WorldWideScience

Sample records for socially responsible investment

  1. Socially responsible investment engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goessling, T.; Buijter, Bas; Freeman, R.E.; Kujala, J.; Sachs, S.

    2017-01-01

    This study explores engagement in socially responsible investment (SRI) processes. More specifically, it researches the impact of shareholder salience on the success of engagement activities. The research question asks: What is the relationship between shareholder salience and engagement effort

  2. Socially Responsible Investing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parisi, Cristiana; Stang, Andreas

    This paper analyzes the Scandinavian market for Socially Responsible Investing (SRI) mutual funds in order to determine the returns from discriminatory investment decision compared to the return from conventional portfolios. The analysis is conducted on 642 Scandinavian equity mutual funds...... counterparts. In the case of Norway no statistical difference in return is found when conducting the three factor regression. The Scandinavian market is considered particularly relevant for the interest of the investors in SRI mutual funds. However, to the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to present....... The methodology adopts the Sharpe ratio to establish the risk return relationship. Moreover, the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) and the Fama and French Three Factor model are used to test the hypotheses. The results indicate the underperformance of Swedish and Danish SRI funds relative to their conventional...

  3. Socially responsible investments

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    In addition to well-established working principles based on conservative and capital preservation oriented investments that ensure it a sustainable future, the CERN Pension Fund recently introduced a new criterion for selecting the numerous opportunities that the market offers: philanthropy. Its first initiative, which also involves the Staff Association’s Long-Term Collection, will help support two orphanages in China.   The two charities are located near Beijing. Beijing’s “China Children Charity and Foundation” is an orphanage that cares for up to 80 babies who need surgery to correct birth defects. The other, “Hope Healing Home”, is an organization that deals with 300 babies and cares for sick and physically disabled babies who have been abandoned. All these babies are awaiting treatment and a medical solution. The CERN Pension Fund has over 6700 members. To ensure the greatest efficiency and profitability, the Fund’s por...

  4. Socially responsible investments in mutual funds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funaru, M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to add contribution to the socially responsible investments (from now on called “SRI” research by examining the significance of this type of investment in terms of ethical or financial prior behaviour. Using the sample of European market of socially responsible investments funds, we first explore the SRI market dimension compared to the global data on SRI. We also investigate whether the ethical recognition is more important rather than the financial performance. Applied to the European social responsible investment fund market, the paper investigates the difference between these two aspects of behaviour and underlies the importance of socially responsible investments in promoting a sustainable development.

  5. Guidelines for integrating socially responsible investment in the investment process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, F.J.; Slager, A.

    2009-01-01

    Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) is of growing importance for institutional investors. Our analysis shows that SRI strategies can be grouped in ethically-based, investment-driven and value-ensuring objectives. We demonstrate that this categorization strengthens decisionmaking in SRI. Based on

  6. Socially Responsible Investments : Methodology, Risk and Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Ter Horst, J.R.; Zhang, C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper surveys the literature on socially responsible investments (SRI). Over the past decade, SRI has experienced an explosive growth around the world. Particular to the SRI funds is that both financial goals and social objectives are pursued. While corporate social responsibility (CSR) -

  7. Socially Responsible Investment in Japanese Pensions

    OpenAIRE

    Henry Hongbo Jin; Olivia S. Mitchell; John Piggott

    2005-01-01

    As the level of retirement-related assets has grown, so too has public and private interest in so-called "Socially Responsible Investment" (SRI), an investment strategy that employs criteria other than the usual financial risk and return factors when selecting firms in which to invest. This study evaluates whether SRI indexes would alter portfolio risk and return patterns for the new defined contribution pension plans currently on offer in Japan. We conclude that SRI funds can be included as ...

  8. Retail Structured Products for Socially Responsible Investments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille

    Institutional investors are the main drivers of demand for socially responsible investment (SRI). Preferences for non- nancial goals such as social and environmental sustainability are also held by small retail agents who, nonetheless, are almost non-existent in the market. This paper studies how...... and when it can be utility enhancing to engage in SRI: It proposes a quantitative method to incorporate responsibility into the investment decision and investigates how structured financial instruments can facilitate access to SRI for small retail agents. The goal is to demonstrate market potential...

  9. The Perception of Investors on Socially Responsible Investment: International Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Chiew, Dominic Kia Seng

    2008-01-01

    It is quite impossible to deny the growing importance of socially responsible investing (SRI) since its introduction in the early 1990s (Robson and Wakefield, 2007), when little attention was paid to this subject within the business ethics community as an alternative outlet to the existing conventional investment philosophy (Sparkes, 2001). The increasing use of Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) in the financial markets has become more apparent today. Organization have included many other...

  10. Corporate social responsibility investment and social objectives : An examination on social welfare investment of chinese state owned enterprises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bo, H.; Li, T.; Toolsema-Veldman, Linda

    We apply the theory of corporate social responsibility to analyse social welfare investment undertaken by Chinese State Owned Enterprises (SOEs). We present a simple theoretical model to illustrate how the presence of social objectives in the firm's objective function changes its investment

  11. CHALLENGES IN PERFORMANCE METRICS IN SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE INVESTMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuti Monika

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability issues have been penetrating the financial world over the decades at corporate and sector levels. In the field of sustainable finance, socially responsible investments (SRI are a dynamically evolving segment which has become a special industry in asset allocation and investments out of a niche movement. This article aims to highlight the trends, investors’ motives and performances of these investments. It concludes that controversies around the terminology, performance metrics and return of socially responsible investments, have not been resolved in academic literature yet.

  12. Socially Responsible Investments : Methodology, Risk Exposure and Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Ter Horst, J.R.; Zhang, C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper surveys the literature on socially responsible investments (SRI). Over the past decade, SRI has experienced an explosive growth around the world. Particular to the SRI funds is that both financial goals and social objectives are pursued. While corporate social responsibility (CSR) -

  13. The opportunity cost of negative screening in socially responsible investing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trinks, Pieter Jan; Scholtens, Bert

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of negative screening on the investment universe as well as on financial performance. We come up with a novel identification process and as such depart from mainstream Socially Responsible Investing (SRI) literature by concentrating on individual firms’ conduct and

  14. Social responsible investment: satisfaction, risks and prospects of development /

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M. Vygivska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The research is devoted to the study of the features and trends of the development of socially responsible investment in Ukraine. The present study shows that under the current conditions of economic development and political situation in different countries, socially responsible investment of various projects and programs of social significance becomes increasingly important and relevant. Today we observe the appearance of the new forms of implementation of socially responsible business activities, among which the impact-investment and financing of socially significant projects on the principles of venture philanthropy are becoming more and more popular. It is determined that IMP involves, firstly, profit making, and secondly, it expects positive social changes, in particular, in support of sustainable agricultural development, ensuring availability of medical services, affordability of housing, development of environmentally friendly technologies. It was found out that the goal of venture philanthropy is primarily to create a social effect, and, eventually, to generate profits that may appear in the process of implementing the project or the activities of the organization. In the vast majority of cases, this type of financing takes place through direct investment or fixed income securities.

  15. Sovereign wealth fund investments and the need to undertake socially responsible investment

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Wei

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing consensus that, beyond financial returns, investors should also consider the environmental and social impacts of their business activities. Major institutional investors currently are entering the realm of socially responsible investment (SRI), which incorporates environmental, social, and governance (ESG) factors into decision-making based on internationally recognized standards and principles. As influential institutional investors, sovereign wealth funds ...

  16. Financial and social performance of socially responsible investments in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, B.

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the performance of socially responsible investments in the Netherlands. It appears that the financial performance of the various types of socially responsible investments differs considerably. We construct a proxy for mutual funds' CSR policies and use information about the environmental

  17. Earning capacity of environmentally friendly companies and social responsible investing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerk, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Firms on Dow Jones Sustainability Index yield over time the same return as the ''ordinary'' firms on the Dow Jones World Stock Index. There are several investment funds today that deal in shares with selected companies having a high environmental or ethical profile. This is Social Responsible Investing (SRI). When the Norwegian company Storebrand Kapitalforvaltning selects companies for SRI, they exclude immediately nuclear power stations, tobacco factories and manufacturers of land mines. In addition to the same return on invested capital, both investors and society get an environmental profit. The firms analysed and selected by Storebrand for SRI contributes significantly less negative environmental effects than the other firms, typically 33% less to the global heating and have on average 53% less toxic emissions and 45% less water consumption

  18. Development of Investment Strategy Applying Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jekaterina Kuzmina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the article: Due to globalization processes and technological development, companies are having more influence on global society than ever. Therefore, business misconduct causes enormous harm to stakeholders, whereas ethical behavior is becoming an important issue. The goal of the following study is to verify and measure a positive effect from investments in social activities on financial attractiveness of companies in the form of its stock portfolio value growth. Methodology/methods: In order to achieve the goal of the research, quantitative analysis is used by comparing performance of stock portfolio of companies having long-term investments in social activities with market index increment. The quantitative results are accompanied with the review of corporate social responsibility definition and some practical issues on governmental and corporation level. Scientific aim: The conducted research contributes both to the scientific discussion about development of appropriate investment strategy in companies applying CSR principles as well as to the discussion of related terminology used in the field. Findings: The research has shown that engagement in the CSR activities tends to have strong positive effect on companies’ financial results and investors’ financial performance. The research proves this fact by comparing value increment of CSR-portfolio (+35.99% gained from January 2015 to March 2017 with market index (+22.37% in the same period. Conclusions: Regardless the positive result achieved in the study the authors have determined several gaps in the research, which will be discussed in the further studies on the field.

  19. 'A COMPARISON OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE AND INVESTMENT STYLES FOR SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE AND CONVENTIONAL INVESTMENT INDICES IN THE UNITED STATES'

    OpenAIRE

    Amish, Patel

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates comparing the financial performance for socially responsible investment equity indices and conventional investment equity indices in the United States, accounting for the recent financial crisis. Two conventional indices are used as a benchmark to four socially responsible indices. The conventional indices used in this paper are the S&P500 Index and CRSP Total Market Index. The socially responsible indices used are the Calvert Social Index, FTSE4Good U.S. Select Index,...

  20. Optimal Responsible Investment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille

    The paper studies retail Socially Responsible Investment and portfolio allocation. It extends conventional portfolio theory by allowing for a personal value based investment decision. When preferences for responsibility enter the framework for mean-variance analysis, it yields an optimal...... responsible investment model. An example of index investing illustrates the theory. Results show that it is crucial for the responsible investor to consider portfolio risk, expected return, and responsibility simultaneously in order to obtain an optimal portfolio. The model enables responsible investors...

  1. Toward a theory of responsible investing : On the economic foundations of corporate social responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, Lammertjan; Scholtens, Lambertus

    Studies that link corporate social and financial performance usually find a positive association between the two. However, the literature does not establish a significant impact of socially responsible investing on stock market returns. We develop a coherent economic framework of responsible

  2. Optimal Responsible Investment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille

    Numerous institutions are now engaged in Socially Responsible Investment or have signed the "UN Principles for Responsible Investment". Retail investors, however, are still lacking behind. This is peculiar since the sector constitutes key stakeholders in environmental, social and governmental...... standards. This paper considers optimal responsible investment for a small retail investor. It extends conventional portfolio theory by allowing for a personal-value based investment decision. Preferences for responsibility are defined in the framework of mean-variance analysis and an optimal responsible...... investment model identified. Implications of the altered investment problem are investigated when the dynamics between portfolio risk, expected return and responsibility is considered. Relying on the definition of a responsible investor, it is shown how superior investment opportunities can emerge when...

  3. Does R&D investment under corporate social responsibility increase firm performance?

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Chun Lin

    2017-01-01

    Research and development (R&D) investment affects firms’ growth and reflects their investment energy. However, it is recorded as an expense in financial statements, according to generally accepted accounting principles (e.g., International Financial Statements Standards). This study examines whether firms’ R&D investment has a positive effect on their performance, when they engage in corporate social responsibility. The author focuses on firms that have earned corporate social responsibility ...

  4. Socially Responsible Property Investment in Cities – Between Economic Reasoning and Social Obligations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodowicz Dominika P.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on socially responsible property investment (SRPI, which is an investment estimated not only to bring financial gain but also social and environmental benefits. The theoretical part of the paper draws on existing literature on responsible investment. The empirical part discussed in this article is based on original research conducted by the author. Starting with a global and regional overview, the query was narrowed down to a national level (Poland with a case study of the capital - Warsaw. The overarching research problem was described as follows: How are SRPI principles manifested and implemented by investors in the commercial real estate market? Additionally, investigation was supported by numerous questions regarding the interest in SRPI and an understanding of its principles and benefits among investors. Research goals were pursued based on primary and secondary data sources regarding existing and planned SRPI projects within the commercial real estate industry. Results indicate that there is a disparity between declared support for SRPI and market practice. At the conceptual level, there is an understanding of responsible investment principles and will to conduct such projects. However, commercial property practice proves a different reality with primary focus on green buildings, while the social factor is missing.

  5. The money-flows of socially responsible investment funds around the world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Ter Horst, J.R.; Zhang, C.; Baker, H.K.; Nofsinger, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter studies the money flows into and out of socially responsible investment (SRI) funds around the world. In their investment decisions, investors in SRI funds may be more concerned with ethical or social issues than with fund performance. Therefore, SRI money flows are less related to past

  6. When Do Firms Invest in Corporate Social Responsibility? : A Real Option Framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cassimon, D.; Engelen, P.J.; Liedekerke, L.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the process for firms to decide whether or not to invest in corporate social responsibility is treated from a real option perspective. We extend the Husted (2005) framework with an important extra parameter that allows us to understand the timing of CSR investment and explain why some

  7. A Framework for Managing a Portfolio of Socially Responsible Investments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.G.P.M. Hallerbach (Winfried); H. Ning (Haikun); A.B.M. Soppe (Aloy); J. Spronk (Jaap)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we present and illustrate using real-life data a framework for managing an investment portfolio in which the investment opportunities are described in terms of a set of attributes and part of this set is intended to capture the effects on society. Here we link with the

  8. The Relationship Between Oil and Gas Industry Investment in Alternative Energy and Corporate Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konyushikhin, Maxim

    The U.S. Energy Information Administration forecasted energy consumption in the United States to increase approximately 19% between 2006 and 2030, or about 0.7% annually. The research problem addressed in this study was that the oil and gas industry's interest in alternative energy is contrary to its current business objectives and profit goals. The purpose of the quantitative study was to explore the relationship between oil and gas industry investments in alternative energy and corporate social responsibilities. Research questions addressed the relationship between alternative energy investment and corporate social responsibility, the role of oil and gas companies in alternative energy investment, and why these companies chose to invest in alternative energy sources. Systems theory was the conceptual framework, and data were collected from a sample of 25 companies drawn from the 28,000 companies in the oil and gas industry from 2004 to 2009. Multiple regression and correlation analysis were used to answer the research questions and test hypotheses using corporate financial data and company profiles related to alternative energy investment and corporate social responsibility in terms of oil and gas industry financial support of programs that serve the greater social good. Results indicated significant relationships between alternative energy investment and corporate social responsibility. With an increasing global population with energy requirements in excess of what is available using traditional means, the industry should increase investment in alternative sources. The research results may promote positive social change by increasing public awareness regarding the degree to which oil and gas companies invest in developing alternative energy sources, which might, in turn, inspire public pressure on companies in the oil and gas industry to pursue use of alternative energy.

  9. Trends of development of social responsible investment in Ukraine: accounting principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudeychuk S.V.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The research is devoted to the study of the features and trends of the development of socially responsible investment in Ukraine. The main objective of the study of social responsibility issues is to systematize and study the prospects for the development and evaluation of corporate social responsibility in Ukraine, as well as to study the peculiarities of its accounting reflection in the accounting system. In the course of the study, the current state of social projects in Ukraine was studied, as well as the main obstacles and perspectives of the development of socially responsible investment in Ukraine. The research defines the features of socially responsible investment in order to identify the main areas of improvement of the information provision of formation of social reporting indicators. The article proposes the bookkeeping for directions of enterprise’s social activity in clearly defined accounts of accounting, regardless of the level of its regulation, followed by the development of analytical sections of accounting in the relevant areas of social policy.

  10. Multilateral development banks and socially responsible investments--the case of tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Pranay

    2012-12-01

    Globally, tobacco kills more people than HIV-related conditions or AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. In 1991, The World Bank, the world's largest lender, pledged that it would no longer support tobacco-related projects. It was expected that other financial investors would follow, but most did not respond to this call. As a result, several financial institutions continue to invest in tobacco and fuel an epidemic to an unprecedented scale. Using tobacco as a case in point, this review highlights the continuing investments among financial institutions which do not conform to 'socially responsible investments' and calls for monitoring and reporting such unethical practices. The paper also underscores the need to harmonise the numerous criteria, principles and voluntary codes that govern socially responsible investing and ensure that financial institutions comply with them.

  11. Socially responsible investing and management style of mutual funds in the euronext stock markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, Auke; Scholtens, Bert

    2001-01-01

    This paper analyses fund management styles on the Euronext stock exchanges. Especially, we investigate how social responsibility is accounted for. We use style analysis to assess fund performance in Belgium, France, and the Netherlands for over 800 investment funds during the 1990s. We find

  12. Exposure to socially responsible investing of mutual funds in the Euronext stock markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, Auke; Scholtens, Bert; Brunia, Nanne

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyses fund management and exposure on the Euronext stock exchanges. Especially, we investigate to what extent mutual funds are engaged in socially responsible investing (SRI). In order to accomplish this goal, we use regression analysis to measure the exposure of mutual funds to stock

  13. Financial Performance, Costs, and Active Management of U.S. Socially Responsible Investment Funds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Jimmy; Scholtens, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Responsible investors, like regular investors, need to investigate whether to actively or passively manage their investments. This especial is of interest for responsible investing as it requires additional information generation and processing compared to more conventional investing. This study

  14. Socially Responsible Investment and Fiduciary Duty: Putting the Freshfields Report into Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Sandberg, Joakim

    2010-01-01

    A critical issue for the future growth and impact of socially responsible investment (SRI) is whether institutional investors are legally permitted to engage in it – in particular whether it is compatible with the fiduciary duties of trustees. An ambitious report from the United Nations Environment Programme’s Finance Initiative (UNEP FI), commonly referred to as the ‘Freshfields report’, has recently given rise to considerable optimism on this issue among proponents of SRI. The present paper...

  15. Using of CBA Method for Evaluation of the Investments in the Link with Social Responsible Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrvová, Ľubica; Vaňová, Jaromíra

    2012-12-01

    The paper presents knowledge from the area of economic efficiency assessment of the environmental investments, in the link with environmental management with context of social responsible business and their mutual connection, on the base of CBA method. CBA method creates basis for the software CBA1.1, which was created for the needs of business practise for the small and medium enterprises in the Slovak Republic.

  16. The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on the Investment Attractiveness of the Russian Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Removna Kelchevskaya

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR and environmental responsibility on the economic performance over the past decades has shown that the implementation of CSR is one of the key drivers of value creation. Disclosure of social policy is one of the key CSR areas, it reduces information asymmetry and also contributes to the company’s reputation, decreasing uncertainty and risk in the assessment of the internal environment. This study shows that the disclosure of CSR information is able to increase the investment attractiveness of companies, and reduce the cost of equity. In the last decade, Russian industry has accumulated considerable positive experience in the implementing and positioning of corporate social responsibility (CSR technologies, which has yet to be assessed. In this paper, we used the sample of social reports of 18 Russian companies in the period from 2004 to 2014. The authors provided content-analysis of information disclosure dimensions including staff training, social policy, charity and environmental responsibility. In contrast to other studies, the results show a comparatively moderate impact of disclosure on the cost of equity capital. Also, we found that different dimensions of the disclosure have an ambiguous impact on the investment attractiveness of companies. Our results allow formulating practical recommendations for the management of metallurgical, oil and gas Russian companies to increase their investment attractiveness, in particular, a prudent choice of CSR information for disclosure. The study is unique for the Russian practice of evaluating the effectiveness of CSR, as it is based on a sample of the largest industrial enterprises

  17. Corporate Social Responsibility as a Strategic Means to Attract Foreign Investment: Evidence from Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juil Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examines how foreign investment can be driven by corporate social responsibility (CSR. By specifying the underlying mechanism of foreign investors’ stock picking behavior, we argue that CSR can attract foreign investment. Given that CSR actions are taken to meet various needs of its stakeholders, the host firm can convey a reliable signal to foreign investors as well as the stakeholders. As such, foreign investments can be increased in the host firm. This idea is examined in a sample of Korean firms. We hypothesize that Korean firms, as host firms, will have more foreign investments, instantiated by foreign ownership, if they are more actively engaged in CSR. To test this argument, we collected a panel dataset of the Korea Economic Justice Institute (KEJI Index between 2004 and 2009 to measure CSR performance of the firm. We estimated foreign ownership with respect to CSR performance. As a result, we found a positive effect of CSR performance on foreign ownership. Given the importance of foreign investment in host countries, this study opens an avenue that can account for foreign investors’ stock-picking behavior.

  18. How do Companies Invest in Corporate Social Responsibility? An Ordonomic Contribution for Empirical CSR Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Georg Will

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper takes both a conceptual and an empirical approach to answer the question as to how Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR can be connected to the company’s role as an agent of social value creation when it operates within an imperfect institutional framework of market competition. To develop a functional design for an empirical study, we draw on the concept of ordonomics, which provides a heuristics for responsible business activities in society. Drawing on ordonomics, we devise three questions: Referring to action responsibility we ask in which CSR activities companies do invest in their day-to-day business. Referring to governance responsibility we ask as to how companies realize win-win solutions through strategic commitments. In addition, with regard to discourse responsibility we ask in which stakeholder dialogues companies engage in order to discuss and find functional rules for organizing win-win solutions. In our empirical study, we reveal insights into the micro-level analysis of the CSP-CFP link and generate several new questions to be the subject of future research.

  19. Indicators of responsible investing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, Bert

    Responsible investment has witnessed significant changes in the past decade. It is estimated that about one fifth of assets under management in the US and about half of all assets under management in the EU are done on the basis of one of the seven responsible investment strategies. This paper

  20. The impact of socially responsible investment index constituent announcements on firm price: evidence from the JSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chimwemwe Chipeta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines whether Socially Responsible Investment (SRI Index constituent announcements have any impact on the returns of firms listing on the JSE SRI Index. The event study methodology is utilised to estimate abnormal returns for the firms included in the Index. The results indicate insignificant average abnormal returns (AARs for the years 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009, suggesting no significant shareholder gains over the entire event window. However, the year 2005 is associated with positive and significant abnormal returns. Post announcement cumulative average abnormal returns (CAARs are positive for the years 2005 and 2007. However, the year 2008 exhibited extreme swings in CAARs with a general declining trend in the latter part of the event window. These swings are attributed to the global financial crisis of 2008. Furthermore, the cumulative returns for the total sample show no clear outperformance of the SRI over the JSE All Share Index.

  1. Comparison of Portfolio Selection and Performance: Shari’ah-Compliant and Socially Responsible Investment Portfolios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Asutay

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the effect of Islamic screening criteria on Shari’ah-compliant portfolio selection and performance compared to Socially Responsible Investment (SRI portfolio. Each portfolio constructed from 15 stocks based on FTSE 100 using data from year 1997. Mean-variance portfolio optimization is employed with some financial ratios added as constraints for the Shari’ah portfolio. Annual expected return of each portfolio from 2008 to 2013 is used to calculate Sharpe’s ratio, Treynor ratio and Jensen’s alpha as the performance measurement tools. Macroeconomic variables are assessed using ordinary least square to examine whether they influence the portfolios’ expected returns or not. The result finds that Shari’ah portfolio has a better performance than SRI from year 2008 to 2010 shown by higher value of the measurement tools. However, from 2011 to 2013, SRI portfolio has better performance than Shari’ah portfolio. 

  2. A model based on Copula Theory for sustainable and social responsible investments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Bilbao-Terol

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a model is proposed that allows us to obtain a portfolio made up of sustainable and socially responsible (SR investment funds. This portfolio tracks the one that investors might have chosen if they had not taken into account social, ethical and ecological (SEE issues in their investment decisions. Therefore, in the first stage, reference portfolio exclusively made up of conventional funds is obtained. For the construction of the conventional portfolio the Prospect Theory has been used: net profits as the financial objective and error function as the utility function. In the second stage, a portfolio consisting exclusively of SR-funds is built. To do so, the reference portfolio is used as an ideal point, with the objectives of the SR-investor being the relative wealth with respect to the reference portfolio and the SEE quality of the portfolio. The relative wealth will be manipulated by a downside-risk measure, the Conditional Value at Risk (CVaR, and the periodic values of the portfolio. The second objective is the SR Quality of the portfolio, taking into account the personal values of a particular investor. This is built using Fuzzy Set Theory tools. We are faced with a multi-objective problem which is solved by using Goal Programming methodology. The estimation of both conventional and SR markets has been carried out by a semi-parametric approach by using the Copula Theory for modeling the dependence structure of the assets’ returns. The approach has been applied to a set of 38 conventional and 12 ethical funds domiciled in Spain.

  3. Effect of Entry into Socially Responsible Investment Index on Cost of Equity and Firm Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kijung Eom

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of a company’s incorporation into the Socially Responsible Investment (SRI index on its cost of equity (COE and corporate value. The study collected and analyzed data about the four-year long changes of the component stocks of the Korea Exchange (KRX SRI index from September 2010 to September 2013 to verify the correlation between the incorporation of the SRI index and the cost of equity or corporate value by using the Price-Earnings Growth (PEG, Modified PEG (MPEG and Gode and Mohanram (GM models for estimation of the implied costs of equity capital, as well as Tobin’s Q ratio. The analysis results failed to show any significant relation between the incorporation of the SRI index and the cost of equity capital. Also, no statistically significant correlation between the incorporation of the SRI index and corporate value was observed. However, at an early phase of introduction of the SRI index, the included companies revealed a negative correlation with the cost of equity. However, after changing the listed stocks, they showed a positive correlation with the cost of equity capital. All in all, this can be ascribed to a mixed presence of optimistic and pessimistic investors about CSR activities, or there is a possibility that the KRX SRI index might not correctly reflect the CSR activities of companies.

  4. Moral Behavior in Stock Markets: Islamic finance and socially responsible investment

    OpenAIRE

    Pitluck, Aaron Z.

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses the puzzle of why the inclusion of non-financial social justice or religious criteria by professional fund managers has been so popular in Malaysia and yet has had to date relatively little influence in the United States stock market. Drawing from over 125 ethnographic interviews with financial workers in Malaysia, this paper argues that moral investment behavior in stock markets is shaped primarily by ‘market structure’ rather than by ‘mandates.’ In both countries man...

  5. Beyond Corporate Social Responsibility : The Scope for Corporate Investment in Community Driven Development

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2006-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed expanded awareness among companies, especially multinational corporations, of their responsibilities toward the communities they impact, elaborated in the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and allied notions such as a Social License to Operate (SLTO). CSR is the realization of business contributions to sustainable development goals. It refers to how business takes account of its economic, social and environmental impacts in the way it operates -- m...

  6. Responsabilidade social e investimento social privado: entre o discurso e a evidenciação Social responsibility and private social investment: between discourse and disclosure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Figueiredo Milani Filho

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa objetivou investigar se as empresas que se declaram socialmente responsáveis divulgam informações financeiras específicas sobre os recursos gastos em benefício público (investimento social privado e, também, verificar se há diferença significativa da dimensão desses gastos entre empresas cujos produtos estão associados a externalidades negativas e as organizações participantes do Índice de Sustentabilidade Empresarial (ISE da Bolsa de Valores de São Paulo (Bovespa. A amostra foi formada por 52 empresas, segregando-se em: 34 organizações participantes do ISE e 18 empresas das indústrias de fumo, bebidas alcoólicas e armas. Os dados foram obtidos dos relatórios anuais dos exercícios de 2005 e 2004, páginas eletrônicas e balanços sociais das respectivas empresas, do banco de dados eletrônicos da Bovespa e, ainda, de questionários enviados aos gestores cujas empresas não explicitavam, publicamente, seus projetos sociais. Os resultados apontaram que nem todas as organizações que declaram realizar investimentos sociais evidenciam tal fato. Na amostra, 11,8% das entidades componentes do ISE e 72,2% das organizações vinculadas a externalidades negativas, não divulgam informações financeiras sobre o valor de gastos sociais, gerando dúvidas sobre a existência ou a dimensão dos investimentos à comunidade. As duas únicas empresas de fumo (CTA Continental e Souza Cruz que evidenciam informações, entretanto, destacam-se por apresentarem média de investimentos sociais maiores do que a das empresas do ISE, indicando que há incentivos específicos para tal comportamento.This study aims to investigate if companies that declare themselves socially responsible divulge specific financial information on resources spent in public benefit (private social investment and, also, if the dimension of these expenses is significantly different between companies whose products are associated to negative externalities and

  7. Earning capacity of environmentally friendly companies and social responsible investing; Miljoevennlige bedrifter gir like hoey avkastning som andre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerk, Jan

    2002-07-01

    Firms on Dow Jones Sustainability Index yield over time the same return as the ''ordinary'' firms on the Dow Jones World Stock Index. There are several investment funds today that deal in shares with selected companies having a high environmental or ethical profile. This is Social Responsible Investing (SRI). When the Norwegian company Storebrand Kapitalforvaltning selects companies for SRI, they exclude immediately nuclear power stations, tobacco factories and manufacturers of land mines. In addition to the same return on invested capital, both investors and society get an environmental profit. The firms analysed and selected by Storebrand for SRI contributes significantly less negative environmental effects than the other firms, typically 33% less to the global heating and have on average 53% less toxic emissions and 45% less water consumption.

  8. Earning capacity of environmentally friendly companies and social responsible investing; Miljoevennlige bedrifter gir like hoey avkastning som andre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerk, Jan

    2002-07-01

    Firms on Dow Jones Sustainability Index yield over time the same return as the ''ordinary'' firms on the Dow Jones World Stock Index. There are several investment funds today that deal in shares with selected companies having a high environmental or ethical profile. This is Social Responsible Investing (SRI). When the Norwegian company Storebrand Kapitalforvaltning selects companies for SRI, they exclude immediately nuclear power stations, tobacco factories and manufacturers of land mines. In addition to the same return on invested capital, both investors and society get an environmental profit. The firms analysed and selected by Storebrand for SRI contributes significantly less negative environmental effects than the other firms, typically 33% less to the global heating and have on average 53% less toxic emissions and 45% less water consumption.

  9. Social Impact Investment: Increasing Private Sector Investment to ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The social impact investment market is now global in scope and it is rapidly expanding in some ... of social impact investing to address environmental, social, and economic challenges. ... New project to improve water management in the Sahel.

  10. Relating corporate social investment with financial performance

    OpenAIRE

    Kgabo L. Kobo; Collins C. Ngwakwe

    2017-01-01

    Previous researchers have found conflicting results between CSI and firm financial performance. This paper moves this debate further by examining the extent to which corporate social investment (CSI) relates with corporate financial performance (CFP) from a developing country perspective. The main aim of the paper was to determine the relationship between CSI, stock price, sales turnover and return on equity (ROE) amongst the socially responsible investing (SRI) companies in the Johannesburg ...

  11. From SRI to ESG: The Changing World of Responsible Investing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Lauren; Griswold, John S.; Jarvis, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Thoughtful investment professionals continue to debate whether a portfolio's long-term performance can be enhanced by including environmental, social, and governance (ESG) considerations in the security selection process, but responsible investing is more than a passing trend. The terms socially-responsible investing, mission-related investing,…

  12. Should firms always invest in corporate social responsibility? Whether, when, and how?

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Prabirendra

    2015-01-01

    Firms in various markets such as health care, financial services, software, consumer goods etc. spend significant amount of money on corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities. The literature suggests that consumers take into consideration firmsí CSR activities when making purchase decisions and this leads to either an increase in willingness to pay or an increase in purchase intention. Unfortunately, notwithstanding its strategic beneÖts, the empirical Öndings regarding the impact o...

  13. Sovereign Wealth Funds and Socially Responsible Investing: Do’s and Don’ts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, van der E.L.

    2012-01-01

    A sovereign wealth fund (SWF) is a long-term investment fund owned by the state. The oldest is the Kuwait Investment Corporation, which was established in 1953. However, because most SWFs were established in 2004 or later, SWFs are, generally speaking, a fairly new phenomenon. Depending on the

  14. Responsible Investment: Taxes and Paradoxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knuutinen Reijo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Taxes have become an issue of corporate social responsibility (CSR, but the role of taxation is to some extent an ambiguous and controversial issue in the CSR framework. Similarly, another unclear question is what role investors who are committed to sustainable and responsible investment (SRI see taxes as having on their environmental, social, and governance (ESG agenda. Corporate taxes have an inverse relationship with the return of the investors: taxes paid directly affect what is left on the bottom line, reducing the return of investors. However, investors are now more aware of tax-related risks, which can include different forms of reputation risk. Corporate tax planning may increase the returns, but those increased returns are riskier. This study focuses particularly on the relationship between SRI and taxation. We find that tax matters are considered to be on the ESG agenda, but their role and significance in the ESG analysis is unclear.

  15. Female Directors and Corporate Social Responsibility: Evidence from the Environmental Investment of Chinese Listed Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Taking Chinese listed companies in 2008–2015 as the sample, in this paper we test in detail the impact of female directors on corporate environmental investments. Furthermore, we study the impact of female directors on environmental investment in enterprises with different types of ownership and industry attributes. Empirical studies show that when there are only 1 or 2 female directors on the board, no significant impact on the scale of corporate environmental investment can be seen. However, when the number reaches at least 3, female directors have a significantly positive impact on the scale of corporate environmental investment. This confirms critical-mass theory; meanwhile, we find that the empirical results do not indicate any significant correlation when the variable of female directors is measured by the proportion of female directors and the Blau index of gender balance. Further analysis suggests that in state-owned enterprises and enterprises from heavily-polluting industries, the above findings remain true, while in non-state-owned enterprises and enterprises from non-heavily-polluting industries, the above findings prove false, i.e., that the impact of female directors on corporate environmental investment is not significant. The conclusion demonstrates that the impact of female directors on environmental investment varies in enterprises with different types of ownership and industry attributes.

  16. The Social Investment in Social Capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gritsaenko Galina I.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at defining the essence of social investment, substantiating the levels of their implementation, and identifying the mechanisms of influence on social capital. The dynamics of the level of trust in the Ukrainian society is analyzed, on the basis of which the conclusion about the crisis of complete personal and institutional distrust, as well as the necessity of systematic work on the formation of social capital, has been made. The essence of social investments as such, which are directed on development of objects of social environment, including human and social capitals, has been defined. It has been suggested to study social investment on the nano-, micro-, meso-, macro- and mega-levels. The relevant investors and beneficiaries, as well as possible directions of their activity activation, are considered. Prospect for further scientific researches should be development of mechanism for efficient interaction of international organizations, governmental structures, representatives of business and civil society as a whole with the purpose of formation of strategy of social investment, which would facilitate the implementation of structural reforms and ensure the sustainable development of Ukraine.

  17. Potential Role of Social Impact Bond and Socially Responsible Investment Sukuk as Financial Tools that Can Help Address Issues of Poverty and Socio-Economic Insecurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Marwan Mujahid bin Syed Azman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to highlight the potential of Social Impact Bond (SIB and Socially Responsible Investment (SRI sukuk as financial models that can be used to help alleviate the social problem of poverty and also potentially provide economic security for the society. From the review of literature, this paper takes case studies of SIB programmes and SRI sukuk, and relates them as programmes that can be used to address the issue of poverty and economic insecurity. The paper finds that there is a growing global interest in innovative financial tools such as SIB and SRI sukuk. Furthermore, the paper explicates that SIB and SRI sukuk models embody the spirit of social responsibility, which is one of the major essence that is currently missing in the Islamic finance industry practice. This paper is conceptual and exploratory in nature. Therefore, further empirical research can be done to provide better understanding and knowledge. Findings from this paper can be used as a reference to understand the concepts and mechanisms involved in SIB and SRI sukuk models. This paper contributes to the awareness of the emerging global interest in SIB and SRI. In addition, it highlights SIB and SRI sukuks’ potential contribution towards Islamic finance. Although SIB and SRI sukuk is gaining interest worldwide, it has not caught much attention of researchers and practitioners involved with Islamic finance. Therefore, this paper offers insight towards SIB and SRI sukuk, which is relatively unknown to academics and Islamic finance industry practitioners.

  18. A framework for social investment strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Jon

    2015-01-01

    and multidimensional nature of social issues and social investments. Theoretically, this article establishes such a framework consisting of generational, life course and gender perspectives on social investments. The generational perspective brings out that social investments involve horizontal redistribution......, underpin the productive and reproductive social contract between generations, and the increased diversity within generations. The life course perspective demonstrates how social issues and social investments in one life stage depend on the situation in prior life stages and affect the situation in later...... life stages and, possibly, in multiple dimensions. The gender perspective shows how social investments can improve economic and social returns when gender and ageing over the life course are taken into consideration. Empirically, cross-national patterns indicate a positive relation between social...

  19. The Glocalization of Responsible Investment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gond, Jean-Pascal; Boxenbaum, Eva

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the institutional work that underlies the diffusion of responsible investment (RI) and enhances its adaptation to local settings. Building on institutional theory and actor–network theory, we advance the concept of contextualization work to describe the institutional work...

  20. Social Investment in Times of Crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prandini, Riccardo; Orlandini, Matteo; Guerra, Alice

    The purpose of this report is to analyse and understand whether and how, in the last twenty years, the EU member countries have adopted welfare systems which incorporate aspects of social investment. The quantitative and comparative study is focused on social investment strategies across 28...... European member states. The aim is to map out and explore the effectiveness of different social investment strategies. An overview of macro-level welfare performance indicators consist of a review of available macro-indicators to assess welfare performance in the light of social investment decisions....

  1. 77 FR 18277 - Domini Social Investment Trust and Domini Social Investments LLC; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Investment Company Act Release No. 29984; 812-13971] Domini Social Investment Trust and Domini Social Investments LLC; Notice of Application March 21, 2012. AGENCY... the Investment Company Act of 1940 (``Act'') for an exemption from section 15(a) of the Act and rule...

  2. Social investment in the globalising learning economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundvall, Bengt-Åke; Lorenz, Edward

    2011-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the importance of social investment and egalitarian distribution policy for reproducing the basis of a learning economy.......This paper demonstrates the importance of social investment and egalitarian distribution policy for reproducing the basis of a learning economy....

  3. How to invest in social capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusak, L; Cohen, D

    2001-06-01

    Business runs better when people within a company have close ties and trust one another. But the relationships that make organizations work effectively are under assault for several reasons. Building such "social capital" is difficult in volatile times. Disruptive technologies spawn new markets daily, and organizations respond with constantly changing structures. The problem is worsened by the virtuality of many of today's workplaces, with employees working off-site or on their own. What's more, few managers know how to invest in such social capital. The authors describe how managers can help their organizations thrive by making effective investments in social capital. For instance, companies that value social capital demonstrate a commitment to retention as a way of limiting workplace volatility. The authors cite SAS's extensive efforts to signal to employees that it sees them as human beings, not just workers. Managers can build trust by showing trust themselves, as well as by rewarding trust and sending clear signals to employees. They can foster cooperation by giving employees a common sense of purpose through good strategic communication and inspirational leadership. Johnson & Johnson's well-known credo, which says the company's first responsibility is to the people who use its products, has helped the company in time of adversity, as in 1982 when cyanide in Tylenol capsules killed seven people. Other methods of fostering cooperation include rewarding the behavior with cash and establishing rules that get people into the habit of cooperating. Social capital, once a given in organizations, is now rare and endangered. By investing in it, companies will be better positioned to seize the opportunities in today's volatile, virtual business environment.

  4. ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL EFFICIENCY OF PROPERTY INVESTMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florina Oana Virlanuta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Investments play a key part within the goods and services industry, consumerism and community as well. The effects generated by any investment project substantiate this statement, regardless the sector of activity in which they are implemented. In the current market economy, economic efficiency indicators are playing an important role in assessing and analyzing an investment project since due to these indicators, the investor can become aware of the most important aspects they need to respond promptly. In this respect, we conducted a market analysis of real estate investments in Romania, highlighting economic and social efficiency of property investments.

  5. Responsible investing : New insights into performance and tastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgers, A.C.T.

    2014-01-01

    In this dissertation I study several financial aspects of socially responsible investing (SRI). It has become relevant due to the rise in assets under management with some form of social responsibility mandate over the past decades. SRI knows different dimensions; investors can (under-) overweight

  6. Social entrepreneurship and impact investing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    The financial crisis and accounting scandals in large companies have stimulated a thorough assessment of the contribution of enterprises and financial institutions to the greater public good and economic prosperity. This assessment has led to a revaluation of the ideas of social entrepreneurship and

  7. Social class and parental investment in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gauthier, A.H.; Scott, Robert A.; Kosslyn, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    This essay critically reviews the literature on social class differences in parental investment in children including differences in (i) parenting practices or behavior; (ii) parenting styles, logics, and strategies; and (iii) parenting values and ideologies. The essay reveals how structural and

  8. Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG and Investment Decision in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayema Sultana

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available As a key facet of sustainable development, environmental, social and governance (ESG discretion on stock market investment decision is gaining prevalence following the global financial crisis. ESG considers the sustainable return, risk reduction, and accountability aspects of investments. This study is an exploration of the individual stock market investors’ preferences for ESG issues and the influence that purpose of investment has on investment decision-making, by testing the investment horizon as a moderator. The theoretical background was taken from the theory of planned behavior (TPB, goal setting theory (GST, and the behavioral asset pricing model (BAPM. The study uses the sequential mix method of research, starting with an interview followed by a survey, which was conducted among individual stock market investors in Bangladesh, using simple random sampling. Structural equation modeling (SEM analysis was carried out using Warp PLS version 6.0. The key findings of this study delineate the effect of ESG issues and the purpose of investment on investment decision-making. The contribution of the study signifies the moderating role of the investment horizon, which confirms the importance of the long-term horizon as a time and risk diversification factor. The sparse utilization of the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC (2004 and Thomson Reuters Corporate Responsibility Index (TRCRI (2013 as measurement scales in this study is mentioned. This study has made practical contributions for managers, investors, and regulators.

  9. Applying Sustainability and Responsible Investment on Islamic Equity Investment: An Analysis of FTSE Shariah and FTSE4GOOD Indices

    OpenAIRE

    Rizki, Reza

    2015-01-01

    2015 dissertation for MSc Islamic Banking and Finance. Selected by academic staff as a good example of a masters level dissertation. \\ud \\ud Shariah-compliant Investment and Sustainability Responsible Investment (SRI) are the slternative asset classes and they are growing rapidly leaving their counterparts behind. Nonetheless, there are some criticisms against the screening criteria which are applied by Islamic equity investment because they exclude the environment, social and human rights is...

  10. The Fundamentals of a Business Model Based on Responsible Investments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Dumitrascu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The harmonization of profitability and social responsibility is possible under the adoption and practice conditions by the companies of some adequate business models. “Responsible profitability” must benefit as well of management tools that guide the business sequentially, based on some objective decision making criteria towards sustainable economic behaviors. The simultaneous increase of the specific economic over-value generated by social responsible investment (SRI project and responsible intensity of economic employment reflects the company’s strong subscription to the authentic sustainable development path.

  11. Social Investment or Private Profit? Diverging Notions of "Investment" in Early Childhood Education and Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Elizabeth; Brennan, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, many OECD countries have adopted the notion of "social investment" to reframe traditional approaches to social welfare. Social investment strategies and policies focus on employment rather than welfare and promote public expenditure on skills and education throughout the life course, starting with early childhood…

  12. Microsimulation of Corporate Response to Investment Subsidies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tongeren, van F.W.

    1998-01-01

    The article presents an application of microsimulation to modeling of firm behavior in an economy-wide framework. The model is used to investigate the response of industrial corporations to investment subsidies in the Netherlands and traces the effects to the macro economic level. The

  13. SOCIAL RESPONSABILITY OF INSURANCE COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MĂRĂCINE MIHAELA SIMONA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of corporate social responsibility has increased significantly nowadays. The studies conducted have shown that consumers are increasingly no longer interested only in buying good quality and reliable products, but they are also interested whether they were produced in a socially responsible manner. In the recent years investors have increasingly realised that investing in social responsibility regarding the social and environmental areas, greatly contributes to the growth of the internal and external image of management. This paper aims at presenting a number of interesting issues related to social responsibility manifested by the insurance companies.

  14. RUSSIAN “PYRAMID” AS A TOOL TO EVALUATE SOCIAL INVESTMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Votchenko, E.S.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyze the modern trends and today’s development stage of social investments and corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Russia. The core of the corporate interactions are social investments that are formed around the image and reputation of a modern business. It means for the Russian business community the extension of the ranges of tools and responses to calls by the authorities and society, provides a unique opportunity to build partnerships with the eq...

  15. Responsible Investing in the Asia-Pacific Region: Understanding Sustainability and Investments in Japan and Hong Kong/China in an Era of Global Climate and Environmental Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Park (Jacob)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The author of this thesis examined the concept and market development of responsible investing (RI), which can be defined as an investment process that integrates social and environmental considerations within the context of traditional investment processes. RI has

  16. Political participation in European welfare states: Does social investment matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marx, Paul; Nguyen, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    The role of the welfare state has expanded beyond passive assistance and decommodificaton. In many countries, social investment policies now actively encourage (re)integration into the labour market. While the effectiveness of these policies is debated, we know even less about their broader social...... and political effects. In this contribution, we explore the impact of social investment policies on one key aspect of social life: political participation. Combining insights from social psychology with institutional analysis, we investigate the impact of three social investment policies (early childhood...... education, secondary education, active labour market policies) on two disadvantaged groups: young individuals from low-skill backgrounds; and single parents. Combining the European Social Survey with data on social investment, we find that these risk groups have reduced political efficacy and political...

  17. Can European socio-economic governance be social investment proof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    Chapter on the European Semester in the a book "The Uses of Social Investment", which provides the first study of the welfare state, under the new post-crisis austerity context and associated crisis management politics, to take stock of the limits and potential of social investment. It surveys the

  18. Does sustainability practices, corporate governance and social responsibility affect risk and return of investments? Práticas de Sustentabilidade, Governança Corporativa e Responsabilidade Social afetam o risco e o retorno dos investimentos?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Milani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to verify whether the investments in companies with better practices of Corporate Social Responsibility, Corporate Governance and Sustainability presents performance differences in relation to investments in companies that represent the market. To this end, we analyzed the series of daily returns of Ibovespa, IGC, IGCT, ISE and ITAG through GARCH model and mean differences tests. The results show that the conditional volatility of the differentiated practices indexes is significantly smaller than the Ibovespa volatility, although the correlation between the returns is very high. Besides that, the Sharpe Index (1966 of the better practices indexes shows that their return per unit of risk is significantly higher than Ibovespa’s. Thus, in general, it is possible to conclude that investments in different practices constitute a less risky and more profitable alternative to the investor.DOI: 10.5902/198346596946O presente artigo tem como objetivo verificar se os investimentos em empresas com melhores práticas de Responsabilidade Social Empresarial, Governança Corporativa e Sustentabilidade apresentam diferenças quanto à performance em relação a investimentos nas empresas que representam o mercado. Para tanto, foram analisadas as séries de retornos diários dos índices Ibovespa, IGC, IGCT, ISE e ITAG através do modelo GARCH e de testes não paramétricos de diferença de média. Os resultados demonstram que a volatilidade condicional dos índices de práticas diferenciadas é significativamente menor do que a volatilidade do índice Ibovespa apesar da correlação entre os retornos ser muito alta. Além disso, o Índice de Sharpe (1966 demonstrou que o retorno por unidade de risco é significativamente superior para os índices de melhores práticas, em relação ao Ibovespa. Assim, de uma maneira geral, é possível concluir que os investimentos em empresas com melhores práticas constituem uma alternativa menos arriscada

  19. Social Investment after Neoliberalism: Policy Paradigms and Political Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeming, Christopher; Smyth, Paul

    2015-04-01

    The concept of the 'social investment state' refocuses attention on the productive function of social policy eclipsed for some time by the emphasis on its social protection or compensation roles. Here we distinguish between different social investment strategies, the Nordic 'heavy' and the Liberal 'light', with particular reference to the inclusive growth approach adopted in Australia. In 2007, social democrats in Australia returned to government with a clear mandate to reject the labour market deregulation and other neoliberal policies of its predecessor, and to tackle entrenched social and economic disadvantage in Australian society. For the last five years, social investment and inclusive growth has been at the centre of the Australian social policy agenda. Against this background, the article examines and critically assesses the (re)turn to 'social investment' thinking in Australia during Labor's term in office (2007-13). Analysis focuses not just on what was actually achieved, but also on the constraining role of prevailing economic and political circumstances and on the processes that were used to drive social investment reform. In many ways, the article goes some way to exposing ongoing tensions surrounding the distinctiveness of 'social investment' strategies pursued by leftist parties within the (neo)liberal state.

  20. Measuring Social Capital Investment: Scale Development and Examination of Links to Social Capital and Perceived Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Rhiana; Gong, Jie; Fang, Xiaoyi; Kaljee, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with greater social capital have better health outcomes. Investment in social capital likely increases one’s own social capital, bearing great implications for disease prevention and health promotion. In this study, the authors developed and validated the Social Capital Investment Inventory (SCII). Direct effects of social capital investment on perceived stress, and indirect effects through social capital were examined. 397 Participants from Beijing and Wuhan, China completed surveys. Analyses demonstrated that the SCII has a single factor structure and strong internal consistency. Structural equation modeling showed that individuals who invested more in social capital had greater bonding social capital, and subsequently less perceived stress. Results suggest that disease prevention and health promotion programs should consider approaches to encourage social capital investment; individuals may be able to reduce stress by increasing their investment in social capital. Future research is needed to provide additional empirical support for the SCII and observed structural relationships. PMID:25648725

  1. Shared Stakes, Distributed Investment: Socially Engaged Art and the Financialization of Social Impact

    OpenAIRE

    Rosamond, Emily

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the implications of the financialization of social impact and the emerging social impact bonds (SIBs) market for socially engaged art practices. How do SIBs, which allow for investment in social impact metrics, shift the broader contexts through which the value of social impact is understood in art discourses? In the British context, recent projects by Assemble, Open School East and others do important social work, yet echo the logic of the social investment market by ou...

  2. Fighting poverty and exclusion through social investment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Jon

    The fight against poverty and social exclusion is at the heart of the Europe 2020 strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth. With more than 120 million people in the EU at risk of poverty or social exclusion, EU leaders have pledged to bring at least 20 million people out of poverty an...

  3. Financial Performance of Socially Responsible Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Śliwiński Paweł

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes rate-of-return and risk related to investments in socially responsible and conventional country indices. The socially responsible indices are the DJSI Korea, DJSI US and Respect Index, and the corresponding conventional country indices are the Korea Stock Exchange Composite KOSPI, Dow Jones Industrial Average and WIG20TR. We conclude that investing in the analyzed SRI indices do not yield systematically better results than investing in the respective conventional indices, both in terms of neoclassical risk and return rate.

  4. ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY AND PRIORITY DIRECTIONS OF ACTIVIZATION OF SOCIAL INVESTMENTS OF THE ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Grishnova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the features of social investment and estimated impact of social investment on key financial and economic indicators of the breweries. Is proved priority areas in social investment and offered to recommendation to improve social investment in the enterprises of the brewing industry in Ukraine.

  5. Social Capital as Investment in the Future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuan Anh, Nguyen; Thomese, Fleur; Salemink, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    This paper identifies how social capital in kinship relations is employed to foster children’s education in the Reform era (Đổi mới), based on an anthropological and sociological study in Quỳnh Đôi village, Quỳnh Lưu district, Nghệ An province, Vietnam. The paper shows that in the Đổi mới period...... học]. From a social capital perspective, we argue that social capital, understood as enforceable trust and reciprocity exchanges, was the foundation for raising patrilineage study encouragement funds. One significant observation was that both patrilineage members and non-members contributed......’s viewpoint, the social capital benefiting pupils was located in ego-based kinship networks which extended beyond just patrilineages. Therefore, in the Đổi mới era, villagers went beyond their patrilineage boundaries to mobilize social capital in their ego-based kin networks, including both relatives inside...

  6. A case of social investment: Uere and Phillips Petroleum do Brasil Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Daniella dos Santos; Fryklund, Robert Eugene [Phillips Petroleum do Brasil Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mello, Yvonne Bezerra de [Projeto Uere, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    CONOCOPHILLIPS views Social Investment as an important element of contributing to social progress and achieving its view of Sustainable Growth. According to CONOCOPHILLIPS a company's ability to grow depends not only on its business successes but also on its reputation as a corporate citizen. This reputation is built largely by responsible civic actions, social investment and environmental stewardship. The company invests in programs that provide sustainable community development, benefit the stakeholders, are aligned with its strategic business objectives, and are consistent with its core values. CONOCOPHILLIPS recognizes that the most effective corporate social investment is achieved by pro actively identifying the key community needs and by entering into strategic partnerships with agencies and organizations that serve good causes. In Rio de Janeiro, Phillips Petroleum do Brasil, a subsidiary of CONOCOPHILLIPS, has been working with Projeto Uere, a non-profit non-governmental organization (NGO) that runs an educational program for children living under social risk in Favela da Mare. Projeto Uere performs preventive work, helping children overcome their learning and social difficulties. The Projeto Uere case study results will highlight the application of some of CONOCOPHILLIPS social investment policies and strategies used to select and evaluate partnership projects in Brazil. (author)

  7. The Future of the Social Investment State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busemeyer, Marius R.; de la Porte, Caroline; Garritzmann, Julian L.

    2018-01-01

    In all advanced democracies, policies related to the welfare state are the largest part of public policy activity. Cross-pressured by globalization, deindustrialization, rising public debts, demographic changes, permanent austerity and the rise of 'new social risks', welfare states in post-indust...

  8. Financing social entrepreneurship: The role of impact investment in shaping social enterprise in Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellas, Erin I-Ping; Ormiston, Jarrod; Findlay, Suzanne

    2018-01-01

    Purpose This paper aims to explore the emergence and nature of impact investment in Australia and how it is shaping the development of the social enterprise sector. Design/methodology/approach Impact investment is an emerging approach to financing social enterprises that aims to achieve blended

  9. The Impact of Social Media Opinions on Innovation Investment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenping; Kang, Lele; Jiang, Qiqi

    Social media is a valuable knowledge source for firm innovation. Extending the literature of both social media and innovation management, we examine how the valence and volume of user-generated content (UGC) from social media influence firm innovation strategies. Based on analysis of 5-year panel...... data including 886 listed firms and their relevant 6.2 million microblogs, we observed three interesting findings. First, valence of UGC from social media has a U-shaped relation with firm innovation investments. In particular, compared with neutral UGC, both negative and positive contents are found...

  10. Social cues trigger differential immune investment strategies in a non-social insect, Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Joe D; Siva-Jothy, Michael T; Evison, Sophie E F

    2018-02-01

    Social immunization (SI) is a horizontal transfer of immunity that protects naive hosts against infection following exposure to infected nestmates. While mainly documented in eusocial insects, non-social species also share similar ecological features which favour the development of group-level immunity. Here, we investigate SI in Tenebrio molitor by pairing naive females with a pathogen-challenged conspecific for 72 h before measuring a series of immune and fitness traits. We found no evidence for SI, as beetles who cohabited with a live pathogen-challenged conspecific were not better protected against bacterial challenge. However, exposure to a heat-killed-bacteria-challenged conspecific appeared to increase pathogen tolerance, which manifested in differential fitness investment. Our results together suggest that T. molitor do respond to immune-related cues in the social environment, despite not showing a classic immunization response as predicted. © 2018 The Author(s).

  11. Financial Crisis and Corporate Social Responsible Mutual Fund Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Sitikantha Parida; Zhihong Wang

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate investment flows into mutual funds that hold more high corporate social responsible stocks (top CSR funds) vs. mutual funds that hold more low corporate social responsible stocks (bottom CSR funds). Using a large sample of equity mutual funds spanning 2003–2012, we find that top CSR funds on average receive about 5% less investment per annum compared to the other funds; whereas bottom CSR funds receive about 5.6% more investments. These relative negative and posi...

  12. Corporate Social Responsibility strategies adopted by Micro Finance Institutions: a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agbeko, D.; Blok, V.; Velde, van der Gerben; Omta, S.W.F.

    2017-01-01

    We hypothesize that, in order to improve their financial performance, Microfinance Institutions (MFI’s) should invest in social empowerment or Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programmes. CSR investments create opportunities to raise savings deposits and reduce default rates among debtors.

  13. Account Managers Creation of Social Capital: Communal and Instrumental Investments and Performance Implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J.M.I. Verbeke (Willem); F.D. Belschak (Frank); S.H.K. Wuyts (Stefan); R.P. Bagozzi (Richard)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractAccount managers invest in two distinct, compensatory social ties to achieve social capital, namely peripheral knowledge ties and implementation support ties. The first ties require communal investments, which consist of organizational citizenship behaviors and peripheral information

  14. PRINCIPLES OF ASSESSING THE SOCIAL EFFECTS BY IMPLEMENTING INVESTMENT PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis SIMOV

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Financial instruments are efficient – in terms of resource – mobilization of cohesion policy resources to achieve the objectives of the strategy. Rules of forming the investment strategy, particularly in State structures, by using the budget funds of the Republic of Moldova, must include as one of the criteria for project selection, the achieve of a positive social effect associated with its implementation.

  15. Response of Foreign Private Investment to Public Debt in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emenike Kalu O.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the long-term relationship and dynamic short-term impact of public debt on foreign private investment for a developing country – Nigeria during the period 1962 to 2012. The paper deploys cointegration model to examine long-term relationship between the variables. The study also examines dynamic short-term impact and causality between public debt and foreign private investment using the VECM and Granger causality test. The study further examines the response paths of foreign private investment variable due to public debts shocks using variance decomposition. The results confirm absence of long-term relationship between public debt and foreign private investment in Nigeria. The results also show that external debt has negative impact on foreign private investment in the short-term. Finally, the results show that there is no causality between foreign private investment and public debt. The major economic implication of these findings is for debt management authorities to be conscious of growing external debts as it discourages foreign private investments into Nigeria.

  16. Shared stakes, distributed investment: Socially engaged art and the financialization of social impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Rosamond

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the implications of the financialization of social impact and the emerging social impact bonds (SIBs market for socially engaged art practices. How do SIBs, which allow for investment in social impact metrics, shift the broader contexts through which the value of social impact is understood in art discourses? In the British context, recent projects by Assemble, Open School East and others do important social work, yet echo the logic of the social investment market by outsourcing social impact. Rather than dismissing socially engaged art initiatives as having been recuperated by financialized capitalism, I suggest the need to develop new ways of achieving a double reading of these works as they relate to – and upset the distinctions between – stakeholder and bondholder valuation.

  17. An investication into geomagnetic and atmospheric response ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Magadan, Khabarovsk, Wakkanai, Akita, Kokubunji, Okinawa and Manila. The study shows that the present storm is double step, and the leading single magnetospheric process that was responsible for both the first and second Dst decrease is the enhancement of the plasma sheet. An enhanced solar wind density drove, ...

  18. Corporate Decision Making and SocioEnvironmental Investments In Brazil: An Analysis Based On Social Audits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Bufoni

    2012-06-01

    indicate a significant correlation between the amount of environmental investments and variables such as age, level of education, professional training of employees and profit-sharing policies. However, no significant correlation between environmental investments and profitability was found. The analysis revealed a linkage between decisions to invest in the environment and social investments outside the firm.

  19. Corporate social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsić Zoran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR is a concept whereby companies integrate social and environmental concerns in their business operations and in their interaction with their stakeholders on a voluntary basis. Definition emphasizes three basic characteristics of CSR. CSR is voluntary concept, it covers environmental issues and interaction with stakeholders, not only shareholders, is taken into account.

  20. Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    2007-01-01

    Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as having explicit policies and implicit norms situated in cultural systems highlights the connections between institutional and cultural structures of nation states and business' commitment to CSR as reflected in the strategies used to communic......Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as having explicit policies and implicit norms situated in cultural systems highlights the connections between institutional and cultural structures of nation states and business' commitment to CSR as reflected in the strategies used...

  1. Social Responsibility of Accounting

    OpenAIRE

    JINNAI, Yoshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Historical and theoretical inquiries into the function of accounting have provided fruitful insights into social responsibility of accounting, which is, and should be, based on accounts kept through everyday accounting activities. However, at the current stage of capitalist accounting, keeping accounts is often regarded as merely a preparatory process for creating financial statements at the end of an accounting period. Thus, discussions on the social responsibility of accounting tend to conc...

  2. Social Responsibility of Business: Strategy and Innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Illina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article social practicians of large Russian corporations, conditions of creation of social strategy by them are analyzed. The ambiguous treatment of the corporate social responsibility (CSR of subjects of interaction in system "business-society-state', a big range of economic, social, cultural problems which corporations need to consider at adoption of business solutions, is the soil for the conflict of interests and limits possibilities of development of business. New trends in practice of CSR of the Russian corporations concern change of character and essence of their social activity that reflects more adequate level of reflexivity business community of requirements of the changed society. Dynamics in approach of the Russian corporations to a choice of spheres of application of social investments, change of motivation of social and responsible behavior and interaction forms with authorities, public groups and movements is revealed. The most effective, from the point of view of business, model of interaction of business and the state is joint definition of priorities of social policy and those areas in which business can take active part. Large corporations start acting as initiators of dialogue and partner interaction with representatives of authorities and local communities, there are the social innovations initiated by business community and directed on increase of efficiency of social investments, development of social partnership and social business.

  3. Investments

    CERN Document Server

    Bodie, Zvi; Marcus, Alan J.

    2017-01-01

    The integrated solutions for Bodie, Kane, and Marcus' Investments set the standard for graduate/MBA investments textbooks. The unifying theme is that security markets are nearly efficient, meaning that most securities are priced appropriately given their risk and return attributes. The content places greater emphasis on asset allocation and offers a much broader and deeper treatment of futures, options, and other derivative security markets than most investment texts. Connect is the only integrated learning system that empowers students by continuously adapting to deliver precisely what they need, when they need it, and how they need it, so that your class time is more engaging and effective.

  4. Investments

    CERN Document Server

    Bodie, Zvi

    2013-01-01

    The integrated solutions for Bodie, Kane, and Marcus' Investments set the standard for graduate/MBA investments textbooks. The unifying theme is that security markets are nearly efficient, meaning that most securities are priced appropriately given their risk and return attributes. The content places greater emphasis on asset allocation and offers a much broader and deeper treatment of futures, options, and other derivative security markets than most investment texts. McGraw-Hill's adaptive learning component, LearnSmart, provides assignable modules that help students master chapter core concepts and come to class more prepared. Bodie Investments' blend of practical and theoretical coverage combines with a complete digital solution to help your students achieve higher outcomes in the course

  5. OUTWARD BRAZILIAN FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT: IMPULSES AND RESPONSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald de Oliveira Concer

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper models the outward foreign direct investment from Brazil series using time a series econometrics model, namely the Vector Auto Regressive (VAR model. We have drawn impulse response functions for the key relevant factors that may explain the outward foreign direct investment flows. We start with a review of the literature on the Dunning location approach to international business. We worked with a data set of quarterly observations from Q1-1995 to Q1-2010. We carried also out Granger causality tests as for determining whether international business travelling should be included as an explanatory variable in our model. Results stressed that although the strong exchange rate in Brazil is often blamed for forcing companies to invest abroad, the evidence found in the aggregate data suggests that there is not a significant relationship between the level of foreign exchange rate and the outward Brazilian foreign direct investment. Differently from previous studies, this paper uses impulse response functions to present dynamic results, thus avoiding the typical binary results “affect” or “don’t affect”, and in so doing we provide a more detailed insight into this important location factor.

  6. OUTWARD BRAZILIAN FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT: IMPULSES AND RESPONSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald de Oliveira Concer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper models the outward foreign direct investment from Brazil series using time a series econometrics model, namely the Vector Auto Regressive (VAR model. We have drawn impulse response functions for the key relevant factors that may explain the outward foreign direct investment flows. We start with a review of the literature on the Dunning location approach to international business. We worked with a data set of quarterly observations from Q1-1995 to Q1-2010. We carried also out Granger causality tests as for determining whether international business travelling should be included as an explanatory variable in our model. Results stressed that although the strong exchange rate in Brazil is often blamed for forcing companies to invest abroad, the evidence found in the aggregate data suggests that there is not a significant relationship between the level of foreign exchange rate and the outward Brazilian foreign direct investment. Differently from previous studies, this paper uses impulse response functions to present dynamic results, thus avoiding the typical binary results “affect” or “don’t affect”, and in so doing we provide a more detailed insight into this important location factor.

  7. The Value-Adding Potentials of Corporate Social Responsibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The increasing trend in the clamour for a more responsible business has necessitated organizations publishing their social responsibility investments. This nonfinancial form of companies' disclosure of their activities has further evolved concerns about the truth and fairness of the content of the social responsibility reports.

  8. Social Economy and Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Abramuszkinová Pavlíková

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the importance of entrepreneurial activities as an engine of economic growth and poverty alleviation, the issue of business development and entrepreneurial activities, has received increasing attention from a number of interested parties worldwide and also in the Czech Republic. The focus of this paper is on a social economy, a social responsibility and social enterprises. The development of the social economy framework will be introduced in the European context and specifically in the Czech Republic. A case study of a Czech social entrepreneur will be introduced based on qualitative research, namely the biographical narrative method.Social enterprises can support activities of various target groups, such as economic activities of mentally and physically handicapped people, which often operate in economically and socially marginalized situations, including stereotyped images. They give them a chance to become active members of society. In this way they can help to reduce the poverty on a local level. The aim of this paper is to introduce a social entrepreneurship as important part of social economy development in the Czech Republic.

  9. Personality maturation around the world: a cross-cultural examination of social-investment theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleidorn, Wiebke; Klimstra, Theo A; Denissen, Jaap J A; Rentfrow, Peter J; Potter, Jeff; Gosling, Samuel D

    2013-12-01

    During early adulthood, individuals from different cultures across the world tend to become more agreeable, more conscientious, and less neurotic. Two leading theories offer different explanations for these pervasive age trends: Five-factor theory proposes that personality maturation is largely determined by genetic factors, whereas social-investment theory proposes that personality maturation in early adulthood is largely the result of normative life transitions to adult roles. In the research reported here, we conducted the first systematic cross-cultural test of these theories using data from a large Internet-based sample of young adults from 62 nations (N = 884,328). We found strong evidence for universal personality maturation from early to middle adulthood, yet there were significant cultural differences in age effects on personality traits. Consistent with social-investment theory, results showed that cultures with an earlier onset of adult-role responsibilities were marked by earlier personality maturation.

  10. Personnel development as component of business social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasova T.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Essence of social responsibility of business has been determined in the article on the basis of existent scientific approaches. It has been educed that in the present conditions the entrepreneurship functions should be complemented by a social function. In a market economy entrepreneurial activity is indissolubly related to the concept of responsibility (to the country, society and partners. Nature of social investment has been substantiated in the article, the difference between charity and social investing carried out by the company through the implementation of internal and external social programs has been shown.

  11. Social responsibility of corporations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babić Jovan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue at stake in the article is corporate social responsibility. There are two rival theories regarding this issue. According to the classical theory managers are responsible to owners (stockholders and their obligation is to pursue the goal of maximizing the profit. According to the other, stakeholder theory, the interests of all corporate stakeholders, all those affected by business, not only stockholders, must be taken in consideration. In the paper these two theories are subject of thorough ethical analysis.

  12. Socially responsible firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrell, A.; Liang, Hao; Renneboog, Luc

    2016-01-01

    In the corporate finance tradition, starting with Berle and Means (1932), corporations should generally be run to maximize shareholder value. The agency view of corporate social responsibility (CSR) considers CSR an agency problem and a waste of corporate resources. Given our identification strategy

  13. Socially Responsible Firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Liang, H.; Ferrell, A.

    2014-01-01

    In the corporate finance tradition starting with Berle & Means (1923), corporations should generally be run so as to maximize shareholder value. The agency view of corporate social responsibility (CSR) generally considers CSR as a managerial agency problem and a waste of corporate resources, since

  14. PENGARUH PENGUNGKAPAN CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY TERHADAP EARNING RESPONSE COEFFICIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MI Mitha Dwi Restuti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui pengaruh negatif pengungkapan Corporate Sosial Responsibility (CSR disclosure terhadap Earning Response Coefficient (ERC. Alat analisis yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini menggunakan metode analisis regresi berganda.Sampel yang digunakan adalah sebanyak 150 perusahaan yang terdaftar pada Bursa Efek Indonesia pada tahun 2010. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian ditemukan bahwa pengungkapan Corporate Social Responsibility tidak berpengaruh terhadap Earning Response Coefficient (ERC. Hal ini dapat dikatakan bahwa investor belum memperhatikan informasi-informasi sosial yang diungkapkan dalam laporan tahunan perusahaan sebagai informasi yang dapat mempengaruhi investor dalam melakukan keputusan investasi. Investor masih mengganggap informasi laba lebih bermanfaat dalam menilai perusahaan dan dianggap lebih mampu memberikan informasi untuk mendapatkan return saham yang diharapkan oleh investor dibandingkan dengan informasi sosial yang diungkapkan oleh perusahaan.The purpose of this study is to determine the negative effect of Corporate Social Responsibility disclosure (CSR disclosure of Earnings Response Coefficient (ERC. Multiple regressions were used to analyze the data. The samples were 150 companies listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange in 2010. Based on the research, the result was the disclosures of Corporate Social Responsibility did not influence Earning Response Coefficient (ECR. It can be said that investors did not pay attention to social information that was disclosed in the company’s annual report as information that could affect investors in making investment decisions. Investor did not consider sosial information; they only consider profit information to assess the company value and their investment return

  15. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Project Technologies: Demand Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

    2012-02-14

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of a limited number of demand response technologies and implementations deployed in the SGIG projects.

  16. HOW DEPRESSION AND SOCIAL MEDIA PREFERENCES AFFECT FINANCIAL INVESTMENT&GAMBLING RISK TAKING BEHAVIOURS

    OpenAIRE

    YALVAC HAMURCU, H. Dilek; HAMURCU, Çağrı

    2017-01-01

    This study mainly examines the relationship between financial investment and gambling risk-taking tendencies and depression. In addition, how financial investment and gambling risk taking attitudes and depression level change with respect to age, gender and social media preferences are also analyzed in this study. DOSPERT Scale with subscales of financial investment and gambling and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) are used for evaluating financial investment&gambling risk-taking tende...

  17. Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liempd, Dennis van; Warming-Rasmussen, Bent; Abild-Nielsen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Målet med denne artikel er at klargøre, at der findes forskellige teoretiske tilgange til ansvarlig leverandørstyring og Corporate Social Responsibility (i det følgende kaldt CSR). Endvidere er det målet at belyse, at området er i kraftig udvikling og forventes at få øget betydning for revisor i...... ansvarlig leverandørstyring og CSR. I artiklen konkluderes følgende: - at udviklingen i Corporate Social Responsibility indikerer, at etik er den mest betydende faktor (driver); (jf. afsnit 1)- at etik som primær driver vil betyde, at virksomheden vil gå ud over lovens minimumkrav, og stræbe efter de...

  18. Social Responsibility Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Mizera

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Responsible business notion is more and more present in Polish economy, however the results of the research carried out in Polish business still shows a low level of CRS idea knowledge, especially in small and medium companies. Although responsible business notion is generally known, its details, ways of preparing strategy, instruments and what is more its benefits are still narrowly spread. Many business people face the lack of knowledge and information, which on one hand make it easier to spread and deepen wrong stereotypes connected with this notion and on the other hand make business people unwilling to implement CRS in their companies. The subjects of this article are examples of instruments which are responsible for realization of social responsibility strategy.

  19. Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Planer-Friedrich, Lisa; Sahm, Marco

    2017-01-01

    We examine the strategic use of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in imperfectly competitive markets. The level of CSR determines the weight a firm puts on consumer surplus in its objective function before it decides upon supply. First, we consider symmetric Cournot competition and show that the endogenous level of CSR is positive for any given number of firms. However, positive CSR levels imply smaller equilibrium profits. Second, we find that an incumbent monopolist can use CSR as an en...

  20. Corporate Social Responsibility in Online Social Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Christian; Brem, Alexander; Wölfl, S.

    2014-01-01

    Considering growing public awareness of social, ethical and ecological responsibility, companies have constantly been increasing their efforts in CSR communications. Social Media as tools of brand communication receive increasing attention and it is expected that the marketing sector...

  1. Social responsibility and SOE restructuring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈志渔; 刘兴国; 周小虎

    2009-01-01

    SOE social responsibility has undergone three stages of evolution.In essence,corporate social responsibility includes social obligations and social expectations.Public attention to SOE social responsibility issues has affected the thinking surrounding SOE restructuring,including the promulgating of objectives and methods.Based on corporate social responsibility,SOE managers must set up a perfect SOE social responsibility system and strengthen supervisory mechanisms;in respect to corporate governance models,SOEs should undertake reform for the corporate citizen governance model.

  2. Review of social issues for large-scale land investment in Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Henley, Giles

    2017-01-01

    Given unsuccessful experiences to date in establishing large-scale investments for biofuels in Zambia, this paper explores the social constraints that may hinder future efforts to use the same models. The author reviews the legal framework that has guided the establishment of most agricultural investments to date (including investment in biofuels), and analyses some of the issues and social repercussions associated with them, through a review of existing case studies. He also explores through...

  3. Risk profiles and corporate social responsibility for socially disadvantaged groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serbanescu Cosmin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Developing a suitable mechanism to stimulate the effective redeployment of capital to social activities can be designed using the corporate social responsibility (CSR concept. Informational asymmetry about the real state of social risks influences the effectiveness of allocations in social protection. Reducing information asymmetries can be achieved by providing the corporations with socially determined risk profiles based on predetermined patterns. Offering concrete lines of action following the risk profiles approach which to base investment decisions of companies in CSR can maximize the results of such a mechanism. In a previous study the authors have developed a theoretical model for determining the poverty risk profile. This study aims to present the practical application of the theoretical model and to provide comments on some errors. Hence, the authors analyzed Buzau county municipalities in presenting the highest risk level determined by the theoretical model and related causes and performed an impact assessment of an investment in CSR based on a model. Specifically, the authors evaluated the impact of reducing the risk of poverty for a suitable investment in CSR. In the second part of the study, the authors analyzed the types of errors that can be found in the municipalities risk profile model due to the granularity of the data. Thus, for the error of over-inclusion, the authors assessed social allocative efficiency at the community level using benchmarking analysis, Data Envelopment respectively and analyzed the data of the under-inclusion error in Buzau county villages. The paper aims to analyze the relative limits on quantitative models and risk of poverty and the practical implementation of these types of models in the development of corporate social responsibility. The study provides also a useful tool which can be made available to companies in order to increase the vulnerable groups’ life quality and the satisfaction of

  4. Advancing social and economic development by investing in women's and children's health: a new Global Investment Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Karin; Axelson, Henrik; Sheehan, Peter; Anderson, Ian; Gülmezoglu, A Metin; Temmerman, Marleen; Mason, Elizabeth; Friedman, Howard S; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Lawn, Joy E; Sweeny, Kim; Tulloch, Jim; Hansen, Peter; Chopra, Mickey; Gupta, Anuradha; Vogel, Joshua P; Ostergren, Mikael; Rasmussen, Bruce; Levin, Carol; Boyle, Colin; Kuruvilla, Shyama; Koblinsky, Marjorie; Walker, Neff; de Francisco, Andres; Novcic, Nebojsa; Presern, Carole; Jamison, Dean; Bustreo, Flavia

    2014-04-12

    A new Global Investment Framework for Women's and Children's Health demonstrates how investment in women's and children's health will secure high health, social, and economic returns. We costed health systems strengthening and six investment packages for: maternal and newborn health, child health, immunisation, family planning, HIV/AIDS, and malaria. Nutrition is a cross-cutting theme. We then used simulation modelling to estimate the health and socioeconomic returns of these investments. Increasing health expenditure by just $5 per person per year up to 2035 in 74 high-burden countries could yield up to nine times that value in economic and social benefits. These returns include greater gross domestic product (GDP) growth through improved productivity, and prevention of the needless deaths of 147 million children, 32 million stillbirths, and 5 million women by 2035. These gains could be achieved by an additional investment of $30 billion per year, equivalent to a 2% increase above current spending. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. EVALUATION CRITERIA OF INNOVATIVE SOCIAL INVESTMENT PROJECTS IN HEALTH CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Aleksandrovich Lomazov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: analysis of key indicators and creation of evaluation criteria of innovative socio-economic investment projects in healthcare, implemented on the basis of public-private partnerships.Methodology: there has been performed comprehensive assessment of specialized socio-economic projects in health sector taking into consideration interests of participants in the project (public and private, main aspects (medical, social, economic, scientific and innovative, and assessment components (presumable effectiveness or risk during implementation of the project. The degree of relative importance of the factors considered in each level, and the levels themselves are determined by experts with the help of paired comparisons method. The values of the project indicators are estimated against nonuniform grading scale, both the results of direct measurements and expert information being used.Results: There has been suggested an approach and a procedure for evaluating projects based on the allocation of interests, issues and evaluation components of the project as sub-criteria levels of the hierarchy analysis method; there has been developed research prototype of information analysis system for assessment of projects on the basis of the proposed approach.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-8-48

  6. External immunity in ant societies: sociality and colony size do not predict investment in antimicrobials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halawani, Omar; Pearson, Bria; Mathews, Stephanie; López-Uribe, Margarita M.; Dunn, Robert R.; Smith, Adrian A.

    2018-01-01

    Social insects live in dense groups with a high probability of disease transmission and have therefore faced strong pressures to develop defences against pathogens. For this reason, social insects have been hypothesized to invest in antimicrobial secretions as a mechanism of external immunity to prevent the spread of disease. However, empirical studies linking the evolution of sociality with increased investment in antimicrobials have been relatively few. Here we quantify the strength of antimicrobial secretions among 20 ant species that cover a broad spectrum of ant diversity and colony sizes. We extracted external compounds from ant workers to test whether they inhibited the growth of the bacterium Staphylococcus epidermidis. Because all ant species are highly social, we predicted that all species would exhibit some antimicrobial activity and that species that form the largest colonies would exhibit the strongest antimicrobial response. Our comparative approach revealed that strong surface antimicrobials are common to particular ant clades, but 40% of species exhibited no antimicrobial activity at all. We also found no correlation between antimicrobial activity and colony size. Rather than relying on antimicrobial secretions as external immunity to control pathogen spread, many ant species have probably developed alternative strategies to defend against disease pressure. PMID:29515850

  7. Corporate social responsibility in Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Polyakova, E.

    2013-01-01

    In the article are considered essence of corporate social responsibility and terms necessary for realization of social activity management subjects. Hikes over are brought to realization of corporate social responsibility, meaningfulness of large and middle business is certain in becoming of social responsibility of enterprises. It is set that exactly midsize business must come forward as a main motor of economic development of Ukraine. Becoming features and modern state of corporate social r...

  8. Social-and-economic mechanism of formation of favorable investment attractiveness of the region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshkina, Tatiana; Mottaeva, Angela; Andreeva, Larisa; Larinina, Tatyana

    2017-10-01

    The article is devoted to the matters of investment attractiveness of regions. The factors making the regional investments possible. The authors argue, that social-and-economic development of regions is connected with the formation of the financial mechanism, representing the set of forms and methods of the organization, planning and stimulation of financial-and-economic activity in the certain social-and-economic space. The proper mechanism of formation of favorable investment attractiveness are offered. Besides, the ways of elimination of limiting factors in formation of favorable investment attractiveness are offered.

  9. Effect of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Investment into Offspring Number, Size, and Condition in a Social Insect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill D Wills

    Full Text Available Resource availability can determine an organism's investment strategies for growth and reproduction. When nutrients are limited, there are potential tradeoffs between investing into offspring number versus individual offspring size. In social insects, colony investment in offspring size and number may shift in response to colony needs and the availability of food resources. We experimentally manipulated the diet of a polymorphic ant species (Solenopsis invicta to test how access to the carbohydrate and amino acid components of nectar resources affect colony investment in worker number, body size, size distributions, and individual percent fat mass. We reared field-collected colonies on one of four macronutrient treatment supplements: water, amino acids, carbohydrates, and amino acid and carbohydrates. Having access to carbohydrates nearly doubled colony biomass after 60 days. This increase in biomass resulted from an increase in worker number and mean worker size. Access to carbohydrates also altered worker body size distributions. Finally, we found a negative relationship between worker number and size, suggesting a tradeoff in colony investment strategies. This tradeoff was more pronounced for colonies without access to carbohydrate resources. The monopolization of plant-based resources has been implicated in the ecological success of ants. Our results shed light on a possible mechanism for this success, and also have implications for the success of introduced species. In addition to increases in colony size, our results suggest that having access to plant-based carbohydrates can also result in larger workers that may have better individual fighting ability, and that can withstand greater temperature fluctuations and periods of food deprivation.

  10. Financial Crisis and Corporate Social Responsible Mutual Fund Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitikantha Parida

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate investment flows into mutual funds that hold more high corporate social responsible stocks (top CSR funds vs. mutual funds that hold more low corporate social responsible stocks (bottom CSR funds. Using a large sample of equity mutual funds spanning 2003–2012, we find that top CSR funds on average receive about 5% less investment per annum compared to the other funds; whereas bottom CSR funds receive about 5.6% more investments. These relative negative and positive flows into the top and bottom CSR funds respectively were larger during the pre-financial crisis period (2003–2007. This trend, however, reversed during the financial crisis (2008–2009. Top CSR funds attracted about 8.7% more investments during the financial crisis compared to the pre-crisis period; whereas bottom CSR funds received about 9.8% less investment. This higher investment into the top CSR funds during the crisis seems to have disappeared during the post-crisis period (2009–2012. Additional analysis shows that the corporate social ratings of top CSR funds improved through the crisis, whereas it deteriorated for the bottom CSR funds. Our findings are consistent with the “flight to quality” phenomenon observed in financial markets during market crises, indicating that investors perceive top CSR fund investments as relatively safe or of higher quality and hence, invest more in them during financial crises.

  11. A Study on the Publishing of Environmental Investments in the Enterprise Sector Using the Social Balance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio Luiz Cadete da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the interest of the society in knowing the true investments of the companies in social responsibility and environment has been frequent. One of these examples can be observed by knowing of the Business Charter for Sustainable Development of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC, divulged in 1991, that suggests some actions that the companies must take in order to be prepared for the new reality originated from environment issues. Being thus, the concern with the environment, boasted in all the spheres of the society, gave space to two subjects of great repercussion in internal and external environments of the organizations: the social responsibility and the concern with the environment. In this context, the demonstration that can supply stakeholders with environment information is the social balance, that has as objective to demonstrate the result of the interaction of the company with the environment. Based on the above considerations, the question which we can make is: in spite of all the persistence of society, can we say that the companies have gradually increased their investments related to environment? This subject is justified by the fact that the companies have used the applications in environment and social responsibility for marketing purposes; however, the applied values and their true involvement adding this information to their financial demonstrations can only be identified by occasion of these publications. The objective of this work was to research the number of companies which had published information of social and environmental nature, in 2005 and 2006, by means of social balance, and afterwards, to verify the behavior of the environmental pointers which were divulged in the mentioned balances and were related to production. The present work was developed by means of documentary and descriptive research and was based on the published financial demonstrations in specific media. In reply to the research

  12. The Role Of Foreign Investment In Economic And Social Development In Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Khalifa Thawadi El. Hamoudi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Investment is whether in local or foreign organization is the action Plan split by various investment activities The Libyan economy is among those economies that require this kind of foreign investment to achieve the desired economic goals which are correlated with the objectives of the Libyan economic system for subsequent stages. Therefore it is important to study the trends and determinants of FDI in developing in general and in Libya in particular. This paper describes the role that could be played by investment foreign investment in economic and social development in Libya pointing out the positive and negative aspects and how to deal with each of them in proportion to the facts of the Libyan Economy needs. And in the light of the new economic orientation in line with the political and economic developments in the international arena and foreign investment and thus contributing to the expansion of the ownership base and create job opportunities for citizen in this study will follow the descriptive approach through the way ahead obtained from digital data from various sources using the forms as required and discussed this paper to the definition of foreign investment evolved of investment determinants of FDI motivated encourage foreign investment history prospects for foreign direct investment in Libya Barriers to foreign direct investment in Libya Policies strategies to support foreign direct investment in Libya conclusions and recommendations.

  13. Organic agriculture as socially responsible business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božić Mitar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For decades, the modern world is faced with the need for global, shared responsibility for development, which is in accordance with the needs of people and nature. Every day, the business community is challenged to be more responsible and sustainable. There is a need for continuous work on the integration of economic, social and environmental aspects. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR is not an additional element of business activity, but it's essential and inseparable component, which will be shown in this paper. Organic agriculture in the world is seen as a good tool for the preservation of the environment, and the concept is coherent with CSR. The system of production of organic food must be in sync with the numerous qualitative and quantitative requirements of environmental protection. Organic agriculture can represent a decisive factor in the development of Serbia, but in this area, there is a necessity for more investment, especially in education and the development of existing capacities. Game theory with its models and conclusions ought to provide sustenance to this topic in business and academic research. In this paper, game theory and its models show that investment in organic production as a socially responsible business generates value. By combining producers and processors in the group, additional economic benefits can be achieved, not only for the group, but also for the entire business in which the group operates. The paper is based on the models of Arya and Mittendorf (2006 and Goering (2012, so it represents their combination and therefore the extended version.

  14. 75 FR 21372 - Calvert Social Investment Fund, et al.; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Investment Company Act Release No. 29209; File No. 812-13718] Calvert Social Investment Fund, et al.; Notice of Application April 19, 2010. AGENCY: Securities and... Company Act of 1940 (``Act'') for an exemption from rule 12d1-2(a) under the Act. Summary of Application...

  15. Marginalised social groups in contemporary weee management within social enterprises investments: A study in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papaoikonomou, K.; Kipouros, S.; Kungolos, A.; Somakos, L.; Aravossis, K.; Antonopoulos, I.; Karagiannidis, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the creation of appropriate conditions aimed at developing social services for reuse and recycling of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), by the inclusion of handicapped and Roma people in the workforce. Application areas for the project are the Hellenic (Greek) regions of Thessaly and North Aegean, where these groups suffer from professional and social exclusion. The efforts to reduce unemployment in the two aforementioned groups, together with the efforts to implement related Greek and European legislation for sustainable WEEE management, are examined here. Furthermore, networking and cooperation at local, regional and central levels between small enterprises, entrepreneurships and local authorities are examined, so that these social enterprises and their corresponding investments may support the development of the Greek alternative WEEE recycling system

  16. Corporate social responsibility in hospitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snježana Gagić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Responsible management of global hospitality companies increasingly recognizes how important are concerns about the society, the environment as well as all stakeholders in maintaining a good market position. In Serbia, the concept of corporate social responsibility is relatively unknown and insufficiently researched in all business areas, especially in the hospitality industry where small businesses are dominated. The papers task is to present particular activities that demonstrate social responsibility to employees, customers-guests, local communities as well as the environment. The paper aims to highlight the benefits of adopting the principles of corporate social responsibility and innovation applied in catering enterprises as an example of good corporate social responsibility practices.

  17. Corporate social responsibility in Islam

    OpenAIRE

    Elasrag, Hussein

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the Islamic principles of CSR, and the definition of a structured social corporate responsibility (CSR), and based on this responsibility. And provide a practical through the international financial institutions that can implement CSR policies framework. This study provides the basis of social responsibilities that apply to those derived from divine sources of international financial institutions.

  18. Analysis of the relationship between social and environmental investment and inclusion of companies in corporate sustainability index of BM&FBOVESPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio André Veras Machado

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8077.2012v14n32p141 This paper aims to investigate the relationship between social and environmental investments and the inclusion of companies in the Corporate Sustainability Index of BM&FBOVESPA, by applying logistic regression. For this, we analyzed information relating to internal and external social and environmental investments, from the social balance of companies.The sample consisted of companies eligible for inclusion in the portfolio ISE in the period of December 2009 to December 2010. According to the results, we can conclude that there is a relationship between environmental investments and entry of firms in the portfolio ISE of BM&FBOVESPA, showing that investment made and evidenced in social and environmental issues is a sign of real commitment to social responsibility and sustainability and not simply a form of accountability of the funds invested. As the variables used, internal social investment (II, External (IE and environmental (IA, we found that IE is the best proxy to explain this relationship. In other words, the results suggest that companies that invest resources in favor of community, either voluntarily or through taxes, which is or should be a resource applied in society, has more chances of entering the ISE portfolio composition.

  19. Social Media Marketing as a tool for promoting the regional investment portals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisa Yu. Fadeyeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective to investigate the potential of Social Media Marketing as a tool for promoting regional investment portals in the information environment to identify the most effective ways of its implementation and to determine the level of mastering of this tool by the Russian regions. Methods general scientific methods observation comparison analysis induction deduction analogy classification. Results the analysis showed that today Social Media Marketing is an essential tool for interaction with the investment community and one of the most effective ways to promote the regional portal which allows to increase the knowledge of and loyalty to the brand to increase the targeted website traffic to increase the awareness of investors about the specific features of the portal and the regional development agenciesrsquo functioning to promptly receive information about the investment environment and to establish contacts with investors. At the same time the study of SMMactivity in the Russian regions revealed a very low level of quality of communication with investors through social networks. Scientific novelty for the first time the article investigates the significance and makes the comparative analysis of the Social Media Marketing channels with regard to investment promotion agencies as well as the results of the regional structures functioning for effective communication through social networks. Practical significance the main results of the research can be used by the regional investment agencies in order to promote their websites increase the quality of communication with investors and promote the investment attractiveness of the region as a whole. nbsp

  20. Social Responsibility is Free

    OpenAIRE

    Peters John

    2014-01-01

    CSR is good for business in two broad ways: the generation of revenues and investment through the creation of a positive image; and the avoidance of loss, through the avoidance of a negative image. We look in particular from a marketing and quality assurance position in taking this view of CSR as value creator and loss avoider. Specifically, how CSR relates to trust, and can be a driver of trust. Trust is a crucial area of business, not particularly well-explored in the literature. Trust rela...

  1. Invester Response to Consumer Elasticity, Nordic Energy Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stine Grenaa; Meibom, Peter; Ravn, Hans V.

    2004-01-01

    . The simulated investment decisions are taken in a stochastic, dynamic setting, where a key point is the timing of the investment decision in relation to the gathering of new information relative to the stochastic elements. Based on this, the consequences of the development in consumer price elasticity......, and it is generally assumed that the demand side has an important role in this, and increasingly so. However, since consumers have not earlier had the incentive to respond to electricity prices, no reliable estimate of demand elasticity is known. The purpose of the present study is to analyse the role of electricity...... demand elasticity for investments in new electricity production capacity. Electricity price scenarios generated with a partial equilibrium model (Balmorel) are combined with a model of investment decisions. In this, various scenarios concerning the development in the demand elasticity are used...

  2. Social Responsibility is Free

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peters John

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available CSR is good for business in two broad ways: the generation of revenues and investment through the creation of a positive image; and the avoidance of loss, through the avoidance of a negative image. We look in particular from a marketing and quality assurance position in taking this view of CSR as value creator and loss avoider. Specifically, how CSR relates to trust, and can be a driver of trust. Trust is a crucial area of business, not particularly well-explored in the literature. Trust relates to how an organization relates to its investors, its employees, its recruits, its customers, and even its regulators. Trust is a key factor in facilitating transactions and building sustainable relationships.

  3. House price responsiveness of housing investments across major European economies

    OpenAIRE

    Gattini, Luca; Ganoulis, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    In comparison with the large literature on house prices, housing investments have been studied far less. This paper investigates the behaviour of private residential investments for the six largest European economies, namely: Germany, France, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. It employs a common modelling structure based on an error correction approach and country specific models. First, co-integration among the parsimoniously specified set of fundamental variables is dete...

  4. Do social factors influence investment behavior and performance? Evidence from mutual fund holdings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgers, Arian; Derwall, J.M.M.; Koedijk, Kees; ter Horst, Jenke

    2015-01-01

    We study the economic significance of social dimensions in investment decisions by analyzing the holdings of U.S. equity mutual funds over the period 2004-2012. Using these holdings, we measure funds' exposures to socially sensitive stocks in order to answer two questions. What explains

  5. Commonfund Study of Responsible Investing: A Survey of Endowments and Their Affiliated Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commonfund Institute, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Commonfund Study of Responsible Investing analyzes policies, practices and attitudes with respect to responsible investing among 200 U.S. colleges and universities, constituting 24.0 percent of the 832 institutions that participated in the 2014 National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO)-Commonfund Study of…

  6. Universities as Intermediaries: Impact Investing and Social Entrepreneurship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekula, Rebecca; Shah, Archana; Jhamb, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    Metropolitan universities are well poised in communities to be intermediaries among various actors involved in social innovation. Pace University established one of the first institutes on social entrepreneurship. Its unique position at the university level allows programming to transcend certain institutional challenges. The emerging field of…

  7. Corporate social responsibility as communicational strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Jorge C. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Based on a concrete case, the negotiation of compensation and reparation for environmental damage in the state of Rio de Janeiro, this paper deals with the role of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as main strategic instrument to set up a relationship among state, businesses and the civil society in the process of licensing and deploying gas pipelines. In this kind of process, a few cultural aspects, such as a social pattern based in philanthropy and paternalism, make difficult for any agreement to be reached among the stake holders. As a result, the process of licensing becomes slow and fragile. In some cases, negotiation ends up unsuccessful. This mental model coexists with an imperious need for investments in energy, leading to a hard contradiction between a traditional behavior and the surge of modern consumerism habits. Besides, local legislation and bureaucracy allow for few or no options to solve the conflict. In this context, as will be seen, CSR is a preferential way to establish fruitful dialog. By means of Corporate Social Investments (CSI), it is possible to create a common experience of local development among entrepreneurs, the state and the community, by this breaking communication barriers and providing alternatives to solve the original contradiction. (author)

  8. Social capital, trust, and firm performance: the value of corporate social responsibility during the financial crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Lins, K V; Servaes, H; Tamayo, A

    2017-01-01

    During the 2008-2009 financial crisis, firms with high social capital, measured as corporate social responsibility (CSR) intensity, had stock returns that were four to seven percentage points higher than firms with low social capital. High-CSR firms also experienced higher profitability, growth, and sales per employee relative to low-CSR firms, and they raised more debt. This evidence suggests that the trust between the firm and both its stakeholders and investors, built through investments i...

  9. Citizenship as individual responsibility through personal investment - an ethnographic study in a study circle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Pastuhov

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to shed light on how the democratic ideal of institutionalised Nordic popular education is realised through an ethnographic field study in an English as a foreign language study circle. The study focuses on how participants express their citizenship when taking part in the study circle. Citizenship is viewed as a dynamic concept comprising the aspects of 'being' and 'acting' and constructed in and through social interaction. The study circle is arranged as a classroom practice: The study circle leader organises the activities, while the participants engage in exercises and attempt to learn correct usage. Through their participation, the participants take individual responsibility for what they see as their lack of sufficient knowledge of English. The participants describe their participation as a personal and voluntary investment in themselves. In light of the study, the individual stance is discussed as limiting possibilities for responsibility and thus expressions of citizenship.

  10. Socially Responsible or Just Plain Social?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Katie Elizabeth; Bruce, Jacklyn

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to understand one facet of leadership development among the newest members of a Greek Letter community at a southern university. New Members (NMs) of the Greek Community at North Carolina State University were administered the Socially Responsible Leadership Survey (SRLS Guidebook, 2005) during the Fall, 2011. Results indicate…

  11. ESG Integration and the Investment Management Process : Fundamental Investing Reinvented

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duuren, Emiel; Plantinga, Auke; Scholtens, Bert

    2016-01-01

    We investigate how conventional asset managers account for environmental, social and governance factors (ESG) in their investment process. We do so on the basis of an international survey among fund managers. We find that many conventional managers integrate responsible investing in their investment

  12. Understanding Medicaid Managed Care Investments in Members' Social Determinants of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Laura; Ackerman, Sara; Wing, Holly; Manchanda, Rishi

    2017-08-01

    Despite widespread interest in addressing social determinants of health (SDH) as a means to improve health and to reduce health care spending, little information is available about how to develop, sustain, and scale nonmedical interventions in diverse payer environments, including Medicaid Managed Care. This study aimed to explore how Medicaid Managed Care Organization (MMCO) leaders interpret their roles and responsibilities around SDH, how they garner resources to develop and sustain interventions to address SDH, and how they perceive the influences of external organizations on related activities. Semistructured qualitative key informant interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 26 Medicaid Managed Care corporate executives. Data were analyzed with an iterative coding, thematic development and interpretation process. MMCO leaders' interests and activities around interventions to address SDH are described, as well as their perceptions of existing and potential incentives and barriers to expanding these interventions. Despite significant experimentation and programmatic diversity of interventions addressing social determinants, MMCO leaders struggle with clinical integration, financing, and evaluation efforts that could promote sustainability. Though their efforts are nascent, MMCO leaders are investing in tackling social determinants to improve health and to decrease health care spending in managed care settings that serve low-income populations. Results highlight both opportunities and concerns about sustaining and scaling clinical interventions addressing SDH.

  13. A Framework for Assessing the Social and Economic Impact of Sustainable Investments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Räikkönen Minna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Investments towards sustainable development are vital for the future and they must be carefully planned to deliver immediate and long-term benefits. Hence, the ability to communicate the forms of impact of sustainable investments to local societies, people, investors and other stakeholders can provide a competitive advantage. However, the assessments are often under pressure to demonstrate short-term effects rather than emphasise the long-term impact. In addition, indirect and intangible forms of impacts should not be measured solely in economic terms. This paper proposes an assessment framework to support the integrated economic and social impact assessment of sustainable investments aimed at improving physical and socio-economic wellbeing. The framework is demonstrated in two case studies: new construction and renovation investments in affordable housing and social impact investment in sustainable development. The investments in the case studies are evaluated, selected and prioritized not only in terms of money but also with regard to sustainability, social acceptability and their overall impact on society, as a whole. The results indicate that a systematic integrated assessment of monetary and non-monetary factors can be successfully combined with the sustainable development decisions.

  14. Social responsibility in the banking sector: Experience from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović-Aleksić Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyze the level of social responsibility, including its basic dimensions, in the banking sector in the Republic of Serbia. The main research goal is to stress the importance of the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR and to determine the level of development of specific dimensions and aspects of corporate social responsibility in the domestic banking sector. Therefore, we provide an insight into the most developed aspects, such as responsibility to the community and customers, within the external dimensions, and those aspects that banks should pay more attention to and invest more resources in, such as internal social responsibility and CSR disclosure. Consideration of the social responsibility of banks from this perspective represents an original research approach and the derived findings are significant in many ways in both theoretical and practical terms.

  15. The Price of Ethics : Evidence from Socially Responsible Mutual Funds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Ter Horst, J.R.; Zhang, C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper estimates the price of ethics by studying the risk-return relation in socially responsible investment (SRI) funds. Consistent with investors paying a price for ethics, SRI funds in many European and Asia-Pacific countries strongly underperform domestic benchmark portfolios by about 5% per

  16. Corporate social responsibility of business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryantseva M.V.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available the article is devoted to actual problems of corporate social responsibility (CSR in today's Russian society, where today it is recognized as one of the most important theoretical and practical problems in terms of establishing effective mutually beneficial cooperation between the state, business and various social institutions, and is the focus of scholars and practitioners of social and economic spheres of society.

  17. Social responsibility in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, K

    1996-03-01

    Nurses will be key participants in health care reform as health care shifts from a hospital-based disease orientation to a community-centered health promotion focus. Nursing in communities, the environmental context of clients' everyday lives, requires attention to social, economic, and political circumstances that influence health status and access to health care. Therefore, nursing educators have the responsibility to prepare future nurses for community-based practice by instilling moral and professional practice obligations, cultural sensitivity, and other facets of social responsibility. In this article, social responsibility and journaling, a teaching/learning strategy suggested by the new paradigm approach of the curriculum revolution, are explored. A qualitative research study of more than 100 nursing student journal entries illustrates the concept of social responsibility and how it developed in a group of baccalaureate nursing students during a clinical practicum in a large urban homeless shelter.

  18. DRIVING CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    henk

    express reference is made to companies' social responsibility (which is commonly referred to as CSR),4 ...... deceptive representations. S 22 of the Act ... South Africa, which requires transparent and effective communication with stakeholders ...

  19. Research on youth crime highlights need for social investment ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2012-03-05

    Mar 5, 2012 ... Before this study, many researchers investigated the risk factors contributing to ... “A question we wanted to look at was, even if we identify indicators of social capital ... “Peer relationships are important, family relationships are very important. ... “Partnership is the key to our success,” says Britannia Woods ...

  20. Mobilisation, politics, investment and constant adaptation: lessons from the Australian health-promotion response to HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Graham; O'Donnell, Daryl; Crooks, Levinia; Lake, Rob

    2014-04-01

    The Australian response to HIV oversaw one of the most rapid and sustained changes in community behaviour in Australia's health-promotion history. The combined action of communities of gay men, sex workers, people who inject drugs, people living with HIV and clinicians working in partnership with government, public health and research has been recognised for many years as highly successful in minimising the HIV epidemic. This article will show how the Australian HIV partnership response moved from a crisis response to a constant and continuously adapting response, with challenges in sustaining the partnership. Drawing on key themes, lessons for broader health promotion are identified. The Australian HIV response has shown that a partnership that is engaged, politically active, adaptive and resourced to work across multiple social, structural, behavioural and health-service levels can reduce the transmission and impact of HIV. The experience of the response to HIV, including its successes and failures, has lessons applicable across health promotion. This includes the need to harness community mobilisation and action; sustain participation, investment and leadership across the partnership; commit to social, political and structural approaches; and build and use evidence from multiple sources to continuously adapt and evolve. So what? The Australian HIV response was one of the first health issues to have the Ottawa Charter embedded from the beginning, and has many lessons to offer broader health promotion and common challenges. As a profession and a movement, health promotion needs to engage with the interactions and synergies across the promotion of health, learn from our evidence, and resist the siloing of our responses.

  1. Corporate social responsibility: a personal reflection on Clover Mama Afrika

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vlok

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Although corporate social responsibility (CSR or corporate social investment (CSI, the term preferred by most South African busines-ses, has been studied from the 1950s, up to date no universally ac-cepted definition has been formulated. However, the basic concepts put forward in the definition of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD (2000 are generally accepted as forming the core of CSR.

  2. Science's social responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil

    2014-01-01

    like Science in the City in which the science institutions communicate and discuss science with interested citizens. It can be done in relation to strategic plans: solving medical, environmental, socio-political problems for which the state or commercial actors provide funding. But it can also be what...... this is kind of funny, it has some kind of serious core to it in that part of science responsibility to society is to figure out the meaning of the questions that we want to pose – and furthermore: which questions can be asked. Doing this may not be limited to short-term processes, to strategic considerations...

  3. Environmental and social risk evaluation of overseas investment under the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruilian; Andam, Francis; Shi, Guoqing

    2017-06-01

    Along with the further implementation of the "One Belt, One Road" initiative and the promotion of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), the construction of the CPEC will likely face challenges owing to differences between China and Pakistan in politics, economics, culture, religion, language, customs, environmental management systems, environmental protection laws, social management systems, and social management regulations. To address potential environmental and social risks associated with Chinese enterprises as they invest in the CPEC region, this paper examines previous studies addressing topics such as the environmental and social safeguards of international institutions and Pakistan's domestic environmental and social management requirements. We then systematically identify the environmental and social risk factors involved in CPEC construction, which cover risks regarding water, air, soil, noise, biodiversity, politics, economics, culture, technology, and individuals. By establishing and calculating these risks and using a multi-fuzzy comprehensive evaluation model, we found that noise and individual risks belong to a medium risk category, while others belong to a higher risk category. In view of these risks, the Chinese government must create a friendly and peaceful environment for Chinese enterprises to invest in the CPEC region, and Chinese enterprises must adopt a development strategy of strength and capacity building and establish enterprises capable of addressing environmental and social issues during the investment process. All stakeholders must understand that if no determined and diligent steps are taken, CPEC construction might be doomed for failure from the start.

  4. Corporate Social Responsibility for Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Przychodzeń

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to is to provide insights on implementing corporate social responsibility for sustainability (CSRS concept and show how it differs from basic corporate social responsibility (CSR. Methodology: The paper discusses major issues with references to existing literature and real business cases from S&P500 consumer discretionary sector. Findings: The main fi nding of this paper is that CSRS could provide the company with a competitive advantage as a growing number of consumers become more sustainable conscious. It could also help to overcome the increasing consumers’ skepticism towards corporate social responsibility practices. Finally, it can also be seen as a step forward in defi ning what types of corporate activities are associated with desirable social and environmental gains. Research limitations: Our sample was restricted to the U.S. fi rms from the consumer discretionary sector. Therefore, conclusions should not be generalized to other markets. Our study is based on the analysis of environmental and social responsibility statements and assumes that they accurately represent corporate commitment in majority of the cases. Practical implications: CSRS offers corporations the opportunity to use their unique skills, culture, values, resources, and management capabilities to lead social progress by making sustainability part of its internal corporate logic. Originality: The paper raises the importance of the different conditions necessary for making sustainable development concept an important part of corporate strategy.

  5. Socially responsible energy futures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starr, C.

    1979-01-01

    After examining briefly the usual positions of nuclear critics and nuclear proponents, Dr. Starr says that the proponents (of whom he is one) have a broader case for nuclear power not thus far effectively advanced - a case based chiefly on a visible concern with social values and the future welfare of humanity. Such a broader case for nuclear power has always existed - a case based on motivations that initially spurred development of this energy resource over the past several decades, but one that has tended to be neglected in the public debate. A concern to avoid worldwide catastrophe is central to this broader case for nuclear power. The threat is perceived as resulting directly from the pending unavailability of petroleum and natural gas at a reasonable cost. This unavailability could lead to global tensions and political instabilities, economic crises, and, ultimately, to military conflicts based on need to obtain and control liquid-fuel resources. It is felt that past history and current events substantiate the threat inherent in the international struggle for raw materials. The broader - and more compelling - case for nuclear power lies in its potential for removing a major threat to the peace, stability, and welfare of the world that is inherent in the growing scarcity of petroleum and natural gas resources and in the limited geographical availability of coal. The catastrophe that could be avoided is at least as threatening as the one projected by those who oppose the use of nuclear power, and, Dr. Starr argues, more realistic in its potential for world-shattering impacts

  6. Social (in)stability, distributive conflicts, and investment in poor and rich economies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riedl, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    A recently much debated issue is why observed investment and growth rates inpoor countries are lower than traditional theory predicts. Empirical evidencesuggests that social and political instability is a major reason for thedivergence between poor and rich countries. However, there is still the

  7. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY: A CONCEPTUAL OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Ozan Büyükyılmaz; Yahya Fidan

    2016-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility includes the activities performed by enterprises that going beyond the legitimate expectations and carried out on a voluntary basis to improve the social and environmental well-being. In this study, the concept of corporate social responsibility is examined within the frame of definition and content, social responsibility theories, causes that enterprises are moving to social responsibility activities and the scope of social responsibility. It is intended to...

  8. Enviromental responsability and corporate social responsability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Marí Farinós

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The environmental management of companies and organizations in general is going to be internalized in the operation and management structures, linking conceptual and chronologically to improve corporate reputation, management excellence, knowledge and innovation. Embracing, undoubtedly too, with the assumption of an ethical commitment of the company to society: environmental sustainability and generational solidarity in the transmission of culture and values of that nature. The existing need to know the potential impact of business operations on society and the environment results in the appearance of a document, which may well be called a Sustainability Report or Social Balance, which is compiled from a series social indicators, which are the instruments responsible to reflect the value of the shares held by the company in social and environmental fields.

  9. Scaling up Corporate Social Investments in Education: Five Strategies That Work. Global Views. Policy Paper 2012-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Fleet, Justin W.

    2012-01-01

    Scaling up good corporate social investment practices in developing countries is crucial to realizing the "Education for All" and "Millennium Development Goals". Yet very few corporate social investments have the right mix of vision, financing, cross-sector engagement and leadership to come to scale. Globally, 67 million…

  10. Enbridge Inc. 2004 corporate social responsibility report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This report disclosed information about Enbridge's social programs and initiatives, as well as information concerning environmental issues related to the company's pipeline operations and distribution systems. The report was compiled in response to requests by stakeholders for evidence of Enbridge's social responsibility. An outline of Enbridge's business operations was presented, as well as an overview of corporate governance concerning risk assessment, health and safety. Details of the board's Environmental, Health and Safety Committee were presented. It was noted that Enbridge is now considering broadening the committee's mandate to include responsibility for human rights, community investment, and stakeholder relations. Issues concerning regulatory compliance, review processes and inspections were presented. It was noted that Enbridge received 21 regulatory notifications from government agencies for environmental and safety issues. Details of fugitive emissions management strategies were presented, as well as outlines of internal efficiencies, demand-side management strategies, and renewable and alternative energy offset programs. Enbridge's contributions to climate change policies were discussed. A list of major air emissions released by Enbridge facilities was provided. Details of spills and releases were also provided, as well as water and waste management strategies and environmental outreach programs. Emergency planning procedures were reviewed, as well as details of employer relations, relations with indigenous peoples, human rights and policy development. 6 tabs, 7 figs

  11. Mapping "Social Responsibility" in Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horst, Maja; Glerup, Cecilie

    The paper investigates the discourse on social responsibility in science as it appears in academic journals. Through database searches a collection of more than 300 papers have been analysed in order to map their answers to the following three questions: - What is the central problem that threatens...... responsibility in science? - What are the central aspects of science or its relation to society that need to be regulated or changed? - What kinds of solutions are imagined and how are these solutions supposed to be put into place? On this basis the paper explores how different interpretations of the notion...... of social responsibility of science imply different forms of governance of and within science. The paper employs a Foucaldian discourse analysis to understand how a particular conceptualisation of responsibility implies a political rationality, i.e. a particular form of governance of science. The analysis...

  12. Partnerships for corporate social responsability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de T.J.N.M. (Theo)

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to conceptualise the extent to which partnerships with non-governmental organisations (NGOs) are a necessity for successful efforts of businesses in the area of corporate social responsibility (CSR). The main findings are based on an analysis of existing literature on

  13. Perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, James F.; Maynard, William S.

    1975-01-01

    This study investigated the possible implications of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) for employee expectations and satisfactions. Specifically, interest centered on the question of how perceptions of an organization's involvement in the resolution of current societal problems might relate to members' expectations of equitable job rewards and…

  14. Multinationals and corporate social responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to shed some more light on the current debate related to corporate social responsibility (CSR), specifically considering multinational enterprises (MNEs) and the complexities they face when dealing with international issues and a range of stakeholders. It discusses notions of CSR in

  15. Outplacement and corporate social responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, R.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a response to the following papers: "Ethical Marketing," by P.E. Murphy, G.R. Laczniak, N.E. Bowie, and T.A. Klein, "Marketing Ethics: Cases and Readings," edited by P.E. Murphy and G.R. Laczniak, "Advertising Ethics" by E.H. Spence and B. van Heekeren, and "Corporate Social

  16. The Social Responsibility of Enterprises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosdahl, Anders

    More than 20 per cent of the Danish working age population is provided for by some form of public income transfer. The goal of the present government is that enterprises should employ more of these persons: Enterprises should become more socially responsible. The paper analyses enterprises...

  17. Preparing Engineers for Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandvoort, H.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I introduce the contributions to a special section of the journal: one devoted to the question of how engineering curricula can or should contribute to the preparation of graduates for socially responsible decision making and conduct. The special section is motivated by the circumstance that, although there is broad agreement that…

  18. Speaking of Corporate Social Responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, H.; Marquis, C.; Renneboog, L.D.R.; Li Sun, Sunny

    2014-01-01

    We argue that the language spoken by corporate decision makers influences their firms’ social responsibility and sustainability practices. Linguists suggest that obligatory future-time-reference (FTR) in a language reduces the psychological importance of the future. Prior research has shown that

  19. Motives for corporate social responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafland, J.J.; Mazereeuw V/d Duijn Schouten, C.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we analyze the motives of executives to take responsibility for the labor, environmental and social aspects of their business. We distinguish three motives: one extrinsic (financial) and two intrinsic (ethical and altruistic) motives and empirically investigate the influences of

  20. Social entrepreneurship as a form of social responsibility in Bulgaria

    OpenAIRE

    Ilieva-Koleva Daniela; Dobreva Julia

    2015-01-01

    Social entrepreneurship is becoming a popular form of social responsibility and a way to solve a variety of urgent social problems. In order for a society to boost social entrepreneurship it needs a specific environment where such ideas can emerge and develop into an active business activity. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive literature review of the terms social responsibility and social entrepreneurship and to examine the current social entrepreneurship activities in Bulgaria. The ...

  1. Performance of Socially Responsible Stocks Portfolios – The Impact of Global Financial Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanita Tripathi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the effective and better implementation of CSR law, development of SRI market in the investment world is essential. Unless the investors turn socially responsible, CSR principles cannot be enforced in practice. This paper examines whether the companies that are socially responsible are performing better than general companies in terms of risk, return and various risk-adjusted measures during pre-crisis, crisis and post-crisis periods. We find that despite having higher risk, socially responsible stocks portfolios generated significantly higher returns and hence outperformed other portfolios on the basis of all risk-adjusted measures, as well as net selectivity returns during crisis period. The results uphold even with the use of Fama-French three factor model for estimating excess returns. Besides augmenting existing literature, our results clearly corroborate the fact that investors can derive benefits by investing in socially responsible companies (especially in crisis period. The study supports the view that socially responsible products can be used as a safe investment vehicle by investors during adversity. Therefore, regulators, policy makers and mutual funds should construct and make available various socially responsible investment products to initiate the movement of socially responsible investing in India.

  2. Corporate Social Responsibility in Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Edwin D.

    2006-01-01

    The dialog within aviation management education regarding ethics is incomplete without a discussion of corporate social responsibility (CSR). CSR research requires discussion involving: (a) the current emphasis on CSR in business in general and aviation specifically; (b) business and educational theory that provide a basis for aviation companies to engage in socially responsible actions; (c) techniques used by aviation and aerospace companies to fulfill this responsibility; and (d) a glimpse of teaching approaches used in university aviation management classes. The summary of this research suggests educators explain CSR theory and practice to students in industry and collegiate aviation management programs. Doing so extends the discussion of ethical behavior and matches the current high level of interest and activity within the aviation industry toward CSR.

  3. Social Media Return on Investment: How Much is it Worth to My Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Daniel J; Nazarian, Sheila

    2018-04-06

    Plastic surgeons are rapidly integrating social media into their practices and recent articles on the subject have exploded in the literature. Although social media is being evaluated as a tool, few have actually been able to quantify the impact of social media on a practice. To quantify the return on investment for social media in a plastic surgery practice. The ideal method for this type of study is a new practice, without preexisting clients and with a broad approach to marketing to examine the effects of multiple marketing tools. In this study, we profile a start-up plastic surgery practice in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles. In this study, we report practice demographics as well as one year of income, broken down by the referral source for each patient. The dollar amount returned was reported for several social media resources and other internet-based marketing tools. Social media has a relatively high return on investment, and to date this is the first study to transparently quantify the value of social media in plastic surgery.

  4. Financial Constraints and the Response of Business Investment to Monetary Policy Shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haase Timothy J.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study I investigate what impact monetary policy shocks have on firms’ fixed investment, the less liquid portion of gross investment that requires more planning. I account for firms facing financial constraints firms by utilizing a common measure of asset size, which is used in previous literature. I use two exogenous, continuous series of monetary policy shocks to show that constrained firms have statistically different responses to policy than unconstrained firms. Specifically, I find that constrained firms’ fixed investment significantly responds more to monetary policy shocks than unconstrained firms.

  5. Cash transfer program and education investment: A model for social evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimit, P. H. T.; Monteiro, L. H. A.; Omar, N.

    2014-03-01

    Assume that the households of a country are socially classified according to the monthly total income, and that they can be part of a lower, a middle or an upper class. By using multi-agent systems, here we model and simulate the economic evolution of households which earn a wage, pay taxes and invest in education. The return of the education investment is monthly added to the salary of the family, and it is function of the corresponding grand total put in education along the time. When a family is unemployed, we consider that it receives cash due to a social program made by the government. The time evolution of the percentages of households belonging to each class is investigated by varying the government investment in such a program of cash transfer and the proportion of employed households in the population. We show that the government should invest in the unemployed lower class if it intends a growth of the middle class. We also propose and analyze a mean-field approximation written in terms of ordinary differential equations. In addition, we verify that our model fits real data from Brazil, in the period between 2003 (when the cash transfer program Bolsa Família was launched) and 2011.

  6. Social Return on Investment: A New Approach to Understanding and Advocating for Value in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Catherine M; Moules, Nancy J

    2017-12-01

    To determine whether the methodology of social return on investment (SROI) could be a way in which the value of a healthcare-related program (children's cancer camp) could be captured, evaluated, and communicated. The value of healthcare goes beyond what can be captured in financial terms; however, this is the most common type of value that is measured. The SROI methodology accounts for a broader concept of value by measuring social, environmental, and economic outcomes and uses monetary values to represent them. The steps/stages of an SROI analysis were applied to the context of a children's camp for this article. Applying the SROI methodology to this healthcare-related program was feasible and provided insight and understanding related to the impacts of this program. Because of SROI's flexibility, it is a tool that has great potential in a healthcare environment and for leaders to evaluate programmatic return on investment.

  7. Social responsibility as modern conception of business

    OpenAIRE

    Vorona, E.

    2010-01-01

    Research of social responsibility is conducted in the context of theory of socialization of the economic systems. Approaches are considered to essence of concept «Social responsibility». The positive consequences of realization of social responsibility and its connection are certain with a competitiveness and efficiency

  8. Education as investment, consumption or adapting to social norm: Implications for educational mismatch among graduates

    OpenAIRE

    SELLAMI, Sana; VERHAEST, Dieter; NONNEMAN, Walter; VAN TRIER, Walter

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the role of four motives to participate in higher education – investment, educational consumption, student life consumption and social pressure – on field of study choices and academic performance and on three labour market outcomes – over-education, wages and job satisfaction. We use data on three cohorts of about 3000 Flemish individuals documenting the transition from education to work. Principal components are used to identify the four study motives. Effects of study motive...

  9. Small Business Social Responsibility Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Mette; Spence, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    approach and we propose for SME managers to investigate Foucault’s notion of “care of the self”. Originality/value: We conceptualize how SBSR is caught in a ‘governmentality dilemma’ where simultaneous expectations to govern others (e.g. through standards) and the self (e.g. through intrinsic motivations......) are confronting owner-managers’ ethos. We explain theoretically how small business managers respond to the challenge when they are required to formalize and display for external surveillance that which would otherwise be informal and part of the non-public or private sphere.......Purpose: Corporate social responsibility communication by small and medium sized enterprises is theorized to form the concept of Small Business Social Responsibility (SBSR) Communication. Design/methodology/approach: This is a conceptual paper that draws on Foucault’s theory of governmentality...

  10. Aphid reproductive investment in response to mortality risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Aphids are striking in their prodigious reproductive capacity and reliance on microbial endosymbionts, which provision their hosts with necessary amino acids and provide protection against parasites and heat stress. Perhaps as a result of this bacterial dependence, aphids have limited immune function that may leave them vulnerable to bacterial pathogens. An alternative, non-immunological response that may be available to infected aphids is to increase reproduction, thereby ameliorating fitness loss from infection. Such a response would reduce the need to mount a potentially energetically costly immune response, and would parallel that of other hosts that alter life-history traits when there is a risk of infection. Here we examined whether pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) respond to immunological challenges by increasing reproduction. As a comparison to the response to the internal cue of risk elicited by immunological challenge, we also exposed pea aphids to an external cue of risk - the aphid alarm pheromone (E)-β-farnesene (EBF), which is released in the presence of predators. For each challenge, we also examined whether the presence of symbionts modified the host response, as maintaining host fitness in the face of challenge would benefit both the host and its dependent bacteria. Results We found that aphids stabbed abdominally with a sterile needle had reduced fecundity relative to control aphids but that aphids stabbed with a needle bearing heat-killed bacteria had reproduction intermediate, and statistically indistinguishable, to the aphids stabbed with a sterile needle and the controls. Aphids with different species of facultative symbiotic bacteria had different reproductive patterns overall, but symbionts in general did not alter aphid reproduction in response to bacterial exposure. However, in response to exposure to alarm pheromone, aphids with Hamiltonella defensa or Serratia symbiotica symbiotic infections increased reproduction but those

  11. Optimal investment for enhancing social concern about biodiversity conservation: a dynamic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joung Hun; Iwasa, Yoh

    2012-11-01

    To maintain biodiversity conservation areas, we need to invest in activities, such as monitoring the condition of the ecosystem, preventing illegal exploitation, and removing harmful alien species. These require a constant supply of resources, the level of which is determined by the concern of the society about biodiversity conservation. In this paper, we study the optimal fraction of the resources to invest in activities for enhancing the social concern y(t) by environmental education, museum displays, publications, and media exposure. We search for the strategy that maximizes the time-integral of the quality of the conservation area x(t) with temporal discounting. Analyses based on dynamic programming and Pontryagin's maximum principle show that the optimal control consists of two phases: (1) in the first phase, the social concern level approaches to the final optimal value y(∗), (2) in the second phase, resources are allocated to both activities, and the social concern level is kept constant y(t) = y(∗). If the social concern starts from a low initial level, the optimal path includes a period in which the quality of the conservation area declines temporarily, because all the resources are invested to enhance the social concern. When the support rate increases with the quality of the conservation area itself x(t) as well as with the level of social concern y(t), both variables may increase simultaneously in the second phase. We discuss the implication of the results to good management of biodiversity conservation areas. 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

  12. The Local Social and Environmental Impacts of Smallholder-Based Biofuel Investments in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura German

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available High oil prices, recent commitments by industrialized countries to enhance the use of renewable energy, and efforts by developing countries to stimulate foreign investment as a pathway to development have fueled high levels of interest in the biofuel sector throughout much of sub-Saharan Africa. Zambia is no exception. A large, land-locked country with high pump prices and vast tracts of land considered by many to be "degraded" or "underutilized," investor interest in the sector has remained high despite uncertainties associated with unproven feedstocks and market fluctuations. While investment in multiple feedstock and production models may be observed, one of the primary investments has been in jatropha outgrower schemes in which small-scale farmers grow feedstock on contract with domestic and foreign investors. We assess the history and evolution of the largest such scheme in Zambia, as well as the social and environmental impacts in two districts with large numbers of outgrowers. Findings suggest that, although such a production model may hold promise for enhancing rural livelihood benefits from the emerging biofuel sector, to date, small-scale farmers have borne the brunt of the risk and uncertainty that are the trademarks of this emerging industry. We conclude with a discussion of options to minimize forest conversion and protect farmers against high-risk investments, while harnessing the potential of this business model for enhancing rural livelihoods in Zambia and elsewhere.

  13. Mapping 'Social Responsibility' in Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, Cecilie; Horst, Maja

    2014-01-01

    This article employs the Foucauldian notion of ‘political rationality’ to map discussions and ideals about the responsibility of science toward society. By constructing and analyzing an archive of 263 journal papers, four political rationalities were identified: the Demarcation rationality, which......, which insists that responsible science should live up to public demands for innovation and democracy; and the Integration rationality, which advocates that science should be co-constructed with societal actors in order to be socially responsible. While each rationality is distinct, the article argues...... that all of them address the issue of a boundary (or integration) between science and society. Hence, it is not possible for scientists to avoid ‘a relationship’ with society. The political question is how this relationship is to be defined and regulated....

  14. Sex differences in parental care: Gametic investment, sexual selection, and social environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liker, András; Freckleton, Robert P; Remeš, Vladimir; Székely, Tamás

    2015-11-01

    Male and female parents often provide different type and amount of care to their offspring. Three major drivers have been proposed to explain parental sex roles: (1) differential gametic investment by males and females that precipitates into sex difference in care, (2) different intensity of sexual selection acting on males and females, and (3) biased social environment that facilitates the more common sex to provide more care. Here, we provide the most comprehensive assessment of these hypotheses using detailed parental care data from 792 bird species covering 126 families. We found no evidence for the gametic investment hypothesis: neither gamete sizes nor gamete production by males relative to females was related to sex difference in parental care. However, sexual selection correlated with parental sex roles, because the male share in care relative to female decreased with both extra-pair paternity and frequency of male polygamy. Parental sex roles were also related to social environment, because male parental care increased with male-biased adult sex ratios (ASRs). Taken together, our results are consistent with recent theories suggesting that gametic investment is not tied to parental sex roles, and highlight the importance of both sexual selection and ASR in influencing parental sex roles. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  15. The U.S. Public's Investment in Medical Research: An Evolving Social Contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinig, Stephen J; Dev, Anurupa; Bonham, Ann C

    2016-01-01

    Medical researchers and their institutions are operating under extraordinary financial stress. More than a decade after completion of the 5-year doubling of the National Institutes of Health budget, the medical research community must confront a significant loss in National Institutes of Health purchasing power and downward pressures in federal discretionary spending. In part, this trend results from a federal budget stalemate over the growth in entitlement programs, particularly spending on medical care. This article considers the changing nature of the federal investment in medical research and the potential for medical researchers and institutions conducting the full spectrum of research to improve health system performance and health equity. In our view, continued federal investments reflect an evolving social contract for research serving the public good; the term contract is used metaphorically to represent a figurative, implicit agreement between the scientific community and the public's representatives in government. Under this conceptual contract, the American people--who are ultimately the funders of research, research training and infrastructure--expect outcomes that lead to better health, security or other benefits. The evolving contract includes expectations for more accountability, transparency, sharing of results and resources, and better integration of research systems and cultures that used to take pride in boundaries and distinctions. We outline here some of the major movements of organizations realigning to social support, which are increasingly essential to sustain public investment in medical research. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Multinational Oil Companies and Corporate Social Responsibilities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Niger Delta Region, Nigeria), the concept of corporate social responsibility must be fully imbibed by the multinational oil companies. Therefore, this study examines multinational oil companies and corporate social responsibilities with particular ...

  17. Consumer Social Responsibility: Example of Cycling Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesevičiūtė-Ufartienė Laima

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents research on consumer social responsibility based on the example of cycling service. The author analyses the tourism sector determining a relation between socially responsible behaviour of an organization and consumer behaviour.

  18. Driving Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) through the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The corporate social responsibility (CSR) movement can be described as a bundle of trends ... important role to play in the creation of an enabling CSR environment. ... policy requiring the implementation of socially responsible practices by the ...

  19. Corporate social responsibility and customer behaviour, empirical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The company reputation related to these fields has become a competition asset. ... to the specific customer's need related to the social responsibility of brands. ... socially responsible consumption, business ethics, relationship marketing ...

  20. The Ethical Challenges of Socially Responsible Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, David B; Elliott, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    Social responsibility is an essential part of the responsible conduct of research that presents difficult ethical questions for scientists. Recognizing one's social responsibilities as a scientist is an important first step toward exercising social responsibility, but it is only the beginning, since scientists may confront difficult value questions when deciding how to act responsibly. Ethical dilemmas related to socially responsible science fall into at least three basic categories: 1) dilemmas related to problem selection, 2) dilemmas related to publication and data sharing, and 3) dilemmas related to engaging society. In responding to these dilemmas, scientists must decide how to balance their social responsibilities against other professional commitments and how to avoid compromising their objectivity. In this article, we will examine the philosophical and ethical basis of social responsibility in science, discuss some of the ethical dilemmas related to exercising social responsibility, and make five recommendations to help scientists deal with these issues.

  1. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serbanica Daniel

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to identify the main opportunities and limitations of corporate social responsibility (CSR. The survey was defined with the aim to involve the highest possible number of relevant CSR topics and give the issue a more wholesome perspective. It provides a basis for further comprehension and deeper analyses of specific CSR areas. The conditions determining the success of CSR in Romania have been defined in the paper on the basis of the previously cumulative knowledge as well as the results of various researches. This paper provides knowledge which may be useful in the programs promoting CSR.

  2. Corporate social responsibility and financial markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, Lammertjan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis examines the economics of corporate social responsibility, with an emphasis on the role of financial markets and institutions. Questions that are raised are: What does corporate social responsibility mean in an economic context? What is the impact of corporate social responsibility on

  3. Systematization of Instruments of Social and Economic Responsibility of Enterprises: Theoretical Aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dielini Maryna M.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is systematization of instruments for implementation of social and economic responsibility of enterprises in Ukraine and theoretical consideration of the presented instruments. The article studies basic views on instruments of social responsibility of business. It is determined which of them are more traditional, and which ones are the latest, that is up to date. Thus, the traditional ones include: philanthropy, charity, sponsorship, volunteering, patronship, monetary grants, equivalent financing. Based on the understanding of the nature of social and economic responsibility of business proposed by the author, to its instruments there can be attributed all traditional instruments, except for volunteering that does not imply obtaining funds for its activities and has only a social effect. There studied modern instruments of business social responsibility, such as social investments, socially responsible investments, social marketing, charity marketing, social programs, social entrepreneurship, social reporting and social expertise, fundraising, socially responsible approaches to doing business and supply chain management. All of them can be regarded as instruments of social and economic responsibility of business.

  4. Corporate social investment – good business and good revenue: The case of woolworths holdings ltd South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins C. Ngwakwe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined the relationship between corporate social investment and revenue in Woolworths Holdings Limited South Africa. The approach is thus a single case study, and financial data on social investment and revenue was retrieved from the Woolworths Holdings’ Good Business Journey report 2008 -2013 and from its annual report of 2002 - 2007. Using the SPSS statistics software, a correlation was sought between the Woolworths Holdings’ social investment expenditure and revenue, earnings per share and return on equity. Findings from the analysis revealed that, within the six years of Woolworths Holdings’ Good Business Journey, a significant positive relationship exists between Woolworths Holdings’ social investment and its revenue, earnings per share (EPS and return on equity (ROE. A further analysis of difference in means using the t-test statistics indicates that the revenue streams to Woolworths Holdings’ between 2008 – 2013 is significantly greater than the revenue streams in the six years before the Good Business Journey. In conclusion, the paper suggests a new research model, referred to in this research as the share holders’ support for corporate social investment model, and it is represented as: SHSSI = f (Rv+Es+Re+Of. The paper thus offers an agenda for further research to apply the above model to evaluate the degree of shareholders’ interest and support for corporate social investment in retailing and other companies

  5. Public administration social responsibility of business entities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. Shpankovskaya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Social responsibility of a business entity is seen as an effective tool of public administration. The current stage of development of social responsibility in Ukraine requires state involvement, as its vision by business entities are different, and there is also a need to develop a national model of social responsibility on the basis of international standards, because Ukraine, on the one hand, has the national characteristics of implementation of social initiatives and, on the other, the conditions and resources for their implementation is different from developed market economies. The visions of on social responsibility in the scientific literature are also different. This was the basis for the determination of her essence. We analyzed the interpretations of social responsibility and identified their advantages and disadvantages. Formulation of social responsibility, which is submitted in article, actualizes ecological orientation of the business entity taking into account the need for responsible behavior, and responsibility for actions, which violate the norms of society.

  6. Investment Strategies based on Social Responsibility and Bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.K. Günster (Nadja)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn contrast to the classical efficient market theory, the behavioral Finance literature acknowledges that people are neither rational utility maximizers nor able to process all available information. Instead, people tend to focus on the most salient aspects of their environment and

  7. The Drivers of Responsible Investment : The Case of European Pension Funds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sievanen, Riikka; Rita, Hannu; Scholtens, Bert

    We investigate what drives responsible investment of European pension funds. Pension funds are institutional investors who assure the income of part of the population for a long period of time. Increasingly, stakeholders hold pension funds accountable for the non-financial consequences of their

  8. Social polyandry, parental investment, sexual selection, and evolution of reduced female gamete size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Malte

    2004-01-01

    Sexual selection in the form of sperm competition is a major explanation for small size of male gametes. Can sexual selection in polyandrous species with reversed sex roles also lead to reduced female gamete size? Comparative studies show that egg size in birds tends to decrease as a lineage evolves social polyandry. Here, a quantitative genetic model predicts that female scrambles over mates lead to evolution of reduced female gamete size. Increased female mating success drives the evolution of smaller eggs, which take less time to produce, until balanced by lowered offspring survival. Mean egg size is usually reduced and polyandry increased by increasing sex ratio (male bias) and maximum possible number of mates. Polyandry also increases with the asynchrony (variance) in female breeding start. Opportunity for sexual selection increases with the maximum number of mates but decreases with increasing sex ratio. It is well known that parental investment can affect sexual selection. The model suggests that the influence is mutual: owing to a coevolutionary feedback loop, sexual selection in females also shapes initial parental investment by reducing egg size. Feedback between sexual selection and parental investment may be common.

  9. Social innovation in the context of corporate social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de Fátima León

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Faced with a reality characterized by unsolved social and environmental problems, it is common to observe the behavior of firms in terms of its contribution in the resolution or treatment of these problems. Many of these initiatives are examples of social innovations offering new products, processes and relationships in terms of benefiting the most disadvantaged groups in areas such as safety, health, education, environment, among others. In this sense, this documentary research examines the role of social innovation in the context of corporate social responsibility, through a review of theoretical topic of innovation, social innovation and corporate social responsibility. Also, through the filter of what can be considered social innovation, raises some examples of Venezuelan companies with socially responsible approaches moving toward maturity in a socially ethical enterprise.

  10. University crisis and social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Camilo dos Santos Filho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the repercussion of the recent crisis of the university on its mission and responsibility and, from this reflection, to propose ways for the consolidation of this responsibility. The three main crisis faced by the university  from the middle of the XXth century identified by Boaventura Souza Santos as crisis of hegemony, of legitimacy and institutional, constituted the framework of discussion of the problem of social responsibility of the university. Although true for the universities of the advanced countries, the loss of hegemony in the area of research still does not occur in Brazilian university. To overcome the crisis of legitimacy, the creation of advanced academic and professional training institutions for the cultivation of the intellectual and professional elite of the country, as well as of non university institutions of mass higher education for the cultural and technological formation of the youth is justified. To make possible the access to these institutions by discriminated socioeconomic segments of society, the adoption of the policy of affirmative action in the form of quotas is justified.  The overcoming of the institutional crisis will be achieved when the State respect the specificity of the universities and when the evaluation criteria of her functions be adequate to her specific nature and the titularity of the evaluation belong to the institutions themselves assuring the external evaluation by effective pairs and not by pairs coopted by the State.

  11. Corporate Social Responsibility in Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Sameer

    This doctoral dissertation examines the business-development relations in Afghanistan by focusing on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and other related practices from corporations in the Afghan mobile telecommunications industry. More concretely, the study aims to explore the characteristics...... provides a relevant empirical focus that can enrich the theoretical debates about CSR in developing countries. The study thereby stresses on the importance of context, and integrates both the societal and corporate dimensions to study CSR by corporations in the Afghan mobile telecommunications industry...... and drivers of the various CSR practices in the Afghan mobile telecommunications industry in order to critically assess the relationship between CSR and development in such context. The thesis highlights that the national context of Afghanistan in combination with the global mobile telecommunications industry...

  12. Corporate Social Responsibility in the Hospitality Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Singal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available With its large footprint in terms of employment and consumption of natural resources, the hospitality is often at the forefront of social responsibility practices. From environmental to social causes, brands must make sure that their corporate social responsibility practices are both genuine and align with business strategy.

  13. Pengaruh Dimensi Pengungkapan Corporate Social Responsibility Terhadap Future Institutional Ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizky Eriandani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Corporate social responsibility practice becomes important subject in company`s activity, because it will affect the company's reputation. Besides, institutional investors likely prefer to invest in companies that have a social responsibility as it is considered to increase the legitimacy and future performance. This study aims to investigate the effect of CSR disclosure on institutional ownership. We use percentages ownership to measure institutional ownership. CSR measurement instrument used in this study adopted a previous research. The instrument comes from research Hackston and Milne, which was adjusted with Bapepam regulation in Indonesia. We also divided CSR disclosures in four sub-dimensions. The samples used in this research were 115 listed agriculture, mining, and manufacturing companies in indonesian Stock Exchange which studied during the years of 2010. Using SPSS 20, The analysis methods of this research used multiple regression analysis. Studies shows that not all dimensions of CSR disclosure effect on institutional ownership. Only product dimensions of CSR disclosures has a significant positive impact on institutional ownership. However, this paper fail to find any significant impact of another CSR dimensions. Thus, our study suggests that the dimensions of the product can affect investment decisions. In contrast, institutional investors have not focused on environment, employee relation, and community activities in investment decisions.

  14. Corporate Social Responsibility: Why? ethical justification of corporate social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susy Caballero Jara

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mucho se ha discutido en el Perú sobre qué es la responsabilidad social empresarial (RSE ycómo se implementa. La pregunta de por qué, en cambio, no ha recibido similar interés. Esta esprecisamente la interrogante que el presente artículo busca responder: ¿Qué justifica la RSE?¿Por qué las empresas deben ser socialmente responsables?Tomando como punto de partida la clasificación en cuatro grandes teorías de responsabilidadsocial empresarial o corporativa propuesta por Garriga y Melé (2004, a saber, las teoríasinstrumentales, políticas, integradoras y éticas, se identifican rastros de las mismas en la literaturaperuana. De esta forma, se logra un panorama de las distintas justificaciones brindadas porlos autores peruanos. Posteriormente, se toma partido a favor de las teorías éticas de RSE, enparticular del subgrupo «teoría normativa de los grupos de interés» (stakeholder normativetheory, que ve a la RSE como ética aplicada a los negocios, exponiendo sus versiones utilitaristay deontológica, exposición que deja a esta última mejor posicionada. De esta manera, sepropone ir más allá de las justificaciones exclusivamente rentistas, según la cual el empresariodebe ser socialmente responsable porque le conviene, y considerar la deontología como lajustificación del por qué hacer RSE.

  15. Quick scan energy conservation investments in the social rental sector; Quick scan investeren in energiebesparing sociale huursector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-15

    Through a brief examination it is inventoried to what extent Dutch government policy affects the number of projects and investment with regard to energy conservation in the social rental sector. June 2013, a brief questionnaire was sent by email to contacts of the Energy Team of the Dutch 'Woonbond' (association of (potential) tenants) to gain insight into the present situation. This report presents the results [Dutch] Via een kort onderzoek is geinventariseerd in hoeverre het kabinetsbeleid invloed heeft op het aantal projecten en investeringen in energiebesparing in de sociale huursector. In juni is via een korte vragenlijst per email onder contacten van het Energieteam van de Nederlandse Woonbond bij woningcorporaties gepeild wat de situatie is. In deze rapportage worden de resultaten weergegeven.

  16. Connecting Corporate and Consumer Social Responsibility Through Social Media Activism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    To highlight aspects of activism obscured by a focus on legitimacy and ideology, this paper argues that shifting focus from legitimacy and ideology to identity, problem-solving & dialogue is needed to understand emerging forms of Social Media Native Activism that connect Consumer Social Responsib......To highlight aspects of activism obscured by a focus on legitimacy and ideology, this paper argues that shifting focus from legitimacy and ideology to identity, problem-solving & dialogue is needed to understand emerging forms of Social Media Native Activism that connect Consumer Social...... Responsibility (CnSR) and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). Taking this view as a basis for social activism offers a valuable perspective for understanding some emergent forms of social media activism towards business. Two cases of social media ‘native’ social activist organizations working to create...

  17. Social entrepreneurship as a form of social responsibility in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilieva-Koleva Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Social entrepreneurship is becoming a popular form of social responsibility and a way to solve a variety of urgent social problems. In order for a society to boost social entrepreneurship it needs a specific environment where such ideas can emerge and develop into an active business activity. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive literature review of the terms social responsibility and social entrepreneurship and to examine the current social entrepreneurship activities in Bulgaria. The analysis highlights the importance of social entrepreneurial ideas for improving the business climate in the country. A number of case studies are discussed to provide evidence of particular entrepreneurial activities which have successfully solved a number of social problems.

  18. The Cost-Effectiveness and Return-On-Investment of a Combined Social and Physical Environmental Intervention in Office Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, J. M.; Coffeng, J. K.; van Wier, M. F.; Boot, C. R. L.; Hendriksen, I. J. M.; van Mechelen, W.; Bongers, P. M.; van der Beek, A. J.; Bosmans, J. E.; van Tulder, M. W.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the cost-effectiveness and return-on-investment of a combined social and physical environmental worksite health promotion program compared with usual practice, and of both intervention conditions separately. Participants were randomized to the combined intervention (n = 92), social environmental intervention (n = 118), physical…

  19. Developing and Implementing a Social Media Program While Optimizing Return on Investment--An MBA Program Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilfoil, David M.; Aukers, Steven M.; Jobs, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, Web 2.0 has brought a wealth of opportunities for improving marketing effectiveness; social media platforms, in particular, have proven to be exceptional tools for realizing growth potential. The big question for businesses used to be how to measure and report financial return on investment (ROI) for social media ad spend to…

  20. corporate social responsibility and psychological contract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    2017-07-04

    Jul 4, 2017 ... KEYWORDS: Corporate social responsibilities, Psychological contract, Nigeria, Niger delta, ... The concept of Corporate Social ... CSR initiatives rather than mere financial ..... fundamental idea in such a contract (PC) is the.

  1. Corporations as social contractors : a study on corporate social responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Kalstad, Marius Aas

    2007-01-01

    This thesis takes up the issue of the role of business in today s society, in the form of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). The research question is: Do corporations/does business have responsibilities beyond maximising profit for owners? Social contract theory, as presented by Hobbes and Locke, is used to morally justify a corporate responsibility that goes beyond the traditional business responsibility of maximising profit for stolckholders. Further, the stakeholder model is proscribed...

  2. Social Responsibility of Hospitality Industry Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuray Türker

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study is to determine the views of employees and managers working at the hospitality industry in Safranbolu towards the social responsibility of tourism enterprises, social responsibility activities carried out by the hotel enterprises, and their views on the advantages and contributions of social responsibility projects to the hotel business. This study will make contributions to the related literature on social responsibility at the hospitality industry by means of identifying the social responsibility activities of hotel enterprises, of which there is relatively limited number of studies.Within this context, a structured survey was conducted with 152 respondents including employees, managers and owners of the hotel enterprises through face to face interviews in order to determine the perceptions of employees towards social responsibility. SPSS 15 for Windows was used to analyze the data. The research has found that the employees working at hospitality industry in Safranbolu are sensitive to the social responsibilities and they act socially responsible in their activities. Additionally the results show that the respondents behave socially responsible towards guests, society and natural environment, but that they are less responsible towards the suppliers.

  3. Model for Managing Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Vlastelica Bakić

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available As a crossfuncional process in the organization, effective management of corporate social responsibility requires a definition of strategies, programs and an action plan that structures this process from its initiation to the measurement of end effects. Academic literature on the topic of corporate social responsibility is mainly focused on the exploration of the business case for the concept, i.e., the determination of effects of social responsibility on individual aspects of the business. Scientific research so far has shown not to have been committed to formalizing management concept in this domain to a satisfactory extent; it is for this reason that this paper attempts to present one model for managing corporate social responsibility. The model represents a contribution to the theory and business practice of corporate social responsibility, as it offers a strategic framework for systematic planning, implementation and evaluation of socially responsible activities and programs.

  4. Mapping knowledge investments in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina: a new approach for assessing regulatory agency responses to environmental disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frickel, Scott; Campanella, Richard; Vincent, M. Bess

    2009-01-01

    In the aftermath of large-scale disasters, the public's dependency on federal and state agencies for information about public safety and environmental risk is acute. While formal rules and procedures are in place to guide policy decisions in environmental risk assessment of spatially concentrated hazards such as regulated waste sites or vacant city lots, standard procedures for risk assessment seem potentially less well-suited for urban-scale disaster zones where environmental hazards may be widely dispersed and widely varying. In this paper we offer a new approach for the social assessment of regulatory science in response to large-scale disaster, illustrating our methodology through a socio-spatial analysis of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) hazard assessment in New Orleans, Louisiana, following Hurricane Katrina in 2005. We find that the agency's commitment of epistemic resources or 'knowledge investments' varied considerably across the flood-impacted portion of the city, concentrating in poorer and disproportionately African American neighborhoods previously known to be heavily contaminated. We address some of the study's social and policy implications, noting the multidimensionality and interactive nature of knowledge investments and the prospects for deepening and extending this approach through comparative research

  5. The social return on investment in the energy efficiency of buildings in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuckshinrichs, Wilhelm; Kronenberg, Tobias; Hansen, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The German government has developed a variety of policy instruments intended to reduce national CO 2 emissions. These instruments include a programme administered by KfW bank, which aims at improving the energy efficiency of buildings. It provides attractive credit conditions or subsidies to finance refurbishment measures which improve the energy efficiency of buildings significantly. The refurbishment programme leads to a reduction in energy use, which benefits private investors by reducing their energy bills. In order to estimate whether the programme benefits society as a whole, additional effects must be taken into account, such as the amount of employment generated and the impact on the public budget. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the social benefits of the German CO 2 refurbishment programme for the years 2005-2007. An extended input-output model is used to estimate the effect of the refurbishment works on public revenue via taxes and social security contributions. The value of avoided CO 2 emissions is approximated using a range of marginal damage estimates from the literature. From these social benefits, the programme cost is deducted. The net social benefit thus computed turns out to be positive. This finding suggests that the refurbishment programme is a reasonable investment of public funds.

  6. Importance of the fund management company in the performance of socially responsible mutual funds

    OpenAIRE

    Belghitar, Yacine; Clark, Ephraim; Deshmukh, Nitin

    2017-01-01

    We compare the performance of a sample of U.K.-based socially responsible investment (SRI) funds with similar conventional funds using a matched-pair analysis based on size, age, investment universe, and fund management company (FMC). We find that both the SRI and conventional funds outperform the market index about 50% of the time, even after fees. Subsample tests show that the SRI funds in our sample perform better in the pre- and postfinancial crisis periods but underperform during the fin...

  7. Connecting Corporate and Consumer Social Responsibility Through Social Media Activism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    To highlight aspects of activism obscured by a focus on legitimacy and ideology, this paper argues that shifting focus from legitimacy and ideology to identity, problem-solving & dialogue is needed to understand emerging forms of Social Media Native Activism that connect Consumer Social...... Responsibility (CnSR) and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). Taking this view as a basis for social activism offers a valuable perspective for understanding some emergent forms of social media activism towards business. Two cases of social media ‘native’ social activist organizations working to create...... movements are examined from this problem solving & dialogue-based perspective—Carrotmob, and the Good Guide. These cases represent examples of a post-dialectic frame for understanding how social media can affect approaches to activism....

  8. Investigating the relationship between social responsibility and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigating the relationship between social responsibility and improving organizational commitment in employees of Tehran Ghavamin Bank with respect to the mediating role of psychological empowerment.

  9. SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY - (NOT A FAMILIAR CONCEPT FOR THE COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liljana Jonoski

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the success of any legal entity exceeds the limits that were laid almost two centuries ago when the company and its owners were interested only on the creation of profit and focused on climbing on the ladder of wealth and profitability. Achieving of these interests was beneficial only for few persons, most often represented in the persons of owners. Namely, taking into account social changes and environment in which corporations operate today, socially responsible operations, the inclusion of a social community, environmental concerns have become one of the general criteria without can not be evaluated the success of the company’s work. Just as important is the nature of ownership of capital assets with which operate the public enterprises (corporations of the same meaning is and the way of managing and its impact on the environment. Although almost unknown notion of corporate governance in the transition period of Macedonia, good and responsible corporate management nowadays is considered as an essential pre-condition for the creation of an attractive investment climate, which is characterized by competitive oriented companies and efficient financial markets where social responsible operations and the concept of social responsibility takes its significant place.

  10. INNOVATIVE APPROACHES TO RESEARCH METHODOLOGY OF SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN THE FIELD OF RISK MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Volokhova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper defines the role of insurance and risk management in corporate social responsibility. Analysed some of the social problems of certain sectors of the economy and the distribution of investments by insurance companies in a socially-oriented areas of the economy. The result of the analysis show that the problem of insurance and risk management should be directed to the development of innovative insurance products that would receive specific corporate social value by real locating investments. To better study on strategic risk - management must diversify and improve the traditionally accepted methodological tools. We consider the theory of positional feedback and corresponding IRT innovative model for analysis of complex, highly-defined characteristics of this sector. In order to determine a common objective evaluation system of corporate social responsibility for all companies emphasis on practical social benefits as measuring the effectiveness and success of socially responsible activities, the benefits that the company will receive from the decision of the social project. The proposed comprehensive system of indicators based insurance, which allows you to deepen the study of social responsibility in risk management strategies. The indicator system includes the following sections: 1. Navkolyshnye environment. 2. Local government (social security community. 3. Occupational Safety. 4. Internal corporate relations. 5. Equality. 6. Product Attributes. 7. Management. 8. The interest of business. 9. Liability business. 10. Socially responsible insurance. The comparative characteristic of the efficacy of social activity of companies and assess their socio-oriented activities for the previous ten years.

  11. Knowledge Mobilization, Collaboration, and Social Innovation: Leveraging Investments in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Nichols

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is a qualitative literature synthesis in the areas of community-campus collaborations, knowledge mobilization and social innovation. The article aims to be useful to people who work in academic settings, community organizations, public institutions, and government. The authors utilized a purposive sampling methodology to explore the following questions: 1. How can university-based knowledge mobilization leverage investments in higher education research and development (R&D through community-campus collaboration and social innovation? 2. What is the role of university-wide knowledge mobilization projects in supporting community-campus connections and ultimately social innovation strategies that contribute to the public good? Our review indicates considerable interplay between community-campus collaborations, knowledge mobilization and social innovation given that knowledge mobilization facilitates – and is facilitated by – collaboration. With sufficient knowledge mobilization, community-campus collaborations stimulate social innovation. The article concludes with recommendations based on our review of the literature.RÉSUMÉCet article se fonde sur une synthèse littéraire qualitative portant sur les collaborations communautaires/académiques, la mobilisation du savoir et l’innovation sociale. Il se veut utile pour toute personne travaillant dans un milieu académique, un organisme communautaire ou une institution publique. Les auteurs ont recours à une méthode d’échantillonnage raisonné pour répondre aux questions suivantes : 1. Comment la mobilisation du savoir universitaire – au moyen de la collaboration communautaire/académique et de l’innovation sociale – peut-elle faire augmenter les investissements en recherche et développement dans l’enseignement supérieur? 2. Comment les projets de mobilisation du savoir universitaire peuvent-ils resserrer les liens entre campus et communauté et, en fin de compte

  12. CHALLENGES OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    its reports on corporate (social) responsibility have helped to focus global attention on ... dimensions of sustainable development – corporate financial responsibility, ..... and that only locals must be employed in junior and intermediate cadre.

  13. Characterizing socially avoidant and affiliative responses to social exclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Elizabeth Powers

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Humans have a fundamental need for social relationships. From an evolutionary standpoint, the drive to form social connections may have evolved as an adaptive mechanism to promote survival, as group membership afforded the benefits of shared resources and security. Thus, rejection from social groups is especially detrimental, rendering the ability to detect threats to social relationships and respond in adaptive ways critical. Previous research indicates that social exclusion alters cognition and behavior in specific ways that may initially appear contradictory. That is, although some studies have found that exclusionary social threats lead to withdrawal from the surrounding social world, other studies indicate that social exclusion motivates affiliative social behavior. Here, we review the existing evidence supporting accounts of avoidant and affiliative responses, and highlight the conditions under which both categories of responses may be simultaneously employed. Then, we review the neuroimaging research implicating specific brain regions underlying the ability to detect and adaptively respond to threats of social exclusion. Collectively, these findings are suggestive of neural system highly attuned to social context and capable of motivating flexible behavioral responses.

  14. The Issue of Social Licence and Energy Utility Planning and Investment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal C. Moore

    2016-03-01

    critical for society. As well, confidence in the regulatory and policy process are vital for ensuring investment and appropriate, environmentally responsibility energy infrastructure facilities are available for all.

  15. Brief Report: Chimpanzee Social Responsiveness Scale (CSRS) Detects Individual Variation in Social Responsiveness for Captive Chimpanzees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faughn, Carley; Marrus, Natasha; Shuman, Jeremy; Ross, Stephen R.; Constantino, John N.; Pruett, John R., Jr.; Povinelli, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Comparative studies of social responsiveness, a core impairment in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), will enhance our understanding of typical and atypical social behavior. We previously reported a quantitative, cross-species (human-chimpanzee) social responsiveness measure, which included the development of the Chimpanzee Social Responsiveness…

  16. The Sociological Imagination and Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hironimus-Wendt, Robert J.; Wallace, Lora Ebert

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we maintain that sociologists should deliberately teach social responsibility as a means of fulfilling the promise that C. Wright Mills envisioned. A key aspect of the sociological imagination includes a sense of social responsibility, but that aspect is best learned through a combination of experience and academic knowledge.…

  17. Corporate Social Responsibility and Profit Maximizing Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Becchetti, Leonardo; Giallonardo, Luisa; Tessitore, Maria Elisabetta

    2005-01-01

    We examine the behavior of a profit maximizing monopolist in a horizontal differentiation model in which consumers differ in their degree of social responsibility (SR) and consumers SR is dynamically influenced by habit persistence. The model outlines parametric conditions under which (consumer driven) corporate social responsibility is an optimal choice compatible with profit maximizing behavior.

  18. Corporate Social Responsibility in banking sector

    OpenAIRE

    Lucie Kvasničková Stanislavská; K. Margarisová; K. Šťastná

    2012-01-01

    After popularity increase of the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility over last century in the USA, with the 21st century the concept comes into the European Union as well, actually into Czech Republic. For the European Union, the concept of social responsibility becomes one of the tool for achieving the most competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economy (Lisbon Strategy, 2000). With the start of the financial and economic crisis, the European Commission sees in the Corporate Social R...

  19. State of the social responsibility art

    OpenAIRE

    Varela López, Leidy Viviana; Universidad de San Buenaventura Cali.

    2015-01-01

    From the eighties, it has been addressing the issue of corporate social responsibility, specifically toward the defense of human rights and climate change. However, although they have applied corporate social responsibility principles in some of the existing institutions, it is still very small the work being done around the specific activity of solid waste management. Some works have been compiled to build a state of the art for understanding in depth the concept of corporate social responsi...

  20. Aberrant reward center response to partner reputation during a social exchange game in generalized social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripada, Chandra; Angstadt, Michael; Liberzon, Israel; McCabe, Kevin; Phan, K Luan

    2013-04-01

    Generalized social anxiety disorder (GSAD) is characterized by excessive fear of public scrutiny and reticence in social engagement. Previous studies have probed the neural basis of GSAD often using static, noninteractive stimuli (e.g., face photographs) and have identified dysfunction in fear circuitry. We sought to investigate brain-based dysfunction in GSAD during more real-world, dynamic social interactions, focusing on the role of reward-related regions that are implicated in social decision-making. Thirty-six healthy individuals (healthy control [HC]) and 36 individuals with GSAD underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning while participating in a behavioral economic game ("Trust Game") involving iterative exchanges with fictive partners who acquire differential reputations for reciprocity. We investigated brain responses to reciprocation of trust in one's social partner, and how these brain responses are modulated by partner reputation for repayment. In both HC and GSAD, receipt of reciprocity robustly engaged ventral striatum, a region implicated in reward. In HC, striatal responses to reciprocity were specific to partners who have consistently returned the investment ("cooperative partners"), and were absent for partners who lack a cooperative reputation. In GSAD, modulation of striatal responses by partner reputation was absent. Social anxiety severity predicted diminished responses to cooperative partners. These results suggest abnormalities in GSAD in reward-related striatal mechanisms that may be important for the initiation, valuation, and maintenance of cooperative social relationships. Moreover, this study demonstrates that dynamic, interactive task paradigms derived from economics can help illuminate novel mechanisms of pathology in psychiatric illnesses in which social dysfunction is a cardinal feature. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The importance of socially responsible strategic planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štrukelj, Tjaša

    2017-10-01

    This paper researches the importance of social responsible strategic planning regardless of the sector and shows research results on the case example of the selected tourism sector, which has economic and employment potential and social and environmental implications. Tourism sector is closely interdependent with transport sector and influences it. Therefore, the more we develop the tourism sector, the more the transport sector is developing as well. Based on Mulej’s Dialectical Systems Theory (DST) we found out that enterprises should integrate sustainability and social responsibility into their strategic planning if they want the Earth to survive. This urged the European Union, ISO International Standards Organization, many other organisations and many researchers. To make strategic planning socially responsible, enterprise’s governors should request social responsibility in business policy, which represents their governance guidelines and is implemented through the strategies set up by top managers and realised in the basic realisation process - their business operations.

  2. Body-Image Evaluation and Body-Image Investment among Adolescents: A Test of Sociocultural and Social Comparison Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Todd G.; Kalin, Rudolf; Morrison, Melanie A.

    2004-01-01

    Sociocultural theory and social comparison theory were used to account for variations in body-image evaluation and body-image investment among male and female adolescents (N = 1,543). Exposure to magazines and television programs containing idealistic body imagery as well as frequency of self-comparison to universalistic targets (e.g., fashion…

  3. The effect of social network site use on appearance investment and desire for cosmetic surgery among adolescent boys and girls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, D.A.; Peter, J.; Nikken, P.; de Graaf, H.

    2014-01-01

    Although adolescents frequently use social network sites, little is known about whether the highly visual and self-presentation-centered character of such sites affects body-related outcomes such as investment in appearance and appearance-changing strategies. Due to gender differences in appearance

  4. Deepening the Institutionalization of Service-Learning: The Added Value of Assessing the Social Return of Investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton-Nichols, Kathleen; Hatcher, Julie; Cecil, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Strategies to institutionalize service-learning are well documented (Furco 1996; Holland, 2000). Using Kecskes (2009) Community-Engaged Department Rubric we evaluated service-learning institutionalization within a school at a metropolitan campus. As a result, we propose adding an additional dimension, social return on investment. This added…

  5. The cost-effectiveness and return-on-investment of a combined social and physical environmental intervention in office employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, J M; Coffeng, J K; van Wier, M F; Boot, Cecile R. L.; Hendriksen, I.J.M.; van Mechelen, W.; Bongers, Paulien M.; Van Der Beek, Allard J.; Bosmans, J E; van Tulder, M W

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the cost-effectiveness and return-on-investment of a combined social and physical environmental worksite health promotion program compared with usual practice, and of both intervention conditions separately. Participants were randomized to the combined intervention (n = 92),

  6. INVESTMENTS IN SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AS THE FACTOR OF FORMATION OF QUALIFIED PERSONNEL IN THE AGRICULTURE SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menshikova M.A.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In paper the condition of a social infrastructure of a countryside is considered. The basic sources of investments into a social infrastructure of village development are revealed. Offers on financing this sphere for attraction and working in an agriculture sector by professionally prepared youth and the improving standards of living of Russia’s countryside citizens are made. "Development of agrarian and industrial complex" is proposed on entering additions into the priority national project.

  7. The Social Responsibility of Enterprises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosdahl, Anders

    . In the paper both common sense conceptions, sociological and economic perspectives are indicated. The conclusion is that the research program must take a social and labour market oriented conception as its point of departure and that both rational choice and cultural perspectives should be considered...... to explain enterprise behaviour....

  8. Sorting mutual funds with respect to process-oriented social responsibility: A FLOWSORT application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Verheyden

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We establish a robust FLOWSORT-based tool to sort mutual funds with respect to process-oriented social responsibility and recommend the use of limiting profiles with open classes. The tool provides an alternative for the limited dichotomous classification of funds, i.e. socially responsible investing (SRI versus conventional funds. By allowing for more heterogeneity in social responsibility the sorting tool is promising for scholars to improve fund performance measurements, and useful for governments to better regulate the supply of SRI products.

  9. Chimpanzee Social Responsiveness Scale (CSRS) Detects Individual Variation in Social Responsiveness for Captive Chimpanzees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faughn, Carley; Marrus, Natasha; Pruett, John R.; Shuman, Jeremy; Ross, Stephen R.; Constantino, John N.; Povinelli, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Comparative studies of social responsiveness, a core impairment in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), will enhance our understanding of typical and atypical social behavior. We previously reported a quantitative, cross-species (human–chimpanzee) social responsiveness measure, which included the development of the Chimpanzee Social Responsiveness Scale (CSRS). Here, we augment our prior CSRS sample with 25 zoo chimpanzees at three sites: combined N = 54. The CSRS demonstrated strong interrater reliability, and low-ranked chimpanzees, on average, displayed higher CSRS scores. The CSRS continues to discriminate variation in chimpanzee social responsiveness, and the association of higher scores with lower chimpanzee social standing has implications for the relationship between autistic traits and human social status. Continued comparative investigations of social responsiveness will enhance our understanding of underlying impairments in ASD, improve early diagnosis, and inform future therapies. PMID:25312279

  10. Corporate social responsibility in the mining industry: Criteria and indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vintro, Carla; Comajuncosa, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) includes economic, social and environmental aspects, and it has particular significance in mining. This paper explores the subject of CSR in the mining industry and the main synergies between CSR and environmental, safety and quality management systems, whose adoption has increased during recent decades. It proposes the establishment of a set of criteria for sustainability, ethics and human capital (to be called CSR criteria). Whilst various international bodies have proposed CSR guides and indicators (commonly used as references for Stock Market investments), there is evidence that the size of the company can act as a moderator factor to the adoption of those systems. The paper offers an easy-to-use CSR performance chart (composed of 31 indicators and a global index), intended as an internal measure for companies of CSR continuous improvement.

  11. Modeling of Social Effect of Foreign Direct Investment in The Regions of Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinara Zhaksylykovna Rakhmatullayeva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the authors estimated the social effect of foreign direct investments (FDI in the regions of Kazakhstan. In order to do it, the authors studied the dynamics of FDI of the region operating enterprises with foreign participation and the regional six indicators of socio-economic development during 2003-2013 on the basis of database of RK Agency on statistics. There are 16 regions of Kazakhstan were involved in the experiment (14 provinces and 2 cities of republican significant — Almaty and Astana. The research was carried out using the “simplified” version of the T. Saati’s Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP mathematical apparatus and MS Excel. The constructed economic-mathematical model of an assessment of FDI impact on the population welfare and living quality in the regions was hypothetical as the expert estimates of hypothetical expert were used. The authors made a hypothesis: to receive tools for an assessment of the social effect of FDI in the regions of Kazakhstan — the Rating of regional priority of the factors (RPF Rating. The RPF Rating allowed to define a priority of the factors of the population welfare and living quality in the regions of the country and to calculate aggregate social effect of FDI in Kazakhstan, having allocated the directions of its action on each of six factors in a regional section. The research did not reveal a negative impact of FDI on socio-economic development of the regions; moreover the aggregate social effect of FDI is positive for all regions of Kazakhstan. The authors believe that RPF Rating can become as the important tool of soundness of socio-economic policy in the area of development of public-private partnership in the regions of Kazakhstan, and also positive social effects of FDI growth in the long term — all of this will result in promoting a long-term positive impact on the welfare and living quality of the population of the republic.

  12. Corporate Social Responsability and Organization Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta CRISTACHE

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available At a time when the world is interested in phenomena such as, ecology, environment, food safety, ozone layer depletion, famine and their effects on social responsibility initiatives are becoming increasingly well received. Even if you can not give a real dimension of the concept of social responsibility-taking as any guarantee of success, an organization must be aware that there is only a tool for maximizing the value of image design, but an essential element of long-term success in direct connection with social and environmental performance of the community. To work is to highlight the link between corporate social responsibility strategies and success in solving organizational policies company issues under restrictive conditions imposed by nouile economic, social and political.

  13. The managerial social investment of ISAGEN: A participative focus for the environmental management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraldo Jaramillo, Marta Ines; Diaz Espinosa, Mauricio

    2002-01-01

    The principle of social and environmental responsibility of the companies is changing of purely philanthropic positions, to an focus in where the relationships between companies and communities begin to be considered as strategic for both, in the process of construction of one more feasible and including society. ISAGEN commits to this project by means of a social participating program, from which the characteristics, the criteria, the methodology, the advances for year 2001 and summary of profits, weaknesses and learning for the company, the communities and the institutions that participate in this process are presented

  14. Science and social responsibility in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed, Douglas L; McKeown, Robert E

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiologists and environmental health researchers have a joint responsibility to acquire scientific knowledge that matters to public health and to apply the knowledge gained in public health practice. We examine the nature and source of these social responsibilities, discuss a debate in the epidemiological literature on roles and responsibilities, and cite approaches to environmental justice as reflective of them. At one level, responsibility refers to accountability, as in being responsible for actions taken. A deeper meaning of responsibility corresponds to commitment to the pursuit and achievement of a valued end. Epidemiologists are committed to the scientific study of health and disease in human populations and to the application of scientific knowledge to improve the public's health. Responsibility is also closely linked to reliability. Responsible professionals reliably perform the tasks they set for themselves as well as the tasks society expects them to undertake. The defining axiom for our approach is that the health of the public is a social good we commit ourselves to pursue, thus assuming an obligation to contribute to its achievement. Epidemiologists cannot claim to be committed to public health as a social good and not accept the responsibility of ensuring that the knowledge gained in their roles as scientists is used to achieve that good. The social responsibilities of environmental health researchers are conspicuous in the environmental justice movement, for example, in community-based participatory research. Responsibility is an ethical concept particularly well suited to frame many key aspects of the ethics of our profession. PMID:14602514

  15. Corporate Social Responsibility in China Apparel Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao Linfei; Gu Qingliang

    2009-01-01

    China apparel industry, which is deeply embedded in the global production network (GPN), faces the dual pressures of social upgrading and economic upgrading. Based on the survey in Ningbo apparel cluster, the paper shows the state of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in China apparel industry is better than before. And the investigation indicates that the firms who practice CSR actively perform better both socially and economically than those who inactively. The resea...

  16. Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Enrico Cavalieri

    2007-01-01

    The ethics we find in companies contains the same elements as the ethics in the socio-economic context in which they operate. The aspirations and ethical levels of companies operating in certain countries differ substantially from those of companies operating in other areas, where the defence of the environment, social welfare, human rights, cooperation, assistance are expected and offered to a lower degree, or are not requested or protected at all. The new globalised, networked economy, base...

  17. Rhetoric and realities of corporate social responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smid, H.

    2014-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is often considered as an alternative for direct government regulation to internalize externalities on markets. Especially in a complex economically liberated and globalized world order, in which direct government regulation and centrally creating new markets

  18. Social Responsibility as a Management Control System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barger, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    In this report, the authors examine how businesses with social responsibility as part of their core strategy use related management control systems within the business strategy control model set forth...

  19. Social Responsibility as a Management Control System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barger, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    ...) to balance business strategy. The authors examine how management control systems for social responsibility apply to each control lever both in theory and through the application of case examples...

  20. Corporate Governance & Social Responsibility: : Challenges Regarding Accountability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    drs. Ewoud Jansen

    2012-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility affects Corporate Governance as it stretches the accountability of companies beyond its traditional boundaries. This however may conflict with the corporate objective of maximizing stockholder wealth. The paper provides an overview of various academic theories and

  1. Corporate Social Responsibility Agreements Model for Community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    2016-06-01

    Jun 1, 2016 ... aspect of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), to the extent that often .... intentions and implemented some community development projects, the .... Environmental Protection Agency, Police and civil society to solicit their ...

  2. Responsible Belief and Our Social Institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woudenberg, R.

    2009-01-01

    The idea that we can properly be held responsible for what we believe underlies large stretches of our social and institutional life; without that idea in place, social and institutional life would be unthinkable, and more importantly, it would stumble and fall. At the same time, philosophers have

  3. Motives of Socially Responsible Business Conduct

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafland, J.J.; Kaptein, M.; Mazereeuw V/d Duijn Schouten, C.

    2010-01-01

    The social and ecological challenges that governments face have raised their interest in socially responsible business conduct (SRBC). In this article we analyze the motives of executives to perform SRBC. We distinguish three types of motives: financial, ethical and altruistic motives. We test the

  4. From Management Systems to Corporate Social Responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    At the start of the 21st century, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) seems to have great potential for innovating business practices with a positive impact on People, Planet and Profit. In this article the differences between the management systems approach of the nineties, and Corporate Social

  5. Corporate Social Responsibility and Shareholder Proposals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eding, Erwin; Scholtens, Bert

    2017-01-01

    We study how corporate social responsibility relates to investors, firms, and shareholder proposals. We examine shareholder proposals on environmental, social, and governance issues at the annual general meeting of shareholders with US Fortune 250 firms during 2011-2014. We find that the probability

  6. Corporate Social Responsibility and Shareholder Proposals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eding, Erwin; Scholtens, Bert

    We study how corporate social responsibility relates to investors, firms, and shareholder proposals. We examine shareholder proposals on environmental, social, and governance issues at the annual general meeting of shareholders with US Fortune 250 firms during 2011-2014. We find that the probability

  7. Purchasing social responsibility : a conceptual study

    OpenAIRE

    Mørk, Eirik; Solheim, Kristian Hauge

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on Purchasing Social Responsibility (PSR). Suppliers play an important role in the overall corporate social responsibility (CSR) efforts of the purchasing firm. The purpose of this paper is to explore potential firm performance effects from PSR, which contributes to an area of research that is limited at this point. The aim is to develop a survey instrument based on a set of formulated hypotheses and a conceptual framework. These are grounded in a literature review of core ...

  8. Using corporate social responsibility to enhance value.

    OpenAIRE

    Taiwo, Waheed

    2012-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become an important focus in today’s society due to reasons ranging from the new consciousness of people’s impact on the planet to how companies’ excessive pursuit of profit has led to the increased negative impact on people and the environment. As a result of this awareness, companies’ actions are being scrutinised like never before. Even though corporate social responsibility is not a new concept, it has evolved and is known under many different ...

  9. Human Resource Management and Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Bujor Anca Liliana

    2012-01-01

    The current context of economic development, the transformations that are subject to national and international organizations impose their traditional attitude change in relation to results and performance of current activity. In this context, the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) aims to achieve economic success in an ethical manner with respect for people, communities and environment. This article analyses the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility in relation to Human Resources (HR...

  10. Board Directors and Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Nedelcu (Bunea

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The boards of directors and corporate social responsibility (CSR have been the subject of much study and debate in the corporate governance circles over the two last decades. With issues ranging from poor corporate reporting to excessive executive compensation often splashed in the headlines, the role of boards comes into the media limelight as never before. Boards of directors are also becoming increasingly aware of corporate social responsibility issues.

  11. Board Directors and Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Nedelcu (Bunea)

    2014-01-01

    The boards of directors and corporate social responsibility (CSR) have been the subject of much study and debate in the corporate governance circles over the two last decades. With issues ranging from poor corporate reporting to excessive executive compensation often splashed in the headlines, the role of boards comes into the media limelight as never before. Boards of directors are also becoming increasingly aware of corporate social responsibility issues.

  12. Proměny Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Knížová, Kristýna

    2014-01-01

    In 1953, Howard R. Bowen gave rise to the debate on social responsibility, and since then it has become very widespread. The concept of Corporate Social Responsibility gained a lot of forms during the second half of the twentieth century and from the university campuses got into practice and also into the Czech Republic. On the background of changing theoretical approaches toward CSR we can see changes of business environment - especially in the change of the conceptualization of the enterpri...

  13. Economics, Corporate Sustainability and Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Tisdell, Clement A.

    2008-01-01

    It is often argued that corporate sustainability requires a corporation to make a profit, to act in a socially responsible manner and to engage in policies that are environmentally sustainable. This is sometimes called the corporation’s triple bottom line. In this paper it is argued that in practice profitability or more general maintaining economic variability constitutes a corporation’s bottom line and that it is limited by this consideration in showing social responsibility and in acting w...

  14. Business Ontology for Evaluating Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Ion Smeureanu; Andreea Dioşteanu; Camelia Delcea; Liviu Cotfas

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a software solution that is developed to automatically classify companies by taking into account their level of social responsibility. The application is based on ontologies and on intelligent agents. In order to obtain the data needed to evaluate companies, we developed a web crawling module that analyzes the company’s website and the documents that are available online such as social responsibility report, mission statement, employment structure, etc. Based on a predefin...

  15. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY: OPTIONAL OR REGULATORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHAELA IRINA IONESCU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Given the collateral activity developed and the economic background of the present author I took the approach of a topic that includes aspects from both fields, namely “Corporate Social responsibility- optional or regulatory”. Through the paper I will try to summarize the pros and cons of regulation, mandatory of corporate social responsibility and to review, present the ways in which countries with advanced economies in European Union and the EU itself have addressed this issue.

  16. Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Social Innovation: A Conceptual Understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jali Muhamad Nizam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In decades, various organizations worldwide engaged with Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR in order to show their corporate commitments and responsibilities towards societies at large. These commitments and responsibilities are coming from monetary and non-monetary resources for example cash, equipment’s and human resources whom are used for social purposes and activities that leads to a betterment of society and also to improved organization reputation. However, in today’s knowledge and innovation led economy, organizations can no longer affords to get involve in charity and community services merely to fulfil social return without having any sort of economic payoffs. This situation warrants organizations moving beyond CSR to Corporate Social Innovation. This paper explores conceptual understanding between CSR and Corporate Social Innovation. CSR is a traditional philanthropy and old paradigm which is somewhat no longer sufficient in coping with current economic situation. Hence, this paper provides an insight and suggests that corporate social innovation as an emergence new paradigm that perhaps could provide a comprehensive representation in the era of knowledge and innovation led economy that will leads to real change in improving the well-being of people’s life, enhance economic and technological growth. Furthermore, this paper also highlighted knowledge resource is the most significant resource of Corporate Social Innovation.

  17. Corporate Social Responsibility in banking sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Kvasničková Stanislavská

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available After popularity increase of the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility over last century in the USA, with the 21st century the concept comes into the European Union as well, actually into Czech Republic. For the European Union, the concept of social responsibility becomes one of the tool for achieving the most competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economy (Lisbon Strategy, 2000. With the start of the financial and economic crisis, the European Commission sees in the Corporate Social Responsibility a way how to cope with the crisis. Also scientific studies (Ghoul, 2011; Gruz, 2009 indicate the positive influence of Corporate Social Responsibility on financial performance of the company. In the Czech Republic, the implementation of the concept is especially for multinational corporations. For example, Corporate Social Responsibility is very popular in financial sector, which the financial crisis did not damage so perceptible as in other countries of developed economies (Singer, 2009. This article defines on a theoretical level the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility, its development, its present form and the influence on financial performance of the company. Another part of the article focuses on three czech banking subjects (Česká spořitelna, Komerční banka a Československá obchodní banka, which regularly take the leading positions of the official corporate donors chart „TOP Filantrop“. The article explores the evolution of corporate donations and finds the connection between corporate donations and corporate profit and financial and economic crisis.

  18. Social Responsibility and Commitment in Management Institutes: Mediation by Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Gupta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to its major influence on individual’s performance, engagement is increasingly becoming popular among practitioners. While its influence on performance has been well established, research on the influence of variables related to organizations on engagement is still in its nascent stage. Therefore, this study examines the mediating role of employee engagement in the corporate social responsibility (CSR – organizational commitment relationship. Multiple regression results using responses from 150 academics working in Indian management institutes predominantly owned by business groups partially support the relationships hypothesized. The findings may encourage Indian management institutes owned by business groups to consider CSR in teaching and research as serious investment areas in order to have a more engaged and committed workforce.

  19. Social Development Needs Analysis as a tool for SIA to guide corporate-community investment: Applications in the minerals industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, Ana Maria; Vanclay, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Mining companies are faced with growing societal demands that a sufficient portion of the benefits from mining should flow to local communities to ensure they are adequately compensated for the negative social impacts they experience. This paper considers how a more equitable benefit distribution system can be achieved through voluntary initiatives, recognising companies as potential agents for social development through the provision of improved services and infrastructure, capacity-building, employment and local economic development initiatives. Social Development Needs Analysis is introduced as an enhancement to participatory Social Impact Assessment methods to give practical guidance to site managers in evaluating community investment alternatives. Social Development Needs Analysis aims to identify the priority social issues that need to be addressed in order for a company to contribute to a net positive impact in the community while building assets for the business

  20. Formation of Social Competencies and Socially Responsible Thinking of Students

    OpenAIRE

    Belousov, Artyom; Redko, Lyudmila Anatolevna; Tichonova, Evgeniya; Yanushevskaya, Marina Nikolaevna

    2017-01-01

    The research is focused on the preparation of undergraduate students enrolled in the quality management program in Tomsk Polytechnic University. The subject of the research is organizational and pedagogical conditions necessary for the formation of social competencies and socially responsible thinking in future undergraduate students enrolled in the quality management program. The research aims to identify and present the theoretical basis for organizational and pedagogical conditions to form...

  1. Does it pay to be social responsible? Portuguese SMEs feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Fonseca

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The research on corporate social responsibility has been focused mainly on Anglo-Saxon countries and big companies. Most scholars agree there is a positive relationship between companies social and economic performance, however, this is not unanimous. Moreover, during economic downturns, companies struggle for survival and might consider corporate social responsibility efforts should be postponed. This research investigates if there is a positive relationship between social performance and key business results using a large sample of small and medium Portuguese companies over an extended period of time. Design/methodology/approach: The investigation is made by using survey responses from a sample of 2.222 small and medium companies (SMEs over a 10 year period, from the Portuguese IAPMEI – Public Agency for Competitiveness and Innovation Benchmarking and Good Practices database. The hypothesis that there is a positive relationship between social and key business results performance was tested with correlation analysis and was complemented with semi-structured interviews of key Portuguese Sustainability Managers. Findings: The research results support the existence of valid positive relationships between companies’ social performance and key business results, confirming it does pay to invest in corporate social responsibility even in less favorable economic scenarios and for small and medium companies across all business sectors. Research limitations/implications: It was not possible to use more powerful statistical methods such as Partial Least Squares (PLS or Structural Equation Modelling (SEM due to data constraints and more qualitative research should be done to triangulate the results and better understating of the cause and effect relationships. Practical implications: Both managers and academics should be aware of the relevance of corporate social responsibility to assure companies enduring success and create benefits for

  2. Corporate social responsibility as an agent for social change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justenlund, Anders; Rebelo, Sofia

    level employees (middle management/employees) go through when working according to CSR-principles, based on social motives and behaviour. A hermeneutical paradigm is applied to the understanding of human (inter-) action in relation to understand a phenomenon as CSR and motives for social change....... It is suggested that the process of positive social change is divided into four phases, which to a point can be compared to The Human Learning Process by Stuart Dreyfus. Another aspect of this paper is also to create a bottom-up approach to the implementation of CSR-principles as the majority of CSR literature......The intention of this paper is to provide a specific understanding of corporate social responsibility with a particular focus in social issues in relation to human resource development. The understanding of CSR is used to create a theoretical analytical framework that should provide researchers...

  3. Theoretical Foundations of Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The article’s objective is to reveal theoretical foundations of corporate social responsibility. It is argued that the financial crisis and its implications for the global economy have demonstrated once and again that stability of the global market is conditional on the responsible behavior, models of balanced business operation, active management, impact of business (companies on the social life, and regulatory framework. The global corporate social responsibility depends on problems associated with change in the global climate and deepened social inequality. The demand for social policy is tremendous at global and sectoral level. Business needs to be engaged in social issues because a new global social contract between business, government and society is required to ensure long-term stabilization and reproduction of wealth. It has become even more obvious at corporate level. It is shown that the notion of “social” has many meanings, but in the legal context it means the need to account, apart from the literary meaning of this norm, for the social context in which this norm operates. The notion “social” is synonymous to society, referring to not only business operation target but also to the responsibility of a businessman. It is demonstrated that the corporate social responsibility will work effectively and help achieve the organizations’ objectives if it has the parameters of an open system interacting with the environment. At the same time, it should be remembered that in keeping with the system characteristic of modern management theories addressing a company as a homogenous and target-oriented system all the internal processes occurring in one component of this system will have effects for its other components.

  4. Intensified neuronal investment in the processing of chemosensory anxiety signals in non-socially anxious and socially anxious individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina M Pause

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability to communicate anxiety through chemosensory signals has been documented in humans by behavioral, perceptual and brain imaging studies. Here, we investigate in a time-sensitive manner how chemosensory anxiety signals, donated by humans awaiting an academic examination, are processed by the human brain, by analyzing chemosensory event-related potentials (CSERPs, 64-channel recording with current source density analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the first study cerebral stimulus processing was recorded from 28 non-socially anxious participants and in the second study from 16 socially anxious individuals. Each individual participated in two sessions, smelling sweat samples donated from either female or male donors (88 sessions; balanced session order. Most of the participants of both studies were unable to detect the stimuli olfactorily. In non-socially anxious females, CSERPs demonstrate an increased magnitude of the P3 component in response to chemosensory anxiety signals. The source of this P3 activity was allocated to medial frontal brain areas. In socially anxious females chemosensory anxiety signals require more neuronal resources during early pre-attentive stimulus processing (N1. The neocortical sources of this activity were located within medial and lateral frontal brain areas. In general, the event-related neuronal brain activity in males was much weaker than in females. However, socially anxious males processed chemosensory anxiety signals earlier (N1 latency than the control stimuli collected during an ergometer training. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It is concluded that the processing of chemosensory anxiety signals requires enhanced neuronal energy. Socially anxious individuals show an early processing bias towards social fear signals, resulting in a repression of late attentional stimulus processing.

  5. The Relationship between Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Financial Performance – Evidence from Empirical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikołajek-Gocejna Magdalena

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Socially responsible investment (SRI has experienced strong growth in recent years. In 2012, $1 out of every $9 US assets under professional management was invested in some form of sustainable investment.1 Global sustainable investment assets have expanded dramatically, rising from $13.3 trillion at the outset of 2012 to reach a total of $21.4 trillion at the start of 2014. Most of the SRI assets are in Europe (63.7 percent, but the relative contribution of the United States has increased from 28.2 percent in 2012 to 30.8 percent in 2014, and over this two-year period, the fastest growing region has been the United States, followed by Canada and Europe. These three regions are also the largest regions in terms of assets, accounting for 99 percent of global SRI.2

  6. The Role of Social Responsibility in Big Business Practics

    OpenAIRE

    V A Gurinov

    2010-01-01

    The study of corporate social responsibility has become especially relevant in national science in the context of the development of big business able to assume significant social responsibilities. The article focuses on the issues of the nature and specificity of social responsibility of big business in Russia. The levels of social responsibility and the arrangements for social programmes implementation are also highlighted.

  7. The conceptual model of organization social responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    LUO, Lan; WEI, Jingfu

    2014-01-01

    With the developing of the research of CSR, people more and more deeply noticethat the corporate should take responsibility. Whether other organizations besides corporatesshould not take responsibilities beyond their field? This paper puts forward theconcept of organization social responsibility on the basis of the concept of corporate socialresponsibility and other theories. And the conceptual models are built based on theconception, introducing the OSR from three angles: the types of organi...

  8. Corporate social responsibility initiatives addressing social exclusion in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Wendy J

    2009-08-01

    The private sector is often seen as a driver of exclusionary processes rather than a partner in improving the health and welfare of socially-excluded populations. However, private-sector initiatives and partnerships- collectively labelled corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives-may be able to positively impact social status, earning potential, and access to services and resources for socially-excluded populations. This paper presents case studies of CSR projects in Bangladesh that are designed to reduce social exclusion among marginalized populations and explores whether CSR initiatives can increase economic and social capabilities to reduce exclusion. The examples provide snapshots of projects that (a) increase job-skills and employment opportunities for women, disabled women, and rehabilitated drug-users and (b) provide healthcare services to female workers and their communities. The CSR case studies cover a limited number of people but characteristics and practices replicable and scaleable across different industries, countries, and populations are identified. Common success factors from the case studies form the basis for recommendations to design and implement more CSR initiatives targeting socially-excluded groups. The analysis found that CSR has potential for positive and lasting impact on developing countries, especifically on socially-excluded populations. However, there is a need for additional monitoring and critical evaluation.

  9. Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives Addressing Social Exclusion in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The private sector is often seen as a driver of exclusionary processes rather than a partner in improving the health and welfare of socially-excluded populations. However, private-sector initiatives and partnerships—collectively labelled corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives—may be able to positively impact social status, earning potential, and access to services and resources for socially-excluded populations. This paper presents case studies of CSR projects in Bangladesh that are designed to reduce social exclusion among marginalized populations and explores whether CSR initiatives can increase economic and social capabilities to reduce exclusion. The examples provide snapshots of projects that (a) increase job-skills and employment opportunities for women, disabled women, and rehabilitated drug-users and (b) provide healthcare services to female workers and their communities. The CSR case studies cover a limited number of people but characteristics and practices replicable and scaleable across different industries, countries, and populations are identified. Common success factors from the case studies form the basis for recommendations to design and implement more CSR initiatives targeting socially-excluded groups. The analysis found that CSR has potential for positive and lasting impact on developing countries, especifically on socially-excluded populations. However, there is a need for additional monitoring and critical evaluation. PMID:19761088

  10. Stock Performance of Socially Responsible Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Tzu-Man

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Every year Corporate Responsibility Magazine selects and ranks 100 companies on the basis of their corporate social responsibility. This study investigates the stock performance of socially responsible companies in the U.S. The monthly stock returns for these companies are analyzed and compared with the market performance, with the S&P 500 index designated as a proxy for the market. The empirical evidence suggests that these 100 companies outperform the market in their monthly stock returns. We also narrow down the number of companies selected to the top 75, 50, 25, and 10 firms. As we narrow down the companies selected, the difference between their returns and the market returns also narrows. In other words, a portfolio that includes all top 100 companies provides the best stock performance. We extend the analysis to long-term annual stock performance. We find that these socially responsible companies′ annual returns are higher than the market returns for up to seven years after they are listed. We also conduct the same analysis on the top 75, 50, 25, and 10 firms, respectively. Similarly, the larger the number of these top 100 companies, the greater the tendency to generate higher annual returns. We suspect that because the difference between the socially responsible companies′ average returns and the market returns is not dramatic, with a bigger population and thus a larger sample size, the difference becomes more significant. However, in practice, transaction costs must be considered. This study is limited in that it does not consider transaction costs. Nevertheless, we hope to shed some light on the issue of socially responsible companies′ stock performance to encourage companies to start thinking about the importance of corporate social responsibility.

  11. Retro-Innovation and Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loucanova Erika

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the retro-innovation and their importance to corporate social responsibility (CSR. Corporate social responsibility is a process with the aim to encourage a positive impact through activities on the environment, consumers, employees, communities, and all other stakeholders of the public sphere. The accelerated rate of technological and social change influences on the society. The main social problems are symptoms of future shock. Retro-innovation trend is emerging against an accelerating backdrop of “datafication”. New products are designed to connect customers with the past in ways that are nostalgic, interactive and environmental. CSR thanks to the retroinnovation encourages has a positive impact on the all stakeholders and eliminates the future shock.

  12. The ethics of corporate social responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Stanley M; Vernillo, Anthony T

    2014-01-01

    Corporations as well as individual professionals have an ethical obligation to help those in need. There is a sound tradition in American business for companies including social outreach as part of business strategy. This approach works best when corporations and community and professional experts work in partnership. Henry Schein's Corporate Social Responsibility program contributes expertise, logistics, connections, and funds to these partnerships in the United States and worldwide.

  13. Cetacean Social Behavioral Response to Sonar Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    likely a social response which anticipates against potential loss of social cohesion, which may be induced by masking of their communication signals...Discrimination of fast click series produced by Risso’s dolphins for echolocation or communication . Wensveen P. et al (in review). The effectiveness of ramp...up of naval sonar to reduce sound levels received by marine mammals : experimental tests with humpback whales. Kvadsheim et al. (2015). The 3S2

  14. The concept of corporate social responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Lebano, A.

    2010-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR), or the idea that companies should combine economic, social and environmental concerns, seems an unavoidable component of discourses on business and society. Why is this the case? Is it because we are in a post neoliberal era, and in an economic crisis, that we are acknowledging the drawbacks of unrestrained business activity? Or is the opposite true, and the popularity of CSR is the product of the triumph of neoliberal ideology? Both views can be support...

  15. Economic Perspectives on Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    KITZMUELLER, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Defense date: 16/04/2010 Examining Board: Professor Pascal Courty, University of Victoria, Canada, Supervisor Professor Luigi Guiso, EUI Professor Franklin Allen, University of Pennsylvania Professor Benjamin Lockwood, University of Warwick What is Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and how can we explain the phenomenon from an economic perspective? Is there a business case for CSR and was Milton Friedman right when writing in the New York Times in 1970 that "the social r...

  16. University Knowledge Transfer Offices and Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Martín-Rubio

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies and reviews about University Knowledge Transfer Offices (UKTO have been written, but there are few that focus on Social Responsibility (SR. We present a systematic review of the research on both fields. We consider not only logics from agency theory and resource-based view, but also the dynamic approach from institutional theory, as they aim to generate sustainable economic and social value. The evolution of Knowledge Transfer Offices depends on their role as brokers of collaborations among different stakeholders, according to their mission and capacity to confront the innovation gap. We follow the line of SR viewed as a response to the specific demands of large stakeholders. Building upon recent conceptualizations of different theories, we develop an integrative model for understanding the institutional effects of the UKTO on university social responsibility.

  17. Corporate social responsibility audit: Theoretical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artem Koldovskyi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper puts a conceptual framework to outline research for corporate social responsibility (CSR audit based on the analysis of current CRS literature and audit models as implementation of CSR. It is intended to make clear the phenomena about the relationship between audit, implementation of business ethics principles and corporate governance. However, most studies do not take into account modify CSR audit. This paper reports part of a research we carried out on the theoretical interpretation of the corporate social responsibility audit. This paper examines the corporate social responsibility audit as a composition of four categories - management system audits, on-site audits, verbal probability expressions (VPE audits and technology audits. The paper concludes suggests to systematize multiple audits so that they can be conduct in three types of audits - environmental management audits covering in-house companies, environmental technology audits of products, and environmental audits of sites, including non-manufacturing sites and non-consolidated subsidiaries.

  18. The business case for corporate social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlastelica-Bakić Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to generating economic growth and competitiveness, modern society expects from companies active contribution to sustainable development of economy and society, as well as preservation of the environment. Corporate social responsibility as a business philosophy aims at achieving long-term benefits for the company and the society in which it operates. Although the concept of corporate social responsibility has already been accepted in both theory and practice, the goal of this paper is to underline the arguments and benefits of introducing the concept in business community. The paper presents the business case for corporate social responsibility through the presentation of the impact on the financial performance of the company, consumer behavior and ultimately on its reputation.

  19. The Social Responsibility Performance Outcomes Model: Building Socially Responsible Companies through Performance Improvement Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Tim

    2000-01-01

    Considers the role of performance improvement professionals and human resources development professionals in helping organizations realize the ethical and financial power of corporate social responsibility. Explains the social responsibility performance outcomes model, which incorporates the concepts of societal needs and outcomes. (LRW)

  20. Using cost-benefit analysis and social return on investment to evaluate the impact of social enterprise: Promises, implementation, and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Joseph J

    2017-10-01

    Since the early 2000's there has been growing interest in using the Social Return on Investment (SROI) as a measure for assessing the performance of social enterprises. By analogy with its business counterpart, the Return on Investment (ROI), the SROI is a metric that compares the monetized social costs of a program with the monetized social benefits of achieving an outcome (or set of outcomes). For example, calculating the SROI of a nonprofit half-way house for drug addicts might involve estimating the reduced social costs attributable to successful rehabilitation of addicts, and comparing this to the social costs of operating the half-way house. Alternatively, the total return of a for-profit social enterprise providing affordable housing might consist both of the traditional private return on investment along with the economic value of meeting the housing needs of lower income households. Early descriptions of the methodology for calculating the SROI suggest that the approach initially evolved from standard methodologies found in the business finance literature for evaluating investments, with the important twist that nonprofit sector returns/payoffs are defined in broader social terms (Thornley, Anderson, & Dixon, 2016). Yet, someone who is familiar with the economic literature on cost benefit analysis (CBA) as it is applied to the evaluation of public programs cannot help but be struck by the similarity between the outcomes that CBA is intended to measure, and those that are the object of efforts to calculate the SROI. One implication is that the literature on the theory and practice of cost benefit analysis offers useful lessons about how to measure the social return on investment, as well as about potential caveats and limitations that need to be confronted when attempting to undertake an analysis of the SROI. The paper discusses the potential uses and limitations of CBA and SROI as tools that governments, private donor/investors, and foundations can use to

  1. Socially responsible marketing decisions - scale development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Lončarić

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to develop a measurement scale for evaluating the implementation level of the concept of social responsibility in taking marketing decisions, in accordance with a paradigm of the quality-of-life marketing. A new scale of "socially responsible marketing decisions" has been formed and its content validity, reliability and dimensionality have been analyzed. The scale has been tested on a sample of the most successful Croatian firms. The research results lead us to conclude that the scale has satisfactory psychometric characteristics but that it is necessary to improve it by generating new items and by testing it on a greater number of samples.

  2. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY VERSUS TAX AVOIDANCE PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoian Ciprian-Dumitru

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide crisis has made multinational companies that are engaged in corporate social responsibility actions to manage their businesses through the lens of various tax avoidance practices. The content of this paper is important due to the fact that tries to identify the impact in case of companies active in corporate social responsibility actions versus their tax structures orientation. Corporate social responsibility literature did not paid enough attention on the impact of the tax avoidance practices of companies. Tax, as a concept, brings in itself an important corporate financial impact with subsequent effects for the life of multiple citizens in countries where private entities are operating. Even though companies are usually expressing their ethical and responsible conduct in respect of the social environment, there are many cases when the business practices were not aligned with the declared corporate behavior. This paper seeks firstly to examine whether companies engaged in tax avoidance practices (ex. offshore tax havens consider that continue to act socially responsible. Secondly, the paper examines the influence on attending the stakeholders’ goals for those companies practicing tax avoidance and its implications on corporate social responsibility actions. Moreover, the paper focuses also on the aspects described before from the perspective of the corporate entities operating in Romania. This paper’s intention is to use and to develop the results of previous research carried out by Lutz Preus (University of London and, subsequently, by Senators Levin, Coleman and Obama in their “Stop Tax Haven Abuse Bill”. The implications and the objectives of this material are to highlight, to identify and to spot clearly the relations and the influences of the tax haven practices of corporations versus their undertaken social responsibility actions. Moreover, this paper brings a fresh perspective of this topic from the

  3. Online Privacy as a Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pollach, Irene

    2011-01-01

    Information technology and the Internet have added a new stakeholder concern to the corporate social responsibility agenda: online privacy. While theory suggests that online privacy is a corporate social responsibility, only very few studies in the business ethics literature have connected...... of the companies have comprehensive privacy programs, although more than half of them voice moral or relational motives for addressing online privacy. The privacy measures they have taken are primarily compliance measures, while measures that stimulate a stakeholder dialogue are rare. Overall, a wide variety...

  4. THE CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN OLTENIA REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Schiopoiu BURLEA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Being confronted with a series of technological, economic and socialproblems in the context of the market economy, the Romanian enterpriseshave come to be aware of the necessity of personalizing the managementpractices for the human resources, the social responsibility and the socialaudit in spite of the fact that there are some clear regulations in theRomanian legislation. The study enabled the evaluation of the impact ofpromoting the Social Responsibility on the competitiveness of the companiesfrom four large activity sectors from the Oltenia Region: automobile,petroleum sector, construction materials, production and transport of electricenergy

  5. Responsibility for health: personal, social, and environmental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, D B

    2007-08-01

    Most of the discussion in bioethics and health policy concerning social responsibility for health has focused on society's obligation to provide access to healthcare. While ensuring access to healthcare is an important social responsibility, societies can promote health in many other ways, such as through sanitation, pollution control, food and drug safety, health education, disease surveillance, urban planning and occupational health. Greater attention should be paid to strategies for health promotion other than access to healthcare, such as environmental and public health and health research.

  6. Turning round the tanker: oil companies and corporate social responsibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn-English, Teresa

    1999-01-01

    This article focuses on the conversion of oil companies to Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), and their dialogue with charities after their reputations plummeted earlier in this decade, and traces this change in corporate culture and the restructuring of toil company operations to take into account CSR. The growing business for CSR consultants and ethical investment companies, the role of charities such as Oxfam in promoting CSR, the fact that most of the world major oil reserves are in countries with human rights problems, the potency of peer pressure, and the competitive disadvantages now attached to companies having a negative impact are discussed. It is questioned whether the cultural transformation is just another PR exercise, and the unbridgeable gap between environmentally friendly operations advocated by Greenpeace and oil company operations, and the CSR performance of the oil giants are considered. Details of the Nigerian experience, codes for companies, and the views of Greenpeace and Amnesty are given. (UK)

  7. Flexible investment under uncertainty in smart distribution networks with demand side response: Assessment framework and practical implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schachter, Jonathan A.; Mancarella, Pierluigi; Moriarty, John; Shaw, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Classical deterministic models applied to investment valuation in distribution networks may not be adequate for a range of real-world decision-making scenarios as they effectively ignore the uncertainty found in the most important variables driving network planning (e.g., load growth). As greater uncertainty is expected from growing distributed energy resources in distribution networks, there is an increasing risk of investing in too much or too little network capacity and hence causing the stranding and inefficient use of network assets; these costs are then passed on to the end-user. An alternative emerging solution in the context of smart grid development is to release untapped network capacity through Demand-Side Response (DSR). However, to date there is no approach able to quantify the value of ‘smart’ DSR solutions against ‘conventional’ asset-heavy investments. On these premises, this paper presents a general real options framework and a novel probabilistic tool for the economic assessment of DSR for smart distribution network planning under uncertainty, which allows the modeling and comparison of multiple investment strategies, including DSR and capacity reinforcements, based on different cost and risk metrics. In particular the model provides an explicit quantification of the economic value of DSR against alternative investment strategies. Through sensitivity analysis it is able to indicate the maximum price payable for DSR service such that DSR remains economically optimal against these alternatives. The proposed model thus provides Regulators with clear insights for overseeing DSR contractual arrangements. Further it highlights that differences exist in the economic perspective of the regulated DNO business and of customers. Our proposed model is therefore capable of highlighting instances where a particular investment strategy is favorable to the DNO but not to its customers, or vice-versa, and thus aspects of the regulatory framework which may

  8. Gaming industry, social responsibility and academia

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, MD; Wood, RTA; Parke, J; Parke, A

    2007-01-01

    This article briefly looks at some of the ways that academics – and more specifically the International Gaming Research Unit (IGRU) – have been helping the gaming industry and related stakeholders in terms of social responsibility. The IGRU is a team of experienced gaming researchers from across the UK, that work together to undertake high quality research and consultancy aimed at developing effective responsible gaming strategies. Rather than outline every single initiative that we have been...

  9. Methodological approaches to the assessment level of social responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Vorona, E.

    2010-01-01

    A study of current approaches to assessing the level of social responsibility. Proposed methodological approach to evaluating the performance of the social responsibility of railway transport. Conceptual Basis of social reporting in rail transport.

  10. CURRENT CONCERNS REGARDING THE CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN ROMANIA

    OpenAIRE

    IONELA CARMEN PIRNEA; NICOLETA BELU; EMILIA IORDACHE

    2012-01-01

    The propose of this paper is to identify current concerns regarding the corporate social responsibility in Romania. First the paper present a short introduction about the concept of corporate social responsibility. Next the paper highlights the importance of corporate social responsibility in Romania and some results about the involvement of small and medium enterprises in social responsibility activities.

  11. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPANIES’ REPUTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia GAZZOLA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research paper is to analyze in what way Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR is capable of enhancing corporate reputation. In the past companies often thought to business and society as being in opposition, but in these days external pressure for CSR continues to grow and numerous organizations monitor, rank, and report social performance. Sometimes the legal, business and reputation risks are great for companies engaging in practices deemed unacceptable. Socially responsible behaviors can increase a company's value in that they can increase the degree of confidence of the various stakeholders and the level of reputation. The research is based on the theoretical framework that supports a thesis of their positive relationship. In the paper the Italian companies with the best CSR reputations are analyzed.

  12. On the foundations of corporate social responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Hao; Renneboog, Luc

    Using corporate social responsibility (CSR) ratings for 23,000 companies from 114 countries, we find that a firm's CSR rating and its country's legal origin are strongly correlated. Legal origin is a stronger explanation than “doing good by doing well” factors or firm and country characteristics

  13. Corporate Social Responsibility in a Danish Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Helle

    This paper describe and discuss how and why in a country with a welfare state, the debate of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has begun. In other countries like USA, CSR is discussed on the basis of the imperfections of the market, in Denmark CSR is discussed on the basis of what could...

  14. Business Students' Perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is a key element of today's Business school curricula. Proponents of CSR have argued that a business has an obligation to balance the interests of its many stakeholders. Critics of CSR, however, have argued that a business has an obligation only to its owners--its shareholders. In this paper I examined the…

  15. Corporate Social Responsibility Under Authoritarian Capitalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman, Peter S.; Moon, Jeremy; Wu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the seemingly oxymoronic context of Chinese “authoritarian capitalism.” Following an introduction to the emergence of authoritarian capitalism, the article considers the emergence of CSR in China using Matten and Moon...

  16. Universities and Corporate Social Responsibility Performance: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper examines the need for universities to carry out corporate social responsibility programmes. Two theories were used as theoretical framework for the study (stakeholder's theory and uncertainty reduction theory). The qualitative research method was used as the research method while personal interview was used ...

  17. The Legal Risks of Social Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsel, Robert E.

    By scrutinizing the extensive and growing literature on media ethics and media codes, as well as the current history of litigation in libel cases, this paper analyzes the risks presented by journalistic social responsibility in the context of expanding tort liability for what might loosely be called journalistic malpractice. Following a review of…

  18. Company learning about corporate social responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cramer, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    This article analyses the learning experiences gained by 19 Dutch companies when implementing the concept of corporate social responsibility in their own business practices. It is concluded that learning processes took place at individual level and, in certain cases, at group level. Learning at

  19. Corporate social responsibility and customer behaviour, empirical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    2018-03-05

    Mar 5, 2018 ... manner by which the socially responsible brand influences the ... the society values and ethics in order to be harmoniously ... many companies establish a process that anticipates, manage, .... but also to build a strong relationship with employees. ... measuring instruments and the determination of the.

  20. Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility Performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corporate social responsibility is an approach whereby a company considers the interests of all stakeholders, both within the organisation and in society and applies those interests while developing its strategy and during execution; it offers organisations various opportunities not only to differentiate themselves from ...

  1. Pluralism in political corporate social responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mäkinen, J.; Kourula, A.

    2012-01-01

    Within corporate social responsibility (CSR), the exploration of the political role of firms (political CSR) has recently experienced a revival. We review three key periods of political CSR literature—classic, instrumental, and new political CSR—and use the Rawlsian conceptualization of division of

  2. Banking efficiency under corporate social responsibilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohene-Asare, Kwaku; Asmild, Mette

    2012-01-01

    This paper expands the banking efficiency literature by developing a banking intermediation model that captures both profit-maximizing and Corporate Social Responsibilities (CSR) of banks. Using a data set of 21 banks for each year 2006-2008, we evaluate the relative efficiency of Ghanaian banks...

  3. Dynamics of Corporate Social Responsibility in Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Rebecca Chunghee; Moon, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in Asia through two related themes: research knowledge and ethical norms. ‘CSR in Asia’ research is shown to be growing, particularly in East Asia. Compared with Western CSR literature, it is shown to be dominated by empirical, parti...

  4. Gender, Business Ethics, and Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosser, Kate; Moon, Jeremy; Nelson, Julie A.

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews a conversation between business ethicists and feminist scholars begun in the early 1990s and traces the development of that conversation in relation to feminist theory. A bibliographic analysis of the business ethics (BE) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) literatures ...

  5. The development of socially responsible marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Ljiljana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In contemporary knowledge-based economy characterized by fast and turbulent changes, the achieved competitive advantage is much more exposed to hazards in contrast to earlier periods. Companies are forced to constantly create new business opportunities in order to respond to the challenges that are generated by the impact of numerous primarily technological and market changes. However, there is a small number of companies, with arranged organization and strategy, that support the requests for the research and creation of sustainable business and marketing strategies. The global scene conditioned by the development of new markets and developing economies requires changes in marketing approaches and strategy adaptation. The realization of superior business performances in global environment is related to the acquirement and adaption to new challenges and trends. The trend that questions the business activity of many companies is the requests for responsible behavior of enterprises in the market and acceptance of ethical, moral and environmental principles. There are more and more evident requests for aligning of business and marketing decisions with the aims of socially responsible business. The development of socially responsible marketing is the imperative of economic and social success. The authors point to the role and importance of innovation in marketing approaches, the need for enhancement of socially responsible marketing with the aim of improving its business performance and successful positioning.

  6. Social Responsibility and Envy: Multicultural Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canen, Alberto G.; Ivenicki, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Multicultural organizations can be central to mitigate organizational situations in which envy could potentially flourish, therefore contributing to fostering organizational conduct that leads to institutional social responsibility. The paper focuses on the inner workings of organizations related to their leaders' understanding of what the…

  7. The Corporate Value and Social Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Edward R.

    In the past two decades, corporate social responsibility has become a controversial issue which is usually responded to according to the management style of individual corporations. Three concepts of management style have developed. Profit maximization considers that money and wealth are most important, labor is a commodity to be bought and sold,…

  8. Lawyer Proliferation and the Social Responsibility Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wines, William A.

    1989-01-01

    Drawing on the model of social responsibility that colleges of business have been teaching, the boom in lawyer education is examined. It is argued that law schools are irresponsible in overselling the benefits of law school graduation, creating a surplus of lawyers whose abilities could be used as well elsewhere. (MSE)

  9. Corporate social responsibility motivations in Zambian SMEs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choongo, P.; van Burg, J.C.; Paas, L.J.; Masurel, Enno; Lungu, John

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the motivations of different forms of corporate social responsibility (CSR) by small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in an under-researched Sub-Saharan African country, Zambia. The results show that internal motivations (financial motivation and moral and ethical motivation)

  10. Corporate Social Responsibility and the Millennials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlone, Teresa; Spain, Judith Winters; McGlone, Vernon

    2011-01-01

    The incorporation of corporate social responsibility (CSR) into an organization's strategic plan may impact the company's ability to attract and keep members of the Millennial generation as employees. The authors examined the CSR attitudes of college students and the correlation of these attitudes with willingness to work for companies that…

  11. Universities and Corporate Social Responsibility Performance: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    CSR universities can pay attention to; these areas are: economic responsibility, ... The idea or thinking of corporate social ... commonly accepted that a good reputation can create a strong competitive advantage ...... Universalities also need to take into consideration philanthropic ..... Critical Perspectives on Accounting. Vol.

  12. Corporate Social Responsibility Agreements Model for Community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corporate Social Responsibility Agreements Model for Community ... their host communities with concomitant adverse effect on mining operations. ... sustainable community development an integral part of the mining business. This paper presents the evolutionary strategic models, with differing principles and action plans, ...

  13. Social responsibility as a management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Arimany-Serrat

    2018-02-01

    Originality/value: The study identifies a business management system that continuously organises and improves the performances of a company in the area of Corporate Social Responsibility, through audited certification that enhances the competitivity of companies that hold the international standard. The study also demonstrates the need for a management system to integrate into business models.

  14. Corporate social responsibility and psychological contract: towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is growing concern about the activities of business in society. Much attention is drawn to the changing nature of the relationship between corporations and society which has increased the demand for organisations to recognise their corporate social responsibility (CSR). This research explores an understanding of the ...

  15. The relationship between customer satisfaction, social responsibility, and long-run financial performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chen Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the link between long-run corporate financial performance, corporate social responsibility, and customer satisfaction. Using annual financial data, customer satisfaction index, and the Dow Jones Sustainability Index, the paper seeks to establish whether it pays organizations to use ethical methods in striving to be sustainable. Data used for this research cover the period 2001 to 2008. We used dynamic panel data linear regression models to analyze the effect of customer satisfaction and social responsibility on short-run and long-run financial performance. It was found that it may benefit organizations to use ethical methods in pursuing sustainability. since organizations who invest time, money, and effort in corporate social responsibility activities, their good reputations and satisfied customers yield long-term cash flow growth. Keywords: corporate customer satisfaction, Corporate Social Responsibility, corporate financial performance DisciplinesL business studies, international studies, ethics, finance studies

  16. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY OF COMPANIES IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

    OpenAIRE

    Čavalić, Admir; Bećirović, Damir

    2017-01-01

    The concept of corporate social responsibility implies that the company has far more responsibilities that overcome its basic economic responsibility. Corporate social responsibility is the imperative of modern business and one of the prerequisites for achieving competitive advantage. Thus, in order to be socially responsible, it is important for a company to demonstrate a certain level of responsibility towards its stakeholders. Historically, the concept of social responsibility has been the...

  17. "Responsibility in Mobility": International Students and Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ly Thi; Vu, Thao Thi Phuong

    2017-01-01

    Enhancing the educational experience and social connectedness for international students is the responsibility of different involved parties among whom international students themselves and host institutions play a key role. However, the question of how the condition of cross-border mobility has shaped and re-shaped international students'…

  18. Social capital theory related to corporate social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Abramuszkinová Pavlíková

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with corporate social responsibility and its relationship to strategic management dealing with acquisition, development and utilisation of essential inputs. They influence the design of processes related to the creation of products or services that satisfy customers’ needs. Authors claim that the successful securing, deployment and development of any input is of human origin or linked to human activity which means that the nature of relationships plays a crucial role. As businesses are not isolated, they operate on a global scale where the question of trust is very important. The concept of social capital stresses that trust in norms and reciprocity facilitate increased productivity in individuals, teams and organisations. Social capital promotes value-added collaboration including on-going and demonstrative transparency which can secure closer bonding among those group members. Business responsibility, CSR and Putnam’s definition of social capital is shown on real case studies as a sign of importance for credibility and effectiveness of any CSR efforts. It is evident that the good will and support garnered from CSR can be fragile and easily damaged.

  19. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND ITS FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Miruna Zapciu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The field of corporate social responsibility (CSR has grown exponentially in the last two decades. There are different views of the role of the firm in society and disagreement as to whether wealth maximization should be the sole goal of a corporation. Nevertheless, there still remains a debate about the legitimacy and value of corporate responses to CSR concerns. This paper examines the effect of CSR on financial performance. It examines the effect CSR- related shareholder proposals lead to positive announcements returns and superior accounting performance. Also, the channels through which companies benefit from CSR are examined. The paper finds that CSR improves employee satisfaction and helps companies cater to customers that are responsive to sustainable practices and that the adoption of CSR proposals is associated with an increase in labor productivity and sales growth. The results indicate that the sign of the relationship is positive and statistically significant relationship between corporate social responsibility and financial performance, supporting the view that socially responsible corporate performance can be associated with a series of bottom-line benefits.

  20. Corporate social Responsibility : Linkage Business Performance and Social Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengku Ezni Balqiah

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Various types of corporate social responsibility (CSR are perceived differently by parties associated with those activities because CSR is driven by different motives. This study investigates how CSR activities – CSR activities concerning health and well-being of mothers and children – act as liaisons between business performance (brand attitude and loyalty and social performance (children’s quality of life. A survey was conducted in Indonesia on 450 respondents–customers of firms in industries related to natural resources and in regards to children’s well-being. The data were considered via factor analysis and multiple regression analysis. The results show business, stakeholder, and moral motives. Brand attitude and loyalty can influence perceptions toward these motive. Further, these motives could increase or decrease social performance. Companies should consider the type of CSR activities to engage in because the activities can be perceived as being driven by different motives and have different impacts on social performance. This result suggests that companies can harmonize business aspects and social aspects of CSR in creating value.

  1. Costs and limits of dosage response to predation risk: to what extent can tadpoles invest in anti-predator morphology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplitsky, Céline; Plénet, Sandrine; Joly, Pierre

    2005-09-01

    Inducible defences have long been considered as a polyphenism opposing defended and undefended morphs. However, in nature, preys are exposed to various levels of predation risk and scale their investment in defence to actual predation risk. Still, among the traits that are involved in the defence, some are specific to one predator type while others act as a more generalised defence. The existence of defence costs could prevent an individual investing in all these traits simultaneously. In this study, we investigate the impact of an increasing level of predator density (stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus) on the expression of morphological inducible defences in tadpoles of Rana dalmatina. In this species, investment in tail length and tail muscle is a stickleback-specific response while increased tail fin depth is a more general defence. As expected, we found a relationship between investment in defence and level of risk through the responses of tail fin depth and tail length. We also found an exponential increase of defence cost, notably expressed by convex decrease of growth and developmental rates. We found a relative independence of investment in the different traits that compose the defence, revealing a high potential for fine tuning the expression of defended phenotypes with respect to local ecological conditions.

  2. Corporate Social Responsibility: Aktualisasi Ajaran Ihsan dalam Bisnis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Muhammad Djakfar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Corporate is a business institution which has rapid development in the modern era. It is to fulfill the diverse society’s needs. In fact, corporation must be close to the society as both of them are interconnected and mutually demanding. To make them close, nowadays, it has been developed Corporate Social Responsibility, specifically, big sale corporate. With this program, corporate can help society based on their needs. Based on theological point of view, if it done wisely for God’s blessing, it is absolutely the actualization of Islamic teaching, Ihsan, in business context. Through the actualization of Ihsan, the business practitioners will be close not only both to others but also to God. According to Islamic teaching, there are many ways to earn fund for this program such as zakat, infak, sedekah, ang wakaf wich can be earned form Islamic employees. With this collected funding, corporate can invest in prospective business. And the result, then can be used as fund to succeed Corporate Social Responsibility program as well as to help the have not people. This program will be truly kindness program which importantly develop as the representation of Islamic teaching.

  3. Medical ethics and education for social responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, M I

    1980-01-01

    The physician, said Henry Sigerist in 1940, has been acquiring an increasingly social role. For centuries, however, codes of medical ethics have concentrated on proper behavior toward individual patients and almost ignored the doctor's responsibilities to society. Major health service reforms have come principally from motivated lay leadership and citizen groups. Private physicians have been largely hostile toward movements to equalize the economic access for people to medical care and improve the supply and distribution of doctors. Medical practice in America and throughout the world has become seriously commercialized. In response, governments have applied various strategies to constrain physicians and induce more socially responsible behavior. But such external pressures should not be necessary if a broad socially oriented code of medical ethics were followed. Health care system changes would be most effective, but medical education could be thoroughly recast to clarify community health problems and policies required to meet them. Sigerist proposed such a new medical curriculum in 1941; if it had been introduced, a social code of medical ethics would not now seem utopian. An international conference might well be convened to consider how physicians should be educated to reach the inspiring goals of the World Health Organization.

  4. The Implementation of Social Responsiveness Initiatives: Case of Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentinas Navickas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A concept of social responsibility reflects public concerns and issues for a specific time, and these change with time. Various stakeholders as consumers, customers, employees, trade unions, communities, non-governmental organizations, foundations, donors, investors are more and more interested in the activities of companies (organizations, and influence on them in a variety of ways. Companies, for their part, also look for ways to meet the expectations of the public in the area of social responsibility. Corporate social responsiveness is an ability of business to respond to social pressure. The article analyzes the implementation of social responsiveness initiatives as organizational programs. Social responsiveness is understood as action dimension of corporate social responsibility. The paper deals with implementation of social responsiveness initiatives in Lithuania. Researched the socially responsiveness initiatives as organizational programs, the authors found that an active development of corporate social responsiveness positively influences on businesses and society relationship and contribute to sustainable development of region or country.

  5. Corporate Social Responsibility: the Challenges and Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piasecki Ryszard

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the chances and vulnerabilities of corporate social responsibility (CSR on two main levels: the small and medium sector at a local level; and big corporations at the macro and international levels. The modern understanding of the definition of CSR is also analyzed. This concept in the management sciences is often misunderstood because it is usually seen as one means in the struggle to achieve a better competitive position. On the other hand, for the development sciences CSR is an effective instrument of income redistribution and as an addition to state support for the underprivileged social groups.

  6. Corporate Social Responsibility Within the Smartphone Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mach, Pascal; Atlason, Reynir Smari; Gerstlberger, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    portray commitments to the economy, society and to the environment, especially with in the public media. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) influences most processes within firms, also the product development. This research handles five smartphone manufacturers and their performance within the economic......, environmental and social area. CSR reports are assessed by using a proven methodology by Morhardt, Baird, & Freeman, based on the G4 Global Sustainability Guidelines. Results show that smartphone manufacturers tend to focus mostly on the environmental sphere within CSR, where Microsoft scored the highest of all...

  7. Some considerations regarding the legal responsibility and the social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Anca ARTENE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The judicial responsibility is acknowledged in the judicial doctrine2, as being ‘the starting point’ of the entire social responsibility, position that continues to have from ancient times until today, thus providing an expression of Law on its most concerted form, which reflect the stage of evolution of the entire social life. Expressing forms and realities of social life, both values and norms are ideal standards of conduct, perceived as individual requirements by each member of society3. The human action enforces the compliance of certain rules and its subordination of certain goals and interests, according to a system of principles and criteria; this is because the individual lead his existence in a relational system with others, a system characterized by extensive interactions and interdependencies. In any society may appear different types of conduct, whose broad includes those conformist, innovative, as well as those non-conformists, escapist or deviant. As full integration of the individual in society, legal norms are not an exclusive element; these are the foundation of a set of rules for the most various types. The institution of social responsibility arises precisely in this way, representing a higher level of integration of the individual in the society.

  8. The invisible hand? Using tax credits to encourage institutional investment in social housing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blessing, A.; Gilmour, T.

    2011-01-01

    Over recent decades many developed countries have commercialised the provision of state-subsidised housing, and introduced a stronger role for market forces. Government financial support now often aims to leverage debt or equity investment. Spearheading this policy change is a quest for the ‘Holy

  9. Social and genetic benefits of parental investment suggest sex differences in selection pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroeder, Julia; Cleasby, Ian; Dugdale, Hannah L.; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Burke, Terry

    Provisioning behavior in altricial birds is often used to measure parental investment and is assumed to have fitness consequences to the parents providing it, with the benefits outweighing the costs. Here we investigate the fitness costs and benefits (parent survival and offspring recruitment) of

  10. Managing contradictions of corporate social responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Toke; Lauring, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has attracted increasing attention in business and research. Studies have documented how management concepts such as diversity management are translated and adapted to differential local sociocultural contexts outside their countries of origin. More research...... is needed concerning how CSR concepts are translated and practiced locally within particular organizations. This research is based on an organizational ethnography of the management of multiple social, ethical and business logics of CSR in a Danish frontrunner firm. The study contributes with insights...... into the ongoing organizational management of potentially opposing logics in CSR. Findings show that managing contradictions of CSR is an ongoing challenge and accomplishment influencing whether ethical, social and business logics collide or reinforce each other. The study shows that when ethics are framed...

  11. JURIDICAL AND ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF THE CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN THE BANKING MANAGEMENT FROM ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muresan (Potincu Laura

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available At present, the corporate social responsibility must be regarded from a complex perspective. We consider that the social responsibility of the banks is what the community expects from a bank ecologically, economically, juridically, ethically, and philanthropically. Thus, the banking corporate social responsibility includes all these types of responsibilities: the ecological responsibility, the economic responsibility, the juridical responsibility, the ethical responsibility, and the philanthropic responsibility. Combining the juridical analysis with the marketing research, this work aims at the actual compliance with the corporate social responsibility by the banks from Romania, an European Union member state. The juridical regulations adopted mid 2013 at the European Union level bring a new approach to the relation between the most important categories of stakeholders – consumers and employees – and the bank by means of actual juridical specifications regarding the banking management. Presenting the most important provisions of Directive 2013/36/UE of the European Parliament and Council regarding the access to the activity of the credit institutions and prudential supervision of the credit institutions and investment companies, and of Regulation no. 575/2013 of the European Parliament and Council regarding the prudential requirements for the credit institutions and investment companies, in relation to the corporate social responsibility aspects offers an interesting image of the evolution of the legislative aspects regulating the banking management. One can note, in practice, the assimilation by the banks of the corporate social responsibility only with its philanthropic component, ignoring the most important elements of the social responsibility: the juridical responsibility, the ethical responsibility, or the economic responsibility. This work shows results of a quantitative marketing research which has been performed in Bra

  12. Do generation firms in restructured electricity markets have incentives to support social-welfare-improving transmission investments?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauma, Enzo E.; Oren, Shmuel S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the incentives that generation firms have in restructured electricity markets for supporting long-term transmission investments. In particular, we study whether generation firms, which arguably play a dominant role in the restructured electricity markets, have the incentives to fund or support incremental social-welfare-improving transmission investments. We examine this question in a two-node network and explore how such incentives are affected by the ownership of financial transmission rights (FTRs) by generation firms. In the analyzed two-node network, we show both (1) that the net exporter generation firm has the correct incentives to increase the transmission capacity incrementally up to a certain level and (2) that, although a policy that allocates FTRs to the net exporter generation firm can be desirable from a social point of view, such a policy would dilute the net-importer-generation-firm's incentives to support transmission expansion. Moreover, if all FTRs were allocated or auctioned off to the net exporter generation firm, then it is possible to increase both consumer surplus and social welfare while keeping the net exporter generation firm revenue neutral. (author)

  13. The Policy to Promote Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosdahl, Anders

    thinking, a vision for the Danish welfare society. An inclusive labour market is one with “a place for everyone”, i.e. also for persons with a reduced working capacity, disabled, ethnic minorities and long-term unemployed – that is persons who have traditionally had difficulties in obtaining or remaining...... viewpoints in the current Danish debate (section 4). Section 5 includes some concluding remarks. Encouraging social responsibility of enterprises is one of the means to promote what in Denmark today is termed an inclusive labour market. The inclusive labour market is, according to current governmental...... in employment. An inclusive labour market is adapted to the needs and capabilities of diverse human beings, also employees, who should be able to reconcile work and family life. The policy to increase the social responsibility of enterprises and to promote an inclusive labour market includes several specific...

  14. Corporate social responsibility for nanotechnology oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Kuzhabekova, Aliya

    2011-11-01

    Growing public concern and uncertainties surrounding emerging technologies suggest the need for socially-responsible behavior of companies in the development and implementation of oversight systems for them. In this paper, we argue that corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an important aspect of nanotechnology oversight given the role of trust in shaping public attitudes about nanotechnology and the lack of data about the health and environmental risks of nanoproducts. We argue that CSR is strengthened by the adoption of stakeholder-driven models and attention to moral principles in policies and programs. In this context, we examine drivers of CSR, contextual and leadership factors that influence CSR, and strategies for CSR. To illustrate these concepts, we discuss existing cases of CSR-like behavior in nanotechnology companies, and then provide examples of how companies producing nanomedicines can exhibit morally-driven CSR behavior.

  15. A Case Study in Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon K. Kendrick

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This case study promotes analysis through a brief investigation into the role of corporate social responsibility (CSR in the operation of a multinational corporation as evidenced by Google, Inc. The study focuses on a transnational company in order to observe the impact of CSR practice on a global level. The study will present implications of CSR for corporate management, corporate employees, state regulators, shareholders, and customers in general. In addition, the study will discuss consequences of poor CSR compliance for a multinational corporation. Questions for analysis include implications of CSR, employee retention, development of corporate culture, and evaluation of advantages and disadvantages of different CSR approaches. Upon conclusion of the study, suggestions are made for future collaborative efforts in corporate social responsibility as applied to psychological, sociological, and economical motives. Recruiting and training possibilities also present partnership opportunities for best practice sharing in regards to community, civic, and service engagement.

  16. The Role of Social Responsibility in Big Business Practics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V A Gurinov

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of corporate social responsibility has become especially relevant in national science in the context of the development of big business able to assume significant social responsibilities. The article focuses on the issues of the nature and specificity of social responsibility of big business in Russia. The levels of social responsibility and the arrangements for social programmes implementation are also highlighted.

  17. Substance misuse prevention as corporate social responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radacsi, Gergely; Hardi, Peter

    2014-03-01

    All sectors of society should be involved in reducing substance misuse, including businesses. However, the business sector is typically involved only to the extent that their products compel them to be (e.g., alcohol producers promoting responsible alcohol consumption). This article examines why business participation has been limited and how embedding prevention within a framework of health promotion could increase participation. It reviews both Hungarian and international cases, concluding that although corporate social responsibility (CSR) offers a framework to approach substance misuse reduction, a different perception of the role of the business sector is necessary to make it viable.

  18. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landhaeusser, Werner; Hildebrandt, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    What means Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in the energy industry? A rising energy demand with limited natural resources pose utilities, industry and consumers with new challenges. This book follows an interdisciplinary approach and for the first time brings together debates and findings from industry, science, politics, culture and media. Because the energy transition can only succeed if it is comprehensible for the individual and fragmented perspectives and interests are merged. [de

  19. Corporate Social Responsibility and Managing Ethical Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Yeney Widya Prihatiningtias

    2012-01-01

    This essay argues that the promotion of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and ethical business conduct is very important. CSR nowadays has become crucial issue as major companies are expected to demonstrate their commitment to society’s values through actions. The current article explains, evaluates, and applies to relevant examples of the narrow, broader socio-economic, as well as broad maximal view of CSR. It also critically describes how organizations can develop ethical cultures and c...

  20. Are Employees Concerned About Corporate Social Responsibility?

    OpenAIRE

    Caner Dincer; Banu Dincer

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on organizational commitment of internal publics especially employees. More precisely, we seek to examine the effect of CSR practices on different dimensions of organizational commitment focusing on the employee level. The study uses a web-based survey research method and employs hierarchical multiple regression analysis to explore the predictive ability of four dimensions of CSR on three dimensions of organizationa...

  1. Determinant of the Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosure

    OpenAIRE

    Sunarsih, Uun; Nurhikmah, N

    2017-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has a very important role for the company and now become an obligation for every company. The purpose of this study examined the effect of institutional ownership, board of commissioners, profitability and size on CSR disclosure. This research conducted at mining manufacturing companies listed in Indonesia Stock Exchange period 2013-2014 and obtained 76 sample companies. The method used is multiple regression analysis. The result showed only institutional...

  2. Earnings Management and Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin Uyagu; Alexander Olawumi Dabor

    2017-01-01

    This study lies at the heart of the issue of reliability of financial statements. Reliability is the accountant’s terminology for integrity of financial statements. This study focused on the impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on earnings management in the Nigerian manufacturing sectors. The study is motivated by the paucity of research on subject matter in manufacturing sub-sector in Nigeria. The study employed the ordinary least square multivariate regression technique. A sample of fi...

  3. Corporate social responsibility audit: Theoretical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Artem Koldovskyi

    2015-01-01

    This paper puts a conceptual framework to outline research for corporate social responsibility (CSR) audit based on the analysis of current CRS literature and audit models as implementation of CSR. It is intended to make clear the phenomena about the relationship between audit, implementation of business ethics principles and corporate governance. However, most studies do not take into account modify CSR audit. This paper reports part of a research we carried out on the theoretical interpreta...

  4. The social responsibility of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuo, Junichi

    2008-01-01

    Interest in the concept of Social Responsibility (SR) has increased recently. Continuing advances in the pace of innovative science and information technology development, growing competition in the world's markets, economic globalization and harsh criticism from communities have all drawn attention to the behavior of different organizations. As a way of drawing global attention to the fulfillment of SR, the goal of coexistence assumes an increasingly significant role from the standpoint of sustainable development of organizations and society. This implies that SR involves two responsibilities: the primary responsibility being an obligation to society, and the secondary responsibility being a positive contribution to society. Seen from the same perspective, Nuclear Energy (NE) is expected to make a positive contribution to the advancement of society and to encourage a safety culture that prevents serious accidents while also encouraging the sound development of organizations and society. ('Society' includes the environment and the economy, with the same sense as a 'triple bottom line'.) Considering the Social Responsibility of Nuclear Energy (NSR) from these points-of-view, NE should coexist with multiple stakeholders. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the relationship between NE and society, to define a framework for problem-solving, and finally to suggest changes in NSR as a whole. (author)

  5. Corporate social responsibility: A pharmaceutical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Theron

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In the modern business environment organisations need to address two important aspects affecting their operations: the quality of management and the impact of their operations on the well-being of the society in which they operate. This dualism often results in economic, political and social dilemmas influencing the viability of organisations in general, and more specifically and recently, local and international pharmaceutical organisations operating in South Africa. This article considers the aspect of corporate social responsibility (CSR in general and attempts to identify the social-related issues impacting on the pharmaceutical industry by means of content analysis - a research technique for making replicable and valid inferences from data. It furthermore describes the re-action of pharmaceutical organisations when confronted with such social demands, and finally analyses the management of CSR against four criteria of CSR. The article confirms the importance of managers to manage CSR towards society in a proactive manner. It furthermore suggests that the "hard" factors of strategic management and financial performance should be balanced with "soft" social/people issues. It also recommends that the industry should consider - and if applicable - endorse the concept of Issues Management as an approach to the proactive management of CSR.

  6. The Development of Forms of Corporate Social Responsibility in Russia in the Current Economic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Arzumanova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the characteristic features of modern trends in the formation and implementation of corporate social responsibility in Russia in the current economic conditions, which is based on the fact that reasonable economic interests oriented business not only on maximizing profits, but also to improve their own macro - socio-economic, natural, political, through voluntary investment profits in the respective areas.

  7. Social sciences research in neglected tropical diseases 3: Investment in social science research in neglected diseases of poverty: a case study of Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Subhash; Reidpath, Daniel; Allotey, Pascale

    2011-01-06

    The level of funding provides a good proxy for the level of commitment or prioritisation given to a particular issue. While the need for research relevant to social, economic, cultural and behavioural aspects of neglected tropical diseases (NTD) control has been acknowledged, there is limited data on the level of funding that supports NTD social science research. A case study was carried out in which the spending of a major independent funder, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) - was analysed. A total of 67 projects funded between October 1998 and November 2008 were identified from the BMGF database. With the help of keywords within the titles of 67 grantees, they were categorised as social science or non-social science research based on available definition of social science. A descriptive analysis was conducted. Of 67 projects analysed, 26 projects (39%) were social science related while 41 projects (61%) were basic science or other translational research including drug development. A total of US$ 697 million was spent to fund the projects, of which 35% ((US$ 241 million) went to social science research. Although the level of funding for social science research has generally been lower than that for non-social science research over 10 year period, social science research attracted more funding in 2004 and 2008. The evidence presented in this case study indicates that funding on NTD social science research compared to basic and translational research is not as low as it is perceived to be. However, as there is the acute need for improved delivery and utilisation of current NTD drugs/technologies, informed by research from social science approaches, funding priorities need to reflect the need to invest significantly more in NTD social science research.

  8. Social sciences research in neglected tropical diseases 3: Investment in social science research in neglected diseases of poverty: a case study of Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reidpath Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The level of funding provides a good proxy for the level of commitment or prioritisation given to a particular issue. While the need for research relevant to social, economic, cultural and behavioural aspects of neglected tropical diseases (NTD control has been acknowledged, there is limited data on the level of funding that supports NTD social science research. Method A case study was carried out in which the spending of a major independent funder, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF - was analysed. A total of 67 projects funded between October 1998 and November 2008 were identified from the BMGF database. With the help of keywords within the titles of 67 grantees, they were categorised as social science or non-social science research based on available definition of social science. A descriptive analysis was conducted. Results Of 67 projects analysed, 26 projects (39% were social science related while 41 projects (61% were basic science or other translational research including drug development. A total of US$ 697 million was spent to fund the projects, of which 35% ((US$ 241 million went to social science research. Although the level of funding for social science research has generally been lower than that for non-social science research over 10 year period, social science research attracted more funding in 2004 and 2008. Conclusion The evidence presented in this case study indicates that funding on NTD social science research compared to basic and translational research is not as low as it is perceived to be. However, as there is the acute need for improved delivery and utilisation of current NTD drugs/technologies, informed by research from social science approaches, funding priorities need to reflect the need to invest significantly more in NTD social science research.

  9. Social rate of return to R&D on various energy technologies: Where should we invest more? A study of G7 countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inglesi-Lotz, Roula

    2017-01-01

    The importance of investment in Research and Development (R&D) in the energy sector is indisputable especially considering the benefits of new technologies to sustainability, security and environmental protection. However, the nature and potential of various energy technologies that are capable of improving the energy and environmental conditions globally is a challenging task for governments and policy makers that have to make decisions on the allocation of funds in R&D. To do so, the optimal resource allocation to R&D should be determined by estimating the social rate of return for R&D investments. This paper aims to estimate the social rate of return of R&D on various energy applications and technologies such as energy efficiency, fossil fuels, renewable energy sources, and nuclear for the G7 countries. The results show that primarily R&D investment on Energy Efficiency technologies and Nuclear are the ones that yield high social benefits for all G7 countries while exactly the opposite holds for Fossil fuels. - Highlights: • Allocation of R&D funding in various energy technologies is a challenging task. • This can be done by estimating the social rate of return for R&D investments • We investigate various technologies’ social rate of return for the G7 countries. • R&D funding yields social benefits from energy efficiency and nuclear technologies. • R&D investment on fossil fuels has negative social rate of return.

  10. Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Hirohisa, Aki; Lai, Judy

    2009-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has launched the Zero-Net-Energy (ZNE) Commercial Building Initiative (CBI) in order to develop commercial buildings that produce as much energy as they use. Its objective is to make these buildings marketable by 2025 such that they minimize their energy use through cutting-edge energy-efficient technologies and meet their remaining energy needs through on-site renewable energy generation. We examine how such buildings may be implemented within the context of a cost- or carbon-minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various technologies, such as photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and passive/demand-response technologies. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has a multi-criteria objective function: the minimization of a weighted average of the building's annual energy costs and carbon/CO2 emissions. The MILP's constraints ensure energy balance and capacity limits. In addition, constraining the building's energy consumed to equal its energy exports enables us to explore how energy sales and demand-response measures may enable compliance with the CBI. Using a nursing home in northern California and New York with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find that a ZNE building requires ample PV capacity installed to ensure electricity sales during the day. This is complemented by investment in energy-efficient combined heat and power equipment, while occasional demand response shaves energy consumption. A large amount of storage is also adopted, which may be impractical. Nevertheless, it shows the nature of the solutions and costs necessary to achieve ZNE. For comparison, we analyze a nursing home facility in New York to examine the effects of a flatter tariff structure and different load profiles. It has trouble reaching ZNE status and its load reductions as well as efficiency measures need to be more effective than those in the CA case

  11. Social Investment, Economic Growth and Labor Market Performance: Case Study—Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Olivia Ștefănescu-Mihăilă

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A few years have passed since the financial crisis began with the bankruptcy of the American Lehman Brothers bank and few dare predict the moment when we will overcome the crisis. Chaotic human resource policy in the Romanian economy and complex taxation have lowered our chances to overcome it. Excessive income tax, massive layoffs, not always dictated by real needs in the private sector, hesitation in the government regarding the reorganization of an oversized public sector and the low productivity are only some obstacles in overcoming the crisis. People are a very important factor in the production process and in the success of a company. It is essential that modern organizations rethink their strategies, make long-term investments, and invest in people. Success and survival on the market greatly depend on the understanding of these facts and managers must be aware of their importance.

  12. From Avoidance to Activism: The Responsible Investment Frameworks of the Norwegian Government Pension Fund Global, the New Zealand Superannuation Fund and California Public Employees’ Retirement System 2000 – 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Kristensen, Maren Diesen

    2016-01-01

    Socially responsible investing (SRI) has since the late 1990s, grown to become an important concept in the global financial industry. This growth has mainly been led by institutional investors, such as pension funds and sovereign wealth funds (SWFs) who, in the early 2000s, became aware of the necessity of behaving as real owners of companies and of adopting a long-term view of investing. As these investors started to embrace SRI, they steered the understanding of SRI away from the original e...

  13. Stages of Formation of the Strategy of Social Responsibility of Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zatieyshchykova Olha O.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article studies existing approaches to formulation of stages of the strategy, according to which a list of stages of formation of the strategy of social responsibility (SSR is formed, including: identification of the mission and vision of SSR, formation of the system of goals of SSR, assessment of influence of factors of external environment, assessment of the level of social responsibility, analysis of alternatives and selection of strategies. The article identifies SSR mission for Ukrainian enterprises, which lies in increase of the quality of life of employees, local society and society in general. SSR vision – improvement of effectiveness of business and profitability indicators on the basis of creation of trustworthy relations between business, society and state. The article develops the goals tree of SSR that has goals of three levels. It identifies a list of factors of external environment, including: growing anxiety about the state of environment and demographic situation, level of education and culture, growing intensity of competition, level of income and wellbeing, active participation of the state policy in the use of principles of social responsibility, propaganda of social responsibility within the impact area, fast change of technologies, fair marketing practice, informing and executing agreements. The article offers to assess the level of social responsibility on the basis of calculation of indicators of social investments both by quantitative and qualitative methods and calculation of indicators of voluntary social responsibility of business. It also offers main components of the essence of the SSR strategy.

  14. Corporate social responsibility report for 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopriva, J.

    2009-01-01

    The bigger the company the greater its responsibility not only for the development of its housekeeping, but also for the environment, in which it operates. Therefore besides its business activity we are devoting our time to several activities closely related to the world of energy generation. Social responsibility and sustainable development are the priorities. Responsibility starts with individual staff members, as people are the most precious asset. They represent the culture, the direction and management of the company. Education and awareness are of eminent importance for us and this starts at home, behind the doorstep of the power plants. We are a good citizen of Slovakia and we are contributing all our energy into values, which are important, so that the following generations can pass them on. (author)

  15. Social media monitoring: Responsive governance in the shadow of surveillance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.J.J.M. Bekkers (Victor); A.R. Edwards (Arthur); D. de Kool (Dennis)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Social media monitoring is gradually becoming a common practice in public organizations in the Netherlands. The main purposes of social media monitoring are strategic control and responsiveness. Social media monitoring poses normative questions in terms of

  16. Corporate Social Responsibility through Education and Sport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina-Eugenia Iamandi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the need to tackle in a sustainable way the new economic and social requirements particularly induced by the recent financial crisis, corporate social responsibility (CSR is one envisaged solution at community and organizational level, because of its win-win strategic potential. More than that, acknowledging the economic impact of strongly supporting social domains like education and sport, the European Union (EU has designed new measures for developing the human potential during 2014-2020 period. Following these two rationales, the main research objective is to emphasize the relationship between CSR and corporate support for educational and sport projects of top performing companies in Romania, Bulgaria and Croatia in the post-crisis period. Four main issues are investigated in detail regarding the corporate support for education and sport areas through CSR initiatives, namely existence of corporate involvement, forms of commitment, reasons for engagement, and main beneficiaries of implication. The research methodology focuses on empirical and analytical perspectives, while the results show new facets and implications of CSR initiatives in education and sport domains, but also a set of similarities and differences between the analysed EU countries. Economic and social impacts are also examined, as well as future research directions.

  17. The Institutional System of Economic Agents’ Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frolova Elena, A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper it was made an attempt to analyse the main characteristics of the institutional system of economic agents social responsibility. The institutional system can be described as a complex of norms, rules, regulations and enforcement mechanisms in the context of interactions and communications of economic agents. The institutional nature of social responsibility allow to solve social dilemmas through the internalization of social responsibility norms and creating social value orientations, which are determine the prosocial behaviour of economic agents. The institutional system of social responsibility was described from the methodological institutionalism point of view. Analysing this phenomenon we are required to develop research on the objects of this system (norms, regulations, behaviour, on the subjects of this system (persons, business, government and on the institutional mechanisms (internalization of social responsibility norms, promoting prosocial behaviour, adaptation and transformation of the social responsibility norms aimed to ensure the understanding of origin and significance of social responsibility for modern society.

  18. Penerapan Corporate Social Responsibility dengan Konsep Community Based Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Suriany

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Business is not only economic institution, but social institution too. As social institution, business has responsibility to help society in solving social problem. This responsibility called Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). CSR pays attention about social problem and environment, so CSR support continuous development to help government role. Nowadays, our government has national development’s agenda. One of them is tourism sector (Visit Indonesia Year 2008 programmed). But ...

  19. Corporate social responsibility of future radiology professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sandra K; Collins, Kevin S

    2011-01-01

    Plagued by difficult economic times, many radiology managers may find themselves faced with ethical dilemmas surrounding ongoing organizational pressures to maintain high levels of productivity with restricted resources. This often times tests the level of moral resilience and corporate social consciousness of even the most experienced radiology professionals. A study was conducted to determine what Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) orientation and viewpoint future radiology professionals may have. The results of the study indicate that these study participants may initially consider patient care more important than profit maximization. Study results indicate that these specific future radiology professionals will not need laws, legal sanctions, and intensified rules to force them to act ethically. However,they may need ongoing training as to the necessity of profit maximization if they seek the highest quality of care possible for their patients.

  20. The glucocorticoid stress response is attenuated but unrelated to reproductive investment during parental care in a teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Constance M; Yick, Claire Y; Gilmour, Kathleen M; Van Der Kraak, Glen; Cooke, Steven J

    2011-01-15

    We investigated whether circulating glucocorticoids and androgens are correlated with reproductive investment in smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), a teleost fish with sole paternal care. Circulating cortisol and androgens prior to and 25 min following a standardized 3 min emersion stressor were quantified for non-reproductive and parental fish across the parental care period. To experimentally investigate the influence of reproductive investment on endocrine parameters, we manipulated brood size (reduced, enlarged, sham-treated, or unmanipulated) 24h prior to sampling parental fish. We predicted that fish guarding offspring would exhibit increased androgens and baseline cortisol levels, and an attenuated cortisol response to the stressor when compared with non-reproductive individuals. We further predicted that these effects would scale with reproductive investment. As predicted, parental care-providing fish exhibited lower post-stress plasma cortisol concentrations than non-reproductive fish. This difference was strongest early during parental care. However, no differences in baseline or post-stress cortisol concentrations were detected among parents guarding offspring with varying brood sizes. There was, however, a trend for parental fish to exhibit an increased cortisol response following brood manipulation, regardless of the direction of change in brood size, a response that likely reflected disturbance. No differences were found in baseline cortisol concentrations. Circulating androgens were found to be highest during early parental care, and no differences were found among parents guarding manipulated broods. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that the endocrine stress response is affected by reproductive status, but the response in this model species does not appear to be scaled according to reproductive investment as predicted by life-history theory. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Work family-life balance and social investment strategies in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Bent

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses and discusses the options and possibilities of combining work and family life in a universal welfare state, e. g. Denmark. Related to the ability to combine work and family life is the welfare states investment in affordable and high quality day care and a perspective...... on caring for elderly citizens. The theoretical underpinnings of universal welfare states is given and also the reason why it has been important to ensure and be able to combine work and family life. The article shows how Denmark, Sweden and Finland compare with countries from other and different types...

  2. Philanthropy and sponsion as constituents of social responsibility of business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pashniuk L.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The essence and results of social responsibility of business are considered. Some components of social responsibility of business such as philanthropy and sponsorship are investigated. The main differences of them are defined.

  3. Social responsibility: conceptualization and embodiment in a school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Maureen A; Connor, Ann; Kun, Karen E; Salmon, Marla E

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes how a school of nursing has conceptualized and embodied social responsibility in its core values, curricular design, admission standards, clinical practice, and service learning opportunities. The school's engagement in the process of practicing social responsibility and clarifying its meaning and application has made apparent the natural linkage between social responsibility and professionalism and the deep and complex relationship between social responsibility and nursing itself. It has also revealed how a commitment to social responsibility impacts and determines for whom nurses care. Claiming social responsibility as a core value and working to refine its meaning and place has increased the school's commitment to it, concomitantly impacting education, practice, and recruitment and evaluation of faculty and students. The school views the conceptualization of social responsibility as a deepening and unfolding evolution, rather than as a formulaic understanding, and expects that its ongoing work of claiming social responsibility as a core value will continue to be enriching.

  4. The mechanisms for social and environmentally responsible agricultural land use

    OpenAIRE

    Ye. Mishenin; I. Yarova

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with arguments that the most effective mechanism for greening use of land resources is to increase the level of social and environmental responsibility. The mechanisms for social and environmentally responsible agricultural land use are formed.

  5. Business social responsibility in Ukraine: the marketing aspect

    OpenAIRE

    Firsova, S.

    2010-01-01

    The article deals with problems of researching the category "social business responsibility", ways of its realization and marketing means of implementation and support of socially responsible initiatives in Ukrainian companies.

  6. Determinants of Corporate Social Responsibility in Japanese Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Krukowska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyze the factors that determine the Japanese approach to corporate social responsibility (CSR to facilitate future empirical research in the Polish conditions. Methodology: To conduct the research, the available literature concerning CSR, managerial behaviour and stakeholder relations in Japan was studied. The research was conducted onsite in Japan after consultation with local experts, both Japanese and foreigners, specialized in Japanese management and the economy. Findings: The Japanese approach to CSR is strongly determined by their religious, philosophical, cultural, historical, economic and legal factors. It is proof of the concept of CSR contextuality, which provokes questions about the nature of the business relations of Japanese companies with their foreign counterparts and their style of management while investing abroad. Research limitations: The methodology was only supposed to gain a general view of the factors infl uencing CSR in Japan. Studying more detailed issues with the use of empirical data was complicated because of the short time available for the research (6 weeks and the relatively low level of transparency of the Japanese companies. Value: The study helped in understanding managerial decisions and Japanese business behaviour in the context of corporate responsibility and the ethics of its everyday operations. It was the fi rst research thoroughly analyzing many of the determinants of CSR in Japan, which may be valuable for any counterparts cooperating with the Japanese companies and foreign researchers analyzing Japanese management systems.

  7. Solution of Media Risk and Social Responsibility Governance of Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Yuan; Li Ming-De; Zhang Hong-Bang

    2017-01-01

    The rapid development of media technology makes the modern society become a “social media” or even “over social media”, the rise of social media makes it beyond the tool attribute, and become an important force in the reconstruction of contemporary society, the risk of concomitant. The anomie and breach of Social media regularly staged, weakened its positive social function, forcing us to think about the social responsibility of social media,which are reflections on the lack of responsibility...

  8. SOCIAL RESPONSABILITY AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE IN EVALUATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRON VASILE-CRISTIAN-IOACHIM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of an entity's economic performance is often perceived by the public as being limited to the analyses carried based on a component of the annual financial statements or on a component of the profit and loss account. We believe, however, that the current financial reporting system no longer offers an informational potential sufficiently high in the process of assessing the performance of an economic entity, and we sustain the large scale introduction of an additional component of reporting (voluntary or required by legal settlements that must be seen as ethical behavior in reporting. This study aims to bring to light this ethical component of reporting by analyzing the concepts of social responsibility and corporate governance, analyzing specialized literature concerning these concepts, but also how this "ethical behavior" is experienced at the level of the entities that activate in the energy sector. In other words, this approach is not an analysis of the ethics in the research of economic performance of entities, but a research of the ethical side of the performance analysis. However, an important objective of this study is to analyze and assess the extent to which ethical behavior of economic entities (shown here by the application and reporting related to social responsibility and corporate governance can influence the performance of an economic entity, or they represent a consequence of performance. The results of the study show that at the level of the analyzed entities from the energy sector there are different approaches in terms of both applying the concepts of social responsibility and corporate governance, as well as regarding the way of reporting these issues. If in the application of these concepts, we can assume that each economic entity is free to find its own vision, regarding the manner of reporting the application of these concepts, we believe that this should be done in a more unitary way, in order to ensure

  9. Development and Examination of Personal and Social Responsibility Behaviors Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Bijen FİLİZ; Gıyasettin DEMİRHAN

    2018-01-01

    In this study, “Personal and Social Responsibility Behaviors Scale (PSRB-S)” was developed in order to determine students’ responsibility behaviors in accordance with “Personal and Social Responsibility” model developed by Don Hellison and students’ personal and social responsibility levels were examined in terms of gender, age and years of sport practice through this scale. Pertaining to personal and social dimension of responsibility, four-category Likert type trial scale consisting of 52 i...

  10. Investing in People: Building Social Capital. Profiles of Excellence in Business and Education Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ralph S.

    One of the challenges that faces business and education leaders today is creating an environment in their workplaces and classrooms that is conducive to the "New Realities of Learning." Social capital is a third asset that should be added to the list of key competitive advantages that includes knowledge and human capital. Social capital…

  11. Institutional investment in social rental housing : France, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom explored

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haffner, M.E.A.; Hoekstra, J.S.C.M.; Tang, C.; Oxley, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, social landlords are facing decreasing governmental financial support for them to fulfil their role in the provision of social housing, which has led to increasing pressure on them to rely on private capital. Traditionally, bank loans were the main source of private capital,

  12. Training Is an Investment with Return in Temporary Workers: A Social Exchange Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambel, Maria Jose; Sobral, Filipa

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse whether a social exchange relationship between temporary workers and organizations is possible. The authors aim to consider whether, when training is perceived by an employee as an organizational practice that promotes his or her employability, this entails a social exchange relationship.…

  13. Social responsibility: a double corporative strategy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel da Silva Pereira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study, eminently theoretical and based on specific literature review, presents a brief historical approach on the corporative social responsibility, besides offering an updated view of the main norms, existing certifications and awardings in the area, searching, in a wider context, to understand both the original strategical meaning of these actions and this new clipping of observation and analysis, which points to a new niche market, with the trading of products and services that aim to support the companies in the socio-environmental issues. Would this new market assumed the corporative strategy condition?

  14. Socially responsible intellectual property: a solution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbe E. L. Brown

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the extent to which the present global IP system contains an inherent imbalance between the rights of IP owning corporations and IP users, and the public benefit. It also studies the potential relevance of human rights in redressing any imbalance within existing institutional and legal fora. The article focuses on the relevance of corporate social responsibility (“CSR” related concepts, particularly in conjunction with legal human rights based arguments, to redress any imbalance by tempering the global conduct of IP owning corporations; how this new approach could be enforced, if at all, and the resulting lessons for IP and its future.

  15. Multimodal Aspects of Corporate Social Responsibility Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Daniela Maier

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses how the multimodal persuasive strategies of corporate social responsibility communication can highlight a company’s commitment to gender empowerment and environmental protection while advertising simultaneously its products. Drawing on an interdisciplinary methodological framework related to CSR communication, multimodal discourse analysis and gender theory, the article proposes a multimodal analysis model through which it is possible to map and explain the multimodal persuasive strategies employed by Coca-Cola company in their community-related films. By examining the semiotic modes’ interconnectivity and functional differentiation, this analytical endeavour expands the existing research work as the usual textual focus is extended to a multimodal one.

  16. Corporate Social Responsibility and Managing Ethical Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeney Widya Prihatiningtias

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay argues that the promotion of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR and ethical business conduct is very important. CSR nowadays has become crucial issue as major companies are expected to demonstrate their commitment to society’s values through actions. The current article explains, evaluates, and applies to relevant examples of the narrow, broader socio-economic, as well as broad maximal view of CSR. It also critically describes how organizations can develop ethical cultures and corporate ethics programs for CSR.

  17. Antipodean Social Policy Responses to Economic Crises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    the government enacted fiscal stimulus measures, the social policy component was small and the government soon returned to welfare retrenchment and workfare policy. Based on a detailed account of recent crisis policies as well as a condensed overview of previous crisis responses (to the 1970s oil shocks......, interest group structures, political institutions and policy legacies. The analysis shows that the recent differences cannot fully be explained through idiosyncratic factors, as partisan ideology was already crucial in strategic policy decisions during the first months of the crisis. The historical pattern...

  18. Corporate social responsibility in hotel industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Abram

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The first objective of this article is to describe the fundamental aspects of the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR. The second goal is to present the activities, or the so-called good practices that hotels may take up and which are in tandem with the idea of CSR. The good practices will be described on the example of Polish hotel group and two hotels active on the Polish market, especially in Krakow. The article outlines possible benefits resulting from the implementation of CSR principles into the hotel strategy.

  19. Corporate Social Responsibility in the Board Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jette Steen; Geisler, Kathrine; Ege, Mette

    2013-01-01

    When do board directors pay attention to corporate social responsibility (CSR) issues? Board directors have traditionally focused on maximizing shareholder profit and viewed corporate governance narrowly as a way to meet this goal. They have paid little or no attention to CSR issues because...... they see CSR as a contrast to profit maximization. We argue in this article that companies can no longer ignore CSR. We propose that three conditions must be met in order for boards to pay attention toCSR. First, the board must have a mindset that considers CSR as contributing value to the firm. Second...

  20. Social Responsibility in the Board Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ege, Mette; Geisler, Kathrine; Knudsen, Jette Steen

    When do board directors pay attention to corporate social responsibility (CSR) issues? Board directors have traditionally focused on maximizing shareholder profit and viewed corporate governance narrowly as a way to meet this goal. They have paid little or no attention to CSR issues because...... they see CSR as a contrast to profit maximization. We argue in this article that companies can no longer ignore CSR. We propose that three conditions must be met in order for boards to pay attention to CSR. First, the board must have a mind-set that considers CSR as contributing value to the firm. Second...

  1. Corporate Social Responsibility: A Cross Sectional Examination of Incentivization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    which address organizational behavior: Corporate Social Responsibility ( CSR ), Expense Preference Approach (EPA), Resource Dependency Theory (RDT...i V *>V CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY : A CROSS SECTIONAL EXAMINATION OF INCENTIVIZATION THESIS Jennifer A. Block, B.S. First Lieutenant, USAF...Distribution/ Availability Codes Dist m Avail and/or Special \\&\\W 0\\1 CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY : A CROSS SECTIONAL EXAMINATION OF

  2. TAX REFORMS AND INVESTMENT IN NIGERIA: AN EMPIRICAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    Tax generated revenues are used to finance public utilities, perform social responsibilities and grease the ..... Capital Theory and Investment Behaviours, The American Review,. 53:247-257. ... ESUT Journal of Accounting, 5(2). December ...

  3. Investing for Impact: The Global Fund Approach to Measurement of AIDS Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Suman; Zorzi, Nathalie

    2017-07-01

    The Global Fund raises and invests nearly US$4 billion a year to support programs run in more than 140 countries. The Global Fund strategy 2012-2016 is focused on "Investing for Impact". In order to accomplish this, timely and accurate data are needed to inform strategies and prioritize activities to achieve greater coverage with quality services. Monitoring and evaluation is intrinsic to the Global Fund's system of performance-based funding. The Global Fund invests in strengthening measurement and reporting of results at all stages of the grant cycle. The Global Fund approach to measurement is based on three key principles-(1) simplified reporting: the Global Fund has updated its measurement guidance to focus on impact, coverage and quality with the use of a harmonized set of indicators. (2) Supporting data systems-based on a common framework developed and supported by partners, it promotes investment in five common data systems: routine reporting including HMIS; Surveys-population based and risk group surveys; Analysis, reviews and transparency; Administrative and financial data sources; and, Vital registration systems. (3) Strengthen data use: the Global Fund funding encourages use of data at all levels-national, subnational and site level. Countries do not automatically prioritize M&E but when guidance, tools and investments are available, there is high level utilization of M&E systems in program design, planning, implementation, and results reporting. An in-depth analysis of the available data helps the Global Fund and countries to direct investments towards interventions where impact could be achieved and focus on target population groups and geographic areas that are most affected.

  4. Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmentally Sound Technology in Endogenous Firm Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela C. Chao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We have entered the “New Normal” economy, with more emphasis on economic growth driven by innovation than resource. This paper investigates the impacts of firms considering corporate social responsibility and environmentally sound technology by building a three-stage Cournot competition model with asymmetric cost. The sustainable development of economic and endogenous firm growth achieves the win–win result in the theoretical model. Using data from 31 firms in China, this paper empirically researches on the relationships among corporate social responsibility, environmentally sound technology and firm endogenous growth. The results show that: (1 Marginal cost decreased with the increase of innovation, as well as getting government research and development subsidy, which has a positive effect on firm growth. (2 Consumers respond positively to corporate social responsibility initiative, the reputation of the firm can be improved. At the same time, environmentally sound technology objectively reduces the marginal cost of competitors because of the technology spillover. (3 Profit of a firm undertaking corporate social responsibility partly decreases, which has a negative effect on firm growth. The contradiction between corporate social responsibility and profit of firm could be adjusted, such as socially responsible investment fund hosed by institutional investors.

  5. What really drives corporate social responsibility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Stojanovic-Aleksic

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Corporate social responsibility (CSR can be motivated either by instrumental, moral or obligatory factors. The paper aims to explore how these motives influence the level of CSR. Specific attention is paid to the CSR in state-owned and private companies, since their motives are significantly different. In order to examine these relationships, we applied a set of statistical techniques. The findings indicate that internal CSR is more developed if philanthropic motives are dominant. Also, CSR in general, internal CSR and responsibility to customers, are higher in state-owned companies, compared to the private ones. The contribution of the paper is reflected in the discovery of new insights, which are the basis for future research, but also useful for directing the activities of management in the field of CSR which is one of the key preconditions for sustainable business.

  6. Humanity and Social Responsibility, Solidarity, and Social Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahola-Launonen, Johanna

    2016-04-01

    This article discusses the suggestion of having the notion of solidarity as the foundational value for welfare scheme reforms. Solidarity is an emerging concept in bioethical deliberations emphasizing the need for value-oriented discussion in revising healthcare structures, and the notion has been contrasted with liberal justice and rights. I suggest that this contrast is unnecessary, flawed, and potentially counterproductive. As necessary as the sense of solidarity is in a society, it is an insufficient concept to secure the goals related to social responsibility. The discussion on solidarity is also based on a questionable sense of nostalgia. Furthermore, solidarity and liberal justice share essential objectives concerning welfare schemes; therefore, the question arises whether the proper comparison should in the first place be within justice and solidarity.

  7. Health insurance and corporate social responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Innovation drives productivity in the nonprofit sector as well as in the commercial sector. The greatest advances come not from incremental improvements in efficiency but from new and better approaches. The most powerful way to create social value, therefore, is by developing a new means to address social problems and putting it into widespread practice. The expertise, research capacity, and reach that companies bring to philanthropy can help nonprofits create new solutions that they could never afford to develop on their own. Corporate managers sometimes work directly with faculty and community residents to implement local business projects. These projects often have significant societal benefits, especially since student collaboration and involvement extend to communities in many different inner cities. These projects are incredibly diverse and through such initiatives, management education not only provides an educationally rewarding outlet for students but also endows and enriches inner city communities. Management students sometimes work directly with faculty and community residents to implement local business projects. These projects often have significant societal benefits, especially since student collaboration and involvement extend to communities in many different inner cities. These projects are incredibly diverse and through such initiatives, management education not only provides an educationally rewarding outlet for students but also endows and enriches inner city communities. This article looks at how to use corporate social responsibility and service learning to drive innovation for local inner-city economic development.

  8. Iranian Corporations and Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Chapardar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Comparative studies have demonstrated that the themes for corporate social responsibility (CSR initiatives are different among nations and geographic regions based on their cultural, political, legal, social, and economic contexts. In this research, which was conducted on 56 corporations from IMI100 (100 Iranian companies with highest annual sales, ranked by Industrial Management Institute or IMI, CSR themes in priority have been identified. Data collected from a semistructured questionnaire and some complementary interviews were analyzed against the results of a reference study over 100 companies from developed countries. The resulted themes, some of which may have several subthemes, were developed in three economic, environmental, and social categories. Beside these qualitative findings, two indices are constructed for indicating the “importance” of and “contribution” to each theme. The results and discussions are supposed to help business leaders, international companies inside Iran, governmental authorities, and researchers to improve CSR discussions and practices in the country where CSR undergoes a less structured platform.

  9. Women on boards and corporate social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Gennari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Data by EU Commission show a low representation of women on boards. The scope of this article is to read contemporary and according to a managerial approach the possible causes of this situation: the availability of skills possessed by women to cover top positions, the presence of binding or self-regulatory rules and the corporate culture towards CSR approach. Our research is focused on EU countries, where the gender equality on board is currently matter of attention and regulatory interventions. We conclude that the scarce presence of women in the boardrooms is not ascribable to a scarcity of expertise, but it is associated with a social background and a corporate culture not inspired by corporate global responsibility values. Regulatory interventions may accelerate the consciousness of gender balance on boards, but without companies’ commitment in CSR matters and without a clear vision of corporate global responsibility (including economic, social and environmental aspects, they tend to become additional tasks in the management of corporate compliance risk.

  10. Dakwah Corporate Social Responsibility di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ade Iwan Ridwanullah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to describe the implementation of proselytism of corporate social responsibility (CSR that is conducted by the company as a business entity that manages natural resources and obligates to carry out social responsibility and environmental enterprise. CSR activities are not only philanthropic activities that have no clear direction and achievement, but those can also be expressed as the realization of proselytism programs in the form of community development with the aim to create the quality of life. The concept of proselytism is not only synonymous with tabligh but also encompassing all aspects of human life to create the change towards the best. The main principle in this proselytism activities is to foster awareness and strength in society as the object of proselytism itself with the aim of improving welfare. Proselytism activities of CSR for people who are in the agricultural area as the main commodity of society are implemented through activities; Land lending, business capital strengthening, management and agricultural development, agricultural cultivation training and marketing of agricultural products. The success of proselytism activities of CSR is supported by factors that support activities such as; Resources, communication and organizational structure that affect each other and strengthen one another.

  11. Output responses to infrastructure investment in the Netherlands, 1850-1913

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groote, Peter; Jacobs, Jan; Sturm, Jan-Egbert

    1995-01-01

    This paper combines a new historical data set regarding capital formation in infrastructure in the Netherlands in the nineteenth century with data-oriented econometric techniques aimed at testing the causal relationship between these infrastructural investments and economic growth. The resulting

  12. Risk implications of investments in demand response from an aggregator perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, Jonas; Kitzing, Lena

    2016-01-01

    gross margins and their probability distributions. We find that, for a case of Danish residential customers with optimistic assumptions on the available flexibility in terms of flexible volumes and load-shift time horizons, the benefits may be in the range of current investment cost for automation...

  13. The social construction of real estate market risk. The case of a financial investments cluster in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise David

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article contributes to the study of the geographical concentration of financial investments in real estate markets. It demonstrates the social construction process at work in the evolution of real estate market risks. The objective is to highlight the conditions that allow or impede the implementation of ‘opportunistic’ and ‘conservative’ risk strategies. By analyzing the market entry of financial investors in the Cuautitlan industrial real estate market - an ‘emerging’ real estate market in Mexico City - this paper demonstrates that, due to the joint action of land developers, non-financial as well as financial real estate investors, this market moved from being ‘too risky’ to becoming an opportunistic market, and then a conservative one. There were two important phases in the transformation process. First, the contribution of land developers was fundamental to the transformation of the market from being too risky to being opportunistic from the perspective of financial investors. Two different types of land developers are evident: some are not willing to help financial investors’ entry in the market while others developed a business plan designed to facilitate financial investments. In the second phase of the market’s risks transformation, opportunistic financial investors enabled the conditions for the arrival of conservative financial investors, thanks to their presence in emerging markets and the diffusion of information.

  14. Corporate Social and Ecological Responsibility of Russian Coal Mining Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Ravochkin Nikita; Shchennikov Vladimir; Syrov Vasiliy

    2017-01-01

    Based on the provisions of corporate social responsibility and taking into account the specifics of Russian mining enterprises, the authors attempt to understand theoretically the corporate social and environmental responsibility in this paper. The study shows that the essence of the principles of socially responsible behavior has ancient roots, while the consumer's attitude towards nature begins only in the era of modern times. The genesis, evolution and transformation of social responsibili...

  15. Corporate social responsibility as a source of employee satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Bauman, Christopher W.; Skitka, Linda J.

    2012-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility has received an increasing amount of attention from practitioners and scholars alike in recent years. However, very little is known about whether or how corporate social responsibility affects employees. Because employees are primary stakeholders who directly contribute to the success of the company, understanding employee reactions to corporate social responsibility may help answer lingering questions about the potential effects of corporate social responsibil...

  16. Group Effects on Individual Attitudes Toward Social Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchi, Davide; Bui, Hong T M

    2018-01-01

    This study uses a quasi-experimental design to investigate what happens to individual socially responsible attitudes when they are exposed to group dynamics. Findings show that group engagement increases individual attitudes toward social responsibility. We also found that individuals with low attitudes toward social responsibility are more likely to change their opinions when group members show more positive attitudes toward social responsibility. Conversely, individuals with high attitudes do not change much, independent of group characteristics. To better analyze the effect of group dynamics, the study proposes to split social responsibility into relative and absolute components. Findings show that relative social responsibility is correlated with but different from absolute social responsibility although the latter is more susceptible than the former to group dynamics.

  17. Optimal Regulation of Lumpy Investments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, G.; Broer, D.P.

    2012-01-01

    When a monopolist has discretion over the timing of infrastructure investments, regulation of post-investment prices interferes with incentivizing socially optimal investment timing. In a model of regulated lumpy investment under uncertainty, we study regulation when the regulator can condition

  18. Social contract theory as a foundation of the social responsibilities of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welie, Jos V M

    2012-08-01

    This paper seeks to define and delimit the scope of the social responsibilities of health professionals in reference to the concept of a social contract. While drawing on both historical data and current empirical information, this paper will primarily proceed analytically and examine the theoretical feasibility of deriving social responsibilities from the phenomenon of professionalism via the concept of a social contract.

  19. Correlation between social responsibility and efficient performance in Croatian enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Vitezić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research is to establish if there is a correlation between efficiency and socially responsible business performance in Croatian enterprises. The research is based on the hypothesis that higher corporate efficiency affects social responsibility development in enterprises and vice versa, that socially more responsible corporate performance have a positive effect on efficiency. In their research, many authors have proved the correlation between social responsibility and financial performance, reputation of the enterprise and added value. Cases from transition countries, which transferred to market economy and focused on socially responsible management and sustainability, have not been the subject of research. The social responsibility concept implies balance between economic, ecological and social goals, which means distribution of assets on several actors, so it may be predicted that more efficient enterprises will sooner accept the sustainability concept and act more responsibly. Except for theoretical social responsibility hypothesis, the initial point in the empirical section is dynamic analysis of business activities of Croatian entrepreneurs in the period between 1993 and 2010, on the basis of which a sample of enterprises was chosen, which submit transparent reports on social responsibility. The main result obtained by univariate analysis confirms that socially more responsible enterprises have better financial results, i.e. they are more efficient, and also have better reputation. The research also had limitations in relation to qualitative determination of the social responsibility impact on efficiency. The conclusion is derived that there is a causal relationship between efficiency and social responsibility, i.e. higher efficiency level enables higher allocation of resources with the purpose of socially more responsible corporate performance and vice versa; socially responsible corporate performance have an impact on

  20. Romanian Campaigns on Corporate Social Responsibility – Signs of Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Patrut

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Organizations play an important role in the development of the modern society since managers have become aware that financial profit highly depends on community involvement. The active participation of organizations in community life implies to adapt global strategies to local issues or to promote local issues at a global level. Actually this is the essence of glocalization. The means by which organizations can achieve these glocal objectives is CSR campaigns.  CSR represents an instrument used to solve diverse issues, such as: human rights, environment and climate change, education, support for vulnerable groups, sustainable development, or establishment of moral capitalism. Within the context of the ever-rising internet access of all audiences, CSR campaigns have become more visible and have capitalized on the advantages of collective intelligence, internet users’ participation and their user generated contents. The purpose of our study is to provide an insight into (1 the prominence of Romanian organizations which are the most socially responsible, (2 the domains in which Romanian organizations have invested; (3 the salience of CSR 1.0 and CSR 2.0 tools used in the promotion of CSR campaigns in Romania. 

  1. Private Capital, Public Goods: Forest Plantations' Investment in Local Infrastructure and Social Services in Rural Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degnet, M.B.; Werf, van der E.; Ingram, V.J.; Wesseler, Justus

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid expansion of private forest plantations worldwide, their impacts on local development are under scrutiny by NGOs and researchers alike. This study investigates the impacts of private forest plantations on local infrastructure and social services in rural Tanzania. We take a

  2. Prepare to Engage: Building Relationships through Social Media Is a Smart Investment for Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doak, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The people an educational institution is trying to reach--prospective and current students, alumni and parents, to name a few--are no longer passive recipients of press releases and newsletters. They are on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, and any other social media platform that comes to mind. What can sometimes get lost amid the constant…

  3. The effect of social network sites on adolescents’ appearance investment and desire for cosmetic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, D.; Peter, J.; Nikken, P.; de Graaf, H.

    2013-01-01

    Although adolescents frequently use social network sites (SNS), little is known about whether the highly visual and self-presentation-centered character of such sites affects body-related outcomes. The first aim of the current study was to investigate the causal direction of the relationship between

  4. Europe's global responsibility to govern trade and investment sustainability: climate, capital, CAP and Cotonou

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, T.F.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the progress made towards forging a Sustainable Development Strategy of the European Union on the basis of three structures of the global economy: Trade, Investment and Knowledge Generation. It identifies deficits in all three, and cites alternatives for improvement such as acknowledging ecological debt and setting up a Global Marshall Plan. It outlines how, over the medium term, compatibility with trade law could be maintained, and how Sustainability Impact Assessments (SIA) could cushion the effects of the current governance regimes. It then considers alternatives such as encouraging the EU's African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) partners to form Regional Trade Areas among themselves. Guidance is given regarding reform of the Common Agricultural Policy and the question as to whether the investment regime can be governed multilaterally and, if so, at which venue. (author)

  5. Earnings Management and Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Uyagu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study lies at the heart of the issue of reliability of financial statements. Reliability is the accountant’s terminology for integrity of financial statements. This study focused on the impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on earnings management in the Nigerian manufacturing sectors. The study is motivated by the paucity of research on subject matter in manufacturing sub-sector in Nigeria. The study employed the ordinary least square multivariate regression technique. A sample of fifty- two manufacturing firms was used. The result shows that there is a positive relationship between CSR and earnings management. This study recommended that statutory bodies should put a ceiling on the amount to be expended on CSR which must be exceeded by any firm.

  6. Corporate Social Responsibility and UK Retailers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jones

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers a preliminary examination of the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR commitments and agendas being addressed and reported by the UK‟s leading retailers. The paper begins with a short discussion of the characteristics and origins of CSR and of the current structure of retailing in the UK. This is followed by an illustrative examination of the CSR issues publicly reported by the UK‟s top ten country of origin retailers and the paper draws its empirical material from the CSR reports posted on the World Wide Web by these retailers. The findings reveal that the UK‟s top ten retailers are addressing and reporting on four sets of CSR themes namely those relating to the environment; the marketplace; the workplace and the community. The paper concludes with a discussion of a number of general issues relating to these themes.

  7. Determinant of The Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uun Sunarsih

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR has a very important role for the company and now become an obligation for every company. The purpose of this study examined the effect of institutional ownership, board of commissioners, profitability and size on CSR disclosure. This research conducted at mining manufacturing companies listed in Indonesia Stock Exchange period 2013-2014 and obtained 76 sample companies. The method used is multiple regression analysis. The result showed only institutional ownership affecting CSR disclosure. This suggests institutional ownership structure can act in monitoring the company. Independent board has not effected on CSR, it failed to monitor the actions of top management. Profitability has not effected on the disclosure of CSR, it enabled the company to have two perspectives on CSR. The most companies view CSR as a deduction from earnings. CSR disclosure has not affect the size of the CSR disclosure area.DOI: 10.15408/etk.v16i2.5236

  8. Corporate Social Responsibility and Labour Agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Coe, Neil M.

    2015-01-01

    to which the measures advocated in a new, emerging policy paradigm on CSR in GPNs enabled labour agency at Nike’s main football supplier factory in Pakistan. We argue that while such CSR policies can create enhanced space for labour agency, that potential agency is also shaped (i) by wider economic forces......This article examines the circumstances under which corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives facilitate and/or constrain labour agency in global production networks (GPNs). Using a case study of Nike’s CSR approach in the football manufacturing industry of Pakistan, we explore the extent...... within the global economy and (ii) relationships with local/national actors and regulatory frameworks. Understanding the intersection of these dimensions becomes vital to interpreting the potential for, and activation of, labour agency within CSR-influenced GPNs....

  9. Corporate Social Responsibility in the Water Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauesen, Linne Marie

    . Instead a simulated market and state regulation has been introduces with annual, national benchmarking to set a price cap as an upper limit for the consumer-price of water. Similar systems are seen in fully privatised water companies in the United Kingdom, the United States, and partially in South Africa......This PhD thesis is the outcome of three-year doctoral study of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and stakeholder engagement in the water sector. This study contributes to new knowledge about water companies formed as hybrid organisations in the aftermath of the new public management (NPM) era...... worldwide. Today we see different hybrid organisations of water companies around the world that have either been fully privatised or quasi-privatised. Quasi-privatisation in Denmark means that water utilities are still perceived as natural monopolies, which has not made them into for-profit driven companies...

  10. The Communications of Corporate Social Responsability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Bucur

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper present the role and interaction between communication and Corporate Social Responsibility, strengtheningin the same time that communication it is a key factor to begin and keep a proper Sustainable Development strategy. The importance of communication is essential, taking in consideration the awareness in the interior and in the exterior of organization strategy, ethical, ecological and socio-economical objectives, since information regarding the impact of the company’s activities, products and services as well as regarding the impacts of changes that can supervene in time, can only be provided in this way. Since there are many ways to communicate regarding the actions of CSR, it is important to know what kind of messages and ideas can resonate with a certain audience, considering the stage in which the ISO 26000 standard’s development stands.

  11. Corporate Responses to Social Issues: Essays in Social Entrepreneurship and Corporate Social Responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O.P. Akemu (Ona)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractCorporations face pressure from governments, civil society groups and consumers to respond to social problems in their operating environments or to improve the sustainability characteristics of their products, services and supply chains. Companies respond to these problems in order

  12. Ecological Modernization and Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naira Tomiello

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the role of social and environmental enterprises revealed in the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR and analyzed in the light of Ecological Modernization Theory (TME.The overall objective of this study is to understand CSR from the perspectiveof TME through more detailed research of a CSR program called  Clube dos Produtores [Producers Club].This program aims to influence the supply chain to adopt responsible and sustainable practices, and seeks to strengthen the small and medium producers through structured actions, such as training, qualification, and inspection, stimulating quality, innovation and productivity growth. It is conducted in parallel, in Portugal, by the Rede Sonae de Distribuição and, in Brazil, by Walmart Company. The data collection included both Countries. In Portugal, the Clube dos Produtores has emerged to combine the synergy between distribution and production and promote the development of domestic production. It takes the environment as the genesis for its creation, maintains a nationalist approach by encouraging the consumption of domestic products, and recognizes consumer pressure as the force for continuous innovation of products and services. In addition, it reconciles tradition and modernity through products supported by different generations. In Brazil, the Club is founded on the sustainability discourse; the customer awareness about environmental issues was not captured in the research; the producers innovations result from their own initiatives to participate in fairs or from direct contact with consumers; the dialogue between tradition and modernity occurs primarily through the entrepreneurial capacity of the producers and less direct intervention by Walmart.

  13. SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY VALUES: A CROSS COUNTRY COMPARISON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CATANA DOINA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This empirical study aims at finding out how similar and/or different are the future Romanian and Slovenian managers in assessing the importance of organizations social responsibility values. The assumption of the research is that most of most of students in engineering and business will hold middle management position in the near future. The sample consists of 727 undergraduate and graduate students levels from Romania and Slovenia, two former socialist countries. The data has been collected between 2008 and 2009 in the framework of GLOBE student project , using a section of GLOBE III questionnaire, about the importance of CSR related values in critical decisions. The findings concern the similarities and significant differences between: 1 whole Romanian and Slovenian samples; 2 Romanian and Slovenian students in engineering; 3 Romanian and Slovenian students in business. Our findings revealed a trend toward convergence in the importance given to decisions effect on contribution to the economic welfare of the nation and local community, as well as on employees professional growth and development and on environment. The biggest difference between the groups concerns the decisions effect on firm profitability (the Romanians considering this value as more important in critical decisions than the Slovenians. The students in engineering proved to be a more homogeneous group, showing convergence in assessing the importance of eight out of fifteen social responsibility values. The biggest difference concerns the decisions effect on firm profitability (Romanians consider it as having higher importance in critical decisions than the Slovenians. Comparison of students in business revealed convergence in assessing the importance of employees professional growth and development and decisions effect on environment. The biggest positive difference concerns the same value of decisions effect on firm profitability. The Romanians are well behind Slovenians in

  14. Corporate social responsibility and safety and health at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, G.; Starren, A.; Schenk, C.; Heuverswyn, K.; Kauppinnen, K.; Lindstrom, K.; Kuhn, K.; Zwink, E.; Lentisco, F.; Vaselli, D.; Pujol, L.; Bestraten, M.; Shearn, P.; Kenny, L.; Goudswaard, A.; Bovenkamp, M. van de

    2004-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) was defined by the European Commission as a concept whereby companies integrate social and environmental concerns in their business operations and in their interaction with their stakeholders on a voluntary basis. To be socially responsible means going beyond

  15. Monitoring and evaluation of corporate social responsibility programmes in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renitha Rampersad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The South African corporate sector invests millions to support community development and social programs. One of the more fundamental issues about sustainability in a business context is the fact that directors have a fiduciary duty to take into account interests of those stakeholders other than investors/shareholders. This therefore places major importance on sustainability reporting through reports on governance, economic, social and environmental performance and is increasingly being regarded as a key form of stakeholder engagement, and the most accepted formal way of communicating measured outcomes to all stakeholders. A number of methodologies may exist for the development of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR strategies or “how-to guides” for community engagement and investment, however, it lacks development in the field of CSR Programme Evaluation. Integrated approaches to the measurement thereof are still in expanding stages of development and statistical data and/or empirical evidence is lacking at this point. Trust and relationships take time to build but are valuable assets, therefore a company must show it has listened and acted in response to stakeholder concerns, this means that ongoing communication and reporting back to stakeholders is a very important component in any engagement strategy. It is therefore important for the corporate sector to not only evaluate the effectiveness of their CSR Programmes, but also to measure the impact on both their beneficiary communities and their business and subsequently on the Return on Investment (ROI. This paper will highlight a case of the South African corporate sectors attempts to evaluate its effectiveness and impact on beneficiary communities and how they quantify the impact of the investment through successful CSR interventions.

  16. Housing property and welfare state change: Social investment and asset-based welfare as compatible social policy approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lennartz, C.; Ronald, R.

    2015-01-01

    Structural economic and family-demographic shifts, as well as socio-economic integration processes at the EU level have led to profound transformations of the established social policy models in Europe in the past two decades. Notwithstanding the considerable variations across nations and regime

  17. “GREEN” CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY: TO BE OR NOT TO BE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrah Merlinda Muharam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental evolutions such as climate change hav e triggered firms’ cultural behaviour in conducting businesses. With this new a wakening consciousness, more attentions are demanded so that firms put its priority of generating profits hand in hand with sustaining the environment. While the environmental benefits are more evident to society, the economic benefits are still vague. Nonetheless, deciding investments on green technology are gettin g harder with the development of environmental regulations and polici es. Limited investment valuation methods add to the complexity. Firms are facing crossroads between profits and social responsibility. This paper sugge sts real option valuation (ROV as a solution that improve firms decision making pr ocess in choosing investments that deal with both issues: profitability and corpo rate social responsibility (CSR, focusing on climate change. ROV incorporates uncert ainties and provides flexibility thus firms are able to balance up profi tability and CSR. Based on a case study, it is hope that findings of this paper lighten the dilemma and none of firms’ objectives is sacrificed.

  18. Company, country, connections: counterfactual origins increase organizational commitment, patriotism, and social investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersner-Hershfield, Hal; Galinsky, Adam D; Kray, Laura J; King, Brayden G

    2010-10-01

    Four studies examined the relationship between counterfactual origins--thoughts about how the beginning of organizations, countries, and social connections might have turned out differently--and increased feelings of commitment to those institutions and connections. Study 1 found that counterfactually reflecting on the origins of one's country increases patriotism. Study 2 extended this finding to organizational commitment and examined the mediating role of poignancy. Study 3 found that counterfactual reflection boosts organizational commitment even beyond the effects of other commitment-enhancing appeals and that perceptions of fate mediate the positive effect of counterfactual origins on commitment. Finally, Study 4 temporally separated the counterfactual manipulation from a behavioral measure of commitment and found that counterfactual reflection predicted whether participants e-mailed social contacts 2 weeks later. The robust relationship between counterfactual origins and commitment was found across a wide range of companies and countries, with undergraduates and M.B.A. students, and for attitudes and behaviors.

  19. Solution of Media Risk and Social Responsibility Governance of Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of media technology makes the modern society become a “social media” or even “over social media”, the rise of social media makes it beyond the tool attribute, and become an important force in the reconstruction of contemporary society, the risk of concomitant. The anomie and breach of Social media regularly staged, weakened its positive social function, forcing us to think about the social responsibility of social media,which are reflections on the lack of responsibility, but also positive response of resolving the media risk and ask for moral strength.

  20. Access to Finance and Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rusinova, Vanya; Wernicke, Georg

    2016-01-01

    We provide causal evidence that investments into CSR are affected by firms’ prior financial performance. To establish causality, we make use of the exogenous variation in firm-level financial constraints induced by the passage of the AJCA of 2004. We further examine the sensitivity of CSR...

  1. Does Firm Innovation Affect Corporate Social Responsibility?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Shen (Rui); Y. Tang (Yi); Y. Zhang (Ying)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis study examines the relationship between firm innovation and CSR. Stakeholders’ concern over transaction-specific investments exacerbates when firms engage heavily in innovation activities. To secure stakeholders’ support, firms adopt CSR effectively as an ex ante signal of

  2. Access to Finance and Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rusinova, Vanya; Wernicke, Georg

    2016-01-01

    We provide causal evidence that investments into CSR are affected by firms’ prior financial performance. To establish causality, we make use of the exogenous variation in firm-level financial constraints induced by the passage of the AJCA of 2004. We further examine the sensitivity of CSR investm...

  3. Corporate Social Responsibility and Workers' Well-being in Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    impacts of corporate social responsibility on the well-being of workers in the ... policies have been the healthcare, education, security, housing, agriculture, arts and tourism, sports, charity organization, religion, social clubs, government ...

  4. Corporate social responsibility and Facebook: A splashy combination?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Arias, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Literature widely explores Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), Online Social Networks and consumer behavior individually. However, research linking them has been scarce. Therefore, this study aims to assess the effect of CSR information provided through Facebook on consumers’ brand image and

  5. Rights and Responsibilities in the Light of Social Contract Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Morte, Michael W.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the influence of the social contract on American institutions, due process when liberty and property are involved, the nature of an individual's responsibility to the government, and the application of social contract theory to education. (Author/IRT)

  6. Investing in health: is social housing value for money? A cost-utility analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, K D; Kearns, A; Petticrew, M; Fenwick, E A L

    2013-10-01

    There is a healthy public policy agenda investigating the health impacts of improving living conditions. However, there are few economic evaluations, to date, assessing value for money. We conducted the first cost-effectiveness analysis of a nationwide intervention transferring social and private tenants to new-build social housing, in Scotland. A quasi-experimental prospective study was undertaken involving 205 intervention households and 246 comparison households, over 2 years. A cost-utility analysis assessed the average cost per change in health utility (a single score summarising overall health-related quality of life), generated via the SF-6D algorithm. Construction costs for new builds were included. Analysis was conducted for all households, and by family, adult and elderly households; with estimates adjusted for baseline confounders. Outcomes were annuitised and discounted at 3.5%. The average discounted cost was £18, 708 per household, at a national programme cost of £ 28.4 million. The average change in health utility scores in the intervention group attributable to the intervention were +0.001 for all households, +0.001 for family households, -0.04 for adult households and -0.03 for elderly households. All estimates were statistically insignificant. At face value, the interventions were not value for money in health terms. However, because the policy rationale was the amenity provision of housing for disadvantaged groups, impacts extend beyond health and may be fully realised over the long term. Before making general value-for-money inferences, economic evaluation should attempt to estimate the full social value of interventions, model long-term impacts and explicitly incorporate equity considerations.

  7. Responses to a warming world: Integrating life history, immune investment, and pathogen resistance in a model insect species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughton, Alice M; O'Connor, Cian O; Knell, Robert J

    2017-11-01

    Environmental temperature has important effects on the physiology and life history of ectothermic animals, including investment in the immune system and the infectious capacity of pathogens. Numerous studies have examined individual components of these complex systems, but little is known about how they integrate when animals are exposed to different temperatures. Here, we use the Indian meal moth ( Plodia interpunctella ) to understand how immune investment and disease resistance react and potentially trade-off with other life-history traits. We recorded life-history (development time, survival, fecundity, and body size) and immunity (hemocyte counts, phenoloxidase activity) measures and tested resistance to bacterial ( E. coli ) and viral ( Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus) infection at five temperatures (20-30°C). While development time, lifespan, and size decreased with temperature as expected, moths exhibited different reproductive strategies in response to small changes in temperature. At cooler temperatures, oviposition rates were low but tended to increase toward the end of life, whereas warmer temperatures promoted initially high oviposition rates that rapidly declined after the first few days of adult life. Although warmer temperatures were associated with strong investment in early reproduction, there was no evidence of an associated trade-off with immune investment. Phenoloxidase activity increased most at cooler temperatures before plateauing, while hemocyte counts increased linearly with temperature. Resistance to bacterial challenge displayed a complex pattern, whereas survival after a viral challenge increased with rearing temperature. These results demonstrate that different immune system components and different pathogens can respond in distinct ways to changes in temperature. Overall, these data highlight the scope for significant changes in immunity, disease resistance, and host-parasite population dynamics to arise from small

  8. The interactive effects of multiple stressors on physiological stress responses and club cell investment in fathead minnows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manek, Aditya K.; Ferrari, Maud C.O.; Niyogi, Som; Chivers, Douglas P.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities have dramatically increased over the past decades, with the consequence that many organisms are simultaneously exposed to multiple stressors. Understanding how organisms respond to these stressors is a key focus for scientists from many disciplines. Here we investigated the interactive effects of two stressors, UV radiation (UVR) and cadmium (Cd) exposure on a common freshwater fish, fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). UVR is known to influence the density of epidermal club cells (ECCs), which are not only a key component of the innate immune system of fishes, but are also the source of chemical alarm cues that serve to warn other fishes of nearby predators. In contrast, Cd impairs the physiological stress response and ability of fish to respond to alarm cues. We used an integrative approach to examine physiological stress response as well as investment in ECCs. Fish exposed to UVR had higher levels of cortisol than non-exposed controls, but Cd reduced cortisol levels substantially for fish exposed to UVR. Fish exposed to UVR, either in the presence or absence of Cd, showed consistent decreases in ECC investment compared to non-exposed controls. Despite differences in ECC number, there was no difference in the potency of alarm cues prepared from the skin of UVR and Cd exposed or non-exposed fish indicating that UVR and Cd exposure combined may have little influence on chemically-mediated predator–prey interactions. - Highlights: • UV radiation caused a physiological stress response (cortisol release) in fish. • Cd reduced cortisol levels substantially for fish exposed to UV. • Fish exposed to UV, with or without Cd, showed decreases in club cell investment. • There was no difference in alarm cues potency from UV and Cd exposed fish. • Our work highlights the difficulty of untangling effects of multiple stressors

  9. The interactive effects of multiple stressors on physiological stress responses and club cell investment in fathead minnows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manek, Aditya K., E-mail: aditya.manek@usask.ca [Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5E2 SK (Canada); Ferrari, Maud C.O. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, WCVM, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B4 (Canada); Niyogi, Som; Chivers, Douglas P. [Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5E2 SK (Canada)

    2014-04-01

    Anthropogenic activities have dramatically increased over the past decades, with the consequence that many organisms are simultaneously exposed to multiple stressors. Understanding how organisms respond to these stressors is a key focus for scientists from many disciplines. Here we investigated the interactive effects of two stressors, UV radiation (UVR) and cadmium (Cd) exposure on a common freshwater fish, fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). UVR is known to influence the density of epidermal club cells (ECCs), which are not only a key component of the innate immune system of fishes, but are also the source of chemical alarm cues that serve to warn other fishes of nearby predators. In contrast, Cd impairs the physiological stress response and ability of fish to respond to alarm cues. We used an integrative approach to examine physiological stress response as well as investment in ECCs. Fish exposed to UVR had higher levels of cortisol than non-exposed controls, but Cd reduced cortisol levels substantially for fish exposed to UVR. Fish exposed to UVR, either in the presence or absence of Cd, showed consistent decreases in ECC investment compared to non-exposed controls. Despite differences in ECC number, there was no difference in the potency of alarm cues prepared from the skin of UVR and Cd exposed or non-exposed fish indicating that UVR and Cd exposure combined may have little influence on chemically-mediated predator–prey interactions. - Highlights: • UV radiation caused a physiological stress response (cortisol release) in fish. • Cd reduced cortisol levels substantially for fish exposed to UV. • Fish exposed to UV, with or without Cd, showed decreases in club cell investment. • There was no difference in alarm cues potency from UV and Cd exposed fish. • Our work highlights the difficulty of untangling effects of multiple stressors.

  10. How Social Media Recruitment Influences Organizational Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel-Andrei BREZOIU

    2014-01-01

    More and more employers declare they used or plan to use social media throughout human resources management processes. On one side, it is part of employer branding policy to offer relevant information to people about how it is to work in that organisation, including social media channels. On the other side, these means are really attractive regarding targeting options and reaching a wide range of applicants at a low cost. This paper summarizes the main evolutions of social media use in busine...

  11. Partiality of Responsibility: Ethics in Sustainability Consulting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Earhart, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    Sustainability, Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) are both highly normative fields of professional practice, framed by various narratives: capitalist versus environmentalist, waste versus respect for the planet, consumerism versus responsibility;

  12. Corporate Social Responsibility in the Angolan Oil Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Arne Wiig

    2005-01-01

    What are the responsibility of oil companies in resource rich countries? Do they take these responsibilities? Based on a utilitarian perspective and theories of the resource curse, we discuss the oil companies' corporate social responsibility (CSR) when a resource rich country such as Angola lacks accountable public institutions. We also analyse the type of responsibility oil companies take and factors driving corporate social responsibility. From undertaking a survey among oil service firms ...

  13. Corporate Social Responsibility in Malaysian Apparel Manufacturing Industry: A Study on Corporate Social Responsibility Website Reporting

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakrishnan, Suresh; Hishan, Sanil S.; Kanjanapathy, Malini

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT:A well planned and implemented Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programs could give any company a competitive advantage over its competitors. However, the way it is communicated to its stakeholders will be one of the deciding factors. This study examines how the WRAP certified apparel manufacturers in Malaysia communicate their CSR programs on their company website. This study identifies the dimensions of CSR they focus while they communicate their CSR initiatives to their stake...

  14. Social and Spill-Over Benefits as Motivating Factors to Investment in Formal Education in Africa: A Reflection around Ghanaian, Kenyan and Rwandan Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampofo, S. Y.; Bizimana, B.; Ndayambaje, I.; Karongo, V.; Lawrence, K. Lyn; Orodho, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the social and spill-over benefits as motivating factors to investment in formal education in selected countries in Africa. The paper had three objectives, namely) to profile the key statistics of formal schooling; ii) examine the formal education and iii) link national goals of education with expectations in Ghana, Kenya and…

  15. The Corporate Social Responsibility of Family Businesses: An International Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Gérard Hirigoyen; Thierry Poulain-Rehm

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This study analyzes the links between listed family businesses and social responsibility. On the theoretical level, it establishes a relationship between socioemotional wealth, proactive stakeholder engagement, and the social responsibility of family businesses. On a practical level, our results (obtained from a sample of 363 companies) show that family businesses do not differ from non-family businesses in many dimensions of social responsibility. Moreover, family bus...

  16. Corporate Sustainable Development Assessment Base on the Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Sun Mei; Nagata Katsuya; Onoda Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    With the resource exhaustion, bad affections of human activities and the awakening of the human rights, the corporate social responsibility became popular corporate strategy achieving sustainable development of both corporation and society. The issue of Guideline of Chinese Corporate Social Responsibility Report promotes greatly corporation to take social responsibility. This paper built the index system according to this guideline and takes the textile industry as an exa...

  17. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN MONGOLIAN BUSINESS SECTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Oyungerel Tudev; Lkhagvasuren Erhembayar

    2011-01-01

    The global aspirations regarding Corporate Social Responsibility remain far from being met in many developing countries today. More specifically, research regarding Mongolian companies´ social responsibility behaviour is missing and, from overall observation the performance is weak. This research is principally focused on explaining existing conflicts about the comprehension or understanding of just what Corporate Social Responsibility means from a theoretical perspective, and precisely, with...

  18. Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability: Tourist Enterprises of Cantabria

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido Palacio, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Currently, corporate social responsibility is seen as a factor to take into account for the sustainable development of the enterprises. This research provides an approach on this matter, defining the socially responsible activities developed in the tourism industry through sustainable development theory and stakeholder's theory. This study is made on a qualitative research methodology, based on case study. The analysis shows that corporate social responsibility is a multidimensional const...

  19. The transmission of socially responsible behaviour through international trade

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Carol; Rand, John; Tarp, Finn; Trifkovic, Neda

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between the corporate social responsibility practices of local domestic firms and their engagement with foreign markets using four waves of panel data on a sample of more than 4,500 manufacturing firms from Viet Nam. We develop a measure of corporate social responsibility that combines compliance with labour standards, management commitment to corporate social responsibility, and community activities. We find a strong relationship between engagement in internat...

  20. Socially Responsible Award of the Procurement Contracts

    OpenAIRE

    Hristina Blagoycehva

    2013-01-01

    With the Europe 2020 strategy the EU has set itself, under conditions of a changing world, the goal of becoming an intelligent, sustainable and inclusive economy. Under the current conditions of budget constraints and economic difficulties the conventional mechanisms for promoting social justice and social cohesion are insufficient. Through the inclusion of social criteria in the awarding of public procurement there can be guaranteed the compliance with social insurance legislation, furthered...

  1. Belief and Investing: Preferences and Attitudes of the Faithful

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Brimble1

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This Australian study seeks to better understand the disparity between the positive attitudes towards Socially Responsible Investing (SRI and the level of investment in SRI (Saulwick &Associates 2001; Watmore & Bradley 2001; Williams 2007; Arjalies 2010, by examining both the attitudes to SRI and the investment choices that are made. It is hypothesised that those who are more committed to religious belief principles are more likely to invest in SRI.To test this 322 people from two large Queensland organisations were surveyed in relation to their investment attitudes and preferences. Results show that those who are more religious are no more likely to invest in SRI, and that the level of importance placed on SRI and financial criteria are similar in most instances for the more and less religious. In addition, women who are religious place more importance on conservative general investment criteria than less ornon-religious women.

  2. Corporate Governance Effects on Social Responsibility Disclosures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Dias

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study uses stakeholder theory to explore how corporate governance [CG] characteristics influence corporate social responsibility disclosure [CSRD] in the context of a global financial crisis [GFC]. Empirical data are drawn from Portugal, a country strongly affected by the GFC. Portuguese companies are characterized by high ownership concentration. The largest shareholder is often the CEO and Board Chair (a phenomenon known as CEO duality. We analyse the association between CSRD (measured by a 40-item disclosure index and CG variables (board size, CEO duality, board independence, ownership concentration and presence of an audit committee or CSR committee for 48 of the 51 listed companies in Portugal. The control variables are company size and industry type. We find that CSRD is affected positively by board size, CEO duality, company size and industry type. This accords with suggestions implicit in stakeholder theory that a larger board will represent a broader diversity of stakeholders and will promote better monitoring, more assertive stakeholder management, greater transparency, and increased levels of CSRD. Larger companies and companies close-to-consumers are associated with high levels of CSRD, ostensibly because they are more visible and subject to greater societal monitoring during a period of financial crisis. We reveal that in a country characterized by high ownership concentration, CEO duality has a positive effect on CSRD.

  3. Corporate Social Responsibility, social contract, corporate personhood and human rights law: Understanding the emerging responsibilities of modern corporations

    OpenAIRE

    Amao, O

    2008-01-01

    Copyright @ 2008 Olufemi Amao. The social contract theory has been advanced as a theoretical basis for explaining the emerging practice of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) by corporations. Since the 17th century the social contract concept has also been used to justify human rights. The concept is the constitutional foundation of many western states starting with England, US and France. Business ethicists and philosophers have tried to construct and analyse the social responsibility o...

  4. Sexually dimorphic neuronal responses to social isolation

    OpenAIRE

    Senst, Laura; Baimoukhametova, Dinara; Sterley, Toni-Lee; Bains, Jaideep Singh

    2016-01-01

    eLife digest Many species, including humans, use social interaction to reduce the effects of stress. In fact, the lack of a social network may itself be a source of stress. Recent research suggests that young girls are more sensitive to social stress than boys. This could mean that social networks are more important for females in general, and that young females from different species, such as mice, may be more sensitive to social isolation than males. However, few studies have examined how s...

  5. The political responsibility of Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Zamanillo Peral

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The intention of this article is to try to recover a critical dialog between the politics and the social work. In this paper it argued that the politics is a dimension of the identity of the social work of which we cannot avoid. In this way, the politics and the social work, are doubly tied. On the one hand, the political power exercise corresponds to every citizen of the polis. And, on the other hand, the social work is narrowly tied to the social politics by means of its object of study. Our arguments it’s construct from a diagnosis of the social reality and professional that is held in this specific relationship. We claim to contribute with elements of analyses that help, not only to understand, but also answering politically as professionals of the social work and as citizen in the society.

  6. Abnormal neural responses to social exclusion in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria B Gradin

    Full Text Available Social exclusion is an influential concept in politics, mental health and social psychology. Studies on healthy subjects have implicated the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, a region involved in emotional and social information processing, in neural responses to social exclusion. Impairments in social interactions are common in schizophrenia and are associated with reduced quality of life. Core symptoms such as delusions usually have a social content. However little is known about the neural underpinnings of social abnormalities. The aim of this study was to investigate the neural substrates of social exclusion in schizophrenia. Patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls underwent fMRI while participating in a popular social exclusion paradigm. This task involves passing a 'ball' between the participant and two cartoon representations of other subjects. The extent of social exclusion (ball not being passed to the participant was parametrically varied throughout the task. Replicating previous findings, increasing social exclusion activated the mPFC in controls. In contrast, patients with schizophrenia failed to modulate mPFC responses with increasing exclusion. Furthermore, the blunted response to exclusion correlated with increased severity of positive symptoms. These data support the hypothesis that the neural response to social exclusion differs in schizophrenia, highlighting the mPFC as a potential substrate of impaired social interactions.

  7. How Social Media Recruitment Influences Organizational Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel-Andrei BREZOIU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available More and more employers declare they used or plan to use social media throughout human resources management processes. On one side, it is part of employer branding policy to offer relevant information to people about how it is to work in that organisation, including social media channels. On the other side, these means are really attractive regarding targeting options and reaching a wide range of applicants at a low cost. This paper summarizes the main evolutions of social media use in businesses in general, but also in recruitment, in particular. Moreover, we consider the ethical implications and possible solutions.

  8. Social marketing and social responsibility of the business: intercoupling and results

    OpenAIRE

    T.V. Shtal; O.O. Tyshchenko

    2012-01-01

    In article is considered problem of social marketing concepts use, problems of provision business-structures to social responsibility and competitiveness provision as criterion to efficiency social-oriented marketing programs. Author not only sets the problem install the correspondence between specified category, but also reveal the criterion to social-directed marketing decisions efficiency.

  9. Managing obligations to society. Case of best ranked universities in social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Păunescu Carmen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Universities have always been engines for the economy, in multiple roles they play, trying to adapt to the continual dynamic changes in the environment, to better align their offerings with the current expectations of the students, employers and society as a whole. Many of the jobs that are now developing on the market and still will develop, as well as the multiple roles that the graduates are asked to play in society, have never been on the agenda of the universities in the past, nor on the mind of the curriculum designers. The current paper aims to assess the university engagement with community by analyzing 27 world universities best ranked in social responsibility according to QS Stars University Ratings 2016. In the paper, we discuss the extent to which different attributes of the university social responsibility are reflected among the initiatives and projects run by the universities investigated. Also, we analyze correlations between university ranking in social responsibility and other rankings. Following the QS Stars methodology, the criteria used to evaluate social responsibility of selected universities included: community investment and development, social work and service in community, human capital development, environmental concern and impact, and other social responsibility actions. The results show that the degree of involvement of universities in social responsible initiatives varies broadly for each one of the dimensions analyzed, in terms of nature, intensity and impact of initiatives. Our research findings offer good insights for both universities’ leaders and community developers in their joint-efforts to develop and grow a prosperous community.

  10. Communicating corporate social responsibility to suspicious audiences: beyond identity washing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elving, W.; van Vuuren, M.; Bech-Larsen, T.; Frandsen, F.

    2010-01-01

    Organizations need good reputations among their stakeholders. One way of creating a better reputation might be the engagement in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) or Corporate Responsibility (CR) programs. However, since several organizations were greenwashing their communication (suggesting a

  11. Social responsibility through art-education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Oliveira, Celso A.; Teixeira, Sandra R.C.; Teixeira, Karla B. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Curiosity about the job site of a pipeline is a strong characteristic among the residents in the area of influence of the PETROBRAS Engineering works, especially because of their proximity and direct interference in people's daily lives. In this context, children demand special attention concerning aspects such as Health, Safety and Environment (HSE). The opening of trenches and the movements of pipes, machines, and heavy equipment creates a fantastic, toy filled world in a child's imagination, which demands the disclosure of possible hazards caused by the job. To mitigate such risks and to extol the positive impacts brought to these communities, PETROBRAS created the Program 'Smart Kids Play Safe' aimed at the public in the 5-12-year-old range in order to encourage safe behavior and the development of a sense of citizenship and respect for the environment by means of playful educational activities including tricks, games, theaters, and workshops, and so on. The program seeks to link the content worked and the terms used to the reality of the target audience in order to maximize the assimilation of the concepts. These events could take place out in the open as well as inside a school. If in school, the role of the teacher becomes fundamental to the suitability of the contents, in addition to his or her experience and active participation during the events. During the construction of the GNL Pipeline main in 2008, in the Rio de Janeiro metropolitan area, PETROBRAS felt the necessity of creating a program that could attract and at the same time sensitize children to the hazards of playing near a pipeline construction site. And to that end, the company decided to involve educators in this process and created the Social Responsibility through Art-Education Program. A culture of environmental protection, and the concepts of socialization, safety, health and citizenship must all be self-sustaining. This contributes to the improvement of Basic

  12. Effects of corporate social responsibility and governance on its credit ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-young; Kim, JeongYeon

    2014-01-01

    This study reviews the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate governance on its credit rating. The result of regression analysis to credit ratings with relevant primary independent variables shows that both factors have significant effects on it. As we have predicted, the signs of both regression coefficients have a positive sign (+) proving that corporates with excellent CSR and governance index (CGI) scores have higher credit ratings and vice versa. The results show nonfinancial information also may have effects on corporate credit rating. The investment on personal data protection could be an example of CSR/CGI activities which have positive effects on corporate credit ratings.

  13. Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility and Governance on Its Credit Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-young

    2014-01-01

    This study reviews the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate governance on its credit rating. The result of regression analysis to credit ratings with relevant primary independent variables shows that both factors have significant effects on it. As we have predicted, the signs of both regression coefficients have a positive sign (+) proving that corporates with excellent CSR and governance index (CGI) scores have higher credit ratings and vice versa. The results show nonfinancial information also may have effects on corporate credit rating. The investment on personal data protection could be an example of CSR/CGI activities which have positive effects on corporate credit ratings. PMID:25401134

  14. Strategic stakeholder management by corporate social responsibility: Some conceptual thoughts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Stiglbauer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The sustainability and responsibility of corporate strategic management has become an important issue in recent years, not only against the background of the current financial and economic crisis. Companies are expected not only to succeed economically, but also ecologically and socially. Companies can use the issue of corporate responsibility to capture new markets and opportunities. But new requirements arise. Thus, stakeholders may exert pressure on companies to assume social responsibility, whereas executives shall lead by example. This paper tries to assess possiblities to meet stakeholder expectations towards companies by implementing corporate social responsibility concepts. We identify primary and secondary stakeholders of companies by using salience theory and try to give conceptual answers how the well-known concept of Caroll‟s corporate social responsibility pyramid my help to improve the current situation and to take top management and supervisory boards into account to establish a change of focus on corporate social responsibility not just as a hot topic.

  15. Social responsibility: a new paradigm of hospital governance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Cristina; Rego, Guilhermina; Duarte, Ivone; Nunes, Rui

    2013-12-01

    Changes in modern societies originate the perception that ethical behaviour is essential in organization's practices especially in the way they deal with aspects such as human rights. These issues are usually under the umbrella of the concept of social responsibility. Recently the Report of the International Bioethics Committee of UNESCO on Social Responsibility and Health has addressed this concept of social responsibility in the context of health care delivery suggesting a new paradigm in hospital governance. The objective of this paper is to address the issue of corporate social responsibility in health care, namely in the hospital setting, emphasising the special governance arrangements of such complex organisations and to evaluate if new models of hospital management (entrepreneurism) will need robust mechanisms of corporate governance to fulfil its social responsiveness. The scope of this responsible behaviour requires hospitals to fulfil its social and market objectives, in accordance to the law and general ethical standards. Social responsibility includes aspects like abstention of harm to the environment or the protection of the interests of all the stakeholders enrolled in the deliverance of health care. In conclusion, adequate corporate governance and corporate strategy are the gold standard of social responsibility. In a competitive market hospital governance will be optimised if the organization culture is reframed to meet stakeholders' demands for unequivocal assurances on ethical behaviour. Health care organizations should abide to this new governance approach that is to create organisation value through performance, conformance and responsibility.

  16. The Concept and Development Tendencies of Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Krisztina Szegedi

    2010-01-01

    The expression Corporate Social Responsibility was first used in the United States of America in the 1960s. This triggered a nationwide debate about the responsibilities corporations have towards societies. The most criticized statement belongs to Milton Friedman, a Nobel prize winner, who said, "The social responsibility of business is to increase its profits."[1] This means that there is only one responsibility of business, namely to use its resources and to become engaged in activities in ...

  17. Culturally Responsive Social Skill Instruction for Latino Male Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ya-yu; Correa, Vivian I.; Anderson, Adrienne L.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-cultural friendships and peer interactions are important skills for Latino students to become socially adjusted in U.S. schools. Culturally responsive social skill instruction allows educators to teach essential social skills while attending to the native culture and personal experiences of the students. The present study examined the…

  18. Women on Boards and Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunjung Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of research suggests that having more women in the boardroom leads to better corporate social responsibility (CSR performance. However, much of this work views the CSR-enhancing effect of women directors as largely driven by their moral orientations and rarely considers other underlying mechanisms. Moreover, less explored are the firm-specific conditions under which such CSR-promoting roles of female directors might be performed more (or less effectively. In this paper, we seek to bridge this gap in the literature by (1 proposing an additional account for the positive influence of female independent directors on the firm’s CSR and (2 illuminating the organizational context in which female directorship is likely to translate into good CSR performance. We argue that women independent directors might take CSR issues more seriously than their male counterparts not only because of their stronger moral orientations, but also because they have reputational reasons to do so. Further, we suggest that female directors’ concerns about CSR-relevant matters are more (less likely to gain support from other members of the organization when their company is doing more (less business in the product markets where reputation for CSR is more (less vital for success. Using a sample of Standard & Poor’s (S&P 1500 index firms (2000–2009 and the data on their board composition and CSR ratings, we find strong support for our argument. We find that the number (or proportion of women independent directors is positively associated with a firm’s CSR ratings and that the strength of this relationship depends on the level of the firm’s consumer market orientation.

  19. Development cooperation as methodology for teaching social responsibility to engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappalainen, Pia

    2011-12-01

    The role of engineering in promoting global well-being has become accentuated, turning the engineering curriculum into a means of dividing well-being equally. The gradual fortifying calls for humanitarian engineering have resulted in the incorporation of social responsibility themes in the university curriculum. Cooperation, communication, teamwork, intercultural cooperation, sustainability, social and global responsibility represent the socio-cultural dimensions that are becoming increasingly important as globalisation intensifies the demands for socially and globally adept engineering communities. This article describes an experiment, the Development Cooperation Project, which was conducted at Aalto University in Finland to integrate social responsibility themes into higher engineering education.

  20. Examining the Effectiveness of Social Responsibility Courses in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droms, Courtney; Stephen, Sheryl-Ann K.

    2015-01-01

    Individual and corporate social responsibility has been gaining more and more attention over the last several years. We examine the effectiveness of incorporating social responsibility courses into the curriculum in higher education, with a specific look at Butler University. In general, the results indicate that implementing this type of…

  1. Human Rights, Mineral Rights and Corporate Social Responsibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This view of the company is often described under the concept of corporate social responsibility. This Paper assesses the nature of corporate social responsibility in Ghana primarily focusing on the mining industry. The Paper outlines the various human rights and mineral rights in Ghana and the effects of mining on human ...

  2. Developmental Change in Social Responsibility during Adolescence: An Ecological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray-Lake, Laura; Syvertsen, Amy K.; Flanagan, Constance A.

    2016-01-01

    Social responsibility can be defined as a set of prosocial values representing personal commitments to contribute to community and society. Little is known about developmental change--and predictors of that change--in social responsibility during adolescence. The present study used an accelerated longitudinal research design to investigate the…

  3. Socially Responsible Organizational Buying: How Can Stakeholders Dictate Purchasing Policies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maignan, I.S.J.; MacAlister, D.

    2003-01-01

    This article investigates socially responsible buying (SRB), a subject that has received little attention in past marketing literature on buyer-seller relationships. On the basis of a brief review of the literature on corporate social responsibility, the article proposes a conceptualization of SRB

  4. Socially Responsible Knowledge and Behaviors: Comparing Upper vs. Lower Classmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozar, Joy M.; Connell, Kim Y. Hiller

    2010-01-01

    Utilizing a sample of undergraduate students and survey research methods, this study examined knowledge on issues of social responsibility within the apparel and textiles industry, comparing the sophistication among upper- versus lower-classmen. The study also investigated the differences between students in their socially responsible apparel…

  5. Corporate social responsibility: An organizational tool for survival in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Demonstrating socially responsible behaviour has become increasingly important for corporations. The study identifies the extent of participation of the banking industries in corporate social responsibility, the bank policies as it affects CRS and the impact of the bank the on the practice of CRS. The study utilized primary ...

  6. Service Learning and the Development of Social Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Scott D.; Bozeman, Marci

    This essay presents the findings of a study employing a developmental approach to student acquisition of social responsibility. Professors at seven collegiate institutions of differing types who teach service-learning courses were asked if they would be willing to include their students in a study of social responsibility development through…

  7. The Corporate Social Responsibility Practices and Concerns of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research aims to understand the corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices by Addis Ababa University, the largest and the oldest university in Ethiopia. The issue of CSR in the context of higher learning institutions is one of the least studied subjects in Ethiopia in terms of what social responsibility considerations a ...

  8. Corporate social responsibility and workers' well-being in Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The usual focus of Corporate Social Responsibility in Nigeria has always been on the society or the community where business is located while the place of workers as stakeholder in business is usually downplayed. This study examined the impact of corporate social responsibility on the wellbeing of workers in the ...

  9. The Developmental Roots of Social Responsibility in Childhood and Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray-Lake, Laura; Syvertsen, Amy K.

    2011-01-01

    Social responsibility is a value orientation, rooted in democratic relationships with others and moral principles of care and justice, that motivates certain civic actions. Given its relevance for building stronger relationships and communities, the development of social responsibility within individuals should be a more concerted focus for…

  10. Education of Social Responsibility among Sports Schools Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinauskas, Romualdas K.; Juodsnukis, Dalius R.

    2017-01-01

    Research aim was to analyze peculiarities of education of social responsibility among football sports school students. We hypothesized that after the educational program sport school students will have more developed social responsibility. The total sample comprised 52 male students. Experimental group consisted of 26 and the control group of 26…

  11. African-American Children's Representation of Personal and Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowling, Claire M.; Brock, Sheri J.; Hastie, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines 12 grade five elementary school students' attitudes and beliefs concerning personal and social responsibility in physical education. Factors used to identify students' attitudes and beliefs were initially divided into the six levels of Hellison's Taking Personal and Social Responsibility Model (TPSR), namely: irresponsibility,…

  12. Developmental change in social responsibility during adolescence: An ecological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray-Lake, Laura; Syvertsen, Amy K; Flanagan, Constance A

    2016-01-01

    Social responsibility can be defined as a set of prosocial values representing personal commitments to contribute to community and society. Little is known about developmental change-and predictors of that change-in social responsibility during adolescence. The present study used an accelerated longitudinal research design to investigate the developmental trajectory of social responsibility values and ecological assets across family, school, community, and peer settings that predict these values. Data come from a 3-year study of 3,683 U.S. adolescents enrolled in upper-level elementary, middle, and high schools in rural, semiurban, and urban communities. Social responsibility values significantly decreased from age 9 to 16 before leveling off in later adolescence. Family compassion messages and democratic climate, school solidarity, community connectedness, and trusted friendship, positively predicted within-person change in adolescents' social responsibility values. These findings held after accounting for other individual-level and demographic factors and provide support for the role of ecological assets in adolescents' social responsibility development. In addition, fair society beliefs and volunteer experience had positive between- and within-person associations with social responsibility values. The manuscript discusses theoretical and practical implications of the conclusion that declines in ecological assets may partly explain age-related declines in social responsibility values. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Social Responsibility in Advertising: A Marketing Communications Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Alice; Fullerton, Jami A.; Kim, Yeo Jung

    2013-01-01

    Although advertising has played a key role in bringing corporate social responsibility (CSR) to the public agenda on behalf of agency clients, little effort has been made to define what social responsibility means in advertising. A national survey of 1,045 advertising and marketing communications students from 176 colleges and universities were…

  14. Integrating Corporate Social Responsibility Awareness into a Retail Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitelspacher, Lauren; Rodgers, Vikki L.

    2018-01-01

    Both students and industry are demanding that marketing instructors incorporate discussions of environmental and social responsibility into their courses. Marketing educators play a critical role in developing the knowledge and skills students need to effectively integrate corporate social responsibility (CSR) into their future business endeavors.…

  15. Incorporating Ethics and Social Responsibility in IS Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Albert L.; Lang, Michael; Yates, Dave; Kruck, S. E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of ethics and social responsibility in information systems (IS) education. The many public scandals of corporate misconduct have increased the need for more emphasis to be placed on ethics and ethical issues in IS education. The authors describe how the inclusion of ethics and social responsibility in the IS…

  16. SOME ASPECTS OF TRAINING SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE ENGINEERS ABROAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sayenko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article gives an overview of various concepts of social responsibility abroad. It is underlined that Ukrainian technical universities should borrow the best practices of ethical education from foreign countries. Analysis of social responsibility content and structural components as well as some ways of its development abroad is given.

  17. Socially Responsive Organizations and the Challenge of Poverty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blasco, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    Review of: Socially Responsive Organizations and the Challenge of Poverty, edited by Milenko Gudíc, Al Rosenbloom, and Carole Parkes. Sheffield: Greenleaf Publishing Limited, 2014. 287 pages, hard cover.......Review of: Socially Responsive Organizations and the Challenge of Poverty, edited by Milenko Gudíc, Al Rosenbloom, and Carole Parkes. Sheffield: Greenleaf Publishing Limited, 2014. 287 pages, hard cover....

  18. URBAN UPBRINGING INFLUENCES RESPONSE TO SOCIAL FEEDBACK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmers-Jansen, Imke; Fett, Anne-Kathrin; Krabbendam, Lydia

    Background: Growing up in an urban environment is associated with a higher incidence of schizophrenia. The effects of urbanicity seem particularly pronounced during development. It has been hypothesized that urbanicity could be a proxy for social stress, which might account for disturbed social

  19. Colombian deathscapes : Social practices and policy responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaufus, C.

    2018-01-01

    This article analyzes social practices in Colombian deathscapes in light of cemetery modernization plans, based on fieldwork in Bogotá and Medellín. Using a performative approach it analyzes the antagonistic aspects of 2 sets of events articulating social inequality and violence: sanctification

  20. The Configuration of Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Tine

    The Danish National Institute of Social Research carries out a research program on the Open Labour Market, to be concluded in 2002. This research program is initiated by the Ministry of Social Affairs. One of the projects in the research program is International experiences and perspectives...