in the course of approbation of the research on the topic “The formation of the sociological portrait of the entrants, students and graduates of the SVE educational programs providing training in the most popular, new and prospective professions and specialties of SVE” in Sochi State University. The authors present an approach to improving the mechanism of the sociological portrayal of a student in secondary vocational education. Practical implications. The results of the study can be applied in the field of vocational education and sociological forecasting.

  15. Sociological aspects of rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babuccu, Orhan; Latifoğlu, Osman; Atabay, Kenan; Oral, Nursen; Coşan, Behçet

    2003-01-01

    Although the psychological aspect of the rhinoplasty operation has been a subject of interest for a long time, with the exception of a few studies, sociological factors have been almost totally ignored. In this prospective study the personality characteristics and socioeconomic backgrounds of 216 rhinoplasty patients were evaluated. Between 1994 and 2000, a questionnaire and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) were given preoperatively to 157 females and 59 males. The MMPI was also given to age-matched people as a control. Six months after surgery, patients were called on the telephone and asked to rate their satisfaction. According to questionnaire, a great majority of the rhinoplasty patients were young, unmarried women with high education levels. In the rhinoplasty group, one or more scales of the inventory were not in the normal ranges in 45% of the patients, whereas this proportion in the control group was 28% (p childish, highly active, impulsive, competitive, reactive, perfectionistic about themselves, talkative, and emotionally superficial. Male patients could be described as rigid, stubborn, over-sensitive, suspicious, perfectionistic, pessimistic, over-reactive, and having somatizations. Tension and anxiety with feelings of inferiority were found to be characteristics of the male patients. The satisfaction rate after six months was reported as 72%. There was no significant correlation between MMPI results and demographic variables, nor satisfaction rate. In conclusion, the rhinoplasty patients in our study are young people at the very beginning of their careers. It could be that their personalities and socioeconomic backgrounds combine to make aesthetic surgery rewarding enough, both socially and personally, to encourage them to follow through.

  16. Social Action among Social Work Practitioners: Examining the Micro-Macro Divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Nicole Olivia

    2018-01-01

    Social work is a profession that seeks to enhance the well-being of all people and promote social justice and social change through a range of activities, such as direct practice, community organizing, social and political action, and policy development. However, the current literature suggests that the profession's focus on social justice and social action are weakening, replaced by individualism and therapeutic interventions. This article examines data derived from a survey of 188 National Association of Social Workers members from Maryland; Virginia; and Washington, DC, to explore levels of social action participation among social workers and determine whether identifying as a macro-level practitioner would predict higher levels of social action activity compared with being a micro-level practitioner. Findings indicate that social workers in this sample engage in only a moderate level of social action behavior. In addition, identifying oneself as a mezzo- or macro-level practitioner predicts increased frequency of social action behavior. Implications include emphasizing the importance of social action in schools of social work and practice settings and adequately preparing social work professionals to engage in social action. © 2017 National Association of Social Workers.

  17. La sociología de Emile Durkheim: ¿una definición “comunitarista” de lo social?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lucía Grondona

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se debate la tesis de Robert Nisbet (1965, 1969 respecto del carácter fundamentalmente comunitario del objeto de la sociología definido por Durkheim. Para hacerlo se recorren aspectos descriptivos y prescriptivos de la obra del sociólogo francés.

  18. The Sociology of Family Health. A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumba-Masagazi, A. H. K., Comp.

    This unannotated bibliography is on man, his family, the society he makes and lives in, and his health. It is about man and his East African environment. It attempts to bring together both the applied and social sciences as they affect the family. Among the disciplines drawn from are: anthropology, sociology, medicine, religion, economics, labor…

  19. introductory concepts on sociological jurisprudence: jhering ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eliasn

    sociological theory whose main and pervasive message is that “law is a social .... content of law is infinitely varied and relative to the different societies. There is thus ... All legal principles for Jhering can be reduced to the security of condition of.

  20. Reflections on Interdisciplinary Collaboration between Sociology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If the original ambition of sociology to constitute itself into an encyclopaedia of the social sciences has largely failed (because of the obligation to restrict its scope through disciplinary specialization), the discipline has been more successful as a key actor in interdisciplinary and trans-disciplinary encounters that cover a wide ...

  1. A Scoping Review of Social Media Use in Social Work Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chitat

    2016-01-01

    The trend of using social media in social work is increasing, but research which systematically reviews and evaluates their uses in actual practice is limited. This article reviews the social work literature to identify the uses, benefits, and limitations of social media in social work practice, and identifies current gaps in the literature to provide recommendations for future social work research. Articles in 64 social work journals published between 2000 and 2014 were screened and analyzed. The included articles (n = 20) were analyzed with particular reference to their level of evidence and ways of social media use. The methodological quality of the studies in this review was low, and this was consistent with the findings of recent systematic reviews of social media use in medical healthcare. The findings initially suggested that social media can potentially contribute to various social work processes, including: service user engagement, need assessment, intervention, and program evaluation. Limitations include lack of quality control, reliability, confidentiality, and privacy. In social work, the dominant research concern in social media is more about professional ethics than their application in intervention. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  2. The Communicability of Non-Communicable Diseases: An Overview of Sociological Contributions to Ideas of Contagion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    2018-01-01

    -communicable diseases from a distinct sociological view of non- communicable diseases as infectious. I conduct a historical anamnesis of sociological theories that inform contemporary sociological thinking about contagion and/or collective action and the social clustering of (health) behaviour, with a particular focus...

  3. The Global Agenda for Social Work and Social Development: Commitment to Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Social Work Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This Global Agenda is the product of a three-year collaborative initiative undertaken by three international organisations representing social work practice, social work education, and social development. All three of these international bodies were founded in 1928 and have held formal consultative status for many decades with the United Nations…

  4. Pedagogy and Diversity: Enrichment and Support for Social Work Instructors Engaged in Social Justice Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garran, Ann Marie; Kang, Hye-Kyung; Fraser, Edith

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of faculty development is to create and sustain a culture of teaching excellence. For social work faculty, an important part of teaching excellence involves incorporating core social work values such as social justice and diversity across the curriculum and developing pedagogical skills and strategies to teach these issues…

  5. Burnout in Social Workers Treating Children as Related to Demographic Characteristics, Work Environment, and Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamama, Liat

    2012-01-01

    This study examined sense of burnout among 126 social workers who directly treat children and adolescents within the human service professions. Burnout was investigated in relation to social workers' demographic characteristics (age, family status, education, and seniority at work), extrinsic and intrinsic work conditions, and social support by…

  6. THE USES OF HUMOR IN SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE: ANALYSIS OF SOCIAL WORKERS’ EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielė Vaitulionytė

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses how humor could enrich social work practice and guideline social workers. Social work field is not that traditionally relates with humor. While social work scholars argue that social work field is full of contradictions and humor is relevant tool to express those contradictions and paradoxes. In micro level practice Gitterman (2003 suggests humor could be a creative tool that “must be used differently based on client background, level of functioning, and specific situation”. Article presents results of qualitative study. The analysis of social workers’ professional experiences is based on social constructionism perspective with the aim to explain how humor is used in everyday practice and how use of purposive humor could be helpful in social work intervention. Episodic interviews with six social workers working in intercultural social work field were conducted. Transcripts of interviews were analyzed through conceptualization, developing story and maximizing aims of the study. Anonymity and confidentiality was considered. The results of analysis demonstrate that humor is unique experience in the sociocultural context. Discursive categories explain the purpose of humor for practice, circumstances and conditions for using that determine how the use of humor could contribute to the success of a social worker-client interaction. Using humor is considered as professional competence, which suggests that “having a good sense of humor” and appropriate use of humor with ability to demonstrate empathy and honesty in social worker-client interaction is an important part of social worker competence. Humor as a professional competence contained understanding of the humorous taboo. During analysis were explored how using humor and cultural stories of clients create mezzo level strategies for professional social work practice. Keywords: humor in social work practice, social work process, humor taboo.

  7. A social work study on job satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Iravani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Job satisfaction plays an important role on having sustainable growth in any business units. When an unsatisfied employee leaves, the business unit not only loses an employee but also it loses an intangible asset. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate overall job satisfaction occasionally and provide some guidelines for improving work conditions. The proposed study of this paper uses five questionnaires, which are associated with job motivation, job satisfaction and organizational commitment. We have selected 25 sample employees who work for the case study of this research located in west region on Iran. Using some statistical tests we analyze the data and the preliminary results indicate that employee have an average job satisfaction. The results indicate that there are some positive relationships between job satisfaction and other factors including wage increase, psychological needs, physical equipments, entertainment equipment and work-team.

  8. Computer support for social awareness in flexible work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Christiansen, Ellen

    2006-01-01

     How do we conceptualize social awareness, and what support is needed to develop and maintain social awareness in flexible work settings? The paper begins by arguing the relevance of designing for social awareness in flexible work. It points out how social awareness is suspended in the field...... of tension that exists between the ephemerality and continuity of social encounters, exploring ways to construct identity through relationships by means of social encounters - notably those that are accidental and unforced. We probe into this issue through design research: In particular, we present three......, to belonging, and to care. Analyzing these three prototypes in their microcosmic usage setting results in specific recommendations for the three types of applications with respect to social awareness. The experiences indicate that the metaphors a ‘shared mirror' and ‘breadcrumbs' are promising foundations...

  9. Sociology of Knowledge Perspective on Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    2018-01-01

    This chapter addresses one of the enduring questions in sociology of knowledge: how is it possible that subjective meanings become objective facticities? It adopts this question to understand the entrepreneurship phenomenon, and, more specifically, to understand how new business or venture ideas...... and new sectors or industries (as subjective meanings) are legitimated and institutionalized (become socially established as reality). Building on Berger and Luckmann’s Treatise in the Sociology of Knowledge, the chapter suggests an alternative order objectivation of meaning to understand entrepreneurship...

  10. Does infant cognition research undermine sociological theory?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jørn

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses how the results of infant research challenge the assumptions of the classical sciences of social behaviour. According to A.J. Bergesen, the findings of infant research invalidate Durkheim's theory of mental categories, thus requiring a re-theorizing of sociology. This article...... argues that Bergesen's reading of Emile Durkheim is incorrect, and his review of the infant research in fact invalidates his argument. Reviewing the assumptions of sociology in the light of the findings of infant research, it is argued that the real challenge is to formulate a research strategy...

  11. WORKING WITH YOUNG PEOPLE: A MODEL OF SOCIAL INTERVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dovilė Lisauskienė

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Social workers, working with young people ought to be aware of the values, needs and problems of contemporary young people. Therefore, it is necessary to develop study programmes of Social Work that would reflect the current situation of modern youth and be oriented towards effective techniques for working with young people. The most common methods described in the literature are counseling, supervision, case management, self-reflection. The article highlights the method of social intervention, which objectively and fully assesses the problem situation and establishes the connections and relationships between the young man and his relatives, friends or authorities. This method helps to enable young people to solve their own problems. The aim of the research is to analyze the application features of the social intervention model when working with young people. The objectives are to discuss the activities of youth organizations in the field of social 99SOCIALINIO TINKLO INTERVENCIJOS MODELIO TAIKYMAS DIRBANT SU JAUNIMU work; to highlight the methods of social workers‘ practice; to investigate the application of social intervention model, enabling young people to solve their own problems. The methods applied include comparative analysis of scientific literature, monitoring, social intervention model. The survey revealed that when social workers enable young people to solve their own problems, a model of social intervention allows to evaluate not only the relationships of close people or family members, but also highlights the roles of youth organizations or social workers and their positive effect on the customer‘s actions. Thus, when applying the method of social intervention, social workers play an important role, as well as their professional knowledge and skills to establish the connection with the client are extremely important in order to promote the client‘s reflection.

  12. The status of research ethics in social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Aidan; Clark, James J

    2018-01-01

    Research ethics provide important and necessary standards related to the conduct and dissemination of research. To better understand the current state of research ethics discourse in social work, a systematic literature search was undertaken and numbers of publications per year were compared between STEM, social science, and social work disciplines. While many professions have embraced the need for discipline-specific research ethics subfield development, social work has remained absent. Low publication numbers, compared to other disciplines, were noted for the years (2006-2016) included in the study. Social work published 16 (1%) of the 1409 articles included in the study, contributing 3 (>1%) for each of the disciplines highest producing years (2011 and 2013). Comparatively, psychology produced 75 (5%) articles, psychiatry produced 64 (5%) articles, and nursing added 50 (4%) articles. The STEM disciplines contributed 956 (68%) articles between 2006 and 2016, while social science produced 453 (32%) articles. Examination of the results is provided in an extended discussion of several misconceptions about research ethics that may be found in the social work profession. Implications and future directions are provided, focusing on the need for increased engagement, education, research, and support for a new subfield of social work research ethics.

  13. Social working memory: neurocognitive networks and directions for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Meghan L; Lieberman, Matthew D

    2012-01-01

    Navigating the social world requires the ability to maintain and manipulate information about people's beliefs, traits, and mental states. We characterize this capacity as social working memory (SWM). To date, very little research has explored this phenomenon, in part because of the assumption that general working memory systems would support working memory for social information. Various lines of research, however, suggest that social cognitive processing relies on a neurocognitive network (i.e., the "mentalizing network") that is functionally distinct from, and considered antagonistic with, the canonical working memory network. Here, we review evidence suggesting that demanding social cognition requires SWM and that both the mentalizing and canonical working memory neurocognitive networks support SWM. The neural data run counter to the common finding of parametric decreases in mentalizing regions as a function of working memory demand and suggest that the mentalizing network can support demanding cognition, when it is demanding social cognition. Implications for individual differences in social cognition and pathologies of social cognition are discussed.

  14. Promoting recovery through peer support: possibilities for social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loumpa, Vasiliki

    2012-01-01

    The Recovery Approach has been adopted by mental health services worldwide and peer support constitutes one of the main elements of recovery-based services. This article discusses the relevancy of recovery and peer support to mental health social work practice through an exploration of social work ethics and values. Furthermore, it provides an exploration of how peer support can be maximized in groupwork to assist the social work clinician to promote recovery and well-being. More specifically, this article discusses how the narrative therapy concepts of "retelling" and "witnessing" can be used in the context of peer support to promote recovery, and also how social constructionist, dialogical, and systemic therapy approaches can assist the social work practitioner to enhance peer support in recovery oriented groupwork. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  15. A History of Social Work in Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Betty J; Marshall, Jamie Wyatt

    2017-12-01

    Social work is a core health profession with origins deeply connected to the development of contemporary public health in the United States. Today, many of the nation's 600 000 social workers practice broadly in public health and in other health settings, drawing on a century of experience in combining clinical, intermediate, and population approaches for greater health impact. Yet, the historic significance of this long-standing interdisciplinary collaboration-and its current implications-remains underexplored in the present era. This article builds on primary and contemporary sources to trace the historic arc of social work in public health, providing examples of successful collaborations. The scope and practices of public health social work practice are explored, and we articulate a rationale for an expanded place for social work in the public health enterprise.

  16. A History of Social Work in Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Betty J.

    2017-01-01

    Social work is a core health profession with origins deeply connected to the development of contemporary public health in the United States. Today, many of the nation’s 600 000 social workers practice broadly in public health and in other health settings, drawing on a century of experience in combining clinical, intermediate, and population approaches for greater health impact. Yet, the historic significance of this long-standing interdisciplinary collaboration—and its current implications—remains underexplored in the present era. This article builds on primary and contemporary sources to trace the historic arc of social work in public health, providing examples of successful collaborations. The scope and practices of public health social work practice are explored, and we articulate a rationale for an expanded place for social work in the public health enterprise. PMID:29236533

  17. Peripheral Social Awareness Information in Collaborative Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Michael B.; Vathanophas, Vichita

    2003-01-01

    Discusses being aware of other members of a team in a collaborative environment and reports on a study that examined group performance on a task that was computer mediated with and without awareness information. Examines how an awareness tool impacts the quality of a collaborative work effort and the communications between group members.…

  18. Theory for the Public Good? Social Capital Theory in Social Work Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MaryAnn Overcamp-Martini

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available As a concept, social capital is both relatively recent and highly controversial. This analysis overviews the history of social capital theory and the three main theoretical frameworks related to the concept. The components of social capital are discussed, as well as the controversy over its conceptualization. A review of recent studies is provided, particularly in the relationship between social capital and mental health. The article concludes with a discussion regarding the heuristic usefulness of social capital theory in the human behavior and social environment sequence in social work education, opening discourse in civic engagement and participation, collectivity, and the value of social networking.

  19. Sex work, immigration and social difference

    OpenAIRE

    Ham, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Public discourses around ‘migrant sex workers’ are often more confident about what migrant sex workers signify morally (i.e. vulnerability, criminality) but are less clear about who the ‘migrant’ is. This thesis interrogates the implications of the ‘migrant sex worker’ category based on semi-structured interviews with 65 immigrant, migrant and racialised women in sex work and two support staff in Melbourne, Australia and Vancouver, Canada during 2013–2014. Specifically, I employ an intersecti...

  20. Social Norms on Working Hours, Work-Life Balance, and Fertility Choice

    OpenAIRE

    大洞, 公平; 田畑, 顕

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the role played by the social norms of working hours in a household labor- leisure and fertility decision model. We suppose that social norms enforce workers not to deviate from the ideal level of working hours, which depends on past and current observations of working hours in workplaces. We show that the social norms lead to multiple equilibria: one with long working hours and a low fertility rate and another with short working hours and a high fertility rate. Our results...

  1. Working memory dysfunctions predict social problem solving skills in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jia; Tan, Shu-ping; Walsh, Sarah C; Spriggens, Lauren K; Neumann, David L; Shum, David H K; Chan, Raymond C K

    2014-12-15

    The current study aimed to examine the contribution of neurocognition and social cognition to components of social problem solving. Sixty-seven inpatients with schizophrenia and 31 healthy controls were administrated batteries of neurocognitive tests, emotion perception tests, and the Chinese Assessment of Interpersonal Problem Solving Skills (CAIPSS). MANOVAs were conducted to investigate the domains in which patients with schizophrenia showed impairments. Correlations were used to determine which impaired domains were associated with social problem solving, and multiple regression analyses were conducted to compare the relative contribution of neurocognitive and social cognitive functioning to components of social problem solving. Compared with healthy controls, patients with schizophrenia performed significantly worse in sustained attention, working memory, negative emotion, intention identification and all components of the CAIPSS. Specifically, sustained attention, working memory and negative emotion identification were found to correlate with social problem solving and 1-back accuracy significantly predicted the poor performance in social problem solving. Among the dysfunctions in schizophrenia, working memory contributed most to deficits in social problem solving in patients with schizophrenia. This finding provides support for targeting working memory in the development of future social problem solving rehabilitation interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of Attachment Theory in Clinical Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Thomas Joseph; Dziadosz, Gregory M

    2015-11-01

    This article proposes the use of attachment theory in clinical social work practice. This theory is very appropriate in this context because of its fit with social work concepts of person-in-situation, the significance of developmental history in the emergence of psychosocial problems, and the content of human behavior in the social environment. A literature review supports the significance of the theory. Included are ideas about how attachment styles and working models may be used in assessment and treatment to help clients achieve a secure attachment style.

  3. Contribution of Psychological, Social, and Mechanical Work Exposures to Low Work Ability

    OpenAIRE

    Emberland, Jan S.; Knardahl, Stein

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the contribution of specific psychological, social, and mechanical work exposures to the self-reported low level of work ability. Methods: Employees from 48 organizations were surveyed over a 2-year period (n = 3779). Changes in 16 work exposures and 3 work ability measures?the work ability index score, perceived current, and future work ability?were tested with Spearman rank correlations. Binary logistic regressions were run to determine contribution of work exposures...

  4. Resilience amid Academic Stress: The Moderating Impact of Social Support among Social Work Students

    OpenAIRE

    Scott E. Wilks

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between academic stress and perceived resilience among social work students, and to identify social support as a protective factor of resilience on this relationship. A conceptual model of moderation was used to test the role of social support as protective. Methods: The sample consisted of 314 social work students (BSW=144; MSW=170) from three accredited schools/programs in the southern United States. Voluntary survey data we...

  5. Towards a Human Rights Culture in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkmeister Rozas, Lisa; Garran, Ann Marie

    2016-01-01

    A human rights perspective must be embedded in the institutions, organisations or agencies where social work students find themselves. This paper will focus on one particular strategy that could be helpful to the process of solidifying a commitment to human rights for our students. Using a pedagogical tool from a school of social work in the USA originally developed to combat the social injustice of racism, the example transcends the academic institution and offers a solid link in connecting human rights, social justice and social work. Using the construct of critical realism, we argue that, for social work programmes to take steps towards an explicit commitment to human rights, not only must human rights be infused throughout the curriculum, but educators must provide opportunities for making more overt the links between human rights principles, social justice and social work. By addressing behaviours, tendencies and attitudes, students then acquire not only the skills and deeper understanding, but they internalise the motivation and commitment to broaden their human rights frame. In the process of developing a more firm commitment to human rights, we must not be limited to the walls of the academy, but rather extend beyond to our field agencies, organisations and communities. PMID:27559204

  6. Towards a Human Rights Culture in Social Work Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkmeister Rozas, Lisa; Garran, Ann Marie

    2016-06-01

    A human rights perspective must be embedded in the institutions, organisations or agencies where social work students find themselves. This paper will focus on one particular strategy that could be helpful to the process of solidifying a commitment to human rights for our students. Using a pedagogical tool from a school of social work in the USA originally developed to combat the social injustice of racism, the example transcends the academic institution and offers a solid link in connecting human rights, social justice and social work. Using the construct of critical realism, we argue that, for social work programmes to take steps towards an explicit commitment to human rights, not only must human rights be infused throughout the curriculum, but educators must provide opportunities for making more overt the links between human rights principles, social justice and social work. By addressing behaviours, tendencies and attitudes, students then acquire not only the skills and deeper understanding, but they internalise the motivation and commitment to broaden their human rights frame. In the process of developing a more firm commitment to human rights, we must not be limited to the walls of the academy, but rather extend beyond to our field agencies, organisations and communities.

  7. [Organization of socially acceptable working hours in nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büssing, A; Glaser, J

    1994-05-01

    Three dimensions in the structure of the working hour system of nurses, rendering them socially acceptable, are becoming important: duration of the working day, the time of day which is being worked and the distribution of working hours. The latter two are of particular importance because flexible shift is becoming the dominant pattern in nursing. Six indicators are discussed as criteria for social acceptability: security of employment which includes access to the labour-market, level of income, health, opportunity for social relationships, social participation, and autonomy. Responses of 297 nurses in one General Hospital taking part in a study, were analysed to examine empirically the concept of 'socially acceptable structure of the working hours'. Ideal and factual patterns are considered first. Secondly aspects of autonomy are considered and the way this depends on time, thirdly the criteria used to define 'social acceptability' are examined for validity. Results show firstly the cross contrast between the hospital's expectation and the nurses' wishes with regard to working hours. Furthermore, inspite of the demand for flexibility, staff have very little choice and there is little sign of joint decision making. Thirdly results show that health, interpersonal and social aspects are of special importance and that, correspondingly, in the view of nurses, financial and practical problems are of lesser importance in their every day life.

  8. Tobacco training in clinical social work graduate programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinfelder, JoAnn; Price, James H; Dake, Joseph A; Jordan, Timothy R; Price, Joy A

    2013-08-01

    The leading cause of preventable death, in the most vulnerable segments of society, whom social workers often counsel, is cigarette smoking. The purpose of this study was to assess tobacco smoking cessation training in clinical social work programs. A valid 21-item questionnaire was sent to the entire population of 189 clinical graduate social work programs identified by the Council on Social Work Education. A three-wave mailing process was used to maximize the return rate. Directors from 112 clinical social work programs returned completed questionnaires (61 percent). The majority (91 percent) of directors reported having never thought about offering formal smoking cessation training, and only nine of the programs (8 percent) currently provided formal smoking cessation education. The three leading barriers to offering smoking cessation education were as follows: not a priority (60 percent), not enough time (55 percent), and not required by the accrediting body (41 percent). These findings indicate that clinical social work students are not receiving standardized smoking cessation education to assist in improving the well-being of their clients. The national accrediting body for graduate clinical social work programs should consider implementing guidelines for smoking cessation training in the curriculums.

  9. The Development of Visual Sociology: A view from the inside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Harper

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a reflection by one of the founding members of the IVSA (International Visual Sociology Association about the events, ideas, social trends and revolutions within sociology that contributed to development of visual sociology. In 2016 the IVSA entered its 34th year and the author has been a participant in the organization for its full duration. The paper details the importance of documentary photography in the early era of visual sociology. During this era key papers by Howard Becker contributed to the intellectual movement’s original intellectual definition and created a pedagogical model that has served as a model for teaching visual sociology to this day. Moving from visual sociology as a method based on black and white photography, the discipline embraced and developed collaborative methods including photo elicitation and photovoice. A parallel track of visual sociology focused on the analysis of the visual dimension of society, drawing on semiotics and cultural studies. More recently visual sociology has begun to explore the rapidly changing meaning and social function of photographic imagery, as cameras and images have become ubiquitous in the cell phone era.

  10. Sociology and Complexity Science A New Field of Inquiry

    CERN Document Server

    Castellani, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This book is the first to identify and review the new field of study, sociology and complexity science—or SACS for short. SACS is comprised of five cutting-edge areas of research: computational sociology, the British-based School of Complexity (BBC), complex social network analysis (CSNA), sociocybernetics and the Luhmann School of Complexity (LSC). Together, these five areas represent the latest development in complexity science and sociological systems thinking, offering researchers a powerful, new set of tools for addressing the growing complexity of sociological inquiry. This book also showcases a new method for modeling social systems, called the SACS Toolkit. The SACS Toolkit comes with a theoretical framework (social complexity theory), procedural algorithm (assemblage) and recommended toolset for modeling social systems (qualitatively, historically or numerically) from the ground-up. In fact, this book uses the SACS Toolkit to review the new field of SACS. The third feature of this book is its compe...

  11. What has become of critique? Reassembling sociology after Latour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Tom

    2017-09-06

    This paper offers a defence of sociology through an engagement with Actor Network Theory (ANT) and particularly the critique of 'critical' and politically engaged social science developed by Bruno Latour. It argues that ANT identifies some weaknesses in more conventional sociology and social theory, and suggests that 'critical' and 'public' orientated sociologists can learn from the analytical precision and ethnographic sensibilities that characterize ANT as a framework of analysis and a research programme. It argues, however, that Latour et al. have too hastily dispensed with 'critique' in favour of a value neutral descriptive sociology, and that the symmetrical and horizontalist approach adopted in ANT is particularly ill-suited to the development of scientific knowledge about social structures. It argues that a more straightforwardly realist sociology would share many of the strengths of ANT whilst being better able to interrogate, empirically and normatively, the centres of contemporary social power. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  12. Heuristic resources of the ‘classics’: Perspectives of sociological enlightenment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D G Podvoyskiy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the methodological question traditional for the humanities and social sciences (and, above all, sociology, namely, the question about their world view status, functions and aims. According to the author, ‘sociological enlightenment’ provides a chance to justify the purport of scientific research on the theory and history of sociology (research that is culturally significant beyond the narrow professional frames of sociology. The most important component of this ‘enlightenment’ is the demonstration of ‘heuristic resources’ of classical and modern theoretical sociology as a means of scientific explanation and conceptualization of social problems at a level comprehensible to non-academic audiences.

  13. Youth work in a marginalized area and its contribution to social mobility and social justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tireli, Üzeyir; Brønsted, Lone Bæk; Larsen, Vibe

    This paper addresses the question of how professionals involved in social pedagogical work in a marginalized area deal with young people’s possibilities of social mobility. Based on interviews with teachers, social pedagogues, pedagogical assistants, educational supervisors, street workers...... mobility therefore results in a form of social reproduction. The paper draws on data from an ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Copenhagen in 2013-2015 as part of a larger research project: “Youth, Social Communities and Educational Challenges”...

  14. Myths as Contextual Logic for Social Control: The Igbo Example

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nneka Umera-Okeke

    This fusion, charts a path for society's growth, thereby fostering social control and protecting ...... existence in the past and a permanent impact for the future. It works to .... _____ “Causes and Prevention of Juvenile Delinquency”. Sociological ...

  15. The sociological imagination in a time of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard, Kari Marie

    2018-04-01

    Despite rising calls for social science knowledge in the face of climate change, too few sociologists have been engaged in the conversations about how we have arrived at such perilous climatic circumstances, or how society can change course. With its attention to the interactive dimensions of social order between individuals, social norms, cultural systems and political economy, the discipline of sociology is uniquely positioned to be an important leader in this conversation. In this paper I suggest that in order to understand and respond to climate change we need two kinds of imagination: 1) to see the relationships between human actions and their impacts on earth's biophysical system (ecological imagination) and 2) to see the relationships within society that make up this environmentally damaging social structure (sociological imagination). The scientific community has made good progress in developing our ecological imagination but still need to develop a sociological imagination. The application of a sociological imagination allows for a powerfully reframing of four key problems in the current interdisciplinary conversation on climate change: why climate change is happening, how we are being impacted, why we have failed to successfully respond so far, and how we might be able to effectively do so. I visit each of these four questions describing the current understanding and show the importance of the sociological imagination and other insights from the field of sociology. I close with reflections on current limitations in sociology's potential to engage climate change and the Anthropocene.

  16. “IDENTITY” IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Polyakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of identity has come to the fore of contemporary societies in the conditions when the institutional structures of these societies their ascriptive statuses have become looser when modernity is “liquid”, “soft”. Varions conceptualizations of identity are becoming a basic part of contemporary sociological theory. The paper aims to reveal the key problems that sociology faces when striving to work out a theory of identity. The paper takes as its starting point the classic notion of identity. This notion was shaped by Erik Erikson on the basis of his dynamic psychology. The paper proves that the contemporary identity is connected with the process of individualization in modern societies. Numerous and varied studies of contemporary identity can be divided into three large groups according to three methodological approaches: constructivist, postmodern and interactionist. The paper compares the major theories based on these approaches and reveals their theoretical and methodological problems. The paper shows that the constructivist approach is based on the notion of reflexivity which is viewed as a mechanism of identity formation by an individual. Identity is a reflexive project which is being realized in a conscious manner. The postmodern theories of identity reveal the fragmentation incompleteness of ego-identitity and it’s narcissic decay. They also reveal the inability of the individual to solve the problem of continuity and unity of her (his own personality. Identity as a notion is replaced by the notion of identification which reduces identity to varions modes of repsentation. The interactionist methodology conld open up the way to tackle, the problem of individual’s unity and continuity as the main problem of human existence. This is the condition of the individual’s psychic and social health. 

  17. Policy and identity change in youth social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitus, Kathrine

    2017-01-01

    _ Summary: This article analyses – by drawing on ideology critical and psychoanalytical concepts from Slavoj Zizek and Glynos et al. – how political, social and fantasmatic logics interplay and form social workers’ professional identities within two youth social work institutions that operate...... within different social policy paradigms: a socialinterventionist paradigm in 2002 and a neoliberal paradigm in 2010. _ Findings: The article shows how the current neoliberalisation of public policy permeates social work practices through fantasmatic narratives that create professional identities to heal...... discrepancies in and conceal the political dimension of everyday life. In one institution, within a welfare state-based ideology a compensating-including social professional identity is created in response to the young people’s alleged deficiencies; in the other institution, within a neoliberal ideology...

  18. Enhancing collaborative leadership in palliative social work in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barbara; Phillips, Farya; Head, Barbara Anderson; Hedlund, Susan; Kalisiak, Angela; Zebrack, Brad; Kilburn, Lisa; Otis-Green, Shirley

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report-Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs-provided recommendations for meeting the palliative care needs of our growing population of older Americans. The IOM report highlights the demand for social work leadership across all aspects of the health care delivery system. Social workers are core interdisciplinary members of the health care team and it is important for them to be well prepared for collaborative leadership roles across health care settings. The ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership education project was created as a direct response to the 2008 IOM Report. This article highlights a sampling of palliative care projects initiated by outstanding oncology social work participants in the ExCEL program. These projects demonstrate the leadership of social workers in palliative care oncology.

  19. Work Socialization and Adolescents' Work-Related Values in Single-Mother African American Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyokawa, Teru; McLoyd, Vonnie C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined African American mothers' work socialization messages in relation to adolescents' work-related values. Moderation effects of mother-adolescent relation quality on the linkage between maternal socialization messages and adolescents' outcomes were also examined. Participants were 245 single African American mothers and their…

  20. Colour attitude test: the possibility of application in sociology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V P Tkach

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the analysis of the cognitive potential of colour tests in sociology. Nowadays colour tests which are extensively used in the framework of psychology find practically no application in sociological research due to a number of their peculiarities. However, it should be recognized that such tests as colour attitude test demonstrate the richest cognitive potential for the identification of value preferences and social attitudes system at the level of the unconscious of various social groups. The methodological experiment carried out by the author has proved demonstratively the feasibility and high efficiency of colour attitude tests application in the framework of empirical sociological research.