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Sample records for society tms held

  1. Toward a cardiovascular pathology training report on the forum held in Vancouver, March 6, 2004, Society for Cardiovascular Pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiene, Gaetano; Becker, Anton E.; Buja, L. Maximilian; Fallon, John T.; McManus, Bruce M.; Schoen, Frederick J.; Winters, Gayle L.

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular pathology is a subspecialty of anatomic pathology that requires both clinical education and expertise in contemporary physiopathology. The Society for Cardiovascular Pathology sponsored a special workshop within the frame of the USCAP Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, March 6-12,

  2. Toward a cardiovascular pathology training report on the forum held in Vancouver, March 6, 2004, Society for Cardiovascular Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiene, Gaetano; Becker, Anton E; Buja, L Maximilian; Fallon, John T; McManus, Bruce M; Schoen, Frederick J; Winters, Gayle L

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular pathology is a subspecialty of anatomic pathology that requires both clinical education and expertise in contemporary physiopathology. The Society for Cardiovascular Pathology sponsored a special workshop within the frame of the USCAP Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, March 6-12, 2004, to address the present and future role of cardiovascular pathology in research, clinical care, and education. Clearly, the recruitment and training of young pathologists are crucial to this aim. The forum tried to answer a series of questions. First, is there room for cardiovascular pathologists and clinicopathologic correlations in the era of extraordinary advances of in vivo human body imaging? What is the evolving role of the autopsy? How can the cardiovascular pathologist simultaneously be an autopsy prosector, a surgical pathologist, a molecular pathologist, and an experimental pathologist? Is there a specific domain content for training in cardiovascular pathology and does it meet the constellation of market needs and demands? What are the experiences in Europe, North America and elsewhere? What is the influence of cardiovascular pathology in departments of pathology? Is the subdiscipline still a Cinderella in the anatomic theatre or a Princess with a double helix coat of arms? The Society for Cardiovascular Pathology is strongly committed to optimizing the academic and professional profile of the future generation of cardiovascular pathologists. This article reports the outcome of the forum and directions that may lead to a vibrant future for well-trained cardiovascular pathologists.

  3. SNF Leaf Optical Properties: TMS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reflectance and transmittance properties of canopy components, measured by Cary-14 spectrometer and averaged (weighted average) to Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS)...

  4. Fourteenth National Congress of the Environmental and Cultural Heritage Chemistry Division, "Chemistry in a Sustainable Society," held in Rimini (Italy) in June 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Elena; Passarini, Fabrizio; Morselli, Luciano

    2014-12-01

    This report briefly presents the aims and the fields of interest of the Environmental and Cultural Heritage Division (Italian Chemical Society) and the issues addressed during its national congress, held in Rimini in June 2013. The broad range of topics raised by different speakers, the variety of affiliations and institutions participating at the conference, the scientific organisations and private companies co-sponsoring the different sessions give a clear picture of the interdisciplinarity which is a hallmark of this division.

  5. Reflections of a TMS International Scholar: Sharing Research across Cultures and Continents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unocic, Kinga A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-19

    Here, I was honored to be selected as the 2017 Japan Institute of Metals (JIM)/TMS Young Leaders International Scholar, an opportunity made possible by the TMS Foundation. One of the benefits of receiving this award for me was traveling to Japan to visit the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), and attending the 2017 JIM Annual Spring Meeting, held at the Tokyo Metropolitan University.

  6. The 52ndInternational Conference on Medicinal Chemistry (RICT 2016) of the French Medicinal Chemistry Society (SCT) Held in Caen (Normandy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapi, Janos; Van Hijfte, Luc; Dallemagne, Patrick

    2017-06-21

    Outstanding Medchem in France: Guest editors Janos Sapi, Luc Van Hjfte, and Patrick Dallemagne look back at the 52 nd International Conference on Medicinal Chemistry (RICT 2016) held in Caen, France. They discuss the history of the French Medicinal Chemistry Society (Société de Chimie Thérapeutique, SCT) and provide highlights of last year's events, including some key presentations now collected in this Special Issue. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Ørsteds Yin & Yang: MEG & TMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Christopher; Pallesen, Karen Johanne

    2011-01-01

    A portrait of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) from a (bio)physical point of view.......A portrait of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) from a (bio)physical point of view....

  8. [Interactive rTMS protocols in psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Richieri, R; Lancon, C; Vion-Dury, J

    2013-12-01

    The efficiency of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of psychiatric disorders is robust for major depressive episode (MDE) while results are encouraging for schizophrenia. However, rTMS protocols need to be optimized. Basic researches in TMS led to the concept of "state dependency TMS". This concept suggests that the neural circuits' activation states, before and during the stimulation, influence the pulse effect. Indeed, TMS effect must be seen, not simply as a stimulus, but also as the result of an interaction between a stimulus and a level of brain activity. Those data suggest that rTMS efficiency could be increased in psychiatric disorders by triggering patients' neurocognitive activities during stimulation. Thus "interactive rTMS protocols" have been submitted. This article provides a review and a classification of different interactive protocols implemented in the treatment of MDE and schizophrenia. Protocols' interactions with cognitive activities and brain electrical activities will be discussed. Interactive rTMS protocols that manipulate cognitive activities have been developed for MDE treatments. They aim at regulating emotional states of depressed patients during the stimulation. The patients perform emotional tasks in order to activate cortical networks involving the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) into a state that may be more sensitive to the rTMS pulse effect. Simultaneous cognitive behavioral therapy ("CBT rTMS") and cognitive-emotional reactivation ("affective rTMS") have thus been tested during left DLPFC rTMS in MDE. Interactive rTMS protocols that manipulate brain electrical activities have been developed for MDE and schizophrenia treatments. Two categories of protocols should be identified. In the first set, personalized brain activity has been analyzed to determine the parameters of stimulation (i.e. frequency of stimulation) matching the patient ("personalized rTMS"). Personalized rTMS protocols

  9. Report from the Biennial Scientific Meeting of the Australasian Section of the American Oil Chemists Society (AAOCS Held in Adelaide, November 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Miller

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Australasian section of the American Oil Chemists Society (AAOCS held their biennial meeting in Adelaide, Australia on 8–11 November 2011. Over 70 scientists, researchers and industry representatives gathered for three days of talks and discussions on lipid related topics. A highlight was the hot topic symposium on the new olive oil standard being introduced in Australia. Paul Miller, Australian Olives Association, gave a compelling address on why the standard was needed. He demonstrated that the increase in price and demand for high quality olive oils has led to products falsely or misleadingly labelled. Furthermore, the genetic and seasonal variation in minor components of olive oil has led to misclassifications. An extensive scientific and political process in Australia and overseas led to development of this new standard. Dr. Leandro Ravetti, Mordern Olives, demonstrated the development of two new methods, for analysis of pyropheophytins and diacylglycerols, are good indicators of modification by deodorisation of oils and show excellent correlation with organoleptic assessment with aging/degradation of extra virgin olive oils. Professor Rod Mailer finished this session with studies of actual adulteration cases in Australia and overseas, further highlighting the need for this new standard. [...

  10. Publication rate of abstracts presented at the emergency medicine congresses held by the European Society for Emergency Medicine (EUSEM) in 2011 and 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Asim; Kose, Ozkan; Bilir, Ozlem; Ersunan, Gokhan; Ozel, Deniz; Guler, Ferhat

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the publication rate of the abstracts presented at the 6th Mediterranean Emergency Medicine Congress, 2011 and the 7th European Congress on Emergency Medicine, 2012. All abstracts, both posters and oral presentations, from the international emergency medicine congresses held by the European Society for Emergency Medicine (EUSEM) in 2011 and 2012 were identified. To establish whether these abstracts were subsequently published in peer-reviewed medical journals, the names of all the authors and the title of the abstracts were searched for in the databases of Clinical Key/Elsevier, EBSCO Discovery Service, MD Consult, Science Direct, Scopus, EMBASE, Medscape, Google Scholar and local ULAKBIM. The year of publication, consistency of author names and titles, the type of study, the journals in which papers were published and countries from which reports were submitted were all recorded. A total of 1721 abstracts were examined; 626 from 2011 (307 oral presentations and 319 posters) and 1095 from 2012 (154 oral presentations and 941 posters). Of all abstracts in 2011, 172 (27.5%) and of all abstracts in 2012, 265 (24.2%) were subsequently published as full-text reports in peer-reviewed journals. Of the 172 papers published in 2011, 152 (88.4%) were accepted by Science Citation Index (SCI) and/or SCI Expanded (SCI-E) journals and 155 (58.5%) of 265 papers were accepted by SCI and/or SCI-E journals in 2012 (p=0.0001). The publication rate of abstracts submitted to international emergency medicine congresses held by EUSEM over those 2 years was low compared with that of abstracts presented in other emergency medicine congresses. Presenters should be encouraged to send their studies to peer-reviewed journals. During the selection process by the scientific panel, constructive critics should be notified to the presenters instead of simply accepting or rejecting the studies that submitted to the congress, which may increase the

  11. Effects of navigated TMS on object and action naming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Hernandez-Pavon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS has been used to induce speech disturbances and to affect speech performance during different naming tasks. Lately, repetitive navigated TMS (nTMS has been used for non-invasive mapping of cortical speech-related areas. Different naming tasks may give different information that can be useful for presurgical evaluation. We studied the sensitivity of object and action naming tasks to nTMS and compared the distributions of cortical sites where nTMS produced naming errors. Eight healthy subjects named pictures of objects and actions during repetitive nTMS delivered to semi-random left-hemispheric sites. Subject-validated image stacks were obtained in the baseline naming of all pictures before nTMS. Thereafter, nTMS pulse trains were delivered while the subjects were naming the images of objects or actions. The sessions were video-recorded for offline analysis. Naming during nTMS was compared with the baseline performance. The nTMS-induced naming errors were categorized by error type and location. nTMS produced no-response errors, phonological paraphasias, and semantic paraphasias. In seven out of eight subjects, nTMS produced more errors during object than action naming. Both intrasubject and intersubject analysis showed that object naming was significantly more sensitive to nTMS. When the number of errors was compared according to a given area, nTMS to postcentral gyrus induced more errors during object than action naming. Object naming is apparently more easily disrupted by TMS than action naming. Different stimulus types can be useful for locating different aspects of speech functions. This provides new possibilities in both basic and clinical research of cortical speech representations.

  12. Understanding communicative actions: a repetitive TMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolk, Arjen; Noordzij, Matthijs L; Volman, Inge; Verhagen, Lennart; Overeem, Sebastiaan; van Elswijk, Gijs; Bloem, Bas; Hagoort, Peter; Toni, Ivan

    2014-02-01

    Despite the ambiguity inherent in human communication, people are remarkably efficient in establishing mutual understanding. Studying how people communicate in novel settings provides a window into the mechanisms supporting the human competence to rapidly generate and understand novel shared symbols, a fundamental property of human communication. Previous work indicates that the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) is involved when people understand the intended meaning of novel communicative actions. Here, we set out to test whether normal functioning of this cerebral structure is required for understanding novel communicative actions using inhibitory low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). A factorial experimental design contrasted two tightly matched stimulation sites (right pSTS vs left MT+, i.e., a contiguous homotopic task-relevant region) and tasks (a communicative task vs a visual tracking task that used the same sequences of stimuli). Overall task performance was not affected by rTMS, whereas changes in task performance over time were disrupted according to TMS site and task combinations. Namely, rTMS over pSTS led to a diminished ability to improve action understanding on the basis of recent communicative history, while rTMS over MT+ perturbed improvement in visual tracking over trials. These findings qualify the contributions of the right pSTS to human communicative abilities, showing that this region might be necessary for incorporating previous knowledge, accumulated during interactions with a communicative partner, to constrain the inferential process that leads to action understanding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Meeting of the International Society for Neurochemistry (10th) Held at Riva del Garda, Italy on 19-24 May 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-08

    on peptide mapping. Biosynthe- appears to be modulated by the sialic sis of two of these proteins increased acid content of the molecule’s carbohy...guid- found a pronounced decrease in sialic ance of retinal cell axons from the eye acid content, and they found that these to the tectum. Studies by...Interna- The subject of neuronal membranes, tional Society for Neurochemistry (ISN) encompassing studies of ion channels and took place at Riva del Garda

  14. Adhesion International 1987. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Adhesion Society, Inc. (10th) Held in Williamsburg, Virginia on 23-27 February 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    principal inorganic (mineral) phase of calcified tissues. The outer enamel layer of teeth t Presented at the Tenth Annual Meeting of The Adhesion Society...Tolan, P. J. Pearce and C. E. M. Morris 309 SESSION OF ISRAEL Correlation Between the Total Morphology of an Epoxy System and Some of its Properties Dov...indicated as contributing to this adhesion. More recently, Venables9 and his team have studied the detailed morphology of the surfaces of aluminium and

  15. Role of Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS & rTMS) in investigation and possible treatment of Impulsivity in neuropsychiatric disorders with ADHD and BPD as examples

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zaman, Rashid

    2014-01-01

    .... Here I will take ADHD and Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) as examples neuropsychiatric disorders with pathological impulsivity as an important component to describe the usefulness of TMS and repetitive TMS (rTMS...

  16. German Quantum Optics Research in the Mirror of the Annual Physical Society Meeting (51st) Held in West Berlin on 30 March - 4 April 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-26

    Quantum optics Research in the Mirror of the Annual Physical Society Meeting 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) PAUL M Rnmn 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 1t3b. TIME COVERED...and KrF lasers. 875 nm, at very low temperatures. Optimization was carefully studied. New types of garnet-based lasers, so The second UV laser session...beam leads to amplification of the Nonlinear optics in Langmuir- Blod - latter. Experimental and theoretical gett films was the exciting topic pre- studies

  17. Highlights of Spanish Astrophysics IV Proceedings of the Seventh Scientific Meeting of the Spanish Astronomical Society (SEA), held in Barcelona, Spain, September 12-15, 2006

    CERN Document Server

    Figueras, Francesca; Hernanz, Margarita; Jordi, Carme

    2007-01-01

    This volume documents the contributions presented at the Seventh Scientific Meeting of the Spanish Astronomical Society (Sociedad Española de Astronomía, SEA). The event bought together 301 participants who presented 161 contributed talks and 120 posters, the greatest numbers up to now. The fact that most exciting items of the current astronomical research were addressed in the meeting proofs the good health of the SEA, a consolidated organization founded fifteen years ago in Barcelona. Two plenary sessions of the meeting were devoted to the approved entrance of Spain as a full member of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and to the imminent first light of the greatest telescope in the world, the GTC (Gran Telescopio de Canarias), milestones that will certainly lead the Spanish Astronomy in the next future.

  18. Electronically switchable sham transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko Hoeft

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is increasingly being used to demonstrate the causal links between brain and behavior in humans. Further, extensive clinical trials are being conducted to investigate the therapeutic role of TMS in disorders such as depression. Because TMS causes strong peripheral effects such as auditory clicks and muscle twitches, experimental artifacts such as subject bias and placebo effect are clear concerns. Several sham TMS methods have been developed, but none of the techniques allows one to intermix real and sham TMS on a trial-by-trial basis in a double-blind manner. We have developed an attachment that allows fast, automated switching between Standard TMS and two types of control TMS (Sham and Reverse without movement of the coil or reconfiguration of the setup. We validate the setup by performing mathematical modeling, search-coil and physiological measurements. To see if the stimulus conditions can be blinded, we conduct perceptual discrimination and sensory perception studies. We verify that the physical properties of the stimulus are appropriate, and that successive stimuli do not contaminate each other. We find that the threshold for motor activation is significantly higher for Reversed than for Standard stimulation, and that Sham stimulation entirely fails to activate muscle potentials. Subjects and experimenters perform poorly at discriminating between Sham and Standard TMS with a figure-of-eight coil, and between Reverse and Standard TMS with a circular coil. Our results raise the possibility of utilizing this technique for a wide range of applications.

  19. Planning and analyzing robotized TMS using virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthäus, Lars; Giese, Alf; Wertheimer, Daniel; Schweikard, Achim

    2006-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a powerful method to examine the brain and non-invasively treat disorders of the central nervous system. Magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex results in the activation of corresponding muscle groups. Hereby, accurate placement of the TMS coil to the patient's head is crucial to successful stimulation. We developed a way to position the TMS coil using a robot and navigate it in virtual reality based on an online registration of the cranium relative to 3D magnetic resonance imaging data. By tracking the head and robotic motion compensation, fixation of the patient's head becomes obsolete. Furthermore, a novel method for motor cortex mapping is presented. The robotized TMS system is used to obtain the characteristic field of a TMS coil. This field is registered to the field of motor evoked potential measurements at the patient's head to yield a prediction of the motoric center of a target muscle.

  20. Common challenges for ecological modelling: synthesis of facilitated discussions held at the symposia organized for the 2009 conference of the International Society for Ecological Modelling in Quebec City, Canada, (October 6-9, 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocque, Guy R.; Mailly, D.; Yue, T.-X.; Anand, M.; Peng, C.; Kazanci, C.; Etterson, M.; Goethals, P.; Jorgensen, S.E.; Schramski, J.R.; McIntire, E.J.B.; Marceau, D.J.; Chen, B.; Chen, G.Q.; Yang, Z.F.; Novotna, B.; Luckai, N.; Bhatti, Jagtar S.; Liu, J.; Munson, A.; Gordon, Andrew M.; Ascough, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    The eleven symposia organized for the 2009 conference of the International Society for Ecological Modelling (ISEM 2009) held in Quebec City, Canada, October 6–9, 2009, included facilitated discussion sessions following formal presentations. Each symposium focused on a specific subject, and all the subjects could be classified into three broad categories: theoretical development, population dynamics and ecosystem processes. Following discussions with the symposia organizers, which indicated that they all shared similar issues and concerns, the facilitated discussions were task-oriented around four basic questions: (1) key challenges in the research area, (2) generating and sharing new ideas, (3) improving collaboration and networking, and (4) increasing visibility to decision-makers, partners and clients. Common challenges that emerged from the symposia included the need for improved communication and collaboration among different academic disciplines, further progress in both theoretical and practical modelling approaches, and accentuation of technology transfer. Regarding the generation and sharing of new ideas, the main issue that emerged was the type of positive interactions that should be encouraged among potential collaborators. The usefulness of the Internet, particularly for the sharing of open-source software and conducting discussion forums, was highlighted for improving collaboration and networking. Several communication tools are available today, and it is important for modellers to use them more intensively. Visibility can be increased by publishing professional newsletters, maintaining informal contacts with the public, organizing educational sessions in primary and secondary schools, and developing simplified analytical frameworks and pilot studies. Specific issues raised in each symposium are also discussed.

  1. Insights on the neural basis of motor plasticity induced by theta burst stimulation from TMS-EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernet, Marine; Bashir, Shahid; Yoo, Woo-Kyoung; Perez, Jennifer M; Najib, Umer; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-02-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a useful tool to induce and measure plasticity in the human brain. However, the cortical effects are generally indirectly evaluated with motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) reflective of modulation of cortico-spinal excitability. In this study, we aim to provide direct measures of cortical plasticity by combining TMS with electroencephalography (EEG). Continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) was applied over the primary motor cortex (M1) of young healthy adults, and we measured modulation of (i) MEPs, (ii) TMS-induced EEG evoked potentials (TEPs), (iii) TMS-induced EEG synchronization and (iv) eyes-closed resting EEG. Our results show the expected cTBS-induced decrease in MEP size, which we found to be paralleled by a modulation of a combination of TEPs. Furthermore, we found that cTBS increased the power in the theta band of eyes-closed resting EEG, whereas it decreased single-pulse TMS-induced power in the theta and alpha bands. In addition, cTBS decreased the power in the beta band of eyes-closed resting EEG, whereas it increased single-pulse TMS-induced power in the beta band. We suggest that cTBS acts by modulating the phase alignment between already active oscillators; it synchronizes low-frequency (theta and/or alpha) oscillators and desynchronizes high-frequency (beta) oscillators. These results provide novel insight into the cortical effects of cTBS and could be useful for exploring cTBS-induced plasticity outside of the motor cortex. © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Utility of TMS to understand the neurobiology of speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenobu eMurakami

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available According to a traditional view, speech perception and production are processed largely separately in sensory and motor brain areas. Recent psycholinguistic and neuroimaging studies provide novel evidence that the sensory and motor systems dynamically interact in speech processing, by demonstrating that speech perception and imitation share regional brain activations. However, the exact nature and mechanisms of these sensorimotor interactions are not completely understood yet.Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS has often been used in the cognitive neurosciences, including speech research, as a complementary technique to behavioral and neuroimaging studies. Here we provide an up-to-date review focusing on TMS studies that explored speech perception and imitation.Single-pulse TMS of the primary motor cortex (M1 demonstrated a speech specific and somatotopically specific increase of excitability of the M1 lip area during speech perception (listening to speech or lip reading. A paired-coil TMS approach showed increases in effective connectivity from brain regions that are involved in speech processing to the M1 lip area when listening to speech. TMS in virtual lesion mode applied to speech processing areas modulated performance of phonological recognition and imitation of perceived speech.In summary, TMS is an innovative tool to investigate processing of speech perception and imitation. TMS studies have provided strong evidence that the sensory system is critically involved in mapping sensory input onto motor output and that the motor system plays an important role in speech perception.

  3. BOREAS NS001 TMS Level-0 Images in BIL Format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NS001 TMS imagery, along with the other remotely sensed images, was collected in order to provide spatially extensive information over the primary study areas....

  4. Changing Anthropology, Changing Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varughese, Heather

    2009-01-01

    Fifty years after the founding of the field of medical anthropology, the Society for Medical Anthropology of the American Anthropological Association held its first independent meeting on September 24-27, 2009, at Yale University. PMID:20027281

  5. Research with rTMS in the treatment of aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeser, Margaret A.; Martin, Paula I; Treglia, Ethan; Ho, Michael; Kaplan, Elina; Bashir, Shahid; Hamilton, Roy; Coslett, H. Branch; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    This review of our research with rTMS to treat aphasia contains four parts: Part 1 reviews functional brain imaging studies related to recovery of language in aphasia with emphasis on nonfluent aphasia. Part 2 presents the rationale for using rTMS to treat nonfluent aphasia patients (based on results from functional imaging studies). Part 2 also reviews our current rTMS treatment protocol used with nonfluent aphasia patients, and our functional imaging results from overt naming fMRI scans, obtained pre- and post- a series of rTMS treatments. Part 3 presents results from a pilot study where rTMS treatments were followed immediately by constraint-induced language therapy (CILT). Part 4 reviews our diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study that examined white matter connections between the horizontal, midportion of the arcuate fasciculus (hAF) to different parts within Broca’s area (pars triangularis, PTr; pars opercularis, POp), and the ventral premotor cortex (vPMC) in the RH and in the LH. Part 4 also addresses some of the possible mechanisms involved with improved naming and speech, following rTMS with nonfluent aphasia patients. PMID:20714075

  6. Effects of parietal TMS on visual and auditory processing at the primary cortical level -- a concurrent TMS-fMRI study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leitão, Joana; Thielscher, Axel; Werner, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    deactivations induced by auditory activity to TMS sounds. TMS to IPS may increase the responses in visual (or auditory) cortices to visual (or auditory) stimulation via a gain control mechanism or crossmodal interactions. Collectively, our results demonstrate that understanding TMS effects on (uni...

  7. Accelerated HF-rTMS Protocol has a Rate-Dependent Effect on dACC Activation in Alcohol-Dependent Patients: An Open-Label Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herremans, Sarah C; De Raedt, Rudi; Van Schuerbeek, Peter; Marinazzo, Daniele; Matthys, Frieda; De Mey, Johan; Baeken, Chris

    2016-01-01

    located at the ventral cortical aspects in 6 of our participants, reliable data were only obtained for the ACC. Our data indicate that higher baseline dACC activation may serve as a protective mechanism regarding relapse. For the first time, it is demonstrated that accelerated HF-rTMS treatment influences dACC activation in a rate-dependent manner: the lower the baseline dACC activation, the more dACC activity was increased after HF-rTMS treatment. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  8. Time- and task-dependent non-neural effects of real and sham TMS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Duecker

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is widely used in experimental brain research to manipulate brain activity in humans. Next to the intended neural effects, every TMS pulse produces a distinct clicking sound and sensation on the head which can also influence task performance. This necessitates careful consideration of control conditions in order to ensure that behavioral effects of interest can be attributed to the neural consequences of TMS and not to non-neural effects of a TMS pulse. Surprisingly, even though these non-neural effects of TMS are largely unknown, they are often assumed to be unspecific, i.e. not dependent on TMS parameters. This assumption is inherent to many control strategies in TMS research but has recently been challenged on empirical grounds. Here, we further develop the empirical basis of control strategies in TMS research. We investigated the time-dependence and task-dependence of the non-neural effects of TMS and compared real and sham TMS over vertex. Critically, we show that non-neural TMS effects depend on a complex interplay of these factors. Although TMS had no direct neural effects, both pre- and post-stimulus TMS time windows modulated task performance on both a sensory detection task and a cognitive angle judgment task. For the most part, these effects were quantitatively similar across tasks but effect sizes were clearly different. Moreover, the effects of real and sham TMS were almost identical with interesting exceptions that shed light on the relative contribution of auditory and somato-sensory aspects of a TMS pulse. Knowledge of such effects is of critical importance for the interpretation of TMS experiments and helps deciding what constitutes an appropriate control condition. Our results broaden the empirical basis of control strategies in TMS research and point at potential pitfalls that should be avoided.

  9. Static field influences on transcranial magnetic stimulation: considerations for TMS in the scanner environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Jeffrey M; Jalinous, Reza; Cantarero, Gabriela L; Desmond, John E

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to simultaneously manipulate and monitor human cortical responses. Although tremendous efforts have been directed at characterizing the impact of TMS on image acquisition, the influence of the scanner's static field on the TMS coil has received limited attention. The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of the scanner's static field on TMS. We hypothesized that spatial variations in the static field could account for TMS field variations in the scanner environment. Using an MRI-compatible TMS coil, we estimated TMS field strengths based on TMS-induced voltage changes measured in a search coil. We compared peak field strengths obtained with the TMS coil positioned at different locations (B0 field vs fringe field) and orientations in the static field. We also measured the scanner's static field to derive a field map to account for TMS field variations. TMS field strength scaled depending on coil location and orientation with respect to the static field. Larger TMS field variations were observed in fringe field regions near the gantry as compared to regions inside the bore or further removed from the bore. The scanner's static field also exhibited the greatest spatial variations in fringe field regions near the gantry. The scanner's static field influences TMS fields and spatial variations in the static field correlate with TMS field variations. Coil orientation changes in the B0 field did not result in substantial TMS field variations. TMS field variations can be minimized by delivering TMS in the bore or outside of the 0-70 cm region from the bore entrance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Contribution of TMS and rTMS in the Understanding of the Pathophysiology and in the Treatment of Dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozeron, Pierre; Poujois, Aurélia; Richard, Alexandra; Masmoudi, Sana; Meppiel, Elodie; Woimant, France; Kubis, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Dystonias represent a heterogeneous group of movement disorders responsible for sustained muscle contraction, abnormal postures, and muscle twists. It can affect focal or segmental body parts or be generalized. Primary dystonia is the most common form of dystonia but it can also be secondary to metabolic or structural dysfunction, the consequence of a drug's side-effect or of genetic origin. The pathophysiology is still not elucidated. Based on lesion studies, dystonia has been regarded as a pure motor dysfunction of the basal ganglia loop. However, basal ganglia lesions do not consistently produce dystonia and lesions outside basal ganglia can lead to dystonia; mild sensory abnormalities have been reported in the dystonic limb and imaging studies have shown involvement of multiple other brain regions including the cerebellum and the cerebral motor, premotor and sensorimotor cortices. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive technique of brain stimulation with a magnetic field applied over the cortex allowing investigation of cortical excitability. Hyperexcitability of contralateral motor cortex has been suggested to be the trigger of focal dystonia. High or low frequency repetitive TMS (rTMS) can induce excitatory or inhibitory lasting effects beyond the time of stimulation and protocols have been developed having either a positive or a negative effect on cortical excitability and associated with prevention of cell death, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) interneurons mediated inhibition and brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulation. rTMS studies as a therapeutic strategy of dystonia have been conducted to modulate the cerebral areas involved in the disease. Especially, when applied on the contralateral (pre)-motor cortex or supplementary motor area of brains of small cohorts of dystonic patients, rTMS has shown a beneficial transient clinical effect in association with restrained motor cortex excitability. TMS is currently a valuable tool to improve

  11. TMS field modelling-status and next steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thielscher, Axel

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years, an increasing number of studies used geometrically accurate head models and finite element (FEM) or finite difference methods (FDM) to estimate the electric field induced by non-invasive neurostimulation techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) or transcranial...... (www.simnibs.de) that allows for the automatic creation of accurate head models from structural and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI) (Windhoff et al., 2011). This enables us to perform field calculations for multiple subjects, as required in neuroscientific studies. We substantially...... will start by summarizing the key findings on how the individual brain anatomy shapes the electric field induced by TMS (Thielscher et al., 2011; Opitz, 2011). The putative link between the modeling results and basic physiological TMS effects is highlighted. I will then introduce the novel features of Sim...

  12. Based on TMS320LF2407 Environment Temperature Humidity Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    hao, Wang; sha, Sha

    This design with TMS320 series DSP and the new digital sensor DS18B20 as the core component temperature measurement and control system. The system USES TMS320 series TMS320LF2407 DSP as control chip, complete temperature receiving, conversion, display management; DALLAS produced by the new single serial digital temperature sensor DS18B20, complete temperature measurement and analysis capabilities. The whole system has the high level of integration, reliability and anti-interference is strong, extensible, available recognition serial number composition multi-point measurement, small volume, low power dissipation characteristics. This system has a temperature sensor, limit alarm and lower limit alarm, temperature control and display function, this paper introduces single line digital temperature sensor basic content of structure and main performance characteristics.

  13. Cortical modulation of short-latency TMS-evoked potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica eVeniero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation - electroencephalogram (TMS-EEG co-registration offers the opportunity to test reactivity of brain areas across distinct conditions through TMS-evoked potentials (TEPs. Several TEPs have been described, their functional meaning being largely unknown. In particular, short-latency potentials peaking at 5 (P5 and 8 (N8 ms after the TMS pulse have been recently described, but because of their huge amplitude, the problem of whether their origin is cortical or not has been opened. To gain information about these components, we employed a protocol that modulates primary motor cortex excitability (MI through an exclusively cortical phenomena: low frequency stimulation of premotor area (PMC. TMS was applied simultaneously with EEG recording from 70 electrodes. Amplitude of TEPs evoked by 200 single-pulses TMS delivered over MI at 110% of resting motor threshold was measured before and after applying 900 TMS conditioning stimuli to left premotor cortex with 1 Hz repetition rate. Single subject analyses showed reduction in TEPs amplitude after PMC conditioning in a sample of participants and increase in TEPs amplitude in two subjects. No effects were found on corticospinal excitability as recorded by motor evoked potentials (MEPs. Furthermore, correlation analysis showed an inverse relation between the effects of the conditioning protocol on P5-N8 complex amplitude and MEPs amplitude. Because the effects of the used protocol have been ascribed to a cortical interaction between premotor area and MI, we suggest that despite the sign of P5-N8 amplitude modulation is not consistent across participant, this modulation could indicate, at least in part, their cortical origin. We conclude that with an accurate experimental procedure early-latency components can be used to evaluate the reactivity of the stimulated cortex.

  14. The value of preoperative functional cortical mapping using navigated TMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Picht, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The surgical removal of brain tumours in so-called eloquent regions is frequently associated with a high risk of causing disabling postoperative deficits. Among the preoperative techniques proposed to help neurosurgical planning and procedure, navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is increasingly performed. A high level of evidence is now available in the literature regarding the anatomical and functional accuracy of this mapping technique. This article presents the principles and facts demonstrating the value of using nTMS in clinical practice to preserve motor or language functions from deleterious lesions secondary to brain tumour resection or epilepsy surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. rTMS: A Treatment to Restore Function After Severe TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    III will examine the effect of rTMS on white fiber tracts and whether or not the rTMS-related effects correlate with improving neurobehavioral function...improving neurobehavioral function; (3) Examine the effect of rTMS on white fiber tracts and whether or not the rTMS-related effects correlate with...aging. Lamar serves at PI. Title: Neuromodulation and Neurorehabilitation for Treatment of Functional Deficits after mTBI plus PTSD Source of Support

  16. ECT, rTMS, and deepTMS in pharmacoresistant drug-free patients with unipolar depression: a comparative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salviati M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amedeo Minichino¹, Francesco Saverio Bersani¹, Enrico Capra¹, Rossella Pannese¹, Celeste Bonanno², Massimo Salviati¹, Roberto Delle Chiaie¹, Massimo Biondi¹¹Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, ²Aldo Moro University of Bari, Bari, ItalyBackground: Biological treatments are considered as additional options for the treatment of resistant unipolar depression. Controversial data exist about the efficacy and tolerability of three of the most used somatic treatments: electroconvulsive therapy (ECT, transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS, and deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (deepTMS. The aim of this review is to investigate and compare the efficacy and tolerability of these three techniques in drug-free patients with pharmacoresistant unipolar depression.Methods: Three independent reviewers extracted data and assessed the quality of methodological reporting of selected studies. The first outcome was the clinical response to the three different techniques defined as a percentage improvement of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS. The second outcome was the evaluation of their neuropsychological effects. The third outcome was the evaluation of the number of remitted patients; remission was defined as an absolute HDRS-24 score of ≤11 or as an absolute HDRS-17 score of ≤8. Tolerability was the fourth outcome; it was evaluated by examining the number of dropped-out patients.Results: The comparative evaluation of HDRS percentage variations shows ECT as the most effective method after 4 weeks of therapy; on the other hand, a better efficacy is obtainable by deepTMS after 2 weeks of therapy. DeepTMS is the technique that gives the best improvement of cognitive performances. The percentage of remitted patients obtained with ECT treatment is the same obtained in the deepTMS group. Both techniques have a remitted patients percentage two times larger than the rTMS. DeepTMS shows a tolerability

  17. Pico-Tesla TMS Therapy on Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Photios Anninos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Magnetoencephalography (MEG is a well-established noninvasive method for investigating human brain activity. Objectives The present study aimed at identifying any change in the brain state after pico- Tesla Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (pT-TMS on patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Methods A whole-head 122 - channel MEG system in a magnetically shielded room with low magnetic noise was used. The study population comprised of 2 male and 8 female volunteers with MS, with a mean age of 41.3 ± 9.5 years. External magnetic field of pT-TMS was applied on the above patients with proper field characteristics (magnetic field amplitude: 1 - 7.5 pT, frequency: the alpha rhythm of the patient 8 - 13 Hz, obtained prior to the application of pT-TMS. Results A significant effect was observed with an increase of frequencies in the range of 2 - 7 Hz among the participants. The results were statistically significant in 7 out of 10 patients (70%. Conclusions The pT-TMS has the prospective to be a significant noninvasive secure and effective means in managing MS symptoms.

  18. Triple Halo Coil: Development and Comparison with Other TMS Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Priyam; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive stimulation technique that can be used for the treatment of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's Disease, PTSD, TBI and anxiety by regulating synaptic activity. TMS is FDA approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder. There is a critical need to develop deep TMS coils that can stimulate deeper regions of the brain without excessively stimulating the cortex in order to provide an alternative to surgical methods. We have developed a novel multi-coil configuration called ``Triple Halo Coil'' (THC) that can stimulate deep brain regions. Investigation of induced electric and magnetic field in these regions have been achieved by computer modelling. Comparison of the results due to THC configuration have been conducted with other TMS coils such as ``Halo Coil'', circular coil and ``Figure of Eight'' coil. There was an improvement of more than 15 times in the strength of magnetic field, induced by THC configuration at 10 cm below the vertex of the head when compared with the ``Figure of Eight'' coil alone. Carver Charitable Trust.

  19. Paired pulse TMS stimulation and human tongue corticomotor pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Svensson, Peter; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbæk

    Objectives: Paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (ppTMS) can be used to assess short-term interval intra-cortical inhibitory (SICI) and facilitatory (ICF) networks. The degree of SICI and ICF varies with interstimulus intervals (ISI) and stimulus intensities of the conditioning stimulus...

  20. Response of Cassava Variety TMS/98/0505 to Potassium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two field experiments were used to study the response of a low cyanide cassava variety TMS/98/0505 to potassium fertilizer and time of harvest in a tropical ultisol in south eastern Nigeria in 2005/06 and 2006/07. In each year, a split plot design was adopted for the experiment with treatments arranged in a randomized ...

  1. TMS to object cortex affects both object and scene remote networks while TMS to scene cortex only affects scene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Sara A; Solomon-Harris, Lily M; Steeves, Jennifer K E

    2015-12-01

    Viewing the world involves many computations across a great number of regions of the brain, all the while appearing seamless and effortless. We sought to determine the connectivity of object and scene processing regions of cortex through the influence of transient focal neural noise in discrete nodes within these networks. We consecutively paired repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) with functional magnetic resonance-adaptation (fMR-A) to measure the effect of rTMS on functional response properties at the stimulation site and in remote regions. In separate sessions, rTMS was applied to the object preferential lateral occipital region (LO) and scene preferential transverse occipital sulcus (TOS). Pre- and post-stimulation responses were compared using fMR-A. In addition to modulating BOLD signal at the stimulation site, TMS affected remote regions revealing inter and intrahemispheric connections between LO, TOS, and the posterior parahippocampal place area (PPA). Moreover, we show remote effects from object preferential LO to outside the ventral perception network, in parietal and frontal areas, indicating an interaction of dorsal and ventral streams and possibly a shared common framework of perception and action. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coupled with electroencephalography (EEG): Biomarker of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimiskidis, V K

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, a number of novel brain-stimulation techniques have been developed (such as TMS-EEG, TMS-fMRI and TMS-NIRS), yet they remain underutilized in the field of epilepsy. Accumulating evidence suggests that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) combined with electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) is a highly relevant technique for exploration of the pathophysiology of human epilepsies as well as a promising biomarker with diagnostic and prognostic potential. In genetic generalized epilepsies, TMS-EEG has provided pathophysiological insight by revealing quasi-stable, covert states of excitability, a subclass of which is associated with the generation of TMS-induced epileptiform discharges (EDs). In focal epilepsy, TMS-induced EDs were successfully employed to identify the epileptogenic zone. In addition, TMS trains applied during focal EDs can terminate them, and appear to restore the effective connectivity of the brain network significantly altered by EDs. This abortive effect of TMS on EDs may possibly serve as a biomarker of response to invasive neuromodulatory techniques. TMS-EEG-based stimulation paradigms can provide insight into the mechanisms underlying human epilepsies and, thus, warrant further study as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. [Combination of TMS and MRT to understand neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, F C

    2014-06-01

    Modern neuroimaging techniques, such as structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and non-invasive brain stimulation techniques, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are increasingly used in the neuroscientific research of neurological disorders, such as stroke, tinnitus and movement disorders. These methods offer a non-invasive approach and especially in combination, not only the opportunity to add to the pathophysiological understanding of these disorders but also to provide information about the functional recovery and the natural course of the disease in a predictive way. Based on such knowledge therapeutic approaches can be adapted in a patient-tailored fashion to achieve the best therapeutic effects. Furthermore, these methods might provide additional non-invasive information for neurosurgical interventions reducing perioperative interventional risks.In the present article these aspects will be discussed with a focus on the combination of MRI and TMS especially addressed for the topic of recovery from stroke.

  4. Visual Underpinnings of Body Aesthetics: A TMS Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Cazzato

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The ‘Dual route model’ for visual body processing suggests that occipital-lateral cortex and premotor cortex may have complementary influences on body perception. In particular, while the Extrastriate body area (EBA may be involved in body form processing, premotor cortex (PMC is necessary in body action processing. Here, we applied rTMS over bilateral EBA and PMC to investigate the neural mechanisms of esthetic of body perception. Female and male healthy volunteers were required to express VAS judgments of how much they liked virtual model bodies that varied either in body size and implied motion. After a 500-ms fixation cross, the stimuli were presented for 150 ms at the center of the screen and were followed by a mask for 500 ms and, finally, by the 100 mm VAS scale. Five 10 Hz rTMS pulses were delivered after 150 ms from stimulus onset. The analysis on the esthetic liking VAS revealed specific effects of EBAvs. dPMC-rTMS according to the size and posture of the bodies. While, rTMS over right EBA specifically decreased the liking judgments of fat models, stimulation of left EBA decreased the liking judgments of slim dynamic models. Importantly, only the left PMC, but not the left EBA, decreased the judgments of slim static bodies. Our results provide evidence of lateralization effects for the positive vs. negative evaluation of the body of conspecifics. Crucially, both EBA and PMC seem to play a complementary role in esthetic processing and their individual contributions influence the final esthetic judgment.

  5. Cell Calcium and the Control of Membrane Transport. Annual Symposium of the Society of General Physiologists (40th) Held in Woods Hole, Massachusetts on September 3-7, 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Atif embrane Tran sport Chapter 9 A Chemical Link in Excitation-Contraction Coupling in Skel- etal Muscle Julio !ergara, Kamlesh Asotra, and Michael...Physiology. The Cardiovascular System. R. M. Berne . N. Sperelakis, and S. R. Geiger. editors. American Physiological Society. Washington. DC. 1: 1! 3...lour’ial of flubl~l l/ Ow/hc1 ’Ii 160:[)S27-9530.( Chapter 9 A Chemical Link in Excitation-Contraction Coupling in Skeletal Muscle Julio Vergara, Kamlesh

  6. Spatially specific versus unspecific disruption of visual orientation perception using chronometric pre-stimulus TMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Alexander De Graaf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS over occipital cortex can impair visual processing. Such ‘TMS masking’ has repeatedly been shown at several stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs, with TMS pulses generally applied after the onset of a visual stimulus. Following increased interest in the neuronal state-dependency of visual processing, we recently explored the efficacy of TMS at ‘negative SOAs’, when no visual processing can yet occur. We could reveal pre-stimulus TMS disruption, with results moreover hinting at two separate mechanisms in occipital cortex biasing subsequent orientation perception. Here we extended this work, including a chronometric design to map the temporal dynamics of spatially specific and unspecific mechanisms of state-dependent visual processing, while moreover controlling for TMS-induced pupil covering. TMS pulses applied 60-40 ms prior to a visual stimulus decreased orientation processing independent of stimulus location, while a local suppressive effect was found for TMS applied 30-10 ms pre-stimulus. These results contribute to our understanding of spatiotemporal mechanisms in occipital cortex underlying the state-dependency of visual processing, providing a basis for future work to link pre-stimulus TMS suppression effects to other known visual biasing mechanisms.

  7. Spatially specific vs. unspecific disruption of visual orientation perception using chronometric pre-stimulus TMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Tom A.; Duecker, Felix; Fernholz, Martin H. P.; Sack, Alexander T.

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over occipital cortex can impair visual processing. Such “TMS masking” has repeatedly been shown at several stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs), with TMS pulses generally applied after the onset of a visual stimulus. Following increased interest in the neuronal state-dependency of visual processing, we recently explored the efficacy of TMS at “negative SOAs”, when no visual processing can yet occur. We could reveal pre-stimulus TMS disruption, with results moreover hinting at two separate mechanisms in occipital cortex biasing subsequent orientation perception. Here we extended this work, including a chronometric design to map the temporal dynamics of spatially specific and unspecific mechanisms of state-dependent visual processing, while moreover controlling for TMS-induced pupil covering. TMS pulses applied 60–40 ms prior to a visual stimulus decreased orientation processing independent of stimulus location, while a local suppressive effect was found for TMS applied 30–10 ms pre-stimulus. These results contribute to our understanding of spatiotemporal mechanisms in occipital cortex underlying the state-dependency of visual processing, providing a basis for future work to link pre-stimulus TMS suppression effects to other known visual biasing mechanisms. PMID:25688194

  8. [European Blood Alliance (EBA) and EuroNet TMS: what challenges for the transfusion of tomorrow?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folléa, G; de Wit, J; Rouger, P

    2011-04-01

    The primary mission of the European Blood Alliance (EBA) is to contribute to the safety and efficiency of the supply of blood products, cells and tissues, in developing an active network of blood establishments in Europe (25 countries). Its strategic objectives are to improve performance (through working groups and projects funded by the European Union), to engage in regulatory affairs (particularly at the European Commission level) to promote best practices and to facilitate a network to collect and share knowledge and experiences. The main objective of EuroNet TMS, combining the blood scientific societies from more than 30 countries in Europe, is to update and publish regularly, intended for policymakers, a White Book on the transfusion chain from donor to patient and probable or possible changes in the coming 5 years. Since 2008, EBA and EuroNet TMS actively collaborate on the drafting of the 2nd edition to be published in 2011. The two presidents jointly drafted the final chapter outlining the major issues of transfusion for tomorrow, summarized thereafter. Transfusion will still be useful for a long time and for reasons of safety and ethics the voluntary and unpaid donations, with non-profit blood establishments, will remain, the cornerstone of the supply of blood products. This renders crucial the continuous improvement of donor management and optimal blood use. On the regulatory side, after 5 years of implementation, EU directives must be independently evaluated and the Blood Guide of the Council of Europe should gradually become a regulatory standard. Finally, if a competition should be introduced for the blood products, it should be strictly regulated to prevent any threat to the security of their supply and quality for patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. TMS 2014 143rd Annual Meeting & Exhibition, Annual Meeting Supplemental Proceedings (ISBN: 978-1-118-88972-5)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, K; Zhukov, A; Ipatov, M; Talaat, A; Blanco, J; Zhukova, V; Churyukanova, M; Kaloshkin, S; Zamiatkina, E; Shuvaeva, E; Gonzalez-Legarreta, L; Hernando, B

    2015-03-02

    The Magnetic Materials for Energy Applications IV, held at the 2014, 143rd Annual Meeting of The Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society (TMS), brought together experts, young investigators, and students from this sub-discipline of materials science in order for them to share their latest discoveries and develop collaborations. This symposium, which is organized by The Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society, is an important event for this community of scientists. This year, over 50 high-level technical talks were planned over the course of the event. In addition, the students and young investigators in attendance ensured the maximum benefit to the next generation’s work force in this area of study. Meeting global energy needs in a clean, efficient, secure and sustainable manner is arguably the greatest challenge facing mankind today. Magnetic materials play a critical role in myriad devices for the collection, conversion, transmission and storage of energy. For example, high performance permanent magnets are currently in great demand for the generators in wind turbines and electric motors in hybrid vehicles. Other classes of advanced magnetic materials are essential for efficient inductors/transformers and motors. Energy efficient cooling based on the magnetocaloric effect is another exciting possibility which is rapidly becoming industrially viable. The potential energy savings related to refrigeration and air conditioning based on magnetocaloric materials are highly attractive. This symposium allowed experts in areas relating to the advanced characterization, simulation, and optimization of magnetic materials to convene and present their latest research. The types of interactions afforded by this event are beneficial to society at large primarily because they provide opportunities for the leaders within this field to learn from one another and thus improve the quality and productivity of their investigations. Additionally, the presence of young investigators

  10. Motor cortex changes in spinal cord injury: a TMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturno, Eleonora; Bonato, Claudio; Miniussi, Carlo; Lazzaro, Vincenzodi; Callea, Leonardo

    2008-12-01

    Using paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigms, we studied cortical excitability in a patient with spinal cord lesion. During posterior tibial nerve stimulation, the contextual flexion of hand fingers contralateral to the stimulated lower limb had suggested a change in motor cortex excitability. Results showed a decrease in the activity of motor cortex inhibitory circuits. This could suggest that in spinal cord injury, just as in stroke and peripheral deafferentation, a disinhibition of latent synapses within the motor cortex and the rewriting of a new motor map can occur.

  11. Long-latency TMS-evoked potentials during motor execution and inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro eYamanaka

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS has often been used in conjunction with electroencephalography (EEG, which is effective for the direct demonstration of cortical reactivity and corticocortical connectivity during cognitive tasks through the spatio-temporal pattern of long-latency TMS-evoked potentials (TEPs. However, it remains unclear what pattern is associated with the inhibition of a planned motor response. Therefore, we performed TMS-EEG recording during a go/stop task, in which participants were instructed to click a computer mouse with a right index finger when an indicator that was moving with a constant velocity reached a target (go trial or to avoid the click when the indicator randomly stopped just before it reached the target (stop trial. Single-pulse TMS to the left (contralateral or right (ipsilateral motor cortex was applied 500 ms before or just at the target time. TEPs related to motor execution and inhibition were obtained by subtractions between averaged EEG waveforms with and without TMS. As a result, in TEPs induced by both contralateral and ipsilateral TMS, small oscillations were followed by a prominent negative deflection around the TMS site peaking at approximately 100 ms post-TMS (N100, and a less pronounced later positive component (LPC over the broad areas that was centered at the midline-central site in both go and stop trials. However, compared to the pattern in go and stop trials with TMS at 500 ms before the target time, N100 and LPC were differently modulated in the go and stop trials with TMS just at the target time. The amplitudes of both N100 and LPC decreased in go trials, while the amplitude of LPC decreased and the latency of LPC was delayed in both go and stop trials. These results suggested that TMS-induced neuronal reactions in the motor cortex and subsequent their propagation to surrounding cortical areas might change functionally according to task demand when executing and inhibiting a motor

  12. Interhemispheric connectivity influences the degree of modulation of TMS-induced effects during auditory processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila eAndoh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive TMS (rTMS has been shown to interfere with many components of language processing, including semantic, syntactic and phonologic. However, not much is known about its effects on primary auditory processing, especially its action on Heschl’s gyrus (HG. We aimed to investigate the behavioural and neural basis of rTMS during a melody processing task, while targeting the left HG, the right HG and the Vertex as a control site. Response Times (RT were normalized relative to the baseline-rTMS (Vertex and expressed as percentage change from baseline (%RT change. We also looked at sex differences in rTMS-induced response as well as in functional connectivity during melody processing using rTMS and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI.Functional MRI results showed an increase in the right HG compared with the left HG during the melody task, as well as sex differences in functional connectivity indicating a greater interhemispheric connectivity between left and right HG in females compared with males. TMS results showed that 10Hz-rTMS targeting the right HG induced differential effects according to sex, with a facilitation of performance in females and an impairment of performance in males. We also found a differential correlation between the %RT change after 10Hz-rTMS targeting the right HG and the interhemispheric functional connectivity between right and left HG, indicating that an increase in interhemispheric functional connectivity was associated with a facilitation of performance. This is the first study to report a differential rTMS-induced interference with melody processing depending on sex. In addition, we showed a relationship between the interference induced by rTMS on behavioral performance and the neural activity in the network connecting left and right HG, suggesting that the interhemispheric functional connectivity could determine the degree of modulation of behavioral performance.

  13. Concurrent TMS to the primary motor cortex augments slow motor learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, Shalini; Zhang, Wei; Rogers, William; Strickland, Casey; Franklin, Crystal; Lancaster, Jack L.; Fox, Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has shown promise as a treatment tool, with one FDA approved use. While TMS alone is able to up- (or down-) regulate a targeted neural system, we argue that TMS applied as an adjuvant is more effective for repetitive physical, behavioral and cognitive therapies, that is, therapies which are designed to alter the network properties of neural systems through Hebbian learning. We tested this hypothesis in the context of a slow motor learning paradigm. Healthy right-handed individuals were assigned to receive 5 Hz TMS (TMS group) or sham TMS (sham group) to the right primary motor cortex (M1) as they performed daily motor practice of a digit sequence task with their non-dominant hand for 4 weeks. Resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by H215O PET at baseline and after 4 weeks of practice. Sequence performance was measured daily as the number of correct sequences performed, and modeled using a hyperbolic function. Sequence performance increased significantly at 4 weeks relative to baseline in both groups. The TMS group had a significant additional improvement in performance, specifically, in the rate of skill acquisition. In both groups, an improvement in sequence timing and transfer of skills to non-trained motor domains was also found. Compared to the sham group, the TMS group demonstrated increases in resting CBF specifically in regions known to mediate skill learning namely, the M1, cingulate cortex, putamen, hippocampus, and cerebellum. These results indicate that TMS applied concomitantly augments behavioral effects of motor practice, with corresponding neural plasticity in motor sequence learning network. These findings are the first demonstration of the behavioral and neural enhancing effects of TMS on slow motor practice and have direct application in neurorehabilitation where TMS could be applied in conjunction with physical therapy. PMID:23867557

  14. What does low-intensity rTMS do to the cerebellum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morellini, N; Grehl, S; Tang, A; Rodger, J; Mariani, J; Lohof, A M; Sherrard, R M

    2015-02-01

    Non-invasive stimulation of the human cerebellum, such as by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), is increasingly used to investigate cerebellar function and identify potential treatment for cerebellar dysfunction. However, the effects of TMS on cerebellar neurons remain poorly defined. We applied low-intensity repetitive TMS (LI-rTMS) to the mouse cerebellum in vivo and in vitro and examined the cellular and molecular sequelae. In normal C57/Bl6 mice, 4 weeks of LI-rTMS using a complex biomimetic high-frequency stimulation (BHFS) alters Purkinje cell (PC) dendritic and spine morphology; the effects persist 4 weeks after the end of stimulation. We then evaluated whether LI-rTMS could induce climbing fibre (CF) reinnervation to denervated PCs. After unilateral pedunculotomy in adult mice and 2 weeks sham or BHFS stimulation, VGLUT2 immunohistochemistry was used to quantify CF reinnervation. In contrast to sham, LI-rTMS induced CF reinnervation to the denervated hemicerebellum. To examine potential mechanisms underlying the LI-rTMS effect, we verified that BHFS could induce CF reinnervation using our in vitro olivocerebellar explants in which denervated cerebellar tissue is co-cultured adjacent to intact cerebella and treated with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (as a positive control), sham or LI-rTMS for 2 weeks. Compared with sham, BDNF and BHFS LI-rTMS significantly increased CF reinnervation, without additive effect. To identify potential underlying mechanisms, we examined intracellular calcium flux during the 10-min stimulation. Complex high-frequency stimulation increased intracellular calcium by release from intracellular stores. Thus, even at low intensity, rTMS modifies PC structure and induces CF reinnervation.

  15. The neural basis of form and form-motion integration from static and dynamic translational Glass patterns: A rTMS investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Andrea; Ghin, Filippo; Donato, Rita; Campana, Gianluca; Mather, George

    2017-08-15

    A long-held view of the visual system is that form and motion are independently analysed. However, there is physiological and psychophysical evidence of early interaction in the processing of form and motion. In this study, we used a combination of Glass patterns (GPs) and repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) to investigate in human observers the neural mechanisms underlying form-motion integration. GPs consist of randomly distributed dot pairs (dipoles) that induce the percept of an oriented stimulus. GPs can be either static or dynamic. Dynamic GPs have both a form component (i.e., orientation) and a non-directional motion component along the orientation axis. GPs were presented in two temporal intervals and observers were asked to discriminate the temporal interval containing the most coherent GP. rTMS was delivered over early visual area (V1/V2) and over area V5/MT shortly after the presentation of the GP in each interval. The results showed that rTMS applied over early visual areas affected the perception of static GPs, but the stimulation of area V5/MT did not affect observers' performance. On the other hand, rTMS was delivered over either V1/V2 or V5/MT strongly impaired the perception of dynamic GPs. These results suggest that early visual areas seem to be involved in the processing of the spatial structure of GPs, and interfering with the extraction of the global spatial structure also affects the extraction of the motion component, possibly interfering with early form-motion integration. However, visual area V5/MT is likely to be involved only in the processing of the motion component of dynamic GPs. These results suggest that motion and form cues may interact as early as V1/V2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of effects of magnetic field by TMS on PET data acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Narayana, Shalini; Fox, Peter [Health Science Center, Texas Univ., San Antonio (United States)

    2001-07-01

    There is a controversy regarding the necessity of mu-metal shielding of PET scanner during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The aim of this study was to test the effects of magnetic field by TMS on PET data acquisition. With TMS on and off in PET field of view, transmission images were acquired for 9 minutes. The frequency and intensity of stimulation were set at 3 {approx} 5 Hz and 70% of the maximum output of the stimulator, respectively. Distance between TMS coil and patient port edge of the PET gantry was varied from 2 cm to 21 cm, and arrangement of TMS coil was varied between parallel or perpendicular orientation of the maximum field with the scanner's axis. On inspection of the sinograms of transmission PET scans and their subtraction images, there was no measurable difference between TMS on and off conditions for any distance and any orientation. The lack of effect may be due to the long distance between TMS coil and detector block in PET scanner with respect to quick fading of magnetic field with distance (3% of maximum field at 10 cm, in air) and the brief duration ({approx}250 {mu} sec) of TMS pulse relative to total PET acquisition time.

  17. Examining frontotemporal connectivity and rTMS in healthy controls: implications for auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gromann, P.M.; Tracy, D.K.; Giampietro, V.; Brammer, M.J.; Krabbendam, A.C.; Shergill, S.S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been shown to have clinically beneficial effects in altering the perception of auditory hallucinations (AH) in patients with schizophrenia. However, the mode of action is not clear. Recent neuroimaging findings indicate that rTMS has

  18. Single pulse TMS-induced modulations of resting brain neurodynamics encoded in EEG phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamoulis, Catherine; Oberman, Lindsay M; Praeg, Elke; Bashir, Shahid; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2011-06-01

    Integration of electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) provides a useful framework for quantifying stimulation-induced modulations of neural dynamics. Amplitude and frequency modulations by different TMS protocols have been previously investigated, but the study of stimulation-induced effects on EEG phase has been more limited. We examined changes in resting brain dynamics following single TMS pulses, focusing on measures in the phase domain, to assess their sensitivity to stimulation effects. We observed a significant, approximately global increase in EEG relative phase following prolonged (>20 min) single-pulse TMS. In addition, we estimated higher rates of phase fluctuation from the slope of estimated phase curves, and higher numbers of phase resetting intervals following TMS over motor cortex, particularly in frontal and centro-parietal/parietal channels. Phase changes were only significantly different from their pre-TMS values at the end of the stimulation session, which suggests that prolonged single-pulse TMS may result in cumulative changes in neural activity reflected in the phase of the EEG. This is a novel result, as prior studies have reported only transient stimulation-related effects in the amplitude and frequency domains following single-pulse TMS.

  19. Reduction of TMS induced artefacts in EEG using principal component analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjer-ter Braack, Esther Maria; Jonge, Benjamin; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2013-01-01

    Co-registration of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) is a new, promising method for assessing cortical excitability and connectivity. Using this technique, a TMS evoked potential (TEP) can be induced and registered with the EEG. However, the TEP contains an

  20. Determination of stimulation focality in heterogeneous head models during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Erik; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an increasingly popular tool used by both the scientific and medical community to understand and treat the brain. TMS has the potential to help people with a wide range of diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and PTSD, while currently being used to treat people with chronic, drug-resistant depression. Through computer simulations, we are able to see the electric field that TMS induces in anatomical human models, but there is no measure to quantify this electric field in a way that relates to a specific patient undergoing TMS therapy. We propose a way to quantify the focality of the induced electric field in a heterogeneous head model during TMS by relating the surface area of the brain being stimulated to the total volume of the brain being stimulated. This figure would be obtained by conducting finite element analysis (FEA) simulations of TMS therapy on a patient specific head model. Using this figure to assist in TMS therapy will allow clinicians and researchers to more accurately stimulate the desired region of a patient's brain and be more equipped to do comparative studies on the effects of TMS across different patients. This work was funded by the Carver Charitable Trust.

  1. Enhancing plasticity through repeated rTMS sessions: the benefits of a night of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Daniel A; Freitas, Catarina; Tormos, Jose Maria; Oberman, Lindsay; Eldaief, Mark; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2010-12-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that corticospinal facilitation from 20Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was greater during a second rTMS session 24h after the first. We sought to determine whether such metaplasticity is dependent on a particular phase of the normal sleep-wake/circadian cycle. Twenty healthy participants received two sessions of 20Hz rTMS over the hand motor cortex (M1) spaced 12h apart, either over-day or overnight. Baseline corticospinal excitability did not differ by group or session. The time-of-day of Session 1 did not influence the relative increase in excitability following rTMS. However, the increase in excitability from the second rTMS session was 2-fold greater in the overnight group. When a night with sleep follows rTMS to M1, the capacity to induce subsequent plasticity in M1 is enhanced, suggesting sleep-wake and/or circadian-dependent modulation of processes of metaplasticity. TMS treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders entails repeated sessions of rTMS. Our findings suggest that the timing of sessions relative to the sleep-wake/circadian cycle may be a critical factor in the cumulative effect of treatment. Future studies using this paradigm may provide mechanistic insights into human metaplasticity, leading to refined strategies to enhance non-invasive stimulation therapies. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigating dynamical information transfer in the brain following a TMS pulse: Insights from structural architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amico, Enrico; Van Mierlo, Pieter; Marinazzo, Daniele; Laureys, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used for more than 20 years to investigate connectivity and plasticity in the human cortex. By combining TMS with high-density electroencephalography (hd-EEG), one can stimulate any cortical area and measure the effects produced by this perturbation in the rest of the cerebral cortex. The purpose of this paper is to investigate changes of information flow in the brain after TMS from a functional and structural perspective, using multimodal modeling of source reconstructed TMS/hd-EEG recordings and DTI tractography. We prove how brain dynamics induced by TMS is constrained and driven by its structure, at different spatial and temporal scales, especially when considering cross-frequency interactions. These results shed light on the function-structure organization of the brain network at the global level, and on the huge variety of information contained in it.

  3. Concurrent Application of TMS and Near-infrared Optical Imaging: Methodological Considerations and Potential Artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan A Parks

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous application of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS with non-invasive neuroimaging provides a powerful method for investigating functional connectivity in the human brain and the causal relationships between areas in distributed brain networks. TMS has been combined with numerous neuroimaging techniques including, electroencephalography (EEG, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, and positron emission tomography (PET. Recent work has also demonstrated the feasibility and utility of combining TMS with non-invasive near-infrared optical imaging techniques, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS and the event-related optical signal (EROS. Simultaneous TMS and optical imaging affords a number of advantages over other neuroimaging methods but also involves a unique set of methodological challenges and considerations. This paper describes the methodology of concurrently performing optical imaging during the administration of TMS, focusing on experimental design, potential artifacts, and approaches to controlling for these artifacts.

  4. A Novel Transcranial Magnetic Stimulator Inducing Near Rectangular Pulses with Controllable Pulse Width (cTMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalinous, Reza; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2013-01-01

    A novel transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) device with controllable pulse width (PW) and near rectangular pulse shape (cTMS) is described. The cTMS device uses an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) with appropriate snubbers to switch coil currents up to 7 kA, enabling PW control from 5 μs to over 100 μs. The near-rectangular induced electric field pulses use 22–34% less energy and generate 67–72% less coil heating compared to matched conventional cosine pulses. CTMS is used to stimulate rhesus monkey motor cortex in vivo with PWs of 20 to 100 μs, demonstrating the expected decrease of threshold pulse amplitude with increasing PW. The technological solutions used in the cTMS prototype can expand functionality, and reduce power consumption and coil heating in TMS, enhancing its research and therapeutic applications. PMID:18232369

  5. Concurrent TMS-fMRI Reveals Interactions between Dorsal and Ventral Attentional Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leitao, Joana; Thielscher, Axel; Tuennerhoff, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    detected weak visual targets that were presented in the lower-left visual field on 50% of the trials. Further, we manipulated the presence/absence of task-irrelevant auditory signals. Critically, on each trial we applied 10 Hz bursts of four TMS (or Sham) pulses to the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). IPS......-TMS relative to Sham-TMS increased activation in the parietal cortex regardless of sensory stimulation, confirming the neural effectiveness of TMS stimulation. Visual targets increased activations in the anterior insula, a component of the ventral attentional system responsible for salience detection....... Conversely, they decreased activations in the ventral visual areas. Importantly, IPS-TMS abolished target-evoked activation increases in the right temporoparietal junction (TPJ) of the ventral attentional system, whereas it eliminated target-evoked activation decreases in the right fusiform. Our results...

  6. Measuring Brain Stimulation Induced Changes in Cortical Properties Using TMS-EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sung Wook; Rogasch, Nigel C; Hoy, Kate E; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2015-01-01

    Neuromodulatory brain stimulation can induce plastic reorganization of cortical circuits that persist beyond the period of stimulation. Most of our current knowledge about the physiological properties has been derived from the motor cortex. The integration of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) is a valuable method for directly probing excitability, connectivity and oscillatory dynamics of regions throughout the brain. Offering in depth measurement of cortical reactivity, TMS-EEG allows the evaluation of TMS-evoked components that may act as a marker for cortical excitation and inhibition. A growing body of research is using concurrent TMS and EEG (TMS-EEG) to explore the effects of different neuromodulatory techniques such as repetitive TMS and transcranial direct current stimulation on cortical function, particularly in non-motor regions. In this review, we outline studies examining TMS-evoked potentials and oscillations before and after, or during a single session of brain stimulation. Investigating these studies will aid in our understanding of mechanisms involved in the modulation of excitability and inhibition by neuroplasticity following different stimulation paradigms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Examining frontotemporal connectivity and rTMS in healthy controls: implications for auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromann, Paula M; Tracy, Derek K; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael J; Krabbendam, Lydia; Shergill, Sukhwinder S

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been shown to have clinically beneficial effects in altering the perception of auditory hallucinations (AH) in patients with schizophrenia. However, the mode of action is not clear. Recent neuroimaging findings indicate that rTMS has the potential to induce not only local effects but also changes in remote, functionally connected brain regions. Frontotemporal dysconnectivity has been proposed as a mechanism leading to psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia. The current study examines functional connectivity between temporal and frontal brain regions after rTMS and the implications for AH in schizophrenia. A connectivity analysis was conducted on the fMRI data of 11 healthy controls receiving rTMS, compared with 11 matched subjects receiving sham TMS, to the temporoparietal junction, before engaging in a task associated with robust frontotemporal activation. Compared to the control group, the rTMS group showed an altered frontotemporal connectivity with stronger connectivity between the right temporoparietal cortex and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the angular gyrus. This finding provides preliminary evidence for the hypothesis that normalizing the functional connectivity between the temporoparietal and frontal brain regions may underlie the therapeutic effect of rTMS on AH in schizophrenia.

  8. Assessing TMS-induced D- and I-waves with spinal H-reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Niclas; Wiegel, Patrick; Kurz, Alexander; Rothwell, John C; Leukel, Christian

    2017-11-15

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of motor cortex produces a series of descending volleys known as D- (direct) and I- (indirect) waves. In the present study, we questioned whether spinal H-reflexes can be used to dissect D-waves, early and late I-waves from TMS. We therefore probed H-reflex facilitation at arrival times of D- and I-waves at the spinal level and thereby changed TMS parameters that have previously been shown to have selective effects on evoked D- and different I-waves. We changed TMS intensity and current direction, and applied a double-pulse paradigm known as short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI). Experiments were conducted in flexor carpi radialis (FCR) in the arm and soleus (SOL) in the leg. There were two major findings: I) In FCR, H-reflex facilitation showed characteristic modulations with altered TMS-parameters that correspond to the changes of evoked D- and I-waves. II) H-reflexes in SOL did not, possibly because of increased interference from other spinal circuits. Therefore, the most significant outcome of this study is that in FCR, H-reflexes combined with TMS seem to be a useful technique to dissect TMS-induced D- and I-waves.

  9. Neuromodulation of Attentional Control in Major Depression: A Pilot DeepTMS Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie Naim-Feil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While Major Depressive Disorder (MDD is primarily characterized by mood disturbances, impaired attentional control is increasingly identified as a critical feature of depression. Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (deepTMS, a noninvasive neuromodulatory technique, can modulate neural activity and induce neuroplasticity changes in brain regions recruited by attentional processes. This study examined whether acute and long-term high-frequency repetitive deepTMS to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC can attenuate attentional deficits associated with MDD. Twenty-one MDD patients and 26 matched control subjects (CS were administered the Beck Depression Inventory and the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART at baseline. MDD patients were readministered the SART and depressive assessments following a single session (n=21 and after 4 weeks (n=13 of high-frequency (20 Hz repetitive deepTMS applied to the DLPFC. To control for the practice effect, CS (n=26 were readministered the SART a further two times. The MDD group exhibited deficits in sustained attention and cognitive inhibition. Both acute and long-term high-frequency repetitive frontal deepTMS ameliorated sustained attention deficits in the MDD group. Improvement after acute deepTMS was related to attentional recovery after long-term deepTMS. Longer-term improvement in sustained attention was not related to antidepressant effects of deepTMS treatment.

  10. Consecutive TMS-fMRI reveals remote effects of neural noise to the "occipital face area".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon-Harris, Lily M; Rafique, Sara A; Steeves, Jennifer K E

    2016-11-01

    The human cortical system for face perception comprises a network of connected regions including the middle fusiform gyrus ("fusiform face area" or FFA), the inferior occipital gyrus ("occipital face area" or OFA), and the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS). Here, we sought to investigate how transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the OFA affects activity within the face processing network. We used offline repetitive TMS to temporarily introduce neural noise in the right OFA in healthy subjects. We then immediately performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure changes in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal across the face network using an fMR-adaptation (fMR-A) paradigm. We hypothesized that TMS to the right OFA would induce abnormal face identity coding throughout the face processing network in regions to which it has direct or indirect connections. Indeed, BOLD signal for face identity, but not non-face (butterfly) identity, decreased in the right OFA and FFA following TMS to the right OFA compared to both sham TMS and TMS to a control site, the nearby object-related lateral occipital area (LO). Further, TMS to the right OFA decreased face-related activation in the left FFA, without any effect in the left OFA. Our findings indicate that TMS to the right OFA selectively disrupts face coding at both the stimulation site and bilateral FFA. TMS to the right OFA also decreased BOLD signal for different identity stimuli in the right pSTS. Together with mounting evidence from patient studies, we demonstrate connectivity of the OFA within the face network and that its activity modulates face processing in bilateral FFA as well as the right pSTS. Moreover, this study shows that deep regions within the face network can be remotely probed by stimulating structures closer to the cortical surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of TMS over premotor and superior temporal cortices on biological motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kemenade, Bianca Michelle; Muggleton, Neil; Walsh, Vincent; Saygin, Ayse Pinar

    2012-04-01

    Using MRI-guided off-line TMS, we targeted two areas implicated in biological motion processing: ventral premotor cortex (PMC) and posterior STS (pSTS), plus a control site (vertex). Participants performed a detection task on noise-masked point-light displays of human animations and scrambled versions of the same stimuli. Perceptual thresholds were determined individually. Performance was measured before and after 20 sec of continuous theta burst stimulation of PMC, pSTS, and control (each tested on different days). A matched nonbiological object motion task (detecting point-light displays of translating polygons) served as a further control. Data were analyzed within the signal detection framework. Sensitivity (d') significantly decreased after TMS of PMC. There was a marginally significant decline in d' after TMS of pSTS but not of control site. Criterion (response bias) was also significantly affected by TMS over PMC. Specifically, subjects made significantly more false alarms post-TMS of PMC. These effects were specific to biological motion and not found for the nonbiological control task. To summarize, we report that TMS over PMC reduces sensitivity to biological motion perception. Furthermore, pSTS and PMC may have distinct roles in biological motion processing as behavioral performance differs following TMS in each area. Only TMS over PMC led to a significant increase in false alarms, which was not found for other brain areas or for the control task. TMS of PMC may have interfered with refining judgments about biological motion perception, possibly because access to the perceiver's own motor representations was compromised.

  12. Autism Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots ... more Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots ...

  13. A Student Project to use Geant4 Simulations for a TMS-PET combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano, A.; Chamorro, A.; Hurtado, K.; Romero, C.; Rueda, A.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Wahl, D.; Zamudio, A.

    2007-10-01

    Geant4 is one of the most powerful tools for MC simulation of detectors and their applications. We present a student project to simulate a combined Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation-Positron Emission Tomography (TMS-PET) system using Geant4. This project aims to study PET-TMS systems by implementing a model for the brain response to the TMS pulse and studying the simulated PET response. In order to increase the speed of the simulations we parallelise our programs and investigate the possibility of using GRID computing.

  14. Civil Society Participation at CONFINTEA VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzes the participation of civil society in the Sixth International Conference on Adult Education held in Belem do Para, Brazil, 1-4 December 2009. As a foundation, the discussion first illuminates the important role that civil society in general plays in democratic issues and the relation between the state and society followed by…

  15. Portable TMC-TMS Communications Demonstration : Western States Rural Transportation Technology Implementers Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    In cooperation with the California Department of Transportation, Montana State University's Western Transportation Institute has conducted an evaluation of communication technologies for application to TMC-TMS communications in Caltrans District 1. W...

  16. Evidence-based guidelines on the therapeutic use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; André-Obadia, Nathalie; Antal, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    A group of European experts was commissioned to establish guidelines on the therapeutic use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) from evidence published up until March 2014, regarding pain, movement disorders, stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy...

  17. TMS suppression of right pars triangularis, but not pars opercularis, improves naming in aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeser, Margaret A.; Martin, Paula I.; Theoret, Hugo; Kobayashi, Masahito; Fregni, Felipe; Nicholas, Marjorie; Tormos, Jose M.; Steven, Megan S.; Baker, Errol H.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to discover if an optimum 1 cm2 area in the non-damaged right hemisphere (RH) was present, which could temporarily improve naming in chronic, nonfluent aphasia patients when suppressed with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Ten minutes of slow, 1 Hz rTMS was applied to suppress different RH ROIs in eight aphasia cases. Picture naming and response time (RT) were examined before, and immediately after rTMS. In aphasia patients, suppression of right pars triangularis (PTr) led to significant increase in pictures named, and significant decrease in RT. Suppression of right pars opercularis (POp), however, led to significant increase in RT, but no change in number of pictures named. Eight normals named all pictures correctly; similar to aphasia patients, RT significantly decreased following rTMS to suppress right PTr, versus right POp. Differential effects following suppression of right PTr versus right POp suggest different functional roles for these regions. PMID:21864891

  18. Preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwigsen, G.; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Stippich, C.

    2010-01-01

    of essential cortex, it cannot provide information preoperatively for surgical planning.Brain imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetoencephalography (MEG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are increasingly being used to localize functionally critical cortical...

  19. EEG responses to TMS are sensitive to changes in the perturbation parameters and repeatable over time

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Casarotto, Silvia; Romero Lauro, Leonor J; Bellina, Valentina; Casali, Adenauer G; Rosanova, Mario; Pigorini, Andrea; Defendi, Stefano; Mariotti, Maurizio; Massimini, Marcello

    2010-01-01

    ... modifications in cortical circuits. However, the diagnostic/monitoring applications of this technique would be limited to the extent that TMS-evoked potentials are either stereotypical (non-sensitive) or random (non-repeatable) responses...

  20. Active Head Motion Compensation of TMS Robotic System Using Neuro-Fuzzy Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Zakaria W.N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS allows neuroscientist to study human brain behaviour and also become an important technique for changing the activity of brain neurons and the functions they sub serve. However, conventional manual procedure and robotized TMS are currently unable to precisely position the TMS coil because of unconstrained subject’s head movement and excessive contact force between the coil and subject’s head. This paper addressed this challenge by proposing an adaptive neuro-fuzzy force control to enable low contact force with a moving target surface. A learning and adaption mechanism is included in the control scheme to improve position disturbance estimation. The results show the ability of the proposed force control scheme to compensate subject’s head motions while maintaining desired contact force, thus allowing for more accurate and repeatable TMS procedures.

  1. Concurrent TMS-fMRI Reveals Interactions between Dorsal and Ventral Attentional Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, Joana; Thielscher, Axel; Tünnerhoff, Johannes; Noppeney, Uta

    2015-08-12

    Adaptive behavior relies on combining bottom-up sensory inputs with top-down control signals to guide responses in line with current goals and task demands. Over the past decade, accumulating evidence has suggested that the dorsal and ventral frontoparietal attentional systems are recruited interactively in this process. This fMRI study used concurrent transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a causal perturbation approach to investigate the interactions between dorsal and ventral attentional systems and sensory processing areas. In a sustained spatial attention paradigm, human participants detected weak visual targets that were presented in the lower-left visual field on 50% of the trials. Further, we manipulated the presence/absence of task-irrelevant auditory signals. Critically, on each trial we applied 10 Hz bursts of four TMS (or Sham) pulses to the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). IPS-TMS relative to Sham-TMS increased activation in the parietal cortex regardless of sensory stimulation, confirming the neural effectiveness of TMS stimulation. Visual targets increased activations in the anterior insula, a component of the ventral attentional system responsible for salience detection. Conversely, they decreased activations in the ventral visual areas. Importantly, IPS-TMS abolished target-evoked activation increases in the right temporoparietal junction (TPJ) of the ventral attentional system, whereas it eliminated target-evoked activation decreases in the right fusiform. Our results demonstrate that IPS-TMS exerts profound directional causal influences not only on visual areas but also on the TPJ as a critical component of the ventral attentional system. They reveal a complex interplay between dorsal and ventral attentional systems during target detection under sustained spatial attention. Adaptive behavior relies on combining bottom-up sensory inputs with top-down attentional control. Although the dorsal and ventral frontoparietal systems are key players in

  2. A Randomised Controlled Trial of Neuronavigated Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS in Anorexia Nervosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica McClelland

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN is associated with morbid fear of fatness, extreme food restriction and altered self-regulation. Neuroimaging data implicate fronto-striatal circuitry, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC.In this double-blind parallel group study, we investigated the effects of one session of sham-controlled high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS to the left DLPFC (l-DLPFC in 60 individuals with AN. A food exposure task was administered before and after the procedure to elicit AN-related symptoms.The primary outcome measure was 'core AN symptoms', a variable which combined several subjective AN-related experiences. The effects of rTMS on other measures of psychopathology (e.g. mood, temporal discounting (TD; intertemporal choice behaviour and on salivary cortisol concentrations were also investigated. Safety, tolerability and acceptability were assessed.Fourty-nine participants completed the study. Whilst there were no interaction effects of rTMS on core AN symptoms, there was a trend for group differences (p = 0.056: after controlling for pre-rTMS scores, individuals who received real rTMS had reduced symptoms post-rTMS and at 24-hour follow-up, relative to those who received sham stimulation. Other psychopathology was not altered differentially following real/sham rTMS. In relation to TD, there was an interaction trend (p = 0.060: real versus sham rTMS resulted in reduced rates of TD (more reflective choice behaviour. Salivary cortisol concentrations were unchanged by stimulation. rTMS was safe, well-tolerated and was considered an acceptable intervention.This study provides modest evidence that rTMS to the l-DLPFC transiently reduces core symptoms of AN and encourages prudent decision making. Importantly, individuals with AN considered rTMS to be a viable treatment option. These findings require replication in multiple-session studies to evaluate therapeutic efficacy

  3. Effect of low frequency rTMS stimulation over lateral cerebellum: a FDG PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Eun Jin; Cho, Sang Soo; Bang, Soong Ae; Park, Hyun Soo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Several lines of evidence suggested the involvement of cerebellum in cognitive function as well as motor function. Because of the measurement difficulty of functional connectivity, little is known about the underlying mechanism involvement of cerebellum in motor and cognitive function in living human brain. To understand the role of cerebellum within the neural network, we investigated the changes of neuronal activity elicited by the cerebellar repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). 11 right-handed normal volunteers (age: 23.4{+-}2.5 y;6 males) were studied with FDG PET under two conditions; sham and 1Hz rTMS over left lateral cerebellum. With 10 min inter-block interval, three blocks of rTMS were started with the intravenous injection of [18F]FDG. In each block, 5min rTMS were delivered with an intensity of 90% of the resting motor threshold (RMT). Sham rTMS was delivered with same protocol but the coil was positioned perpendicular to the target area with 50% RMT. PET scans were acquired immediately after the rTMS stimulation. Sham and 1Hz rTMS images compared using paired t-test with SPM2. Inhibited neuronal activity compare to the sham condition were revealed in the stimulated left lateral cerebellum and orbitofrontal gyrus and right motor related areas (S1, SMA and posterior parietal cortex). While enhanced neuronal activity compare to the sham condition were revealed in the bilateral inferior frontal gyri including Broca's area and superior temporal gyrus including primary auditory cortex. Bilateral middle temporal, left precentral and right middle occipital gyri were also showed enhanced neuronal activity. This result showed that rTMS over left lateral cerebellum modulate direct vicinity of the targeted region and a large network of remote interconnected contralateral motor and ipsilateral language related brain regions. Present result provide evidence that cerebellum may contribute to language related cognitive function as well as motor

  4. Predictive value of brain perfusion SPECT for rTMS response in pharmacoresistant depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richieri, Raphaelle; Lancon, Christophe [Sainte-Marguerite University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Marseille (France); La Timone University, EA 3279 - Self-perceived Health Assessment Research Unit, School of Medicine, Marseille (France); Boyer, Laurent [La Timone University, EA 3279 - Self-perceived Health Assessment Research Unit, School of Medicine, Marseille (France); La Timone University Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Marseille, Department of Public Health, Marseille (France); Farisse, Jean [Sainte-Marguerite University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Marseille (France); Colavolpe, Cecile; Mundler, Olivier [La Timone University Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Marseille, Service Central de Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, Marseille (France); Universite de la Mediterranee, Centre Europeen de Recherche en Imagerie Medicale (CERIMED), Marseille (France); Guedj, Eric [La Timone University Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Marseille, Service Central de Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, Marseille (France); Universite de la Mediterranee, Centre Europeen de Recherche en Imagerie Medicale (CERIMED), Marseille (France); Hopital de la Timone, Service Central de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire, Marseille Cedex 5 (France)

    2011-09-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the predictive value of whole-brain voxel-based regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) response in patients with pharmacoresistant depression. Thirty-three right-handed patients who met DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder (unipolar or bipolar depression) were included before rTMS. rTMS response was defined as at least 50% reduction in the baseline Beck Depression Inventory scores. The predictive value of {sup 99m}Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for rTMS response was studied before treatment by comparing rTMS responders to non-responders at voxel level using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) (p < 0.001, uncorrected). Of the patients, 18 (54.5%) were responders to rTMS and 15 were non-responders (45.5%). There were no statistically significant differences in demographic and clinical characteristics (p > 0.10). In comparison to responders, non-responders showed significant hypoperfusions (p < 0.001, uncorrected) in the left medial and bilateral superior frontal cortices (BA10), the left uncus/parahippocampal cortex (BA20/BA35) and the right thalamus. The area under the curve for the combination of SPECT clusters to predict rTMS response was 0.89 (p < 0.001). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for the combination of clusters were: 94, 73, 81 and 92%, respectively. This study shows that, in pharmacoresistant depression, pretreatment rCBF of specific brain regions is a strong predictor for response to rTMS in patients with homogeneous demographic/clinical features. (orig.)

  5. Tracking Dynamic Interactions Between Structural and Functional Connectivity: A TMS/EEG-dMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amico, Enrico; Bodart, Olivier; Rosanova, Mario; Gosseries, Olivia; Heine, Lizette; Van Mierlo, Pieter; Martial, Charlotte; Massimini, Marcello; Marinazzo, Daniele; Laureys, Steven

    2017-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in combination with neuroimaging techniques allows to measure the effects of a direct perturbation of the brain. When coupled with high-density electroencephalography (TMS/hd-EEG), TMS pulses revealed electrophysiological signatures of different cortical modules in health and disease. However, the neural underpinnings of these signatures remain unclear. Here, by applying multimodal analyses of cortical response to TMS recordings and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) tractography, we investigated the relationship between functional and structural features of different cortical modules in a cohort of awake healthy volunteers. For each subject, we computed directed functional connectivity interactions between cortical areas from the source-reconstructed TMS/hd-EEG recordings and correlated them with the correspondent structural connectivity matrix extracted from dMRI tractography, in three different frequency bands (α, β, γ) and two sites of stimulation (left precuneus and left premotor). Each stimulated area appeared to mainly respond to TMS by being functionally elicited in specific frequency bands, that is, β for precuneus and γ for premotor. We also observed a temporary decrease in the whole-brain correlation between directed functional connectivity and structural connectivity after TMS in all frequency bands. Notably, when focusing on the stimulated areas only, we found that the structure-function correlation significantly increases over time in the premotor area controlateral to TMS. Our study points out the importance of taking into account the major role played by different cortical oscillations when investigating the mechanisms for integration and segregation of information in the human brain.

  6. EEG Responses to TMS Are Sensitive to Changes in the Perturbation Parameters and Repeatable over Time

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Casarotto; Romero Lauro, Leonor J.; Valentina Bellina; Casali, Adenauer G.; Mario Rosanova; Andrea Pigorini; Stefano Defendi; Maurizio Mariotti; Marcello Massimini

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-density electroencephalography (hd-EEG) combined with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) provides a direct and non-invasive measure of cortical excitability and connectivity in humans and may be employed to track over time pathological alterations, plastic changes and therapy-induced modifications in cortical circuits. However, the diagnostic/monitoring applications of this technique would be limited to the extent that TMS-evoked potentials are either stereotypical (non-...

  7. Mass Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Christian

    2017-01-01

    the negative features usually ascribed by late nineteenth-century crowd psychology to spontaneous crowds, and attributes these to the entire social fabric. However, in contrast to crowd psychology, theorists of mass society often place greater emphasis on how capitalism, technological advances, or demographic......Mass society is a societal diagnosis that emphasizes – usually in a pejorative, modernity critical manner – a series of traits allegedly associated with modern society, such as the leveling of individuality, moral decay, alienation, and isolation. As such, the notion of mass society generalizes...... developments condition such negative features, and some theorists argue that mass society produces a propensity to totalitarianism. Discussions of mass society culminated in the early and mid-twentieth century....

  8. Effectiveness of rTMS and retraining in the treatment of focal hand dystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Jacobson Kimberley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Though the pathophysiology of dystonia remains uncertain, two primary factors implicated in the development of dystonic symptoms are excessive cortical excitability and impaired sensorimotor processing. The aim of this study was to determine the functional efficacy of a sensorimotor intervention combining rTMS and sensorimotor retraining. A randomized, single-subject, multiple baseline design with crossover was used to examine participants with focal hand dystonia (FHD (n=9. Intervention: 5 days rTMS + sensorimotor retraining (SMR vs. 5 days rTMS + control therapy (CTL (which included stretching and massage. The rTMS was applied to the premotor cortex at 1 Hz at 80% resting motor threshold for 1200 pulses. For sensorimotor retraining, a subset of the Learning-based Sensorimotor Training program was followed. Each session consisted of rTMS followed immediately by 30 minutes of the therapy intervention (SMR or CTL. Group analyses revealed no additional benefit from the SMR training vs CTL, which was contrary to our hypothesis. When analyzed across group however, there was significant improvement from first baseline in several measures, including tests of sensory ability and self-rated changes. The patient rated improvements were accompanied by a moderate effect size suggesting clinical meaningfulness. These results provide encouragement for further investigation of rTMS in FHD with a need to optimized a secondary intervention and determine likely responders vs. non-responders.

  9. rTMS induced tinnitus relief is related to an increase in auditory cortical alpha activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Müller

    Full Text Available Chronic tinnitus, the continuous perception of a phantom sound, is a highly prevalent audiological symptom. A promising approach for the treatment of tinnitus is repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS as this directly affects tinnitus-related brain activity. Several studies indeed show tinnitus relief after rTMS, however effects are moderate and vary strongly across patients. This may be due to a lack of knowledge regarding how rTMS affects oscillatory activity in tinnitus sufferers and which modulations are associated with tinnitus relief. In the present study we examined the effects of five different stimulation protocols (including sham by measuring tinnitus loudness and tinnitus-related brain activity with Magnetoencephalography before and after rTMS. Changes in oscillatory activity were analysed for the stimulated auditory cortex as well as for the entire brain regarding certain frequency bands of interest (delta, theta, alpha, gamma. In line with the literature the effects of rTMS on tinnitus loudness varied strongly across patients. This variability was also reflected in the rTMS effects on oscillatory activity. Importantly, strong reductions in tinnitus loudness were associated with increases in alpha power in the stimulated auditory cortex, while an unspecific decrease in gamma and alpha power, particularly in left frontal regions, was linked to an increase in tinnitus loudness. The identification of alpha power increase as main correlate for tinnitus reduction sheds further light on the pathophysiology of tinnitus. This will hopefully stimulate the development of more effective therapy approaches.

  10. TMS Affects Moral Judgment, Showing the Role of DLPFC and TPJ in Cognitive and Emotional Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danique eJeurissen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Decision-making involves a complex interplay of emotional responses and reasoning processes. In this study, we use TMS to explore the neurobiological substrates of moral decisions in humans. To examining the effects of TMS on the outcome of a moral-decision, we compare the decision outcome of moral-personal and moral-impersonal dilemmas to each other and examine the differential effects of applying TMS over the right DLPFC or right TPJ. In this comparison, we find that the TMS-induced disruption of the DLPFC during the decision process, affects the outcome of the moral-personal judgment, while TMS-induced disruption of TPJ affects only moral-impersonal conditions. In other words, we find a double-dissociation between DLPFC and TPJ in the outcome of a moral decision. Furthermore, we find that TMS-induced disruption of the DLPFC during non-moral, moral-impersonal, and moral-personal decisions lead to lower ratings of regret about the decision. Our results are in line with the dual-process theory and suggest a role for both the emotional response and cognitive reasoning process in moral judgment. Both the emotional and cognitive processes were shown to be involved in the decision outcome.

  11. Is there potential for repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) as a treatment of OCD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Rashid; Robbins, Trevor W

    2017-09-01

    Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a common and highly debilitating psychiatric disorder. Amongst OCD sufferers are a significant number (40-60%) of so-called non-responders who do not fully respond to commonly available treatments, which include medications (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors-SSRIs) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). Modern 'neuromodulatory' techniques such as Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) potentially offer alternative forms of treatment for OCD patients who either do not respond to, or are unable or unwilling to take SSRIs and undergo CBT. Although shown to be effective in treatment resistant OCD, DBS requires invasive neurosurgical procedures with associated risks. On the other hand, rTMS and tDCS are non-invasive forms of treatment, which are largely risk free, but the evidence of their efficacy so far is somewhat limited, with only small number of published studies. In this brief survey we will address the potential of rTMS as a therapeutic tool for OCD and review the published literature on the cortical targets for rTMS used so far. We will also discuss some of the newer variants of rTMS techniques only a few of which have been employed so far, and speculate whether there might be a place for rTMS as a standard treatment in OCD, along side CBT, SSRIs and DBS.

  12. rTMS Induced Tinnitus Relief Is Related to an Increase in Auditory Cortical Alpha Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Nadia; Lorenz, Isabel; Langguth, Berthold; Weisz, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus, the continuous perception of a phantom sound, is a highly prevalent audiological symptom. A promising approach for the treatment of tinnitus is repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) as this directly affects tinnitus-related brain activity. Several studies indeed show tinnitus relief after rTMS, however effects are moderate and vary strongly across patients. This may be due to a lack of knowledge regarding how rTMS affects oscillatory activity in tinnitus sufferers and which modulations are associated with tinnitus relief. In the present study we examined the effects of five different stimulation protocols (including sham) by measuring tinnitus loudness and tinnitus-related brain activity with Magnetoencephalography before and after rTMS. Changes in oscillatory activity were analysed for the stimulated auditory cortex as well as for the entire brain regarding certain frequency bands of interest (delta, theta, alpha, gamma). In line with the literature the effects of rTMS on tinnitus loudness varied strongly across patients. This variability was also reflected in the rTMS effects on oscillatory activity. Importantly, strong reductions in tinnitus loudness were associated with increases in alpha power in the stimulated auditory cortex, while an unspecific decrease in gamma and alpha power, particularly in left frontal regions, was linked to an increase in tinnitus loudness. The identification of alpha power increase as main correlate for tinnitus reduction sheds further light on the pathophysiology of tinnitus. This will hopefully stimulate the development of more effective therapy approaches. PMID:23390539

  13. Clinical and demographic predictors of response to rTMS treatment in unipolar and bipolar depressive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Reza; Kazemi, Reza; Nitsche, Michael A; Gholipour, Fatemeh; Salehinejad, M A

    2017-10-01

    Previous studies investigated predictors of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) response in depressive disorders but there is still limited knowledge about clinical predictors. Moreover, predictors of rTMS response in bipolar depression (BDD) are less studied than unipolar depression (UDD). We performed a binary logistic regression analysis in 248 patients with depressive disorders (unipolar N=102, bipolar N=146) who received 20 sessions of DLPFC rTMS (High-frequency rTMS, low-frequency rTMS, bilateral rTMS) to investigate significant clinical and demographic predictors of rTMS response. We also investigated effects of depression type, response (yes, no) and time on reducing somatic and cognitive-affective symptoms of patients. Depression type (unipolar vs. bipolar) did not have a significant effect on rTMS response. 45% of all patients, 51.5% of UDD patients and 41% of BDD patients, responded to rTMS treatment. Age was the only significant demographic predictor of treatment response in all patients. Cognitive-affective symptoms, compared to somatic symptoms were significant predictors for treatment response to rTMS. Common and unique clinical predictor for UDD and BDD were identified. Younger patients and those with cognitive-affective rather than somatic symptoms benefit more from DLPFC rTMS treatment. rTMS is effective in UDD and BDD patients. Patients should be selected based on clinical and demographic profile. Findings are based on the largest thus far reported sample of patients with depressive disorders that received DLPFC rTMS. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Bilateral Theta-Burst TMS to Influence Global Gestalt Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzinger, Bernd; Huberle, Elisabeth; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2012-01-01

    While early and higher visual areas along the ventral visual pathway in the inferotemporal cortex are critical for the recognition of individual objects, the neural representation of human perception of complex global visual scenes remains under debate. Stroke patients with a selective deficit in the perception of a complex global Gestalt with intact recognition of individual objects – a deficit termed simultanagnosia – greatly helped to study this question. Interestingly, simultanagnosia typically results from bilateral lesions of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). The present study aimed to verify the relevance of this area for human global Gestalt perception. We applied continuous theta-burst TMS either unilaterally (left or right) or bilateral simultaneously over TPJ. Healthy subjects were presented with hierarchically organized visual stimuli that allowed parametrical degrading of the object at the global level. Identification of the global Gestalt was significantly modulated only for the bilateral TPJ stimulation condition. Our results strengthen the view that global Gestalt perception in the human brain involves TPJ and is co-dependent on both hemispheres. PMID:23110106

  15. Bilateral theta-burst TMS to influence global gestalt perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Ritzinger

    Full Text Available While early and higher visual areas along the ventral visual pathway in the inferotemporal cortex are critical for the recognition of individual objects, the neural representation of human perception of complex global visual scenes remains under debate. Stroke patients with a selective deficit in the perception of a complex global Gestalt with intact recognition of individual objects - a deficit termed simultanagnosia - greatly helped to study this question. Interestingly, simultanagnosia typically results from bilateral lesions of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ. The present study aimed to verify the relevance of this area for human global Gestalt perception. We applied continuous theta-burst TMS either unilaterally (left or right or bilateral simultaneously over TPJ. Healthy subjects were presented with hierarchically organized visual stimuli that allowed parametrical degrading of the object at the global level. Identification of the global Gestalt was significantly modulated only for the bilateral TPJ stimulation condition. Our results strengthen the view that global Gestalt perception in the human brain involves TPJ and is co-dependent on both hemispheres.

  16. Bilateral theta-burst TMS to influence global gestalt perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzinger, Bernd; Huberle, Elisabeth; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2012-01-01

    While early and higher visual areas along the ventral visual pathway in the inferotemporal cortex are critical for the recognition of individual objects, the neural representation of human perception of complex global visual scenes remains under debate. Stroke patients with a selective deficit in the perception of a complex global Gestalt with intact recognition of individual objects - a deficit termed simultanagnosia - greatly helped to study this question. Interestingly, simultanagnosia typically results from bilateral lesions of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). The present study aimed to verify the relevance of this area for human global Gestalt perception. We applied continuous theta-burst TMS either unilaterally (left or right) or bilateral simultaneously over TPJ. Healthy subjects were presented with hierarchically organized visual stimuli that allowed parametrical degrading of the object at the global level. Identification of the global Gestalt was significantly modulated only for the bilateral TPJ stimulation condition. Our results strengthen the view that global Gestalt perception in the human brain involves TPJ and is co-dependent on both hemispheres.

  17. [The Problems with Domestic Introduction of rTMS from the Three Viewpoints of Scientific Evidence, Specialty and Social Responsibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinosaki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The domestic introduction of rTMS is expected as a new treatment option for treatment-resistant depression. I discussed some problems with the introduction from three viewpoints : scientific evidence, specialty, and social responsibility. I surveyed scientific evidence for rTMS regarding the action mechanism, effectiveness, side effects, and its positioning in the treatment guidelines. To secure the quality of rTMS treatment, I proposed rTMS guidelines, nurturing of the specialists, and a center hospital plan, and pointed out some medium-term problems after its introduction and the consistency of rTMS treatment and standard depression treatment. From the viewpoint of social responsibility, rTMS treatment should be a medical service covered by health insurance to avoid its misuse. We should prepare to overcome the public suspicion of brain stimulation treatment for mental disease.

  18. The TMS34010 graphic processor - an architecture for image visualization in NMR tomography; O processador grafico TMS34010 - uma arquitetura para visualizacao de imagem em tomografia por RMN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaets, Jan Frans Willem; Paiva, Maria Stela Veludo de; Almeida, Lirio O.B

    1989-12-31

    This abstract presents a description of the minimum system implemented with the graphic processor TMS34010, which will be used in the reconstruction, treatment and interpretation f images obtained by NMR tomography. The project is being developed in the LIE (Electronic Instrumentation Laboratory), of the Sao Carlos Chemistry and Physical Institute, S P, Brazil and is already in operation 4 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Fast Left Prefrontal rTMS Acutely Suppresses Analgesic Effects of Perceived Controllability on the Emotional Component of Pain Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Borckardt, Jeffrey J.; Reeves, Scott T.; Frohman, Heather; Madan, Alok; Jensen, Mark P.; Patterson, David; Barth, Kelly; Smith, A. Richard; Gracely, Richard; George, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex may be a promising target for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the management of pain. It is not clear how prefrontal TMS affects pain perception, but previous findings suggest that ventral lateral and medial prefrontal circuits may comprise an important part of a circuit of ‘perceived controllability’ regarding pain, stress and learned helplessness. While the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is a common TMS target for treating clinical depression as well as...

  20. Trait-like differences in underlying oscillatory state predict individual differences in the TMS-evoked response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Bornali; Johnson, Jeffrey S; Postle, Bradley R

    2014-01-01

    Combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) can provide insights into how differing cognitive contexts produce different brain states, through TMS-based measures of effective connectivity. For instance, in a recent study, the amplitude of the TMS-evoked response (TMS-ER) derived during the delay-period of a spatial short-term memory (STM) task had a larger amplitude, and greater spread to distal cortical areas, than the TMS-ER from a fixation condition (Johnson et al. J Neurophysiol, 2012). This indicated that the brain's electrical response to TMS is influenced by the cognitive context (STM or fixation) at the time of stimulation. This study also showed significant individual differences in the shape of the TMS-ER. Further, delay-period spectrograms revealed patterns of activity, the sustained pattern of delay-period activity (SPDPA), which were different across individuals. The present study addressed whether individual differences in the SPDPA predict spectral properties of the TMS-ER. We predicted that significant relationships would exist in task-relevant areas, such as the prefrontal cortex in the case of STM. The TMS-ER was derived using TMS-EEG and source-localization methods. The SPDPA varied significantly across subjects, and these differences predicted individual differences in several frequency-dependent parameters of the TMS-ER that were specific to task-relevant areas, including prefrontal cortex for STM. Furthermore, a follow-up test-retest study revealed that the SPDPA was stable over sessions. These observations offer a window into how individual differences in the effects of TMS are related to trait-like individual differences in physiological profile. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Repetitive TMS suggests a role of the human dorsal premotor cortex in action prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waltraud eStadler

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Predicting the actions of other individuals is crucial for our daily interactions. Recent evidence suggests that the prediction of object-directed arm and full-body actions employs the PMd. Thus, the neural substrate involved in action control may also be essential for action prediction. Here, we aimed to address this issue and hypothesised that disrupting the PMd impairs action prediction. Using fMRI-guided coil navigation, rTMS (5 pulses, 10 Hz was applied over the left PMd and over the vertex (control region while participants observed everyday actions in video clips that were transiently occluded for one second. The participants detected manipulations in the time course of occluded actions, which required them to internally predict the actions during occlusion. To differentiate between functional roles that the PMd could play in prediction, rTMS was either delivered at occluder onset (TMS-early, affecting the initiation of action prediction, or 300 ms later during occlusion (TMS-late, affecting the maintenance of an ongoing prediction. TMS-early over the left PMd produced more prediction errors than TMS-early over the vertex. TMS-late had no effect on prediction performance, suggesting that the left PMd might be involved particularly during the initiation of internally guided action prediction but may play a subordinate role in maintaining ongoing prediction. These findings open a new perspective on the role of the left PMd in action prediction which is in line with its functions in action control and in cognitive tasks. In the discussion, the relevance of the left PMd for integrating external action parameters with the observer’s motor repertoire is emphasised. Overall, the results are in line with the notion that premotor functions are employed in both action control and action observation.

  2. Repetitive TMS Suggests a Role of the Human Dorsal Premotor Cortex in Action Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Waltraud; Ott, Derek V. M.; Springer, Anne; Schubotz, Ricarda I.; Schütz-Bosbach, Simone; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Predicting the actions of other individuals is crucial for our daily interactions. Recent evidence suggests that the prediction of object-directed arm and full-body actions employs the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd). Thus, the neural substrate involved in action control may also be essential for action prediction. Here, we aimed to address this issue and hypothesized that disrupting the PMd impairs action prediction. Using fMRI-guided coil navigation, rTMS (five pulses, 10 Hz) was applied over the left PMd and over the vertex (control region) while participants observed everyday actions in video clips that were transiently occluded for 1 s. The participants detected manipulations in the time course of occluded actions, which required them to internally predict the actions during occlusion. To differentiate between functional roles that the PMd could play in prediction, rTMS was either delivered at occluder-onset (TMS-early), affecting the initiation of action prediction, or 300 ms later during occlusion (TMS-late), affecting the maintenance of an ongoing prediction. TMS-early over the left PMd produced more prediction errors than TMS-early over the vertex. TMS-late had no effect on prediction performance, suggesting that the left PMd might be involved particularly during the initiation of internally guided action prediction but may play a subordinate role in maintaining ongoing prediction. These findings open a new perspective on the role of the left PMd in action prediction which is in line with its functions in action control and in cognitive tasks. In the discussion, the relevance of the left PMd for integrating external action parameters with the observer’s motor repertoire is emphasized. Overall, the results are in line with the notion that premotor functions are employed in both action control and action observation. PMID:22363279

  3. EEG responses to TMS are sensitive to changes in the perturbation parameters and repeatable over time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Casarotto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High-density electroencephalography (hd-EEG combined with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS provides a direct and non-invasive measure of cortical excitability and connectivity in humans and may be employed to track over time pathological alterations, plastic changes and therapy-induced modifications in cortical circuits. However, the diagnostic/monitoring applications of this technique would be limited to the extent that TMS-evoked potentials are either stereotypical (non-sensitive or random (non-repeatable responses. Here, we used controlled changes in the stimulation parameters (site, intensity, and angle of stimulation and repeated longitudinal measurements (same day and one week apart to evaluate the sensitivity and repeatability of TMS/hd-EEG potentials. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In 10 volunteers, we performed 92 single-subject comparisons to evaluate the similarities/differences between pairs of TMS-evoked potentials recorded in the same/different stimulation conditions. For each pairwise comparison, we used non-parametric statistics to calculate a Divergence Index (DI, i.e., the percentage of samples that differed significantly, considering all scalp locations and the entire post-stimulus period. A receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that it was possible to find an optimal DI threshold of 1.67%, yielding 96.7% overall accuracy of TMS/hd-EEG in detecting whether a change in the perturbation parameters occurred or not. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate that the EEG responses to TMS essentially reflect deterministic properties of the stimulated neuronal circuits as opposed to stereotypical responses or uncontrolled variability. To the extent that TMS-evoked potentials are sensitive to changes and repeatable over time, they may be employed to detect longitudinal changes in the state of cortical circuits.

  4. Involvement of SMAp in the intention-related long latency stretch reflex modulation: a TMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieser, L; Aubert, S; Bonnard, M

    2013-08-29

    When our movement is perturbed by environmental forces, the Long Latency Stretch Reflex (LLSR), generated by a transcortical loop through the primary motor cortex (M1), is the fastest reaction adapted according to our prior intent. We investigated the involvement of the caudal part of the Supplementary Motor Area (SMAp) in this intention-related LLSR modulation. Subjects were instructed either to not react (i.e. to 'let-go') or to resist a mechanical perturbation extending the wrist and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) was used to transiently inactivate SMAp, either at the time of the LLSR generation (TMS was applied 50 ms before the perturbation), or at the end of the preparation period (TMS was applied 150 ms before the perturbation). The effect of SMAp transient inactivation on the LLSR modulation was compared to the effect of transient inactivation of M1 or of a Control area. Compared to the Control condition, the intention-related LLSR modulation decreased when TMS was applied either over SMAp or over M1 50 ms before perturbation occurrence, suggesting that SMAp, as M1, is involved in the LLSR modulation. Moreover, the LLSR modulation also decreased when TMS was applied over SMAp 150 ms before the perturbation, indicating that anticipatory processes taking place in SMAp participate to the LLSR modulation. In addition, TMS applied over SMAp elicited Motor-Evoked Potentials (MEPs) whose latency and shape were similar to MEPs evoked by TMS over M1, suggesting that they are due to direct corticospinal projections from SMAp. Interestingly, the SMAp MEPs amplitude was modulated depending on the subject's intention to resist or to let-go. Taken together these results strongly favor the idea that, during the expectation of a perturbation, SMAp is the seat of anticipatory processes that are specific to the subject's intent and that preset M1 in order to adapt the LLSR to this intention. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Brain SPECT guided repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in treatment resistant major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Shailesh; Chadda, Rakesh K; Kumar, Nand; Bal, C S

    2016-06-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has emerged as a potential treatment in treatment resistant major depressive disorder (MDD). However, there is no consensus about the exact site of stimulation for rTMS. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) offers a potential technique in deciding the site of stimulation. The present study was conducted to assess the difference in outcome of brain SPECT assisted rTMS versus standard protocol of twenty sessions of high frequency rTMS as add on treatment in 20 patients with treatment resistant MDD, given over a period of 4 weeks. Thirteen subjects (group I) received high frequency rTMS over an area of hypoperfusion in the prefrontal cortex, as identified on SPECT, whereas 7 subjects (group II) were administered rTMS in the left dorsoslateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) area. Improvement was monitored using standardized instruments. Patients in the group I showed a significantly better response compared to those in the group II. In group I, 46% of the subjects were responders on MADRS, 38% on BDI and 77% on CGI. The parallel figures of responders in Group II were 0% on MADRS, 14% on BDI and 43% on CGI. There were no remitters in the study. No significant untoward side effects were noticed. The study had limitations of a small sample size and non-controlled design, and all the subjects were also receiving the standard antidepressant therapy. Administration of rTMS over brain SPECT specified area of hypoperfusion may have a better clinical outcome compared to the standard protocol. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Fully Automated Trimethylsilyl (TMS Derivatisation Protocol for Metabolite Profiling by GC-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Zarate

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS has long been used for metabolite profiling of a wide range of biological samples. Many derivatisation protocols are already available and among these, trimethylsilyl (TMS derivatisation is one of the most widely used in metabolomics. However, most TMS methods rely on off-line derivatisation prior to GC-MS analysis. In the case of manual off-line TMS derivatisation, the derivative created is unstable, so reduction in recoveries occurs over time. Thus, derivatisation is carried out in small batches. Here, we present a fully automated TMS derivatisation protocol using robotic autosamplers and we also evaluate a commercial software, Maestro available from Gerstel GmbH. Because of automation, there was no waiting time of derivatised samples on the autosamplers, thus reducing degradation of unstable metabolites. Moreover, this method allowed us to overlap samples and improved throughputs. We compared data obtained from both manual and automated TMS methods performed on three different matrices, including standard mix, wine, and plasma samples. The automated TMS method showed better reproducibility and higher peak intensity for most of the identified metabolites than the manual derivatisation method. We also validated the automated method using 114 quality control plasma samples. Additionally, we showed that this online method was highly reproducible for most of the metabolites detected and identified (RSD < 20 and specifically achieved excellent results for sugars, sugar alcohols, and some organic acids. To the very best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the automated TMS method has been applied to analyse a large number of complex plasma samples. Furthermore, we found that this method was highly applicable for routine metabolite profiling (both targeted and untargeted in any metabolomics laboratory.

  7. FOUNDING SOCIETIES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henry Petroski

    2008-01-01

      [...] with the development of the railroads, the telegraph, and other marvels of the Industrial Revolution, a civil engineering society did not provide a sufficiently broad umbrella under which mining...

  8. Removing artefacts from TMS-EEG recordings using independent component analysis: importance for assessing prefrontal and motor cortex network properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogasch, Nigel C; Thomson, Richard H; Farzan, Faranak; Fitzgibbon, Bernadette M; Bailey, Neil W; Hernandez-Pavon, Julio C; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2014-11-01

    The combination of transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) is emerging as a powerful tool for causally investigating cortical mechanisms and networks. However, various artefacts contaminate TMS-EEG recordings, particularly over regions such as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). The aim of this study was to substantiate removal of artefacts from TMS-EEG recordings following stimulation of the DLPFC and motor cortex using independent component analysis (ICA). 36 healthy volunteers (30.8 ± 9 years, 9 female) received 75 single TMS pulses to the left DLPFC or left motor cortex while EEG was recorded from 57 electrodes. A subset of 9 volunteers also received 50 sham pulses. The large TMS artefact and early muscle activity (-2 to ~15 ms) were removed using interpolation and the remaining EEG signal was processed in two separate ICA runs using the FastICA algorithm. Five sub-types of TMS-related artefacts were manually identified: remaining muscle artefacts, decay artefacts, blink artefacts, auditory-evoked potentials and other noise-related artefacts. The cause of proposed blink and auditory-evoked potentials was assessed by concatenating known artefacts (i.e. voluntary blinks or auditory-evoked potentials resulting from sham TMS) to the TMS trials before ICA and evaluating grouping of resultant independent components (ICs). Finally, we assessed the effect of removing specific artefact types on TMS-evoked potentials (TEPs) and TMS-evoked oscillations. Over DLPFC, ICs from proposed muscle and decay artefacts correlated with TMS-evoked muscle activity size, whereas proposed TMS-evoked blink ICs combined with voluntary blinks and auditory ICs with auditory-evoked potentials from sham TMS. Individual artefact sub-types characteristically distorted each measure of DLPFC function across the scalp. When free of artefact, TEPs and TMS-evoked oscillations could be measured following DLPFC stimulation. Importantly, characteristic TEPs

  9. Neuromodulation integrating rTMS and neurofeedback for the treatment of autism spectrum disorder: An exploratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhadze, Estate M.; El-Baz, Ayman S.; Tasman, Allan; Sears, Lonnie L.; Wang, Yao; Lamina, Eva V.; Casanova, Manuel F.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a pervasive developmental disorder characterized by deficits in social interaction, language, stereotyped behaviors, and restricted range of interests. In previous studies low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been used, with positive behavioral and electrophysiological results, for the experimental treatment in ASD. In this study we combined prefrontal rTMS sessions with electroencephalographic (EEG) neurofeedback (NFB) to prolong and reinforce TMS-induced EEG changes. The pilot trial recruited 42 children with ASD (~14.5 yrs). Outcome measures included behavioral evaluations and reaction time test with event-related potential (ERP) recording. For the main goal of this exploratory study we used rTMS-neurofeedback combination (TMS-NFB, N=20) and waitlist (WTL, N=22) groups to examine effects of 18 sessions of integrated rTMS-NFB treatment or wait period) on behavioral responses, stimulus and response-locked ERPs, and other functional and clinical outcomes. The underlying hypothesis was that combined TMS-NFB will improve executive functions in autistic patients as compared to the waitlist group. Behavioral and ERP outcomes were collected in pre- and post-treatment tests in both groups. Results of the study supported our hypothesis by demonstration of positive effects of combined TMS-NFB neurotherapy in active treatment group as compared to control waitlist group, as the TMS-NFB group showed significant improvements in behavioral and functional outcomes as compared to the waitlist group. PMID:25267414

  10. Individualized rTMS neuronavigated according to regional brain metabolism ((18)FGD PET) has better treatment effects on auditory hallucinations than standard positioning of rTMS: a double-blind, sham-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klirova, Monika; Horacek, Jiri; Novak, Tomas; Cermak, Jan; Spaniel, Filip; Skrdlantova, Lucie; Mohr, Pavel; Höschl, Cyril

    2013-09-01

    Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (LF-rTMS) of the left temporo-parietal cortex (LTPC) has been proposed as a useful therapeutic method for auditory hallucinations (AHs). Stereotactic neuronavigation enables the magnetic coil to be targeted according to the individual parameters obtained from neuroimaging. Individualized rTMS neuronavigated according to 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)FDG PET) allows us to focus the coil explicitly on a given area with detected maxima of specific abnormalities, thus presuming a higher therapeutic effect of the method. The objective of this study is to test clinical efficacy of neuronavigated LF-rTMS administered according to the local maxima of (18)FDG PET uptake of LTPC and to compare it with treatment effects of standard and sham rTMS. In a double-blind, sham-controlled design, patients with AHs underwent a 10-day series of LF-rTMS using (1) (18)FDG PET-guided "neuronavigation," (2) "standard" anatomically guided positioning, and (3) sham coil. The effect of different rTMS conditions was assessed by the Auditory Hallucinations Rating Scale (AHRS) and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Fifteen patients were randomized to a treatment sequence and ten of them completed all three treatment conditions. The intention-to-treat analysis of AHRS score change revealed superiority of the (18)FDG PET-guided rTMS over both the standard and the sham rTMS. The analyses of the PANSS scores failed to detect significant difference among the treatments. Our data showed acute efficacy of (18)FDG PET-guided rTMS in the treatment of AHs. Neuronavigated rTMS was found to be more effective than standard, anatomically guided rTMS.

  11. TMS-induced cortical potentiation during wakefulness locally increases slow wave activity during sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reto Huber

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Sleep slow wave activity (SWA is thought to reflect sleep need, increasing in proportion to the length of prior wakefulness and decreasing during sleep. However, the process responsible for SWA regulation is not known. We showed recently that SWA increases locally after a learning task involving a circumscribed brain region, suggesting that SWA may reflect plastic changes triggered by learning.To test this hypothesis directly, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS in conjunction with high-density EEG in humans. We show that 5-Hz TMS applied to motor cortex induces a localized potentiation of TMS-evoked cortical EEG responses. We then show that, in the sleep episode following 5-Hz TMS, SWA increases markedly (+39.1+/-17.4%, p<0.01, n = 10. Electrode coregistration with magnetic resonance images localized the increase in SWA to the same premotor site as the maximum TMS-induced potentiation during wakefulness. Moreover, the magnitude of potentiation during wakefulness predicts the local increase in SWA during sleep.These results provide direct evidence for a link between plastic changes and the local regulation of sleep need.

  12. Timing of emotion representation in right and left occipital region: Evidence from combined TMS-EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattavelli, Giulia; Rosanova, Mario; Casali, Adenauer G; Papagno, Costanza; Romero Lauro, Leonor J

    2016-07-01

    Neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies provide evidence of hemispheric differences in processing faces and, in particular, emotional expressions. However, the timing of emotion representation in the right and left hemisphere is still unclear. Transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) was used to explore cortical responsiveness during behavioural tasks requiring processing of either identity or expression of faces. Single-pulse TMS was delivered 100ms after face onset over the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) while continuous EEG was recorded using a 60-channel TMS-compatible amplifier; right premotor cortex (rPMC) was also stimulated as control site. The same face stimuli with neutral, happy and fearful expressions were presented in separate blocks and participants were asked to complete either a facial identity or facial emotion matching task. Analyses performed on posterior face specific EEG components revealed that mPFC-TMS reduced the P1-N1 component. In particular, only when an explicit expression processing was required, mPFC-TMS interacted with emotion type in relation to hemispheric side at different timing; the first P1-N1 component was affected in the right hemisphere whereas the later N1-P2 component was modulated in the left hemisphere. These findings support the hypothesis that the frontal cortex exerts an early influence on the occipital cortex during face processing and suggest a different timing of the right and left hemisphere involvement in emotion discrimination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Neural Network Based Response Prediction of rTMS in Major Depressive Disorder Using QEEG Cordance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erguzel, Turker Tekin; Ozekes, Serhat; Gultekin, Selahattin; Tarhan, Nevzat; Hizli Sayar, Gokben; Bayram, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The combination of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), a non-pharmacological form of therapy for treating major depressive disorder (MDD), and electroencephalogram (EEG) is a valuable tool for investigating the functional connectivity in the brain. This study aims to explore whether pre-treating frontal quantitative EEG (QEEG) cordance is associated with response to rTMS treatment among MDD patients by using an artificial intelligence approach, artificial neural network (ANN). The artificial neural network using pre-treatment cordance of frontal QEEG classification was carried out to identify responder or non-responder to rTMS treatment among 55 MDD subjects. The classification performance was evaluated using k-fold cross-validation. The ANN classification identified responders to rTMS treatment with a sensitivity of 93.33%, and its overall accuracy reached to 89.09%. Area under Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) value for responder detection using 6, 8 and 10 fold cross validation were 0.917, 0.823 and 0.894 respectively. Potential utility of ANN approach method can be used as a clinical tool in administering rTMS therapy to a targeted group of subjects suffering from MDD. This methodology is more potentially useful to the clinician as prediction is possible using EEG data collected before this treatment process is initiated. It is worth using feature selection algorithms to raise the sensitivity and accuracy values.

  14. TMS interference with primacy and recency mechanisms reveals bimodal episodic encoding in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Iglis; Cappa, Stefano F; Feurra, Matteo; Giovannelli, Fabio; Santarnecchi, Emiliano; Bianco, Giovanni; Cincotta, Massimo; Rossi, Simone

    2013-01-01

    A classic finding of the psychology of memory is the "serial position effect." Immediate free recall of a word list is more efficient for items presented early (primacy effect) or late (recency effect), with respect to those in the middle. In an event-related, randomized block design, we interfered with the encoding of unrelated words lists with brief trains of repetitive TMS (rTMS), applied coincidently with the acoustic presentation of each word to the left dorsolateral pFC, the left intraparietal lobe, and a control site (vertex). Interference of rTMS with encoding produced a clear-cut double dissociation on accuracy during immediate free recall. The primacy effect was selectively worsened by rTMS of the dorsolateral pFC, whereas recency was selectively worsened by rTMS of the intraparietal lobe. These results are in agreement with the double dissociation between short-term and long-term memory observed in neuropsychological patients and provide direct evidence of distinct cortical mechanisms of encoding in the human brain.

  15. Causal Influence of Articulatory Motor Cortex on Comprehending Single Spoken Words: TMS Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomers, Malte R; Kirilina, Evgeniya; Weigand, Anne; Bajbouj, Malek; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2015-10-01

    Classic wisdom had been that motor and premotor cortex contribute to motor execution but not to higher cognition and language comprehension. In contrast, mounting evidence from neuroimaging, patient research, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) suggest sensorimotor interaction and, specifically, that the articulatory motor cortex is important for classifying meaningless speech sounds into phonemic categories. However, whether these findings speak to the comprehension issue is unclear, because language comprehension does not require explicit phonemic classification and previous results may therefore relate to factors alien to semantic understanding. We here used the standard psycholinguistic test of spoken word comprehension, the word-to-picture-matching task, and concordant TMS to articulatory motor cortex. TMS pulses were applied to primary motor cortex controlling either the lips or the tongue as subjects heard critical word stimuli starting with bilabial lip-related or alveolar tongue-related stop consonants (e.g., "pool" or "tool"). A significant cross-over interaction showed that articulatory motor cortex stimulation delayed comprehension responses for phonologically incongruent words relative to congruous ones (i.e., lip area TMS delayed "tool" relative to "pool" responses). As local TMS to articulatory motor areas differentially delays the comprehension of phonologically incongruous spoken words, we conclude that motor systems can take a causal role in semantic comprehension and, hence, higher cognition. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. Improving the quality of combined EEG-TMS neural recordings: Introducing the coil spacer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, K L; Woolley, D G; Mantini, D; Balsters, J H; Enz, N; Wenderoth, N

    2017-11-06

    In the last decade, interest in combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) approaches has grown substantially. Aside from the obvious artifacts induced by the magnetic pulses themselves, separate and more sinister signal disturbances arise as a result of contact between the TMS coil and EEG electrodes. Here we profile the characteristics of these artifacts and introduce a simple device - the coil spacer - to provide a platform allowing physical separation between the coil and electrodes during stimulation. EEG data revealed high amplitude signal disturbances when the TMS coil was in direct contact with the EEG electrodes, well within the physiological range of viable EEG signals. The largest artifacts were located in the Delta and Theta frequency range, and standard data cleanup using independent components analysis (ICA) was ineffective due to the artifact's similarity to real brain oscillations. While the current best practice is to use a large coil holding apparatus to fixate the coil 'hovering' over the head with an air gap, the spacer provides a simpler solution that ensures this distance is kept constant throughout testing. The results strongly suggest that data collected from combined TMS-EEG studies with the coil in direct contact with the EEG cap are polluted with low frequency artifacts that are indiscernible from physiological brain signals. The coil spacer provides a cheap and simple solution to this problem and is recommended for use in future simultaneous TMS-EEG recordings. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. rTMS over bilateral inferior parietal cortex induces decrement of spatial sustained attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyeon eLee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Sustained attention is an essential brain function that enables a subject to maintain attention level over the time of a task. In previous work, the right inferior parietal lobe (IPL has been reported as one of the main brain regions related to sustained attention, however, the right lateralization of vigilance/sustained attention is unclear because information about the network for sustained attention is traditionally provided by neglect patients who typically have right brain damage. Here, we investigated sustained attention by applying a virtual lesion technique, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, over the left and right superior parietal lobe (SPL and IPL. We used two different types of visual sustained attention tasks: spatial (location based and non-spatial (feature based. When the participants performed the spatial task, repetitive TMS (rTMS over either the right or left IPL induced a significant decrement of sustained attention causing a progressive increment of errors and response time. In contrast, participants’ performance was not changed by rTMS on the non-spatial task. Also, omission errors (true negative gradually increased with time on right and left IPL rTMS conditions, while commission errors (false positive were relatively stable. These findings suggest that the maintenance of attention, especially in tasks regarding spatial location, is not uniquely lateralized to the right IPL, but may also involve participation of the left IPL as well.

  18. Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lars; Tække, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    the five strands of theory on the network society. Each theoretical position has its specific implications for acting toward strategic goals. In its entirety, the five perspectives give a thorough understanding of the conditions for successful strategic communication in the 21st century....

  19. Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lars; Tække, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    the five strands of theory on the network society. Each theoretical position has its specific implications for acting toward strategic goals. In its entirety, the five perspectives give a thorough understanding of the conditions for successful strategic communication in the 21st century....

  20. Modulation of sensory inhibition of motor evoked potentials elicited by TMS prior to movement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leukel, Christian; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    Short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) refers to a decrement of the size of a motor evoked potential (MEP) by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) after electrical stimulation of a peripheral afferent nerve (PNS) (Tokimura et al. 2000). Since SAI occurs when TMS is applied at the time...... to rest. In 9 healthy subjects (23 ± 3 years) MEPs were recorded in m. first dorsal interosseus (FDI) and m. abductor pollicis brevis (APB). To induce SAI, n. medianus was stimulated 20 ms prior to TMS over the motorcortex. In control trials, interstimulus intervals (ISIs) between afferent stimulation...... because the afferent information triggered the movement and therefore was important for motor performance. Alle et al. (2009). J Physiol 587:5163-5176 Chen et al. (1998). Ann Neurol 44:317-325 Tokimura et al. (2000). J Physiol 523 Pt 2:503-513...

  1. Development of cortical motor circuits between childhood and adulthood: A navigated TMS-HdEEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttä, Sara; Könönen, Mervi; Kallioniemi, Elisa; Lakka, Timo; Lintu, Niina; Lindi, Virpi; Ferreri, Florinda; Ponzo, David; Säisänen, Laura

    2017-05-01

    Motor functions improve during childhood and adolescence, but little is still known about the development of cortical motor circuits during early life. To elucidate the neurophysiological hallmarks of motor cortex development, we investigated the differences in motor cortical excitability and connectivity between healthy children, adolescents, and adults by means of navigated suprathreshold motor cortex transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) combined with high-density electroencephalography (EEG). We demonstrated that with development, the excitability of the motor system increases, the TMS-evoked EEG waveform increases in complexity, the magnitude of induced activation decreases, and signal spreading increases. Furthermore, the phase of the oscillatory response to TMS becomes less consistent with age. These changes parallel an improvement in manual dexterity and may reflect developmental changes in functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2599-2615, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Ethanol modulates cortical activity: direct evidence with combined TMS and EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kähkönen, S; Kesäniemi, M; Nikouline, V V; Karhu, J; Ollikainen, M; Holi, M; Ilmoniemi, R J

    2001-08-01

    The motor cortex of 10 healthy subjects was stimulated by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) before and after ethanol challenge (0.8 g/kg resulting in blood concentration of 0.77 +/- 0.14 ml/liter). The electrical brain activity resulting from the brief electromagnetic pulse was recorded with high-resolution electroencephalography (EEG) and located using inversion algorithms. Focal magnetic pulses to the left motor cortex were delivered with a figure-of-eight coil at the random interstimulus interval of 1.5-2.5 s. The stimulation intensity was adjusted to the motor threshold of abductor digiti minimi. Two conditions before and after ethanol ingestion (30 min) were applied: (1) real TMS, with the coil pressed against the scalp; and (2) control condition, with the coil separated from the scalp by a 2-cm-thick piece of plastic. A separate EMG control recording of one subject during TMS was made with two bipolar platinum needle electrodes inserted to the left temporal muscle. In each condition, 120 pulses were delivered. The EEG was recorded from 60 scalp electrodes. A peak in the EEG signals was observed at 43 ms after the TMS pulse in the real-TMS condition but not in the control condition or in the control scalp EMG. Potential maps before and after ethanol ingestion were significantly different from each other (P = 0.01), but no differences were found in the control condition. Ethanol changed the TMS-evoked potentials over right frontal and left parietal areas, the underlying effect appearing to be largest in the right prefrontal area. Our findings suggest that ethanol may have changed the functional connectivity between prefrontal and motor cortices. This new noninvasive method provides direct evidence about the modulation of cortical connectivity after ethanol challenge. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  3. TMS perturbs saccade trajectories and unmasks an internal feedback controller for saccades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu-Wilson, Minnan; Tian, Jing; Shadmehr, Reza; Zee, David S.

    2011-01-01

    When we applied a single pulse of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to any part of the human head during a saccadic eye movement, the ongoing eye velocity was reduced starting as early as 45ms after the TMS, and lasted around 32ms. The perturbation to the saccade trajectory was not due to a mechanical effect of the lid on the eye (e.g., from blinks). When the saccade involved coordinated movements of both the eyes and the lids, e.g., in vertical saccades, TMS produced a synchronized inhibition of the motor commands to both eye and lid muscles. The TMS induced perturbation of the eye trajectory did not show habituation with repetition, and was present in both pro- and anti-saccades. Despite the perturbation, the eye trajectory was corrected within the same saccade with compensatory motor commands that guided the eyes to the target. This within-saccade correction did not rely on visual input, suggesting that the brain monitored the oculomotor commands as the saccade unfolded, maintained a real time estimate of the position of the eyes, and corrected for the perturbation. TMS disrupted saccades regardless of the location of the coil on the head, suggesting that the coil discharge engages a non-habituating startle-like reflex system. This system affects ongoing motor commands upstream of the oculomotor neurons, possibly at the level of the superior colliculus or omnipause neurons. Therefore, a TMS pulse centrally perturbs saccadic motor commands, which are monitored possibly via efference copy, and are corrected via internal feedback. PMID:21832184

  4. Investigating the Effects of Low Frequency rTMS on Kindled Seizure in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yadollahpour

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neural stimulation is a promising new technology for the treatment of medically-intractable seizures.  Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS is a simple, non-invasive, low cost technique which is widely used in neurophysiology. In a few studies that have been performed at different frequencies the therapeutic effects of this technique were not obvious. Repetition of low frequencies TMS (≤1 Hz has inhibitory and quenching effects on neuron activities and it decreases the excitability of the cortex. In epilepsy, as a disease of the central nervous system, the excitability of the cortex increases. It seems that such a technique at its optimum frequencies has therapeutic potential in epilepsy. Materials and Methods: In this study, the effect of 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 Hz repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS at an  intensity of  80% Resting Motor Threshold (RMT and at 1 Hz with an  intensity of  90 and 100% RMT  on Amygdala-kindling model in rats in optimum spatial coordinate was investigated. The procedure includes delivering a daily 5 minute rTMS stimulus using a butterfly figure coil having 25 mm in diameter and the coordinate which induces the maximum electrical field in Amygdala area.  The stimulus was given within five minutes after the electrical kindling stimulus was delivered.  The number of days to reach stage 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 of kindling model After Discharge Duration (ADD in each day and the percentage of cumulative ADD between the treated and the control group was statistically compared.  Two groups were used to investigate the effect of the intensity of the magnetic field. A frequency of 1 Hz rTMS at an intensity of 90% and 100% RMT was delivered with the same physical parameters as before. Results: Using a frequency of 1 Hz rTMS at an intensity of 80% and RMT of 90% showed a significant inhibitory effect on the spread of seizure into other areas of brain in comparison to the control group. Increasing

  5. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Therapy in Parkinson Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle Shukla, Aparna; Shuster, Jonathan J; Chung, Jae Woo; Vaillancourt, David E; Patten, Carolynn; Ostrem, Jill; Okun, Michael S

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have reported repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) therapy as an effective treatment for the control of motor symptoms in Parkinson disease. The objective of the study is to quantify the overall efficacy of this treatment. Systematic review and meta-analysis. We reviewed the literature on clinical rTMS trials in Parkinson disease since the technique was introduced in 1980. We used the following databases: MEDLINE, Web of Science, Cochrane, and CINAHL. Patients with Parkinson disease who were participating in prospective clinical trials that included an active arm and a control arm and change in motor scores on Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale as the primary outcome. We pooled data from 21 studies that met these criteria. We then analyzed separately the effects of low- and high-frequency rTMS on clinical motor improvements. The overall pooled mean difference between treatment and control groups in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor score was significant (4.0 points, 95% confidence interval, 1.5, 6.7; P = .005). rTMS therapy was effective when low-frequency stimulation (≤ 1 Hz) was used with a pooled mean difference of 3.3 points (95% confidence interval 1.6, 5.0; P = .005). There was a trend for significance when high-frequency stimulation (≥ 5 Hz) studies were evaluated with a pooled mean difference of 3.9 points (95% confidence interval, -0.7, 8.5; P = .08). rTMS therapy demonstrated benefits at short-term follow-up (immediately after a treatment protocol) with a pooled mean difference of 3.4 points (95% confidence interval, 0.3, 6.6; P = .03) as well as at long-term follow-up (average follow-up 6 weeks) with mean difference of 4.1 points (95% confidence interval, -0.15, 8.4; P = .05). There were insufficient data to statistically analyze the effects of rTMS when we specifically examined bradykinesia, gait, and levodopa-induced dyskinesia using quantitative methods. rTMS therapy in patients with Parkinson

  6. Cognitive correlates of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS in treatment-resistant depression- a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kedzior Karina K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the current study was to investigate the cognitive correlates of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS in 10 treatment-resistant depression patients. Methods Patients received forty 20-min sessions of fast-frequency (10 Hz rTMS of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC over 20 days. Concept-shift ability (accuracy and duration of performance was assessed daily with a Modified Concept-Shifting Task (mCST in patients and in eight healthy volunteers. General cognitive functioning test (Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status; RBANS, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D were applied before the first and after the last rTMS. Results Compared to before rTMS on the first 10 days, the patients performed the mCST significantly more accurately after rTMS on the last 10 days (p p = .256, partial eta squared=.18. A significant improvement in immediate memory on RBANS and reduction in BDI and HAM-D scores were also observed after the last compared to before the first rTMS. Conclusion The rTMS is associated with an improvement in selective cognitive functions that is not explained by practice effects on tasks administered repeatedly. Trial registration Name: "Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS in the treatment of depression, assessed with HAM-D over a four week period." URL: www.actr.org.au Registration number: ACTRN012605000145606

  7. A Method for Evaluation and Comparison of Parallel Robots for Safe Human Interaction, Applied to Robotic TMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Jan Johannes; Stienen, Arno; van der Wijk, V.; Wessels, Martijn; van der Kooij, Herman

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive method to modify behaviour of neurons in the brain. TMS is applied by running large currents through a coil close to the scalp. For consistent results it is required to maintain the coil position within millimetres of the targeted location,

  8. Expression of auxin synthesis gene tms1 under control of tuber-specific promoter enhances potato tuberization in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolachevskaya, Oksana O; Alekseeva, Valeriya V; Sergeeva, Lidiya I; Rukavtsova, Elena B; Getman, Irina A; Vreugdenhil, Dick; Buryanov, Yaroslav I; Romanov, Georgy A

    2015-09-01

    Phytohormones, auxins in particular, play an important role in plant development and productivity. Earlier data showed positive impact of exogenous auxin on potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuberization. The aim of this study was to generate potato plants with increased auxin level predominantly in tubers. To this end, a pBinB33-tms1 vector was constructed harboring the Agrobacterium auxin biosynthesis gene tms1 fused to tuber-specific promoter of the class I patatin gene (B33-promoter) of potato. Among numerous independently generated B33:tms1 lines, those without visible differences from control were selected for detailed studies. In the majority of transgenic lines, tms1 gene transcription was detected, mostly in tubers rather than in shoots. Indoleacetic acid (IAA) content in tubers and the auxin tuber-to-shoot ratio were increased in tms1-expressing transformants. The organ-specific increase in auxin synthesis in B33:tms1-transformants accelerated and intensified the process of tuber formation, reduced the dose of carbohydrate supply required for in vitro tuberization, and decreased the photoperiodic dependence of tuber initiation. Overall, a positive correlation was observed between tms1 expression, IAA content in tubers, and stimulation of tuber formation. The revealed properties of B33:tms1 transformants imply an important role for auxin in potato tuberization and offer prospects to magnify potato productivity by a moderate organ-specific enhancement of auxin content. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  9. The coil orientation dependency of the electric field induced by TMS for M1 and other brain areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.M.; Oostendorp, T.F.; Stegeman, D.F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) depends highly on the coil orientation relative to the subject's head. This implies that the direction of the induced electric field has a large effect on the efficiency of TMS. To improve future protocols, knowledge about the

  10. Add-on deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (dTMS) for the treatment of chronic migraine: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapinesi, Chiara; Del Casale, Antonio; Scatena, Paola; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Di Pietro, Simone; Ferri, Vittoria Rachele; Bersani, Francesco Saverio; Brugnoli, Roberto; Raccah, Ruggero Nessim; Zangen, Abraham; Ferracuti, Stefano; Orzi, Francesco; Girardi, Paolo; Sette, Giuliano

    2016-06-03

    Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (dTMS) can be an alternative treatment to relieve pain in chronic migraine (CM). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of high-frequency dTMS in add-on to standard treatment for CM in patients not responding to effective abortive or preventive drug treatment. We randomized 14 patients with International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd Edition (ICHD-3) treatment-resistant CM to add-on dTMS (n=7) or standard abortive or preventive antimigraine treatment (n=7). Three sessions of alternate day 10Hz dTMS consisting of 600 pulses in 10 trains were delivered to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), bilaterally, but with left hemisphere prevalence, for 12 sessions spread over one month. The add-on dTMS treatment was well tolerated. Patients treated with dTMS showed significant reduction of pain intensity, frequency of attacks, analgesic overuse, and depressive symptoms during treatment and one month later, compared to the month preceding treatment and at the same time-points compared to the control group. As compared to standard pharmacological treatment alone, add-on high-frequency dTMS of the bilateral DLPFC reduced the frequency and intensity of migraine attack, drug overuse, and depressive symptoms. This study supports the add-on dTMS treatment in treatment-resistant CM. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. Where does TMS Stimulate the Motor Cortex? Combining Electrophysiological Measurements and Realistic Field Estimates to Reveal the Affected Cortex Position

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bungert, Andreas; Antunes, André; Espenhahn, Svenja

    2016-01-01

    of functionally and histologically distinct subareas, this also renders the hypotheses on the physiological TMS effects uncertain. We use the finite element method (FEM) and magnetic resonance image-based individual head models to get realistic estimates of the electric field induced by TMS. The field changes...... in different subparts of the motor cortex are compared with electrophysiological threshold changes of 2 hand muscles when systematically varying the coil orientation in measurements. We demonstrate that TMS stimulates the region around the gyral crown and that the maximal electric field strength in this region......Much of our knowledge on the physiological mechanisms of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) stems from studies which targeted the human motor cortex. However, it is still unclear which part of the motor cortex is predominantly affected by TMS. Considering that the motor cortex consists...

  12. Theta and Alpha Oscillations during the Retention Period of Working Memory by rTMS Stimulating the Parietal Lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song; Jin, Jing-Na; Wang, Xin; Qi, Hong-Zhi; Liu, Zhi-Peng; Yin, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Studies on repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) have shown that stimulating the parietal lobe, which plays a role in memory storage, can enhance performance during the "retention" process of working memory (WM). However, the mechanism of rTMS effect during this phase is still unclear. In this study, we stimulated the superior parietal lobe (SPL) using 5-Hz rTMS in 26 participants and recorded electroencephalography (EEG) while they performed a delayed-recognition WM task. The analyses included the comparisons of event-related spectral perturbation (ERSP) value variations in theta (4-7 Hz) and alpha (8-14 Hz) band frequencies between conditions (rTMS vs. sham), as well as the correlations between different brain areas. Following rTMS, the ERSP values of theta-band oscillations were significantly increased in the parietal and occipital-parietal brain areas (P variations of theta-band oscillations between the two conditions in the left parietal and left prefrontal areas were positively correlated with the response time (RT) variations (by using rTMS, the more subject RT decreased, the more ERSP value of theta oscillation increased). The ERSP value variations of alpha-band oscillations in the left parietal and bilateral prefrontal areas were negatively correlated with RT variations (by using rTMS, the more RT of the subject decreased, the more ERSP value of alpha oscillation decreased). Inter-sites phase synchronization of theta-band EEG between the left parietal and left prefrontal areas, as well as alpha-band EEG between the left parietal and bilateral prefrontal areas were enhanced by rTMS. These results indicated that activities of both parietal and prefrontal areas were required for information storage, and these activities were related to the behavioral responses. Moreover, the connectivity between these two regions was intensified following rTMS. Thus, rTMS may affect the frontal area indirectly via the frontal parietal pathway.

  13. Fast left prefrontal rTMS acutely suppresses analgesic effects of perceived controllability on the emotional component of pain experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borckardt, Jeffrey J; Reeves, Scott T; Frohman, Heather; Madan, Alok; Jensen, Mark P; Patterson, David; Barth, Kelly; Smith, A Richard; Gracely, Richard; George, Mark S

    2011-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex may be a promising target for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the management of pain. It is not clear how prefrontal TMS affects pain perception, but previous findings suggest that ventral lateral and medial prefrontal circuits may comprise an important part of a circuit of perceived controllability regarding pain, stress, and learned helplessness. Although the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is a common TMS target for treating clinical depression as well as modulating pain, little is known about whether TMS over this area may affect perceived controllability. The present study explored the immediate effects of fast TMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex on the analgesic effects of perceived pain controllability. Twenty-four healthy volunteers underwent a laboratory pain task designed to manipulate perception of pain controllability. Real TMS, compared with sham, suppressed the analgesic benefits of perceived control on the emotional dimension of pain, but not the sensory/discriminatory dimension. Findings suggest that, at least acutely, fast TMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex may interrupt the perceived-controllability effect on the emotional dimension of pain experience. Although it is not clear whether this cortical area is directly involved with modulating perceived controllability or whether downstream effects are responsible for the present findings, it appears possible that left dorsolateral prefrontal TMS may produce analgesic effects by acting through a cortical perceived-control circuit regulating limbic and brainstem areas of the pain circuit. Despite evidence that prefrontal TMS can have analgesic effects, fast left prefrontal TMS appears to acutely suppress analgesia associated with perceived-control. This effect may be limited to the emotional dimension of pain experience. Copyright © 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    expert members on the subject to deliver lectures and take part in devising courses in the universities. IVS publishes a quarterly called the `Bulletin of Indian Vacuum Society' since its inception, in which articles on vacuum and related topics are published. NIRVAT, news, announcements, and reports are the other features of the Bulletin. The articles in the Bulletin are internationally abstracted. The Bulletin is distributed free to all the members of the society. The society also publishes proceedings of national/international symposia and seminars, manuals, lecture notes etc. It has published a `Vacuum Directory' containing very useful information on vacuum technology. IVS has also set up its own website http://www.ivsnet.org in January 2002. The website contains information about IVS, list of members, list of EC members, events and news, abstracts of articles published in the `Bulletin of Indian Vacuum Society', utilities, announcements, reports, membership and other forms which can be completed online and also gives links to other vacuum societies. Our Society has been a member of the executive council of the International Union of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications (IUVSTA) and its various committees since 1970. In 1983 IVS conducted an International Symposium on Vacuum Technology and Nuclear Applications in BARC, Mumbai, under the sponsorship of IUVSTA. In 1987 IVS arranged the Triennial International Conference on Thin Films in New Delhi, where more than 200 foreign delegates participated. IVS also hosted the IUVSTA Executive Council Meeting along with the conference. The society organized yet again an International Conference on Vacuum Science and Technology and SRS Vacuum Systems at CAT, Indore in1995. IVS arranges the prestigious Professor Balakrishnan Memorial Lecture in memory of its founder vice-president. Leading scientists from India and abroad in the field are invited to deliver the talks. So far 23 lectures have been held in this series. IVS

  15. Cryptozoology Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Reports of Loch Ness monsters, Bigfoot, and the Yeti spring u p from time to time, sparking scientific controversy about the veracity of these observations. Now an organization has been established to help cull, analyze, and disseminate information on the alleged creatures. The International Society of Cryptozoology, formed at a January meeting at the U.S. National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution, will serve as the focal point for the investigation, analysis, publication, and discussion of animals of unexpected form or size or of unexpected occurrences in time or space.

  16. Afghanistan, state and society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kværnø, Ole

    of both governmental and nongovernmental institutions from more than 20 states. Its theme was to discuss the problems that Afghanistan faces in the wake of the U.S.-led attack on al Qaeda training camps and the Taliban government; examine the challenges confronting the NATO International Security......In June 2007, the RAND Corporation and the Royal Danish Defence College hosted a conference titled “Afghanistan: State and Society, Great Power Politics, and the Way Ahead”. The two-day event, held in Copenhagen, was attended by more than 100 politicians, scholars, academics, and representative...... Assistance Force as it coordinates nation-building activities in Afghanistan; and suggest ways to address these issues. This volume compiles 11 of the papers presented at the conference; themes include the importance of historical precedents, coordination among relevant parties, and the development of an all...

  17. Plasticity-Inducing TMS Protocols to Investigate Somatosensory Control of Hand Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jacobs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hand function depends on sensory feedback to direct an appropriate motor response. There is clear evidence that somatosensory cortices modulate motor behaviour and physiology within primary motor cortex. However, this information is mainly from research in animals and the bridge to human hand control is needed. Emerging evidence in humans supports the notion that somatosensory cortices modulate motor behaviour, physiology and sensory perception. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS allows for the investigation of primary and higher-order somatosensory cortices and their role in control of hand movement in humans. This review provides a summary of several TMS protocols in the investigation of hand control via the somatosensory cortices. TMS plasticity inducing protocols reviewed include paired associative stimulation, repetitive TMS, theta-burst stimulation as well as other techniques that aim to modulate cortical excitability in sensorimotor cortices. Although the discussed techniques may modulate cortical excitability, careful consideration of experimental design is needed to isolate factors that may interfere with desired results of the plasticity-inducing protocol, specifically events that may lead to metaplasticity within the targeted cortex.

  18. rTMS in the treatment of drug addiction: an update about human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamoli, Elisa; Manganotti, Paolo; Schwartz, Robert P; Rimondo, Claudia; Gomma, Maurizio; Serpelloni, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Drug addiction can be a devastating and chronic relapsing disorder with social, psychological, and physical consequences, and more effective treatment options are needed. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique that has been assessed in a growing number of studies for its therapeutic potential in treating addiction. This review paper offers an overview on the current state of clinical research in treating drug addiction with rTMS. Because of the limited research in this area, all studies (including case reports) that evaluated the therapeutic use of rTMS in nicotine, alcohol, or illicit drug addiction were included in this review. Papers published prior to December 2012 were found through an NCBI PubMed search. A total of eleven studies were identified that met review criteria. There is nascent evidence that rTMS could be effective in reducing cocaine craving and nicotine and alcohol craving and consumption and might represent a potential therapeutic tool for treating addiction. Further studies are needed to identify the optimal parameters of stimulation for the most effective treatment of drug addiction, to improve our comprehension of the treatment neurophysiological effects, and to conduct rigorous, controlled efficacy studies with adequate power.

  19. A combined study of MEG and pico-Tesla TMS on children with autism disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anninos, Photios; Chatzimichael, Athanasios; Adamopoulos, Adam; Kotini, Athanasia; Tsagas, Nicolaos

    2016-12-01

    Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings from the brain of 10 children with autism (6 boys and 4 girls, with ages range from 5-12 years, mean[Formula: see text][Formula: see text][Formula: see text]SD: 8.3[Formula: see text][Formula: see text][Formula: see text]2.1) were obtained using a whole-head 122-channel MEG system in a magnetically shielded room of low magnetic noise. A double-blind experimental design was used in order to look for possible effect of external pico-Tesla Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (pT-TMS). The pT-TMS was applied on the brain of the autistic children with proper field characteristics (magnetic field amplitude: 1-7.5[Formula: see text]pT, frequency: the alpha - rhythm of the patient 8-13[Formula: see text]Hz). After unblinding it was found a significant effect of an increase of frequencies in the range of 2-7[Formula: see text]Hz across the subjects followed by an improvement and normalization of their MEG recordings. The statistical analysis of our results showed a statistical significance at 6 out of 10 patients (60%). It is also observed an increase of alpha activity in autistic children at the end of one month after pT-TMS treatment at home. In conclusion, the application of pT-TMS has the prospective to be a noninvasive, safe and important modality in the management of autism children.

  20. The role of the prefrontal cortex in controlling gender-stereotypical associations: a TMS investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Mattavelli, Giulia; Platania, Elisa; Papagno, Costanza

    2011-06-01

    Stereotypes associated with gender, race, ethnicity and religion are powerful forces in human social interactions. Previous neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies point to a role of the prefrontal cortex in controlling stereotypical responses. Here we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in combination with an Implicit Association Test (IAT) to highlight the possible causal role of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the right anterior dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (aDMPFC) in controlling gender-stereotypical responses. Young male and female participants were tested. Our results showed that applying TMS over the left DLPFC and the right aDMPFC increased the gender-stereotypical bias in male participants compared to when TMS was applied to a control site (vertex). This suggests that both the left DLPFC and the right aDMPFC play a direct role in stereotyping. Females did not show a significant gender bias on the IAT; correspondingly their responses were unaffected by TMS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Validation of the Treatment Motivation Scales for forensic outpatient treatment (TMS-F)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drieschner, Klaus H.; Boomsma, Anne

    The validity of the Treatment Motivation Scales for outpatient offender treatment (TMS-F), a self-report questionnaire with scales for the motivation of patients to engage in the treatment and six cognitive and emotional determinants of this motivation, is evaluated in two studies. In Study 1 (N =

  2. CpG island methylation of TMS1/ASC and CASP8 genes in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamandani DM

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene silencing associated with aberrant methylation of promoter region CpG islands is an acquired epigenetic alteration that serves as an alternative to genetic defects in the inactivation of tumor suppressor and other genes in human cancers. Aims This study describes the methylation status of TMS1/ASC and CASP8 genes in cervical cancer. We also examined the prevalence of TMS1/ASC and CASP8 genes methylation in cervical cancer tissue and none - neo plastic samples in an effort to correlate with smoking habit and clinicopathological features. Method Target DNA was modified by sodium bisulfite, converting all unmethylated, but not methylated, cytosines to uracil, and subsequently amplified by Methylation Specific (MS PCR with primers specific for methylated versus unmethylated DNA. The PCR product was detected by gel electrophoresis and combined with the clinical records of patients. Results The methylation pattern of the TMS1/ASC and CASP8 genes in specimens of cervical cancer and adjacent normal tissues were detected [5/80 (6.2%, 3/80 (3.75%-2/80 (2.5%, 1/80 (1.2% respectively]. No statistical differences were seen in the extent of differentiation, invasion, pathological type and smoking habit between the methylated and unmethylated tissues (P > 0.05. Conclusion The present study conclude that the frequency of TMS1/ASC and CASP8 genes methylation in cervical cancer are rare (

  3. [Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), inhibition processes and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) - an overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegl, Thomas; Bender, Stephan; Buchmann, Johannes; Kratz, Oliver; Moll, Gunther H; Heinrich, Hartmut

    2014-11-01

    Motor system excitability can be tested by transcranial magnetic stimulation CFMS). In this article, an overview of recent methodological developments and research findings related to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is provided. Different TMS parameters that reflect the function of interneurons in the motor cortex may represent neurophysiological markers of inhibition in ADHD, particularly the so-called intracortical inhibition. In children with a high level of hyperactivity and impulsivity, intracortical inhibition was comparably low at rest as shortly before the execution of a movement. TMS-evoked potentials can also be measured in the EEG so that investigating processes of excitability is not restricted to motor areas in future studies. The effects of methylphenidate on motor system excitability may be interpreted in the sense of a 'fine-tuning' with these mainly dopaminergic effects also depending on genetic parameters (DAT1 transporter). A differentiated view on the organization of motor control can be achieved by a combined analysis of TMS parameters and event-related potentials. Applying this bimodal approach, strong evidence for a deviant implementation of motor control in children with ADHD and probably compensatory mechanisms (with involvement of the prefrontal cortex) was obtained. These findings, which contribute to a better understanding of hyperactivity/impulsivity, inhibitory processes and motor control in ADHD as well as the mechanisms of medication, underline the relevance of TMS as a neurophysiological method in ADHD research.

  4. The Treatment Motivation Scales for Forensic Outpatient Treatment (TMS-F) : Construction and Psychometric Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drieschner, Klaus H.; Boomsma, Anne

    The Treatment Motivation Scales for forensic outpatient treatment (TMS-F) is a Dutch 85-item self-report questionnaire for the motivation of forensic outpatients to engage in their treatment and six cognitive and affective determinants of this motivation. Following descriptions of the conceptual

  5. Implementasi Modulasi dan Demodulasi M-ary QAM pada DSK TMS320C6416T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angga Yuda Prasetya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Salah satu jenis modulasi digital yang sering digunakan adalah QAM (Quadrature Amplitude Modulation. Modulator dan demodulator M-ary QAM dapat diprogram dengan menggunakan DSP processor. DSK TMS320C6416T adalah suatu board/hardware untuk memproses sinyal yang termasuk dalam keluarga besar processor TMS320 produksi Texas Instrument, bekerja pada frekuensi 0-96 kHz yang merupakan standar dalam sistem telekomunikasi. Tujuannya yaitu melakukan implementasi modulasi dan demodulasi M-ary QAM secara real ke dalam DSP Starter Kit TMS320C6416T. Terdapat empat implementasi sistem yaitu sistem dengan input bernoulli binary generator, input pulse generator, sinyal input dari function generator melalui port Line-In dan input suara melalui port Mic-In. Pengujian dilakukan untuk mengetahui kinerja DSK TMS320C6416T yang ditampilkan dalam bentuk grafik Bit Error Rate terhadap variasi nilai Eb/N0 dilakukan dengan mengirimkan 100.000 bit. Kinerja terbaik terdapat pada implementasi menggunakan sistem QAM dengan nilai BER mencapai 1.00E-05 pada nilai Eb/N0≥11dB. Sedangkan kinerja terburuk pada semua sistem dengan input dari function generator dengan nilai BER yang tidak mencapai 1.00E-05 dibandingkan dengan sistem yang telah dirancang.

  6. Implementasi Modulasi dan Demodulasi GMSK pada DSK TMS320C6416T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Sukmana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gaussian minimum shift keying (GMSK adalah teknik modulasi yang mengurangi spectrum sidelobe pada MSK dengan cara melewatkan sinyal NRZ ke filter LPF Gaussian sehingga menimbulkan kelebihan dan kekurangan tertentu. Modulator dan demodulator GMSK dapat diprogram dengan menggunakan DSP processor. DSK TMS320C6416T adalah salah satu board/hardware untuk memproses sinyal digital yang termasuk dalam platform TMS320C6000. Aplikasi DSP processor ini bekerja pada frekuensi 0-96 kHz yang merupakan standar dalam sistem telekomunikasi. Tugas Akhir ini melakukan implementasi modulasi dan demodulasi GMSK secara real ke dalam DSP Starter Kit TMS320C6416T. Pemodelan sistemnya di-generate dengan menggunakan software Simulink MATLAB. Simulasi dan implementasi sistem yaitu dengan input bernoulli binary generator, pulse generator, dan random integer. Pengujian dilakukan untuk mengetahui kinerja DSK TMS320C6416T secara real terhadap parameter GMSK yang diujikan seperti efisiensi bandwidth dan karakteristik ISI terhadap perubahan nilai bandwidth/bit time (BT serta kinerja BER, terhadap variasi nilai Eb/N0 dan BT yang dilakukan dengan mengirimkan 100.000 bit yang ditampilkan pada blok display Simulink MATLAB dan Visual Analyser. Kinerja terbaik terdapat pada implementasi yang menggunakan nilai BT sama dengan 1 dan nilai Eb/N0 sama dengan 15 dan kinerja terburuk terdapat pada implementasi dengan nilai BT dan nilai Eb/N0 yang semakin menurun mendekati 0. 

  7. Normalizing biased spatial attention with parietal rTMS in a patient with focal hand dystonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricci, Raffaella; Salatino, Adriana; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2014-01-01

    We report the following case to highlight the possible relevance of biased spatial attention in focal hand dystonia (FHD). Deficient sensorimotor inhibition is a prominent pathophysiological feature of FHD [1,2]. Low-frequency repetitive Trascranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) over contralateral...

  8. July 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    OpenAIRE

    Robbins RA

    2013-01-01

    No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The first Arizona Thoracic Society meeting in Tucson was held on Wednesday, 7/24/2013 at Kiewit Auditorium on the University of Arizona Medical Center campus beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 36 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. Dinner was sponsored by Accredo Health Group. A brief discussion was held of plans to have the December 2013 meeting in Tucson on a weekend as p...

  9. Behavioral and TMS markers of action observation might reflect distinct neuronal processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Hétu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS studies have shown that observing an action induces muscle-specific changes in corticospinal excitability. From a signal detection theory standpoint, this pattern can be related to sensitivity, which here would measure the capacity to distinguish between two action observation conditions. In parallel to these TMS studies, action observation has also been linked to behavioral effects such as motor priming and interference. It has been hypothesized that behavioral markers of action observation could be related to TMS markers and thus represent a potentially cost-effective mean of assessing the functioning of the action-perception system. However, very few studies have looked at possible relationships between these two measures. The aim of this study was to investigate if individual differences in sensitivity to action observation could be related to the behavioral motor priming and interference effects produced by action observation. To this end, fourteen healthy participants observed index and little finger movements during a TMS task and a stimulus-response compatibility task. Index muscle displayed sensitivity to action observation, and action observation resulted in significant motor priming+interference, while no significant effect was observed for the little finger in both task. Nevertheless, our results indicate that the sensitivity measured in TMS was not related to the behavioral changes measured in the stimulus-response compatibility task. Contrary to a predominant assumption, the current results indicate that individual differences in physiological and behavioral markers of action observation may be unrelated. This could have important impacts on the potential use of behavioral markers in place of more costly physiological markers of action observation in clinical settings.

  10. rTMS treatments combined with speech training for a conduction aphasia patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Chen, Ying; Hu, Ruiping; Yang, Liqing; Wang, Mengxing; Zhang, Jilei; Lu, Haifeng; Wu, Yi; Du, Xiaoxia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: To date, little is known regarding the neural mechanisms of the functional recovery of language after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in aphasia. Our aim was to investigate the mechanism that underlies rTMS and speech training in a case report. Patient concerns and diagnoses: We report the case of a 39-year-old woman who was initially diagnosed with conduction aphasia following a left hemisphere stroke. Interventions: The rTMS location comprised the left Broca area, and a frequency of 5 Hz for 20 min/d for 10 days during a 2-week period was used. She had received speech rehabilitation training 1 month after stroke. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging were used to investigate the functional and microstructural changes before and after rTMS treatment. Outcomes: The results demonstrated that the Western Aphasia Battery scores significantly improved for language ability at 2 weeks post-treatment, and the gains were steadily increased at 2.5 months post-treatment. The fMRI results indicated a more focused activation pattern and showed significant activation in the left dominant hemisphere relative to the right hemisphere, especially in the perilesional areas, post-treatment during 2 language tasks compared with pretreatment. Moreover, the fractional anisotropy increased in the left superior temporal gyrus, which comprises an important area that is involved in language processing. Lessons: Our findings suggest that rTMS combined with speech training improved the speech-language ability of this chronic conduction aphasia patient and enhanced the cerebral functional and microstructural reorganization. PMID:28796033

  11. Double-Cone Coil TMS Stimulation of the Medial Cortex Inhibits Central Pain Habituation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico D'Agata

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS applied over the medial line of the scalp affects the subjective perception of continuous pain induced by means of electric stimulation. In addition, we wanted to identify the point of stimulation where this effect was maximum.Superficial electrical stimulation was used to induce continuous pain on the dominant hand. At the beginning of the experiment we reached a pain rating of 5 on an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS; 0 = no pain and 10 = maximum tolerable pain for each subject by setting individually the current intensity. The TMS (five pulses at increasing intensities was applied on 5 equidistant points (one per session over the medial line of the scalp in 13 healthy volunteers using a double-cone coil to stimulate underlying parts of the brain cortex. In every experimental session the painful stimulation lasted 45 minutes, during which pain and distress intensities NRS were recorded continuously. We calculated the effect of adaptation and the immediate effect of the TMS stimulation for all locations. Additionally, an ALE (Activation Likelihood Estimation meta-analysis was performed to compare our results with the neuroimaging literature on subjective pain rating.TMS stimulation temporarily decreased the pain ratings, and pain adaptation was suppressed when applying the TMS over the FCz site on the scalp. No effect was found for distress ratings.The present data suggest that the medial cortex in proximity of the cingulated gyrus has a causal role in adaptation mechanisms and in processing ongoing pain and subjective sensation of pain intensity.

  12. Impact of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS on Brain Functional Marker of Auditory Hallucinations in Schizophrenia Patients

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    Sonia Dollfus

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Several cross-sectional functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI studies reported a negative correlation between auditory verbal hallucination (AVH severity and amplitude of the activations during language tasks. The present study assessed the time course of this correlation and its possible structural underpinnings by combining structural, functional MRI and repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS. Methods: Nine schizophrenia patients with AVH (evaluated with the Auditory Hallucination Rating scale; AHRS and nine healthy participants underwent two sessions of an fMRI speech listening paradigm. Meanwhile, patients received high frequency (20 Hz rTMS. Results: Before rTMS, activations were negatively correlated with AHRS in a left posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS cluster, considered henceforward as a functional region of interest (fROI. After rTMS, activations in this fROI no longer correlated with AHRS. This decoupling was explained by a significant decrease of AHRS scores after rTMS that contrasted with a relative stability of cerebral activations. A voxel-based-morphometry analysis evidenced a cluster of the left pSTS where grey matter volume negatively correlated with AHRS before rTMS and positively correlated with activations in the fROI at both sessions. Conclusion: rTMS decreases the severity of AVH leading to modify the functional correlate of AVH underlain by grey matter abnormalities.

  13. The reliability of repeated TMS measures in older adults and in patients with subacute and chronic stroke

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    Heidi M. Schambra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS measures in healthy older adults and stroke patients has been insufficiently characterized. We determined whether common TMS measures could reliably evaluate change in individuals and in groups using the smallest detectable change (SDC, or could tell subjects apart using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. We used a single-rater test-retest design in older healthy, subacute stroke, and chronic stroke subjects. At twice daily sessions on two consecutive days, we recorded resting motor threshold, test stimulus intensity, recruitment curves, short-interval intracortical inhibition and facilitation, and long-interval intracortical inhibition. Using variances estimated from a random effects model, we calculated the SDC and ICC for each TMS measure. For all TMS measures in all groups, SDCs for single subjects were large; only with modest group sizes did the SDCs become low. Thus, while these TMS measures cannot be reliably used as a biomarker to detect individual change, they can reliably detect change exceeding measurement noise in moderate-sized groups. For several of the TMS measures, ICCs were universally high, suggesting that they can reliably discriminate between subjects. Though most TMS measures have sufficient reliability in particular contexts, work establishing their validity, responsiveness, and clinical relevance is still needed.

  14. Role of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in Treatment of Addiction and Related Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makani, Ramkrishna; Pradhan, Basant; Shah, Umang; Parikh, Tapan

    2017-11-29

    Addiction and related disorders are devastating with their tremendous social, psychological, and physical consequences for which development of optimally effective treatments are long overdue. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is relatively safe and is becoming an emerging therapeutic tool for these conditions. This systematic review was conducted using PubMed, PsycINFO, PsychiatryOnline and Cochrane Library ranging from year 2001 to 2017. Our search retrieved 70 related articles of which, based on the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT) guidelines, 33 indicated Level-1 study quality and class-B strength of recommendation for rTMS in nicotine addiction (effective in 218/289 subjects who received rTMS as found in 11 studies). Level-2/Class-B evidence was found for alcohol and cocaine addictions (Alcohol: effective in 126/193 subjects who received rTMS as found in 8 studies; Cocaine: effective in 86/128 subjects, as found in 5 studies). For food cravings, Level-3/Class-B evidence was noted (effective in 134/169, found in 7 studies). However, the evidence was limited to Level-3/Class-C for heroin (10/20 subjects received active rTMS, effective in 1 study), methamphetamine (33/48 subjects received active rTMS, effective in 2 studies), cannabis (18/18 subjects received active rTMS, effective in 1 study), and pathological gambling (31/31 subjects received active rTMS, effective in 2 studies). rTMS may serve as an emerging therapeutic option for addiction and related disorders. The major lacunae include important methodological limitations and dearth of knowledge about precise mechanism of action that need to be addressed in the future studies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. 1-Hz rTMS in the treatment of tinnitus: A sham-controlled, randomized multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgrebe, Michael; Hajak, Göran; Wolf, Stefan; Padberg, Frank; Klupp, Philipp; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Polak, Thomas; Höppner, Jacqueline; Haker, Rene; Cordes, Joachim; Klenzner, Thomas; Schönfeldt-Lecuona, Carlos; Kammer, Thomas; Graf, Erika; Koller, Michael; Kleinjung, Tobias; Lehner, Astrid; Schecklmann, Martin; Pöppl, Timm B; Kreuzer, Peter; Frank, Elmar; Langguth, Berthold

    Chronic tinnitus is a frequent, difficult to treat disease with high morbidity. This multicenter randomized, sham-controlled trial investigated the efficacy and safety of 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied to the left temporal cortex in patients with chronic tinnitus. Tinnitus patients were randomized to receive 10 sessions of either real or sham 1-Hz-rTMS (2000 stimuli, 110% motor threshold) to the left temporal cortex. The primary outcome was the change in the sum score of the tinnitus questionnaire (TQ) of Goebel and Hiller from baseline to end of treatment. A total of 163 patients were enrolled in the study (real rTMS: 75; sham rTMS: 78). At day 12, the baseline mean of 43.1 TQ points in 71 patients assigned to real rTMS changed by -0.5 points; it changed by 0.5 points from a baseline of 42.1 in 75 patients randomized to sham rTMS (adjusted mean difference between groups: -1.0; 95.19% confidence interval: -3.2 to 1.2; p = 0.36). All secondary outcome measures including measures of depression and quality of life showed no significant differences either (p > 0.11). The number of participants with side-effects or adverse events did not differ between groups. Real 1-Hz-rTMS over the left temporal cortex was well tolerated but not superior compared with sham rTMS in improving tinnitus severity. These findings are in contrast to results from studies with smaller sample sizes and put the efficacy of this rTMS protocol for treatment of chronic tinnitus into question. Controlled Trials: http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN89848288. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of DBS, premotor rTMS, and levodopa on motor function and silent period in advanced Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäumer, Tobias; Hidding, Ute; Hamel, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a widely used and highly effective treatment for patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Repetitive TMS (rTMS) applied to motor cortical areas has also been shown to improve symptoms in PD and modulate motor cortical...... excitability. Here, we compared clinical and neurophysiological effects of STN stimulation with those of 1 Hz rTMS given to the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) and those following intake of levodopa in a group of PD patients with advanced disease. Ten PD patients were studied on 2 consecutive days before...

  17. Preoperative rTMS Language Mapping in Speech-Eloquent Brain Lesions Resected Under General Anesthesia: A Pair-Matched Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Philipp; Senger, Sebastian; Simgen, Andreas; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Oertel, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    The value of preoperative repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) language mapping for function preservation in surgery of speech-eloquent lesions under general anesthesia remains to be determined. We prospectively enrolled 20 consecutive right-handed patients with a malignant, left-sided perisylvian language-eloquent brain tumor. All patients were subjected to surgical resection under general anesthesia guided by preoperative rTMS language mapping (rTMS group, 2014-2016). A matched-pair analysis with 20 patients who also underwent surgical resection under general anesthesia in the pre-rTMS era (pre-rTMS group, 2009-2013) was performed. Language performance status was ranked from grade 0 to grade 3 (none, mild, medium, severe). Rates of gross total resection, tumor residual, and complications were equal in both groups. Duration of surgery (P = 0.039) and inpatient stay (P = 0.001) were significantly shorter in the rTMS group. Preoperatively, 14 patients in the rTMS and 13 patients in the pre-rTMS group had language deficits (P = 0.380). One week after surgery, 8/14 patients (57.1%) in the rTMS group but only 1/13 patients (7.7%) in the pre-rTMS group experienced improvement of language performance status (P = 0.013). At 6 weeks follow-up, language performance status was significantly better in the rTMS group (P = 0.048). However, at 3 months follow-up, the rTMS and pre-rTMS groups showed an equal language performance status. Implementation of preoperative rTMS language mapping seems to provide a favorable early language outcome in patients undergoing surgical resection of language-eloquent lesions under general anesthesia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of the Selective α5-GABAAR Antagonist S44819 on Excitability in the Human Brain: A TMS-EMG and TMS-EEG Phase I Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmani, Ghazaleh; Zipser, Carl M; Böhmer, Gabriele M; Deschet, Karine; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Belardinelli, Paolo; Schwab, Matthias; Ziemann, Ulf

    2016-12-07

    Alpha-5 gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (α5-GABAARs) are located extrasynaptically, regulate neuronal excitability through tonic inhibition, and are fundamentally important for processes such as plasticity and learning. For example, pharmacological blockade of α5-GABAAR in mice with ischemic stroke improved recovery of function by normalizing exaggerated perilesional α5-GABAAR-dependent tonic inhibition. S44819 is a novel competitive selective antagonist of the α5-GABAAR at the GABA-binding site. Pharmacological modulation of α5-GABAAR-mediated tonic inhibition has never been investigated in the human brain. Here, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to test the effects of a single oral dose of 50 and 100 mg of S44819 on electromyographic (EMG) and electroencephalographic (EEG) measures of cortical excitability in 18 healthy young adults in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover phase I study. A dose of 100 mg, but not 50 mg, of S44819 decreased active motor threshold, the intensity needed to produce a motor evoked potential of 0.5 mV, and the amplitude of the N45, a GABAAergic component of the TMS-evoked EEG response. The peak serum concentration of 100 mg S44819 correlated directly with the decrease in N45 amplitude. Short-interval intracortical inhibition, a TMS-EMG measure of synaptic GABAAergic inhibition, and other components of the TMS-evoked EEG response remained unaffected. These findings provide first time evidence that the specific α5-GABAAR antagonist S44819 reached human cortex to impose an increase in cortical excitability. These data warrant further development of S44819 in a human clinical trial to test its efficacy in enhancing recovery of function after ischemic stroke. The extrasynaptic α-5 gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (α5-GABAAR) regulates neuronal excitability through tonic inhibition in the mammalian brain. Tonic inhibition is important for many fundamental processes such as

  19. Limited Contribution of Primary Motor Cortex in Eye-Hand Coordination: A TMS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, James; Eusebio, Alexandre; Danion, Frederic

    2017-10-04

    The ability to track a moving target with the eye is substantially improved when the target is self-moved compared with when it is moved by an external agent. To account for this observation, it has been postulated that the oculomotor system has access to hand efference copy, thereby allowing to predict the motion of the visual target. Along this scheme, we tested the effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the hand area of the primary motor cortex (M1) when human participants (50% females) are asked to track with their eyes a visual target whose horizontal motion is driven by their grip force. We reasoned that, if the output of M1 is used by the oculomotor system to keep track of the target, on top of inducing short latency disturbance of grip force, single-pulse TMS should also quickly disrupt ongoing eye motion. For comparison purposes, the effect of TMS over M1 was monitored when subjects tracked an externally moved target (while keeping their hand at rest or not). In both cases, results showed no alterations in smooth pursuit, meaning that its velocity was unaffected within the 25-125 ms epoch that followed TMS. Overall, our results imply that the output of M1 has limited contribution in driving the eye motion during our eye-hand coordination task. This study suggests that, if hand motor signals are accessed by the oculomotor system, this is upstream of M1.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The ability to coordinate eye and hand actions is central in everyday activity. However, the neural mechanisms underlying this coordination remain to be clarified. A leading hypothesis is that the oculomotor system has access to hand motor signals. Here we explored this possibility by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the hand area of the primary motor cortex (M1) when humans tracked with the eyes a visual target that was moved by the hand. As expected, ongoing hand action was perturbed 25-30 ms after TMS, but our results fail to show any disruption

  20. Improve communications between TMC and TMS elements in a rural environment through a system that is deployable statewide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    An evaluation of communication technologies for application to TMC-TMS (Transportation Management Center : to Transportation Management Site) communications in Caltrans District 1. Wireless and wired technologies : have been evaluated for prospective...

  1. Effect of rTMS on brain activation in schizophrenia with negative symptoms : A proof-of-principle study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dlabac-de Lange, Jozarni J.; Liemburg, Edith J.; Bais, Leonie; Renken, Remco J.; Knegtering, Henderikus; Aleman, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prefrontal cortical dysfunction is frequently reported in schizophrenia and is thought to underlie negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) can modulate neuronal activity and has been shown to improve negative symptoms in patients with

  2. Repetitive activation of the corticospinal tract by means of rTMS may reduce the efficiency of corticomotoneuronal synapses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taube, Wolfgang; Leukel, Christian; Schubert, Martin

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is extensively used to study cognitive and motor function in humans and might be of value in the treatment of various disorders. For a better understanding of the effects of rTMS and its more efficient application it is crucial to identify...... the sites and neural circuits affected by rTMS. It is well known that low frequency rTMS applied to the motor cortex (M1) produces long-lasting depression of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) evoked over the same stimulation site (Speer et al., 2003). It is commonly assumed that this depression largely...... in the corticomotoneuronal transmission to the a-motoneurons, the soleus H-reflex was conditioned either by magnetic stimulation of the cervicomedullary junction (CMS-conditioning) or the motor cortex (M1-conditioning). The first detectable facilitation of the H-reflex (early facilitation) was determined after M1- and CMS...

  3. Left posterior BA37 is involved in object recognition: a TMS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, Lauren; Meyer, Bernd-Ulrich; Frith, Uta

    2001-01-01

    Functional imaging studies have proposed a role for left BA37 in phonological retrieval, semantic processing, face processing and object recognition. The present study targeted the posterior aspect of BA37 to see whether a deficit, specific to one of the above types of processing could be induced...... to name pictures when TMS was given over lBA37 compared to vertex or rBA37. rTMS over lBA37 had no significant effect on word reading, nonword reading or colour naming. The picture naming deficit is suggested to result from a disruption to object recognition processes. This study corroborates the finding...... from a recent imaging study, that the most posterior part of left hemispheric BA37 has a necessary role in object recognition....

  4. Improvement of tactile discrimination performance and enlargement of cortical somatosensory maps after 5 Hz rTMS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Tegenthoff

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is increasingly used to investigate mechanisms of brain functions and plasticity, but also as a promising new therapeutic tool. The effects of rTMS depend on the intensity and frequency of stimulation and consist of changes of cortical excitability, which often persists several minutes after termination of rTMS. While these findings imply that cortical processing can be altered by applying current pulses from outside the brain, little is known about how rTMS persistently affects learning and perception. Here we demonstrate in humans, through a combination of psychophysical assessment of two-point discrimination thresholds and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, that brief periods of 5 Hz rTMS evoke lasting perceptual and cortical changes. rTMS was applied over the cortical representation of the right index finger of primary somatosensory cortex, resulting in a lowering of discrimination thresholds of the right index finger. fMRI revealed an enlargement of the right index finger representation in primary somatosensory cortex that was linearly correlated with the individual rTMS-induced perceptual improvement indicative of a close link between cortical and perceptual changes. The results demonstrate that repetitive, unattended stimulation from outside the brain, combined with a lack of behavioral information, are effective in driving persistent improvement of the perception of touch. The underlying properties and processes that allow cortical networks, after being modified through TMS pulses, to reach new organized stable states that mediate better performance remain to be clarified.

  5. Releasing the cortical brake by non-invasive electromagnetic stimulation? rTMS induces LTD of GABAergic neurotransmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Lenz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique which modulates cortical excitability beyond the stimulation period. However, despite its clinical use rTMS-based therapies which prevent or reduce disabilities in a functional significant and sustained manner are scarce. It remains unclear how rTMS-mediated changes in cortical excitability, which are not task- or input-specific, exert beneficial effects in some healthy subjects and patients. While experimental evidence exists that repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS is linked to the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP of excitatory neurotransmission, less attention has been dedicated to rTMS-induced structural, functional and molecular adaptations at inhibitory synapses. In this review we provide a concise overview on basic neuroscience research, which reveals an important role of local disinhibitory networks in promoting associative learning and memory. These studies suggest that a reduction in inhibitory neurotransmission facilitates the expression of associative plasticity in cortical networks under physiological conditions. Hence, it is interesting to speculate that rTMS may act by decreasing GABAergic neurotransmission onto cortical principal neurons. Indeed, evidence has been provided that rTMS is capable of modulating inhibitory networks. Consistent with this suggestion recent basic science work discloses that a 10 Hz rTMS protocol reduces GABAergic synaptic strength on principal neurons. These findings support a model in which rTMS-induced long-term depression (LTD of GABAergic synaptic strength mediates changes in excitation/inhibition-balance of cortical networks, which may in turn facilitate (or restore the ability of stimulated networks to express input- and task-specific associative synaptic plasticity.

  6. Reductions in Cortico-Striatal Hyperconnectivity Accompany Successful Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder with Dorsomedial Prefrontal rTMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Katharine; Woodside, Blake; Olmsted, Marion; Colton, Patricia; Giacobbe, Peter; Downar, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a disabling illness with high rates of nonresponse to conventional treatments. OCD pathophysiology is believed to involve abnormalities in cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical circuits through regions such as dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) and ventral striatum. These regions may constitute therapeutic targets for neuromodulation treatments, such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). However, the neurobiological predictors and correlates of successful rTMS treatment for OCD are unclear. Here, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify neural predictors and correlates of response to 20-30 sessions of bilateral 10 Hz dmPFC-rTMS in 20 treatment-resistant OCD patients, with 40 healthy controls as baseline comparators. A region of interest in the dmPFC was used to generate whole-brain functional connectivity maps pre-treatment and post treatment. Ten of 20 patients met the response criteria (⩾50% improvement on Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, YBOCS); response to dmPFC-rTMS was sharply bimodal. dmPFC-rTMS responders had higher dmPFC-ventral striatal connectivity at baseline. The degree of reduction in this connectivity, from pre- to post-treatment, correlated to the degree of YBOCS symptomatic improvement. Baseline clinical and psychometric data did not predict treatment response. In summary, reductions in fronto-striatal hyperconnectivity were associated with treatment response to dmPFC-rTMS in OCD. This finding is consistent with previous fMRI studies of deep brain stimulation in OCD, but opposite to previous reports on mechanisms of dmPFC-rTMS in major depression. fMRI could prove useful in predicting the response to dmPFC-rTMS in OCD.

  7. Elevated prefrontal cortex GABA in patients with major depressive disorder after TMS treatment measured with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubin, Marc J.; Mao, Xiangling; Banerjee, Samprit; Goodman, Zachary; Lapidus, Kyle A.B.; Kang, Guoxin; Liston, Conor; Shungu, Dikoma C.

    2016-01-01

    Background GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmitter systems are central to the pathophysiology of depression and are potential targets of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). We assessed the effect of 10-Hz rTMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of patients with major depressive disorder on the levels of medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the combined resonance of glutamate and glutamine (Glx) as assessed in vivo with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS). Methods Currently depressed individuals between the ages of 23 and 68 years participated in a 5-week naturalistic, open-label treatment study of rTMS, with 1H MRS measurements of MPFC GABA and Glx levels at baseline and following 5 weeks of the rTMS intervention. We applied rTMS pulses over the left DLPFC at 10 Hz and 80%–120% of motor threshold for 25 daily sessions, with each session consisting of 3000 pulses. We assessed therapeutic response using the 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD24). The GABA and Glx levels are expressed as ratios of peak areas relative to the area of the synchronously acquired and similarly fitted unsuppressed voxel water signal (W). Results Twenty-three currently depressed individuals (7 men) participated in the study. GABA/W in the MPFC increased 13.8% (p = 0.013) in all depressed individuals. There were no significant effects of rTMS on Glx/W. GABA/W and Glx/W were highly correlated in severely depressed patients at baseline but not after TMS. Limitations The primary study limitations are the open-label design and the inclusion of participants currently taking stable regimens of antidepressant medications. Conclusion These results implicate GABAergic and glutamatergic systems in the mechanism of action of rTMS for major depression, warranting further investigation in larger samples. PMID:26900793

  8. Neurocognitive Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD)

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher A Wall; Christopher A Wall; Paul eCroarkin; Paul eCroarkin; Shawn eMcClintock; Shawn eMcClintock; Lauren L Murphy; Lorelei A Bandel; Leslie A Sim; Leslie A Sim; Shirlene M Sampson

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: It is estimated that 30% to 40% of adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) do not receive full benefit from current antidepressant therapies. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a novel therapy approved by the US FDA to treat adults with MDD. Research suggests rTMS is not associated with adverse neurocognitive effects in adult populations; however, there is no documentation of its neurocognitive effects in adolescents. This is a secondary post hoc ana...

  9. The Validity Of Advanced TMS: A Strategic Development Marketing System - Toyotas Scientific Customer Creative Model Utilizing New JIT

    OpenAIRE

    Kakuro Amasaka

    2011-01-01

    A future successful global marketer must develop an excellent quality marketing system that impresses users and continuously provides excellent, quality products in a timely manner through corporate management. In this paper, the author discusses the validity of Advanced TMS as a core technology Total Marketing System, TMS of New JIT, which contributes to constructing a Strategic Development Marketing System, SDMS. This paper aims to create a Scientific Customer Creative Model, SCCM, a form o...

  10. The compensatory dynamic of inter-hemispheric interactions in visuospatial attention revealed using rTMS and fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ela B Plow

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A balance of mutual tonic inhibition between bi-hemispheric posterior parietal cortices is believed to play an important role in bilateral visual attention. However, experimental support for this notion has been mainly drawn from clinical models of unilateral damage. We have previously shown that low-frequency repetitive TMS (rTMS over the intraparietal sulcus (IPS generates a contralateral attentional deficit in bilateral visual tracking. Here, we used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI to study whether rTMS temporarily disrupts the inter-hemispheric balance between bilateral IPS in visual attention. Following application of 1 Hz rTMS over the left IPS, subjects performed a bilateral visual tracking task while their brain activity was recorded using fMRI. Behaviorally, tracking accuracy was reduced immediately following rTMS. Areas ventro-lateral to left IPS, including inferior parietal lobule (IPL, lateral IPS (LIPS, and middle occipital gyrus (MoG, showed decreased activity following rTMS, while dorsomedial areas, such as Superior Parietal Lobule (SPL, Superior occipital gyrus (SoG, and lingual gyrus, as well as middle temporal areas (MT+, showed higher activity. The brain activity of the homologues of these regions in the un-stimulated, right hemisphere was reversed. Interestingly, the evolution of network-wide activation related to attentional behavior following rTMS showed that activation of most occipital synergists adaptively compensated for contralateral and ipsilateral decrement after rTMS, but that of parietal synergists, and SoG remained competing. This pattern of ipsilateral and contralateral activations empirically supports the hypothesized loss of inter-hemispheric balance that underlies clinical manifestation of visual attentional extinction.

  11. How to include the variability of TMS responses in simulations: a speech mapping case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geeter, N.; Lioumis, P.; Laakso, A.; Crevecoeur, G.; Dupré, L.

    2016-11-01

    When delivered over a specific cortical site, TMS can temporarily disrupt the ongoing process in that area. This allows mapping of speech-related areas for preoperative evaluation purposes. We numerically explore the observed variability of TMS responses during a speech mapping experiment performed with a neuronavigation system. We selected four cases with very small perturbations in coil position and orientation. In one case (E) a naming error occurred, while in the other cases (NEA, B, C) the subject appointed the images as smoothly as without TMS. A realistic anisotropic head model was constructed of the subject from T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI. The induced electric field distributions were computed, associated to the coil parameters retrieved from the neuronavigation system. Finally, the membrane potentials along relevant white matter fibre tracts, extracted from DTI-based tractography, were computed using a compartmental cable equation. While only minor differences could be noticed between the induced electric field distributions of the four cases, computing the corresponding membrane potentials revealed different subsets of tracts were activated. A single tract was activated for all coil positions. Another tract was only triggered for case E. NEA induced action potentials in 13 tracts, while NEB stimulated 11 tracts and NEC one. The calculated results are certainly sensitive to the coil specifications, demonstrating the observed variability in this study. However, even though a tract connecting Broca’s with Wernicke’s area is only triggered for the error case, further research is needed on other study cases and on refining the neural model with synapses and network connections. Case- and subject-specific modelling that includes both electromagnetic fields and neuronal activity enables demonstration of the variability in TMS experiments and can capture the interaction with complex neural networks.

  12. Subcortical contribution to late TMS-induced I-waves in intact humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, John; Perez, Monica A.

    2015-01-01

    Paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the human motor cortex results in consecutive facilitatory motor evoked potential (MEP) peaks in surface electromyography. It has been proposed that early and late MEP peaks involve different mechanisms of action; however, little is known about the characteristics of the later peaks. Using paired-pulse TMS over the hand motor cortex at different test (S1) and conditioning (S2) interstimulus intervals and intensities we examined early (first) and late (second and third) MEP peaks in a resting finger muscle. We demonstrate that the third peak had reduced amplitude and duration compared with the second, regardless of the S1 intensity. Higher S2 intensity increased the amplitude of the third but not the second peak, suggesting that the third peak had a higher threshold. The interval between the second and third peak was longer than between the first and second peak in all conditions even though all peaks had a similar latency dispersion. No differences were found in the amplitude, duration, and threshold of the first and second peaks. A threshold electrical S2 over the cervicomedullary junction facilitated the second and third but not the first peak similarly to TMS. Our results indicate that the third MEP peak is smaller and has higher threshold than the second peak and the similarities between the first and second peak suggest that this is less likely explained by a reduced effectiveness in recruitment. We argue that subcortical pathways might contribute to differences found between late TMS-induced peaks in intact humans. PMID:26069470

  13. PENGGUNAAN ALGORITMA GORTZEL UNTUK DETEKSI FREKUENSI DTMF BERBASIS PROCESSOR DSP TMS320C31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Putra Sastra

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Algoritma Gortzel yang diturunkan dari DFT (Discrete Fourier Transform, dapat digunakan untuk mendeteksi frekuensi dengan bantuan processor DSP TMS320C31. Algoritma Gortzel mendeteksi frekuensi dengan tingkat keberhasilan pendeteksian sangat tergantung pada jumlah cuplikan (N, semakin banyak jumlah cuplikan makasemakin akurat pendeteksian frekuensi tersebut. Akan tetapi semakin banyak jumlah N, maka proses iterasinya menjadi lebih kompleks, sehingga waktu yang diperlukan untuk melakukan pendeteksian semakin lama. Untuk itu perlu dipilih jumlah N yang digunakan agar waktu yang diperlukan sesingkat mungkin.

  14. Where does transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) stimulate? Modelling of induced field maps for some common cortical and cerebellar targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijsterbosch, Janine D; Barker, Anthony T; Lee, Kwang-Hyuk; Woodruff, P W R

    2012-07-01

    Computational models have been be used to estimate the electric and magnetic fields induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and can provide valuable insights into the location and spatial distribution of TMS stimulation. However, there has been little translation of these findings into practical TMS research. This study uses the International 10-20 EEG electrode placement system to position a standard figure-of-eight TMS coil over 13 commonly adopted targets. Using a finite element method and an anatomically detailed and realistic head model, this study provides the first pictorial and numerical atlas of TMS-induced electric fields for a range of coil positions. The results highlight the importance of subject-specific gyral folding patterns and of local thickness of subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Our modelling shows that high electric fields occur primarily on the peaks of those gyri which have only a thin layer of CSF above them. These findings have important implications for inter-individual generalizability of the TMS-induced electric field. We propose that, in order to determine with accuracy the site of stimulation for an individual subject, it is necessary to solve the electric field distribution using subject-specific anatomy obtained from a high-resolution imaging modality such as MRI.

  15. High-frequency rTMS to treat refractory binge eating disorder and comorbid depression: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczynski, Tathiana Pires; de Aquino Chaim, Carolina Hanna; Nazar, Bruno Palazzo; Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Arias-Carrion, Oscar; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Machado, Sergio; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2014-01-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) has limited therapeutic options. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a modulation technique of cortical excitability that has shown good results in treating certain psychiatric disorders by correcting dysfunctional cortical regions. We hypothesize that rTMS could be an alternative therapy for BED through potential modulation action on frontostriatal abnormalities and dopaminergic pathways noted by neuroimaging. We report the case of a young woman presenting refractory BED and comorbid depression treated with 20 sessions of rTMS for 30 minutes over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex at 10 Hz for about a month (2400 stimuli per day). She answered two self-report questionnaires, the Binge Eating Scale (BES) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Before rTMS treatment, the BES score was 38, and the BDI score was 42. Three days after rTMS treatment, the BES score was 27 and the BDI score was 23, and the patient referred to no binge eating episodes for that week. Therefore, rTMS could offer a new option of treatment for BED and comorbid depression.

  16. The EEG Correlates of the TMS Induced EMG Silent Period in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzan, Faranak; Barr, Mera S.; Hoppenbrouwers, Sylco S.; Fitzgerald, Paul B.; Chen, Robert; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.

    2014-01-01

    Application of magnetic or electrical stimulation to the motor cortex can result in a period of electromyography (EMG) silence in a tonically active peripheral muscle. This period of EMG silence is referred to as the silent period (SP). The duration of SP shows intersubject variability and reflects the integrity of cortical and corticospinal pathways. A non-invasive technique for assessing the duration of SP is the combination of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) with EMG. Utilizing TMS-EMG, several studies have reported on the shortening or lengthening of SP in neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, and stroke. However, cortical, corticospinal and peripheral components are difficult to disentangle from EMG alone. Here, we use the multimodal neuroimaging technique of TMS-EMG combined with concurrent electroencephalography (EEG) recording to further examine the cortical origin of SP and the cortical oscillatory activity that underlies SP genesis. We demonstrate that the duration of SP is related to the temporal characteristics of the cortical reactivity and the power of delta to alpha oscillations in both local and remote areas ipsilateral and contralateral to the stimulation site, and beta oscillations locally. We illustrate that, compared to EMG, the EEG indices of the SP provide additional information about the brain dynamics and propose that the EEG measures of SP may be used in future clinical and research investigations to more precisely delineate the mechanisms underlying inhibitory impairments. PMID:23800790

  17. The EEG correlates of the TMS-induced EMG silent period in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzan, Faranak; Barr, Mera S; Hoppenbrouwers, Sylco S; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Chen, Robert; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2013-12-01

    Application of magnetic or electrical stimulation to the motor cortex can result in a period of electromyography (EMG) silence in a tonically active peripheral muscle. This period of EMG silence is referred to as the silent period (SP). The duration of SP shows intersubject variability and reflects the integrity of cortical and corticospinal pathways. A non-invasive technique for assessing the duration of SP is the combination of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) with EMG. Utilizing TMS-EMG, several studies have reported on the shortening or lengthening of SP in neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, and stroke. However, cortical, corticospinal and peripheral components are difficult to disentangle from EMG alone. Here, we use the multimodal neuroimaging technique of TMS-EMG combined with concurrent electroencephalography (EEG) recording to further examine the cortical origin of SP and the cortical oscillatory activity that underlies SP genesis. We demonstrate that the duration of SP is related to the temporal characteristics of the cortical reactivity and the power of delta to alpha oscillations in both local and remote areas ipsilateral and contralateral to the stimulation site, and beta oscillations locally. We illustrate that, compared to EMG, the EEG indices of the SP provide additional information about the brain dynamics and propose that the EEG measures of SP may be used in future clinical and research investigations to more precisely delineate the mechanisms underlying inhibitory impairments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of coil orientation on the electric field induced by TMS over the hand motor area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-06

    Responses elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the hand motor area depend on the position and orientation of the stimulating coil. In this work, we computationally investigate the induced electric field for multiple coil orientations and locations in order to determine which parts of the brain are affected and how the sensitivity of motor cortical activation depends on the direction of the electric field. The finite element method is used for calculating the electric field induced by TMS in two individual anatomical models of the head and brain. The orientation of the coil affects both the strength and depth of penetration of the electric field, and the field strongly depends on the direction of the sulcus, where the target neurons are located. The coil position that gives the strongest electric field in the target cortical region may deviate from the closest scalp location by a distance on the order of 1 cm. Together with previous experimental data, the results support the hypothesis that the cortex is most sensitive to fields oriented perpendicular to the cortical layers, while it is relatively insensitive to fields parallel to them. This has important implications for targeting of TMS. To determine the most effective coil position and orientation, it is essential to consider both biological (the direction of the targeted axons) and physical factors (the strength and direction of the electric field).

  19. Dance and emotion in posterior parietal cortex: a low-frequency rTMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosbras, Marie-Hélène; Tan, Haodan; Pollick, Frank

    2012-04-01

    The neural bases of emotion are most often studied using short non-natural stimuli and assessed using correlational methods. Here we use a brain perturbation approach to make causal inferences between brain activity and emotional reaction to a long segment of dance. We aimed to apply offline rTMS over the brain regions involved in subjective emotional ratings to explore whether this could change the appreciation of a dance performance. We first used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify regions correlated with fluctuating emotional rating during a 4-min dance performance, looking at both positive and negative correlation. Identified regions were further characterized using meta-data interrogation. Low-frequency repetitive TMS was applied over the most important node in a different group of participants prior to them rating the same dance performance as in the fMRI session. FMRI revealed a negative correlation between subjective emotional judgement and activity in the right posterior parietal cortex. This region is commonly involved in cognitive tasks and not in emotional task. Parietal rTMS had no effect on the general affective response, but it significantly (Pemotional reaction to dance. They can be interpreted in the framework of competition between resources allocated to emotion and resources allocated to cognitive functions. They highlight potential use of brain stimulation in neuro-æsthetic investigations. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Disrupting SMA activity modulates explicit and implicit emotional responses: an rTMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodigari, Alessia; Oliveri, Massimiliano

    2014-09-05

    Supplementary Motor Area (SMA) has been considered as an interface between the emotional/motivational system and motor effector system. Here, we investigated whether it is possible to modulate emotional responses using non-invasive brain stimulation of the SMA. 1Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) trains were applied over the SMA of healthy subjects performing a task requiring to judge the valence and arousal of emotional stimuli. rTMS trains over the SMA increased the perceived valence of emotionally negative visual stimuli, while decreasing the perceived valence of emotionally positive ones. The modulatory effect on emotional valence was specific for stimuli with emotional content, since it was not observed for neutral visual stimuli. The effect was also specific for the site of stimulation, since rTMS of the visual cortex failed to modulate either perceived valence or arousal. These findings provide the first example of neuromodulation of emotional responses based on non-invasive brain stimulation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Hot Spot Hound: a novel robot-assisted platform for enhancing TMS performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennimpede, Giuseppe; Spedaliere, Luca; Formica, Domenico; Di Pino, Giovanni; Zollo, Loredana; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Guglielmelli, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive technique that produces excitatory depolarization in the neurons located in the cerebral cortex. In order to proficiently stimulate a specific cerebral area it is of main importance the correct positioning and maintaining of the magnetic coil, while avoiding the mismatch due to subject head-coil relative movement. Hot Spot Hound is a novel robot-assisted experimental platform for enhancing TMS stimulation performance. It integrates a commercial optoelectronic neuronavigation system (E.M.S. srl, Italy) for gathering data on the relative pose (position and orientation) of subject's scalp and TMS coil, and a service robotic arm designed for human interaction (LWR system by KUKA, Germany). Besides integrating and synchronizing different platform sub-systems, we implement a control strategy to center the stimulation point and compensate for involuntary subject movements. Specifically, the proposed control maintains constant over time the homogeneous transformation matrix between the pose of the coil and of the head. The value of position stiffness has been chosen in order to assure the better compromise between coil position and orientation error, and the safety of the experimental subject. In this paper we show that Hot Spot Hound can provide coil position and orientation errors well beyond the ones achieved by manual experimenter, while assuring safety in the physical interaction with the stimulated subject.

  2. Field modeling for transcranial magnetic stimulation: A useful tool to understand the physiological effects of TMS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielscher, Axel; Antunes, Andre; Saturnino, Guilherme B

    2015-01-01

    Electric field calculations based on numerical methods and increasingly realistic head models are more and more used in research on Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). However, they are still far from being established as standard tools for the planning and analysis in practical applications of TMS. Here, we start by delineating three main challenges that need to be addressed to unravel their full potential. This comprises (i) identifying and dealing with the model uncertainties, (ii) establishing a clear link between the induced fields and the physiological stimulation effects, and (iii) improving the usability of the tools for field calculation to the level that they can be easily used by non-experts. We then introduce a new version of our pipeline for field calculations (www.simnibs.org) that substantially simplifies setting up and running TMS and tDCS simulations based on Finite-Element Methods (FEM). We conclude with a brief outlook on how the new version of SimNIBS can help to target the above identified challenges.

  3. Semantic incongruity attracts attention at a pre-conscious level: Evidence from a TMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Tudela, Javier; Martín-Arévalo, Elisa; Chica, Ana B; Lupiáñez, Juan

    2017-09-09

    Unpredicted objects, i.e., those that do not fit in a specific context, have been shown to quickly attract attention as a mean of extracting more information about potentially relevant items. Whether the required semantic processing triggering the attraction of attention can occur independently of participants' awareness of the object is still a highly debated topic. In the present study we make use of a change detection task in which we manipulate the semantic congruity between the to-be-detected object and the background scene. We applied inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the right temporo-parietal junction (right TPJ) and a control location (vertex) to test the causal role of the former in the processing of objects at a pre-conscious level. Our results clearly show that semantic congruity can impact detection and identification processes in opposite ways, even when low-level features are controlled for. Incongruent objects are quickly detected but poorly identified. rTMS over the right TPJ effectively diminishes semantic effects on object detection. These results suggest that at least some high order category processing takes place before conscious detection to direct attention towards the most informative regions of space. Moreover, rTMS over right TPJ also impacts object identification, which calls for a re-evaluation of right TPJ's role on object processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hand-held medical robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Christopher J; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2014-08-01

    Medical robots have evolved from autonomous systems to tele-operated platforms and mechanically-grounded, cooperatively-controlled robots. Whilst these approaches have seen both commercial and clinical success, uptake of these robots remains moderate because of their high cost, large physical footprint and long setup times. More recently, researchers have moved toward developing hand-held robots that are completely ungrounded and manipulated by surgeons in free space, in a similar manner to how conventional instruments are handled. These devices provide specific functions that assist the surgeon in accomplishing tasks that are otherwise challenging with manual manipulation. Hand-held robots have the advantages of being compact and easily integrated into the normal surgical workflow since there is typically little or no setup time. Hand-held devices can also have a significantly reduced cost to healthcare providers as they do not necessitate the complex, multi degree-of-freedom linkages that grounded robots require. However, the development of such devices is faced with many technical challenges, including miniaturization, cost and sterility, control stability, inertial and gravity compensation and robust instrument tracking. This review presents the emerging technical trends in hand-held medical robots and future development opportunities for promoting their wider clinical uptake.

  5. The Bioelectromagnetic Society Thirteenth Annual Meeting 1991: Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains author abstracts representing oral and poster presentations made at the Thirteenth Annual Meeting of The Bioelectromagnetic Society held in Salt Lake City, Utah June 23--27, 1991.

  6. Theta and Alpha Oscillations during the Retention Period of Working Memory by rTMS Stimulating the Parietal Lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies on repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS have shown that stimulating the parietal lobe, which plays a role in memory storage, can enhance performance during the “retention” process of working memory (WM. However, the mechanism of rTMS effect during this phase is still unclear. In this study, we stimulated the superior parietal lobe (SPL using 5-Hz rTMS in 26 participants and recorded electroencephalography (EEG while they performed a delayed-recognition WM task. The analyses included the comparisons of event-related spectral perturbation (ERSP value variations in theta (4–7 Hz and alpha (8–14 Hz band frequencies between conditions (rTMS vs. sham, as well as the correlations between different brain areas. Following rTMS, the ERSP values of theta-band oscillations were significantly increased in the parietal and occipital-parietal brain areas (P < 0.05*, whereas the ERSP values of alpha-band oscillations were significantly decreased in the parietal area (P < 0.05*. The ERSP value variations of theta-band oscillations between the two conditions in the left parietal and left prefrontal areas were positively correlated with the response time (RT variations (by using rTMS, the more subject RT decreased, the more ERSP value of theta oscillation increased. The ERSP value variations of alpha-band oscillations in the left parietal and bilateral prefrontal areas were negatively correlated with RT variations (by using rTMS, the more RT of the subject decreased, the more ERSP value of alpha oscillation decreased. Inter-sites phase synchronization of theta-band EEG between the left parietal and left prefrontal areas, as well as alpha-band EEG between the left parietal and bilateral prefrontal areas were enhanced by rTMS. These results indicated that activities of both parietal and prefrontal areas were required for information storage, and these activities were related to the behavioral responses. Moreover, the connectivity

  7. The effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on depression, visual perception, and activities of daily living in stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ko-Un; Kim, Soo-Han; An, Tae-Gyu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study aimed to investigate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on visual perception, depression, and activities of daily livings (ADLs) in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-four stroke patients were divided equally into an experimental group that underwent rTMS and a control group that underwent mock rTMS. Changes in patient visual perception, depression, and ADLs were evaluated. All subjects underwent treatment for 20 minutes, ...

  8. Reversal of TMS-induced motor twitch by training is associated with a reduction in excitability of the antagonist muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fregni Felipe

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A single session of isolated repetitive movements of the thumb can alter the response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, such that the related muscle twitch measured post-training occurs in the trained direction. This response is attributed to transient excitability changes in primary motor cortex (M1 that form the early part of learning. We investigated; (1 whether this phenomenon might occur for movements at the wrist, and (2 how specific TMS activation patterns of opposing muscles underlie the practice-induced change in direction. Methods We used single-pulse suprathreshold TMS over the M1 forearm area, to evoke wrist movements in 20 healthy subjects. We measured the preferential direction of the TMS-induced twitch in both the sagittal and coronal plane using an optical goniometer fixed to the dorsum of the wrist, and recorded electromyographic (EMG activity from the flexor carpi radialis (FCR and extensor carpi radialis (ECR muscles. Subjects performed gentle voluntary movements, in the direction opposite to the initial twitch for 5 minutes at 0.2 Hz. We collected motor evoked potentials (MEPs elicited by TMS at baseline and for 10 minutes after training. Results Repetitive motor training was sufficient for TMS to evoke movements in the practiced direction opposite to the original twitch. For most subjects the effect of the newly-acquired direction was retained for at least 10 minutes before reverting to the original. Importantly, the direction change of the movement was associated with a significant decrease in MEP amplitude of the antagonist to the trained muscle, rather than an increase in MEP amplitude of the trained muscle. Conclusions These results demonstrate for the first time that a TMS-twitch direction change following a simple practice paradigm may result from reduced corticospinal drive to muscles antagonizing the trained direction. Such findings may have implications for training paradigms in

  9. A double-blind, randomized trial of deep repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enticott, Peter G; Fitzgibbon, Bernadette M; Kennedy, Hayley A; Arnold, Sara L; Elliot, David; Peachey, Amy; Zangen, Abraham; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical treatment options for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are extremely limited. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a safe and efficacious technique when targeting specific areas of cortical dysfunction in major depressive disorder, and a similar approach could yield therapeutic benefits in ASD, if applied to relevant cortical regions. The aim of this study was to examine whether deep rTMS to bilateral dorsomedial prefrontal cortex improves social relating in ASD. 28 adults diagnosed with either autistic disorder (high-functioning) or Asperger's disorder completed a prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled design with 2 weeks of daily weekday treatment. This involved deep rTMS to bilateral dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (5 Hz, 10-s train duration, 20-s inter-train interval) for 15 min (1500 pulses per session) using a HAUT-Coil. The sham rTMS coil was encased in the same helmet of the active deep rTMS coil, but no effective field was delivered into the brain. Assessments were conducted before, after, and one month following treatment. Participants in the active condition showed a near significant reduction in self-reported social relating symptoms from pre-treatment to one month follow-up, and a significant reduction in social relating symptoms (relative to sham participants) for both post-treatment assessments. Those in the active condition also showed a reduction in self-oriented anxiety during difficult and emotional social situations from pre-treatment to one month follow-up. There were no changes for those in the sham condition. Deep rTMS to bilateral dorsomedial prefrontal cortex yielded a reduction in social relating impairment and socially-related anxiety. Further research in this area should employ extended rTMS protocols that approximate those used in depression in an attempt to replicate and amplify the clinical response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Neurocognitive Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS in Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD

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    Christopher A Wall

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: It is estimated that 30% to 40% of adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD do not receive full benefit from current antidepressant therapies. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is a novel therapy approved by the US FDA to treat adults with MDD. Research suggests rTMS is not associated with adverse neurocognitive effects in adult populations; however, there is no documentation of its neurocognitive effects in adolescents. This is a secondary post hoc analysis of neurocognitive outcome in adolescents who were treated with open label rTMS in two separate studies. Methods: Eighteen patients (mean age, 16.2 ± 1.1 years; 11 females, 7 males with MDD who failed to adequately respond to at least 1 antidepressant agent were enrolled in the studies. Fourteen patients completed all 30 rTMS treatments (5 days/week, 120% of motor threshold, 10 Hz, 3,000 stimulations per session applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (L-DLPFC. Depression was rated using the Children’s Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R. Neurocognitive evaluation was performed at baseline and after completion of 30 rTMS treatments with the Children’s Auditory Verbal Learning Test (CAVLT and Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (DKEFS Trail Making Test. Results: Over the course of 30 rTMS treatments, adolescents showed a substantial decrease in depression severity and a statistically significant improvement in memory and delayed verbal recall. Other learning and memory indices and executive function remained intact. Neither participants nor their family members reported clinically meaningful changes in neurocognitive function. Conclusion: These preliminary findings suggest rTMS does not adversely impact neurocognitive functioning in adolescents and may provide subtle enhancement of verbal memory as measured by the CAVLT. Further controlled investigations are warranted to confirm and extend these findings.

  11. GC-ECNICI-MS/MS of eicosanoids as pentafluorobenzyl-trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives: Evidence of CAD-induced intramolecular TMS ether-to-ester rearrangement using carboxy-18O-labelled eicosanoids and possible implications in quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2017-03-15

    GC-MS and GC-MS/MS of pentafluorobenzyl (PFB) ester trimethylsilyl (TMS) ether (PFB-TMS) derivatives of hydroxylated long-chain fatty acids including arachidonic acid metabolites, the eicosanoids, in the electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization (ECNICI) mode are the most sensitive and accurate approaches to quantify carboxyl groups-containing compounds in complex biological fluids such as plasma and urine. Under ECNICI conditions, PFB-TMS derivatives of eicosanoids ionize to form very few ions, with the carboxylates [M-PFB]- being typically the most intense. Less intense ions may be additionally formed by consecutive neutral loss (NL) of trimethylsilanol (TMSOH, 90Da) groups ([M-PFB-(TMSOH)n]-). By using [1,1-18O2]- and [1,ω-18O2]-eicosanoids, we studied ion processes following collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) of the precursor ions [M-PFB]-. We found that CAD resulted in formation of product ions due to NL of a TMS18OH (92Da) group in monocarboxylic and of a PFB18OH (200Da) group in dicarboxylic eicosanoids. TMS18OH NL implies an intra-molecular transfer of the TMS group from hydroxyl groups to their carboxylate anions [M-PFB]-. From a mechanistic point of view, this rearrangement may explain formation of unique product ions in GC-MS/MS of eicosanoids under ECNICI conditions. From the quantitative point of view, quantification by GC-MS/MS of product ions due to [M-PFB-(TMSOH)n]- and [M-PFB-TMS18OH-(TMSOH)n-1]-would reveal incorrect data, if [1,1-18O2]-eicosanoids are used as internal standards and if no correction for the 18O-loss is performed. In 18O-labelled dicarboxylic eicosanoids, such as the major urinary metabolite (MUM) of E prostaglandins, i.e., [1,ω-18O2]-PGE-MUM), no TMS ester/TMS ether rearrangement was observed. Yet, 18O-loss occurred upon CAD of [M-PFB]- due to NL of PFB18OH (200Da). In both cases the extent of 18O-loss needs to be determined and considered for accurate quantification of monocarboxylic acids such as 8

  12. Distinct control of initiation and metrics of memory-guided saccades and vergence by the FEF: a TMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing; Kapoula, Zoi

    2011-01-01

    The initiation of memory guided saccades is known to be controlled by the frontal eye field (FEF). Recent physiological studies showed the existence of an area close to FEF that controls also vergence initiation and execution. This study is to explore the effect of transcranial magnetic simulation (TMS) over FEF on the control of memory-guided saccade-vergence eye movements. Subjects had to make an eye movement in dark towards a target flashed 1 sec earlier (memory delay); the location of the target relative to fixation point was such as to require either a vergence along the median plane, or a saccade, or a saccade with vergence; trials were interleaved. Single pulse TMS was applied on the left or right FEF; it was delivered at 100 ms after the end of memory delay, i.e. extinction of fixation LED that was the "go" signal. Twelve healthy subjects participated in the study. TMS of left or right FEF prolonged the latency of all types of eye movements; the increase varied from 21 to 56 ms and was particularly strong for the divergence movements. This indicates that FEF is involved in the initiation of all types of memory guided movement in the 3D space. TMS of the FEF also altered the accuracy but only for leftward saccades combined with either convergence or divergence; intrasaccadic vergence also increased after TMS of the FEF. The results suggest anisotropy in the quality of space memory and are discussed in the context of other known perceptual motor anisotropies.

  13. 10 Hz rTMS over right parietal cortex alters sense of agency during self-generated movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anina eRitterband-Rosenbaum

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A large body of fMRI and lesion-literature has provided evidence that the Inferior Parietal Cortex (IPC is important for sensorimotor integration and sense of agency (SoA. We used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS to explore the role of the IPC during a validated SoA detection task. 12 healthy, right-handed adults were included. The effects of rTMS on subjects’ SoA during self-generated movements were explored. The experiment consisted of 1/3 self-generated movements and 2/3 computer manipulated movements that introduced uncertainty as to whether the subjects were agents of an observed movement. Subjects completed three sessions, in which subjects received online rTMS over the right IPC (active condition, over the vertex (CZ (sham condition or no TMS but a sound-matched control. We found that rTMS over right IPC significantly altered SoA of the non-perturbed movements. Following IPC stimulation subjects were more likely to experience self-generated movements as being externally perturbed compared to the control site (P=0.002 and the stimulation-free control (P=0.042. The data support the importance of IPC activation during sensorimotor comparison in order to correctly determine the agent of movements.

  14. MRI-guided dmPFC-rTMS as a Treatment for Treatment-resistant Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Katharine; Gaprielian, Pauline; Blumberger, Daniel; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Kennedy, Sidney H; Giacobbe, Peter; Downar, Jonathan

    2015-08-11

    Here we outline the protocol for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Technicians used a neuronavigation system to process patient MRIs to generate a 3-dimensional head model. The head model was subsequently used to identify patient-specific stimulatory targets. The dmPFC was stimulated daily for 20 sessions. Stimulation intensity was titrated to address scalp pain associated with rTMS. Weekly assessments were conducted on the patients using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HamD17) and Beck Depression Index II (BDI-II). Treatment-resistant MDD patients achieved significant improvements on both HAMD and BDI-II. Of note, angled, double-cone coil rTMS at 120% resting motor threshold allows for optimal stimulation of deeper midline prefrontal regions, which results in a possible therapeutic application for MDD. One major limitation of the rTMS field is the heterogeneity of treatment parameters across studies, including duty cycle, number of pulses per session and intensity. Further work should be done to clarify the effect of stimulation parameters on outcome. Future dmPFC-rTMS work should include sham-controlled studies to confirm its clinical efficacy in MDD.

  15. Implementasi Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum pada DSK TMS320C6416T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanang Arif Haryadi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Spread spectrum merupakan teknik pengiriman sinyal yang tahan terhadap gangguan dan mempunyai tingkat keamanan informasi yang cukup tinggi pada saat pengiriman. Salah satu teknik spread spectrum yang dikembangkan adalah direct sequence. Pada sistem Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS digunakan pseudo-noise pada proses transmisi sebagai gelombang modulasi untuk ‘menyebarkan’ energi sinyal melalui bandwidth yang lebih besar dari bandwidth sinyal informasi. Modulator dan demodulator Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum dapat dirancang menggunakan software MATLAB yang kemudian diimplementasikan pada board DSP yaitu DSK TMS320C6416T. Dengan ukurannya yang relatif kecil dan dapat dioperasikan dengan daya yang kecil dan portable. Aplikasi umum dengan DSP processor bekerja pada frekuensi 0-96 kHz yang merupakan standar dalam sistem telekomunikasi. Untuk mengetahui tingkat ketahanan teknik DSSS terhadap penagruh sinyal pengganggu, maka dilakukan simulasi dan implementasi modulasi dan demodulasi DSSS yang telah terkena jamming secara real ke dalam DSP Starter Kit TMS320C6416T. Terdapat dua implementasi sistem yaitu sistem DSSS dengan gangguan singletone dan gangguan multitone dengan masing-masing gangguan dibedakan lagi dalam tiga frekuensi kerja yang berbeda. Pengujian dilakukan untuk mengetahui kinerja sistem pada DSK TMS320C6416T yang ditampilkan dalam bentuk grafik Bit Error Rate terhadap variasi nilai daya sinyal jamming dengan mengirimkan 10.000 bit. Kinerja sistem terbaik didapat ketika daya sinyal jamming lebih kecil atau sama dengan daya sinyal carrier. Pada kondisi tersebut besarnya Eb/No dapat berpengaruh baik pada kinerja sistem. Rata-rata sistem akan mencapai nilai BER 1.00E-04 pada saat besar daya sinyal jamming 60% dan 70% dari daya sinyal pembawa.

  16. Science in the Information Society

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    CERN will host the Role of Science in the Information Society (RSIS) conference on Monday and Tuesday, focusing on how science-driven information and communication technologies can help close the digital divide. There will be an army of bodyguards at CERN at the beginning of December. CERN will not only host the official visits, but also around 500 scientists, politicians, and members of civil society who will descend on the Main Auditorium for the Role of Science in the Information Society (RSIS) conference on 8-9 December. The RSIS conference hosted by CERN is a high-profile event focusing on how to make information technologies work for the greatest human benefit - a marked change from keeping a relatively low profile so far, making its discoveries available to all with little input in how they are applied. The RSIS, held 8-9 December at CERN, will be a Summit Event of the World Summit on the Information Society taking place at Palexpo on 9-13 December. RSIS participants will apply a scientific point of...

  17. Academic Performance of Students with the Highest and Mediocre School-leaving Grades: Does the Aptitude Test for Medical Studies (TMS Balance Their Prognoses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadmon, Guni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Admission to undergraduate medical training in Germany occurs by central and local pathways. Central admission includes two distinct groups: Students with top school-leaving grades (best-SLG group and students with inferior school-leaving grades who are admitted with a delay of up to seven years (delayed admission group. Students with academic difficulties and early dropouts are present in both groups. Local admission at our university involves the German Test for Medical Studies (TMS and allows the admission by merit of students with a wide range of school-leaving grades. Aims: To examine the justification of a TMS-based strategy to reduce the admission of potentially weak best school-leavers and enhance the admission of potentially able candidates with mediocre school-leaving grades.Method: The prognostic contribution of the school-leaving (SL GPA and the TMS to academic performance and to continuity in the pre-clinical part of the undergraduate medical program was examined in two study groups: best school leavers (SL grade 1.0, SL-GPA 823-900 points and mediocre school leavers (SL grades 2.0-2.3, SL-GPA 689-660 points. The outcomes in both groups were compared in relation to their TMS results. The prospective study included four consecutive cohorts. Results: In each study group the TMS predicted the academic performance (β=0.442-0.446 and the continuity of studies (OR=0.890-0.853 better than the SL-GPA (β=0.238-0.047; OR=1.009-0.998. Attrition was most strongly associated with failing to take the TMS (OR=0.230-0.380. Mediocre school leavers with TMS scores ≥125 performed as well as the best school leavers. Mediocre school leavers with TMS scores between 110-124 performed on average less well but within the required standards. Best school leavers with mediocre TMS scores and 30% of the best school leavers who hadn't taken the TMS performed less well than most mediocre school leavers with high TMS scores. Discussion: The TMS

  18. Academic Performance of Students with the Highest and Mediocre School-leaving Grades: Does the Aptitude Test for Medical Studies (TMS) Balance Their Prognoses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadmon, Guni; Kadmon, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Admission to undergraduate medical training in Germany occurs by central and local pathways. Central admission includes two distinct groups: Students with top school-leaving grades (best-SLG group) and students with inferior school-leaving grades who are admitted with a delay of up to seven years (delayed admission group). Students with academic difficulties and early dropouts are present in both groups. Local admission at our university involves the German Test for Medical Studies (TMS) and allows the admission by merit of students with a wide range of school-leaving grades. Aims: To examine the justification of a TMS-based strategy to reduce the admission of potentially weak best school-leavers and enhance the admission of potentially able candidates with mediocre school-leaving grades. Method: The prognostic contribution of the school-leaving (SL) GPA and the TMS to academic performance and to continuity in the pre-clinical part of the undergraduate medical program was examined in two study groups: best school leavers (SL grade 1.0, SL-GPA 823-900 points) and mediocre school leavers (SL grades 2.0-2.3, SL-GPA 689-660 points). The outcomes in both groups were compared in relation to their TMS results. The prospective study included four consecutive cohorts. Results: In each study group the TMS predicted the academic performance (β=0.442-0.446) and the continuity of studies (OR=0.890-0.853) better than the SL-GPA (β=0.238-0.047; OR=1.009-0.998). Attrition was most strongly associated with failing to take the TMS (OR=0.230-0.380). Mediocre school leavers with TMS scores ≥125 performed as well as the best school leavers. Mediocre school leavers with TMS scores between 110-124 performed on average less well but within the required standards. Best school leavers with mediocre TMS scores and 30% of the best school leavers who hadn't taken the TMS performed less well than most mediocre school leavers with high TMS scores. Discussion: The TMS appears to

  19. Online LI-rTMS during a Visual Learning Task: Differential Impacts on Visual Circuit and Behavioral Plasticity in Adult Ephrin-A2A5-/-Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Eugenia Z; Harvey, Alan R; Makowiecki, Kalina; Rodger, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) induces plasticity in normal and abnormal neural circuitries, an effect that may be influenced by intrinsic brain activity during treatment. Here, we study potential synergistic effects between low-intensity rTMS (LI-rTMS) and concurrent neural activity in promoting circuit reorganization and enhancing visual behavior. We used ephrin-A2A5 -/- mice, which are known to possess visuotopic mapping errors that are ameliorated by LI-rTMS, and assessed the impact of stimulation when mice were engaged in a visual learning task. A detachable coil was affixed to each mouse, and animals underwent 2 wk of 10-min daily training in a two-choice visual discrimination task with concurrent LI-rTMS or sham stimulation. No-task controls (+LI-rTMS/sham) were placed in the task arena without visual task training. At the end of the experiment, visuomotor tracking behavior was assessed, and corticotectal and geniculocortical pathway organization was mapped by injections of fluorescent tracers into the primary visual cortex. Consistent with previous results, LI-rTMS alone improved geniculocortical and corticotectal topography, but combining LI-rTMS with the visual learning task prevented beneficial corticotectal reorganization and had no additional effect on geniculocortical topography or visuomotor tracking performance. Unexpectedly, there was a significant increase in the total number of trials completed by task + LI-rTMS mice in the visual learning task. Comparison with wild-type mice revealed that ephrin-A2A5 -/- mice had reduced accuracy and response rates, suggesting a goal-directed behavioral deficit, which was improved by LI-rTMS. Our results suggest that concurrent brain activity during behavior interacts with LI-rTMS, altering behavior and different visual circuits in an abnormal system.

  20. Reproductive immunology update: the 52nd annual meeting of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauma, S W

    1997-02-01

    The American Society of Reproductive Medicine meeting (formerly the American Fertility Society) was held in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, on November 2-6, 1996. Numerous abstracts concerning original research in reproductive immunology were presented at the meeting. In addition, seminars and round table discussions were held on the topics of hormonal immunocontraception, immunologic testing in reproduction, antiphospholipid syndrome, endometriosis, and immunologic infertility.

  1. Integration of airborne Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS) data and digitized aerial photography via an ISH transformation. [Intensity Saturation Hue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosia, Vincent G.; Myers, Jeffrey S.; Ekstrand, Robert E.; Fitzgerald, Michael T.

    1991-01-01

    A simple method for enhancing the spatial and spectral resolution of disparate data sets is presented. Two data sets, digitized aerial photography at a nominal spatial resolution 3,7 meters and TMS digital data at 24.6 meters, were coregistered through a bilinear interpolation to solve the problem of blocky pixel groups resulting from rectification expansion. The two data sets were then subjected to intensity-saturation-hue (ISH) transformations in order to 'blend' the high-spatial-resolution (3.7 m) digitized RC-10 photography with the high spectral (12-bands) and lower spatial (24.6 m) resolution TMS digital data. The resultant merged products make it possible to perform large-scale mapping, ease photointerpretation, and can be derived for any of the 12 available TMS spectral bands.

  2. The role of the lateral occipital cortex in aesthetic appreciation of representational and abstract paintings: a TMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Lega, Carlotta; Ferrari, Chiara; Vecchi, Tomaso; Cela-Conde, Camilo José; Silvanto, Juha; Nadal, Marcos

    2015-04-01

    Neuroimaging studies of aesthetic appreciation have shown that activity in the lateral occipital area (LO)-a key node in the object recognition pathway-is modulated by the extent to which visual artworks are liked or found beautiful. However, the available evidence is only correlational. Here we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate the putative causal role of LO in the aesthetic appreciation of paintings. In our first experiment, we found that interfering with LO activity during aesthetic appreciation selectively reduced evaluation of representational paintings, leaving appreciation of abstract paintings unaffected. A second experiment demonstrated that, although the perceived clearness of the images overall positively correlated with liking, the detrimental effect of LO TMS on aesthetic appreciation does not owe to TMS reducing perceived clearness. Taken together, our findings suggest that object-recognition mechanisms mediated by LO play a causal role in aesthetic appreciation of representational art. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of prefrontal and parietal cortices in esthetic appreciation of representational and abstract art: a TMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Lega, Carlotta; Gardelli, Chiara; Merabet, Lotfi B; Cela-Conde, Camilo J; Nadal, Marcos

    2014-10-01

    To explain the biological foundations of art appreciation is to explain one of our species' distinctive traits. Previous neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies have pointed to the prefrontal and the parietal cortex as two critical regions mediating esthetic appreciation of visual art. In this study, we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the left prefrontal cortex and the right posterior parietal cortex while participants were evaluating whether they liked, and by how much, a particular painting. By depolarizing cell membranes in the targeted regions, TMS transiently interferes with the activity of specific cortical areas, which allows clarifying their role in a given task. Our results show that both regions play a fundamental role in mediating esthetic appreciation. Critically though, the effects of TMS varied depending on the type of art considered (i.e. representational vs. abstract) and on participants' a-priori inclination toward one or the other. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. May 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first 150 words. The May 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 5/28/2014 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 13 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep and radiology communities. A discussion was held regarding the Arizona Thoracic Society relationship with the American Lung Association. Several members volunteered to talk to the lung association regarding common ground to strengthen the relationship. The wine tasting with the California, New Mexico and Colorado Thoracic Societies at the American Thoracic Society International Meeting was a big success. There were about 55 at the meeting. The tasting will probably be held again next year. At the ATS meeting data was presented that pirfenidone was effective in reducing the progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. The data was published in the New England Journal of Medicine on 8/29/14 (1. Lewis Wesselius is one of the investigators enrolling patients in a phase ...

  5. Non-invasive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS of the Motor Cortex for Neuropathic Pain—At the Tipping Point?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roi Treister

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The term “neuropathic pain” (NP refers to chronic pain caused by illnesses or injuries that damage peripheral or central pain-sensing neural pathways to cause them to fire inappropriately and signal pain without cause. Neuropathic pain is common, complicating diabetes, shingles, HIV, and cancer. Medications are often ineffective or cause various adverse effects, so better approaches are needed. Half a century ago, electrical stimulation of specific brain regions (neuromodulation was demonstrated to relieve refractory NP without distant effects, but the need for surgical electrode implantation limited use of deep brain stimulation. Next, electrodes applied to the dura outside the brain’s surface to stimulate the motor cortex were shown to relieve NP less invasively. Now, electromagnetic induction permits cortical neurons to be stimulated entirely non-invasively using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS. Repeated sessions of many TMS pulses (rTMS can trigger neuronal plasticity to produce long-lasting therapeutic benefit. Repeated TMS already has US and European regulatory approval for treating refractory depression, and multiple small studies report efficacy for neuropathic pain. Recent improvements include “frameless stereotactic” neuronavigation systems, in which patients’ head MRIs allow TMS to be applied to precise underlying cortical targets, minimizing variability between sessions and patients, which may enhance efficacy. Transcranial magnetic stimulation appears poised for the larger trials necessary for regulatory approval of a NP indication. Since few clinicians are familiar with TMS, we review its theoretical basis and historical development, summarize the neuropathic pain trial results, and identify issues to resolve before large-scale clinical trials.

  6. Short and Long-term Effects of rTMS Treatment on Alzheimer's Disease at Different Stages: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Rutherford

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS uses a magnetic coil to induce an electric field in brain tissue. As a pilot study, we investigated the effect of rTMS treatment on 10 volunteers with Alzheimer's disease (AD in a two-stage study. The first stage consisted of a double-blind crossover study with real and sham treatments. Each treatment block consisted of 13 sessions over 4 weeks. During each session, 2000 TMS pulses at 90%-100% of resting motor threshold were applied to dorsolateral prefrontal cortex bilaterally, and the patients were kept cognitively active by object/action naming during the treatment. The second stage was an open-label study, in which the same treatments were performed in 2-week blocks (10 sessions approximately every 3 months as follow-up treatments on six of the volunteers, who completed the first stage of the study. Primary outcome measures were the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MOCA and the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale. The secondary outcome measures were the Revised Memory and Behavior Checklist as well as our team's custom-designed cognitive assessments. The results showed a noticeably stronger improvement on all assessments during the real treatment as compared to the sham treatment. The changes in MOCA scores as well as our designed cognitive assessment were found to be statistically significant, with particularly strong results in the six volunteers who were in the early stages of the disease. The long-term trends observed in the second stage of the study also showed generally less decline than would be expected for their condition. It appears that rTMS can be an effective tool for improving the cognitive abilities of patients with early to moderate stages of AD. However, the positive effects of rTMS may persist for only up to a few weeks. Specific skills being practiced during rTMS treatment may retain their improvement for longer periods.

  7. Civil Society and Islamism in Iraq | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A vibrant civil society sector in some Middle Eastern states has managed over the years to fill a role traditionally held by state institutions, that of providing social services such as health care, education and housing. Islamic civil society organizations have been especially successful in this role, and in doing so have acquired ...

  8. DNA commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P; Brenner, C H; Buckleton, J S

    2006-01-01

    The DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) was convened at the 21st congress of the International Society for Forensic Genetics held between 13 and 17 September in the Azores, Portugal. The purpose of the group was to agree on guidelines to encourage best practice...

  9. The Effect of Lamotrigine and Levetiracetam on TMS-Evoked EEG Responses Depends on Stimulation Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Premoli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The combination of transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroencephalography (TMS-EEG has uncovered underlying mechanisms of two anti-epileptic medications: levetiracetam and lamotrigine. Despite their different mechanism of action, both drugs modulated TMS-evoked EEG potentials (TEPs in a similar way. Since both medications increase resting motor threshold (RMT, the current aim was to examine the similarities and differences in post-drug TEPs, depending on whether stimulation intensity was adjusted to take account of post-drug RMT increase. The experiment followed a placebo controlled, double blind, crossover design, involving a single dose of either lamotrigine or levetiracetam. When a drug-induced increase of RMT occurred, post-drug measurements involved two blocks of stimulations, using unadjusted and adjusted stimulation intensity. A cluster based permutation analysis of differences in TEP amplitude between adjusted and unadjusted stimulation intensity showed that lamotrigine induced a stronger modulation of the N45 TEP component compared to levetiracetam. Results highlight the impact of adjusting stimulation intensity.

  10. Primary motor cortex functionally contributes to language comprehension: An online rTMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Nikola; Feurra, Matteo; Shpektor, Anna; Myachykov, Andriy; Shtyrov, Yury

    2017-02-01

    Among various questions pertinent to grounding human cognitive functions in a neurobiological substrate, the association between language and motor brain structures is a particularly debated one in neuroscience and psychology. While many studies support a broadly distributed model of language and semantics grounded, among other things, in the general modality-specific systems, theories disagree as to whether motor and sensory cortex activity observed during language processing is functional or epiphenomenal. Here, we assessed the role of motor areas in linguistic processing by investigating the responses of 28 healthy volunteers to different word types in semantic and lexical decision tasks, following repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of primary motor cortex. We found that early rTMS (delivered within 200ms of word onset) produces a left-lateralised and meaning-specific change in reaction speed, slowing down behavioural responses to action-related words, and facilitating abstract words - an effect present only during semantic, but not lexical, decision. We interpret these data in light of action-perception theory of language, bolstering the claim that motor cortical areas play a functional role in language comprehension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Integrating nTMS Data into a Radiology Picture Archiving System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Teemu; Vitikainen, Anne-Mari; Laakso, Aki; Mäkelä, Jyrki P

    2015-08-01

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is employed in eloquent brain area localization prior to intraoperative direct cortical electrical stimulations and neurosurgery. No commercial archiving or file transfer protocol existed for these studies. The aim of our project was to establish a standardized protocol for the transfer of nTMS results and medical assessments to the end users in pursuance of improving data security and facilitating presurgical planning. The existing infrastructure of the hospital's Radiology Department was used. Hospital information systems and networks were configured to allow communications and archiving of the study results, and in-house software was written for file manipulations and transfers. Graphical user interface with description suggestions and user-defined text legends enabled an easy and straightforward workflow for annotations and archiving of the results. The software and configurations were implemented and have been applied in studies of ten patients. The creation of the study protocol required the involvement of various professionals and interdepartmental cooperation. The introduction of the protocol has ended previously recurrent involvement of staff in the file transfer phase and improved cost-effectiveness.

  12. The role of prefrontal cortex in visuo-spatial planning: A repetitive TMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Demis; Lotze, Martin; Vitale, Lavinia; Ferreri, Florinda; Bisiacchi, Patrizia; Olivetti Belardinelli, Marta; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Birbaumer, Niels

    2006-05-01

    The visuo-spatial planning process is based on an "opportunistic" combination of heuristics and strategies, carried out in small units during the execution of plans. In order to investigate the functional role of the prefrontal cortex in heuristic switching, 42 healthy controls performed a labyrinth crossing task (the Maps Test). During this computerized version of the Travelling Salesperson Problem, subjects had to decide which order of locations optimizes total travel time and distance. This task was performed with and without 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), which exerts an inhibitory action on the targeted area, applied during the task over bilateral frontal sites (active stimulation) and parieto-occipital site (sham stimulation). Only repetitive bilateral rTMS over F3 and F4 significantly decreased the number of strategies with changes of heuristics, and increased the number of movements required to solve the task. This behaviour contrasts with the performance of healthy subjects in the planning task, but is consistent with the performance of frontal traumatic brain injury patients. The results indicate that, in a visuo-spatial problem-solving task, the prefrontal cortex is involved in the switching between heuristics during the execution of a plan.

  13. Fractal Communication System Using Digital Signal Processing Starter Kit (DSK TMS320c6713

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsyad Ramadhan Darlis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1992, Wornell and Oppenheim did research on a modulation which is formed by using wavelet theory. In some other studies, proved that this modulation can survive on a few channels and has reliability in some applications. Because of this modulation using the concept of fractal, then it is called as fractalmodulation. Fractal modulation is formed by inserting information signal into fractal signals that are selffractal similary. This modulation technique has the potential to replace the OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing, which is currently used on some of the latest telecommunication technologies. The purpose of this research is to implement the fractal communication system using Digital Signal Processing Starter Kit (DSK TMS320C6713 without using AWGN and Rayleigh channel in order to obtain the ideal performance of the system. From the simulation results using MATLAB7.4. it appears that this communication system has good performance on some channels than any other communication systems. While in terms of implementation by using (DSK via TMS320C6713 Code Composer Studio (CCS, it can be concluded that thefractal communication system has a better execution time on some tests.

  14. Dissociation of the rostral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during sequence learning in saccades: a TMS investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, M R; Coats, R O

    2016-02-01

    This experiment sought to find whether differences exist between the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the medial rostral prefrontal cortex (MRPFC) for performing stimulus-independent and stimulus-oriented tasks, respectively. To find a causal relationship in these areas, we employed the use of trans-cranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Prefrontal areas were stimulated whilst participants performed random or predictable sequence learning tasks at stimulus onset (1st presentation of the sequence only for both Random and Predictable), or during the inter-sequence interval. Overall, we found that during the predictable task a significant decrease in saccade latency, gain and duration was found when compared to the randomised conditions, as expected and observed previously. However, TMS stimulation in DLPFC during the delay in the predictive sequence learning task reduced this predictive ability by delaying the saccadic onset and generating abnormal reductions in saccadic gains during prediction. In contrast, we found that stimulation during a delay in MRPFC reversed the normal effects on peak velocity of the task with the predictive task revealing higher peak velocity than the randomised task. These findings provide causal evidence for independent functions of DLPFC and MRPFC in performing stimulus-independent processing during sequence learning in saccades.

  15. Alternative Stimulation Intensities for Mapping Cortical Motor Area with Navigated TMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallioniemi, Elisa; Julkunen, Petro

    2016-05-01

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is becoming a popular tool in pre-operative mapping of functional motor areas. The stimulation intensities used in the mapping are commonly suprathreshold intensities with respect to the patient's resting motor threshold (rMT). There is no consensus on which suprathreshold intensity should be used nor on the optimal criteria for selecting the appropriate stimulation intensity (SI). In this study, the left motor cortices of 12 right-handed volunteers (8 males, age 24-61 years) were mapped using motor evoked potentials with an SI of 110 and 120 % of rMT and with an upper threshold (UT) estimated by the Mills-Nithi algorithm. The UT was significantly lower than 120 % of rMT (p motor cortex. Therefore, the UT seems to be a good option for SI in motor mapping applications to outline functional motor areas with nTMS and it could potentially reduce the inter-individual variation caused by the selection of SI in motor mapping in pre-surgical applications and radiosurgery planning.

  16. Dexterity with numbers: rTMS over left angular gyrus disrupts finger gnosis and number processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Elena; Walsh, Vincent; Butterworth, Brian

    2005-01-01

    Since the original description of Gerstmann's syndrome with its four cardinal symptoms, among which are finger agnosia and acalculia, the neuro-cognitive relationship between fingers and calculation has been debated. We asked our participants to perform four different tasks, two of which involved fingers and the other two involving numbers, during repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the posterior parietal lobe of either hemisphere. In the finger tasks, they were required to transform a tactile stimulus randomly delivered on one of their fingers into a speeded key-press response either with the same or with the homologous finger on the opposite hand. In the numerical tasks, they were asked to perform a magnitude or a parity matching on pairs of single digits, in the context of arithmetically related or unrelated numerical primes. In accordance with the original anatomical hypothesis put forward by Gerstmann [Gerstmann, J. (1924). Fingeragnosie: eine umschriebene Stoerung der Orienterung am eigenen Koerper. Wiener clinische Wochenschrift, 37, 1010-12], we found that rTMS over the left angular gyrus disrupted tasks requiring access to the finger schema and number magnitude processing in the same group of participants. In addition to the numerous studies which have employed special populations such as neurological patients and children, our data confirm the presence of a relationship between numbers and body knowledge in skilled adults who no longer use their fingers for solving simple arithmetical tasks.

  17. Citizenship in civil society?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Marinus R.R.

    2007-01-01

    This article seeks to provide a conceptual framework to complement and guide the empirical analysis of civil society. The core argument is that civil society must be understood, not as a category of (post)industrialized society, but as one of individualized society. Civil society is characterized by

  18. Repetitive activation of the corticospinal pathway by means of rTMS may reduce the efficiency of corticomotoneuronal synapses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taube, Wolfgang; Leukel, Christian; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2015-01-01

    Low-frequency rTMS applied to the primary motor cortex (M1) may produce depression of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs). This depression is commonly assumed to reflect changes in cortical circuits. However, little is known about rTMS-induced effects on subcortical circuits. Therefore, the present......-either at M1 and/or the CM synapse. As the early facilitation reflects activation of direct CM projections, the most likely site of action is the synapse of the CM neurons onto spinal motoneurons....

  19. Cerebellar TMS in treatment of a patient with cerebellar ataxia: evidence from clinical, biomechanics and neurophysiological assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzan, Faranak; Wu, Yunfen; Manor, Brad; Anastasio, Elana M; Lough, Matthew; Novak, Vera; Greenstein, Patricia E; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-10-01

    We describe a patient with a probable diagnosis of idiopathic late-onset cerebellar atrophy who shows improvement of limb coordination, speech, and gait following 21 days of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied to scalp regions presumably corresponding to the cerebellum. This case study provides, for the first time, a quantitative assessment of gait improvement in response to TMS therapy in ataxia, as well as neurophysiological evidence in support of modification of cerebellar-cortical interaction that may underlie some of the improvements.

  20. Remote detection of geobotanical anomalies associated with hydrocarbon microseepage using thematic mapper simulator (TMS) and airborne imaging spectrometer (AIS) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, B. N.

    1984-01-01

    An interpretation of TMS and AIS data sets collected from Lost River, West Virginia, are presented, along with a brief review of the supervised vegetation classification approach to vegetation mapping used at Lost River. A preliminary study of AIS data suggests that contiguous high-spectral resolution data from a very limited portion of the spectrum (1.2-1.5 micron) provide a greater discriminatory capability than do broad-band sensors such as the TMS covering of wider spectral range (0.45-2.35 microns).

  1. Preliminary Evidence of the Effects of High-frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) on Swallowing Functions in Post-Stroke Individuals with Chronic Dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ivy K. Y.; Chan, Karen M. K.; Wong, C. S.; Cheung, Raymond T. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence of potential benefits of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the rehabilitation of dysphagia. However, the site and frequency of stimulation for optimal effects are not clear. Aims: The aim of this pilot study is to investigate the short-term effects of high-frequency 5 Hz rTMS applied to…

  2. High-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS Improves Functional Recovery by Enhancing Neurogenesis and Activating BDNF/TrkB Signaling in Ischemic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Luo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS has rapidly become an attractive therapeutic approach for stroke. However, the mechanisms underlying this remain elusive. This study aimed to investigate whether high-frequency rTMS improves functional recovery mediated by enhanced neurogenesis and activation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB pathway and to compare the effect of conventional 20 Hz rTMS and intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS on ischemic rats. Rats after rTMS were sacrificed seven and 14 days after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO, following evaluation of neurological function. Neurogenesis was measured using specific markers: Ki67, Nestin, doublecortin (DCX, NeuN and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, and the expression levels of BDNF were visualized by Western blotting and RT-PCR analysis. Both high-frequency rTMS methods significantly improved neurological function and reduced infarct volume. Moreover, 20 Hz rTMS and iTBS significantly promoted neurogenesis, shown by an increase of Ki67/DCX, Ki67/Nestin, and Ki67/NeuN-positive cells in the peri-infarct striatum. These beneficial effects were accompanied by elevated protein levels of BDNF and phosphorylated-TrkB. In conclusion, high-frequency rTMS improves functional recovery possibly by enhancing neurogenesis and activating BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway and conventional 20 Hz rTMS is better than iTBS at enhancing neurogenesis in ischemic rats.

  3. Differential effects of left and right prefrontal high frequency rTMS on resting state fMRI in healthy individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schluter, Renee S.; Jansen, Jochem M.; van Holst, Ruth J.; van den Brink, Wim; Goudriaan, Anna E.

    2017-01-01

    High frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) has gained great interest in multiple clinical and research fields and is believed to accomplish its effect by influencing neuronal networks. The dlPFC is frequently chosen as the cortical target for HF-rTMS. However very little

  4. Effects of low frequency rTMS treatment on brain networks for inner speech in patients with schizophrenia and auditory verbal hallucinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bais, Leonie; Liemburg, Edith; Vercammen, Ans; Bruggeman, Richard; Knegtering, Henderikus; Aleman, Andre

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Efficacy of repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) targeting the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) for the treatment of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) remains under debate. We assessed the influence of a 1 Hz rTMS treatment on neural networks involved in a cognitive

  5. Subthreshold rTMS over pre-motor cortex has no effect on tics in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orth, M.; Kirby, R.; Richardson, M.P.; Snijders, A.H.; Rothwell, J.C.; Trimble, M.R.; Robertson, M.M.; Munchau, A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A previous study showed no effect of 1Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on tics in Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (GTS). We modified the rTMS protocol in order to investigate some of the possible methodological reasons for the negative outcome in that study. METHODS:

  6. Pre-stimulus Alpha Oscillations and Inter-subject Variability of Motor Evoked Potentials in Single- and Paired-Pulse TMS Paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iscan, Zafer; Nazarova, Maria; Fedele, Tommaso; Blagovechtchenski, Evgeny; Nikulin, Vadim V

    2016-01-01

    Inter- and intra-subject variability of the motor evoked potentials (MEPs) to TMS is a well-known phenomenon. Although a possible link between this variability and ongoing brain oscillations was demonstrated, the results of the studies are not consistent with each other. Exploring this topic further is important since the modulation of MEPs provides unique possibility to relate oscillatory cortical phenomena to the state of the motor cortex probed with TMS. Given that alpha oscillations were shown to reflect cortical excitability, we hypothesized that their power and variability might explain the modulation of subject-specific MEPs to single- and paired-pulse TMS (spTMS, ppTMS, respectively). Neuronal activity was recorded with multichannel electroencephalogram. We used spTMS and two ppTMS conditions: intracortical facilitation (ICF) and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI). Spearman correlations were calculated within and across subjects between MEPs and the pre-stimulus power of alpha oscillations in low (8-10 Hz) and high (10-12 Hz) frequency bands. Coefficient of quartile variation was used to measure variability. Across-subject analysis revealed no difference in the pre-stimulus alpha power among the TMS conditions. However, the variability of high-alpha power in spTMS condition was larger than in the SICI condition. In ICF condition pre-stimulus high-alpha power variability correlated positively with MEP amplitude variability. No correlation has been observed between the pre-stimulus alpha power and MEP responses in any of the conditions. Our results show that the variability of the alpha oscillations can be more predictive of TMS effects than the commonly used power of oscillations and we provide further support for the dissociation of high and low-alpha bands in predicting responses produced by the stimulation of the motor cortex.

  7. Characterizing Brain Cortical Plasticity and Network Dynamics Across the Age-Span in Health and Disease with TMS-EEG and TMS-fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Freitas, Catarina; Oberman, Lindsay; Horvath, Jared C.; Halko, Mark; Eldaief, Mark; Bashir, Shahid; Vernet, Marine; Shafi, Mouhshin; Westover, Brandon; Vahabzadeh-Hagh, Andrew M.; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Brain plasticity can be conceptualized as nature’s invention to overcome limitations of the genome and adapt to a rapidly changing environment. As such, plasticity is an intrinsic property of the brain across the life-span. However, mechanisms of plasticity may vary with age. The combination of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with electroencephalography (EEG) or functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables clinicians and researchers to directly study local and network cortical plasticity, in humans in vivo, and characterize their changes across the age-span. Parallel, translational studies in animals can provide mechanistic insights. Here, we argue that, for each individual, the efficiency of neuronal plasticity declines throughout the age-span and may do so more or less prominently depending on variable ‘starting-points’ and different ‘slopes of change’ defined by genetic, biological, and environmental factors. Furthermore, aberrant, excessive, insufficient, or mistimed plasticity may represent the proximal pathogenic cause of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders such as autism spectrum disorders or Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:21842407

  8. Should We Expand the Toolbox of Psychiatric Treatment Methods to Include Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS)? A Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of rTMS in Psychiatric Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotema, Christina W.; Blom, Jan Dirk; Hoek, Hans W.; Sommer, Iris E. C.

    Objective: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a safe treatment method with few side effects However, efficacy for various psychiatric disorders is currently not clear Data sources: A literature search was performed from 1966 through October 2008 using PubMed, Ovid Medline, Embase

  9. Functional anatomy of top-down visuospatial processing in the human brain : evidence from rTMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleman, A; Schutter, DJLG; Ramsey, NF; van Honk, J; Kessels, RPC; Hoogduin, JM; Postma, A; Kahn, RS; de Haan, EHF

    The hypothesis was tested that visuospatial mental imagery relies on processing in the posterior parietal lobe. Using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in a cross-over, sham-controlled design, we compared involvement of right posterior parietal cortex with primary visual cortex.

  10. Functional anatomy of top-down visuospatial processing in the human brain: evidence from rTMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleman, A.; Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Ramsey, N.F.; Honk, E.J. van; Kessels, R.P.C.; Hoogduin, J.M.; Postma, A.; Kahn, R.S.; Haan, E.H.F. de

    2002-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that visuospatial mental imagery relies on processing in the posterior parietal lobe. Using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in a cross-over, sham-controlled design, we compared involvement of right posterior parietal cortex with primary visual cortex.

  11. The effect of local anatomy on the electric field induced by TMS: evaluation at 14 different target sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.J.E.M.; Oostendorp, T.F.; Stegeman, D.F.

    2014-01-01

    Many human cortical regions are targeted with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The stimulus intensity used for a certain region is generally based on the motor threshold stimulation intensity determined over the motor cortex (M1). However, it is well known that differences exist in

  12. Improved Picture Naming in Chronic Aphasia after Tms to Part of Right Broca's Area: An Open-Protocol Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeser, M.A.; Martin, P.I.; Nicholas, M.; Baker, E.H.; Seekins, H.; Kobayashi, M.; Theoret, H.; Fregni, F.; Maria-Tormos, J.; Kurland, J.; Doron, K.W.; Pascual-Leone, A.

    2005-01-01

    Functional imaging studies with nonfluent aphasia patients have observed ''over-activation'' in right (R) language homologues. This may represent a maladaptive strategy; suppression may result in language improvement. We applied slow, 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to an anterior portion of R Broca's homologue daily, for…

  13. Right posterior parietal cortex is involved in disengaging from threat:a 1 Hz rTMS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulckhuyse, M.G.J.; Engelmann, J.B.; Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Roelofs, K.

    2017-01-01

    The right posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is implicated in spatial attention, but its specific role in emotional spatial attention remains unclear. In the present study, we combined inhibitory transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with a fear conditioning paradigm to test the role of the right PPC

  14. Right Posterior Parietal Cortex is involved in disengaging from threat: a 1-Hz rTMS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulckhuyse, M.; Engelmann, J.B.; Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Roelofs, K.

    2017-01-01

    The right posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is implicated in spatial attention, but its specific role in emotional spatial attention remains unclear. In this study, we combined inhibitory transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with a fear-conditioning paradigm to test the role of the right PPC in

  15. Effective electric fields along realistic DTI-based neural trajectories for modelling the stimulation mechanisms of TMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Geeter, N.; Crevecoeur, G.; Leemans, A.; Dupré, L.

    2015-01-01

    In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), an applied alternating magnetic field induces an electric field in the brain that can interact with the neural system. It is generally assumed that this induced electric field is the crucial effect exciting a certain region of the brain. More specifically,

  16. 41 CFR 301-73.106 - What are the basic services that should be covered by a TMS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... availability, reservations and confirmation, compliance with Hotel/Motel Fire Safety Act, availability of Fed... reservations by type of service (common carrier, lodging, and car rental); (2) Extent to which reservations are... services that should be covered by a TMS? 301-73.106 Section 301-73.106 Public Contracts and Property...

  17. Treatment of dysphasia with rTMS and language therapy after childhood stroke: Multimodal imaging of plastic change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Helen L; Jadavji, Zeanna; Mineyko, Aleksandra; Damji, Omar; Hodge, Jacquie; Saunders, Jenny; Hererro, Mia; Nowak, Michele; Patzelt, Rebecca; Mazur-Mosiewicz, Anya; MacMaster, Frank P; Kirton, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Expressive dysphasia accompanies left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG/Broca) injury. Recovery may relate to interhemispheric balance with homologous, contralesional IFG but is unexplored in children. We evaluated effects of inhibitory rTMS to contralesional IFG combined with intensive speech therapy (SLT). A 15year-old, right-handed male incurred a left middle cerebral artery stroke. After 30months, severe non-fluent dysphasia impacted quality of life. Language networks, neuronal metabolism and white matter pathways were explored using MRI. Language function was measured longitudinally. An intensive SLT program was combined with contralesional inhibitory rTMS of right pars triangularis. Procedures were well tolerated. Language function improved persisting to four months. Post-treatment fMRI demonstrated increased left perilesional IFG activations and connectivity at rest. Bilateral changes in inositol and glutamate metabolism were observed. Contralesional, inhibitory rTMS appears safe in childhood stroke-induced dysphasia. We observed clinically significant improvements after SLT coupled with rTMS. Advanced neuroimaging can evaluate intervention-induced plasticity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. rTMS in fibromyalgia: a randomized trial evaluating QoL and its brain metabolic substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyer, L.; Dousset, A.; Roussel, P.; Dossetto, N.; Cammilleri, S.; Piano, V.M.M.; Khalfa, S.; Mundler, O.; Donnet, A.; Guedj, E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study investigated the impact of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on quality of life (QoL) of patients with fibromyalgia, and its possible brain metabolic substrate. METHODS: Thirty-eight patients were randomly assigned

  19. Combined rTMS treatment targeting the Anterior Cingulate and the Temporal Cortex for the Treatment of Chronic Tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, Peter M.; Lehner, Astrid; Schlee, Winfried; Vielsmeier, Veronika; Schecklmann, Martin; Poeppl, Timm B.; Landgrebe, Michael; Rupprecht, Rainer; Langguth, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been proposed as a tinnitus treatment option. Promising results have been obtained by consecutive stimulation of lateral frontal and auditory brain regions. We investigated a combined stimulation paradigm targeting the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) with double cone coil rTMS, followed by stimulation of the temporo-parietal junction area with a figure-of-eight coil. The study was conducted as a randomized, double-blind pilot trial in 40 patients suffering from chronic tinnitus. We compared mediofrontal stimulation with double-cone-coil, (2000 stimuli, 10 Hz) followed by left temporo-parietal stimulation with figure-of-eight-coil (2000 stimuli, 1 Hz) to left dorsolateral-prefrontal-cortex stimulation with figure-of-eight-coil (2000 stimuli, 10 Hz) followed by temporo-parietal stimulation with figure-of-eight-coil (2000 stimuli, 1 Hz). The stimulation was feasible with comparable dropout rates in both study arms; no severe adverse events were registered. Responder rates did not differ in both study arms. There was a significant main effect of time for the change in the TQ score, but no significant time x group interaction. This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of combined mediofrontal/temporoparietal-rTMS-stimulation with double cone coil in tinnitus patients but failed to show better outcome compared to an actively rTMS treated control group. PMID:26667790

  20. Sleep disturbances in obsessive-compulsive disorder: Association with non-response to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donse, L.; Sack, A.T.; Fitzgerald, P.B.; Arns, M.W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a promising augmentation strategy for treatment-refractory OCD. However, a substantial group still fails to respond. Sleep disorders, e.g. circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD), are highly prevalent in OCD and might mediate

  1. Efficacy, Safety and Tolerability of Augmentative rTMS in Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD): A Prospective Cohort Study in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipcic, Igor; Milovac, Zeljko; Sucic, Strahimir; Gajsak, Tomislav; Filipcic, Ivona Simunovic; Ivezic, Ena; Aljinovic, Vjekoslav; Orgulan, Ivana; Penic, Sandra Zecevic; Bajic, Zarko

    2017-03-01

    An increasing body of research suggest that repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) is effective and safe treatment option for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). The Psychiatric Hospital "Sveti Ivan" has the first TMS laboratory with rTMS and deep TMS (dTMS) in Croatia. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy, safety and tolerability of augmentative rTMS treatment vs standard treatment in Croatian patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Total of 93 MDD patients were enrolled; 41 of them were treated by augmentative rTMS and 52 were treated by standard (psychopharmacotherapy and psychotherapy) therapy only. We delivered rTMS to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex at 120% motor threshold (10 Hz, 4-second train duration), 3000 pulses per session using a figure-eight coil, minimum of 20 sessions during four weeks. Our key outcome was the change in Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D17) result from baseline to 4 th week. Our secondary outcomes were changes in Hamilton Anxiety (HAM-A) and WHOQOL-BREF scales. After four weeks the changes of HAM-D17 and HAM-A results were significantly different between the group of patients treated by augmentative rTMS (48% and 53% decrease, respectively) and the group of patients treated by the standard therapy alone (24% and 30% decrease) (P=0.004, P=0.007). Absolute benefit increase defined as the difference between rates of remission (HAM-D17 ≤7) in rTMS and control group was 33% (P=0.001). Number of patients needed to treat with rTMS in order to achieve remission in one patient was NNT=3. In a group of patients treated with augmentative rTMS 21/41 (51%), and in control group 17/52 (33%) were responders (P=0.071). It seems that augmentative treatment with rTMS is more effective on depression and anxiety symptoms than standard therapy in MDD with equal safety and tolerability. Randomized, controlled studies are required to verify this finding.

  2. Induction of plasticity in the human motor cortex by pairing an auditory stimulus with TMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Fredrick Sowman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic stimuli can cause a transient increase in the excitability of the motor cortex. The current study leverages this phenomenon to develop a method for testing the integrity of auditorimotor integration and the capacity for auditorimotor plasticity. We demonstrate that appropriately timed transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS of the hand area, paired with auditorily mediated excitation of the motor cortex, induces an enhancement of motor cortex excitability that lasts beyond the time of stimulation. This result demonstrates for the first time that paired associative stimulation (PAS -induced plasticity within the motor cortex is applicable with auditory stimuli. We propose that the method developed here might provide a useful tool for future studies that measure auditory-motor connectivity in communication disorders.

  3. Les TMS dans la filière viande. Revue de la littérature.

    OpenAIRE

    LOPPINET, M.; Aptel, Michel

    1997-01-01

    Les troubles musculo-squelettiques du membre supérieur sont aujourd'hui la première cause de maladie professionnelle en France. Tous les secteurs de main d'oeuvre à forte activité répétitive et monotone sont concernés par ce problème de santé au travail et en particulier les industries de transformation de la viande. L'objectif de la présente synthèse est triple, il s'agit de : établir la réalité du risque de TMS dans la filière viande à travers l'examen des données statistiques et épidémiolo...

  4. Bioètica de la TMS en nens i adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Payeras Crespí, Joan Miquel

    2015-01-01

    L'estimulació magnètica transcranial -TMS- és una tècnica per a l'estimulació no invasiva del cervell, usada sovint com a eina de recerca per estudiar la fisiologia del cervell, però també amb utilitats clíniques i com a eina terapèutica. La bioètica és l'estudi de les qüestions ètiques sorgides de les noves situacions i possibilitats dels avanços en biologia i medicina i es fonamenta en quatre principis: autonomia, beneficència, no maleficència i justícia. En aquest treball s'apliquen aquest...

  5. TMS of the occipital cortex induces tactile sensations in the fingers of blind Braille readers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ptito, M; Fumal, A; de Noordhout, A Martens

    2008-01-01

    Various non-visual inputs produce cross-modal responses in the visual cortex of early blind subjects. In order to determine the qualitative experience associated with these occipital activations, we systematically stimulated the entire occipital cortex using single pulse transcranial magnetic...... stimulation (TMS) in early blind subjects and in blindfolded seeing controls. Whereas blindfolded seeing controls reported only phosphenes following occipital cortex stimulation, some of the blind subjects reported tactile sensations in the fingers that were somatotopically organized onto the visual cortex...... cortical pathway between the somatosensory cortex and the visual cortex in early blind subjects. These results also add new evidence that the activity of the occipital lobe in the blind takes its qualitative expression from the character of its new input source, therefore supporting the cortical deference...

  6. Research on Direct Torque Control of Induction Motor Based on TMS320LF2407A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lufei, Xu; Guangqun, Nan

    The direct torque control of Induction Motor is one of the high performance control system, which was proposed after the vector control scheme. During the recent 20 years, It has been developed rapidly for its concise system scheme, excellent dynamic and static performances. DTC system directly controls the electromagnetic torque and stator flux, using the analyzing method of space vector and stator flux orientation. This paper establishes the mathematical model of direct torque control (DTC) system of induction motor, and direct torque control (DTC) scheme of induction motor based on TMS320LF2407A is introduced. The control scheme gets the switch control signal of inverter with the space voltage vector modulation technology. Finally the approach has been implemented on DSP in a 1.1 kW drive. The results show that the DTC with SVPWM has many merits such as simple realization, good running performance and high voltage utilization ratio.

  7. Design of one large telescope direct drive control system based on TMS320F28xx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao-li; Wang, Da-xing; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Zhen-chao; Chen, Li-yan; Ren, Chang-zhi

    2014-08-01

    The mount drive control is the key technique which mostly affects astronomical telescope's resolution and its speed. However, the ultra -lower speed and the giant moment of inertia make it very difficult to be controlled. In this paper, one segmented permanent-magnet synchronous motor (PMSM), 4m diameter, is suggested for the mount driving. A method is presented to drive the motor directly, which is based on TMS320F28XX and Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) , also, HEIDENHAIN tape is used to detect the absolute position of the motor together with the Hall sensor. The segmented PMSM can work stable and the mount drive can realize nice tracking performance at ultra -lower speed with this drive system.

  8. Effects of Weekly Low-Frequency rTMS on Autonomic Measures in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Fernando Casanova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The term autism spectrum disorder (ASD describes a range of conditions characterized by impairments in social interactions, communication, and by restricted and repetitive behaviors. ASD may also present with symptoms suggestive of autonomic nervous system (ANS dysfunction. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of 18 sessions of low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS on autonomic function in children with ASD by recording electrocardiogram (EKG and electrodermal activity pre-, post- and during each rTMS session. The autonomic measures of interest in this study were R-R cardiointervals in EKG (R-R, time and frequency domain measures of heart rate variability (HRV and skin conductance level (SCL. HRV measures such as R-R intervals, standard deviation of cardiac intervals, pNN50 (percentage of cardiointervals>50 ms different from preceding interval, power of high frequency (HF and low frequency (LF components of HRV spectrum, LF/HF ratio, were then derived from the recorded EKG. We expected that the course of 18 weekly inhibitory low-frequency rTMS applied to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC would enhance autonomic balance by facilitating frontal inhibition of limbic activity thus resulting in decreased overall heart rate, increased HRV (in a form of increased HF power, decreased LF power (resulting in decreased LF/HF ratio, and decreased SCL. Behavioral evaluations post-18 TMS showed decreased irritability, hyperactivity, stereotype behavior and compulsive behavior ratings while autonomic measures indicated a significant increase in cardiac interval variability and a decrease of tonic SCL. The results suggest that 18 sessions of low frequency rTMS in ASD results in increased cardiac vagal control and reduced sympathetic arousal.

  9. rTMS treatments combined with speech training for a conduction aphasia patient: A case report with MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Chen, Ying; Hu, Ruiping; Yang, Liqing; Wang, Mengxing; Zhang, Jilei; Lu, Haifeng; Wu, Yi; Du, Xiaoxia

    2017-08-01

    To date, little is known regarding the neural mechanisms of the functional recovery of language after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in aphasia. Our aim was to investigate the mechanism that underlies rTMS and speech training in a case report. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman who was initially diagnosed with conduction aphasia following a left hemisphere stroke. The rTMS location comprised the left Broca area, and a frequency of 5 Hz for 20 min/d for 10 days during a 2-week period was used. She had received speech rehabilitation training 1 month after stroke. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging were used to investigate the functional and microstructural changes before and after rTMS treatment. The results demonstrated that the Western Aphasia Battery scores significantly improved for language ability at 2 weeks post-treatment, and the gains were steadily increased at 2.5 months post-treatment. The fMRI results indicated a more focused activation pattern and showed significant activation in the left dominant hemisphere relative to the right hemisphere, especially in the perilesional areas, post-treatment during 2 language tasks compared with pretreatment. Moreover, the fractional anisotropy increased in the left superior temporal gyrus, which comprises an important area that is involved in language processing. Our findings suggest that rTMS combined with speech training improved the speech-language ability of this chronic conduction aphasia patient and enhanced the cerebral functional and microstructural reorganization.

  10. Differential effects of motor cortical excitability and plasticity in young and old individuals: a Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid eBashir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with changes in the motor system that, over time, can lead to functional impairments and contribute negatively to the ability to recover after brain damage. Unfortunately, there are still many questions surrounding the physiological mechanisms underlying these impairments. We examined cortico-spinal excitability and plasticity in a young cohort (age range: 19-31 and an elderly cohort (age range: 47-73 of healthy right-handed individuals using navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS. Subjects were evaluated with a combination of physiological (motor evoked potentials (MEPs, motor threshold (MT, intracortical inhibition (ICI, intracortical facilitation (ICF, and silent period (SP and behavioral (reaction time (RT, pinch force, 9 hole peg task (HPT measures at baseline and following one session of low-frequency (1 Hz navigated repetitive TMS (rTMS to the right (non-dominant hemisphere.In the young cohort, the inhibitory effect of 1 Hz rTMS was significantly in the right hemisphere and a significant facilitatory effect was noted in the unstimulated hemisphere. Conversely, in the elderly cohort, we report only a trend toward a facilitatory effect in the unstimulated hemisphere, suggesting reduced cortical plasticity and interhemispheric commuinication. To this effect, we show that significant differences in hemispheric cortico-spinal excitability were present in the elderly cohort at baseline, with significantly reduced cortico-spinal excitability in the right hemisphere as compared to the left hemisphere. A correlation analysis revealed no significant relationship between cortical thickness of the selected region of interest and MEPs in either young or old subjects prior to and following rTMS. When combined with our preliminary results, further research into this topic could lead to the development of neurophysiological markers pertinent to the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of neurological

  11. Distinct Control of Initiation and Metrics of Memory-Guided Saccades and Vergence by the FEF: A TMS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing; Kapoula, Zoi

    2011-01-01

    Background The initiation of memory guided saccades is known to be controlled by the frontal eye field (FEF). Recent physiological studies showed the existence of an area close to FEF that controls also vergence initiation and execution. This study is to explore the effect of transcranial magnetic simulation (TMS) over FEF on the control of memory-guided saccade-vergence eye movements. Methodology/Principal Findings Subjects had to make an eye movement in dark towards a target flashed 1 sec earlier (memory delay); the location of the target relative to fixation point was such as to require either a vergence along the median plane, or a saccade, or a saccade with vergence; trials were interleaved. Single pulse TMS was applied on the left or right FEF; it was delivered at 100 ms after the end of memory delay, i.e. extinction of fixation LED that was the “go” signal. Twelve healthy subjects participated in the study. TMS of left or right FEF prolonged the latency of all types of eye movements; the increase varied from 21 to 56 ms and was particularly strong for the divergence movements. This indicates that FEF is involved in the initiation of all types of memory guided movement in the 3D space. TMS of the FEF also altered the accuracy but only for leftward saccades combined with either convergence or divergence; intrasaccadic vergence also increased after TMS of the FEF. Conclusions/Significance The results suggest anisotropy in the quality of space memory and are discussed in the context of other known perceptual motor anisotropies. PMID:21637804

  12. Distinct control of initiation and metrics of memory-guided saccades and vergence by the FEF: a TMS study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The initiation of memory guided saccades is known to be controlled by the frontal eye field (FEF. Recent physiological studies showed the existence of an area close to FEF that controls also vergence initiation and execution. This study is to explore the effect of transcranial magnetic simulation (TMS over FEF on the control of memory-guided saccade-vergence eye movements. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Subjects had to make an eye movement in dark towards a target flashed 1 sec earlier (memory delay; the location of the target relative to fixation point was such as to require either a vergence along the median plane, or a saccade, or a saccade with vergence; trials were interleaved. Single pulse TMS was applied on the left or right FEF; it was delivered at 100 ms after the end of memory delay, i.e. extinction of fixation LED that was the "go" signal. Twelve healthy subjects participated in the study. TMS of left or right FEF prolonged the latency of all types of eye movements; the increase varied from 21 to 56 ms and was particularly strong for the divergence movements. This indicates that FEF is involved in the initiation of all types of memory guided movement in the 3D space. TMS of the FEF also altered the accuracy but only for leftward saccades combined with either convergence or divergence; intrasaccadic vergence also increased after TMS of the FEF. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest anisotropy in the quality of space memory and are discussed in the context of other known perceptual motor anisotropies.

  13. Role of the right inferior parietal cortex in auditory selective attention: An rTMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareham, Corinne A; Georgieva, Stanimira D; Kamke, Marc R; Lloyd, David; Bekinschtein, Tristan A; Mattingley, Jason B

    2018-02-01

    Selective attention is the process of directing limited capacity resources to behaviourally relevant stimuli while ignoring competing stimuli that are currently irrelevant. Studies in healthy human participants and in individuals with focal brain lesions have suggested that the right parietal cortex is crucial for resolving competition for attention. Following right-hemisphere damage, for example, patients may have difficulty reporting a brief, left-sided stimulus if it occurs with a competitor on the right, even though the same left stimulus is reported normally when it occurs alone. Such "extinction" of contralesional stimuli has been documented for all the major sense modalities, but it remains unclear whether its occurrence reflects involvement of one or more specific subregions of the temporo-parietal cortex. Here we employed repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the right hemisphere to examine the effect of disruption of two candidate regions - the supramarginal gyrus (SMG) and the superior temporal gyrus (STG) - on auditory selective attention. Eighteen neurologically normal, right-handed participants performed an auditory task, in which they had to detect target digits presented within simultaneous dichotic streams of spoken distractor letters in the left and right channels, both before and after 20 min of 1 Hz rTMS over the SMG, STG or a somatosensory control site (S1). Across blocks, participants were asked to report on auditory streams in the left, right, or both channels, which yielded focused and divided attention conditions. Performance was unchanged for the two focused attention conditions, regardless of stimulation site, but was selectively impaired for contralateral left-sided targets in the divided attention condition following stimulation of the right SMG, but not the STG or S1. Our findings suggest a causal role for the right inferior parietal cortex in auditory selective attention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  14. An efficient and accurate new method for locating the F3 position for prefrontal TMS applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, William; Borckardt, Jeffrey J; Reeves, Scott T; George, Mark S

    2009-01-01

    The International 10-20 system is a method for standardized placement of electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes. The 10-20 system correlates external skull locations with the underlying cortical areas. This system accounts for variability in patient skull size by using certain percentages of the circumference and distances between four basic anatomical landmarks. This 10-20 system has recently been used in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) research for locating specific cortical areas. In the treatment of depression (and some types of pain), the desired placement of the TMS coil is often above the left dorsalateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) which corresponds to the F3 location given by the 10-20 system. However, for an administrator with little experience with the 10-20 system, the numerous measurements and calculations can be excessively time-consuming. Additionally, with more measurements comes more opportunity for human error. For this reason we have developed a new, simpler and faster way to find the F3 position using only three skull measurements. In this paper, we describe and illustrate the application of the new F3 location system, provide the formulas used in the calculation of the F3 position, and summarize data from 10 healthy adults. After using both the International 10-20 system and this new method, it appears that the new method is sufficiently accurate; however, future investigations may be warranted to conduct more in dept analyses of the method's utility and potential limitations. This system requires less time and training to find the optimal position for prefrontal coil placement and it saves considerable time compared to the 10-20 EEG system.

  15. Implementasi Filter Finite Impulse Response (FIR Window Hamming dan Blackman menggunakan DSK TMS320C6713

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LITA LIDYAWATI

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Filter didefinisikan sebagai proses atau rangkaian yang melewatkan pita frekuensi tertentu yang diinginkan dan meredam pita frekuensi lainnya. Salah satu metode perancangan filter digital Finite Impulse Response (FIR adalah metode windowing. Dalam penelitian ini digunakan jenis window Hamming dan Blackman. Simulasi dilakukan dengan menggunakan software Matlab dengan memasukan frekuensi passband, frekuensi stopband, ripple passband, dan stopband attenuation. Dengan frekuensi sampling sebesar 15000 Hz, frekuensi passband sebesar 3000 Hz, frekuensi stopband sebesar 5000 Hz. Setelah simulasi dilakukan implementasi filter dengan parameter yang sama menggunakan DSK TMS 320C6713 dengan bantuan software CCS. Simulasi dan implementasi dilakukan pada semua band frekuensi. Hasil pengujian terhadap implementasi filter adalah respon magnitude, frekuensi cut-off, bandwidth, dan faktor kualitas dengan hasil simulasi tidak menunjukkan perbedaan yang signifikan. Kata kunci: filter digital, windowing, Hamming, Blackman, frekuensi cut-off . ABSTRACT Filter is defined as a process or series that skip certain desired frequency band and other frequency bands drown. One method of designing a digital filter Finite Impulse Response (FIR is a windowing method. This study used the type of window Hamming and Blackman. Simulations performed using Matlab software by inserting a frequency passband, stopband frequency, passband ripple, and stopband attenuation. With a sampling frequency of 15,000 Hz, a frequency of 3000 Hz passband, stopband frequency of 5000 Hz. After the simulation is completed, implementation of the filter with the same parameters using TMS 320C6713 DSK with the help of software CCS. Simulation and implmentasi performed on all frequency bands. The test results of the implementation of the filter is the Magnitude response, the cut-off frequency, bandwidth, and quality factor with simulation results showed no significant difference. Keywords: digital

  16. The Neuroprotective Mechanism of Low-Frequency rTMS on Nigral Dopaminergic Neurons of Parkinson’s Disease Model Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoyun Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease in elder people, pathophysiologic basis of which is the severe deficiency of dopamine in the striatum. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of low-frequency rTMS on Parkinson’s disease in model mice. Methods. The effects of low-frequency rTMS on the motor function, cortex excitability, neurochemistry, and neurohistopathology of MPTP-induced Parkinson’s disease mice were investigated through behavioral detection, electrophysiologic technique, high performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection, immunohistochemical staining, and western blot. Results. Low-frequency rTMS could improve the motor coordination impairment of Parkinson’s disease mice: the resting motor threshold significantly decreased in the Parkinson’s disease mice; the degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neuron and the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase were significantly improved by low-frequency rTMS; moreover, the expressions of brain derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor were also improved by low-frequency rTMS. Conclusions. Low-frequency rTMS had a neuroprotective effect on the nigral dopaminergic neuron which might be due to the improved expressions of brain derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The present study provided a theoretical basis for the application of low-frequency rTMS in the clinical treatment and recovery of Parkinson’s disease.

  17. A history of the American Society for Clinical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Joel D.

    2009-01-01

    One hundred years ago, in 1909, the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI) held its first annual meeting. The founding members based this new society on a revolutionary approach to research that emphasized newer physiological methods. In 1924 the ASCI started a new journal, the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The ASCI has also held an annual meeting almost every year. The society has long debated who could be a member, with discussions about whether members must be physicians, what sorts of research they could do, and the role of women within the society. The ASCI has also grappled with what else the society should do, especially whether it ought to take a stand on policy issues. ASCI history has reflected changing social, political, and economic contexts, including several wars, concerns about the ethics of biomedical research, massive increases in federal research funding, and an increasingly large and specialized medical environment. PMID:19348041

  18. Scoliosis Research Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoliosis Research Society Close Menu Member Login Become a Member Home Find a Specialist | Calendar Contact | Donate ... a Member Find a Specialist Calendar Contact Donate Scoliosis Research Society Dedicated to the optimal care of ...

  19. April 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A dinner meeting was held on Wednesday, 4/24/2013 at Scottsdale Shea beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 13 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, infectious disease, and radiology communities. Drs. Gotway and August, thoracic radiologists, were both unable to attend. Dr. Tilman Kolesch from Maricopa more than capably filled in as our radiologist. The meeting was preceded by a discussion on Pharma and the availability of physicians who accept money, including dinners, from pharmaceutical companies. The Arizona Thoracic Society is sponsored by pharmaceutical companies. Ken Knox asked if Arizona Thoracic Society meetings could be held in Tucson during July and December, the two months meetings have not been scheduled. The attendees enthusiastically endorsed this expansion of the Arizona Thoracic Society meetings. In addition, Dr. Knox wishes to sponsor a winter symposium in Tucson in collaboration with the Arizona Thoracic Society. The attendees also enthusiastically endorsed this meeting. Four …

  20. Reclaiming Society Publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip E. Steinberg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Learned societies have become aligned with commercial publishers, who have increasingly taken over the latter’s function as independent providers of scholarly information. Using the example of geographical societies, the advantages and disadvantages of this trend are examined. It is argued that in an era of digital publication, learned societies can offer leadership with a new model of open access that can guarantee high quality scholarly material whose publication costs are supported by society membership dues.

  1. Effects of TMS on different stages of motor and non-motor verb processing in the primary motor cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liuba Papeo

    Full Text Available The embodied cognition hypothesis suggests that motor and premotor areas are automatically and necessarily involved in understanding action language, as word conceptual representations are embodied. This transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS study explores the role of the left primary motor cortex in action-verb processing. TMS-induced motor-evoked potentials from right-hand muscles were recorded as a measure of M1 activity, while participants were asked either to judge explicitly whether a verb was action-related (semantic task or to decide on the number of syllables in a verb (syllabic task. TMS was applied in three different experiments at 170, 350 and 500 ms post-stimulus during both tasks to identify when the enhancement of M1 activity occurred during word processing. The delays between stimulus onset and magnetic stimulation were consistent with electrophysiological studies, suggesting that word recognition can be differentiated into early (within 200 ms and late (within 400 ms lexical-semantic stages, and post-conceptual stages. Reaction times and accuracy were recorded to measure the extent to which the participants' linguistic performance was affected by the interference of TMS with M1 activity. No enhancement of M1 activity specific for action verbs was found at 170 and 350 ms post-stimulus, when lexical-semantic processes are presumed to occur (Experiments 1-2. When TMS was applied at 500 ms post-stimulus (Experiment 3, processing action verbs, compared with non-action verbs, increased the M1-activity in the semantic task and decreased it in the syllabic task. This effect was specific for hand-action verbs and was not observed for action-verbs related to other body parts. Neither accuracy nor RTs were affected by TMS. These findings suggest that the lexical-semantic processing of action verbs does not automatically activate the M1. This area seems to be rather involved in post-conceptual processing that follows the retrieval of motor

  2. Effects of TMS on Different Stages of Motor and Non-Motor Verb Processing in the Primary Motor Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papeo, Liuba; Vallesi, Antonino; Isaja, Alessio; Rumiati, Raffaella Ida

    2009-01-01

    The embodied cognition hypothesis suggests that motor and premotor areas are automatically and necessarily involved in understanding action language, as word conceptual representations are embodied. This transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) study explores the role of the left primary motor cortex in action-verb processing. TMS-induced motor-evoked potentials from right-hand muscles were recorded as a measure of M1 activity, while participants were asked either to judge explicitly whether a verb was action-related (semantic task) or to decide on the number of syllables in a verb (syllabic task). TMS was applied in three different experiments at 170, 350 and 500 ms post-stimulus during both tasks to identify when the enhancement of M1 activity occurred during word processing. The delays between stimulus onset and magnetic stimulation were consistent with electrophysiological studies, suggesting that word recognition can be differentiated into early (within 200 ms) and late (within 400 ms) lexical-semantic stages, and post-conceptual stages. Reaction times and accuracy were recorded to measure the extent to which the participants' linguistic performance was affected by the interference of TMS with M1 activity. No enhancement of M1 activity specific for action verbs was found at 170 and 350 ms post-stimulus, when lexical-semantic processes are presumed to occur (Experiments 1–2). When TMS was applied at 500 ms post-stimulus (Experiment 3), processing action verbs, compared with non-action verbs, increased the M1-activity in the semantic task and decreased it in the syllabic task. This effect was specific for hand-action verbs and was not observed for action-verbs related to other body parts. Neither accuracy nor RTs were affected by TMS. These findings suggest that the lexical-semantic processing of action verbs does not automatically activate the M1. This area seems to be rather involved in post-conceptual processing that follows the retrieval of motor

  3. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) influences spatial cognition and modulates hippocampal structural synaptic plasticity in aging mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Zhang, Zhanchi; Kang, Lin; Geng, Dandan; Wang, Yanyong; Wang, Mingwei; Cui, Huixian

    2014-10-01

    Normal aging is characteristic with the gradual decline in cognitive function associated with the progressive reduction of structural and functional plasticity in the hippocampus. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has developed into a novel neurological and psychiatric tool that can be used to investigate the neurobiology of cognitive function. Recent studies have demonstrated that low-frequency rTMS (≤1Hz) affects synaptic plasticity in rats with vascular dementia (VaD), and it ameliorates the spatial cognitive ability in mice with Aβ1-42-mediated memory deficits, but there are little concerns about the effects of rTMS on normal aging related cognition and synaptic plasticity changes. Thus, the current study investigated the effects of rTMS on spatial memory behavior, neuron and synapse morphology in the hippocampus, and synaptic protein markers and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) in normal aging mice, to illustrate the mechanisms of rTMS in regulating cognitive capacity. Relative to adult animals, aging caused hippocampal-dependent cognitive impairment, simultaneously inhibited the activation of the BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway, reduced the transcription and expression of synaptic protein markers: synaptophysin (SYN), growth associated protein 43 (GAP43) and post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), as well as decreased synapse density and PSD (post-synaptic density) thickness. Interestingly, rTMS with low intensity (110% average resting motor threshold intensity, 1Hz, LIMS) triggered the activation of BDNF and TrkB, upregulated the level of synaptic protein markers, and increased synapse density and thickened PSD, and further reversed the spatial cognition dysfunction in aging mice. Conversely, high-intensity magnetic stimulation (150% average resting motor threshold intensity, 1Hz, HIMS) appeared to be detrimental, inducing thinning of PSDs, disordered synaptic structure, and a large number of

  4. Vibration and impulsivity analysis of hand held olive beaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deboli, Roberto; Calvo, Angela; Preti, Christian

    2016-07-01

    To provide more effective evaluations of hand arm vibration syndromes caused by hand held olive beaters, this study focused on two aspects: the acceleration measured at the tool pole and the analysis of the impulsivity, using the crest factor. The signals were frequency weighted using the weighting curve Wh as described in the ISO 5349-1 standard. The same source signals were also filtered by the Wh-bl filter (ISO/TS 15694), because the weighting filter Wh (unlike the Wh-bl filter) could underestimate the effect of high frequency vibration on vibration-induced finger disorders. Ten (experienced) male operators used three beater models (battery powered) in the real olive harvesting condition. High vibration total values were obtained with values never lower than 20 m(-2). Concerning the crest factor, the values ranged from 5 to more than 22. This work demonstrated that the hand held olive beaters produced high impulsive loads comparable to the industry hand held tools. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Food habits and beliefs in transitional societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, A

    1998-12-01

    This paper discusses the concept of the nutrition transition in detail. It commences with an overview of societies which are recognised as being in transition. The economic foundations of the transition from traditional to modern (and post-modern societies) will be emphasised. This will be followed by an examination of the nutrition problems and food habits associated with transitional societies. The public health context of such nutritional problems will also be described. Comparisons will be made between the food beliefs and habits held in traditional societies and those in transitional, modern and post-modern societies. It will be argued that nutritional and medical beliefs have come to play more extensive roles in non-traditional societies, most probably through the mass media. Changes in personal values associated with societal transition will be described in relation to the pursuit of luxury foods. Finally, some of the responses to the nutritional problems of transitional societies will be described. The essential roles of government and non-government organisations in moderating harmful effects of the global economy will be elucidated. It will be argued that the success of nutrition interventions such as food-based dietary guideline policies depend on the development of effective national and local social organisations.

  6. The Information Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiranya Nath

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article briefly discusses various definitions and concepts of the so-called information society. The term information society has been proposed to refer to the post-industrial society in which information plays a pivotal role. The definitions that have been proposed over the years highlight five underlying characterisations of an information society: technological, economic, sociological, spatial, and cultural. This article discusses those characteristics. While the emergence of an information society may be just a figment of one’s imagination, the concept could be a good organising principle to describe and analyse the changes of the past 50 years and of the future in the 21st century.

  7. An evoked auditory response fMRI study of the effects of rTMS on putative AVH pathways in healthy volunteers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tracy, D K

    2010-01-01

    Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) are the most prevalent symptom in schizophrenia. They are associated with increased activation within the temporoparietal cortices and are refractory to pharmacological and psychological treatment in approximately 25% of patients. Low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the temporoparietal cortex has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing AVH in some patients, although results have varied. The cortical mechanism by which rTMS exerts its effects remain unknown, although data from the motor system is suggestive of a local cortical inhibitory effect. We explored neuroimaging differences in healthy volunteers between application of a clinically utilized rTMS protocol and a sham rTMS equivalent when undertaking a prosodic auditory task.

  8. Assessment of cortical response during motor task in adults by a multimodality approach based on fNIRS-EEG, fMRI-EEG, and TMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torricelli, Alessandro; Contini, Davide; Caffini, Matteo; Zucchelli, Lucia; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Molteni, Erika; Bianchi, Anna Maria; Baselli, Giuseppe; Cerutti, Sergio; Visani, Elisa; Gilioli, Isabella; Rossi Sebastiano, Davide; Schiaffi, Elena; Panzica, Ferruccio; Franceschetti, Silvana

    2011-07-01

    A multimodality approach based on fNIRS-EEG, fMRI-EEG and TMS was used on adult volunteers during motor task aiming at optimizing a functional imaging procedure to be eventually used on patients with movement disorders.

  9. The left visual-field advantage in rapid visual presentation is amplified rather than reduced by posterior-parietal rTMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verleger, Rolf; Möller, Friderike; Kuniecki, Michal

    2010-01-01

    In the present task, series of visual stimuli are rapidly presented left and right, containing two target stimuli, T1 and T2. In previous studies, T2 was better identified in the left than in the right visual field. This advantage of the left visual field might reflect dominance exerted...... by the right over the left hemisphere. If so, then repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the right parietal cortex might release the left hemisphere from right-hemispheric control, thereby improving T2 identification in the right visual field. Alternatively or additionally, the asymmetry in T2...... identification might reflect capacity limitations of the left hemisphere, which might be aggravated by rTMS to the left parietal cortex. Therefore, rTMS pulses were applied during each trial, beginning simultaneously with T1 presentation. rTMS was directed either to P4 or to P3 (right or left parietal cortex...

  10. Symposia, congresses, societies, meetings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1985-01-01

    Please submit your announcement to this Bulletin as early as possible! Several made here were received too late for interested readers to make use of. After the event please send a summary of the doings, and/or the Proceedings, if any. Settlement of aliens was the subject of a colloquium held at

  11. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in schizophrenia with treatment-refractory auditory hallucinations and major self-mutilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Torsten; Berger, Christoph; Krecklow, Beate; Kurth, Jens; Schwarzenboeck, Sarah; Foley, Paul; Thome, Johannes; Krause, Bernd Joachim; Hoeppner, Jacqueline

    2015-08-01

    Major self-mutilation is one of the most hazardous complications encountered in psychiatric patients, and is generally associated with auditory verbal hallucinations as part of a psychotic syndrome. This case report exemplarily discusses the treatment of such hallucinations with repeated (20 sessions) low-frequency (1 Hz) transcranial magnetic stimulation targeting areas of elevated metabolic activity in the temporo-parietal cortex ('neuronavigated rTMS'), drawing upon experience concerning treatment of a patient with chronic auditory verbal hallucinations that had proved intractable to antipsychotic medication combined with cognitive behavioural therapy, and who had severed a forearm because of the content of these hallucinations. This example of major self-mutilation underscores the urgent requirement for effective management of chronic auditory verbal hallucinations in patients suffering from psychiatric disease, and neuronavigated rTMS represents an approach that deserves further exploration in this regard.

  12. Cortical inhibition of distinct mechanisms in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is related to working memory performance: a TMS-EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogasch, Nigel C; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2015-03-01

    Paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) is a method for studying cortical inhibition from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying TMS-evoked cortical potentials (TEPs) from this region, let alone inhibition of these components. The aim of this study was to assess cortical inhibition of distinct TEPs and oscillations in the DLPFC using TMS-EEG and to investigate the relationship of these mechanisms to working memory. 30 healthy volunteers received single and paired (interstimulus interval = 100 msec) TMS to the left DLPFC. Variations in long-interval cortical inhibition (LICI) of different TEP peaks (N40, P60, N100) and different TMS-evoked oscillations (alpha, lower beta, upper beta, gamma) were compared between individuals. Variation in N100 slope following single pulse TMS, another putative marker of inhibition, was also compared with LICI of each measure. Finally, these measures were correlated with performance of a working memory task. LICI resulted in significant suppression of all TEP peaks and TMS-evoked oscillations (all p Variation in N100 slope correlated with LICI of N40 and beta oscillations. In addition, LICI of P60 and N100 were differentially correlated with working memory performance. The results suggest that both the LICI paradigm and N100 following single pulse TMS reflect complementary methods for assessing GABAB-mediated cortical inhibition in the DLPFC. Furthermore, these measures demonstrate the importance of prefrontal GABAB-mediated inhibitory control for working memory performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Motor cortex inhibition by TMS reduces cognitive non-motor procedural learning when immediate incentives are present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Leonora; Koshy, Philip J; Steel, Adam; Bageac, Devin; Schintu, Selene; Wassermann, Eric M

    2017-12-01

    Inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the primary motor area (M1) impairs motor sequence-learning, but not basic motor function. It is unknown if this is specific for motor forms of procedural learning or a more general effect. To investigate, we tested the effect of M1-inhibition on the weather prediction task (WPT), a learning task with minimal motor learning component. In the WPT, participants learn arbitrary, probabilistic, associations between sets of meaningless cues and fictional outcomes. In our "Feedback" (FB) condition, they received monetary rewards/punishments during learning. In the "paired associate" (PA) condition they learned the same information by passive observation of associations. The observational and feedback learning conditions were matched for their non-learning-specific motor demands. In each of two FB or PA sessions, we delivered Real (inhibitory) or Sham continuous theta-burst (cTBS) to the left-M1, before 150 training-trials. We then tested learning with 42 trials without feedback immediately after learning and again 1-h after cTBS. Compared to Sham, Real cTBS reduced performance during FB-learning, when learning was immediately reinforced, but not when knowledge was tested after PA learning. Furthermore, when FB-based memory was tested after learning without immediate incentive, there was no effect of TMS compared to post-PA test performance, showing the TMS effect operated only in the presence of incentive and feedback. We conclude that M1 is a node in a network underlying feedback-driven procedural learning and inhibitory rTMS there results in decreased network efficiency. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Reductions in Cortico-Striatal Hyperconnectivity Accompany Successful Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder with Dorsomedial Prefrontal rTMS

    OpenAIRE

    Dunlop, Katharine; Woodside, Blake; Olmsted, Marion; Colton, Patricia; Giacobbe, Peter; Downar, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a disabling illness with high rates of nonresponse to conventional treatments. OCD pathophysiology is believed to involve abnormalities in cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical circuits through regions such as dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) and ventral striatum. These regions may constitute therapeutic targets for neuromodulation treatments, such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). However, the neurobiological predictors and corre...

  15. A multi-scale computational model of the effects of TMS on motor cortex [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Seo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The detailed biophysical mechanisms through which transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS activates cortical circuits are still not fully understood. Here we present a multi-scale computational model to describe and explain the activation of different pyramidal cell types in motor cortex due to TMS. Our model determines precise electric fields based on an individual head model derived from magnetic resonance imaging and calculates how these electric fields activate morphologically detailed models of different neuron types. We predict neural activation patterns for different coil orientations consistent with experimental findings. Beyond this, our model allows us to calculate activation thresholds for individual neurons and precise initiation sites of individual action potentials on the neurons’ complex morphologies. Specifically, our model predicts that cortical layer 3 pyramidal neurons are generally easier to stimulate than layer 5 pyramidal neurons, thereby explaining the lower stimulation thresholds observed for I-waves compared to D-waves. It also shows differences in the regions of activated cortical layer 5 and layer 3 pyramidal cells depending on coil orientation. Finally, it predicts that under standard stimulation conditions, action potentials are mostly generated at the axon initial segment of cortical pyramidal cells, with a much less important activation site being the part of a layer 5 pyramidal cell axon where it crosses the boundary between grey matter and white matter. In conclusion, our computational model offers a detailed account of the mechanisms through which TMS activates different cortical pyramidal cell types, paving the way for more targeted application of TMS based on individual brain morphology in clinical and basic research settings.

  16. Combined rTMS and virtual reality brain-computer interface training for motor recovery after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, N N; Carey, J; Edelman, B J; Doud, A; Grande, A; Lakshminarayan, K; He, B

    2018-02-01

    Combining repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) with brain-computer interface (BCI) training can address motor impairment after stroke by down-regulating exaggerated inhibition from the contralesional hemisphere and encouraging ipsilesional activation. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of combined rTMS  +  BCI, compared to sham rTMS  +  BCI, on motor recovery after stroke in subjects with lasting motor paresis. Three stroke subjects approximately one year post-stroke participated in three weeks of combined rTMS (real or sham) and BCI, followed by three weeks of BCI alone. Behavioral and electrophysiological differences were evaluated at baseline, after three weeks, and after six weeks of treatment. Motor improvements were observed in both real rTMS  +  BCI and sham groups, but only the former showed significant alterations in inter-hemispheric inhibition in the desired direction and increased relative ipsilesional cortical activation from fMRI. In addition, significant improvements in BCI performance over time and adequate control of the virtual reality BCI paradigm were observed only in the former group. When combined, the results highlight the feasibility and efficacy of combined rTMS  +  BCI for motor recovery, demonstrated by increased ipsilesional motor activity and improvements in behavioral function for the real rTMS  +  BCI condition in particular. Our findings also demonstrate the utility of BCI training alone, as shown by behavioral improvements for the sham rTMS  +  BCI condition. This study is the first to evaluate combined rTMS and BCI training for motor rehabilitation and provides a foundation for continued work to evaluate the potential of both rTMS and virtual reality BCI training for motor recovery after stroke.

  17. Combined rTMS and virtual reality brain–computer interface training for motor recovery after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, N. N.; Carey, J.; Edelman, B. J.; Doud, A.; Grande, A.; Lakshminarayan, K.; He, B.

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Combining repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) with brain–computer interface (BCI) training can address motor impairment after stroke by down-regulating exaggerated inhibition from the contralesional hemisphere and encouraging ipsilesional activation. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of combined rTMS  +  BCI, compared to sham rTMS  +  BCI, on motor recovery after stroke in subjects with lasting motor paresis. Approach. Three stroke subjects approximately one year post-stroke participated in three weeks of combined rTMS (real or sham) and BCI, followed by three weeks of BCI alone. Behavioral and electrophysiological differences were evaluated at baseline, after three weeks, and after six weeks of treatment. Main results. Motor improvements were observed in both real rTMS  +  BCI and sham groups, but only the former showed significant alterations in inter-hemispheric inhibition in the desired direction and increased relative ipsilesional cortical activation from fMRI. In addition, significant improvements in BCI performance over time and adequate control of the virtual reality BCI paradigm were observed only in the former group. Significance. When combined, the results highlight the feasibility and efficacy of combined rTMS  +  BCI for motor recovery, demonstrated by increased ipsilesional motor activity and improvements in behavioral function for the real rTMS  +  BCI condition in particular. Our findings also demonstrate the utility of BCI training alone, as shown by behavioral improvements for the sham rTMS  +  BCI condition. This study is the first to evaluate combined rTMS and BCI training for motor rehabilitation and provides a foundation for continued work to evaluate the potential of both rTMS and virtual reality BCI training for motor recovery after stroke.

  18. Different effects of double-pulse TMS of the posterior parietal cortex on reflexive and voluntary saccades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoi eKAPOULA

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Gap and overlap tasks are widely used to promote automatic versus controlled saccades. This study examines the hypothesis that the right posterior parietal cortex (PPC is differently involved in the two tasks. Twelve healthy students participated in the experiment. We used double-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS on the right PPC, the first pulse delivered at the target onset and the second 65 or 80ms later. Each subject performed several blocks of gap or overlap task with or without dTMS. Eye movements were recorded with an Eyelink device. The results show an increase of latency of saccades after dTMS of the right PPC for both tasks but for different time windows (0-80ms for the gap task, 0-65ms for the overlap task. Moreover, for rightward saccades the coefficient of variation of latency increased in the gap task but decreased in the overlap task. Finally, in the gap task and for leftward saccades only, dTMS at 0-80ms decreased the amplitude and the speed of saccades. Although the study is preliminary and needs further investigation in detail, the results support the hypothesis that the right PPC is involved differently in the initiation of the saccades for two tasks: in the gap task the PPC controls saccade triggering while in the overlap task it could be a relay to the Frontal Eye Fields which is known to control voluntary saccades, e.g. memory-guided and perhaps the controlled saccades in the overlap task The results have theoretical and clinical significance as gap-overlap tasks are easy to perform even in advanced age and in patients with neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Hand-held Dynamo-metry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, Rutger Jan Otto van der

    1992-01-01

    This study describes the application of a hand-held dynamometer that was designed to measure muscle strength in normal individuals and neurological patients in a simple way, comparable to manual muscle testing. Zie: Summary

  20. Precision of hand-held dental radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueggeberg, F A

    1993-06-01

    The intensity of light within the wavelengths of 400 to 500 nm on a dental photocurable resin restorative material is a vital factor affecting many of the physical and chemical properties of the resulting restoration. This paper compares the precision of two recently introduced hand-held radiometers. The results indicate that the response of both hand-held meters was linear. For a given amount of decrease in light source intensity, both hand-held units responded with a corresponding decrement in measured intensity value. Both hand-held meters were found to limit their pass band of intensity readings between 400 and 515 nm, making them very useful clinical instruments. However, the absolute intensity readings between the two units were significantly different.

  1. Language mapping in healthy volunteers and brain tumor patients with a novel navigated TMS system: evidence of tumor-induced plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösler, J; Niraula, B; Strack, V; Zdunczyk, A; Schilt, S; Savolainen, P; Lioumis, P; Mäkelä, J; Vajkoczy, P; Frey, D; Picht, T

    2014-03-01

    This article explores the feasibility of a novel repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rnTMS) system and compares language mapping results obtained by rnTMS in healthy volunteers and brain tumor patients. Fifteen right-handed healthy volunteers and 50 right-handed consecutive patients with left-sided gliomas were examined with a picture-naming task combined with time-locked rnTMS (5-10 Hz and 80-120% resting motor threshold) applied over both hemispheres. Induced errors were classified into four psycholinguistic types and assigned to their respective cortical areas according to the coil position during stimulation. In healthy volunteers, language disturbances were almost exclusively induced in the left hemisphere. In patients errors were more frequent and induced at a comparative rate over both hemispheres. Predominantly dysarthric errors were induced in volunteers, whereas semantic errors were most frequent in the patient group. The right hemisphere's increased sensitivity to rnTMS suggests reorganization in language representation in brain tumor patients. rnTMS is a novel technology for exploring cortical language representation. This study proves the feasibility and safety of rnTMS in patients with brain tumor. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. TMS-EEG reveals hemispheric asymmetries in top-down influences of posterior intraparietal cortex on behavior and visual event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Mika; Grassini, Simone; Hurme, Mikko; Salminen-Vaparanta, Niina; Railo, Henry; Vorobyev, Victor; Tallus, Jussi; Paavilainen, Teemu; Revonsuo, Antti

    2017-11-11

    Clinical data and behavioral studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) suggest right-hemisphere dominance for top-down modulation of visual processing in humans. We used concurrent TMS-EEG to directly test for hemispheric differences in causal influences of the right and left intraparietal cortex on visual event-related potentials (ERPs). We stimulated the left and right posterior part of intraparietal sulcus (IPS1) while the participants were viewing and rating the visibility of bilaterally presented Gabor patches. Subjective visibility ratings showed that TMS of right IPS shifted the visibility toward the right hemifield, while TMS of left IPS did not have any behavioral effect. TMS of right IPS, but not left one, reduced the amplitude of posterior N1 potential, 180-220 ms after stimulus-onset. The attenuation of N1 occurred bilaterally over the posterior areas of both hemispheres. Consistent with previous TMS-fMRI studies, this finding suggests that the right IPS has top-down control on the neural processing in visual cortex. As N1 most probably reflects reactivation of early visual areas, the current findings support the view that the posterior parietal cortex in the right hemisphere amplifies recurrent interactions in ventral visual areas during the time-window that is critical for conscious perception. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Prognostic Value of Cortically Induced Motor Evoked Activity by TMS in Chronic Stroke: Caveats from a Revealing Single Clinical Case

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Amengual, Julià L

    2012-06-08

    AbstractBackgroundWe report the case of a chronic stroke patient (62 months after injury) showing total absence of motor activity evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of spared regions of the left motor cortex, but near-to-complete recovery of motor abilities in the affected hand.Case presentationMultimodal investigations included detailed TMS based motor mapping, motor evoked potentials (MEP), and Cortical Silent period (CSP) as well as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of motor activity, MRI based lesion analysis and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) Tractography of corticospinal tract (CST). Anatomical analysis revealed a left hemisphere subinsular lesion interrupting the descending left CST at the level of the internal capsule. The absence of MEPs after intense TMS pulses to the ipsilesional M1, and the reversible suppression of ongoing electromyographic (EMG) activity (indexed by CSP) demonstrate a weak modulation of subcortical systems by the ipsilesional left frontal cortex, but an inability to induce efficient descending volleys from those cortical locations to right hand and forearm muscles. Functional MRI recordings under grasping and finger tapping patterns involving the affected hand showed slight signs of subcortical recruitment, as compared to the unaffected hand and hemisphere, as well as the expected cortical activations.ConclusionsThe potential sources of motor voluntary activity for the affected hand in absence of MEPs are discussed. We conclude that multimodal analysis may contribute to a more accurate prognosis of stroke patients.

  4. Evidence for a social function of the anterior temporal lobes: low-frequency rTMS reduces implicit gender stereotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Cara L; Harris, Justin A; Gallate, Jason E

    2012-01-01

    By nature, stereotypes require processes of categorization or semantic association, including social information about groups of people. There is empirical evidence that the anterior temporal lobe (ATL) processes domain-general semantic information, and supports social knowledge. A recent study showed that inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the ATL reduced racial stereotypes on an implicit association test (IAT). However, it was not determined whether this was caused by changes to specific social, or general semantic processing, or both. The current study addresses these theoretical issues. The design investigated the effect of rTMS to the left or right ATL, or a sham stimulation, on a social IAT (gender stereotypes), a non-social IAT (living versus non-living associations), and a non-semantic control (Stroop) task. The results showed that low-frequency rTMS to both left and right ATL significantly reduced D-scores on the gender IAT compared to the sham group; however, there were no differences on the non-social IAT or the Stroop. The findings show the ATL has a role in mediating stereotypes, and the decrease of bias after stimulation could be due to weakening of social stereotypical associations either within the ATL or via a network of brain regions connected with the ATL.

  5. Temporo-parietal junction is involved in attribution of hostile intentionality in social interactions: an rTMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardina, Angela; Caltagirone, Carlo; Oliveri, Massimiliano

    2011-05-16

    The temporal-parietal junction (TPJ) is a brain area implicated in social cognition, attention, integrating body-related information and self-processing. We investigated involvement of both the left and the right TPJ in a complex social cognitive task that required attributing intentions to other people. Fourteen healthy subjects participated in experiments that involved simulating interactions with other people in everyday conflicting situations. The task was performed following application of inhibitory trains of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the right and the left TPJ and to a control occipital brain site. Results showed a different pattern of involvement for the left and the right TPJ in judgements related to social interactions. When rTMS was applied to the right TPJ, attribution of hostile intentionality to the other increased and the tendency to interpret others' behaviour in terms of non-hostile intentionality decreased. By contrast, rTMS of the left TPJ tended to produce the opposite pattern, that is, attribution of non-hostile intentionality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Left dorsolateral prefrontal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS): sleep factor changes during treatment in patients with pharmacoresistant major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenquist, Peter B; Krystal, Andrew; Heart, Karen L; Demitrack, Mark A; McCall, W Vaughn

    2013-01-30

    As they alleviate major depressive disorder, antidepressant therapies may improve associated sleep disturbances, but may also have inherent sedating or activating properties. We examined sleep changes during a multicenter, sham-controlled, trial of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) therapy for pharmacoresistant MDD. Medication-free outpatients (N=301) were randomized to receive active (N=155) or sham (N=146) TMS for 6 weeks. Depression severity was rated with the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, the 24-item Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), and the Inventory of Depressive Symptoms-Self Report (IDS-SR). Assessments were performed at baseline, 2, 4, and 6 week time points. Sleep was assessed using the HAMD and IDS-SR sleep factors; comparison between treatment groups employed ANCOVA model. No significant differences were identified between the active and sham treatment groups in either the HAMD or IDS-SR sleep factor scores at any time during treatment. Sleep difficulty as an adverse event over the length of the study did not differ between active and sham treatment. Stratified by end of acute treatment responder status, there was a statistically significant improvement in both the HAMD sleep factor score and the IDS-SR sleep factor during acute treatment in both the active and sham treatment conditions. TMS exerts no intrinsic effect upon sleep in patients with MDD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dissociable neural representations of grammatical gender in Broca's area investigated by the combination of satiation and TMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Devlin, Joseph T; Vecchi, Tomaso; Silvanto, Juha

    2009-08-15

    Along with meaning and form, words can be described on the basis of their grammatical properties. Grammatical gender is often used to investigate the latter as it is a grammatical property that is independent of meaning. The left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) has been implicated in the encoding of grammatical gender, but its causal role in this process in neurologically normal observers has not been demonstrated. Here we combined verbal satiation with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to demonstrate that subpopulations of neurons within Broca's area respond preferentially to different classes of grammatical gender. Subjects were asked to classify Italian nouns into living and nonliving categories; half of these words were of masculine and the other half of feminine grammatical gender. Prior to each test block, a satiation paradigm (a phenomenon in which verbal repetition of a category name leads to a reduced access to that category) was used to modulate the initial state of the representations of either masculine or feminine noun categories. In the No TMS condition, subjects were slower in responding to exemplars to the satiated category relative to exemplars of the nonsatiated category, implying that the neural representations for different classes of grammatical gender are partly dissociable. The application of TMS over Broca's area removed the behavioral impact of verbal (grammatical) satiation, demonstrating the causal role of this region in the encoding of grammatical gender. These results show that the neural representations for different cases of a grammatical property within Broca's area are dissociable.

  8. Retaliation or selfishness? An rTMS investigation of the role of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in prosocial motives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Leinß, Jan-Martin; Enzi, Björn; Flasbeck, Vera; Brüne, Martin

    2017-12-01

    Equity, fairness and cooperative behavior are crucial for everyday social interactions. Recent neuroimaging studies suggest that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is involved in the evaluation of violations of fairness rules, though difficulties remain to determine its role in implementing retaliating or forgiving responses to unfairness. Accordingly, we applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the left and right DLPFC and investigated the impact of the DLPFC on retaliation and selfishness using a sequential neuroeconomic task establishing a role reversal. That is, participants first played an Ultimatum Game (in the role of a recipient) against fair or unfair proposers, followed by a Dictator Game in the role of a proposer. Following inhibition of the right DLPFC, subjects showed an increased punishment rate regarding previously unfair opponents. Surprisingly, previously fair opponents were also treated less fairly after rTMS to the right DLPFC, but not after left or sham rTMS. Previous work suggests that the right DLPFC provides "top-down" cognitive control over prepotent emotional responses to unfairness. Our results indicate, however, that the right DLPFC may be involved in controlling selfish behavior and that its suppression leads to maximization of one's own benefit, regardless of another's fairness or unfairness in previous encounters.

  9. The Astronomical Society of New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, A. G. D.

    2000-05-01

    The New York Astronomical Corporation was formed in 1968 by astronomers at New York State universities, colleges and observatories with the aim of building a large telescope for the use of astronomers in the state. Hawaii was selected as a possible site for a 150-in telescope and for a period of five years a vigorous effort was made at fund raising. A grant was received from the New York State Science and Technology Foundation to help in the organization of the group. By 1973 it was decided to stop plans for a New York Telescope since we had no success in the fund raising. However our group was already involved in holding meetings at the member institutions and staff and students would give reports on their work. In 1973 we formally set up the Astronomical Society of New York. Meetings are held twice a year. The Fall meeting is held at Union College or RPI and at this time the business meeting of NYAC is held. The Spring meeting is held at the other member institutions, from Alfred University in the west and the State University of New York at Stony Brook, in the east. The proceedings of the meetings are published in the News Letter of the Astronomical Society of New York. Prizes are awarded for the best graduate and the best undergraduate papers submitted to the Prize Committee. The winners give invited talks at a meeting following the award. Travel grants are awarded to both graduate and undergraduate students who are granted time to observe on optical or radio telescopes. ASNY has provided a good platform for students to give their first papers and by awarding the prizes and travel grants ASNY has been able to support student research. The meetings help to maintain good contacts among New York astronomers.

  10. Civil Society and Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgård, Lars

    An illustration of how important the relationship is between civil society anbd governance. A short historic journey with four snapshots of times and situations that have provided interesting evidence about the connection between civil society and governance. My goal for the short historic journey...... is to make clear and hopefully even verify that providing knowledge about the impact of civil society and citizens’ participation on governance is one of the most urgent research tasks in the current period of time....

  11. Investigating emotional top down modulation of ambiguous faces by single pulse TMS on early visual cortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Adam Yaple

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Top-down processing is a mechanism in which memory, context and expectation are used to perceive stimuli. For this study we investigated how emotion content, induced by music mood, influences perception of happy and sad emoticons. Using single pulse TMS we stimulated right occipital face area (rOFA, primary visual cortex (V1 and vertex while subjects performed a face-detection task and listened to happy and sad music. At baseline, incongruent audio-visual pairings decreased performance, demonstrating dependence of emotion while perceiving ambiguous faces. However, performance of face identification decreased during rOFA stimulation regardless of emotional content. No effects were found between Cz and V1 stimulation. These results suggest that while rOFA is important for processing faces regardless of emotion, V1 stimulation had no effect. Our findings suggest that early visual cortex activity may not integrate emotional auditory information with visual information during emotion top-down modulation of faces.

  12. Efficient implementation of adaptive filters using TMS320C6713 DSP platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Kaoru Takayama

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology for accelerated development of solution associated to adaptive filtering using Matlab/Simulink, Code Composer Studio and DSK 6713 digital signal processing (DSP technologies. The purpose of this methodology is to provide an efficient and rapid method to develop and test adaptive filters in DSPs. The methodology development represents a very important tool for the engineer in charge of design-simulation-implementation of adaptive filters. Another important benefit is that it avoids low level hardware work that can be tedious and time consuming. An example of application is presented in this paper in order to illustrate the feasibility of this methodology. The methodology is applied in order to implement an adaptive filter in the DSP platform. The project steps are discussed in details, including the methods of transforming the Matlab code into DSP code. The results are analyzed in terms of accuracy and convergence speed. The TMS320C6713 development kit supplied by Spectrum Digital Inc., that includes a float point DSP, was used to implement the adaptive filter.

  13. Establishing between-session reliability of TMS-conditioned soleus H-reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, W A; Sabatier, M J; Kesar, T M; Borich, M R

    2017-02-15

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the primary motor cortex (M1) can be used to evaluate descending corticomotor influences on spinal reflex excitability through modulation of the Hoffman reflex (H-reflex). The purpose of this study was to characterize between-session reliability of cortical, spinal, and cortical-conditioned spinal excitability measures collected from the soleus muscle. Thirteen able-bodied young adult participants were tested over four sessions. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to quantify between-session reliability of active motor threshold (AMT), unconditioned H-reflexes (expressed as a percentage of Mmax), and conditioned H-reflexes using short-latency facilitation (SLF) and long-latency facilitation (LLF). Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to assess associations between H-reflex facilitation and unconditioned H-reflex amplitude. Between-session reliability for SLF (ICC=0.71) was higher than for LLF (ICC=0.45), was excellent for AMT (ICC=0.95), and was moderate for unconditioned H-reflexes (ICC=0.63). Our results suggest moderate-to-good reliability of SLF and LLF to evaluate cortical influences on spinal reflex excitability across multiple testing sessions in able-bodied individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. TMS of the occipital cortex induces tactile sensations in the fingers of blind Braille readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptito, M; Fumal, A; de Noordhout, A Martens; Schoenen, J; Gjedde, A; Kupers, R

    2008-01-01

    Various non-visual inputs produce cross-modal responses in the visual cortex of early blind subjects. In order to determine the qualitative experience associated with these occipital activations, we systematically stimulated the entire occipital cortex using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in early blind subjects and in blindfolded seeing controls. Whereas blindfolded seeing controls reported only phosphenes following occipital cortex stimulation, some of the blind subjects reported tactile sensations in the fingers that were somatotopically organized onto the visual cortex. The number of cortical sites inducing tactile sensations appeared to be related to the number of hours of Braille reading per day, Braille reading speed and dexterity. These data, taken in conjunction with previous anatomical, behavioural and functional imaging results, suggest the presence of a polysynaptic cortical pathway between the somatosensory cortex and the visual cortex in early blind subjects. These results also add new evidence that the activity of the occipital lobe in the blind takes its qualitative expression from the character of its new input source, therefore supporting the cortical deference hypothesis.

  15. Lateralization of Motor Cortex Excitability in Stroke Patients during Action Observation: A TMS Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Marangon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Action observation activates the same motor areas as those involved in the performance of the observed actions and promotes functional recovery following stroke. Movement observation is now considered a promising tool for motor rehabilitation, by allowing patients to train their motor functions when voluntary movement is partially impaired. We asked chronic-stroke patients, affected by either left (LHD or right hemisphere (RHD lesions, to observe either a left or right hand, while grasping a small target (eliciting a precision grip or a large target (eliciting a whole hand grasp directed towards a target object. To better understand the effects of action observation on damaged motor circuits, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to induce motor evoked potentials (MEP from two muscles of the unaffected hand in 10 completely hemiplegic participants. Results revealed that LHD patients showed MEP facilitation on the right (contralesional M1 during action observation of hand-object interactions. In contrast, results showed no facilitation of the left (contralesional M1 in RHD patients. Our results confirm that action observation might have a positive influence on the recovery of motor functions after stroke. Activating the motor system by means of action observation might provide a mechanism for improving function, at least in LHD patients.

  16. Purification and characterization of manganese-dependent alkaline serine protease from Bacillus pumilus TMS55.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Kalibulla Syed; Muniyandi, Jeyaraj; Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah

    2011-01-01

    The purification and characterization of a Mn2+-dependent alkaline serine protease produced by Bacillus pumilus TMS55 were investigated. The enzyme was purified in three steps: concentrating the crude enzyme using ammonium sulfate precipitation, followed by gel filtration and cation-exchange chromatography. The purified protease had a molecular mass of approximately 35 kDa, was highly active over a broad pH range of 7.0 to 12.0, and remained stable over a pH range of 7.5 to 11.5. The optimum temperature for the enzyme activity was found to be 60 degreesC. PMSF and AEBSF (1 mM) significantly inhibited the protease activity, indicating that the protease is a serine protease. Mn2+ ions enhanced the activity and stability of the enzyme. In addition, the purified protease remained stable with oxidants (H2O2, 2%) and organic solvents (25%), such as benzene, hexane, and toluene. Therefore, these characteristics of the protease and its dehairing ability indicate its potential for a wide range of commercial applications.

  17. A novel design of subminiature star sensor's imaging system based on TMS320DM3730

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meiying; Wang, Hu; Wen, Desheng; Yang, Shaodong

    2017-02-01

    Development of the next generation star sensor is tending to miniaturization, low cost and low power consumption, so the imaging system based on FPGA in the past could not meet its developing requirements. A novel design of digital imaging system is discussed in this paper. Combined with the MT9P031 CMOS image sensor's timing sequence and working mode, the sensor driving circuit and image data memory circuit were implemented with the main control unit TMS320DM3730. In order to make the hardware system has the advantage of small size and light weight, the hardware adopted miniaturization design. The software simulation and experimental results demonstrated that the designed imaging system was reasonable, the function of tunable integration time and selectable window readout modes were realized. The communication with computer was exact. The system has the advantage of the powerful image processing, small-size, compact, stable, reliable and low power consumption. The whole system volume is 40 mm *40 mm *40mm,the system weight is 105g, the system power consumption is lower than 1w. This design provided a feasible solution for the realization of the subminiature star sensor's imaging system.

  18. Guiding Binocular Saccades during Reading: A TMS Study of the PPC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernet, Marine; Yang, Qing; Kapoula, Zoï

    2011-01-01

    Reading is an activity based on complex sequences of binocular saccades and fixations. During saccades, the eyes do not move together perfectly: saccades could end with a misalignment, compromising fused vision. During fixations, small disconjugate drift can partly reduce this misalignment. We hypothesized that maintaining eye alignment during reading involves active monitoring from posterior parietal cortex (PPC); this goes against traditional views considering only downstream binocular control. Nine young adults read a text; transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied over the PPC every 5 ± 0.2 s. Eye movements were recorded binocularly with Eyelink II. Stimulation had three major effects: (1) disturbance of eye alignment during fixation; (2) increase of saccade disconjugacy leading to eye misalignment; (3) decrease of eye alignment reduction during fixation drift. The effects depend on the side; the right PPC was more involved in maintaining alignment over the motor sequence. Thus, the PPC is actively involved in the control of binocular eye alignment during reading, allowing clear vision. Cortical activation during reading is related to linguistic processes and motor control per se. The study might be of interest for the understanding of deficits of binocular coordination, encountered in several populations, e.g., in children with dyslexia.

  19. Guiding binocular saccades during reading: a TMS study of the PPC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine eVERNET

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Reading is an activity based on complex sequences of binocular saccades and fixations. During saccades, the eyes do not move together perfectly: saccades could end with a misalignment, compromising fused vision. During fixations, small disconjugate drift can partly reduce this misalignment. We hypothesized that maintaining eye alignment during reading involves active monitoring from posterior parietal cortex (PPC; this goes against traditional views considering only downstream binocular control.Nine young adults read a text; transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS was applied over the PPC every 5±0.2 sec. Eye movements were recorded binocularly with Eyelink II. Stimulation had three major effects: (1 disturbance of eye alignment during fixation; (2 increase of saccade disconjugacy leading to eye misalignment; (3 absence of eye alignment reduction during fixation drift. The effects depend on the side; the right PPC was more involved in maintaining alignment over the motor sequence.Thus, the PPC is actively involved in the control of binocular eye alignment during reading, allowing clear vision. Cortical activation during reading is related to linguistic processes and motor control per se. The study might be of interest for the understanding of deficits of binocular coordination, encountered in several populations, e.g. in children with dyslexia.

  20. Meeting Report: 2015 Scientific Meeting of the Pan Arab Interventional Radiology Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauqir A. Rana

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The second Annual Scientific Meeting of the Pan Arab Interventional Radiology Society (PAIRS, held March 12-14, 2015, was a step above the inaugural edition, and opened new concepts for development.

  1. Key paediatric messages from the 2016 European Respiratory Society International Congress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Grigg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the Group Chairs of the Paediatric Assembly of the European Respiratory Society (ERS highlight some of the most interesting abstracts presented at the 2016 ERS International Congress, which was held in London.

  2. Key paediatric messages from the 2016 European Respiratory Society International Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour-Lynn, Ian M.; Everard, Mark; Hall, Graham; Karadag, Bülent; Priftis, Kostas; Roehr, Charles Christoph; Rottier, Bart L.; Midulla, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the Group Chairs of the Paediatric Assembly of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) highlight some of the most interesting abstracts presented at the 2016 ERS International Congress, which was held in London. PMID:28154820

  3. High-sensitivity TMS/fMRI of the Human Motor Cortex Using a Dedicated Multichannel MR Coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro de Lara, Lucia I; Tik, Martin; Woletz, Michael; Frass-Kriegl, Roberta; Moser, Ewald; Laistler, Elmar; Windischberger, Christian

    2017-04-15

    To validate a novel setup for concurrent TMS/fMRI in the human motor cortex based on a dedicated, ultra-thin, multichannel receive MR coil positioned between scalp and TMS system providing greatly enhanced sensitivity compared to the standard birdcage coil setting. A combined TMS/fMRI design was applied over the primary motor cortex based on 1Hz stimulation with stimulation levels of 80%, 90%, 100%, and 110% of the individual active motor threshold, respectively. Due to the use of a multichannel receive coil we were able to use multiband-accelerated (MB=2) EPI sequences for the acquisition of functional images. Data were analysed with SPM12 and BOLD-weighted signal intensity time courses were extracted in each subject from two local maxima (individual functional finger tapping localiser, fixed MNI coordinate of the hand knob) next to the hand area of the primary motor cortex (M1) and from the global maximum. We report excellent image quality without noticeable signal dropouts or image distortions. Parameter estimates in the three peak voxels showed monotonically ascending activation levels over increasing stimulation intensities. Across all subjects, mean BOLD signal changes for 80%, 90%, 100%, 110% of the individual active motor threshold were 0.43%, 0.63%, 1.01%, 2.01% next to the individual functional finger tapping maximum, 0.73%, 0.91%, 1.34%, 2.21% next to the MNI-defined hand knob and 0.88%, 1.09%, 1.65%, 2.77% for the global maximum, respectively. Our results show that the new setup for concurrent TMS/fMRI experiments using a dedicated MR coil array allows for high-sensitivity fMRI particularly at the site of stimulation. Contrary to the standard birdcage approach, the results also demonstrate that the new coil can be successfully used for multiband-accelerated EPI acquisition. The gain in flexibility due to the new coil can be easily combined with neuronavigation within the MR scanner to allow for accurate targeting in TMS/fMRI experiments. Copyright

  4. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Autumn Meeting 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 1999 autumn meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on November 19-20, 1999 in Seoul, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 4 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: Cancer, Neurology, Radiopharmacy and biology, General nuclear medicine. (Yi, J. H.)

  5. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Autumn Meeting 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 2000 autumn meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on November 18, 2000 in Seoul, Korean. This proceedings is comprised of 3 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: nuclear medicine: cost-benefit analysis, radiology, general nuclear medicine and so on. (Yi, J. H.)

  6. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Autumn Meeting 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 2001 autumn meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on November 16-17, 2001 in Seoul, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 6 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: Cancer, Physics of nuclear medicine, Neurology, Radiopharmacy and biology, Nuclear cardiology, General nuclear medicine. (Yi, J. H.)

  7. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Spring Meeting 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 2001 spring meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on May 18, 2001 in Daegu, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 3 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: Nuclear medicine, Neurology, Cancer. (Yi, J. H.)

  8. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Autumn Meeting 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 1998 Autumn meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on November 13-14, 1998 in Seoul, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 5 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: general nuclear medicine, neurology, radiopharmacy and biology, nuclear cardiology, physics and instrumentation. (Yi, J. H.)

  9. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Autumn Meeting 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 2004 autumn meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on November 19-20, 2004 in Seoul, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 4 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: Radiation Chemistry, General Cancer, Cancer PET and General Nuclear Medicine. (Yi, J. H.)

  10. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Spring Meeting 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 1999 spring meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on May 21, 1999 in Chonju, Korea. The subject title of proceedings is radioisotope therapy using Re-188. Radiopharmaceuticals have been used for the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases, mostly for the diagnostic purposes in nuclear medicine. (Yi, J. H.)

  11. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Autumn Meeting 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 2007 autumn meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on October 26-27, 2007 in Seoul, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 4 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: Radiation Chemistry, General Cancer, Cancer PET and General Nuclear Medicine. (Yi, J. H.)

  12. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Autumn Meeting 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 2002 autumn meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on November 15-16, 2002 in Seoul, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 5 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: Cancer, Physics of nuclear medicine, Neurology, Radiopharmacy and biology, General nuclear medicine. (Yi, J. H.)

  13. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Autumn Meeting 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 2005 autumn meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on November 18-19, 2005 in Seoul, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 4 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: Radiation Chemistry, General Cancer, Cancer PET and General Nuclear Medicine. (Yi, J. H.)

  14. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Spring Meeting 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 1998 spring meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on May 15, 1998 in Chungju, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 3 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: general nuclear medicine, neurology, radiopharmacy and biology. (Yi, J. H.)

  15. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Autumn Meeting 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 2003 autumn meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on November 14-15, 2003 in Seoul, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 6 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: General Cancer, Cancer PET, Brain Neurology and General Nuclear Medicine. (Yi, J. H.)

  16. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Spring Meeting 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 2002 Spring meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on May 17, 2002 in Suwon, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 3 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: Gynecological and Colorectal cancer, Lung cancer and Lymphoma, and general nuclear medicine. (Yi, J. H.)

  17. Translation challenges in a multilingual society: Legal documentation in Belgium

    OpenAIRE

    Kockaert, Hendrik; Steurs, Frieda; Sauberer, Gabriele

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This paper wants to propose a system architecture for a context-sensitive terminology management system (TMS) in the domain of legal LSP. The TMS is expected to meet the needs of the translation services in the Belgian Federal Public Service of Justice in that our TMS will allow to search, (re)use and edit each term in its customized archetypical phraseological context. In a second part, we propose to link this TMS to EN 15038, the EU standard on Translation Services, which has bee...

  18. Education Societies in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scottish Educational Review, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Describes origins, membership criteria, activities, and publications of the Scottish branches of six educational societies: British Association of Early Childhood Education, British Psychological Society, National Association for Gifted Children, National Council for Special Education, United Kingdom Reading Association, and Education Otherwise.…

  19. Fieldwork in Transforming Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Ed; Michailova, Snejina

    The contributors to this text discuss the personal and professional challenges of conducting fieldwork in the difficult, sometimes threatening contexts of the transforming societies of post-socialist Europe and China.......The contributors to this text discuss the personal and professional challenges of conducting fieldwork in the difficult, sometimes threatening contexts of the transforming societies of post-socialist Europe and China....

  20. Refractions of Civil Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuzmanovic, Daniella

    The thesis investigates various perceptions of civil society among civic activists in Turkey, and how these perceptions are produced and shaped. The thesis is an anthropological contribution to studies of civil society in general, as well as to studies on political culture in Turkey....

  1. Glaciers and society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagné, Karine; Rasmussen, Mattias Borg; Orlove, Ben

    2014-01-01

    toward technological methodologies. Yet, as elements of the landscape, glaciers are strongly integrated to various societies around the world in ways that exceed their role as provider of fundamental sources of water. The relation between glaciers and societies is therefore marked by processes...

  2. World Society and Globalisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate discourses on globalisation and world society and to disclose the commonalities and differences of both scientific debates. In particular, it draws attention to theoretical concepts of globalisation and world society. This is considered fruitful for comprehending the complex mechanisms of…

  3. Islam dan Civil Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Sukardi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The article tries to address the concept of civil society from varied perspectives. From a historical point of view, civil society demands not only the absent domination of state but also liberates individuals from the hegemony of state. The article shows that in Indonesia and Malaysian discourse, masyarakat madani is often used to represent the term of civil society. Using this conception, major values of civil society also share with basic ideas within the Medina Treaty in the history of Islam. These ideas include egalitarianism, human rights protection, participation, law and justice enforcement and pluralism. In this frame, the question on whether or not Islam is compatible with the concept of civil society is clearly answered. Muslims could benefit such a concept to build their awareness of being progressive and adaptive to social changes.

  4. Lecture held at the Royal Society, 14 November 2002The Clifford Paterson Lecture, 2002. Computer security?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Roger

    2003-07-15

    The technical aspects of computer security have fascinated researchers (including the author) for decades. It is, however, beginning to appear that the challenging problems are to do with people, rather than with mathematics or electronics.

  5. Recent activities of the physical society of Japan and the Japan society of applied physics gender equality promotion committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaki, K.; Okiharu, F.; Tajima, S.; Takayama, H.; Watanabe, M. O.

    2013-03-01

    The results of a 2007 large-scale survey of gender equality in scientific and technological professions in Japan are reported. The activities of two Japanese physics societies in the three years since the 3rd IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics was held in 2008 are reported.

  6. The characteristic and changes of the event-related potentials (ERP and brain topographic maps before and after treatment with rTMS in subjective tinnitus patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidi Yang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To compare the event-related potentials (ERPs and brain topographic maps characteristic and change in normal controls and subjective tinnitus patients before and after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS treatment. METHODS AND PARTICIPANTS: The ERPs and brain topographic maps elicited by target stimulus were compared before and after 1-week treatment with rTMS in 20 subjective tinnitus patients and 16 healthy controls. RESULTS: Before rTMS, target stimulus elicited a larger N1 component than the standard stimuli (repeating soundsin control group but not in tinnitus patients. Instead, the tinnitus group pre-treatment exhibited larger amplitude of N1 in response to standard stimuli than to deviant stimuli. Furthermore tinnitus patients had smaller mismatch negativity (MMN and late discriminative negativity (LDNcomponent at Fz compared with the control group. After rTMS treatment, tinnitus patients showed increased N1 response to deviant stimuli and larger MMN and LDN compared with pre-treatment. The topographic maps for the tinnitus group before rTMS -treatment demonstrated global asymmetry between the left and right cerebral hemispheres with more negative activities in left side and more positive activities in right side. In contrast, the brain topographic maps for patients after rTMS-treatment and controls seem roughly symmetrical. The ERP amplitudes and brain topographic maps in post-treatment patient group showed no significant difference with those in controls. CONCLUSIONS: The characterical changes in ERP and brain topographic maps in tinnitus patients maybe related with the electrophysiological mechanism of tinnitus induction and development. It can be used as an objective biomarker for the evaluation of auditory central in subjective tinnitus patients. These findings support the notion that rTMS treatment in tinnitus patients may exert a beneficial effect.

  7. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) responses elicited in hindlimb muscles as an assessment of synaptic plasticity in spino-muscular circuitry after chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, Hayk A; Alessi, Valentina; Sisto, Sue A; Kaufman, Mark; Arvanian, Victor L

    2017-03-06

    Electromagnetic stimulation applied at the cranial level, i.e. transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), is a technique for stimulation and neuromodulation used for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in clinical and research settings. Although recordings of TMS elicited motor-evoked potentials (MEP) are an essential diagnostic tool for spinal cord injured (SCI) patients, they are reliably recorded from arm, and not leg muscles. Mid-thoracic contusion is a common SCI that results in locomotor impairments predominantly in legs. In this study, we used a chronic T10 contusion SCI rat model and examined whether (i) TMS-responses in hindlimb muscles can be used for evaluation of conduction deficits in cortico-spinal circuitry and (ii) if plastic changes at spinal levels will affect these responses. In this study, plastic changes of transmission in damaged spinal cord were achieved by repetitive electro-magnetic stimulation applied over the spinal level (rSEMS). Spinal electro-magnetic stimulation was previously shown to activate spinal nerves and is gaining large acceptance as a non-invasive alternative to direct current and/or epidural electric stimulation. Results demonstrate that TMS fails to induce measurable MEPs in hindlimbs of chronically SCI animals. After facilitation of synaptic transmission in damaged spinal cord was achieved with rSEMS, however, MEPs were recorded from hindlimb muscles in response to single pulse TMS stimulation. These results provide additional evidence demonstrating beneficial effects of TMS as a diagnostic technique for descending motor pathways in uninjured CNS and after SCI. This study confirms the ability of TMS to assess plastic changes of transmission occurring at the spinal level. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Hunting for right and left parietal hot spots using single-pulse TMS: modulation of visuospatial perception during line bisection judgment in the healthy brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salatino, Adriana; Poncini, Marisa; George, Mark S; Ricci, Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    A series of studies have consistently reproduced left neglect-like bias on line length estimation tasks in healthy participants by applying transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the right posterior parietal cortex (PPC), while no significant changes have been reported when stimulating the left PPC. However, a notable inter-individual variability in the right parietal site where TMS modulates visuospatial perception can be observed, and no general agreement exists on how to identify the optimal parietal site of stimulation. In the present study, we propose a new site-finding TMS protocol to easily identify the optimum parietal location, or "hot spot," where TMS may modulate visuospatial perception on a line length estimation task (the Landmark task). Single-pulse TMS at 115% of motor threshold was applied 150 ms after the visual stimulus onset over nine different sites of a 3 cm × 3 cm grid, centred over right or left PPC (P4 and P3 according to the 10-20 EEG system, respectively) in eight healthy participants. Stimulation of right PPC induced a significant left neglect-like bias, when the coil was applied over the most posterior and dorso-posterior sites. Unexpectedly, TMS over left PPC also produced left neglect-like bias. However, in this case significant effects were found when targeting the most anterior and dorso-anterior portions of the grid. These results are discussed in relation to recent findings on neural networks underlying spatial cognition. The hunting protocol we propose might offer an economical and easy-to-use tool to functionally identify the optimal parietal site where TMS can modulate visuospatial perception, in healthy subjects and possibly in post-stroke patients undergoing repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation treatment.

  9. Equivalent brain SPECT perfusion changes underlying therapeutic efficiency in pharmacoresistant depression using either high-frequency left or low-frequency right prefrontal rTMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richieri, Raphaëlle; Boyer, Laurent; Padovani, Romain; Adida, Marc; Colavolpe, Cécile; Mundler, Olivier; Lançon, Christophe; Guedj, Eric

    2012-12-03

    Functional neuroimaging studies have suggested similar mechanisms underlying antidepressant effects of distinct therapeutics. This study aimed to determine and compare functional brain patterns underlying the antidepressant response of 2 distinct protocols of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). 99mTc-ECD SPECT was performed before and after rTMS of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in 61 drug-resistant right-handed patients with major depression, using high frequency (10Hz) left-side stimulation in 33 patients, and low frequency (1Hz) right-side stimulation in 28 patients. Efficiency of rTMS response was defined as at least 50% reduction of the baseline Beck Depression Inventory score. We compared the whole-brain voxel-based brain SPECT changes in perfusion after rTMS, between responders and non-responders in the whole sample (pleft- and right-stimulation. Before rTMS, the left- and right-prefrontal stimulation groups did not differ from clinical data and brain SPECT perfusion. rTMS efficiency (evaluated on % of responders) was statistically equivalent in the two groups of patients. In the whole-group of responder patients, a perfusion decrease was found after rTMS, in comparison to non-responders, within the left perirhinal cortex (BA35, BA36). This result was secondarily confirmed separately in the two subgroups, i.e. after either left stimulation (p=0.017) or right stimulation (pbrain functional changes associated to antidepressive efficiency, consisting to a remote brain limbic activity decrease within the left perirhinal cortex. However, these results will have to be confirmed in a double-blind randomized trial using a sham control group. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Single Session of rTMS Enhances Small-Worldness in Writer’s Cramp: Evidence from Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Multi-Modal Brain Graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose D. Bharath

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS induces widespread changes in brain connectivity. As the network topology differences induced by a single session of rTMS are less known we undertook this study to ascertain whether the network alterations had a small-world morphology using multi-modal graph theory analysis of simultaneous EEG-fMRI.Method: Simultaneous EEG-fMRI was acquired in duplicate before (R1 and after (R2 a single session of rTMS in 14 patients with Writer’s Cramp (WC. Whole brain neuronal and hemodynamic network connectivity were explored using the graph theory measures and clustering coefficient, path length and small-world index were calculated for EEG and resting state fMRI (rsfMRI. Multi-modal graph theory analysis was used to evaluate the correlation of EEG and fMRI clustering coefficients.Result: A single session of rTMS was found to increase the clustering coefficient and small-worldness significantly in both EEG and fMRI (p < 0.05. Multi-modal graph theory analysis revealed significant modulations in the fronto-parietal regions immediately after rTMS. The rsfMRI revealed additional modulations in several deep brain regions including cerebellum, insula and medial frontal lobe.Conclusion: Multi-modal graph theory analysis of simultaneous EEG-fMRI can supplement motor physiology methods in understanding the neurobiology of rTMS in vivo. Coinciding evidence from EEG and rsfMRI reports small-world morphology for the acute phase network hyper-connectivity indicating changes ensuing low-frequency rTMS is probably not “noise”.

  11. rTMS stimulation to induce plastic changes at the language motor area in a patient with a left recidivant brain tumor affecting Broca's area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcia, Juan A; Sanz, Ana; González-Hidalgo, Mercedes; de Las Heras, Carmen; Alonso-Lera, Pedro; Díaz, Pedro; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Oliviero, Antonio; Ortiz, Tomás

    2012-01-01

    Extent of resection is one of the most powerful predictors of outcome in surgery of gliomas. Tumors located within areas governing eloquence may impede a total tumor resection. Functional plasticity may be induced by therapeutic means, such as cortical stimulation with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Thus, rTMS is a potential tool to induce an improvement of functions of eloquence menaced by brain tumors. We report a case of a 59-year-old woman operated for a left sided precentral oligodendroglioma with awake intraoperative stimulation, whose tumor could not be completely removed because it affected areas governing language. Nine months later the tumor progressed and the motor language functions worsened. We submitted the patient to rTMS directed to Broca's area, next to the anterior pole of the tumor, with the aim of improving motor language function before a new tumor resection attempt. We performed 12 daily sessions of theta-burst rTMS followed by intensive language rehabilitation for 10 minutes, and 5 different aspects of language were measured before, immediately after and 10 minutes after each session. Repetition and nomination worsened immediately after each rTMS session, and improved after 10 min of rehabilitation. However, basal values improved globally along the experiment. Also, the impact of rTMS on motor language was increasingly less along the procedure. rTMS induces changes in Broca's area and this effect can be potentially used to improve language function in tumors located at or close to eloquent cortical areas.

  12. A Single Session of rTMS Enhances Small-Worldness in Writer's Cramp: Evidence from Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Multi-Modal Brain Graph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharath, Rose D; Panda, Rajanikant; Reddam, Venkateswara Reddy; Bhaskar, M V; Gohel, Suril; Bhardwaj, Sujas; Prajapati, Arvind; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) induces widespread changes in brain connectivity. As the network topology differences induced by a single session of rTMS are less known we undertook this study to ascertain whether the network alterations had a small-world morphology using multi-modal graph theory analysis of simultaneous EEG-fMRI. Method: Simultaneous EEG-fMRI was acquired in duplicate before (R1) and after (R2) a single session of rTMS in 14 patients with Writer's Cramp (WC). Whole brain neuronal and hemodynamic network connectivity were explored using the graph theory measures and clustering coefficient, path length and small-world index were calculated for EEG and resting state fMRI (rsfMRI). Multi-modal graph theory analysis was used to evaluate the correlation of EEG and fMRI clustering coefficients. Result: A single session of rTMS was found to increase the clustering coefficient and small-worldness significantly in both EEG and fMRI (p graph theory analysis revealed significant modulations in the fronto-parietal regions immediately after rTMS. The rsfMRI revealed additional modulations in several deep brain regions including cerebellum, insula and medial frontal lobe. Conclusion: Multi-modal graph theory analysis of simultaneous EEG-fMRI can supplement motor physiology methods in understanding the neurobiology of rTMS in vivo. Coinciding evidence from EEG and rsfMRI reports small-world morphology for the acute phase network hyper-connectivity indicating changes ensuing low-frequency rTMS is probably not "noise".

  13. Information society studies

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, Alistair S

    2013-01-01

    We are often told that we are ""living in an information society"" or that we are ""information workers."" But what exactly do these claims mean, and how might they be verified? In this important methodological study, Alistair S. Duff cuts through the rhetoric to get to the bottom of the ""information society thesis."" Wide-ranging in coverage, this study will be of interest to scholars in information science, communication and media studies and social theory. It is a key text for the newly-unified specialism of information society studies, and an indispensable guide to the future of this disc

  14. Climate and Ancient Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Climate, and human responses to it, have a strongly interconnected relationship. This when climate change occurs, the result of either natural or human causes, societies should react and adapt to these. But do they? If so, what is the nature of that change, and are the responses positive...... or negative for the long-term survival of social groups? In this volume, scholars from diverse disciplines including archaeology, geology and climate sciences explore scientific and material evidence for climate changes in the past, their causes, their effects on ancient societies and how those societies...

  15. September 2012 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A dinner meeting was held on 9/26//2012 at Scottsdale Shea beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 18 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology, and radiology communities.A discussion was held on Pending Premium Cigar Legislation HR. 1639 and S.1461, the "Traditional Cigar Manufacturing and Small Business Jobs Preservation Act of 2011”. This bill would exempt "premium cigars" from FDA oversight. The definition of premium cigars is so broad that candy flavored cigars, cigarillos and blunts would be exempted from FDA regulation. Teenage cigar smoking is increasing and this legislation may result in a further increase. The Arizona Thoracic Society is opposed to this bill. Dr. Robbins is to put a link on the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care website linking to the ATS website. This will enable members to contact their Congressmen opposing this legislation. A discussion was also held on a proposed combined Tucson/Phoenix …

  16. March 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The March 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was a special meeting. In conjunction with the Valley Fever Center for Excellence and the Arizona Respiratory Center the Eighteenth Annual Farness Lecture was held in the Sonntag Pavilion at St. Joseph's Hospital at 6 PM on Friday, April 4, 2014. The guest speaker was Antonio "Tony" Catanzaro, MD from the University of California San Diego and current president of the Cocci Study Group. There were 57 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and infectious disease communities. After opening remarks by Arizona Thoracic Society president, Lewis Wesselius (a former fellow under Dr. Catanzaro at UCSD, John Galgiani, director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence, gave a brief history of the Farness lecture before introducing Dr. Catanzaro. The lecture is named for Orin J. Farness, a Tucson physician, who was the first to report culture positive coccidioidomycosis (cocci or Valley Fever. ...

  17. Valie EXPORT Society. Overlok

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2001-01-01

    Valie EXPORT Society asutasid 23. okt. 1999. a. Frankfurdis Kadi Estland, Killu Sukmit ja Mari Laanemets, kui olid külastanud austria naiskunstniku Valie Exporti näitust. Rühmituse aktsioonide kirjeldus

  18. Valie EXPORT Society Rooseumis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2002-01-01

    Malmös Rooseumi Kaasaegse Kunsti Keskuses näitus "Baltic Babel". Projekt koosneb Läänemeremaade linnades tegutsevate innovatiivsete gruppide aktsioonidest. Kuraator Charles Esche. Esinejatest (Eestist Valie Export Society: Kadi Estland, Killu Sukmit)

  19. American Geriatrics Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learn More Social Media Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Instagram Social Media Bar Right Menu Annual Meeting Donate to our Foundation Contact Us American Geriatrics Society 40 Fulton St., 18th Floor New York, NY ...

  20. The global knowledge society

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fedoroff, Nina V

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge societies rest on a foundation of educational and research excellence. The Internet, advances in communications technology, and the rapidly expanding global fiber optic network are necessary, but not sufficient...

  1. American Rhinologic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6th Bulgarian-Italian Rhinology Friendship Meeting Sofia Hotel Balkan, Sofia, Bulgaria, December 1-3, 2017 9.17. ... you there! Terms of Use | Site Map © 2011 American Rhinologic Society All Rights Reserved

  2. Producing Civil Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt, Liv Egholm; Hein Jessen, Mathias

    Since the beginning of the 1990’s, civil society has attracted both scholarly and political interest as the ‘third sphere’ outside the state and the market not only a normatively privileged site of communication and ‘the public sphere’, but also as a resource for democratization processes......’ and as such dominates our way of thinking about civil society. Yet, this view hinders the understanding of how civil society is not a pre-existing or given sphere, but a sphere which is constantly produced both discursively, conceptually and practically. Through two examples; 1,the case of philanthropy in the beginning...... of the century. 2, the laws and strategies of implementing regarding the regulation of civil societal institutions (folkeoplysningsloven) since the 1970’s this paper shows how civil society in 20th century Denmark was produced both conceptually and practically and how this entailed a specific vision and version...

  3. American Society of Echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Good News About Echo Marketing and Promotional Opportunities Social Media Mobile Resources About ▼ About ASE Board of Directors Committees and Councils Industry Roundtable Partners Contact Us American Society of Echocardiography 2100 Gateway Centre Boulevard, Ste. 310 ...

  4. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SAMBA Link Digital Newsletter Educational Bibliography Research IARS/Anesthesia & Analgesia SCOR About SCOR Sponsor SAMBA Meetings Affinity Sponsor Program We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, ...

  5. National Multiple Sclerosis Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Have you met? d Our Healthcare Voice National Multiple Sclerosis Society International Progressive MS Alliance live from Paris ... Persist for Years October 25, 2017 View All Multiple Sclerosis News & Press View All Clinical Trial Alerts Every ...

  6. Transnationalising Civil Society?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Bak

    The paper takes a transnational perspective on developing an analytical framework for understanding how transnationalism interacts with civil society and how immigrant organisations use transnational strategies to challenge the pre-given positions of immigrants within given integration...

  7. American Society of Hematology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Account Navigation Main Content American Society of Hematology ASH Store ASH Job Center ASH Apps Share ... youtube linkedin Research In This Section Agenda for Hematology Research Sickle Cell Priorities Lymphoma Roadmap Moonshot Initiative ...

  8. The Tranquebarian Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niklas Thode

    2015-01-01

    of this development was the establishment of the Tranquebarian Society, the third learned society east of the Cape of Good Hope. The article examines the unique assemblage of scientific networks, people, instruments, institutions, and ideas of local and global origin that converged in Tranquebar, and it investigates...... the fusion of local problems and radical ideas of enlightenment, education, and improvement that united government, mission, and merchants in Tranquebar in the quest for ‘useful knowledge’....

  9. The Society for Scandinavian Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grand, Karina Lykke

    2016-01-01

    The Society for Nordic Art & the Scandinavian Society [Selskabet for Nordisk Kunst & Skandinavisk Selskab]......The Society for Nordic Art & the Scandinavian Society [Selskabet for Nordisk Kunst & Skandinavisk Selskab]...

  10. Annual scientific meeting--American Headache Society Washington 2011--highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, R Allan

    2012-05-01

    The 53rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Headache Society was held in Washington from June 2 to 5, 2011. Important clinical and basic science information was presented at this meeting. This is a review of the highlights of that meeting dealing in many areas of headache medicine. Once again, this meeting, which is the premier scientific meeting of the American Headache Society, provided lots of new and exciting information about multiple facets of migraine headache and other disorders. © 2012 American Headache Society.

  11. A two-site pilot randomized 3 day trial of high dose left prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for suicidal inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Mark S; Raman, Rema; Benedek, David M; Pelic, Christopher G; Grammer, Geoffrey G; Stokes, Karen T; Schmidt, Matthew; Spiegel, Chad; Dealmeida, Nancy; Beaver, Kathryn L; Borckardt, Jeffrey J; Sun, Xiaoying; Jain, Sonia; Stein, Murray B

    2014-01-01

    Suicide attempts and completed suicides are common, yet there are no proven acute medication or device treatments for treating a suicidal crisis. Repeated daily left prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for 4-6 weeks is a new FDA-approved treatment for acute depression. Some open-label rTMS studies have found rapid reductions in suicidality. This study tests whether a high dose of rTMS to suicidal inpatients is feasible and safe, and also whether this higher dosing might rapidly improve suicidal thinking. This prospective, 2-site, randomized, active sham-controlled (1:1 randomization) design incorporated 9 sessions of rTMS over 3 days as adjunctive to usual inpatient suicidality treatment. The setting was two inpatient military hospital wards (one VA, the other DOD). Research staff screened approximately 377 inpatients, yielding 41 adults admitted for suicidal crisis. Because of the funding source, all patients also had either post-traumatic stress disorder, mild traumatic brain injury, or both. Repetitive TMS (rTMS) was delivered to the left prefrontal cortex with a figure-eight solid core coil at 120% motor threshold, 10 Hertz (Hz), 5 second (s) train duration, 10 s intertrain interval for 30 minutes (6000 pulses) 3 times daily for 3 days (total 9 sessions; 54,000 stimuli). Sham rTMS used a similar coil that contained a metal insert blocking the magnetic field and utilized electrodes on the scalp, which delivered a matched somatosensory sensation. Primary outcomes were the daily change in severity of suicidal thinking as measured by the Beck Scale of Suicidal Ideation (SSI) administered at baseline and then daily, as well as subjective visual analog scale measures before and after each TMS session. Mixed model repeated measures (MMRM) analysis was performed on modified intent to treat (mITT) and completer populations. This intense schedule of rTMS with suicidal inpatients was feasible and safe. Minimal side effects occurred, none

  12. Shaped magnetic field pulses by multi-coil repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) differentially modulate anterior cingulate cortex responses and pain in volunteers and fibromyalgia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzabazis, Alexander; Aparici, Carina Mari; Rowbotham, Michael C; Schneider, M Bret; Etkin, Amit; Yeomans, David C

    2013-07-02

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has shown promise in the alleviation of acute and chronic pain by altering the activity of cortical areas involved in pain sensation. However, current single-coil rTMS technology only allows for effects in surface cortical structures. The ability to affect activity in certain deep brain structures may however, allow for a better efficacy, safety, and tolerability. This study used PET imaging to determine whether a novel multi-coil rTMS would allow for preferential targeting of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), an area always activated with pain, and to provide preliminary evidence as to whether this targeted approach would allow for efficacious, safe, and tolerable analgesia both in a volunteer/acute pain model as well as in fibromyalgia chronic pain patients. Part 1: Different coil configurations were tested in a placebo-controlled crossover design in volunteers (N = 16). Tonic pain was induced using a capsaicin/thermal pain model and functional brain imaging was performed by means of H2(15)O positron emission tomography - computed tomography (PET/CT) scans. Differences in NRS pain ratings between TMS and sham treatment (NRS(TMS)-NRS(placebo)) which were recorded each minute during the 10 minute PET scans. Part 2: 16 fibromyalgia patients were subjected to 20 multi-coil rTMS treatments over 4 weeks and effects on standard pain scales (Brief Pain Inventory, item 5, i.e. average pain NRS over the last 24 hours) were recorded. A single 30 minute session using one of 3 tested rTMS coil configurations operated at 1 Hz consistently produced robust reduction (mean 70% on NRS scale) in evoked pain in volunteers. In fibromyalgia patients, the 20 rTMS sessions also produced a significant pain inhibition (43% reduction in NRS pain over last 24 hours), but only when operated at 10 Hz. This degree of pain control was maintained for at least 4 weeks after the final session. Multi-coil rTMS may be a safe and

  13. International Conference held at the University of Alberta

    CERN Document Server

    Strobeck, Curtis

    1983-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the International Conference in Population Biology held at The University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada from June 22 to June 30, 1982. The Conference was sponsored by The University of Alberta and The Canadian Applied Mathematics Society, and overlapped with the summer meeting of CAMS. The main objectives of this Conference were: to bring mathematicians and biologists together so that they may interact for their mutual benefit; to bring those researchers interested in modelling in ecology and those interested in modelling in genetics together; to bring in keynote speakers in the delineated areas; to have sessions of contributed papers; and to present the opportunity for researchers to conduct workshops. With the exception of the last one, the objec­ tives were carried out. In order to lend some focus to the Conference, the following themes were adopted: models of species growth, predator-prey, competition, mutualism, food webs, dispersion, age structure, stability, evol...

  14. Low-frequency rTMS with language therapy over a 3-month period for sensory-dominant aphasia: case series of two post-stroke Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuda, Wataru; Abo, Masahiro; Uruma, Go; Kaito, Nobuyoshi; Watanabe, Motoi

    2010-01-01

    To examine the safety and feasibility of therapeutic application of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with language therapy for post-stroke patients with sensory-dominant aphasia. Two post-stroke Japanese patients with sensory-dominant aphasia were studied. In both patients, 10 sessions of 20-minute low-frequency rTMS with 1 Hz to the Wernicke's area were provided throughout 6-day hospitalization, followed by weekly outpatient rTMS treatment for 3 months. The language therapy was also provided through the period of in- and out-patient treatment. Language function was evaluated using the Token test and the Standard Language Test of Aphasia (SLTA) at the start and end of the in-patient treatment and the end of the outpatient treatment. The therapeutic protocol was well tolerated throughout the in- and out-patient treatments, without any adverse effects. The scores of the Token test and certain sub-categories of SLTA increased in both patients after the in-patient rTMS treatment. Persistent improvement of the score was noted over the 3-month post-discharge period. The proposed protocol of long-term application of low-frequency rTMS to the Wernicke's area and language therapy is considered a safe and feasible therapeutic approach for post-stroke patients with sensory-dominant aphasia.

  15. Effective electric fields along realistic DTI-based neural trajectories for modelling the stimulation mechanisms of TMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geeter, N; Crevecoeur, G; Leemans, A; Dupré, L

    2015-01-21

    In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), an applied alternating magnetic field induces an electric field in the brain that can interact with the neural system. It is generally assumed that this induced electric field is the crucial effect exciting a certain region of the brain. More specifically, it is the component of this field parallel to the neuron's local orientation, the so-called effective electric field, that can initiate neuronal stimulation. Deeper insights on the stimulation mechanisms can be acquired through extensive TMS modelling. Most models study simple representations of neurons with assumed geometries, whereas we embed realistic neural trajectories computed using tractography based on diffusion tensor images. This way of modelling ensures a more accurate spatial distribution of the effective electric field that is in addition patient and case specific. The case study of this paper focuses on the single pulse stimulation of the left primary motor cortex with a standard figure-of-eight coil. Including realistic neural geometry in the model demonstrates the strong and localized variations of the effective electric field between the tracts themselves and along them due to the interplay of factors such as the tract's position and orientation in relation to the TMS coil, the neural trajectory and its course along the white and grey matter interface. Furthermore, the influence of changes in the coil orientation is studied. Investigating the impact of tissue anisotropy confirms that its contribution is not negligible. Moreover, assuming isotropic tissues lead to errors of the same size as rotating or tilting the coil with 10 degrees. In contrast, the model proves to be less sensitive towards the not well-known tissue conductivity values.

  16. Dissociable roles of preSMA in motor sequence chunking and hand switching-a TMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muessgens, Diana; Thirugnanasambandam, Nivethida; Shitara, Hitoshi; Popa, Traian; Hallett, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Motor chunking, the grouping of individual movements into larger units, is crucial for sequential motor performance. The presupplementary motor area (preSMA) is involved in chunking and other related processes such as task switching, response selection, and response inhibition that are crucial for organizing sequential movements. However, previous studies have not systematically differentiated the role of preSMA in motor chunking and hand switching, thus leaving its relative contribution to each of these processes unclear. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the differential role of preSMA in motor chunking and hand switching. We designed motor sequences in which different kinds of hand switches (switching toward the right or left hand or continuing with the right hand) were counterbalanced across between- and within-chunk sequence points. Eighteen healthy, right-handed participants practiced four short subsequences (chunks) of key presses. In a subsequent task, these chunks had to be concatenated into one long sequence. We applied double-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over left preSMA or left M1 areas at sequence initiation, between chunks, or within chunks. TMS over the left preSMA significantly slowed the next response when stimulation was given between chunks, but only if a hand switch toward the contralateral (right) hand was required. PreSMA stimulation within chunks did not interfere with responses. TMS over the left M1 area delayed responses with the contralateral hand, both within and between chunks. Both preSMA and M1 stimulation decreased response times at sequence initiation. These results suggest that left preSMA is not necessary for chunking per se, but rather for organizing complex movements that require chunking and hand switching simultaneously.

  17. Dissociable roles of preSMA in motor sequence chunking and hand switching—a TMS study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirugnanasambandam, Nivethida; Shitara, Hitoshi; Popa, Traian; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Motor chunking, the grouping of individual movements into larger units, is crucial for sequential motor performance. The presupplementary motor area (preSMA) is involved in chunking and other related processes such as task switching, response selection, and response inhibition that are crucial for organizing sequential movements. However, previous studies have not systematically differentiated the role of preSMA in motor chunking and hand switching, thus leaving its relative contribution to each of these processes unclear. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the differential role of preSMA in motor chunking and hand switching. We designed motor sequences in which different kinds of hand switches (switching toward the right or left hand or continuing with the right hand) were counterbalanced across between- and within-chunk sequence points. Eighteen healthy, right-handed participants practiced four short subsequences (chunks) of key presses. In a subsequent task, these chunks had to be concatenated into one long sequence. We applied double-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over left preSMA or left M1 areas at sequence initiation, between chunks, or within chunks. TMS over the left preSMA significantly slowed the next response when stimulation was given between chunks, but only if a hand switch toward the contralateral (right) hand was required. PreSMA stimulation within chunks did not interfere with responses. TMS over the left M1 area delayed responses with the contralateral hand, both within and between chunks. Both preSMA and M1 stimulation decreased response times at sequence initiation. These results suggest that left preSMA is not necessary for chunking per se, but rather for organizing complex movements that require chunking and hand switching simultaneously. PMID:27655967

  18. Potential diagnostic significance of HSP90, ACS/TMS1, and L-plastin in the identification of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Allen G; Vasquez, Juan G; Yates, Nathan; Ho, Jonhan

    2014-12-01

    Melanoma is one of the deadliest cancers, yet it remains a diagnostic and prognostic challenge. The lack of effective treatment modalities compounds this challenge. Characterizing the molecular mechanisms leading to the development of melanoma is the first step to understanding the pathophysiology of melanoma. Numerous molecular studies have helped us understand critical changes that occur in the transition from a benign nevus to melanoma. However, many of these processes remain undiscovered. The goal of the current project was to characterize the proteomes of benign nevi and malignant melanomas using proteomic methods, with confirmation by immunohistochemical analysis. Using tandem mass spectrometry, we identified proteins potentially involved in melanoma pathogenesis. Several of the identified proteins have known roles in oncogenesis, melanogenesis, or both. We selected Hsp90-β, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC/TMS1), and L-plastin from these to analyze nevi and melanoma samples by immunohistochemical analysis. Hsp90-β and ASC/TMS1 staining was higher in melanoma when compared with nevi, whereas L-plastin protein expression was not significantly different between cells of these tumor types; however, it was expressed in the inflammatory milieu of melanoma. ACS/TMS1 showed staining in normal and junctional melanocytes, as well as in superficial nevomelanocytes, but deeper dermal nevomelanocytes gradually lost expression. This study helps validate the use of proteomics to aid in characterizing protein differences between nevi and melanomas and also underscores the importance of correlating proteomic results with histomorphology to understand the context of the information. The proteins in the current study may hold potential in differentiating between melanoma and benign nevi in diagnostically challenging cases.

  19. Predictors of response to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuzon, G; Timour, Q; Saoud, M

    2017-02-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), based on the principle of electromagnetic induction, consists of applying series of magnetic impulses to the cerebral cortex so as to modulate neurone activity in a target zone. This technique, still experimental, could prove promising in the field of psychiatry, in particular for the treatment of major depressive disorder. It is important for the clinician to be able to assess the response potential of a given patient to rTMS, and this among other things requires relevant predictive factors to be available. This review of the literature aims to determine and analyse reported predictive factors for therapeutic response to rTMS treatment in major depressive disorder. Different parameters are studied, in particular age, the severity of the depressive episode, psychological dimensions, genetic factors, cerebral blood flows via cerebral imagery, and neuronavigation. The factors found to be associated with better therapeutic response were young age, low level of severity of the depressive episode, motor threshold intensity over 100%, more than 1000 stimulations per session, more than 10 days treatment, L/L genotype on the 5-HTTLPR transporter gene, C/C homozygosity on the promotor regions of the 5-HT1A receptor gene, Val/Val homozygosity on the BDNF gene, cordance analyses by EEG, and finally the accurate localisation provided by neuronavigation. The authors conclude that investigations in larger patient samples are required in the future, and that the work already achieved should provide lines of approach for the coming experimental studies. Copyright © 2016 L'Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. The TMS Motor Map Does Not Change Following a Single Session of Mirror Training Either with Or without Motor Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark van de Ruit

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Both motor imagery and mirror training have been used in motor rehabilitation settings to promote skill learning and plasticity. As motor imagery and mirror training are suggested to be closely linked, it was hypothesized that mirror training augmented by motor imagery would increase corticospinal excitability (CSE significantly compared to mirror training alone. Forty-four participants were split over two experimental groups. Each participant visited the laboratory once to receive either mirror training alone or mirror training augmented with layered stimulus response training (LSRT, a type of motor imagery training. Participants performed 16 min of mirror training, making repetitive grasping movements paced by a metronome. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS mapping was performed before and after the mirror training to test for changes in CSE of the untrained hand. Self-reports suggested that the imagery training was effective in helping the participant to perform the mirror training task as instructed. Nonetheless, neither training type resulted in a significant change of TMS map area, nor was there an interaction between the groups. The results from the study revealed no effect of a single session of 16 min of either mirror training or mirror training enhanced by imagery on TMS map area. Despite the negative result of the present experiment, this does not suggest that either motor imagery or mirror training might be ineffective as a rehabilitation therapy. Further study is required to allow disentangling the role of imagery and action observation in mirror training so that mirror training can be further tailored to the individual according to their abilities.

  1. HAND-HELD MYOMETRY - REFERENCE VALUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERPLOEG, RJO; FIDLER, [No Value; OOSTERHUIS, HJGH

    In thirteen major muscle groups of 50 healthy females and 50 males, aged 20-60 years, maximum voluntary contraction was measured with a hand-held dynamometer. The intrasession variation, the left-right variation, and the fifth and fiftieth centile values were calculated. The ratio of two

  2. Board Size Effects in Closely Held Corporations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Morten; Kongsted, H.C.; Meisner Nielsen, Kasper

    2004-01-01

    Previous work on board size effects in closely held corporationshas established a negative correlation between board size and firm performance.We argue that this work has been incomplete in analysing the causalrelationship due to lack of ownership information and weak identificationstrategies...

  3. GOP level parallelism implementation for real-time H264/AVC video encoder on multicore DSP TMS320C6472

    OpenAIRE

    Bahri, Nejmeddine; Grandpierre, Thierry; ben ayed, Mohamed Ali; Masmoudi, Nouri; Akil, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we exploit the parallelism offered by six-core Digital Signal Processor (DSP) TMS320C6472 to implement the H264/AVC video encoder in order to meet the real-time constraint for different video resolutions. To enhance the encoding speed, GOP Level Parallelism approach is implemented on 5 slave DSP cores. A master core is reserved to manage data transfers among DSP memory and personal computer in order to perform a real-time video encoding demo taken into a...

  4. 10 Hz rTMS over right parietal cortex alters sense of agency during self-controlled movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritterband-Rosenbaum, Anina; Karabanov, Anke N; Christensen, Mark Schram

    2014-01-01

    task. 12 healthy, right-handed adults were included. The effects of rTMS on subjects' SoA during self-controlled movements were explored. The experiment consisted of 1/3 self-controlled movements and (2)/3 computer manipulated movements that introduced uncertainty as to whether the subjects were agents....... Following IPC stimulation subjects were more likely to experience self-controlled movements as being externally perturbed compared to the control site (P = 0.002) and the stimulation-free control (P = 0.042). The data support the importance of IPC activation during sensorimotor comparison in order...

  5. [History of the German-Japanese Society of Dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Kiyoshi

    2017-03-01

    The relationships between German and Japanese dermatology are traditionally very strong. This fact led Professor Hornstein and Professor Nishiyama to organize joint meetings of dermatologists from both countries. The first meeting of the German-Japanese Society of Dermatology was held in Erlangen, Germany, following the 16th World Congress of Dermatology in 1967. Since then, meetings have been held alternating between Germany and Japan. These meetings were successfully organized by professors from both countries. In this article, I present memorable photos from these joint meetings.

  6. Advanced information society(2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuyama, Keiichi

    Our modern life is full of information and information infiltrates into our daily life. Networking of the telecommunication is extended to society, company, and individual level. Although we have just entered the advanced information society, business world and our daily life have been steadily transformed by the advancement of information network. This advancement of information brings a big influence on economy, and will play they the main role in the expansion of domestic demands. This paper tries to view the image of coming advanced information society, focusing on the transforming businessman's life and the situation of our daily life, which became wealthy by the spread of daily life information and the visual information by satellite system, in the development of the intelligent city.

  7. Civil society sphericules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufte, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    the organization strategizes about and seeks to articulate amongst Tanzanian youth. Situated in the ‘perverse confluence’ (Dagnino, 2011) between neoliberal and radical democratic agendas in the communicative practices of civil society-driven media platforms, Femina navigates between identities as an NGO, a social...... movement and a media initiative. In the context of the growing literature on social networking sites and their affordances, dynamics and structures, the case of Femina illustrates how a civil society sphericule emerges within the dynamic co-evolution of new and old media platforms. The study is furthermore...... an example of the difficult shift in civil society practice, from service provision to an agenda of public service monitoring, social accountability and community engagement....

  8. November 2017 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The November 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 15, 2017 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with a lecture followed by case presentations. There were 15 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, allergy, infectious disease and radiology communities. At the beginning of the meeting several issues were discussed: 1. CME offered by the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (SWJPCC is currently offered to only the Southwest state thoracic societies and the Mayo Clinic. After discussion it was felt that this restriction of access was no longer appropriate and CME credits should be available to all. 2. Efforts continue to obtain CME for the Arizona Thoracic Society meetings. Our Chapter Representative, Dr. Gerry Schwartzberg, is approaching this with the American Thoracic Society. Locally, HonorHealth sent out a survey on CME needs. Members were encouraged …

  9. April 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The April 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 4/23/2014 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 15 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. It was announced that there will be a wine tasting with the California, New Mexico and Colorado Thoracic Societies at the American Thoracic Society International Meeting. The tasting will be led by Peter Wagner and is scheduled for the Cobalt Room in the Hilton San Diego Bayfront on Tuesday, May 20, from 4-8 PM. Guideline development was again discussed. The consensus was to await publication of the IDSA Cocci Guidelines and respond appropriately. George Parides, Arizona Chapter Representative, gave a presentation on Hill Day. Representatives of the Arizona, New Mexico and Washington Thoracic Societies met with their Congressional delegations, including Rep. David Schweikert, to discuss the Cigar Bill, NIH funding, and the Medicare Sustainable Growth ...

  10. Branding Cities, Changing Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    Societal changes are seldom discussed in the literature on city branding. The time element is important because it highlights the fluctuating reality of society. The city brand message freezes the place but in fact, the city branding exercise is a continuous process. Society emerges too. City...... brands are supposed to accentuate the uniqueness of the city, be built from the bottom-up and reflect the city's identity. This paper highlights three paradoxes, pointing out that city branding processes can also make cities more alike, bring about societal changes and forge new city identities. A city...

  11. Advanced information society(7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Toshihiro

    Various threats are hiding in advanced informationalized society. As we see car accident problems in motorization society light aspects necessarily accompy shady ones. Under the changing circumstances of advanced informationalization added values of information has become much higher. It causes computer crime, hacker, computer virus to come to the surface. In addition it can be said that infringement of intellectual property and privacy are threats brought by advanced information. Against these threats legal, institutional and insurance measures have been progressed, and newly security industry has been established. However, they are not adequate individually or totally. The future vision should be clarified, and countermeasures according to the visions have to be considered.

  12. Science and Society Colloquium

    CERN Multimedia

    Randi, J

    1991-01-01

    Mr. Randi will give an update of his lecture to the American Physical Society on the occasion of his award of the 1989 Forum Prize. The citation said: "for his unique defense of Science and the scientific method in many disciplines, including physics, against pseudoscience, frauds and charlatans. His use of scientific techniques has contributed to refuting suspicious and fraudulent claims of paranormal results. He has contributed significantly to public understanding of important issues where science and society interact". He is a professional magician and author of many books. He worked with John Maddox, the Editor of Nature to investigate the claims of "water with memory".

  13. rTMS of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex modulates dopamine release in the ipsilateral anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soo Cho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain dopamine is implicated in the regulation of movement, attention, reward and learning and plays an important role in Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and drug addiction. Animal experiments have demonstrated that brain stimulation is able to induce significant dopaminergic changes in extrastriatal areas. Given the up-growing interest of non-invasive brain stimulation as potential tool for treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders, it would be critical to investigate dopaminergic functional interactions in the prefrontal cortex and more in particular the effect of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC (areas 9/46 stimulation on prefrontal dopamine (DA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Healthy volunteers were studied with a high-affinity DA D2-receptor radioligand, [(11C]FLB 457-PET following 10 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS of the left and right DLPFC. rTMS on the left DLPFC induced a significant reduction in [(11C]FLB 457 binding potential (BP in the ipsilateral subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (ACC (BA 25/12, pregenual ACC (BA 32 and medial orbitofrontal cortex (BA 11. There were no significant changes in [(11C]FLB 457 BP following right DLPFC rTMS. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge, this is the first study to provide evidence of extrastriatal DA modulation following acute rTMS of DLPFC with its effect limited to the specific areas of medial prefrontal cortex. [(11C]FLB 457-PET combined with rTMS may allow to explore the neurochemical functions of specific cortical neural networks and help to identify the neurobiological effects of TMS for the treatment of different neurological and psychiatric diseases.

  14. Improvements in hand function in adults with chronic tetraplegia following a multi-day 10Hz rTMS intervention combined with repetitive task practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Osman, Joyce; Field-Fote, Edelle C.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Evidence suggests the use of stimulation to increase corticomotor excitability improves hand function in persons with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). We assessed effects of multi-day application of 10Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied to the corticomotor hand area combined with repetitive task practice (RTP) in participants with tetraplegia and neurologically healthy participants. Methods Using a double-blind randomized crossover design, 11 participants with chronic tetraplegia and 10 neurologically healthy participants received 3 sessions of 10Hz rTMS+RTP and 3 sessions of sham-rTMS+RTP to the corticomotor hand region controlling the weaker hand. RTMS was interleaved with RTP of a skilled motor task between pulse trains. Hand function (Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test [JTT], pinch, and grasp strength) and corticomotor excitability (amplitude of motor-evoked potential) were assessed prior to and following the rTMS+RTP and sham-rTMS+RTP phases. We assessed significance using paired t-tests on pre-post differences and effect sizes using standardized response mean (SRM). Results RTMS+RTP was associated with larger effect sizes compared to sham-rTMS+RTP for improvement in JTT for both the trained hand (SRM=0.85 and 0.42, respectively), non-trained hand (0.55, 0.31, respectively), and for grasp strength of the trained hand in the SCI group (0.67, 0.39, respectively) alone. Effect sizes for all other measures were small and there were no statistical between-condition differences in the outcomes assessed. Discussion and Conclusions RTMS may be a valuable adjunct to RTP for improving hand function in persons with tetraplegia. Higher stimulation dose (frequency, intensity, number of sessions) may be associated with larger effects. Video Abstract available (See Supplemental Digital Conent 1) for more insights from the authors. PMID:25415549

  15. Not an Aspirin: No Evidence for Acute Anti-Nociception to Laser-Evoked Pain After Motor Cortex rTMS in Healthy Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Claire; Perchet, Caroline; Lelekov-Boissard, Taïssia; Magnin, Michel; Garcia-Larrea, Luis

    2016-01-01

    High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) has shown efficacy in relieving neuropathic pain. Whether its analgesic effect also applies to acute physiological nociception remains unclear due to previous contradictory findings. To provide an in-depth investigation of the effects of motor cortex HF-rTMS on acute laser-evoked pain and excitability of nociceptive networks in healthy subjects. Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over study in 20 healthy participants. Laser heat stimuli at nociceptive threshold were delivered to the right hand, allowing assessment of: (a) subjective pain intensity and unpleasantness; (b) laser-evoked potentials (LEPs, 128 electrodes) and their source model; (c) sympathetic skin responses, and (d) spino-thalamic pathway excitability. Data were collected before and 20 minutes after a session of neuro-navigated 20 Hz rTMS to the contralateral motor cortex. Subjective pain reports to thermal laser pulses, amplitude of late cortical potentials and sympathetic skin responses were decreased after cortical stimulation, to a similar extent whether it was active or placebo. Early cortical potentials and nociceptive network excitability remained identical before and after rTMS, as did anatomical sources of LEPs. Our results do not provide evidence for a genuine anti-nociceptive effect of rTMS on acute physiological pain. We suggest that motor cortex rTMS may act upon high-order networks linked to the emotional and cognitive appraisal of chronic pain, and/or modulate pathologically sensitized networks, rather than change the physiological transmission within an intact nervous system. Such dichotomy is reminiscent of that observed with most drugs used for neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Can temporal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation be enhanced by targeting affective components of tinnitus with frontal rTMS? a randomized controlled pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Michael Kreuzer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS of the temporal cortex has been investigated as a new treatment tool for chronic tinnitus during the last years and has shown moderate efficacy. However, there is growing evidence that tinnitus is not a pathology of a specific brain region, but rather the result of network dysfunction involving both auditory and non-auditory brain regions. In functional imaging studies the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex has been identified as an important hub in tinnitus related networks and has been shown to particularly reflect the affective components of tinnitus. Based on these findings we aimed to investigate whether the effects of left low frequency rTMS can be enhanced by antecedent right prefrontal low-frequency rTMS. Study Design: Fifty-six patients were randomized to receive either low-frequency left temporal rTMS or a combination of low-frequency right prefrontal followed by low-frequency left temporal rTMS. The change of the tinnitus questionnaire (TQ score was the primary outcome, secondary outcome parameters included the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, numeric rating scales and the Beck Depression Inventory. The study is registered in clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01261949.Results: Directly after therapy there was a significant improvement of the TQ-score in both groups. Comparison of both groups revealed a trend towards more pronounced effects for the combined group (effect size: Cohen’s d=0.176, but this effect did not reach significance. A persistent trend towards better efficacy was also observed in all other outcome criteria. Conclusion: Additional stimulation of the right prefrontal cortex seems to be a promising strategy for enhancing TMS effects over the temporal cortex. These results further support the involvement of the right DLPFC in the pathophysiology of tinnitus. The small effect size might be due to the study design comparing the protocol to an active control

  17. Effect of low-frequency rTMS on electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) and regional brain metabolism (PET) in schizophrenia patients with auditory hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horacek, Jiri; Brunovsky, Martin; Novak, Tomas; Skrdlantova, Lucie; Klirova, Monika; Bubenikova-Valesova, Vera; Krajca, Vladimir; Tislerova, Barbora; Kopecek, Milan; Spaniel, Filip; Mohr, Pavel; Höschl, Cyril

    2007-01-01

    Auditory hallucinations are characteristic symptoms of schizophrenia with high clinical importance. It was repeatedly reported that low frequency (effect of rTMS in auditory hallucinations has yet to be published. To evaluate the distribution of neuronal electrical activity and the brain metabolism changes after low-frequency rTMS in patients with auditory hallucinations. Low-frequency rTMS (0.9 Hz, 100% of motor threshold, 20 min) applied to the left temporoparietal cortex was used for 10 days in the treatment of medication-resistant auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia (n = 12). The effect of rTMS on the low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) and brain metabolism ((18)FDG PET) was measured before and after 2 weeks of treatment. We found a significant improvement in the total and positive symptoms (PANSS), and on the hallucination scales (HCS, AHRS). The rTMS decreased the brain metabolism in the left superior temporal gyrus and in interconnected regions, and effected increases in the contralateral cortex and in the frontal lobes. We detected a decrease in current densities (LORETA) for the beta-1 and beta-3 bands in the left temporal lobe whereas an increase was found for beta-2 band contralaterally. Our findings implicate that the effect is connected with decreased metabolism in the cortex underlying the rTMS site, while facilitation of metabolism is propagated by transcallosal and intrahemispheric connections. The LORETA indicates that the neuroplastic changes affect the functional laterality and provide the substrate for a metabolic effect. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Big Society, Big Deal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    Political leaders like to put forward guiding ideas or themes which pull their individual decisions into a broader narrative. For John Major it was Back to Basics, for Tony Blair it was the Third Way and for David Cameron it is the Big Society. While Mr. Blair relied on Lord Giddens to add intellectual weight to his idea, Mr. Cameron's legacy idea…

  19. Literacy in Traditional Societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Jack, Ed.

    This series of essays derives from an interest in communications, in media and their effect upon human intercourse. Primarily, this concern with the technology of the intellect centers upon the effect of literacy on human culture, especially in 'traditional' or pre-industrial societies. In most of the essays, the effects of literacy are considered…

  20. Education for Jobless Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorkin, Alexander M.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of societies with low employment rates will present a challenge to education. Education must move away from the discourse of skills and towards the discourse of meaning and motivation. The paper considers three kinds of non-waged optional labor that may form the basis of the future economy: prosumption, volunteering, and self-design.…

  1. Rationality in Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flache, Andreas; Dijkstra, Jacob; Wright, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary theories of rational behavior in human society augment the orthodox model of rationality both by adding various forms of bounded rationality and relaxing the assumptions of self-interest and materialistic preferences. This entry discusses how these extensions of the theory of rational

  2. SOCIETY: LESSONS FORZUNIVERSITIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the interaction model of knowledge utilization is engaged to ... and organizational diversity,” (4) “social accountability and reflexivity,” and (5) ... The system of reference for knowledge production under Mode 2 is the network of ... based society characterized by increased demand for transfer and utilization of.

  3. The Civil Society Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Anheier, Helmut K.; Lester M. Salamon

    2015-01-01

    Salamon and Anheier bring the civil society sector - the plethora of private, nonprofit, and nongovernmental organizations that have emerged in recent decades - into better focus conceptually as well as empirically. They draw on the results of a major inquiry into the scope, structure, financing and role of the "nonprofit sector" in a broad cross-section of countries around the world.

  4. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... STS The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Instagram Flickr About STS Governance and Leadership ... All Events » Tweets by @STS_CTsurgery Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Instagram Flickr Footer menu Home Contact Us ...

  5. Connecting Science with Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    awareness of the important questions of our society reflected in scientific research and of the answers produced by these research activities. The CRIS2010 conference, entitled “Bringing Science to Society”, therefore seeks to highlight the role of Current Research Information Systems for communicating...

  6. MARX EMBRYOLOGY OF SOCIETY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOUTERS, A

    This article presents a new interpretation of Marx's dialectical method. Marx conceived dialectics as a method for constructing a model of society. The way this model is developed is analogous to the way organisms develop according to the German embryologist Karl Ernst von Baer, and, indeed, Marx's

  7. Correlation between Motor Cortex Excitability Changes and Cognitive Impairment in Vascular Depression: Pathophysiological Insights from a Longitudinal TMS Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Pennisi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS highlighted functional changes in dementia, whereas there are few data in patients with vascular cognitive impairment-no dementia (VCI-ND. Similarly, little is known about the neurophysiological impact of vascular depression (VD on deterioration of cognitive functions. We test whether depression might affect not only cognition but also specific cortical circuits in subcortical vascular disease. Methods. Sixteen VCI-ND and 11 VD patients, age-matched with 15 controls, underwent a clinical-cognitive, neuroimaging, and TMS assessment. After approximately two years, all participants were prospectively reevaluated. Results. At baseline, a significant more pronounced intracortical facilitation (ICF was found in VCI-ND patients. Reevaluation revealed an increase of the global excitability in both VCI-ND and VD subjects. At follow-up, the ICF of VCI-ND becomes similar to the other groups. Only VD patients showed cognitive deterioration. Conclusions. Unlike VD, the hyperfacilitation found at baseline in VCI-ND patients suggests enhanced glutamatergic neurotransmission that might contribute to the preservation of cognitive functioning. The hyperexcitability observed at follow-up in both groups of patients also indicates functional changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission. The mechanisms enhancing the risk of dementia in VD might be related either to subcortical vascular lesions or to the lack of compensatory functional cortical changes.

  8. Consecutive TMS-fMRI reveals an inverse relationship in BOLD signal between object and scene processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Caitlin R; Steeves, Jennifer K E

    2013-12-04

    The human visual system is capable of recognizing an infinite number of scenes containing an abundance of rich visual information. There are several cortical regions associated with the representation of a scene, including those specialized for object processing (the lateral occipital area [LO]) and for the spatial layout of scenes (the parahippocampal place area). Although behavioral studies have demonstrated that these image categories (scenes and objects) exert an influence on each other such that scene context can facilitate object identification or that scene categorization can be impaired by the presence of a salient object, little is known about the apparent cortical interactions involved in building the conscious representation of a complete scene. It has been shown that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the left LO disrupts object categorization but facilitates scene categorization. Here, we show that this effect is also reflected by changes in the BOLD signal such that TMS to the left LO decreases BOLD signal at the stimulation site (LO) while viewing objects and increases BOLD signal in the left PPA when viewing scenes. This suggests that these regions, although likely not on a strict hierarchy of bottom-up coding, share functional communication likely in the form of inhibitory connections.

  9. Correlation between Motor Cortex Excitability Changes and Cognitive Impairment in Vascular Depression: Pathophysiological Insights from a Longitudinal TMS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, Manuela; Lanza, Giuseppe; Cantone, Mariagiovanna; Ricceri, Riccardo; Spampinato, Concetto; Pennisi, Giovanni; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Bella, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) highlighted functional changes in dementia, whereas there are few data in patients with vascular cognitive impairment-no dementia (VCI-ND). Similarly, little is known about the neurophysiological impact of vascular depression (VD) on deterioration of cognitive functions. We test whether depression might affect not only cognition but also specific cortical circuits in subcortical vascular disease. Methods. Sixteen VCI-ND and 11 VD patients, age-matched with 15 controls, underwent a clinical-cognitive, neuroimaging, and TMS assessment. After approximately two years, all participants were prospectively reevaluated. Results. At baseline, a significant more pronounced intracortical facilitation (ICF) was found in VCI-ND patients. Reevaluation revealed an increase of the global excitability in both VCI-ND and VD subjects. At follow-up, the ICF of VCI-ND becomes similar to the other groups. Only VD patients showed cognitive deterioration. Conclusions. Unlike VD, the hyperfacilitation found at baseline in VCI-ND patients suggests enhanced glutamatergic neurotransmission that might contribute to the preservation of cognitive functioning. The hyperexcitability observed at follow-up in both groups of patients also indicates functional changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission. The mechanisms enhancing the risk of dementia in VD might be related either to subcortical vascular lesions or to the lack of compensatory functional cortical changes.

  10. The effect of local anatomy on the electric field induced by TMS: evaluation at 14 different target sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Arno M; Oostendorp, Thom F; Stegeman, Dick F

    2014-10-01

    Many human cortical regions are targeted with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The stimulus intensity used for a certain region is generally based on the motor threshold stimulation intensity determined over the motor cortex (M1). However, it is well known that differences exist in coil-target distance and target site anatomy between cortical regions. These differences may well make the stimulation intensity derived from M1 sub-optimal for other regions. Our goal was to determine in what way the induced electric fields differ between cortical target regions. We used finite element method modeling to calculate the induced electric field for multiple target sites in a realistic head model. The effects on the electric field due to coil-target distance and target site anatomy have been quantified. The results show that a correction based on the distance alone does not correctly adjust the induced electric field for regions other than M1. In addition, a correction based solely on the TMS-induced electric field (primary field) does not suffice. A precise adjustment should include coil-target distance, the secondary field caused by charge accumulation at conductivity discontinuities and the direction of the field relative to the local cerebrospinal fluid-grey matter boundary.

  11. Sex-Specific Automatic Responses to Infant Cries: TMS Reveals Greater Excitability in Females than Males in Motor Evoked Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Irene; Cattaneo, Luigi; Venuti, Paola; de Pisapia, Nicola; Serra, Mauro; Esposito, Gianluca; Rigo, Paola; Farneti, Alessandra; Bornstein, Marc H

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging reveals that infant cries activate parts of the premotor cortical system. To validate this effect in a more direct way, we used event-related transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Here, we investigated the presence and the time course of modulation of motor cortex excitability in young adults who listened to infant cries. Specifically, we recorded motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from the biceps brachii (BB) and interosseus dorsalis primus (ID1) muscles as produced by TMS delivered from 0 to 250 ms after sound onset in six steps of 50 ms in 10 females and 10 males. We observed an excitatory modulation of MEPs at 100 ms from the onset of infant cry specific to females and to the ID1 muscle. We regard this modulation as a response to natural cry sounds because it was attenuated to stimuli increasingly different from natural cry and absent in a separate group of females who listened to non-cry stimuli physically matched to natural infant cries. Furthermore, the 100-ms latency of this response is not compatible with a voluntary reaction to the stimulus but suggests an automatic, bottom-up audiomotor association. The brains of adult females appear to be tuned to respond to infant cries with automatic motor excitation.

  12. The sound of size: crossmodal binding in pitch-size synesthesia: a combined TMS, EEG and psychophysics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, Nina; ten Oever, Sanne; Goebel, Rainer; Sack, Alexander T

    2012-01-02

    Crossmodal binding usually relies on bottom-up stimulus characteristics such as spatial and temporal correspondence. However, in case of ambiguity the brain has to decide whether to combine or segregate sensory inputs. We hypothesise that widespread, subtle forms of synesthesia provide crossmodal mapping patterns which underlie and influence multisensory perception. Our aim was to investigate if such a mechanism plays a role in the case of pitch-size stimulus combinations. Using a combination of psychophysics and ERPs, we could show that despite violations of spatial correspondence, the brain specifically integrates certain stimulus combinations which are congruent with respect to our hypothesis of pitch-size synesthesia, thereby impairing performance on an auditory spatial localisation task (Ventriloquist effect). Subsequently, we perturbed this process by functionally disrupting a brain area known for its role in multisensory processes, the right intraparietal sulcus, and observed how the Ventriloquist effect was abolished, thereby increasing behavioural performance. Correlating behavioural, TMS and ERP results, we could retrace the origin of the synesthestic pitch-size mappings to a right intraparietal involvement around 250 ms. The results of this combined psychophysics, TMS and ERP study provide evidence for shifting the current viewpoint on synesthesia more towards synesthesia being at the extremity of a spectrum of normal, adaptive perceptual processes, entailing close interplay between the different sensory systems. Our results support this spectrum view of synesthesia by demonstrating that its neural basis crucially depends on normal multisensory processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Proprioceptive drift in the rubber hand illusion is intensified following 1 Hz TMS of the left EBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eWold

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The rubber hand illusion (RHI is a paradigm used to induce an illusory feeling of owning a dummy hand through congruent multisensory stimulation. Thus, it can grant insights into how our brain represents our body as our own. Recent research has demonstrated an involvement of the extrastriate body area (EBA, an area of the brain that is typically implicated in the perception of non-face body parts, in illusory body ownership. In this experiment we sought causal evidence for the involvement of the EBA in the RHI. 16 participants took part in a sham controlled, 1 Hz repetitive TMS (1200 pulse experiment where they received synchronous (RHI condition or asynchronous (control stroking and were asked to report the perceived location of their real hand as well as the intensity and the temporal onset of experienced ownership of the dummy hand. Following TMS of the left EBA, participants misjudged their real hand's location significantly more towards the rubber hand during synchronous stroking than after sham stimulation. This difference in proprioceptive drift provides the first causal evidence that the EBA is involved in the RHI and subsequently in body representation and further supports the view that the EBA is necessary for multimodal integration.

  14. Sex-specific automatic responses to infant cries: TMS reveals greater excitability in females than males in motor evoked potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene eMessina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging reveals that infant cries activate parts of the premotor cortical system. To validate this effect in a more direct way, we used event-related transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS. Here, we investigated the presence and the time course of modulation of motor cortex excitability in young adults who listened to infant cries. Specifically, we recorded motor evoked potentials (MEPs from the biceps brachii (BB and interosseus dorsalis primus (ID1 muscles as produced by TMS delivered from 0 to 250 ms from sound onset in six steps of 50 ms in 10 females and 10 males. We observed an excitatory modulation of MEPs at 100 ms from the onset of the infant cry specific to females and to the ID1 muscle. We regard this modulation as a response to natural cry sounds because it was delayed, attenuated to stimuli increasingly different from natural cry, and was absent in a separate group of females who listened to non-cry stimuli physically matched to natural infant cries. Furthermore, the 100-ms latency of this modulation is not compatible with a voluntary reaction to the stimulus but suggests an automatic, bottom-up audiomotor association. The brains of adult females appear to be tuned to respond to infant cries with automatic motor excitation. This effect may reflect the greater and longstanding burden on females in caregiving infants.

  15. Metabolomics continues to flourish: highlights from the 2014 Metabolomics Society Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roessner, U.; Hall, R.D.

    2014-01-01

    The Metabolomics Society has now been organising its annual meetings for 10 years! The 10th annual conference returned, in June, to Tsuruoka, Japan where the very first meeting was also held in 2005—just shortly after our society had been formally established and our journal Metabolomics had brought

  16. TERATOLOGY SOCIETY 1998 PUBLIC AFFAIRS COMMITTEE SYMPOSIUM: THE NEW THALIDOMIDE ERA: DEALING WITH THE RISKS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Teratology Society Public Affairs Committee Symposium was held on June 21, 1998, during the Society's annual meeting in San Diego, California. The symposium was organized and chaired by Dr. Carole Kimmel. The sysmposium was designed to consider the medical, social, and ethi...

  17. Primary structure of the tms and prs genes of Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Dan; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Arnvig, Kirsten

    1989-01-01

    products remains to be established. The prs gene contains an open reading frame of 317 codons resulting in a subunit Mr of 34828. An open reading frame comprising the tms gene contained 456 codons resulting in a putative translation product with an Mr of 49,554. Comparison of the deduced B. subtilis PRPP...... synthetase amino acid sequence with PRPP synthetases from Escherichia coli and rat liver showed extensive similarity. The deduced Tms amino acid sequence was found to be 43% similar to the deduced amino acid sequence of ecourfl, a gene of E. coli with unknown function....

  18. Consumption in the Information Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherebin, V. M.; Ermakova, N. A.; Makhrova, O. N.

    2010-01-01

    The current state of the economy in the developed countries make it possible to characterize them using concepts and terms such as the postindustrial society, the new economy, the service economy, the creative economy, the posteconomic society, the information society, the knowledge society, and the consumer society. Among these terms and…

  19. High performance hand-held gas chromatograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.M.

    1998-04-28

    The Microtechnology Center of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a high performance hand-held, real time detection gas chromatograph (HHGC) by Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) technology. The total weight of this hand-held gas chromatograph is about five lbs., with a physical size of 8{close_quotes} x 5{close_quotes} x 3{close_quotes} including carrier gas and battery. It consumes about 12 watts of electrical power with a response time on the order of one to two minutes. This HHGC has an average effective theoretical plate of about 40k. Presently, its sensitivity is limited by its thermal sensitive detector at PPM. Like a conventional G.C., this HHGC consists mainly of three major components: (1) the sample injector, (2) the column, and (3) the detector with related electronics. The present HHGC injector is a modified version of the conventional injector. Its separation column is fabricated completely on silicon wafers by means of MEMS technology. This separation column has a circular cross section with a diameter of 100 pm. The detector developed for this hand-held GC is a thermal conductivity detector fabricated on a silicon nitride window by MEMS technology. A normal Wheatstone bridge is used. The signal is fed into a PC and displayed through LabView software.

  20. l'Internet Society

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN

    1997-01-01

    Conference of Vinton "Vint" Gray Cerf in the Intercontinental Hostel. Vinton Gray Cerf (born June 23, 1943) is an American computer scientist who is commonly referred to as one of the "founding fathers of the Internet" for his key technical and managerial role, together with Bob Kahn, in the creation of the Internet and the TCP/IP protocols which it uses. He was also a co-founder (in 1992) of the Internet Society (ISOC) which is intended to both promote the views of ordinary users of the Internet, and also serve as an umbrella body for the technical groups developing the Internet (such as the Internet Engineering Task Force). He served as the first president of the Internet Society from 1992-1995.

  1. Discrimination in Modern Society

    OpenAIRE

    Schekach, E. V.; Щекач, Е. В.

    2013-01-01

    Issues of discrimination in modern society are examined in the article. Types of discrimination, ways of demonstration, methods of combating discrimination and inequality are described. Particular attention is paid to the legal basis and the real life stories, which serve as a material base for judgments how to prevent discrimination. Possible ways are suggested to eliminate such a negative phenomenon of society like discrimination. Статья посвящена вопросам дискриминации в современном общ...

  2. Cooking and Society

    OpenAIRE

    Teplá, Hedvika

    2012-01-01

    The bachelor thesis "Cooking and Society" focuses on cooking, a process of food preparation. The thesis analyzes cooking as a leisure activity, type of housework and it also discusses the relation between cooking and cultural identity. It focuses on the importance of national and ethnic cuisine and deals with the differences in cooking influenced by religion and social stratification. The thesis also deals with the acquisition of cooing skills and transgeneral transfer of cooking skills. It d...

  3. European Physical Society awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The winners of the 2004 Accelerator Prizes, awarded by the European Physical Society's Interdivisional Group on Accelerators (EPS-IGA), have been announced. Vladmir Shiltsev (Fermilab) and Igor Meshkov (JINR, Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna) will be presented with their awards during the 9th European Particle Accelerator Conference, EPAC'04, on 8 July 2004 in Lucerne. Both physicists will also give a talk about their work. More details on: http://epac.web.cern.ch/

  4. Society and Social Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janani Harish

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Society is the source of immense power. Over the past few centuries humanity has record­ed phenomenal growth in its collective capacity for accomplishment, as reflected in the 12-fold growth in global per capita income since 1800. The remarkable achievements in living standards, longevity, science, technology, industry, education, democracy, human rights, peace and global governance are the result of the exponential development of the capacity of society to harness human energies and convert them into social power for productive purposes. Today, humanity possesses the power and capabilities needed to fully meet the multi-dimensional challenges confronting global society. The source of this energy is people. Human energy is transformed into social power by the increasing reach, frequency and complexity of human relationships. Society is a complex living network of organized relationships between people. Its power issues from channelizing our collective energies in productive ways by means of organizing principles such as coordination, systems, specialization of function, hierarchy of authority, and integration. This immense social power remains largely underutilized. Social science needs to evolve a comprehensive, trans-disciplinary understanding of the roots of social power and the process by which it is generated, distributed and applied. This knowledge is the essential foundation for formulating effective social policies capable of eradicating forever persistent poverty, unemployment and social inequality. This article is based on a series of lectures delivered by the author in the WAAS-WUC course on “Toward a Trans-disciplinary Science of Society” at Dubrovnik on September 1-3, 2014. It traces the development of social power in different fields to show that human and social capital are inexhaustible in potential. The more we harness them, the more they grow. Unleashing, directing, channeling and converting human potential into social

  5. Leadership in Small Societies

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Younger

    2010-01-01

    Multi-agent simulation was used to study several styles of leadership in small societies. Populations of 50 and100 agents inhabited a bounded landscape containing a fixed number of food sources. Agents moved about the landscape in search of food, mated, produced offspring, and died either of hunger or at a predetermined maximum age. Leadership models focused on the collection and redistribution of food. The simulations suggest that individual households were more effective at meeting their ne...

  6. The new totalitarian society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlajki Emil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The new totalitarian society is a euphemized expression denoting the New World Order, which in itself denotes the American globalization. The underpinning of this mindset is rationality, which is characteristic of Western civilization. Christianity engendered rationality by introducing it through St. Thomas Aquinas, Aristotle, and especially formal logic. Since it is obvious that religion and logic cannot ultimately be harmonized, this combination has proven lethal in many cases throughout history. For instance, the Inquisition, which, contrary to what happened at scholastic universities, severely berated rational thinking in practice. Catholicism helped carry out genocide against the Jews, and Orthodoxy is in a certain manner tied in with Stalinism. The new totalitarian society is anchored in American Protestantism. On the whole, Christian rationalism is a sphere of science, techniques and technologies efficiently employed to promote the West to the status of a society of plenty and the conception of human rights, which turn into their opposite and irrational behavior of the worst kind. An example of such inhumanity is the attack against Yugoslavia/Serbia in 1999.

  7. The Mastocytosis Society survey on mast cell disorders: patient experiences and perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Susan; Russell, Nancy; Jennings, Blair; Slee, Valerie; Sterling, Lisa; Castells, Mariana; Valent, Peter; Akin, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Mast cell diseases include mastocytosis and mast cell activation syndromes, some of which have been shown to involve clonal defects in mast cells that result in abnormal cellular proliferation or activation. Numerous clinical studies of mastocytosis have been published, but no population-based comprehensive surveys of patients in the United States have been identified. Few mast cell disease specialty centers exist in the United States, and awareness of these mast cell disorders is limited among nonspecialists. Accordingly, information concerning the experiences of the overall estimated population of these patients has been lacking. To identify the experiences and perceptions of patients with mastocytosis, mast cell activation syndromes, and related disorders, The Mastocytosis Society (TMS), a US based patient advocacy, research, and education organization, conducted a survey of its members and other people known or suspected to be part of this patient population. A Web-based survey was publicized through clinics that treat these patients and through TMS's newsletter, Web site, and online blogs. Both online and paper copies of the questionnaire were provided, together with required statements of consent. The first results are presented for 420 patients. These results include demographics, diagnoses, symptoms, allergies, provoking factors of mast cell symptoms, and disease impact. Patients with mastocytosis and mast cell activation syndromes have provided clinical specialists, collaborators, and other patients with information to enable them to explore and deepen their understanding of the experiences and perceptions of people coping with these disorders. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Replicating viral vectors as HIV vaccines: Summary report from IAVI Sponsored Satellite Symposium, International AIDS Society Conference, July 22, 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koff, W. C.; Parks, C. L.; Berkhout, B.; Ackland, J.; Noble, S.; Gust, I. D.

    2008-01-01

    At the International AIDS Society Conference oil Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention held in Sydney, Australia, in July 2007, the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) convened a satellite symposium entitled 'Accelerating the Development of Replicating Viral Vectors for AIDS Vaccines.' Its

  9. Determining Electrode Placement for Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: A Comparison of EEG- Versus TMS-Guided Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Tonya L; Menk, Jeremiah S; Rudser, Kyle D; Chen, Mo; Meekins, Gregg D; Peña, Edgar; Feyma, Timothy; Bawroski, Kay; Bush, Christina; Gillick, Bernadette T

    2017-11-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is increasingly researched as an adjuvant to motor rehabilitation for children with hemiparesis. The optimal method for the primary motor cortex (M1) somatotopic localization for tDCS electrode placement has not been established. The objective, therefore, was to determine the location of the M1 derived using the 10/20 electroencephalography (EEG) system and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in children with hemiparesis (CWH) and a comparison group of typically developing children (TDC). We hypothesized a difference in location for CWH but not for TDC. The 2 locations were evaluated in 47 children (21 CWH, 26 TDC). Distances between the locations were measured pending presence of a motor evoked potential. Distances between the EEG and TMS locations that exceeded the 2.5 cm × 2.5 cm rubber electrode area are reported in percentages [95% confidence interval] in CWH-nonlesioned hemisphere was 68.8% [41.3-89.0], lesioned: 85.7% [57.2-98.2]; TDC-dominant hemisphere 73.9% [51.6-89.8], nondominant: 82.6% [61.2-95.0]. Distances that exceeded the 3 × 5 cm electrode sponge area in CWH-nonlesioned was 25.0% [7.3-52.4], lesioned was 28.6% [8.4-58.1]; TDC-dominant was 52.2% [30.6-73.2], nondominant was 43.5 [23.2-65.5]). Distances that exceeded the 5 × 7 cm electrode sponge area in CWH-nonlesioned was 18.8% [4.0-45.6] and lesioned was 21.4% [4.7-50.8]; TDC-dominant was 21.7% [7.5-43.7] and nondominant was 26.1% [10.2-48.4]. Individual variability in brain somatotopic organization may influence surface scalp localization of underlying M1 in children regardless of neurologic impairment. Findings suggest further investigation of optimal tDCS electrode placement. EEG and TMS methods reveal variability in localizing M1 in children regardless of stroke diagnosis. This study was registered on clinicaltrials.gov NCT02015338.

  10. A report on the first Asian Oncology Nursing Society conference

    OpenAIRE

    Qi Wang; Rui-Shuang Zheng; Judi Johnson

    2014-01-01

    The first Asian Oncology Nursing Society (AONS) conference was held in Thailand from November 22 to 24 2013. It was a significant milestone in the journey of the development of the AONS. The objectives of the conference were to facilitate opportunities for networking, collaboration and exchange of ideas with renowned leaders in Oncology Nursing, to facilitate sharing and collaboration of oncology nursing in Asia and to explore innovative strategies to strengthen the implementation of evidence...

  11. Functional localization in the human brain: Gradient-echo, spin-echo, and arterial spin-labeling fMRI compared with neuronavigated TMS.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekhoff, S.; Uludag, K.; Sparing, R.; Tittgemeyer, M.; von Cramon, D.Y.; Grefkes, C.

    2010-01-01

    A spatial mismatch of up to 14 mm between optimal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) site and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal has consistently been reported for the primary motor cortex. The underlying cause might be the effect of magnetic susceptibility around large

  12. The Improvement of Oxidation Resistance of a Re-Based Diffusion Barrier/Ni–Al Coating on the Single-Crystal Ni-Based TMS-82+ Superalloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y.; Wang, Y.M.; Song, G.M.; Li, X.W.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidation behavior of a Re-based diffusion barrier/Ni–Al coated single-crystal (SC) Ni-based TMS-82+ superalloy was studied to compare with those of the base and Ni–Al coated superalloys under cyclic air at 1150 °C for 200 h. The base superalloy showed a negative mass gain due to extensive oxide

  13. The dorsomedial prefrontal cortex mediates the interaction between moral and aesthetic valuation: a TMS study on the beauty-is-good stereotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Chiara; Nadal, Marcos; Schiavi, Susanna; Vecchi, Tomaso; Cela-Conde, Camilo J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Attractive individuals are perceived as possessing more positive personal traits than unattractive individuals. This reliance on aesthetic features to infer moral character suggests a close link between aesthetic and moral valuation. Here we aimed to investigate the neural underpinnings of the interaction between aesthetic and moral valuation by combining transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with a priming paradigm designed to assess the Beauty-is-Good stereotype. Participants evaluated the trustworthiness of a series of faces (targets), each of which was preceded by an adjective describing desirable, undesirable, or neutral aesthetic qualities (primes). TMS was applied between prime and target to interfere with activity in two regions known to be involved in aesthetic and moral valuation: the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC, a core region in social cognition) and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC, critical in decision making). Our results showed that when TMS was applied over vertex (control) and over the dlPFC, participants judged faces as more trustworthy when preceded by positive than by negative aesthetic primes (as also shown in two behavioral experiments). However, when TMS was applied over the dmPFC, primes had no effect on trustworthiness judgments. A second Experiment corroborated this finding. Our results suggest that mPFC plays a causal role linking moral and aesthetic valuation. PMID:28158864

  14. Neurophysiology and Neuroanatomy of Reflexive and Volitional Saccades as Revealed by Lesion Studies with Neurological Patients and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muri, Rene M.; Nyffeler, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This review discusses the neurophysiology and neuroanatomy of the cortical control of reflexive and volitional saccades in humans. The main focus is on classical lesion studies and studies using the interference method of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). To understand the behavioural function of a region, it is essential to assess…

  15. Science, Society and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K. S.; Teich, A. H.

    2010-12-01

    Apart from the journals they produce, scientific societies play an important role in communicating scientific findings and norms to the broader society. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) includes among its goals to promote and defend the integrity of science and its use; provide a voice for science on societal issues; promote the responsible use of science in public policy; and increase public engagement with science and technology. AAAS websites and programs, including Communicating Science (www.aaas.org/communicatingscience), Working with Congress (http://www.aaas.org/spp/cstc/wwc/book.htm) and ScienceCareers.org (http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org), provide tools for scientists to become more directly engaged in effectively communicating their findings and involved in the policy process. Education programs work to build the next generation of scientists and a science-literate public. To bridge the current communication gap between scientists, the public and policymakers, AAAS, like other scientific societies, maintains policy and outreach programs with limited budgets and staff. AAAS works to engage policymakers and provide scientific underpinning to key issues through congressional briefings, meetings, policy briefs, and media outreach. AAAS responds to challenges to accepted scientific findings and processes through op-eds, letters to government officials, resolutions, and Board statements. Some of these initiatives occur on a local level in partnership with local civic leaders, whose endorsement makes them more powerful. On a national scale, they assure that the voice of science is included in the debate. The changing media landscape presents opportunities and challenges for future AAAS endeavors.

  16. June 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The June 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 6/25/14 at the Bio5 building on the University of Arizona Medical Center campus in Tucson beginning at 5:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 33 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. Four cases were presented: Eric Chase presented a 68 year old incarcerated man shortness of breath, chest pain and productive cough. The patient was a poor historian. He was supposed to be receiving morphine for back pain but this had been held. He also had a 45 pound weight loss over the past year. His PMH was positive for COPD, hypertension, congestive heart failure, chronic back pain and hepatitis C. Past surgical history included a back operation and some sort of chest operation. On physical examination he was tachypneic, tachycardic and multiple scars over his neck ...

  17. July 2016 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first 150 words. The July 2016 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, July 27, 2016 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. Prior to the case presentations, a discussion was held on 4 issues. First, Dr. Rick Robbins gave a summary of ATS Hill Day. During Hill Day a presentation was given by a representative from the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. Their web site lists tobacco company contributions to members of Congress on their web site. Dr. Gary Ewart from the ATS office in Washington gave a presentation on the Traditional Cigar Manufacturing and Small Business Jobs Preservation Act before Congress (aka the Cigar Bill which the ATS opposes. He noted that cosponsors for the bill included several Congressmen from Southwestern states. Dr. Robbins combined the two ...

  18. July 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The first Arizona Thoracic Society meeting in Tucson was held on Wednesday, 7/24/2013 at Kiewit Auditorium on the University of Arizona Medical Center campus beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 36 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. Dinner was sponsored by Accredo Health Group. A brief discussion was held of plans to have the December 2013 meeting in Tucson on a weekend as part of the University of Arizona winter pulmonary meeting. There were 4 cases presented: 1.Mohammad Dalabih presented a case of a 48 yo woman with respiratory failure cared for by Gordon Carr, Linda Snyder, and himself. Radiology findings were discussed by Isabel Oliva. Lung biopsy showed acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia rather than ARDS and was presented by Richard Sobonya. 2.Franz Rischard presented a case of a 61 year old with progressive dyspnea and moderate COPD with evidence of

  19. August 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first 150 words. The August Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 8/28/2013 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 23 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and pathology communities. A brief discussion was held about the audio-visual aids available. It was generally agreed that our current projector is inadequate. Judd Tillinghast will inquire about using a hospital overhead projector. If that is not possible, it was agreed to purchase a new projector. Plans for telecasting the meeting between Phoenix and Tucson continue. A trial of a link between Shea and the University in Tucson failed. Once the link is successfully established, it is hoped that the meeting can be telecasted. There were 6 cases presented: 1. Dr. Thomas Colby, pulmonary pathologist from Mayo Clinic Arizona, presented the case of a 10 year old boy with chronic dyspnea for > 4 yrs. He had growth retardation since age …

  20. Popular Music and Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    or the Russkii Rok-Klub v Amerike (Russian Rock Club of America).   This special edition of Popular Music and Society aims to present research on contemporary popular music (broadly defined) in the former Soviet republics and their diasporas.  A central issue will be how the musical landscape has changed since...... the collapse of the Soviet Union: What present trends can be observed?  How has the Soviet context influenced the popular music of today?  How is music performed and consumed?  How has the interrelationship between cultural industry and performers developed?  How are nationalist sensibilities affecting popular...

  1. Disciplining Global Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Evans

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the puzzles of the current era is the divide between optimists and pessimists on the question of human rights. The prominence of human rights on the international political agenda sustains the optimist’s hopes for the future, while pessimists point to continued and widespread reports of civil, political, economic, social and cultural violations. This article looks at the tensions and apparent contradictions between these two approaches. Following a discussion on the construction of global human rights discourse(s, the article concludes that the pretensions of law act to mask the socioeconomic normative framework that acts to discipline global society.

  2. Disciplining Global Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Evans

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the puzzles of the current era is the divide between optimists and pessimists on the question of human rights. The prominence of human rights on the international political agenda sustains the optimist’s hopes for the future, while pessimists point to continued and widespread reports of civil, political, economic, social and cultural violations. This article looks at the tensions and apparent contradictions between these two approaches. Following a discussion on the construction of global human rights discourse(s, the article concludes that the pretensions of law act to mask the socioeconomic normative framework that acts to discipline global society.

  3. Membership in cooperative societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eba Gaminde Egia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we will analyze the practical application of one of the cooperative principles, «voluntary and free membership», referring to the entering of members in cooperative societies. We will first explain the meaning of this principle, and then bring up its normative regulation, with special emphasis on those aspects in which our autonomic laws differ, and ending with a brief reference to the economic aspect and the different ways to make contributions and their consequences.Received: 31 May 2017Accepted: 14 October 2017Published online: 22 December 2017

  4. 23 CFR 500.204 - TMS components for highway traffic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... be available to address traffic data program needs. (d) Short term traffic monitoring. (1) Count data... monitoring shall comply to the data needs identified in § 500.203(a) of this subpart. (2) Vehicle... the test procedure as well as the frequency of testing. Standards of the American Society for Testing...

  5. The Impact of Accelerated HF-rTMS on the Subgenual Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Refractory Unipolar Major Depression: Insights From 18FDG PET Brain Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeken, Chris; Marinazzo, Daniele; Everaert, Hendrik; Wu, Guo-Rong; Van Hove, Christian; Audenaert, Kurt; Goethals, Ingeborg; De Vos, Filip; Peremans, Kathelijne; De Raedt, Rudi

    2015-01-01

    Although one of the most frequent diagnosed mental illnesses worldwide, it appears to be challenging to successfully treat major depressive disorder (MDD). Although the phenomenon of treatment-resistant depression (TRD) still remains unclear, the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) has been put forward as a possible neurobiological marker to evaluate clinical effects of a variety of antidepressant treatments, including repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Accelerated high-frequency (HF)-rTMS may have the potential to rapidly result in beneficial clinical outcomes in TRD. No studies yet examined the clinical effects of such accelerated stimulation treatment paradigms on sgACC regional glucose metabolism (CMRglc), nor the predictive value of the latter for clinical outcome. First, we investigated the predictive value of baseline sgACC metabolic activity for clinical outcome. Second, we hypothesized that in clinical responders only accelerated HF-rTMS treatment would result in significant metabolic decreases. We recruited right-handed antidepressant-free unipolar melancholic TRD patients to participate in a two-week randomized sham-controlled crossover HF-rTMS treatment study. Stimulation was applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Fifteen patients underwent 18FDG PET (CMRglc) at baseline (T0), after the first week (T1) of accelerated HF-rTMS and at the end of the treatment after the second week (T2). Higher baseline sgACC metabolic activity may indicate beneficial clinical outcome to this kind of accelerated HF-rTMS treatment. Moreover, clinical response resulted in a significant decrease in sgACC CMRglc. Non-response did not affect sgACC CMRglc. Our results add to the sgACC as a specific neurobiological marker for anti-depressive response in accelerated HF-rTMS treatment paradigms. Such protocols may not only have the ability to result in fast clinical responses but they may also have potential to acutely modulate a

  6. Effect of low-frequency rTMS on aphasia in stroke patients: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Li Ren

    Full Text Available Small clinical trials have reported that low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS might improve language recovery in patients with aphasia after stroke. However, no systematic reviews or meta-analyses studies have investigated the effect of rTMS on aphasia. The objective of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of studies that explored the effects of low-frequency rTMS on aphasia in stroke patients.We searched PubMed, CENTRAL, Embase, CINAHL, ScienceDirect, and Journals@Ovid for randomized controlled trials published between January 1965 and October 2013 using the keywords "aphasia OR language disorders OR anomia OR linguistic disorders AND repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation OR rTMS". We used fixed- and random-effects models to estimate the standardized mean difference (SMD and a 95% CI for the language outcomes.Seven eligible studies involving 160 stroke patients were identified in this meta-analysis. A significant effect size of 1.26 was found for the language outcome severity of impairment (95% CI = 0.80 to 1.71 without heterogeneity (I2 = 0%, P = 0.44. Further analyses demonstrated prominent effects for the naming subtest (SMD = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.18 to 0.87, repetition (SMD = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.16 to 0.92, writing (SMD = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.19 to 1.22, and comprehension (the Token test: SMD = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.07 to 1.09 without heterogeneity (I2 = 0%. The SMD of AAT and BDAE comprehension subtests was 0.32 (95% CI = -0.08 to 0.72 with moderate heterogeneity (I2 = 32%,P = 0.22. The effect size did not change significantly even when any one trial was eliminated. None of the patients from the 7 included articles reported adverse effects from rTMS.Low-frequency rTMS with a 90% resting motor threshold that targets the triangular part of the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG has a positive effect on language recovery in patients with aphasia following

  7. 48th Annual Convention of Computer Society of India

    CERN Document Server

    Avadhani, P; Udgata, Siba; Lakshminarayana, Sadasivuni; ICT and Critical Infrastructure

    2014-01-01

      This volume contains 85 papers presented at CSI 2013: 48th Annual Convention of Computer Society of India with the theme “ICT and Critical Infrastructure”. The convention was held during 13th –15th December 2013 at Hotel Novotel Varun Beach, Visakhapatnam and hosted by Computer Society of India, Vishakhapatnam Chapter in association with Vishakhapatnam Steel Plant, the flagship company of RINL, India. This volume contains papers mainly focused on Data Mining, Data Engineering and Image Processing, Software Engineering and Bio-Informatics, Network Security, Digital Forensics and Cyber Crime, Internet and Multimedia Applications and E-Governance Applications.

  8. Academic Freedom and Society: Some Critical Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Choksey

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A review of a recent one-day conference, Academic Freedom and Society, held on June 2 2017 at the University of Warwick, which sought to pose questions about ideals and practices of academic freedom, historically and in the current moment, across disciplinary and national borders. Speakers discussed the university and human rights practices, Islamophobia and teaching law, ‘Decolonise the University’, links between funding and research, digital piracy, new sites of knowledge commons, and university managerialism, and the challenges and possibilities these topics pose to the practice of academic freedom. Has the university ever been autonomous from state interests, and what modes of freedom are currently available to academics – already unevenly contingent on social and national identifications – in practice?

  9. XVth Italian Society of Archaeoastronomy Congress

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses a variety of topics within the growing discipline of Archaeoastronomy, focusing especially on Archaeoastronomy in Sicily and the Mediterranean and Cultural Astronomy. A further priority is discussion of the astronomical and statistical methods used today to ascertain the degree of reliability of the chronological and cultural definition of sites and artifacts of archaeoastronomical interest. The contributions were all delivered at the XVth Congress of the Italian Society of Archaeoastronomy (SIA), held under the rubric "The Light, the Stones and the Sacred" – a theme inspired by the International Year of Light 2015, organized by UNESCO. The full meaning of many ancient monuments can only be understood by examining their relation to light, given the effects that light radiation produces in “interacting” with lithic structures. Moreover, in addition to manifestations of the sacred through the medium of light (hierophanies), there are many ties between temples, tombs, megalithic structu...

  10. 30 CFR 56.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 56.12033 Section 56.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL....12033 Hand-held electric tools. Hand-held electric tools shall not be operated at high potential...

  11. 30 CFR 57.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 57.12033 Section 57.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Surface and Underground § 57.12033 Hand-held electric tools. Hand-held electric tools shall not be...

  12. Access to state-held information as a fundamental right under the European Convention on Human Rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hins, W.; Voorhoof, D.

    2007-01-01

    Access to state-held information essential in a democratic society - Traditional reluctance of the European Court of Human Rights to apply Article 10 European Convention on Human Rights in access to information cases - Positive obligations and new perspectives: initiatives within the Council of

  13. Civil society in beweging: Vier moskeeorganisaties in Amsterdam Slotervaart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge de Jong

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a picture is drawn of four mosques and affiliated foundations in the civil society of the Amsterdam city district Slotervaart. The focus in this article is concerned with civil society and religion. We took a closer look at what activities were being organised, what developments were underway, and what view the boards of the foundations and mosque councils held with respect to citizenship and the function of places of worship in Dutch society. The results of the study show that members of the board and volunteers try to build a bridge to Dutch society by appealing to the community from the perspective of theirn bonding function. The organisations find themselves in a field of force with internal and external developments in which they must function and within which they try to give their social responsibility shape.

  14. 23rd Workshop of the Italian Neural Networks Society (SIREN)

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, Anna; Morabito, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    This volume collects a selection of contributions which has been presented at the 23rd Italian Workshop on Neural Networks, the yearly meeting of the Italian Society for Neural Networks (SIREN). The conference was held in Vietri sul Mare, Salerno, Italy during May 23-24, 2013. The annual meeting of SIREN is sponsored by International Neural Network Society (INNS), European Neural Network Society (ENNS) and IEEE Computational Intelligence Society (CIS). The book – as well as the workshop-  is organized in two main components, a special session and a group of regular sessions featuring different aspects and point of views of artificial neural networks, artificial and natural intelligence, as well as psychological and cognitive theories for modeling human behaviors and human machine interactions, including Information Communication applications of compelling interest.  .

  15. Real time implementation of genetic algorithm cancellation of sinusoidal noise in ECG using TMS320C50 DSP processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaravel, N; Viswanathan, S M

    1999-01-01

    Power-line interference (either 50 Hz or 60 Hz) is a significant source of noise in biomedical recording. Elimination of power-line interference in the Electrocardiogram (ECG) signal by various methods have been proposed in the past. Despite the high common mode rejection ratio of the input amplifiers of the Electrocardiographs, recordings are often contaminated by power-line (mains) frequency interference, usually phase shifted with respect to the mains voltage. The use of conventional filter affects the signal components adjacent to the mains line frequency. A variety of adaptive filters for this purpose have been proposed but they require some adaptation period whenever there is change in the power-line interference. This paper describes a method of implementing the genetic algorithm noise cancellation in real time, using TMS320C50 based add-on DSP card that does the process of conversion and subtraction and the host PC doing the training process.

  16. Auxin synthesis gene tms1 driven by tuber-specific promoter alters hormonal status of transgenic potato plants and their responses to exogenous phytohormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolachevskaya, Oksana O; Sergeeva, Lidiya I; Floková, Kristyna; Getman, Irina A; Lomin, Sergey N; Alekseeva, Valeriya V; Rukavtsova, Elena B; Buryanov, Yaroslav I; Romanov, Georgy A

    2017-03-01

    Ectopic auxin overproduction in transgenic potato leads to enhanced productivity accompanied with concerted and occasional changes in hormonal status, and causing altered response of transformants to exogenous auxin or cytokinin. Previously, we generated potato transformants expressing Agrobacterium-derived auxin synthesis gene tms1 driven by tuber-specific patatin gene promoter (B33-promoter). Here, we studied the endogenous hormonal status and the response to exogenous phytohormones in tms1 transformants cultured in vitro. Adding indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) or kinetin to culture medium affected differently tuberization of tms1-transformed and control plants, depending also on sucrose content in the medium. Exogenous phytohormones ceased to stimulate the tuber initiation in transformants at high (5-8%) sucrose concentration, while in control plants the stimulation was observed in all experimental settings. Furthermore, exogenous auxin partly inhibited the tuber initiation, and exogenous cytokinin reduced the average tuber weight in most transformants at high sucrose content. The elevated auxin level in tubers of the transformants was accompanied with a decrease in content of cytokinin bases and their ribosides in tubers and most shoots. No concerted changes in contents of abscisic, jasmonic, salicylic acids and gibberellins in tubers were detected. The data on hormonal status indicated that the enhanced productivity of tms1 transformants was due to auxin and not mediated by other phytohormones. In addition, exogenous cytokinin was shown to upregulate the expression of genes encoding orthologs of auxin receptors. Overall, the results showed that tms1 expression and local increase in IAA level in transformants affect both the balance of endogenous cytokinins and the dynamics of tuberization in response to exogenous hormones (auxin, cytokinin), the latter reaction depending also on the carbohydrate supply. We introduce a basic model for the hormonal network

  17. Effectiveness and acceptability of accelerated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for treatment-resistant major depressive disorder: an open label trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGirr, Alexander; Van den Eynde, Frederique; Tovar-Perdomo, Santiago; Fleck, Marcelo P A; Berlim, Marcelo T

    2015-03-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a significant cause of worldwide disability and treatment resistance is common. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) has emerged as a treatment for MDD, and while efficacious, the daily commitment for typical 4-6 weeks of treatment poses a significant challenge. We aimed to determine the effectiveness and acceptability of an accelerated rTMS protocol for MDD. In this naturalistic trial, 27 patients with moderate to severe chronic and treatment-resistant MDD were treated with twice-daily HF-rTMS (10 Hz) applied over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for 2 consecutive weeks (60,000 pulses). The primary outcomes were rates of clinical remission and response (16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology post-treatment score ≤ 6, and ≥ 50% reduction, respectively). Secondary outcomes were self-reported anxious symptoms, depressive symptoms and quality of life, and dropout rates as a proxy for acceptability. Ten (37.0%) patients met criteria for clinical remission and 15 (55.6%) were classified as responders, with comparable outcomes for both moderate and severe MDD. Clinician-rated improvements in depressive symptoms were paralleled in self-reported depressive and anxious symptoms, as well as quality of life. No patient discontinued treatment. This study is limited by short treatment duration that might be lengthened with corresponding improvements in effectiveness, limited duration of follow-up, small sample size, and an open-label design requiring randomized controlled replication. An accelerated protocol involving twice-daily sessions of HF-rTMS over the left DLPFC for 2 weeks was effective in treatment-resistant MDD, and had excellent acceptability. Additional research is required to optimize accelerated rTMS treatment protocols and determine efficacy using sham-controlled trials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular cloning, sequence and structural analysis of dehairing Mn(2+) dependent alkaline serine protease (MASPT) of Bacillus pumilus TMS55.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Kalibulla Syed; Muniyandi, Jeyaraj; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2011-10-01

    Leather industries release a large amount of pollution-causing chemicals which creates one of the major industrial pollutions. The development of enzyme based processes as a potent alternative to pollution-causing chemicals is useful to overcome this issue. Proteases are enzymes which have extensive applications in leather processing and in several bioremediation processes due to their high alkaline protease activity and dehairing efficacy. In the present study, we report cloning, characterization of a Mn2+ dependent alkaline serine protease gene (MASPT) of Bacillus pumilus TMS55. The gene encoding the protease from B. pumilus TMS55 was cloned and its nucleotide sequence was determined. This gene has an open reading frame (ORF) of 1,149 bp that encodes a polypeptide of 383 amino acid residues. Our analysis showed that this polypeptide is composed of 29 residues N-terminal signal peptide, a propeptide of 79 residues and a mature protein of 275 amino acids. We performed bioinformatics analysis to compare MASPT enzyme with other proteases. Homology modeling was employed to model three dimensional structure for MASPT. Structural analysis showed that MASPT structure is composed of nine α-helices and nine β-strands. It has 3 catalytic residues and 14 metal binding residues. Docking analysis showed that residues S223, A260, N263, T328 and S329 interact with Mn2+. This study allows initial inferences about the structure of the protease and will allow the rational design of its derivatives for structure-function studies and also for further improvement of the enzyme.

  19. Images of Mathematics Held by Undergraduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basanta Raj Lamichhane

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore images of mathematics held by undergraduate students and possible influencing factors. The image of mathematics in this study was conceptualized as the mental representations or views of mathematics as undergraduate students experienced during their academic journey through the interaction largely at school. Pierre Bourdieu’s construct of symbolic violence served as the theoretical lens to evaluate the students' images of mathematics. The design of this study was explorative qualitative and interpretive. Semi-structured interview was used to generate data texts from three participants who were senior undergraduate students studying mathematics at an affiliated college of Tribhuvan University in Kathmandu. From the thematic analysis and interpretation of the textual data, four common themes emerged as images of mathematics held by the participants. These themes were – mathematics as difficult and abstract, as decontextualized, as mysterious subject, and as applicable in different fields. The influencing factors on the formation of these images were largely related to the curricular and pedagogical approaches from schools to university classes. These are conventional and disempowering methods of teaching, decontextualized curriculum and textbooks and other teaching learning resources, medium of instruction and nature of mathematics itself. 

  20. Hand-held myometry: reference values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ploeg, R J; Fidler, V; Oosterhuis, H J

    1991-01-01

    In thirteen major muscle groups of 50 healthy females and 50 males, aged 20-60 years, maximum voluntary contraction was measured with a hand-held dynamometer. The intrasession variation, the left-right variation, and the fifth and fiftieth centile values were calculated. The ratio of two observations within one session ranged from 0.85 to 1.18 and the ratio of left to right ranged from 0.82 to 1.22 (95% reference limits). In 20 volunteers the repeatability was tested after one week. The ratio of averages of three measurements in two successive weeks ranged from 0.82 to 1.23 (95% reference limits). There were only small differences between muscle groups concerning these ratios. A significant relation with age and weight/Quetelet Index could be demonstrated in some muscle groups. The mean strength of females is approximately two thirds of the strength of males. The data may be useful as reference values in the application of hand-held myometry. PMID:2030353

  1. Communicating Science to Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Samuel; Muller, Jennifer; Leather, Kimberley; Morgan, William; O'Meara, Simon; Topping, David; Booth, Alastair; Llyod, Gary; Young, Dominique; Bannan, Thomas; Simpson, Emma; Percival, Carl; Allen, Grant; Clark, Elaine; Muller, Catherine; Graves, Rosemarie

    2014-05-01

    "Nothing in science has any value to society if it is not communicated." So goes the 1952 quote from Anne Roe, the noted twentieth century American psychologist and writer. She went on to say that "scientists are beginning to learn their social obligations", and now over 60 years later there is certainly evidence to support her assertions. As scientists, by communicating our research to the general public we not only better inform the tax payer where their money is being spent, but are also able to help put into context the topical environmental challenges and issues that society faces, as well as inspiring a whole new generation of future scientists. This process of communication is very much a two-way street; by presenting our work to people outside of our usual spheres of contemporaries, we expose ourselves to alternative thoughts and insights that can inspire us, as scientists, to take another look at our research from angles that we had never before considered. This work presents the results and experiences from a number of public engagement and outreach activities across the UK, in which geoscientists engaged and interacted with members of the general public. These include the design and implementation of Raspberry Pi based outreach activities for several hundred high school students; the process of running a successful podcast (http://thebarometer.podbean.com); hosting and participating in science events for thousands of members of the general public (e.g. http://www.manchestersciencefestival.com and http://sse.royalsociety.org/2013); and creating a citizen science activity that involved primary school children from across the UK. In communicating their research it is imperative that scientists interact with their audience in an effective and engaging manner, whether in an international conference, a classroom, or indeed down the pub. This work also presents a discussion of how these skills can be developed at an early stage in the careers of a research

  2. Making Sense for Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heide, J. J.; Grus, M. M.; Nouwens, J. C. A. J.

    2017-09-01

    The Netherlands is a densely populated country. Cities in the metropolitan area (Randstad) will be growing at a fast pace in the coming decades1. Cities like Amsterdam and Rotterdam are being overrun by tourists. Climate change effects are noticed in cities (heavy rains for instance). Call for circular economy rises. Traffic increases. People are more self-reliant. Public space is shared by many functions. These challenges call for smart answers, more specific and directly than ever before. Sensor data is a cornerstone of these answers. In this paper we'll discuss the approaches of Dutch initiatives using sensor data as the new language to live a happy life in our cities. Those initiatives have been bundled in a knowledge platform called "Making sense for society" 1 https://www.cbs.nl/nl-nl/nieuws/2016/37/pbl-cbs-prognose-groei-steden-zet-door (in dutch)

  3. War and society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upeniece V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A discussion of effects of war on society is desirable as it can stimulate nations and their politicians to refrain in their international and non-international relations from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of the state. The prohibition of the use of force is a valid norm of customary international law and is fixed in the Charter of the United Nations. Any specific use of force can be lawful only if it is based on exceptions of this rule (action of self-defence under the Article 51 or action under specific authorization by the Security Council under Chapter VII. However the main issue is how to ensure that the other states respect this principle of non-use of force.

  4. Behaviorism and Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapfl, Jon E

    2016-05-01

    A probable list of causes for the limited acceptance of behaviorism in our society is identified. This is followed by a summary review of the proposed solutions identified in other papers in this special issue of The Behavior Analyst, most of which relate to either better marketing of either the behavior analytic process or the results achieved as a consequence. One paper proposes a more broad conception of behavior analysis. This paper endorses the solutions identified in previous papers and then goes on to propose an even more broad conception of behavior analysis and makes the point that behavior analysis is unlikely to flourish unless behavior analysts understand a good deal more about the cultural and other contextual features of the environments in which they work.

  5. Libraries in Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansson, Michael; Skouvig, Laura

    The purpose of the paper is to investigate the phenomenon of openness in relation to library development. The term openness is presented and related to library development from historical and theoretical perspectives. The paper elaborates on the differences over time on to how openness has been...... understood in a library setting. Historically, openness in form of the open shelves played a crucial role in developing the modern public library. The paper examines this openness-centred library policy as adopted by Danish public libraries in the beginning of the 20th century by applying the theories...... by Michel Foucault on discourse and power to the introduction of open shelves. Furthermore, the paper discusses current challenges facing the modern public library in coping with openness issues that follow from changes in society and advances in technology. These influences and developments are not least...

  6. Advanced information society (1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Gosei

    In considering the relationship of informationization and industrial structure, this paper analize some factors such as information revolution, informationization of industries and industrialization of information as background of informationization of Japanese society. Next, some information indicators such as, information coefficient of household which is a share of information related expenditure, information coefficient of industry which is a share of information related cost to total cost of production, and information transmission census developed by Ministry of Post and Telecommunication are introduced. Then new information indicator by Economic Planning Agency, that is, electronic info-communication indicator is showed. In this study, the information activities are defined to produce message or to supply services on process, stores or sale of message using electronic information equipment. International comparisons of information labor force are also presented.

  7. Reintegrating ghettos into society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mechlenborg, Mette

    2018-01-01

    international regeneration programmes in order to close the socio-economic gap between housing areas and residents. Based on the recent architectural evaluation of social housing renewals for the Danish National Building Foundation (Bech-Danielsen & Mechlenborg 2017) and with a Lefebvrean perspective......In 2010, the Danish government launched a ghetto strategy with 32 initiatives in order to “dissolve parallel communities” in Danish housing areas and to (re)integrate them into Danish society (Statsministeret, 2010). Despite its negative offspring in the Muhammed riots (Freiesleben 2016, Houlind...... 2016), the strategy arguably presented a strategy for revalorization of space and, thereby, a new strategic approach combining social and physical initiatives in order to permanently transform deprived housing areas in a Danish contexts. With the ghetto strategy, Denmark is aligned with similar...

  8. Nuclear Research and Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggermont, G

    2000-07-01

    In 1998, SCK-CEN took the initiative to include social sciences and humanities into its research programme. Within this context, four projects were defined, respectively on sustainability and nuclear development; transgenerational ethics related to the disposal of long-lived radioactive waste; legal aspects and liability; emergency communication and risk perception. Two reflection groups were established, on expert culture and ethical choices respectively, in order to deepen insight while creating exchange of disciplinary approaches of the committed SCK-CEN researchers and social scientists. Within the context of SCK-CEN's social sciences and humanities programme, collaborations with various universities were initiated, teams consisting of young doctorate and post-doctorate researchers and university promotors with experience in interaction processes of technology with society were established and steering committees with actors and external experts were set up for each project. The objectives and main achievements in the four projects are summarised.

  9. Science, Technology and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgstock, Martin; Burch, David; Forge, John; Laurent, John; Lowe, Ian

    1998-03-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the human, social and economic aspects of science and technology. It examines a broad range of issues from a variety of perspectives, using examples and experiences from around the world. The authors present complex issues, including the responsibilities of scientists, ethical dilemmas and controversies, the Industrial Revolution, economic issues, public policy, and science and technology in developing countries. The book ends with a thoughtful and provocative look toward the future. It features extensive guides to further reading, as well as a useful section on information searching skills. This book will provoke, engage, inform and stimulate thoughtful discussion about culture, society and science. Broad and interdisciplinary, it will be of considerable value to both students and teachers.

  10. Ancient Hindu Society and Eliot's Ideal Christian Society

    OpenAIRE

    Bhela, Anita

    2012-01-01

    In her article "Ancient Hindu Society and Eliot's Ideal Christian Society" Anita Bhela examines the influence of Hindu thought and Hindu philosophy on T.S. Eliot's critical writings. In The Idea of a Christian Society Eliot gives a hypothetical account of an ideal society that would contribute towards the well-being of all its members, while in Notes towards the Definition of Culture he enumerates the essential conditions needed for the growth and survival of culture. Bhela argues that religi...

  11. CAS Accelerator Physics held in Erice, Italy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Accelerator School

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) recently organised a specialised course on Superconductivity for Accelerators, held at the Ettore Majorana Foundation and Centre for Scientific Culture in Erice, Italy from 24 April-4 May, 2013.   Photo courtesy of Alessandro Noto, Ettore Majorana Foundation and Centre for Scientific Culture. Following a handful of summary lectures on accelerator physics and the fundamental processes of superconductivity, the course covered a wide range of topics related to superconductivity and highlighted the latest developments in the field. Realistic case studies and topical seminars completed the programme. The school was very successful with 94 participants representing 23 nationalities, coming from countries as far away as Belorussia, Canada, China, India, Japan and the United States (for the first time a young Ethiopian lady, studying in Germany, attended this course). The programme comprised 35 lectures, 3 seminars and 7 hours of case study. The case studies were p...

  12. November 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The November 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 30 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. Jud Tillinghast was nominated as the Arizona Thoracic Society physician of the year. Three cases were presented: 1. George Parides presented a case of a 70-year-old woman with a 3 areas of ground glass picked up incidentally on CT scan. She had some wheezing. A needle biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. The biopsy and radiologic pattern were consistent with adenocarcinoma in situ or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma. Discussion centered around treatment. Most felt that if the areas could be removed that surgical resection was indicated (1. 2. Lewis Wesselius presented a 60-year-old man with Marfan's syndrome and a history of an aortic valve replacement on chronic ...

  13. March 2017 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The March 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There 11 attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, thoracic surgery and radiology communities. There was a discussion of supporting the Tobacco 21 bill which had been introduced into the Arizona State Legislature. The bill was assigned to the House Commerce Committee but was not scheduled for a hearing by the Chair-Representative, Jeff Wininger from Chandler. It seems likely that the bill will be reintroduced in the future and the Arizona Thoracic Society will support the bill in the future. Three cases were presented: 1. Dr. Bridgett Ronan presented a 57-year-old man with cough and shortness of breath. His physical examination and spirometry were unremarkable. A thoracic CT scan showed large calcified and noncalcified pleural plaques and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. …

  14. September 2017 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The September 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, September 27, 2017 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 16 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. There was a discussion of the Tobacco 21 bill which had been introduced the last session in the Arizona State Legislature. Since it seems likely that the bill will be reintroduced, the Arizona Thoracic Society will support the bill in the future. Dr. Rick Robbins announced that the SWJPCC has applied to be included in PubMed. In addition, Dr. Robbins was assigned the task of tracking down the campaign contributions to congressional members from the tobacco PAC before the next election. There were 7 case presentations: 1.\tAshley L. Garrett, MD, pulmonary fellow at Mayo, presented an elderly man with insulin-dependent diabetes who felt he …

  15. The Society for Translational Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Shugeng; Zhang, Zhongheng; Aragón, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The Society for Translational Medicine and The Chinese Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery conducted a systematic review of the literature in an attempt to improve our understanding in the postoperative management of chest tubes of patients undergoing pulmonary lobectomy. Recommendati......The Society for Translational Medicine and The Chinese Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery conducted a systematic review of the literature in an attempt to improve our understanding in the postoperative management of chest tubes of patients undergoing pulmonary lobectomy...

  16. Indicators of Information Society Measurement :

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind Elwy

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The indicator of information society describe the infrastructure of information and communication technology ; as well as it’s use and it’s production in different estate of society. The importance economic and social of tic is crescent in modern society. and the presentation of tendency inform above the situation of information society . in this article we want to describe the indicator of tic in Algeria according to librarian’s vision in Mentouri university

  17. Symposium introduction: the first joint American Chemical Society Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division and the American Chemical Society International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    The American Chemical Society (ACS) Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division (AGFD) and the ACS International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand (ICSCT) worked together to stage the “1st Joint ACS AGFD - ACS ICSCT Symposium on Agricultural and Food Chemistry,” which was held in Bangkok, Thailand ...

  18. Civil Society in Fragile Contexts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, M. van; Verkoren, W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Policies to promote peace in conflict-torn societies increasingly include “civil society (CS) building” as an aim; however, in such settings, it is often difficult – if not impossible – to distinguish between state and society, or between “civil” and “uncivil”. Local legitimacy (representativeness

  19. Contraception and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diczfalusy, E

    2002-12-01

    When an idea meets the exigencies of an epoch, it becomes stronger than any form of political power and it becomes the common property of humankind. Such an idea was the development of contraceptives. In retrospect, the invention of contraceptives was as fundamental for the evolution of humankind as the invention of the wheel; today more than 550 million couples are using contraceptive methods. The large-scale use of contraceptives triggered the most powerful social revolutions of a century in reproductive health and gender equity, and substantially contributed to an unparalleled demographic change, characterized by a rapid aging of populations. One of the important reasons for population aging is a significant decline in fertility rates, resulting in gradually changing population structures with fewer and fewer children and more and more elderly persons. The causes underlying these demographic changes are complex and manifold; they reflect major societal changes of historical dimensions. Many of our institutions cater increasingly for a population structure that no longer exists. There is therefore an increasing need for institutional reforms in social security, health care, housing and education. In addition, several surveys conducted in the developed world have indicated an erosion of confidence in our basic institutions, e.g. courts and justice, the Church and Parliament. Whereas modem sociologists are concerned about an increase in crime, decrease in trust and depleted social capital, one can also observe an accelerated perception of our global destiny and a re-awakening of the moral impulse with a strong demand for increased transparency in public affairs. Also, various global communities have assumed a growing importance. It can be predicted that international professional communities, such as the European Society of Contraception, will play an increasingly important future role in influencing policies in general and health policies in particular. because of

  20. Risk and society; Risque et societe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tubiana, M. [Academie des Sciences, 75 - Paris (France)]|[Centre Antoine Beclere, Faculte de medecine, 75 - Paris (France); Vrousos, C.; Pages, J.P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 38 - Grenoble (France); Carde, C.

    1999-07-01

    This book brings together the communications presented at the colloquium 'risk and society' held in Paris (France) on November 1998. During this colloquium, the various aspects of risk and of its management were discussed by medical specialists, historians, industrialists, engineers, philosophers, lawyers, politicians and administration representatives. The first theme concerns the controversies generated by the development of some activities (genetics, bio-technologies, nuclear and radiations use). The second theme concerns the management of risks and the way to conciliate the point of view of authorities and citizens (confidence of the public with respect to experts, scientists, industrialists, government and administrative representatives, role played by the media). The debates that took place during the colloquium have shown that the public opinion concerning the nuclear activities or the new technologies greatly depends on the ideological attitudes and on the public's likes and dislikes with respect to some categories of actors (distrust with respect to public decisions, fears with respect to changes and future, nostalgia of the past). The following aspects are reviewed: Notions of risk and hazard (risk and health, risk in today's society, medicine and society, the point of view of the industrialists and of the scientific and technical specialists); from the psychological aspects of the risk to its social aspects (survey of the risk assessment battlefield, social attenuation and amplification of risk, the feeling of risks in Europe, insecurity and delinquency, controversies around radioactivity and health); the negotiation and communication about risks (risk and public health, negotiation around risks, risks and information dissemination about the public debate, communication and crisis, evolution of risk communication, comparison between American and European approaches, the Seveso directive); the public debate and the evolution of risks

  1. Paperless or vanishing society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner Luke, Joy

    2002-06-01

    In the 1940s color photography became available and within a few years, extremely popular. As people switched from black and white photographs made with the old metallic silver process to the new color films, pictures taken to record their lives and families began a slow disappearing act. The various color processes, coupled with the substrates they were printed on, affected their longevity, but many color photographs taken from the late 1950s through the 1970s, and even into the 1980s, faded not only when exposed to the light, but also when stored in the dark. Henry Wilhelm's excellent book 'The Permanence and Care of Color Photographs' documents this history in detail. Today we are making another transition in the storage of pictures and information. There are questions about the longevity of different types of digital storage, and also of the images printed by various types of inkjet printers, or by laser printers using colored toners. Very expensive and very beautiful works of art produced on Iris printers are appearing in art exhibitions. Some of these are referred to as Giclee prints and are offered on excellent papers. Artists are told the prints will last a lifetime; and if by change they don't it is only necessary to make another print. Henry Wilhelm has begun to test and rate these images for lightfastness; however, his test method was developed for examining longevity in colored photographs. It is of interest to find out how these prints will hold up in the tests required for fine art materials. Thus far companies producing digital inks and printers have not invested the time and money necessary to develop an American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard method for evaluating the lightfastness of digital prints. However, it is possible to use ASTM D 5383, Standard Practice for Visual Determination of the Lightfastness of Art Materials by Art Technologists, to pinpoint colors that will fade in a short time, even though the test is not as

  2. CERN & Society launches donation portal

    CERN Multimedia

    Cian O'Luanaigh

    2014-01-01

    The CERN & Society programme brings together projects in the areas of education and outreach, innovation and knowledge exchange, and culture and arts, that spread the CERN spirit of scientific curiosity for the inspiration and benefit of society. Today, CERN & Society is launching its "giving" website – a portal to allow donors to contribute to various projects and forge new relationships with CERN.   "The CERN & Society initiative in its embryonic form began almost three years ago, with the feeling that the laboratory could play a bigger role for the benefit of society," says Matteo Castoldi, Head of the CERN Development Office, who, with his team, is seeking supporters and ambassadors for the CERN & Society initiative. "The concept is not completely new – in some sense it is embedded in CERN’s DNA, as the laboratory helps society by creating knowledge and new technologies – but we would like to d...

  3. Suitability of the HAM-Nat test and TMS module "basic medical-scientific understanding" for medical school selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hissbach, Johanna; Feddersen, Lena; Sehner, Susanne; Hampe, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Tests with natural-scientific content are predictive of the success in the first semesters of medical studies. Some universities in the German speaking countries use the 'Test for medical studies' (TMS) for student selection. One of its test modules, namely "medical and scientific comprehension", measures the ability for deductive reasoning. In contrast, the Hamburg Assessment Test for Medicine, Natural Sciences (HAM-Nat) evaluates knowledge in natural sciences. In this study the predictive power of the HAM-Nat test will be compared to that of the NatDenk test, which is similar to the TMS module "medical and scientific comprehension" in content and structure. 162 medical school beginners volunteered to complete either the HAM-Nat (N=77) or the NatDenk test (N=85) in 2007. Until spring 2011, 84.2% of these successfully completed the first part of the medical state examination in Hamburg. Via different logistic regression models we tested the predictive power of high school grade point average (GPA or "Abiturnote") and the test results (HAM-Nat and NatDenk) with regard to the study success criterion "first part of the medical state examination passed successfully up to the end of the 7(th) semester" (Success7Sem). The Odds Ratios (OR) for study success are reported. For both test groups a significant correlation existed between test results and study success (HAM-Nat: OR=2.07; NatDenk: OR=2.58). If both admission criteria are estimated in one model, the main effects (GPA: OR=2.45; test: OR=2.32) and their interaction effect (OR=1.80) are significant in the HAM-Nat test group, whereas in the NatDenk test group only the test result (OR=2.21) significantly contributes to the variance explained. On their own both HAM-Nat and NatDenk have predictive power for study success, but only the HAM-Nat explains additional variance if combined with GPA. The selection according to HAM-Nat and GPA has under the current circumstances of medical school selection (many good applicants

  4. The Graphic Calculator Is Dead, Long Live Hand Held Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldknow, Adrian

    2001-01-01

    Explores the broader potential of hand held technology. Presents web resources with descriptions of new technologies and applications that include graphing calculators and classroom communication systems. (MM)

  5. Inhibitory and facilitatory connectivity from ventral premotor to primary motor cortex in healthy humans at rest--a bifocal TMS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäumer, T; Schippling, S; Kroeger, J

    2009-01-01

    stimulation (TMS) to examine intrahemispheric connectivity between left PMv and M1 in humans. A conditioning stimulus (CS) was applied to PMv at intensities of 80% and 90% of active motor threshold (AMT) and 90% and 110% of resting motor threshold (RMT). A supra-threshold test stimulus (TS) was given 2, 4, 6....... SIGNIFICANCE: The fact that conditioning effects following PMd stimulation differ from those after PMv stimulation supports the concept that inputs from premotor cortices to M1 are functionally segregated....

  6. Violence in society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Pedro de Andrade Dores

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent interest in the sociology of violence has arisen at the same time that western societies are being urged to consider the profound social crisis provoked by global financial turmoil. Social changes demand the evo- lution of sociological practices. The analysis herein proposed, based on the studies of M. Wieviorka, La Violence (2005, and of R. Collins, Violence: A Micro-sociological Theory (2008, concludes that violence is subject to sociological treatments cen- tered on the aggressors, on the struggles for power and on male gender. There is a lack of connection between prac- tical proposals for violence prevention and the sociol- ogy of violence. It is accepted that violence as a subject of study has the potential, as well as the theoretical and social centrality, to promote the debate necessary to bring social theory up to date. This process is more likely to oc- cur in periods of social transformation, when sociology is open to considering subjects that are still taboo in its study of violence, such as the female gender and the state. The rise of the sociology of violence confronts us with a dilemma. We can either collaborate with the construc- tion of a sub discipline that reproduces the limitations and taboos of current social theory, or we can use the fact that violence has become a “hot topic” as an opportunity to open sociology to themes that are taboo in social the- ory (such as the vital and harmonious character of the biological aspects of social mechanisms or the normative aspects of social settings. ResumenEl interés reciente en la sociología de la violencia ha surgido al mismo tiempo que las sociedades occidenta- les están requiriendo considerar la profunda crisis social provocada por la agitación financiera global. Los cambios sociales demandan la evolución de las prácticas socioló- gicas. El análisis aquí expuesto, basado en los estudios de M. Wieviorka, La Violence (2005, and of R. Collins

  7. Changes of cortical excitability as markers of antidepressant response in bipolar depression: preliminary data obtained by combining transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canali, Paola; Sferrazza Papa, Giovanna; Casali, Adenauer G; Schiena, Giandomenico; Fecchio, Matteo; Pigorini, Andrea; Smeraldi, Enrico; Colombo, Cristina; Benedetti, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    It is still unclear which biological changes are needed to recover from a major depressive episode. Current perspectives focus on cortical synaptic neuroplasticity. Measures of cortical responses evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) change with sleep homeostasic pressure in humans and approximate measures of synaptic strength in animal models. Using repeated total sleep deprivation as a model of antidepressant treatment, we aimed to correlate recovery from depression with these measures of cortical excitability. We recorded electroencephalographic responses to TMS in the prefrontal cortex of 21 depressed inpatients with bipolar disorder treated with repeated sleep deprivation combined with light therapy. We performed seven TMS/electroencephalography sessions during one week and calculated three measures of cortical excitability. Cortical excitability progressively increased during the antidepressant treatment and as a function of time awake. Higher values differentiated responders from non-responders at baseline and during and after treatment on all measures. Changes in measures of cortical excitability parallel and predict antidepressant response to combined sleep deprivation and light therapy. Data suggest that promoting cortical plasticity in bipolar depression could be a major effect of successful antidepressant treatments, and that patients not responding could suffer a persistent impairment in their neuroplasticity mechanisms. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Paired-Pulse TMS and Fine-Wire Recordings Reveal Short-Interval Intracortical Inhibition and Facilitation of Deep Multifidus Muscle Fascicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Massé-Alarie

    Full Text Available Paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (ppTMS is used to probe inhibitory and excitatory networks within the primary motor cortex (M1. These mechanisms are identified for limb muscles but it is unclear whether they share properties with trunk muscles. The aim was to determine whether it was possible to test the intracortical inhibition and facilitation of the deep multifidus muscle fascicles (DM and at which inter-stimulus intervals (ISI.In ten pain-free individuals, TMS was applied over M1 and motor evoked potentials (MEP were recorded using fine-wire electrodes in DM. MEPs were conditioned with subthreshold stimuli at ISIs of 1 to 12 ms to test short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI and at 15 ms for long-interval intracortical facilitation. Short-interval facilitation (SICF was tested using 1-ms ISI.SICI of DM was consistently obtained with ISI of 1-, 3-, 4- and 12-ms. Facilitation of DM MEP was only identified using SICF paradigm.A similar pattern of MEP modulation with ISI changes for deep trunk and limb muscles implies that M1 networks share some functional properties.The ppTMS paradigm presents a potential to determine how M1 inhibitory and excitatory mechanisms participate in brain re-organization in back pain that affects control of trunk muscles.

  9. A short history of the Australian Society of Soil Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennison, Linda

    2013-04-01

    (1990,) J Quirk (1998) and RE White (2012). In 1989 a motion was narrowly defeated to introduce a Fellows category of membership to the Society. In 2012 members attending the annual general meeting of the Society discussed the introduction of a Fellow category as an Award and members voted to continue discussion on this initiative. Federal Council initiated a Student Award in 1969 and over ensuing years a range of awards were initiated; JA Prescott Medal of Soil Science (1972), Australian Society of Soil Science Inc Publication Medal (1979), JK Taylor OBE Gold Medal in Soil Science (1984), CG Stephens PhD Award in Soil Science (2003), LJH Teakle Award (2010) along with the Society's conference presentation awards. Branches were busy during this time and hosted many activities including seminars, field trips and conferences for both members and those interested in soil science. By the early seventies several branches had conducted refresher courses and in 1974 the Society became incorporated. The Society hosted its first world congress, the 9th International Society of Soil Science Congress, in Adelaide in 1968 with 310 papers printed, 239 papers presented and 720 delegates. In contrast, 42 years later the 19th World Congress of Soil Science returned to Australia, where in Brisbane 1914 delegates from 68 countries were treated to 343 presentations, 1227 research posters, 8 keynote and 65 invited lead speakers. A commemorative stamp was produced for the first Congress and another stamp was created in 2007 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Society. Originally Society conferences were held every four years however this was reduced to, and still remains, at two year intervals. An inaugural joint conference of the New Zealand Society of Soil Science and the Australian Society of Soil Science Inc. was held in Rotorua in November 1986. This paved the way for the series of joint national conferences between the two societies, the first one of which was held in Melbourne

  10. Plasticity in the sensorimotor cortex induced by Music-supported therapy in stroke patients: A TMS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eGrau-Sánchez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Playing a musical instrument demands the engagement of different neural systems. Recent studies about the musician’s brain and musical training highlight that this activity requires the close interaction between motor and somatosensory systems. Moreover, neuroplastic changes have been reported in motor-related areas after short and long-term musical training. Because of its capacity to promote neuroplastic changes, music has been used in the context of stroke neurorehabilitation. The majority of patients suffering from a stroke have motor impairments, preventing them to live independently. Thus, there is an increasing demand for effective restorative interventions for neurological deficits. Music-supported Therapy (MST has been recently developed to restore motor deficits. We report data of a selected sample of stroke patients who have been enrolled in a MST program (1 month intense music learning. Prior to and after the therapy, patients were evaluated with different behavioral motor tests. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS was applied to evaluate changes in the sensorimotor representations underlying the motor gains observed. Several parameters of excitability of the motor cortex were assessed as well as the cortical somatotopic representation of a muscle in the affected hand. Our results revealed that participants obtained significant motor improvements in the paretic hand and those changes were accompanied by changes in the excitability of the motor cortex. Thus, MST leads to neuroplastic changes in the motor cortex of stroke patients which may explain its efficacy.

  11. Plasticity in the sensorimotor cortex induced by Music-supported therapy in stroke patients: a TMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau-Sánchez, Jennifer; Amengual, Julià L; Rojo, Nuria; Veciana de Las Heras, Misericordia; Montero, Jordi; Rubio, Francisco; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münte, Thomas F; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Playing a musical instrument demands the engagement of different neural systems. Recent studies about the musician's brain and musical training highlight that this activity requires the close interaction between motor and somatosensory systems. Moreover, neuroplastic changes have been reported in motor-related areas after short and long-term musical training. Because of its capacity to promote neuroplastic changes, music has been used in the context of stroke neurorehabilitation. The majority of patients suffering from a stroke have motor impairments, preventing them to live independently. Thus, there is an increasing demand for effective restorative interventions for neurological deficits. Music-supported Therapy (MST) has been recently developed to restore motor deficits. We report data of a selected sample of stroke patients who have been enrolled in a MST program (1 month intense music learning). Prior to and after the therapy, patients were evaluated with different behavioral motor tests. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) was applied to evaluate changes in the sensorimotor representations underlying the motor gains observed. Several parameters of excitability of the motor cortex were assessed as well as the cortical somatotopic representation of a muscle in the affected hand. Our results revealed that participants obtained significant motor improvements in the paretic hand and those changes were accompanied by changes in the excitability of the motor cortex. Thus, MST leads to neuroplastic changes in the motor cortex of stroke patients which may explain its efficacy.

  12. Theta Burst Stimulation of the Cerebellum Modifies the TMS-Evoked N100 Potential, a Marker of GABA Inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allanah Harrington

    Full Text Available Theta burst stimulation (TBS of the cerebellum, a potential therapy for neurological disease, can modulate corticospinal excitability via the dentato-thalamo-cortical pathway, but it is uncertain whether its effects are mediated via inhibitory or facilitatory networks. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 30Hz cerebellar TBS on the N100 waveform of the TMS-evoked potential (TEP, a marker of intracortical GABAB-mediated inhibition. 16 healthy participants (aged 18-30 years; 13 right handed and 3 left handed received 30Hz intermittent TBS (iTBS, continuous TBS (cTBS or sham stimulation over the right cerebellum, in three separate sessions. The first 8 participants received TBS at a stimulus intensity of 80% of active motor threshold (AMT, while the remainder received 90% of AMT. Motor evoked potentials (MEP and TEP were recorded before and after each treatment, by stimulating the first dorsal interosseus area of the left motor cortex. Analysis of the 13 right handed participants showed that iTBS at 90% of AMT increased the N100 amplitude compared to sham and cTBS, without significantly altering MEP amplitude. cTBS at 80% of active motor threshold decreased the N100 amplitude and cTBS overall reduced resting MEP amplitude. The study demonstrates effects of 30Hz cerebellar TBS on inhibitory cortical networks that may be useful for treatment of neurological conditions associated with dysfunctional intracortical inhibition.

  13. Repetitive TMS of the temporo-parietal junction disrupts participant's expectations in a spontaneous Theory of Mind task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardi, Lara; Six, Pieter; Brass, Marcel

    2017-09-14

    A recent debate about Theory of Mind (ToM) concerns whether spontaneous and explicit mentalizing are based on the same mechanisms. However, only a few neuroimaging studies have investigated the neural bases of spontaneous ToM, with inconsistent results. The present study had two goals: first, to investigate whether the right Temporo-Parietal Junction (rTPJ) is crucially involved in spontaneous ToM and second, to gain insight into the role of the rTPJ in ToM. For the first time, we applied rTMS to the rTPJ while participants were engaged in a spontaneous false belief task. Participants watched videos of a scene including an agent who acquires a true or false belief about the location of an object. At the end of the movie, participants reacted to the presence of the object. Results show that, during stimulation of the control site, RTs were affected by both the participant's expectations and the belief of the agent. Stimulation of the rTPJ significantly modulated task performance, supporting the idea that spontaneous ToM, as well as explicit ToM, relies on TPJ activity. However, we did not observe a disruption of the representation of the agent's belief. Rather, the stimulation interfered with participant's predictions, supporting the idea that rTPJ is crucially involved in self-other distinction. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. Science communication at scientific societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braha, Jeanne

    2017-10-01

    Scientific societies can play a key role in bridging the research and practice of scientists' engagement of public audiences. Societies are beginning to support translation of science communication research, connections between scientists and audiences, and the creation of opportunities for scientists to engage publics without extensive customization. This article suggests roles, strategies, and mechanisms for scientific societies to promote and enhance their member's engagement of public audiences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. High performance hand-held gas chromatograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C M; Koo, J C

    2001-01-10

    Gas chromatography is a prominent technique for separating complex gases and then analyzing the relative quantities of the separate components. This analytical technique is popular with scientists in a wide range of applications, including environmental restoration for air and water pollution, and chemical and biological analysis. Today the analytical instrumentation community is to working towards moving the analysis away from the laboratory to the point of origin of the sample (''the field'') to achieve real-time data collection and lower analysis costs. The Microtechnology Center of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has developed a hand-held, real-time detection gas chromatograph (GC) through Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) technology. The total weight of this GC is approximately 8 pounds, and it measures 8 inches by 5 inches by 3 inches. It consumes approximately 12 watts of electrical power and has a response time on the order of 2 minutes. The current detector is a glow discharge detector with a sensitivity of parts per billion. The average retention time is about 30 to 45 seconds. Under optimum conditions, the calculated effective plate number is 40,000. The separation column in the portable GC is fabricated completely on silicon wafers. Silicon is a good thermal conductor and provides rapid heating and cooling of the column. The operational temperature can be as high as 350 degrees Celsius. The GC system is capable of rapid column temperature ramping and cooling operations. These are especially important for organic and biological analyses in the GC applications.

  16. Digital Denmark: From Information Society to Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Falch, Morten

    2000-01-01

    for a welfare society. However, globalisation and the spreading use of new information and communication technologies and services challenge this position. This article examines Denmark's performance in implementing its IS 2000 plans, the background to the Digital Denmark report, and its implications......The Danish Government recently issued a new policy report, Digital Denmark, on the "conversion to a network society", as a successor to its Information Society 2000 report (1994). This is part of a new round of information society policy vision statements that are, or will be forthcoming from...... national governments everywhere. Denmark provides an interesting case study because it ranks high in the benchmark indicators of information network society developments. This position has been obtained largely by public sector initiatives and without erosion of the highly reputed Scandinavian model...

  17. 24 CFR 401.461 - HUD-held second mortgage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false HUD-held second mortgage. 401.461... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MULTIFAMILY HOUSING MORTGAGE AND HOUSING ASSISTANCE RESTRUCTURING PROGRAM (MARK-TO-MARKET) Restructuring Plan § 401.461 HUD-held second mortgage. (a) Amount. (1) The...

  18. PÖFFi klippide autor on Martti Helde / Maire Kõrver

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kõrver, Maire, 1961-

    2009-01-01

    13. Pimedate Ööde filmifestivali tutvustava kahe filmiklipi autor on Kohilast pärit Martti Helde. "Seep teeb pimedaks, vaata filme" algidee on reklaamiagentuurilt Age McCann, teostus Martti Heldelt ja tema töögrupilt. Klipi "Kinotreiler" režissöör ja stsenarist on Martti Helde

  19. 45 CFR 681.25 - Where is the hearing held?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Where is the hearing held? 681.25 Section 681.25 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT REGULATIONS Hearing Procedures § 681.25 Where is the hearing held? The ALJ will...

  20. 9 CFR 381.77 - Carcasses held for further examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carcasses held for further examination. 381.77 Section 381.77 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... examination by the inspector, shall be held for further examination. The identity of each such carcass...

  1. 9 CFR 354.126 - Carcasses held for further examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carcasses held for further examination. 354.126 Section 354.126 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... examination by the inspector, shall be held for further examination. The identity of each such carcass...

  2. A multi-center study on low-frequency rTMS combined with intensive occupational therapy for upper limb hemiparesis in post-stroke patients

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    Kakuda Wataru

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS and intensive occupational therapy (OT have been recently reported to be clinically beneficial for post-stroke patients with upper limb hemiparesis. Based on these reports, we developed an inpatient combination protocol of these two modalities for the treatment of such patients. The aims of this pilot study were to confirm the safety and feasibility of the protocol in a large number of patients from different institutions, and identify predictors of the clinical response to the treatment. Methods The study subjects were 204 post-stroke patients with upper limb hemiparesis (mean age at admission 58.5 ± 13.4 years, mean time after stroke 5.0 ± 4.5 years, ± SD from five institutions in Japan. During 15-day hospitalization, each patient received 22 treatment sessions of 20-min low-frequency rTMS and 120-min intensive OT daily. Low-frequency rTMS of 1 Hz was applied to the contralesional hemisphere over the primary motor area. The intensive OT, consisting of 60-min one-to-one training and 60-min self-exercise, was provided after the application of low-frequency rTMS. Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA and Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT were performed serially. The physiatrists and occupational therapists involved in this study received training prior to the study to standardize the therapeutic protocol. Results All patients completed the protocol without any adverse effects. The FMA score increased and WMFT log performance time decreased significantly at discharge, relative to the respective values at admission (change in FMA score: median at admission, 47 points; median at discharge, 51 points; p Conclusions The 15-day inpatient rTMS plus OT protocol is a safe, feasible, and clinically useful neurorehabilitative intervention for post-stroke patients with upper limb hemiparesis. The response to the treatment was not influenced by age or time after stroke onset. The

  3. More female patients and fewer stimuli per session are associated with the short-term antidepressant properties of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS: a meta-analysis of 54 sham-controlled studies published between 1997–2013

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    Kedzior KK

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Karina Karolina Kedzior,1 Valeriya Azorina,2 Sarah Kim Reitz11School of Humanities and Social Sciences, 2School of Engineering and Science, Jacobs University Bremen, Bremen, GermanyBackground: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC appears to have short-term antidepressant properties. The aim of the current study was to update our previous meta-analysis and to investigate factors associated with the antidepressant properties of rTMS.Method: Following a systematic literature search conducted in Medline and PsycInfo, N=14 sham-controlled, parallel design studies (published after 2008 to August 2013 that had utilized rTMS of the DLPFC in major depression were included in the current meta-analysis. The sensitivity and moderator analyses also included data from N=40 studies (published in 1997–2008 from our previous meta-analysis. The effect size (Cohen’s d in each study was the standardized difference in mean depression scores (on Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale from baseline to final (after last session in rTMS compared to sham groups.Results: According to a random-effects model with inverse-variance weights, depression scores were significantly reduced after rTMS compared to sham in studies published from 2008–2013 based on N=659 patients (overall mean weighted d=–0.42, 95% confidence interval: –0.66, –0.18, P=0.001. Combining studies from our past and current meta-analyses (published in 1997–2013; N=54 revealed that depression was significantly reduced after left-fast (>1 Hz, right-slow (≤1 Hz, and bilateral (or sequential rTMS of DLPFC compared to sham. Significant antidepressant properties of rTMS were observed in studies with patients who were treatment resistant, unipolar (or bipolar, non-psychotic, medication-free (or started on antidepressants concurrently with rTMS. According to univariate meta

  4. Swiss Society of Nuclear Medicine (SGNM/SSMN) 9th annual congress. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    The article covers the abstracts of lectures held during the 9th Annual Congress of the Swiss Society of Nuclear Medicine (SGNM/SSMN) concerning the following topics: conventional diagnostics/SPECT-CT (6 abstracts), radiochemistry/therapy (6 abstracts), varia (8 abstracts), nuclear cardiology (11 abstracts), oncology/PET-CT (5 abstracts), Poster session (6 abstracts).

  5. Life Style and Cancer ? The Open Symposium of the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS) in 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Kamiya, Hiroyuki; Oikawa, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    The Open Symposium of the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS), entitled ?Life Style and Cancer?, was held at the Shiba-Kyoritsu campus of Keio University, Tokyo, on May 30, 2015. The major aim of this symposium was to provide information about the relationships between lifestyle habits and cancers and an opportunity to inform a wide range of people about the JEMS activities.

  6. [Living in a Temporary Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, Warren G.

    Society is in the process of accelerated change and the institutionalization of this change through research and technology. Other factors affecting American society are an increase in affluence, an elevation of the educational level of the population, and a growing interdependence of institutions. The fact that this country is currently going…

  7. The governance of cooperative societies

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    Yaiza Juanes Sobradillo

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to expose the appropriate legislation for cooperative societies to which Article 129 of the Spanish Constitution refers, deepen the analysis of the organs of management and control based on the Spanish and Basque Laws on Cooperatives and the Statute for the European Cooperative Societies.

  8. Public Libraries in postindustrial societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbeshausen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The article’s focus is on how public libraries are affected by structural changes in the wake of the transition to the knowledge society. Their attempts to match the knowledge society are illustrated by processes of sensemaking and sensegiving made in public libraries in Canada, the UK and Denmark....

  9. 47th Scientific Meeting of the Italian Statistical Society

    CERN Document Server

    Moreno, Elías; Racugno, Walter

    2016-01-01

    This book brings together selected peer-reviewed contributions from various research fields in statistics, and highlights the diverse approaches and analyses related to real-life phenomena. Major topics covered in this volume include, but are not limited to, bayesian inference, likelihood approach, pseudo-likelihoods, regression, time series, and data analysis as well as applications in the life and social sciences. The software packages used in the papers are made available by the authors. This book is a result of the 47th Scientific Meeting of the Italian Statistical Society, held at the University of Cagliari, Italy, in 2014.

  10. A report on the first Asian Oncology Nursing Society conference

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    Qi Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The first Asian Oncology Nursing Society (AONS conference was held in Thailand from November 22 to 24 2013. It was a significant milestone in the journey of the development of the AONS. The objectives of the conference were to facilitate opportunities for networking, collaboration and exchange of ideas with renowned leaders in Oncology Nursing, to facilitate sharing and collaboration of oncology nursing in Asia and to explore innovative strategies to strengthen the implementation of evidence-based practice in oncology nursing.

  11. A report on the first Asian Oncology Nursing Society conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The first Asian Oncology Nursing Society (AONS conference was held in Thailand from November 22 to 24 2013. It was a significant milestone in the journey of the development of the AONS. The objectives of the conference were to facilitate opportunities for networking, collaboration and exchange of ideas with renowned leaders in Oncology Nursing, to facilitate sharing and collaboration of oncology nursing in Asia and to explore innovative strategies to strengthen the implementation of evidence-based practice in oncology nursing.

  12. What is the Knowledge Society?

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    Marin Dinu

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This study sets out to establish conceptual delimitations, more concordant to the theoretical acquisitions with regard to the knowledge society. The author considers it opportune to situate in the center of the definition of the concept of knowledge society the problem of prevalence in the typology of resources. Thus, the knowledge society appears as a form of organization in which scientific knowledge predominates, be that informatics as well. The concordances of essence are discovered through the discerning of the functional relationship knowledge society – global society. In the spectrum of meanings specific to this highway of post-postmodernist configuration of the world, the priorities of the project of the second modernity – the paradigmatic matrix of globalization – are approached. In fact, the study argues in favor of refocusing globalization on the humane, on its distinctive values which substantiate and lend sense to the evolutions of the world. Postreferentiality is the rational expression of humanity coming back to itself.

  13. Geosciences Information for Teachers (GIFT) Workshops held in Conjunction with Alexander von Humboldt (AvH) EGU Conferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laj, Carlo; Cifelli, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    The Alexander von Humboldt Conference Series of the European Geosciences Union are a series of meetings held outside of Europe, in particular in South America, Africa or Asia, on selected topics of geosciences with a socio-economic impact for regions on these continents, jointly organised with the scientists and their institutes and the institutions of these regions. Given the increasing success of the GIFT workshops held in conjunction with the General Assemblies, since 2010 EGU has also developed a series of GIFT workshops held in conjunction with AvH conferences. Associated GIFT workshops were held in Merida, Yucatan, on the theme of Climate Change, Natural Hazards and Societies (March 2010), then in Penang, Malaysia (June 2011) on the theme of Ocean Acidification, in November 2012 in Cusco (Peru) on the theme of Natural Disasters, Global Change and the Preservation of World Heritage Sites, finally in Istanbul (March 2014) on "High Impact Natural Hazards Related to the Euro-Mediterranean Region. The next GIFT workshop is already planned for October 2015 in Adis Ababa (Ethiopia) on the theme "Water". In each case, the GIFT workshop was held on the last two days of the AvH conference and reunited 40-45 teachers from the nation where the AvH was held. Keynote speakers from AvH were speakers to the GIFT workshops which also included hands-on activities animated by sciences educators. These GIFT workshops represented the first workshops specifically aimed at teachers held in the country, and therefore represents a significant Earth Sciences contribution to secondary education in non European countries.

  14. November 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The November 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. There were 3 case presentations: 1. Dr. Gerald Schwartzberg presented a case of a 56-year-old man with a history of diabetes, alcoholism and tobacco abuse who has a history of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI with a residual thin-walled cavity in his right upper lobe (RUL. After quitting drinking and smoking and years of being asymptomatic, he presented with hemoptysis. Chest x-ray showed increasing density in the RUL. CT scan showed an intracavitary density in his previous cavity presumably a fungus ball. Sputum cultures are pending. Discussion followed on management of fungus balls. Bronchoscopy was recommended to view the bronchial anatomy to exclude other diagnosis as well ...

  15. December 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

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    Richard A. Robbins

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A breakfast meeting of the Arizona Thoracic Society and the Tucson winter lung series was held on Saturday, 12/14/2013 at Kiewit Auditorium on the University of Arizona Medical Center Campus beginning at 8:30 AM. There were 31 in attendance. A lecture was presented by Joe G. N. "Skip" Garcia, MD, the senior vice president for health sciences at the University of Arizona. The title of Garcia’s talk was “Personalizing Medicine in Cardiopulmonary Disorders: The Post ACA Landscape”. Garcia began with reiterating that the Affordable Care Act (ACA, Obamacare is fact and could pose a threat to academic medical centers. However, he views the ACA as an opportunity to develop personalized medicine which grew from the human genome project. Examples cited included the genetic variability among patients in determining the dose of warfarin and bronchodilator response to beta agonists in asthma (1,2. Garcia’s laboratory has studied predominately 6 diseases including the …

  16. Congress Report: Democratic Society and Education

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    Matthias Busch

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In March 2010 the Congress of the German Educational Research Association (GERA/DGfE was held in Mainz. This year‘s topic “Bildung in der Demokratie” (Education in a Democratic Society touched upon the classic questions and concerns of processes of learning in the domain of the social sciences, i.e. social, economic or political subjects. Therefore, in these conference proceedings we intend to present the research-trends and theoretical profiles that should be of interest especially for teaching the social sciences. Three major trends in the discipline were represented at the conference with their rather different understandings of education in social sciences: knowledge-oriented subject matter didactics, socially-oriented “Demokratiedidaktik” (didactics of democracy, and a systemic and function-oriented sociology of education. Unfortunately, dialogue between these trends was rare at Mainz. The congress proceedings will thus try to show the different approaches they take and to reconstruct the communication that was needed, but often absent. A conceptual and empirical linkage between these positions seems necessary and reasonable. The following report presents a number of research-projects which attempt such linkages and thereby reconstruct and constructively orient the inner logic of pedagogical processes along the road to an empirically founded theory of education.

  17. September 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

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    Robbins RA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The September Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 9/25/2013 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 13 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and pathology communities. After a brief discussion, Gerry Swartzberg was selected as Arizona’s 2014 nominee for Clinician of the Year. There was 1 case presented: Dr. Thomas Colby, pulmonary pathologist from Mayo Clinic Arizona, presented the case of a 67 year old woman with multiple pulmonary nodules. The largest was 1.2 cm CT scan. She had a fine needle aspiration of one of the nodules. The pathology revealed spindle-shaped cells which were synaptophysin + (also known as the major synaptic vesicle protein p38. Synaptophysin marks neuroendocrine tissue and on this basis the patient was diagnosed with multiple carcinoid tumors. Aguayo et al. (1 described six patients with diffuse hyperplasia and dysplasia of pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, multiple carcinoid tumorlets, and peribronchiolar fibrosis …

  18. August 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

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    Robbins RA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The August 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 8/27/14 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 30 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep and radiology communities. A presentation was given by Julie Reid of the American Lung Association in Arizona on their Lung Force initiative. This is an initiative to make women more aware that lung cancer is the number 1 cause of cancer deaths in women. There will be a fund raising Lung Force Walk on November 15, 2014 in Phoenix. More information can be found at http://www.lungforce.org/walk-events or http://www.lung.org/associations/states/arizona/local-offices/phoenix/ or contact Julie Reid at JReid@Lung Arizona.org or (602 258-7505. A discussion was instigated by Dr. Parides on whether there is an increased risk of clinical Valley Fever in patients previously treated who begin therapy with biological therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. The ...

  19. October 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The October Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 10/23/2013 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 21 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and thoracic surgery communities. A proposal was made to decrease the number of meetings from 10 to 8 per year. After a brief discussion, this was adopted. Dr. Parides will try and coordinate these changes with Tucson. Meetings were announced for December in Tucson, January in Carmel, February in Albuquerque, and April in Phoenix. A suggestion was made to have a separate area for meetings on the SWJPCC website. There were 2 cases presented-both by Nick Sparacino, a first year fellow at Good Samaritan/VA. 1. The first case was a 48 year old man admitted to podiatry for chronic diabetic foot ulcers. His preoperative chest x-ray revealed multiple pulmonary nodules. Importantly, he had a history of working in a brake pad …

  20. The Impact of Accelerated Right Prefrontal High-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS on Cue-Reactivity: An fMRI Study on Craving in Recently Detoxified Alcohol-Dependent Patients.

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    Sarah C Herremans

    Full Text Available In alcohol-dependent patients craving is a difficult-to-treat phenomenon. It has been suggested that high-frequency (HF repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS may have beneficial effects. However, exactly how this application exerts its effect on the underlying craving neurocircuit is currently unclear. In an effort to induce alcohol craving and to maximize detection of HF-rTMS effects to cue-induced alcohol craving, patients were exposed to a block and event-related alcohol cue-reactivity paradigm while being scanned with fMRI. Hence, we assessed the effect of right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC stimulation on cue-induced and general alcohol craving, and the related craving neurocircuit. Twenty-six recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients were included. First, we evaluated the impact of one sham-controlled stimulation session. Second, we examined the effect of accelerated right DLPFC HF-rTMS treatment: here patients received 15 sessions in an open label accelerated design, spread over 4 consecutive days. General craving significantly decreased after 15 active HF-rTMS sessions. However, cue-induced alcohol craving was not altered. Our brain imaging results did not show that the cue-exposure affected the underlying craving neurocircuit after both one and fifteen active HF-rTMS sessions. Yet, brain activation changes after one and 15 HF-rTMS sessions, respectively, were observed in regions associated with the extended reward system and the default mode network, but only during the presentation of the event-related paradigm. Our findings indicate that accelerated HF-rTMS applied to the right DLPFC does not manifestly affect the craving neurocircuit during an alcohol-related cue-exposure, but instead it may influence the attentional network.