WorldWideScience

Sample records for social web technologies

  1. Social customer relationship management: taking advantage of Web 2.0 and Big Data technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Orenga-Rogl?, Sergio; Chalmeta, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of Web 2.0 and Big Data technologies has allowed a new customer relationship strategy based on interactivity and collaboration called Social Customer Relationship Management (Social CRM) to be created. This enhances customer engagement and satisfaction. The implementation of Social CRM is a complex task that involves different organisational, human and technological aspects. However, there is a lack of methodologies to assist companies in these processes. This paper shows a nove...

  2. Using Web 2.0 and social media technologies to foster proenvironmental action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew T. Ballew; Allen M. Omoto; Patricia L. Winter

    2015-01-01

    Research from a variety of disciplines suggests that online technologies (i.e., Web 2.0 and social media) have considerable potential for spurring proenvironmental action; however, relatively little work examines how to effectively capitalize on these communication and organization tools. This review paper describes the Technologies for Proenvironmental Action Model (...

  3. Using Web 2.0 and Social Media Technologies to Foster Proenvironmental Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T. Ballew

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Research from a variety of disciplines suggests that online technologies (i.e., Web 2.0 and social media have considerable potential for spurring proenvironmental action; however, relatively little work examines how to effectively capitalize on these communication and organization tools. This review paper describes the Technologies for Proenvironmental Action Model (TPAM, a conceptual framework that explicates how different functions of Web 2.0 and social media (i.e., informational, relational, and experiential can generate and/or facilitate personal, social, and contextual pathways to environmentally responsible behaviors. As derived from the TPAM, the likelihood of achieving practical goals of increasing proenvironmental behaviors is enhanced when technological functions are matched to the different pathways to proenvironmental action. For example, the relational function of technologies, as exemplified by Social Networking Sites (SNSs, should be particularly effective in communicating social norms supportive of environmentally responsible behaviors. The TPAM is intended as a guide to develop novel approaches, research questions, and methodologies in leveraging Web 2.0 and social media technologies to promote proenvironmental action. Results will contribute to basic theory development and work in applied settings (e.g., local environmental organizations in order to effectively communicate and organize with different segments of the population to increase sustainable behaviors.

  4. Learning with Web 2.0: Social Technology and Discursive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Norm; Lowe, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen the rise of Internet technologies which facilitate activities that are, above all, social and participatory, allowing children and adults to create and share their own content, and to communicate in a wide range of forums. Correspondingly, there has been great popular and expert interest in the potential of Web 2.0…

  5. Social customer relationship management: taking advantage of Web 2.0 and Big Data technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenga-Roglá, Sergio; Chalmeta, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of Web 2.0 and Big Data technologies has allowed a new customer relationship strategy based on interactivity and collaboration called Social Customer Relationship Management (Social CRM) to be created. This enhances customer engagement and satisfaction. The implementation of Social CRM is a complex task that involves different organisational, human and technological aspects. However, there is a lack of methodologies to assist companies in these processes. This paper shows a novel methodology that helps companies to implement Social CRM, taking into account different aspects such as social customer strategy, the Social CRM performance measurement system, the Social CRM business processes, or the Social CRM computer system. The methodology was applied to one company in order to validate and refine it.

  6. Injury surveillance in low-resource settings using Geospatial and Social Web technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuurman Nadine

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive public health gains have benefited high-income countries in recent decades, however, citizens of low and middle-income countries (LMIC have largely not enjoyed the same advancements. This is in part due to the fact that public health data - the foundation for public health advances - are rarely collected in many LMIC. Injury data are particularly scarce in many low-resource settings, despite the huge associated burden of morbidity and mortality. Advances in freely-accessible and easy-to-use information and communication (ICT technology may provide the impetus for increased public health data collection in settings with limited financial and personnel resources. Methods and Results A pilot study was conducted at a hospital in Cape Town, South Africa to assess the utility and feasibility of using free (non-licensed, and easy-to-use Social Web and GeoWeb tools for injury surveillance in low-resource settings. Data entry, geocoding, data exploration, and data visualization were successfully conducted using these technologies, including Google Spreadsheet, Mapalist, BatchGeocode, and Google Earth. Conclusion This study examined the potential for Social Web and GeoWeb technologies to contribute to public health data collection and analysis in low-resource settings through an injury surveillance pilot study conducted in Cape Town, South Africa. The success of this study illustrates the great potential for these technologies to be leveraged for public health surveillance in resource-constrained environments, given their ease-of-use and low-cost, and the sharing and collaboration capabilities they afford. The possibilities and potential limitations of these technologies are discussed in relation to the study, and to the field of public health in general.

  7. Injury surveillance in low-resource settings using Geospatial and Social Web technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinnamon, Jonathan; Schuurman, Nadine

    2010-05-24

    Extensive public health gains have benefited high-income countries in recent decades, however, citizens of low and middle-income countries (LMIC) have largely not enjoyed the same advancements. This is in part due to the fact that public health data - the foundation for public health advances - are rarely collected in many LMIC. Injury data are particularly scarce in many low-resource settings, despite the huge associated burden of morbidity and mortality. Advances in freely-accessible and easy-to-use information and communication (ICT) technology may provide the impetus for increased public health data collection in settings with limited financial and personnel resources. A pilot study was conducted at a hospital in Cape Town, South Africa to assess the utility and feasibility of using free (non-licensed), and easy-to-use Social Web and GeoWeb tools for injury surveillance in low-resource settings. Data entry, geocoding, data exploration, and data visualization were successfully conducted using these technologies, including Google Spreadsheet, Mapalist, BatchGeocode, and Google Earth. This study examined the potential for Social Web and GeoWeb technologies to contribute to public health data collection and analysis in low-resource settings through an injury surveillance pilot study conducted in Cape Town, South Africa. The success of this study illustrates the great potential for these technologies to be leveraged for public health surveillance in resource-constrained environments, given their ease-of-use and low-cost, and the sharing and collaboration capabilities they afford. The possibilities and potential limitations of these technologies are discussed in relation to the study, and to the field of public health in general.

  8. [Using web 2.0 technologies and social media for the nephrologist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Eugenio; Quintaliani, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    New media tools such as web 2.0 are increasingly being used in the medical field. RSS feeds, podcasts, blogs, wikis, online social networks and social media have all been proposed as innovative tools for the education and updating of clinicians, nurses, other health workers and medical students because of their ease of access and widespread use. Nephrology is one of the medical fields where these technologies have been successfully applied. Medical journals such as the American Journal Kidney Diseases and the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, and medical societies such as the American Society of Nephrology, are all using these new and powerful communication tools. In addition, blogs and social networks have been developed to allow physicians to distribute, share and comment medical material concerning issues related to nephrology and kidney disease, including images, videos, slides, scientific abstracts and clinical trials updates. This review provides background information on the evolution of both web 2.0 and the social media and describes some of the most interesting applications of web 2.0 and its correlated tools in the field of nephrology.

  9. The emerging Web 2.0 social software: an enabling suite of sociable technologies in health and health care education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel Boulos, Maged N; Wheeler, Steve

    2007-03-01

    Web 2.0 sociable technologies and social software are presented as enablers in health and health care, for organizations, clinicians, patients and laypersons. They include social networking services, collaborative filtering, social bookmarking, folksonomies, social search engines, file sharing and tagging, mashups, instant messaging, and online multi-player games. The more popular Web 2.0 applications in education, namely wikis, blogs and podcasts, are but the tip of the social software iceberg. Web 2.0 technologies represent a quite revolutionary way of managing and repurposing/remixing online information and knowledge repositories, including clinical and research information, in comparison with the traditional Web 1.0 model. The paper also offers a glimpse of future software, touching on Web 3.0 (the Semantic Web) and how it could be combined with Web 2.0 to produce the ultimate architecture of participation. Although the tools presented in this review look very promising and potentially fit for purpose in many health care applications and scenarios, careful thinking, testing and evaluation research are still needed in order to establish 'best practice models' for leveraging these emerging technologies to boost our teaching and learning productivity, foster stronger 'communities of practice', and support continuing medical education/professional development (CME/CPD) and patient education.

  10. Applied Semantic Web Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sugumaran, Vijayan

    2011-01-01

    The rapid advancement of semantic web technologies, along with the fact that they are at various levels of maturity, has left many practitioners confused about the current state of these technologies. Focusing on the most mature technologies, Applied Semantic Web Technologies integrates theory with case studies to illustrate the history, current state, and future direction of the semantic web. It maintains an emphasis on real-world applications and examines the technical and practical issues related to the use of semantic technologies in intelligent information management. The book starts with

  11. Building Social Web Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Gavin

    2009-01-01

    Building a web application that attracts and retains regular visitors is tricky enough, but creating a social application that encourages visitors to interact with one another requires careful planning. This book provides practical solutions to the tough questions you'll face when building an effective community site -- one that makes visitors feel like they've found a new home on the Web. If your company is ready to take part in the social web, this book will help you get started. Whether you're creating a new site from scratch or reworking an existing site, Building Social Web Applications

  12. Benchmarking semantic web technology

    CERN Document Server

    García-Castro, R

    2009-01-01

    This book addresses the problem of benchmarking Semantic Web Technologies; first, from a methodological point of view, proposing a general methodology to follow in benchmarking activities over Semantic Web Technologies and, second, from a practical point of view, presenting two international benchmarking activities that involved benchmarking the interoperability of Semantic Web technologies using RDF(S) as the interchange language in one activity and OWL in the other.The book presents in detail how the different resources needed for these interoperability benchmarking activities were defined:

  13. [Using Web 2.0 technologies and social media for the cardiologist's education and update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Eugenio; Caldarola, Pasquale; Villella, Alessandro

    2011-03-01

    The features and tools of Web 2.0 are increasingly introduced and used in the medical field. RSS feeds, podcasts, blogs, online social networks, and social media are proposed as innovative tools for the education and update of clinicians, physicians, nurses, and medical students because of their easy and widespread use. Cardiology area is one of the medical fields where they have been successfully applied. Medical journals such as Circulation and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, and scientific societies such as the American College of Cardiology and the European Society of Cardiology are using these new and powerful communication tools. In addition, blogs and social networks have been developed to allow physicians to distribute, share, and comment medical contents (images, videos, slides, scientific abstracts, clinical trials updates) concerning issues related to cardiology and cardiovascular diseases. This review provides some background on the evolution of Web 2.0 and social media and describes the most interesting applications of Web 2.0 (and its features) both in the medical and cardiology fields.

  14. Semantic Web Technologies for the Adaptive Web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolog, Peter; Nejdl, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    provide conceptualization for the links which are a main vehicle to access information on the web. The subject domain ontologies serve as constraints for generating only those links which are relevant for the domain a user is currently interested in. Furthermore, user model ontologies provide additional...... are crucial to be formalized by the semantic web ontologies for adaptive web. We use examples from an eLearning domain to illustrate the principles which are broadly applicable to any information domain on the web.......Ontologies and reasoning are the key terms brought into focus by the semantic web community. Formal representation of ontologies in a common data model on the web can be taken as a foundation for adaptive web technologies as well. This chapter describes how ontologies shared on the semantic web...

  15. Cloud Pedagogy: Utilizing Web-Based Technologies for the Promotion of Social Constructivist Learning in Science Teacher Preparation Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Miri

    2017-10-01

    The new guidelines for science education emphasize the need to introduce computers and digital technologies as a means of enabling visualization and data collection and analysis. This requires science teachers to bring advanced technologies into the classroom and use them wisely. Hence, the goal of this study was twofold: to examine the application of web-based technologies in science teacher preparation courses and to examine pre-service teachers' perceptions of "cloud pedagogy"—an instructional framework that applies technologies for the promotion of social constructivist learning. The study included university teachers ( N = 48) and pre-service science teachers ( N = 73). Data were collected from an online survey, written reflections, and interviews. The findings indicated that university teachers use technologies mainly for information management and the distribution of learning materials and less for applying social constructivist pedagogy. University teachers expect their students (i.e., pre-service science teachers) to use digital tools in their future classroom to a greater extent than they themselves do. The findings also indicated that the "cloud pedagogy" was perceived as an appropriate instructional framework for contemporary science education. The application of the cloud pedagogy fosters four attributes: the ability to adapt to frequent changes and uncertain situations, the ability to collaborate and communicate in decentralized environments, the ability to generate data and manage it, and the ability to explore new venous.

  16. Web Mining and Social Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Guandong; Zhang, Yanchun; Li, Lin

    This book examines the techniques and applications involved in the Web Mining, Web Personalization and Recommendation and Web Community Analysis domains, including a detailed presentation of the principles, developed algorithms, and systems of the research in these areas. The applications of web ...... sense of individuals or communities. The volume will benefit both academic and industry communities interested in the techniques and applications of web search, web data management, web mining and web knowledge discovery, as well as web community and social network analysis.......This book examines the techniques and applications involved in the Web Mining, Web Personalization and Recommendation and Web Community Analysis domains, including a detailed presentation of the principles, developed algorithms, and systems of the research in these areas. The applications of web...... mining, and the issue of how to incorporate web mining into web personalization and recommendation systems are also reviewed. Additionally, the volume explores web community mining and analysis to find the structural, organizational and temporal developments of web communities and reveal the societal...

  17. Challenges Facing the Semantic Web and Social Software as Communication Technology Agents in E-Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaniran, Bolanle A.

    2010-01-01

    The semantic web describes the process whereby information content is made available for machine consumption. With increased reliance on information communication technologies, the semantic web promises effective and efficient information acquisition and dissemination of products and services in the global economy, in particular, e-learning.…

  18. Comaparison of Web Developement Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh Nagilla, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Web applications play an important role for many business purpose activities in the modernworld. It has become a platform for the companies to fulfil the needs of their business. In thissituation, Web technologies that are useful in developing these kinds of applications become animportant aspect. Many Web technologies like Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP), Active ServerPages (ASP.NET), Cold Fusion Markup Language (CFML), Java, Python, and Ruby on Rails areavailable in the market. All these techn...

  19. Decoding Technology: Web Browsers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Tim; Donohue, Chip

    2007-01-01

    More than ever, early childhood administrators are relying on the Internet for information. A key to becoming an exceptional Web "surfer" is getting to know the ins and outs of the Web browser being used. There are several options available, and almost all can be downloaded for free. However, many of the functions and features they offer are very…

  20. Academic Social Networking Brings Web 2.0 Technologies to the Middle Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taranto, Gregory; Dalbon, Melissa; Gaetano, Julie

    2011-01-01

    The middle grades are an exciting time for adolescents to explore, learn, and collaborate with one another (National Middle School Association, 2010). By incorporating an academic social network as part of the classroom experience, collaboration and active learning take on new forms, and a transformation from passive learning to active learning…

  1. Informal Learning through Expertise Mining in the Social Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Garcia, Rafael; Garcia-Sanchez, Francisco; Casado-Lumbreras, Cristina; Castellanos-Nieves, Dagoberto; Fernandez-Breis, Jesualdo Tomas

    2012-01-01

    The advent of Web 2.0, also called the Social Web, has changed the way people interact with the Web. Assisted by the technologies associated with this new trend, users now play a much more active role as content providers. This Web paradigm shift has also changed how companies operate and interact with their employees, partners and customers. The…

  2. Social web and knowledge management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolog, Peter; Kroetz, Markus; Schaffert, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    to represent knowledge assets. It is therefore obvious that the Web will influence and change Knowledge Management, but it is very unclear what the impact of these changes will be. This chapter raises questions and discusses visions in the area that connects the Social Web and Knowledge Management – an area......Knowledge Management is the study and practice of representing, communicating, organizing, and applying knowledge in organizations. Moreover, being used by organizations, it is inherently social. The Web, as a medium, enables new forms of communications and interactions and requires new ways...

  3. Social Web Data Analytics : Relevance, Redundancy, Diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, K.

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, the Social Web has evolved into both an essential channel for people to exchange information and a new type of mass media. The immense amount of data produced presents new possibilities and challenges: algorithms and technologies need to be developed to extract and infer useful

  4. New web technologies for astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprimont, P.-G.; Ricci, D.; Nicastro, L.

    2014-12-01

    Thanks to the new HTML5 capabilities and the huge improvements of the JavaScript language, it is now possible to design very complex and interactive web user interfaces. On top of that, the once monolithic and file-server oriented web servers are evolving into easily programmable server applications capable to cope with the complex interactions made possible by the new generation of browsers. We believe that the whole community of amateur and professionals astronomers can benefit from the potential of these new technologies. New web interfaces can be designed to provide the user with a large deal of much more intuitive and interactive tools. Accessing astronomical data archives, schedule, control and monitor observatories, and in particular robotic telescopes, supervising data reduction pipelines, all are capabilities that can now be implemented in a JavaScript web application. In this paper we describe the Sadira package we are implementing exactly to this aim.

  5. Foundations of semantic web technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Hitzler, Pascal; Rudolph, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    The Quest for Semantics Building Models Calculating with Knowledge Exchanging Information Semanic Web Technologies RESOURCE DESCRIPTION LANGUAGE (RDF)Simple Ontologies in RDF and RDF SchemaIntroduction to RDF Syntax for RDF Advanced Features Simple Ontologies in RDF Schema Encoding of Special Data Structures An ExampleRDF Formal Semantics Why Semantics? Model-Theoretic Semantics for RDF(S) Syntactic Reasoning with Deduction Rules The Semantic Limits of RDF(S)WEB ONTOLOGY LANGUAGE (OWL) Ontologies in OWL OWL Syntax and Intuitive Semantics OWL Species The Forthcoming OWL 2 StandardOWL Formal Sem

  6. Teaching with technology: free Web resources for teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Diane M; Smith-Stoner, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    In this bimonthly series, the department editor examines how nurse educators can use Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, collaborative writing tools; social networking, and social bookmarking sites; virtual worlds; and Web-based teaching and learning programs. In this article, the department editor and her coauthor describe free Web-based resources that can be used to support teaching and learning.

  7. Recommender Systems for the Social Web

    CERN Document Server

    Pazos Arias, José J; Díaz Redondo, Rebeca P

    2012-01-01

    The recommendation of products, content and services cannot be considered newly born, although its widespread application is still in full swing. While its growing success in numerous sectors, the progress of the  Social Web has revolutionized the architecture of participation and relationship in the Web, making it necessary to restate recommendation and reconciling it with Collaborative Tagging, as the popularization of authoring in the Web, and  Social Networking, as the translation of personal relationships to the Web. Precisely, the convergence of recommendation with the above Social Web pillars is what motivates this book, which has collected contributions from well-known experts in the academy and the industry to provide a broader view of the problems that Social Recommenders might face with.  If recommender systems have proven their key role in facilitating the user access to resources on the Web, when sharing resources has become social, it is natural for recommendation strategies in the Social Web...

  8. Bioprocess-Engineering Education with Web Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Sessink, O.

    2006-01-01

    Development of learning material that is distributed through and accessible via the World Wide Web. Various options from web technology are exploited to improve the quality and efficiency of learning material.

  9. The new community rules marketing on the social web

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, Tamar

    2009-01-01

    Blogs, networking sites, and other examples of the social web provide businesses with a largely untapped marketing channel for products and services. But how do you take advantage of them? With The New Community Rules, you''ll understand how social web technologies work, and learn the most practical and effective ways to reach people who frequent these sites. Written by an expert in social media and viral marketing, this book cuts through the hype and jargon to give you intelligent advice and strategies for positioning your business on the social web, with case studies that show how other c

  10. Intelligent web data management software architectures and emerging technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Kun; Yang, Bo; Sun, Runyuan

    2016-01-01

    This book presents some of the emerging techniques and technologies used to handle Web data management. Authors present novel software architectures and emerging technologies and then validate using experimental data and real world applications. The contents of this book are focused on four popular thematic categories of intelligent Web data management: cloud computing, social networking, monitoring and literature management. The Volume will be a valuable reference to researchers, students and practitioners in the field of Web data management, cloud computing, social networks using advanced intelligence tools.

  11. Web Browser Trends and Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin-Jones, Bob

    2000-01-01

    Discusses Web browsers and how their capabilities have been expanded, support for Web browsing on different devices (cell phones, palmtop computers, TV sets), and browser support for the next-generation Web authoring language, XML ("extensible markup language"). (Author/VWL)

  12. Web 2.0 Technologies: Applications for Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajt, Susanne K.

    2011-01-01

    The current generation of new students, referred to as the Millennial Generation, brings a new set of challenges to the community college. The influx of these technologically sophisticated students, who interact through the social phenomenon of Web 2.0 technology, bring expectations that may reshape institutions of higher learning. This chapter…

  13. Social Web mining and exploitation for serious applications: Technosocial Predictive Analytics and related technologies for public health, environmental and national security surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel Boulos, Maged N; Sanfilippo, Antonio P; Corley, Courtney D; Wheeler, Steve

    2010-10-01

    This paper explores Technosocial Predictive Analytics (TPA) and related methods for Web "data mining" where users' posts and queries are garnered from Social Web ("Web 2.0") tools such as blogs, micro-blogging and social networking sites to form coherent representations of real-time health events. The paper includes a brief introduction to commonly used Social Web tools such as mashups and aggregators, and maps their exponential growth as an open architecture of participation for the masses and an emerging way to gain insight about people's collective health status of whole populations. Several health related tool examples are described and demonstrated as practical means through which health professionals might create clear location specific pictures of epidemiological data such as flu outbreaks. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Enabling Problem Based Learning through Web 2.0 Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tambouris, Efthimios; Panopoulou, Eleni; Tarabanis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    of modern educational systems. Established pedagogical strategies, such as Problem Based Learning (PBL), are being adapted for online use in conjunction with modern Web 2.0 technologies and tools. However, even though Web 2.0 and progressive social-networking technologies are automatically associated......Advances in Information and Communications Technology (ICT), particularly the so-called Web 2.0, are affecting all aspects of our life: how we communicate, how we shop, how we socialise, and how we learn. Facilitating learning through the use of ICT, also known as eLearning, is a vital part...... with ideals such as collaboration, sharing, and active learning, it is also possible to use them in a very conservative, teacher-centred way limiting thus their impact. In this paper, we present a PBL 2.0 framework, i.e., a framework combining PBL practices with Web 2.0 technologies. More specifically, we (a...

  15. Rationalizing social technologies

    OpenAIRE

    V V Scherbina

    2016-01-01

    The article considers the problem of defining the specifics and types of social technologies (hereinafter ST). The author pursues the following objectives: first, to clarify the specific features of social technologies; second, to identify the grounds for classifying the existing types of social technologies; third, to describe the basic characteristics (functions, tasks, tools, the scope and limits of application, and ideological bases) of social technologies; fourth, to identify the basic f...

  16. Cloud Pedagogy: Utilizing Web-Based Technologies for the Promotion of Social Constructivist Learning in Science Teacher Preparation Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Miri

    2017-01-01

    The new guidelines for science education emphasize the need to introduce computers and digital technologies as a means of enabling visualization and data collection and analysis. This requires science teachers to bring advanced technologies into the classroom and use them wisely. Hence, the goal of this study was twofold: to examine the…

  17. Handbook of social network technologies and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Furht, Borko

    2010-01-01

    Social networking is a concept that has existed for a long time; however, with the explosion of the Internet, social networking has become a tool for people to connect and communicate in ways that were impossible in the past. The recent development of Web 2.0 has provided many new applications, such as Myspace, Facebook, and LinkedIn. The purpose of ""Handbook of Social Networks: Technologies and Applications"" is to provide comprehensive guidelines on the current and future trends in social network technologies and applications in the field of Web-based Social Networks. This handbook includes

  18. Web 2.0 and libraries impacts, technologies and trends

    CERN Document Server

    Parkes, Dave

    2010-01-01

    In a world where computing power, ubiquity and connectivity create powerful new ways to facilitate learning, this book examines how librarians and information professionals can utilize emerging technologies to expand service and resource delivery. With contributions from leading professionals, including lecturers, librarians and e-learning technologists, this bookl explores strategic approaches for effectively implementing, living with, and managing revolutionary technological change in libraries.Explores the impact of the social and technological aspects of Web 2.0 on librarie

  19. Emerging Technologies: Web 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Claire

    2011-03-01

    Web 2.0 has brought a change to how we communicate and disseminate information with the use of Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, instant messaging and blogging. This technology is beginning to be used in the health field for public awareness campaigns, emergency health alerts, medical education and remote healthcare services. Australian Health Information Managers will be called upon to reconcile their organisations' policies and procedures regarding the use of Web 2.0 technologies within the existing legal framework of privacy, confidentiality and consent. This article explores various applications of Web 2.0, their benefits and some of their potential legal and ethical implications when implemented in Australia.

  20. An Introduction to XML and Web Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anders; Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    , building on top of the early foundations. This book offers a comprehensive introduction to the area. There are two main threads of development, corresponding to the two parts of this book. XML technologies generalize the notion of data on the Web from hypertext documents to arbitrary data, including those...... that have traditionally been the realm of databases. In this book we cover the basic XML technology and the supporting technologies of XPath, DTD, XML Schema, DSD2, RELAX NG, XSLT, XQuery, DOM, JDOM, JAXB, SAX, STX, SDuce, and XACT. Web technologies build on top of the HTTP protocol to provide richer...

  1. Capturing Trust in Social Web Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, John

    The Social Web constitutes a shift in information flow from the traditional Web. Previously, content was provided by the owners of a website, for consumption by the end-user. Nowadays, these websites are being replaced by Social Web applications which are frameworks for the publication of user-provided content. Traditionally, Web content could be `trusted' to some extent based on the site it originated from. Algorithms such as Google's PageRank were (and still are) used to compute the importance of a website, based on analysis of underlying link topology. In the Social Web, analysis of link topology merely tells us about the importance of the information framework which hosts the content. Consumers of information still need to know about the importance/reliability of the content they are reading, and therefore about the reliability of the producers of that content. Research into trust and reputation of the producers of information in the Social Web is still very much in its infancy. Every day, people are forced to make trusting decisions about strangers on the Web based on a very limited amount of information. For example, purchasing a product from an eBay seller with a `reputation' of 99%, downloading a file from a peer-to-peer application such as Bit-Torrent, or allowing Amazon.com tell you what products you will like. Even something as simple as reading comments on a Web-blog requires the consumer to make a trusting decision about the quality of that information. In all of these example cases, and indeed throughout the Social Web, there is a pressing demand for increased information upon which we can make trusting decisions. This chapter examines the diversity of sources from which trust information can be harnessed within Social Web applications and discusses a high level classification of those sources. Three different techniques for harnessing and using trust from a range of sources are presented. These techniques are deployed in two sample Social Web

  2. Changing Academic Teaching with Web 2.0 Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newland, Barbara; Byles, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Academic teaching can change with the use of Web 2.0 technologies, such as blogs and wikis, as these enable a different pedagogical approach through collaborative learning and the social construction of knowledge. Student expectations of their university learning experience have changed as they expect e-learning to be part of the learning…

  3. Internet Web Communication Technology (WCT) and Information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Internet Web Communication Technology (WCT) and Information Communication Technology (ICT) Development and Use for Veterinary Medicine Education in Nigeria ... Contrarily, the level of ICT use in Nigerian education system, including veterinary medicine education, is still very low, with an estimated 90% of Nigeria's ...

  4. The Social Web and Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Guus Wijngaards

    2008-01-01

    On the internet we see a continuously growing generation of web applications enabling anyone to create and publish online content in a simple way, to link content and to share it with others: wellknown instances include MySpace, Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, Wikipedia and Google Earth. The internet has

  5. Semantic-Web Technology: Applications at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashish, Naveen

    2004-01-01

    We provide a description of work at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) on building system based on semantic-web concepts and technologies. NASA has been one of the early adopters of semantic-web technologies for practical applications. Indeed there are several ongoing 0 endeavors on building semantics based systems for use in diverse NASA domains ranging from collaborative scientific activity to accident and mishap investigation to enterprise search to scientific information gathering and integration to aviation safety decision support We provide a brief overview of many applications and ongoing work with the goal of informing the external community of these NASA endeavors.

  6. Evaluating the use and impact of Web 2.0 technologies in local government

    OpenAIRE

    Sivarajah, U; Irani, Z; Weerakkody, V

    2015-01-01

    Second generation web-based technologies (Web 2.0) such as social media and networking sites are increasingly being used by governments for activities ranging from open policy making to communication campaigns and customer service. However, this in turn has brought about additional challenges. By its very nature, Web 2.0 technologies are more interactive than the traditional models of information provision or creation of digital services. Such technologies open up a new set of benefits, costs...

  7. Opportunities and Challenges of using Web 2.0 Technologies in Government: A Conceptual Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sivarajah, U; Weerakkody, V; Irani, Z

    2016-01-01

    Public administration has endured signification transformation over the last decade enabled largely through Information and Communication Technology. In recent times, second generation web technologies (Web 2.0) such as social media and net-working sites are increasingly being used by governments for its digital activities rang-ing from public relations to knowledge management. However, as Web 2.0 technolo-gies are more interactive than the traditional models of information provision or crea-...

  8. Biological data integration using Semantic Web technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, C

    2008-04-01

    Current research in biology heavily depends on the availability and efficient use of information. In order to build new knowledge, various sources of biological data must often be combined. Semantic Web technologies, which provide a common framework allowing data to be shared and reused between applications, can be applied to the management of disseminated biological data. However, due to some specificities of biological data, the application of these technologies to life science constitutes a real challenge. Through a use case of biological data integration, we show in this paper that current Semantic Web technologies start to become mature and can be applied for the development of large applications. However, in order to get the best from these technologies, improvements are needed both at the level of tool performance and knowledge modeling.

  9. Cases, Simulacra, and Semantic Web Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, P.; Tscholl, M.

    2013-01-01

    "Ensemble" is an interdisciplinary research and development project exploring the potential role of emerging Semantic Web technologies in case-based learning across learning environments in higher education. Empirical findings have challenged the claim that cases "bring reality into the classroom" and that this, in turn, might…

  10. Social Web in Lehre und Forschung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruber, Marion

    2011-01-01

    Gruber, M. R. (2011). Social Web in Lehre und Forschung. Presentation at the Faculty of Arts, University of Zurich. January, 19, 2011, Info-Veranstaltung der E-Learning-Koordination der Philosophischen Fakultät, Zürich, Schweiz: Universität Zürich.

  11. Fusing recommendations for social bookmarking web sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogers, T.; Bosch, A.P.J. van den

    2011-01-01

    Social bookmarking Web sites are rapidly growing in popularity. Recommender systems, a promising remedy to the information overload accompanying the explosive growth in content, are designed to identify which unseen content might be of interest to a particular user, based on his or her past

  12. Social Media and the “Read-Only” Web: Reconfiguring Social Logics and Historical Boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Sapnar Ankerson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The web’s historical periodization as Web 1.0 (“read-only” and Web 2.0 (“read/write” eras continues to hold sway even as the umbrella term “social media” has become the preferred way to talk about today’s ecosystem of connective media. Yet, we have much to gain by not exclusively positing social media platforms as a 21st-century phenomenon. Through case studies of two commercially sponsored web projects from the mid-1990s—Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab’s Day in the Life of Cyberspace and Rick Smolan’s 24 Hours in Cyberspace —this article examines how notions of social and publics were imagined and designed into the web at the start of the dot-com boom. In lieu of a discourse of versions, I draw on Lucy Suchman’s trope of configuration as an analytic tool for rethinking web historiography. By tracing how cultural imaginaries of the Internet as a public space are conjoined with technological artifacts (content management systems, templates, session tracking, and e-commerce platforms and reconfigured over time, the discourses of “read-only publishing” and the “social media revolution” can be reframed not as exclusively oppositional logics, but rather, as mutually informing the design and development of today’s social, commercial, web.

  13. Untangling Web 2.0: Charting Web 2.0 Tools, the NCSS Guidelines for Effective Use of Technology, and Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diacopoulos, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for social studies to embrace instructional technology and Web 2.0 applications has become a growing trend in recent social studies research. As part of an ongoing process of collaborative enquiry between an instructional specialist and social studies teachers in a Professional Learning Community, a table of Web 2.0 applications was…

  14. Modellierung von Anwenderverhalten im Social Semantic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Armin; Höfler, Patrick; Lindstaedt, Stefanie

    Ziel dieses Kapitels ist es, gemeinsame Verwendungsszenarien des Semantic Web und des Social Web zu identifizieren und zu benennen. Dabei wird ein Teilaspekt des Themengebiets im Detail betrachtet: die Nutzung von Services, die Beobachtungen des Verhaltens von Anwendern analysieren, um daraus maschinell interpretierbare Informationen zu erhalten und diese als Modelle zu organisieren. Es werden zunächst einige Eigenschaften und Unterscheidungsmerkmale von Anwenderverhalten und organisierten Modellen dargestellt. Anschließend wird der mögliche wechselseitige Nutzen von Anwenderverhalten und Modellen diskutiert. Den Abschluss bildet eine Betrachtung einiger exemplarischer Software-Services, die heute schon verwendet werden, um Anwenderverhalten in Modelle überzuführen.

  15. Capitalizing on Web 2.0 in the Social Studies Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Lori B.; Beal, Candy M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses primarily on the integration of Web 2.0 technologies into social studies education. It documents how various Web 2.0 tools can be utilized in the social studies context to support and enhance teaching and learning. For the purposes of focusing on one specific topic, global connections at the middle school level will be the…

  16. Learning to Design WebQuests: An Exploration in Preservice Social Studies Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Alisa

    2008-01-01

    Effective uses of technology in social studies methods courses is an under-researched field. This study focused on the development of WebQuests to engage teacher candidate's exploration of the Internet as an authentic medium for inquiry in social studies education. Analysis of appropriateness of tasks in the WebQuests, depth of ideas and audience…

  17. Social networking for web-based communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Issa, T.; Kommers, Petrus A.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the 21st century, a new technology was introduced to facilitate communication, collaboration, and interaction between individuals and businesses. This technology is called social networking; this technology is now part of Internet commodities like email, browsing and blogging. From the 20th

  18. Segmenting The Web 2.0 Market: Behavioural And Usage Patterns Of Social Web Consumers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorenzo Romero, Carlota; Constantinides, Efthymios; Alarcon-del-Amo, Maria-del-Carmen

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of the commercial Internet to the current phase, commonly called Web 2.0 (or Social Web) has firmly positioned the web not only as a commercial but also as a social communication platform: an online environment facilitating peer-to-peer interaction, socialization, co-operation and

  19. Sistemas de Inteligencia Web basados en Redes Sociales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Rosa Troyano, Fco. Fernando

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Social Network Analysis (SNA is an emerging area, essential in decision making processes. Its capacities to analyze and intervene in a social network can be used to implant surveillance tasks in research centers or technological-based businesses. The aim of this work is to make a proposal to design intelligence web systems based on social networks. The first obstacle to implant these systems is the data gather process. In order to solve this problem, an extracting social networks methodology is presented. The extraction process is carried out by analyzing the search engine results. Queries are based on electronic mails. From the extracted network, its spatial distribution of social relationships, the global thematic impact and the institutional relationships are also analyzed. The social structure of REDES email distribution list is analyzed as an example.

  20. The web as platform: Data flows in social media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmond, A.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation looks into the history of Web 2.0 as "the web as platform" (O’Reilly 2004) and traces the transition of social network sites into social media platforms to examine how social media has transformed the web. In order to understand this process from an infrastructural perspective, I

  1. Social Studies and the Language of Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John K.; Bennett, Clifford

    1999-01-01

    Provides definitions of the following words and phrases that are related to technology and its use in the social sciences classroom: CD-ROM, database, discussion group, e-mail, hypertext and hypermedia, Internet, simulation, spreadsheets, virtual field trip, and World Wide Web. (AEF)

  2. Social Tagging for Personalized Web Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancalana, Claudio

    Social networks and collaborative tagging systems are rapidly gaining popularity as primary means for sorting and sharing data: users tag their bookmarks in order to simplify information dissemination and later lookup. Social Bookmarking services are useful in two important respects: first, they can allow an individual to remember the visited URLs, and second, tags can be made by the community to guide users towards valuable content. In this paper we focus on the latter use: we present a novel approach for personalized web search using query expansion. We further extend the family of well-known co-occurence matrix technique models by using a new way of exploring social tagging services. Our approach shows its strength particularly in the case of disambiguation of word contexts. We show how to design and implement such a system in practice and conduct several experiments. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study centered on using social bookmarking and tagging techniques for personalization of web search and its evaluation in a real-world scenario.

  3. Infusing Classrooms with Web 2.0 Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Richard Carlos L.

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of digital technologies over the past couple of decades has contributed to a paradigm shift in education where the internet and web-based applications have become ubiquitous in primary and secondary classrooms (Glassman & Kang, 2011). With this shift came the digital phenomena known today as Web 2.0 technologies. Web 2.0…

  4. Deriving a Typology of Web 2.0 Learning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Matt

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the methods and outcomes of a typological analysis of Web 2.0 technologies. A comprehensive review incorporating over 2000 links led to identification of over 200 Web 2.0 technologies that were suitable for learning and teaching purposes. The typological analysis involved development of relevant Web 2.0 dimensions, grouping…

  5. Understanding web services: The platform technology for next ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Understanding web services: The platform technology for next-generation computing systems. ... Web Services is the latest approach to Service Oriented Computing (SOC), an advanced form of Web application development, a sub domain of distributed computing and the technological driver of an emerging discipline ...

  6. Incorporating Web 2.0 Technologies from an Organizational Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, R.

    2009-12-01

    SIMILE project at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) for displaying time-based events in a clean, horizontal timeline display. Numerous standards, applications, and 3rd party integration services are also available for use in today's Web 2.0 environment. In addition to a cohesive online platform, the following tools can improve networking, information sharing, and increased scientific and educational collaboration: ○ Facebook (Fan pages, social networking, etc) ○ Twitter/Twitterfeed (Automatic updates in 3 steps) ○ Mobify.me (Mobile web) ○ Wimba, Adobe Connect, etc (real time conferencing) Increasingly, the scientific community is being asked to share data and information within and outside disciplines, with K-12 students, and with members of the public and policy-makers. Web 2.0 technologies can easily be set up and utilized to share data and other information to specific audiences in real time, and their simplicity ensures their increasing use by the science community in years to come.

  7. [Stress and information-communication technologies: from videoterminal to web].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomei, G; Ciarrocca, M; De Sio, S; Suppi, A; Sinibaldi, F; Di Pastena, C; Scala, B; Corbosiero, P; De Angelis, A; Prenna, A; Tomei, F; Sancini, A

    2012-07-01

    The relationship between stress and new technologies has always been a vexed question. Sociologists and philosophers say technology is a double edged sword, on one hand it increases the potential of human senses, while on the other hand it forces man to adopt rhythms and conditions not natural but artificial, with consequences for his physical and mental health. Modern Cognitive Ergonomic tries to analyze to technology, interacting with mental functions, causes stress and it tries to offer the most appropriate technological solutions for human work. From our analysis it emerges that the old media have an influence on mood causing episodes of insomnia, irritability, anxiety, etc., even if in a way that cannot be completely evaluated. Contrariwise, a controlled use of the web can improve the communication and the interacting abilities in patients with psychosocial distress and low social skills. Nielsen's Heuristics are a great tool to value methods of informatical and media interfaces.

  8. Web Development Technology-PHP. How It Is Related To Web Development Technology ASP.NET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manya Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper tells about the technologies used in PHP and how they are related to ASP.NET. The paper begin with the introduction of PHP defining what and how technologies has been used in development of User Complaint Web Application. How thistechnology is related to ASP.NET in features such as implementation functionality validation and proactive behavior involved in validating user input from the browser providing users feedback overall time consumed in development and maintenance.

  9. Teaching Web 2.0 technologies using Web 2.0 technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rethlefsen, Melissa L; Piorun, Mary; Prince, J Dale

    2009-10-01

    The research evaluated participant satisfaction with the content and format of the "Web 2.0 101: Introduction to Second Generation Web Tools" course and measured the impact of the course on participants' self-evaluated knowledge of Web 2.0 tools. The "Web 2.0 101" online course was based loosely on the Learning 2.0 model. Content was provided through a course blog and covered a wide range of Web 2.0 tools. All Medical Library Association members were invited to participate. Participants were asked to complete a post-course survey. Respondents who completed the entire course or who completed part of the course self-evaluated their knowledge of nine social software tools and concepts prior to and after the course using a Likert scale. Additional qualitative information about course strengths and weaknesses was also gathered. Respondents' self-ratings showed a significant change in perceived knowledge for each tool, using a matched pair Wilcoxon signed rank analysis (P2.0-style courses, though demanding time and self-motivation from participants, can increase knowledge of Web 2.0 tools.

  10. Teaching Web 2.0 technologies using Web 2.0 technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piorun, Mary; Prince, J. Dale

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The research evaluated participant satisfaction with the content and format of the “Web 2.0 101: Introduction to Second Generation Web Tools” course and measured the impact of the course on participants' self-evaluated knowledge of Web 2.0 tools. Methods: The “Web 2.0 101” online course was based loosely on the Learning 2.0 model. Content was provided through a course blog and covered a wide range of Web 2.0 tools. All Medical Library Association members were invited to participate. Participants were asked to complete a post-course survey. Respondents who completed the entire course or who completed part of the course self-evaluated their knowledge of nine social software tools and concepts prior to and after the course using a Likert scale. Additional qualitative information about course strengths and weaknesses was also gathered. Results: Respondents' self-ratings showed a significant change in perceived knowledge for each tool, using a matched pair Wilcoxon signed rank analysis (Pself-motivation from participants, can increase knowledge of Web 2.0 tools. PMID:19851488

  11. Cooperative Learning and Web 2.0: A Social Perspective on Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipke, Rae Carrington

    2018-01-01

    This article discusses how cooperative learning as a socioinstructional approach, relates to both socially-based emerging technologies (i.e. Web 2.0) and to critical thinking with respect to co-cognition. It begins with a discussion of the importance of connecting cooperative learning, Web 2.0, and critical thinking. This is followed by the need…

  12. Segmenting The Web 2.0 Market: Behavioural And Usage Patterns Of Social Web Consumers

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzo Romero, Carlota; Constantinides, Efthymios; Alarcon-del-Amo, Maria-del-Carmen

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of the commercial Internet to the current phase, commonly called Web 2.0 (or Social Web) has firmly positioned the web not only as a commercial but also as a social communication platform: an online environment facilitating peer-to-peer interaction, socialization, co-operation and information exchange. Internet users are not any more passive consumers of information but are actively involved in online creation, editing, and dissemination of content. They form virtual communities...

  13. WebScore: An Effective Page Scoring Approach for Uncertain Web Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaojie Qiao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available To effectively score pages with uncertainty in web social networks, we first proposed a new concept called transition probability matrix and formally defined the uncertainty in web social networks. Second, we proposed a hybrid page scoring algorithm, called WebScore, based on the PageRank algorithm and three centrality measures including degree, betweenness, and closeness. Particularly,WebScore takes into a full consideration of the uncertainty of web social networks by computing the transition probability from one page to another. The basic idea ofWebScore is to: (1 integrate uncertainty into PageRank in order to accurately rank pages, and (2 apply the centrality measures to calculate the importance of pages in web social networks. In order to verify the performance of WebScore, we developed a web social network analysis system which can partition web pages into distinct groups and score them in an effective fashion. Finally, we conducted extensive experiments on real data and the results show that WebScore is effective at scoring uncertain pages with less time deficiency than PageRank and centrality measures based page scoring algorithms.

  14. The geospatial web how geobrowsers, social software and the web 2 0 are shaping the network society

    CERN Document Server

    Scharl, Arno; Tochtermann, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    The Geospatial Web will have a profound impact on managing knowledge, structuring work flows within and across organizations, and communicating with like-minded individuals in virtual communities. The enabling technologies for the Geospatial Web are geo-browsers such as NASA World Wind, Google Earth and Microsoft Live Local 3D. These three-dimensional platforms revolutionize the production and consumption of media products. They not only reveal the geographic distribution of Web resources and services, but also bring together people of similar interests, browsing behavior, or geographic location. This book summarizes the latest research on the Geospatial Web's technical foundations, describes information services and collaborative tools built on top of geo-browsers, and investigates the environmental, social and economic impacts of geospatial applications. The role of contextual knowledge in shaping the emerging network society deserves particular attention. By integrating geospatial and semantic technology, ...

  15. PLEs from virtual ethnography to social web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Torres

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presenta una investigación exploratoria basada en la etnografía virtualdesde un entorno de investigación y aprendizaje con nuevas tecnologías. La etnografía esun método de investigación cualitativo de las ciencias sociales que es usadoprincipalmente en la antropología socio-cultural, donde tiene su fundamento teórico. Elobjetivo fue explorar la web 2.0 y sus herramientas desde la etnografía virtual. Elmétodo de investigación es basado en la etnografía virtual y la observación participante,la cual se realizó participando en comunidades virtuales y por medio de un blog y otrasherramientas 2.0. El resultado de la experiencia etnográfica es un modelo descriptivo dela web 2.0 basado en un Entorno Personal de Aprendizaje (PLE.

  16. PLEs from virtual ethnography to social web

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Torres; Jordi Ojeda; Josep Monguet; Hugo Gonzalez

    2011-01-01

    En este artículo se presenta una investigación exploratoria basada en la etnografía virtualdesde un entorno de investigación y aprendizaje con nuevas tecnologías. La etnografía esun método de investigación cualitativo de las ciencias sociales que es usadoprincipalmente en la antropología socio-cultural, donde tiene su fundamento teórico. Elobjetivo fue explorar la web 2.0 y sus herramientas desde la etnografía virtual. Elmétodo de investigación es basado en la etnografía virtual y la observa...

  17. Evaluating HDR photos using Web 2.0 technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guoping; Mei, Yujie; Duan, Jiang

    2011-01-01

    High dynamic range (HDR) photography is an emerging technology that has the potential to dramatically enhance the visual quality and realism of digital photos. One of the key technical challenges of HDR photography is displaying HDR photos on conventional devices through tone mapping or dynamic range compression. Although many different tone mapping techniques have been developed in recent years, evaluating tone mapping operators prove to be extremely difficult. Web2.0, social media and crowd-sourcing are emerging Internet technologies which can be harnessed to harvest the brain power of the mass to solve difficult problems in science, engineering and businesses. Paired comparison is used in the scientific study of preferences and attitudes and has been shown to be capable of obtaining an interval-scale ordering of items along a psychometric dimension such as preference or importance. In this paper, we exploit these technologies for evaluating HDR tone mapping algorithms. We have developed a Web2.0 style system that enables Internet users from anywhere to evaluate tone mapped HDR photos at any time. We adopt a simple paired comparison protocol, Internet users are presented a pair of tone mapped images and are simply asked to select the one that they think is better or click a "no difference" button. These user inputs are collected in the web server and analyzed by a rank aggregation algorithm which ranks the tone mapped photos according to the votes they received. We present experimental results which demonstrate that the emerging Internet technologies can be exploited as a new paradigm for evaluating HDR tone mapping algorithms. The advantages of this approach include the potential of collecting large user inputs under a variety of viewing environments rather than limited user participation under controlled laboratory environments thus enabling more robust and reliable quality assessment. We also present data analysis to correlate user generated qualitative

  18. Inferring Trust Relationships in Web-Based Social Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Golbeck, Jennifer; Hendler, James

    2006-01-01

    The growth of web-based social networking and the properties of those networks have created great potential for producing intelligent software that integrates a user's social network and preferences...

  19. The use of Web 2.0 technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohtz, Cindy; Gowda, Connie; Stockert, Patricia; White, Jane; Kennel, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Although many publications laud the potential benefits of using Web 2.0 technologies in nursing education, little has been published on the extent of their use. This descriptive study examined the personal and academic use of Web 2.0 technologies among nursing students enrolled in 3 different baccalaureate programs.

  20. Weaving a Personal Web: Using Online Technologies to Create Customized, Connected, and Dynamic Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElvaney, Jessica; Berge, Zane

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores how "personal web technologies" (PWTs) can be used by learners and the relationship between PWTs and connectivist learning principles. Descriptions and applications of several technologies including social bookmarking tools, personal publishing platforms, and aggregators are also included. With these tools,…

  1. Prototype of a Mobile Social Network for Education Using Dynamic Web Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoentsch, Sandra Costa Pinto; Carvalho, Felipe Oliveira; Santos, Luiz Marcus Monteiro de Almeida; Ribeiro, Admilson de Ribamar Lima

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the proposal of a social network site SocialNetLab that belongs to the Department of Computing-Federal University of Sergipe and which aims to locate and notify users of a nearby friend independently of the location technology available in the equipment through dynamic Web Service; to serve as a laboratory for research in…

  2. Social Web Identity Established upon Trust and Reputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajni Goel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Online social networks have become a seamless and critical online communication platform for personal interactions. They are a powerful tool that businesses are using to expand among domestic markets. The increase in participation in online social networking can and has caused damage to individuals and organizations, and the issuance of trust has become a concern on the social web. The factors determining the reputation of persons (customers in the real world may relate to the factors of reputation on the social web, though relative to how trust is established in the physical world, establishing trust on the social web can be fairly difficult. Determining how to trust another individual’s online social profile becomes critical in initiating any interaction on the social web. Rather than focusing on content on the social network page, this research proposes and examines the application of user reputations to determine whether the trust should be issued on the social web. A top-level framework to establish trust in an identity on the Social Network Sites (SNS as a function of the users’ associations, usage patterns and reputation on the social web is presented.

  3. Designing Virtual Museum Using Web3D Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianghai

    VRT was born to have the potentiality of constructing an effective learning environment due to its 3I characteristics: Interaction, Immersion and Imagination. It is now applied in education in a more profound way along with the development of VRT. Virtual Museum is one of the applications. The Virtual Museum is based on the WEB3D technology and extensibility is the most important factor. Considering the advantage and disadvantage of each WEB3D technology, VRML, CULT3D AND VIEWPOINT technologies are chosen. A web chatroom based on flash and ASP technology is also been created in order to make the Virtual Museum an interactive learning environment.

  4. Social Technologies in Shipbuilding Workshop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1983-01-01

    Social technology refers to innovative organizations of work and human resource management practices employed in experimental or quasi-experimental settings for the purpose of improving performance...

  5. Utilizing Social Bookmarking Tag Space for Web Content Discovery: A Social Network Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Social bookmarking has gained popularity since the advent of Web 2.0. Keywords known as tags are created to annotate web content, and the resulting tag space composed of the tags, the resources, and the users arises as a new platform for web content discovery. Useful and interesting web resources can be located through searching and browsing based…

  6. Technology and social communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, G.A.

    1996-12-31

    For centuries advances in what we now term media have generated concerns about the effect these advances have on values and morality-books, stage drama, movies, TV, and now computer-based fantasy and Internet-based distribution. These media comprise some of the most powerful agents for developing our fundamental strategies for living. Computer-based fantasy can provide waves of sensations that everyday life does not prepare us for; they create a wow effect. The implications are especially, strong for adolescents. Wow effects come to seem ordinary. We can easily overdose on them with a subsequent dulling of sensibility that motivates one to seek the next level. As the wow effect is numbed, socializing restrictions break down. A psychological strategy of distancing is one defense against enhanced imagery - a strategy of cool as antidote. The wow-cool dipole can foster a role as spectator that inhibits empathy and a fundamental distancing from the self. Technology - the source of our concerns-can also help to counteract them. The most powerful drive in children is to learn mastery of the world. New input and output devices and especially properly designed software can enhance the capacity to learn and to be creative, i.e. to gain mastery over the world. These powerful new modes of communication not only give us great access to the world, they give the world great access to us. We must supplant what is now mostly a passive broadcast system with interactive exploration and two-way communication.

  7. Blending Web 2.0 Technologies with Developing of Writing Skills in ESL Classroom: Some Insights

    OpenAIRE

    Hind Talal Mashrah

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the educational field has adopted a new route for improving and increasing the way we learn languages, particularly English language, through using social networking services such as; Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and other technologies in writing skills. In this respect, this paper discusses how ESL classroom can apply the social networking services or Web 2.0. Technologies effectively to promote learners' writing skills. The paper first details research studies about the characteri...

  8. World Wide Web Usage Mining Systems and Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chen Hu

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Web usage mining is used to discover interesting user navigation patterns and can be applied to many real-world problems, such as improving Web sites/pages, making additional topic or product recommendations, user/customer behavior studies, etc. This article provides a survey and analysis of current Web usage mining systems and technologies. A Web usage mining system performs five major tasks: i data gathering, ii data preparation, iii navigation pattern discovery, iv pattern analysis and visualization, and v pattern applications. Each task is explained in detail and its related technologies are introduced. A list of major research systems and projects concerning Web usage mining is also presented, and a summary of Web usage mining is given in the last section.

  9. Semantic Web technologies for the big data in life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongyan; Yamaguchi, Atsuko

    2014-08-01

    The life sciences field is entering an era of big data with the breakthroughs of science and technology. More and more big data-related projects and activities are being performed in the world. Life sciences data generated by new technologies are continuing to grow in not only size but also variety and complexity, with great speed. To ensure that big data has a major influence in the life sciences, comprehensive data analysis across multiple data sources and even across disciplines is indispensable. The increasing volume of data and the heterogeneous, complex varieties of data are two principal issues mainly discussed in life science informatics. The ever-evolving next-generation Web, characterized as the Semantic Web, is an extension of the current Web, aiming to provide information for not only humans but also computers to semantically process large-scale data. The paper presents a survey of big data in life sciences, big data related projects and Semantic Web technologies. The paper introduces the main Semantic Web technologies and their current situation, and provides a detailed analysis of how Semantic Web technologies address the heterogeneous variety of life sciences big data. The paper helps to understand the role of Semantic Web technologies in the big data era and how they provide a promising solution for the big data in life sciences.

  10. Web Technologies in Radiation Protection Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco Arboli, M.; Hernando Velasco, E.; Rodriguez Suarez, M; Gomez Ros, J. M.; Rodriguez, M.; Villaroel, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the major advances already done in the educational web site maintained on the CIEMAT server and accessible through the CSN web. This training project attempts to propose the use of a web site as the standardisation of radiation protection training programmes. The main objective of this project is to provide training material for course organisers, trainers and professionals, and to promote the exchange of expertise between workers involved in all activities using radiation sources. The web site is being developed to provide educational material based on a modular design and in Spanish. We present the initial results of this useful tool for practitioners. The user can choose to obtain the information included in the web site by downloading the complete course or by obtaining the individual modules stepwise. Task in each of the training modules has been designed to develop specific competence taking into account different target groups. Complete materials for trainers and trainees will be available in the web site, to ease courses performance. The project also aims to obtain necessary standardisation of the Rp knowledge provided to workers. (Author) 12 refs

  11. Using Real-Time Social Media Technologies to Monitor Levels of Perceived Stress and Emotional State in College Students: A Web-Based Questionnaire Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sam; Zhu, Miaoqi; Yu, Dong Jin; Rasin, Alexander; Young, Sean D

    2017-01-10

    College can be stressful for many freshmen as they cope with a variety of stressors. Excess stress can negatively affect both psychological and physical health. Thus, there is a need to find innovative and cost-effective strategies to help identify students experiencing high levels of stress to receive appropriate treatment. Social media use has been rapidly growing, and recent studies have reported that data from these technologies can be used for public health surveillance. Currently, no studies have examined whether Twitter data can be used to monitor stress level and emotional state among college students. The primary objective of our study was to investigate whether students' perceived levels of stress were associated with the sentiment and emotions of their tweets. The secondary objective was to explore whether students' emotional state was associated with the sentiment and emotions of their tweets. We recruited 181 first-year freshman students aged 18-20 years at University of California, Los Angeles. All participants were asked to complete a questionnaire that assessed their demographic characteristics, levels of stress, and emotional state for the last 7 days. All questionnaires were completed within a 48-hour period. All tweets posted by the participants from that week (November 2 to 8, 2015) were mined and manually categorized based on their sentiment (positive, negative, neutral) and emotion (anger, fear, love, happiness) expressed. Ordinal regressions were used to assess whether weekly levels of stress and emotional states were associated with the percentage of positive, neutral, negative, anger, fear, love, or happiness tweets. A total of 121 participants completed the survey and were included in our analysis. A total of 1879 tweets were analyzed. A higher level of weekly stress was significantly associated with a greater percentage of negative sentiment tweets (beta=1.7, SE 0.7; P=.02) and tweets containing emotions of fear (beta=2.4, SE 0.9; P=.01

  12. Dynamics of Investor Attention on the Social Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian

    2013-01-01

    The World Wide Web has been revolutionizing how investors produce and consume information while participating in financial markets. Both the amount of information and the speed it flows around have achieved unprecedented magnitudes. The preeminent change is the growth of investor communities on the social web, which give rise to multidimensional…

  13. An Implementation of Semantic Web System for Information retrieval using J2EE Technologies.

    OpenAIRE

    B.Hemanth kumar,; Prof. M.Surendra Prasad Babu

    2011-01-01

    Accessing web resources (Information) is an essential facility provided by web applications to every body. Semantic web is one of the systems that provide a facility to access the resources through web service applications. Semantic web and web Services are new emerging web based technologies. An automatic information processing system can be developed by using semantic web and web services, each having its own contribution within the context of developing web-based information systems and ap...

  14. Intranet Implementation in a Context of Web Technology Discovery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Asnawi, Amrullah

    1999-01-01

    This thesis presents a model of intranet implementation for a military facility within the context of an organization that is in the process of discovering Web technology and the browser as a central...

  15. Social Web in Teacher Education and Teacher Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruber, Marion

    2011-01-01

    Gruber, M. R. (2011). Social Web in Teacher Education and Teacher Training. Presentation at the Workshop "Het gebruik van digitale collecties leermaterialen". April, 21, 2011, Eindhoven, The Netherlands: Open Universiteit, Studiecentrum Eindhoven.

  16. Outreach for Outreach: Targeting social media audiences to promote a NASA kids’ web site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, C. C.

    2009-12-01

    The Space Place is a successful NASA web site that benefits upper elementary school students and educators by providing games, activities, and resources to stimulate interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, as well as to inform the audience of NASA’s contributions. As online social networking grows to be a central component of modern communication, The Space Place has explored the benefits of integrating social networks with the web site to increase awareness of materials the web site offers. This study analyzes the capabilities of social networks, and specifically the demographics of Twitter and Facebook. It then compares these results with the content, audience, and perceived demographics of The Space Place web site. Based upon the demographic results, we identified a target constituency that would benefit from the integration of social networks into The Space Place web site. As a result of this study, a Twitter feed has been established that releases a daily tweet from The Space Place. In addition, a Facebook page has been created to showcase new content and prompt interaction among fans of The Space Place. Currently, plans are under way to populate the Space Place Facebook page. Each social network has been utilized in an effort to spark excitement about the content on The Space Place, as well as to attract followers to the main NASA Space Place web site. To pursue this idea further, a plan has been developed to promote NASA Space Place’s social media tools among the target audience.

  17. Web-enabling technologies for the factory floor: a web-enabling strategy for emanufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Ricardo; Lastra, Jose L. M.; Tuokko, Reijo O.

    2001-10-01

    This paper is intended to address the different technologies available for Web-enabling of the factory floor. It will give an overview of the importance of Web-enabling of the factory floor, in the application of the concepts of flexible and intelligent manufacturing, in conjunction with e-commerce. As a last section, it will try to define a Web-enabling strategy for the application in eManufacturing. This is made under the scope of the electronics manufacturing industry, so every application, technology or related matter is presented under such scope.

  18. Talking physics in the social web

    CERN Multimedia

    Griffiths, Martin

    2007-01-01

    "From "blogs" to "wikis", the Web is now more than a mere repository of information. Martin Griffiths investigates how this new interactivity is affecting the way physicists communicate and access information." (5 pages)

  19. What¿s the deal with the web/blogs/the next big technology: a key role for information science in e-social science research?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thelwall, M.; Wouters, P.

    2005-01-01

    Since many nations have provided substantial funding for new e-social science and humanities investigations, there is now an opportunity for information scientists to adopt an enabling role for this new kind of research. Logically, a more information-centred environment should be more conducive to

  20. Web 2.0 for social learning in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh

    2011-01-01

    The use of Web 2.0 in higher education provides for a number of different possibilities. In this paper we look into the use of Web 2.0 as a platform for social learning supplementing traditional teaching methods such as lectures and on place group work. The findings are astonishing revealing...... challenges such as the unknown genre of Web 2.0 for learning and changed behaviors with relevance for the identity creation and perception of others. The insight points to a number of issues of relevance when Web 2.0 is integrated in design for learning....

  1. Social technologies and socialization of research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos Leijten

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Whether we like it or not, and how many difficulties this may pose, scientific research and technology are becoming the “property” of everybody and increasingly will become subject of public guidance and political decision making. Socialization happens because what people think, want and do has become central to the development of science and technology. Socialization of research is simply happening because it is the development characteristic of a society in which knowledge is becoming the main driving force. And just like in agricultural or industrial societies in the past it leads to (re-invent the institutions and mechanisms which allow the knowledge society to function properly.This note will further explore the developments contributing to the socialization of research and their impact on research and research institutes. It will focus more on technologies than on science per se, because applications and usage will become the main drivers.

  2. Semantic web technologies for enterprise 2.0

    CERN Document Server

    Passant, A

    2010-01-01

    In this book, we detail different theories, methods and implementations combining Web 2.0 paradigms and Semantic Web technologies in Enterprise environments. After introducing those terms, we present the current shortcomings of tools such as blogs and wikis as well as tagging practices in an Enterprise 2.0 context. We define the SemSLATES methodology and the global vision of a middleware architecture based on Semantic Web technologies and Linked Data principles (languages, models, tools and protocols) to solve these issues. Then, we detail the various ontologies that we build to achieve this g

  3. Book Reviews, Annotation, and Web Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Patricia

    From reading texts to annotating web pages, grade 6-8 students rely on group cooperation and individual reading and writing skills in this research project that spans six 50-minute lessons. Student objectives for this project are that they will: read, discuss, and keep a journal on a book in literature circles; understand the elements of and…

  4. Web technology to support LHD experiment management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagayama, Yoshio, E-mail: nagayama.yoshio@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Emoto, Masahiko; Yoshida, Masanobu; Iwata, Chie [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    The large helical device (LHD), which is the world largest helical confinement system, is a national project serving Japanese fusion community. In LHD, experiments of 7000 shots are carried out for 250 proposals every year. Efficient experiment arrangement is required in order to carry out many collaborators' proposal. Sometimes collaborators who are not familiar to LHD stay at NIFS only a few day to join the experiment. Issues are as follows: how to reduce collaborator's effort, how to reduce manager's effort to optimize the schedule; how to publicize plan and results of the experiment. We have developed web systems of virtual printer, experimental proposal and scheduling by using Ruby on Rails (RoR), which encapsulates relational data base (RDB) and AJAX. RDB enables to make tables by searching and sorting data with key words. Web servers are equipped in the virtual computer system in order to minimize efforts and cost of maintenance. The LHD web portal has been also developed in order to provide collaborators an efficient and intuitive interface to access the above systems, to take LHD information, and to use tools for LHD data analysis. The web systems have reduced collaborators' and managers' efforts significantly.

  5. Using Web 2.0 Technology to Enhance, Scaffold and Assess Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies, such as social networks, wikis, blogs, and virtual worlds provide a platform for collaborative working, facilitating sharing of resources and joint document production. They can act as a stimulus to promote active learning and provide an engaging and interactive environment for students, and as such align with the philosophy…

  6. Children and Young People's Views on Web 2.0 Technologies. LGA Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Peter; Walker, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies are online tools that allow users to share, collaborate and interact with one another. This small-scale project focused on young people's personal use of social media, and on the potential to use these tools to collect the views of young people and involve them in democracy in communities and local authorities. The main…

  7. Embedded Web Technology: Applying World Wide Web Standards to Embedded Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponyik, Joseph G.; York, David W.

    2002-01-01

    Embedded Systems have traditionally been developed in a highly customized manner. The user interface hardware and software along with the interface to the embedded system are typically unique to the system for which they are built, resulting in extra cost to the system in terms of development time and maintenance effort. World Wide Web standards have been developed in the passed ten years with the goal of allowing servers and clients to intemperate seamlessly. The client and server systems can consist of differing hardware and software platforms but the World Wide Web standards allow them to interface without knowing about the details of system at the other end of the interface. Embedded Web Technology is the merging of Embedded Systems with the World Wide Web. Embedded Web Technology decreases the cost of developing and maintaining the user interface by allowing the user to interface to the embedded system through a web browser running on a standard personal computer. Embedded Web Technology can also be used to simplify an Embedded System's internal network.

  8. Representations for Semantic Learning Webs: Semantic Web Technology in Learning Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzbor, M.; Stutt, A.; Motta, E.; Collins, T.

    2007-01-01

    Recent work on applying semantic technologies to learning has concentrated on providing novel means of accessing and making use of learning objects. However, this is unnecessarily limiting: semantic technologies will make it possible to develop a range of educational Semantic Web services, such as interpretation, structure-visualization, support…

  9. The Digital Economy: Social Interaction Technologies – an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teófilo Redondo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Social interaction technologies (SIT is a very broad field that encompasses a large list of topics: interactive and networked computing, mobile social services and the Social Web, social software and social media, marketing and advertising, various aspects and uses of blogs and podcasting, corporate value and web-based collaboration, e-government and online democracy, virtual volunteering, different aspects and uses of folksonomies, tagging and the social semantic cloud of tags, blog-based knowledge management systems, systems of online learning, with their ePortfolios, blogs and wikis in education and journalism, legal issues and social interaction technology, dataveillance and online fraud, neogeography, social software usability, social software in libraries and nonprofit organizations, and broadband visual communication technology for enhancing social interaction. The fact is that the daily activities of many businesses are being socialized, as is the case with Yammer (https://www.yammer.com/, the social enterprise social network. The leitmotivs of social software are: create, connect, contribute, and collaborate.

  10. Audiovisual consumption and its social logics on the web

    OpenAIRE

    Rose Marie Santini; Juan C. Calvi

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes the social logics underlying audiovisualconsumption on digital networks. We retrieved some data on the Internet globaltraffic of audiovisual files since 2008 to identify formats, modes of distributionand consumption of audiovisual contents that tend to prevail on the Web. Thisresearch shows the types of social practices which are dominant among usersand its relation to what we designate as “Internet culture”.

  11. An Introduction to Social Semantic Web Mining & Big Data Analytics for Political Attitudes and Mentalities Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Schatten

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The social web has become a major repository of social and behavioral data that is of exceptional interest to the social science and humanities research community. Computer science has only recently developed various technologies and techniques that allow for harvesting, organizing and analyzing such data and provide knowledge and insights into the structure and behavior or people on-line. Some of these techniques include social web mining, conceptual and social network analysis and modeling, tag clouds, topic maps, folksonomies, complex network visualizations, modeling of processes on networks, agent based models of social network emergence, speech recognition, computer vision, natural language processing, opinion mining and sentiment analysis, recommender systems, user profiling and semantic wikis. All of these techniques are briefly introduced, example studies are given and ideas as well as possible directions in the field of political attitudes and mentalities are given. In the end challenges for future studies are discussed.

  12. Social network extraction based on Web: 1. Related superficial methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairuddin Matyuso Nasution, Mahyuddin

    2018-01-01

    Often the nature of something affects methods to resolve the related issues about it. Likewise, methods to extract social networks from the Web, but involve the structured data types differently. This paper reveals several methods of social network extraction from the same sources that is Web: the basic superficial method, the underlying superficial method, the description superficial method, and the related superficial methods. In complexity we derive the inequalities between methods and so are their computations. In this case, we find that different results from the same tools make the difference from the more complex to the simpler: Extraction of social network by involving co-occurrence is more complex than using occurrences.

  13. Bipolar disorder research 2.0: Web technologies for research capacity and knowledge translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Erin E; McBride, Sally; Barnes, Steven J; Wood, Chanel S; Khatri, Nasreen; Balram Elliott, Nusha; Parikh, Sagar V

    2017-12-01

    Current Web technologies offer bipolar disorder (BD) researchers many untapped opportunities for conducting research and for promoting knowledge exchange. In the present paper, we document our experiences with a variety of Web 2.0 technologies in the context of an international BD research network: The Collaborative RESearch Team to Study psychosocial issues in BD (CREST.BD). Three technologies were used as tools for enabling research within CREST.BD and for encouraging the dissemination of the results of our research: (1) the crestbd.ca website, (2) social networking tools (ie, Facebook, Twitter), and (3) several sorts of file sharing (ie YouTube, FileShare). For each Web technology, we collected quantitative assessments of their effectiveness (in reach, exposure, and engagement) over a 6-year timeframe (2010-2016). In general, many of our strategies were deemed successful for promoting knowledge exchange and other network goals. We discuss how we applied our Web analytics to inform adaptations and refinements of our Web 2.0 platforms to maximise knowledge exchange with people with BD, their supporters, and health care providers. We conclude with some general recommendations for other mental health researchers and research networks interested in pursuing Web 2.0 strategies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. The Visual Web User Interface Design in Augmented Reality Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Chouyin Hsu; Haui-Chih Shiau

    2013-01-01

    Upon the popularity of 3C devices, the visual creatures are all around us, such the online game, touch pad, video and animation. Therefore, the text-based web page will no longer satisfy users. With the popularity of webcam, digital camera, stereoscopic glasses, or head-mounted display, the user interface becomes more visual and multi-dimensional. For the consideration of 3D and visual display in the research of web user interface design, Augmented Reality technology providing the convenient ...

  15. Flexible and Affordable Foreign Language Learning Environment based on Web 2.0 Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Guetl

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Web technologies and educational platforms have greatly evolved over the past decade. One of the most significant factors contributing to education on the Internet has been the development of Web 2.0 technologies. These technologies, socially interactive in nature, have much to contribute to the area of Computer Assisted Language Leaning. Unfortunately, Web 2.0 technologies for the most part have been used in an ad hoc manner, permitting language learners acquire knowledge through interaction, but not through a more structured manner as these technologies were not developed to help lean languages as such. The goal of our work is to research and develop an environment, which employs Web 2.0 technology plus online language learning tools to provide a more integrated language learning environment. This paper will explore the technologies and provide information about how tools can be better integrated to provide a more productive working environment for language learners. A first working proof of concept based on our approach introduced is promising supporting modern language requirements and first findings and space for improvements are discussed.

  16. Using Web 2.0 Technology to Enhance, Scaffold and Assess Problem-Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Hack

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Web 2.0 technologies, such as social networks, wikis, blogs, and virtual worlds provide a platform for collaborative working, facilitating sharing of resources and joint document production. They can act as a stimulus to promote active learning and provide an engaging and interactive environment for students, and as such align with the philosophy of Problem-based Learning. Furthermore, Web 2.0 technologies can provide the tutor or facilitator with an opportunity to scaffold and asses the PBL process. However, whilst it is recognised that technology has an important role in enhancing each step of a PBL exercise, academic staff can be reluctant to use it. This paper provides some illustrative examples of the technologies that have been used to enhance, scaffold and assess PBL and their evaluation by distance learning and on-campus students at the University of Ulster. The benefits and limitations of using technology for both staff and students to support PBL are discussed.

  17. Auditing the NCI thesaurus with semantic web technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougin, Fleur; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2008-11-06

    Auditing biomedical terminologies often results in the identification of inconsistencies and thus helps to improve their quality. In this paper, we present a method based on Semantic Web technologies for auditing biomedical terminologies and apply it to the NCI thesaurus. We stored the NCI thesaurus concepts and their properties in an RDF triple store. By querying this store, we assessed the consistency of both hierarchical and associative relations from the NCI thesaurus among themselves and with corresponding relations in the UMLS Semantic Network. We show that the consistency is better for associative relations than for hierarchical relations. Causes for inconsistency and benefits from using Semantic Web technologies for auditing purposes are discussed.

  18. Vilkår og muligheder i det sociale web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    Dette podcast gengiver et indlæg på Forskningsnetkonferencen 2007 om muligheder og vilkår i det sociale web med særligt henblik på e-læring. Fysisk medie: Flash-fil......Dette podcast gengiver et indlæg på Forskningsnetkonferencen 2007 om muligheder og vilkår i det sociale web med særligt henblik på e-læring. Fysisk medie: Flash-fil...

  19. Sport psychology group consultation using social networking web sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Frederick; Shipherd, Amber M; Gershgoren, Lael; Filho, Edson Medeiros; Basevitch, Itay

    2012-08-01

    A social networking Web site, Facebook, was used to deliver long-term sport psychology consultation services to student-athletes (i.e., soccer players) in 30- to 60-min weekly sessions. Additional short-term team building, group cohesion, communication, anger management, injury rehabilitation, mental toughness, commitment, and leadership workshops were provided. Cohesion and overall relationships between both the student-athletes and the sport psychology consultants benefited from this process. Social networking Web sites offer a practical way of providing sport psychology consulting services that does not require use of major resources. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Advances and Perspectives in Web Technologies for Music Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Baratè

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Web technologies are quickly evolving in order to provide an increasing set of services to Internet users. Multimedia is one of the fields where the availability of high-speed networks, innovative devices and new technological approaches is noticeably arousing the interest of content producers and consumers. In this regard, it is worth mentioning new HTML5 elements to embed multimedia, recent evolutions of e-book formats towards interactivity and hypermedia, and the establishment of new W3C groups addressing specific media-related issues. Such technological advances can have a deep impact on digital cultures, as it regards both content production and dissemination on the Web. The current challenge is to combine new hardware and software technologies in order to radically improve and customize content experience. After discussing a number of approaches to music representation, this paper aims to review the most relevant Web technologies already available and to propose new Web applications addressing music in an advanced multimedia context.

  1. Social Search: A Taxonomy of, and a User-Centred Approach to, Social Web Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Michael; Shiri, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to introduce the notion of social search as a new concept, drawing upon the patterns of web search behaviour. It aims to: define social search; present a taxonomy of social search; and propose a user-centred social search method. Design/methodology/approach: A mixed method approach was adopted to investigate…

  2. Accelerating cancer systems biology research through Semantic Web technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihui; Sagotsky, Jonathan; Taylor, Thomas; Shironoshita, Patrick; Deisboeck, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    Cancer systems biology is an interdisciplinary, rapidly expanding research field in which collaborations are a critical means to advance the field. Yet the prevalent database technologies often isolate data rather than making it easily accessible. The Semantic Web has the potential to help facilitate web-based collaborative cancer research by presenting data in a manner that is self-descriptive, human and machine readable, and easily sharable. We have created a semantically linked online Digital Model Repository (DMR) for storing, managing, executing, annotating, and sharing computational cancer models. Within the DMR, distributed, multidisciplinary, and inter-organizational teams can collaborate on projects, without forfeiting intellectual property. This is achieved by the introduction of a new stakeholder to the collaboration workflow, the institutional licensing officer, part of the Technology Transfer Office. Furthermore, the DMR has achieved silver level compatibility with the National Cancer Institute's caBIG, so users can interact with the DMR not only through a web browser but also through a semantically annotated and secure web service. We also discuss the technology behind the DMR leveraging the Semantic Web, ontologies, and grid computing to provide secure inter-institutional collaboration on cancer modeling projects, online grid-based execution of shared models, and the collaboration workflow protecting researchers' intellectual property. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. SPADOCK: Adaptive Pipeline Technology for Web System using WebSocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aries RICHI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As information technology grows to the era of IoT(Internet of Things and cloud computing, the performance ofweb application and web service which acts as the informationgateway becomes an issue. Horizontal quality of serviceimprovement through system performance escalation becomesan issue pursued by engineers and scientists, giving birth toBigPipe pipeline technology which was developed by Facebook.We make SPADOCK, an adaptive pipeline system which is builtunder distributed system architecture with the utilization ofHTML5 WebSocket, then measure its performance. Parametersused for the measurement includes latency, workload, andbandwidth. The result shows that SPADOCK could reduceserving latency by 68.28% compared with the conventional web,and it is 20.63% faster than BigPipe.

  4. Enhancing promotional strategies within social marketing programs: use of Web 2.0 social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Rosemary; Neiger, Brad L; Hanson, Carl L; McKenzie, James F

    2008-10-01

    The second generation of Internet-based applications (i.e., Web 2.0), in which users control communication, holds promise to significantly enhance promotional efforts within social marketing campaigns. Web 2.0 applications can directly engage consumers in the creative process by both producing and distributing information through collaborative writing, content sharing, social networking, social bookmarking, and syndication. Web 2.0 can also enhance the power of viral marketing by increasing the speed at which consumers share experiences and opinions with progressively larger audiences. Because of the novelty and potential effectiveness of Web 2.0, social marketers may be enticed to prematurely incorporate related applications into promotional plans. However, as strategic issues such as priority audience preferences, selection of appropriate applications, tracking and evaluation, and related costs are carefully considered, Web 2.0 will expand to allow health promotion practitioners more direct access to consumers with less dependency on traditional communication channels.

  5. Social web artifacts for boosting recommenders theory and implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Ziegler, Cai-Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Recommender systems, software programs that learn from human behavior and make predictions of what products we are expected to appreciate and purchase, have become an integral part of our everyday life. They proliferate across electronic commerce around the globe and exist for virtually all sorts of consumable goods, such as books, movies, music, or clothes. At the same time, a new evolution on the Web has started to take shape, commonly known as the “Web 2.0” or the “Social Web”: Consumer-generated media has become rife, social networks have emerged and are pulling significant shares of Web traffic. In line with these developments, novel information and knowledge artifacts have become readily available on the Web, created by the collective effort of millions of people. This textbook presents approaches to exploit the new Social Web fountain of knowledge, zeroing in first and foremost on two of those information artifacts, namely classification taxonomies and trust networks. These two are used to impr...

  6. Technological Dynamics and Social Capability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerberg, Jan; Feldman, Maryann; Srholec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    for the sample as a whole between 1998 and 2008. The results indicate that social capabilities, such as well-developed public knowledge infrastructure, an egalitarian distribution of income, a participatory democracy and prevalence of public safety condition the growth of technological capabilities. Possible...... effects of other factors, such as agglomeration, urbanization, industrial specialization, migration and knowledge spillovers are also considered....

  7. Undergraduates, Technology, and Social Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Betsy; Boniek, Susan; Turner, Elena; Lovell, Elyse D'nn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the spectrum of undergraduate students' social interactions and related technological tools. Qualitative methods were used for this phenomenological study exploring 35 in-person interviews, with horizonalization in an open coding system secured by in-depth analysis which revealed nuanced themes and…

  8. Semantic Web Technologies as the Foundation for the Information Infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oosterom, Peter; Zlatanova, S.; Van Harmelen, Frank; Van Oosterom, Peter; Zlatanova, S

    2008-01-01

    The Semantic Web is arising over the pas few years as a realistic option for a world wide Information Infrastructure, with its promises of semantic interoperability and serendipitous reuse. In this paper we will analyse the essential ingredients of semantic technologies, what makes them suitable as

  9. Enhancing e-Learning Content by Using Semantic Web Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, Herminio; Gayo, José Emilio Labra; del Puerto Paule-Ruiz, María

    2017-01-01

    We describe a new educational tool that relies on Semantic Web technologies to enhance lessons content. We conducted an experiment with 32 students whose results demonstrate better performance when exposed to our tool in comparison with a plain native tool. Consequently, this prototype opens new possibilities in lessons content enhancement.

  10. Case-Based Learning, Pedagogical Innovation, and Semantic Web Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garcia, A.; Morris, S.; Tscholl, M.; Tracy, F.; Carmichael, P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of Semantic Web technologies to support teaching and learning in a variety of higher education settings in which some form of case-based learning is the pedagogy of choice. It draws on the empirical work of a major three year research and development project in the United Kingdom: "Ensemble: Semantic…

  11. CERN's web application updates for electron and laser beam technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sigas, Christos

    2017-01-01

    This report describes the modifications at CERN's web application for electron and laser beam technologies. There are updates at both the front and the back end of the application. New electron and laser machines were added and also old machines were updated. There is also a new feature for printing needed information.

  12. ICT AND WEB TECHNOLOGY BASED INNOVATIONS IN EDUCATION SECTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Dhamdhere SANGEETA NAMDEV,

    2012-01-01

    ICT made real magic and drastic changes in all service sectors along with higher education and library practices and services. The academic environment is changing from formal education to distance and online learning mode because of ICT. Web technology and mobile technology has made great impact on education sector. The role of Open Access, institutional repositories, opens archives and e-publishing trends indicates the shift towards new way of communication on an increasing scale in the stu...

  13. Aprovechar la web social en clase de E/LE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Soler Albiñana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo principal de esta comunicación es presentar una experiencia personal acerca de cómo podemos, los profesores de ELE, incorporar la web social a nuestras clases de español, mediante la adaptación de tareas comunicativas. Todos sabemos ya, que actualmente se hallan a nuestra disposición en internet multitud de herramientas gratuitas y relativamente fáciles de utilizar, incluso para los emigrantes digitales, es decir, aquellos que estamos en el mundo desde antes de la llegada de la era digital. Por esta razón, ni el profesor ni el alumno necesitan ya ser expertos en nuevas tecnologías para hacer uso de la web social o web 2.0., basta con tener un poco de curiosidad y ganas de aprender, como las que dieron origen a esta presentación.

  14. Combating the counterfeits with web portal technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, S. L.; Ip, W. H.

    2015-10-01

    Due to the globalisation of counterfeiting activities, the penetration of fake products in open market is growing. So far, the technologies to combat counterfeiting are mostly applied to high-value products (e.g. premium wine and branded handbags); however, in the medium- and low-value products' perspective, there is no secure way for consumers to identify whether the purchased items are genuine or not. To address the counterfeiting problems effectively, a platform for identifying authenticated products and promoting anti-counterfeit activities is very important. The aim of this paper is to design and develop an anti-counterfeit platform which includes two functions: providing customers a secure network to ascertain the genuineness of their purchased product and increasing public awareness of the current counterfeit problems and updated anti-counterfeit solutions. By combining these two functions, it enables public to fight against fake and beware of counterfeit. Results of adopting portal technology in anti-counterfeiting show high accuracy in product checking and improved creditability. This reveals that the applicability and advantage of the proposed methodology are satisfactory.

  15. Using WebQuests in the Social Sciences Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachina, Olga A.

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates if WebQuests have been an effective instructional tool for teaching Social Sciences subjects. In order to obtain an answer to this question, a review of scholarly literature from 1995 to the present has been undertaken and action research in 8th grade U.S. history course was conducted. The literature investigation has…

  16. User Data on the Social Web: Authorship, Agency, and Appropriation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyman, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Social web services catalog users' activities across the Internet, aggregating, analyzing, and selling a vast array of user data to be used largely for consumer profiling and target marketing. This article interrogates the tacit agreements and terms-of-use policies that govern who owns user data, how it circulates, and how it can be used. Relying…

  17. Functionality for learning networks: lessons learned from social web applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berlanga, Adriana; Sloep, Peter; Brouns, Francis; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Koper, Rob

    2007-01-01

    Berlanga, A. J., Sloep, P., Brouns, F., Van Rosmalen, P., Bitter-Rijpkema, M., & Koper, R. (2007). Functionality for learning networks: lessons learned from social web applications. Proceedings of the ePortfolio 2007 Conference. October, 18-19, 2007, Maastricht, The Netherlands. [See also

  18. Spatial and social connectedness in web-based work collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Handberg, L.; Gullström, C.; Kort, J.; Nyström, J.

    2016-01-01

    The work presented here seeks an integration of spatial and social features supporting shared activities, and engages users in multiple locations to manipulate realtime video-streams. Standard and easily available equipment is used together with the communication standard WebRTC. It adds a spatial

  19. Web-Based Assessment of Children's Social-Emotional Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKown, Clark; Russo-Ponsaran, Nicole M.; Johnson, Jason K.; Russo, Jaclyn; Allen, Adelaide

    2016-01-01

    This article presents results from two studies that included ethnically and socioeconomically diverse samples totaling 4,462 children in kindergarten through third grade. Each study examined the psychometric properties of a web-based, self-administered battery of assessments of social-emotional comprehension called "SELweb." Assessment…

  20. Research on Webbed Connectivity in a Web-Based Learning Environment: Online Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Dorinda; Russell, Amy Catherine

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary data and analysis of how students in an online MSW program perceive their experiences, interactions, and responses to learning structure, material, and technology in the Web environment. The student perceptions, which have been used to refine the online program, highlight how important it is to students to feel…

  1. Using Social Media Technologies to Enhance Online Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hershey H. Friedman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Models of distance education have evolved over decades, just in time to collide with modern pedagogies in which communication, interaction, student engagement, and active learning are of critical importance. The number of college students taking online classes continues to grow. Today, nearly 30% of college students are taking at least one online class. The social media technologies encompass a wide variety of Web-based technologies such as blogs, wikis, online social networking, and virtual worlds. This paper examines the relevant published literature, looking at online learning activities through the prism of the defining characteristics of today’s new communication technologies.

  2. Blending Web 2.0 Technologies with Developing of Writing Skills in ESL Classroom: Some Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind Talal Mashrah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the educational field has adopted a new route for improving and increasing the way we learn languages, particularly English language, through using social networking services such as; Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and other technologies in writing skills. In this respect, this paper discusses how ESL classroom can apply the social networking services or Web 2.0. Technologies effectively to promote learners' writing skills. The paper first details research studies about the characteristics of two social networking, Blogs and Wikis, to show the importance of implementing Web 2.0 technologies in writing skills. Then the benefits of applying social networking services as an essential approach for teaching and learning writing skills in L2 are presented. Paper also discusses the counter –argument, as opposite perspectives, that applying social networking websites is not always considered as a proper method to improve writing skills due to many reasons which may lead decreasing learners' level of English or make them far behind because of their difficulties they face when they use these technologies

  3. Empirical analysis of online social networks in the age of Web 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Feng; Liu, Lianghuan; Wang, Long

    2008-01-01

    Today the World Wide Web is undergoing a subtle but profound shift to Web 2.0, to become more of a social web. The use of collaborative technologies such as blogs and social networking site (SNS) leads to instant online community in which people communicate rapidly and conveniently with each other. Moreover, there are growing interest and concern regarding the topological structure of these new online social networks. In this paper, we present empirical analysis of statistical properties of two important Chinese online social networks-a blogging network and an SNS open to college students. They are both emerging in the age of Web 2.0. We demonstrate that both networks possess small-world and scale-free features already observed in real-world and artificial networks. In addition, we investigate the distribution of topological distance. Furthermore, we study the correlations between degree (in/out) and degree (in/out), clustering coefficient and degree, popularity (in terms of number of page views) and in-degree (for the blogging network), respectively. We find that the blogging network shows disassortative mixing pattern, whereas the SNS network is an assortative one. Our research may help us to elucidate the self-organizing structural characteristics of these online social networks embedded in technical forms.

  4. Remote sensing education and Internet/World Wide Web technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J.A.; Egbert, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    Remote sensing education is increasingly in demand across academic and professional disciplines. Meanwhile, Internet technology and the World Wide Web (WWW) are being more frequently employed as teaching tools in remote sensing and other disciplines. The current wealth of information on the Internet and World Wide Web must be distilled, nonetheless, to be useful in remote sensing education. An extensive literature base is developing on the WWW as a tool in education and in teaching remote sensing. This literature reveals benefits and limitations of the WWW, and can guide its implementation. Among the most beneficial aspects of the Web are increased access to remote sensing expertise regardless of geographic location, increased access to current material, and access to extensive archives of satellite imagery and aerial photography. As with other teaching innovations, using the WWW/Internet may well mean more work, not less, for teachers, at least at the stage of early adoption. Also, information posted on Web sites is not always accurate. Development stages of this technology range from on-line posting of syllabi and lecture notes to on-line laboratory exercises and animated landscape flyovers and on-line image processing. The advantages of WWW/Internet technology may likely outweigh the costs of implementing it as a teaching tool.

  5. Mining social media and web searches for disease detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y Tony; Horneffer, Michael; DiLisio, Nicole

    2013-04-28

    Web-based social media is increasingly being used across different settings in the health care industry. The increased frequency in the use of the Internet via computer or mobile devices provides an opportunity for social media to be the medium through which people can be provided with valuable health information quickly and directly. While traditional methods of detection relied predominately on hierarchical or bureaucratic lines of communication, these often failed to yield timely and accurate epidemiological intelligence. New web-based platforms promise increased opportunities for a more timely and accurate spreading of information and analysis. This article aims to provide an overview and discussion of the availability of timely and accurate information. It is especially useful for the rapid identification of an outbreak of an infectious disease that is necessary to promptly and effectively develop public health responses. These web-based platforms include search queries, data mining of web and social media, process and analysis of blogs containing epidemic key words, text mining, and geographical information system data analyses. These new sources of analysis and information are intended to complement traditional sources of epidemic intelligence. Despite the attractiveness of these new approaches, further study is needed to determine the accuracy of blogger statements, as increases in public participation may not necessarily mean the information provided is more accurate.

  6. Sistemas de Inteligencia Web basados en redes sociales

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa Troyano, Fco. Fernando de la; Martínez Gasca, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    El Análisis de las Redes Sociales (ARS) es un área que está emergiendo como imprescindible en los procesos de toma de decisiones. Su capacidad para analizar e intervenir una red social puede ser aprovechada para implantar tareas de vigilancia en los sistemas de inteligencia de un centro de investigación o una empresa de base tecnológica. El objetivo de este trabajo es realizar una propuesta para diseñar sistemas de inteligencia web basados en redes sociales. El primer obstáculo para implantar...

  7. Aspects of Data Warehouse Technologies for Complex Web Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Christian

    to this thesis has primarily been done in relation to the project European Internet Accessibility Observatory (EIAO) where a data warehouse for accessibility data (roughly data about how usable web resources are for disabled users) has been specified and developed. But the results of the thesis can also...... be applied to other projects using business intelligence (BI) and/or complex web data. An interesting perspective is that all the technologies used and developed in the presented work are based on open source software. The thesis presents several tools in a survey of the possibilities for using open source...... for the EIAO project. A new and efficient way to store triples from an OWL ontology known from the Semantic Web field is presented. In contrast to traditional triple stores where the data is stored in few, but big, tables with few columns, the presented solution spreads the data over more tables that may have...

  8. Businesses Integration with Workflow and Web Service Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianina RIZESCU

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available If businesses want to benefit from the power of the Internet, web siteshave to evolve. It is often no longer beneficial for them to only provide staticinformation. It is necessary for these web sites to find ways that allow them tointeract with other websites, operating systems, and applications. With Webservices it is finally possible to create functions that can easily be accessed over theInternet by both internal and external parties. In other words, with Web services it ispossible to integrate different value chains from different organizations with ease.On the other hand, workflows provide tools and mechanisms for managing theinteraction between people, systems, applications and business functions. Thecombination of these two technologies offers a very powerful solution forbusinesses integration.

  9. Social Media in School Emergency Management: Using New Media Technology to Improve Emergency Management Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Social Media is the use of social networking sites, messaging sites, texting, and other web-based or mobile technologies to support social interaction. Facebook is by far the most widely used social networking site. Twitter is by far the most widely used messaging site. The goals of this presentation are: (1) To provide an understanding of the…

  10. Towards Development of Web-based Assessment System Based on Semantic Web Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosam Farouk El-Sofany

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment process in an educational system is an important and primordial part of its success to assure the correct way of knowledge transmission and to ensure that students are working correctly and succeed to acquire the needed knowledge. In this study, we aim to include Semantic Web technologies in the E-learning process, as new components. We use Semantic Web (SW to: 1 support the evaluation of open questions in e-learning courses, 2 support the creation of questions and exams automatically, 3 support the evaluation of exams created by the system. These components should allow for measuring academic performance, providing feedback mechanisms, and improving participative and collaborative ideas. Our goal is to use Semantic Web and Wireless technologies to design and implement the assessment system that allows the students, to take: web-based tutorials, quizzes, free exercises, and exams, to download: course reviews, previous exams and their model answers, to access the system through the Mobile and take quick quizzes and exercises. The system facilitates generation of automatic, balanced, and different exam sheets that contain different types of questions covering the entire curriculum, and display gradually from easiness to difficulty. The system provides the teachers and administrators with several services such as: store different types of questions, generate exams with specific criteria, and upload course assignments, exams, and reviews.

  11. Xerox trails: a new web-based publishing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Venkatesh G.; Vandervort, David; Silverstein, Jesse

    2010-02-01

    Xerox Trails is a new digital publishing model developed at the Xerox Research Center, Webster. The primary purpose of the technology is to allow Web users and publishers to collect, organize and present information in the form of a useful annotated narrative (possibly non-sequential) with editorial content and metadata, that can be consumed both online and offline. The core concept is a trail: a digital object that improves online content production, consumption and navigation user experiences. When appropriate, trails can also be easily sequenced and transformed into printable documents, thereby bridging the gap between online and offline content experiences. The model is partly inspired by Vannevar Bush's influential idea of the "Memex" [1] which has inspired several generations of Web technology [2]. Xerox Trails is a realization of selected elements from the idea of the Memex, along with several original design ideas. It is based on a primitive data construct, the trail. In Xerox Trails, the idea of a trail is used to support the architecture of a Web 2.0 product suite called Trailmeme, that includes a destination Web site, plugins for major content management systems, and a browser toolbar.

  12. A Personalized Tag-Based Recommendation in Social Web Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durao, Frederico; Dolog, Peter

    2009-01-01

    -based recommender system which suggests similar Web pages based on the similarity of their tags from a Web 2.0 tagging application. The proposed approach extends the basic similarity calculus with external factors such as tag popularity, tag representativeness and the affinity between user and tag. In order...... to study and evaluate the recommender system, we have conducted an experiment involving 38 people from 12 countries using data from Del.icio.us , a social bookmarking web system on which users can share their personal bookmarks......Tagging activity has been recently identified as a potential source of knowledge about personal interests, preferences, goals, and other attributes known from user models. Tags themselves can be therefore used for finding personalized recommendations of items. In this paper, we present a tag...

  13. Web Search Personalization Via Social Bookmarking and Tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Michael G.; Meinel, Christoph

    In this paper, we present a new approach to web search personalization based on user collaboration and sharing of information about web documents. The proposed personalization technique separates data collection and user profiling from the information system whose contents and indexed documents are being searched for, i.e. the search engines, and uses social bookmarking and tagging to re-rank web search results. It is independent of the search engine being used, so users are free to choose the one they prefer, even if their favorite search engine does not natively support personalization. We show how to design and implement such a system in practice and investigate its feasibility and usefulness with large sets of real-word data and a user study.

  14. Managing the Business of Social Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeretta Horn Nord

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A greater number of consumers use social technologies-social media, social networking, and social relevance-than organizations. Economically, however, companies have much to gain by taking the plunge. Results show that organizations that have made the effort to increase their knowledge and build social technology platforms have experienced astounding results. The purpose of this article is to discuss social technology categories and present a strategy for knowledge management so that organizations may successfully implement these technologies. A huge growth is expected in the number of companies whose management will make a decision or have already made a decision to develop social technology platforms in the near future. This article provides a straight forward approach accompanied by examples of real companies who have used social technologies and experienced real returns–many in the millions of dollars. The intention is to provide a concise, up-to-date social technologies knowledge management guide.

  15. Accessing NASA Technology with the World Wide Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Bianco, David J.

    1995-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) began using the World Wide Web (WWW) in the summer of 1993, becoming the first NASA installation to provide a Center-wide home page. This coincided with a reorganization of LaRC to provide a more concentrated focus on technology transfer to both aerospace and non-aerospace industry. Use of WWW and NCSA Mosaic not only provides automated information dissemination, but also allows for the implementation, evolution and integration of many technology transfer and technology awareness applications. This paper describes several of these innovative applications, including the on-line presentation of the entire Technology OPportunities Showcase (TOPS), an industrial partnering showcase that exists on the Web long after the actual 3-day event ended. The NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS) provides uniform access to many logically similar, yet physically distributed NASA report servers. WWW is also the foundation of the Langley Software Server (LSS), an experimental software distribution system which will distribute LaRC-developed software. In addition to the more formal technology distribution projects, WWW has been successful in connecting people with technologies and people with other people.

  16. Angular JS – The Newest Technology in Creating Web Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu BUCEA-MANEA-TONIS

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is the result of searching and selecting new technologies that help programmer in developing web applications. It also represents a pleading for using it, showing its advantages and disadvantages. Alongside the article there are features regarding binding elements, modules, filters and directives. It is a synthesis and a guide of good practice for innovative programmers. All technical issues presented are supported by a case study.

  17. Collaborative Middle School Geometry through Blogs and Other Web 2.0 Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mokter; Wiest, Lynda R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the use of blogs, a simple application of Web 2.0 technologies, in middle school geometry instruction. Specifically, it provides an overview of the interactive features of Web 2.0 technologies and the feasibility of using Web 2.0 technologies in geometry teaching and learning, as well as a proposed model for creating a…

  18. Mobile Phone and Web 2.0 Technologies for Weight Management: A Systematic Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardus, Marco; Smith, Jane R; Samaha, Laya; Abraham, Charles

    2015-11-16

    Widespread diffusion of mobile phone and Web 2.0 technologies make them potentially useful tools for promoting health and tackling public health issues, such as the increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity. Research in this domain is growing rapidly but, to date, no review has comprehensively and systematically documented how mobile and Web 2.0 technologies are being deployed and evaluated in relation to weight management. To provide an up-to-date, comprehensive map of the literature discussing the use of mobile phone and Web 2.0 apps for influencing behaviors related to weight management (ie, diet, physical activity [PA], weight control, etc). A systematic scoping review of the literature was conducted based on a published protocol (registered at CRD42014010323). Using a comprehensive search strategy, we searched 16 multidisciplinary electronic databases for original research documents published in English between 2004 and 2014. We used duplicate study selection and data extraction. Using an inductively developed charting tool, selected articles were thematically categorized. We identified 457 articles, mostly published between 2013 and 2014 in 157 different journals and 89 conference proceedings. Articles were categorized around two overarching themes, which described the use of technologies for either (1) promoting behavior change (309/457, 67.6%) or (2) measuring behavior (103/457, 22.5%). The remaining articles were overviews of apps and social media content (33/457, 7.2%) or covered a combination of these three themes (12/457, 2.6%). Within the two main overarching themes, we categorized articles as representing three phases of research development: (1) design and development, (2) feasibility studies, and (3) evaluations. Overall, articles mostly reported on evaluations of technologies for behavior change (211/457, 46.2%). There is an extensive body of research on mobile phone and Web 2.0 technologies for weight management. Research has reported on (1

  19. SocialTrends: a Web Application for Monitoring and Visualizing Users in Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Tesconi, Maurizio; Gazz?, Davide; Lo Duca, Angelica

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays social media trends are becoming very importantto describe the variation of popularity, activity and influence of an entity.In this paper we define an abstract model which can be used on differentsocial media to compare metrics with the same meaning. In particularwe describe three classes of metrics: popularity, activity and influence.We also present SocialTrends, a web application (http://www.social-trends.it/) which collects, elaborates and visualizes social media data.Finally, we ...

  20. Social Technologies to Jump Start Geoscience Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Christopher; Martinez, Cynthia; Gonzales, Leila

    2010-05-01

    Collaborative and social technologies have been increasingly used to facilitate distributed data collection and observation in science. However, "Web 2.0" and basic social media are seeing limited coordinated use in building student and early-career geoscientists knowledge and understanding of the profession and career for which they have undertaken. The current generation of geology students and early career professionals are used to ready access to myriad of information and interaction opportunities, but they remain largely unaware about the geoscience profession, what the full scope of their opportunities are, and how to reach across institutional and subdisciplinary boundaries to build their own professional network. The American Geological Institute Workforce Program has tracked and supported the human resources of the geosciences since 1952. With the looming retirement of Baby Boomers, increasing demand for quality geoscientists, and a continued modest supply of students entering the geosciences, AGI is working to strengthen the human resource pipeline in the geosciences globally. One aspect of this effort is the GeoConnection Network, which is an integrated set of social networking, media sharing and communication Web 2.0 applications designed to engage students in thinking about careers in the geosciences and enabling them to build their own personal professional network. Developed by the American Geological Institute (AGI), GeoConnection links practicing and prospective geoscientists in an informal setting to share information about the geoscience profession, including student and career opportunities, current events, and future trends in the geosciences. The network includes a Facebook fan page, YouTube Channel, Twitter account and GeoSpectrum blog, with the goal of helping science organizations and departments recruit future talent to the geoscience workforce. On the social-networking platform, Facebook, the GeoConnection page is a forum for students and

  1. Web 2.0: Today's Technology, Tomorrow's Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groff, Jennifer; Haas, Jason

    2008-01-01

    When it comes to technologies like digital games, simulations, and social networking, teachers and students may find themselves at cross purposes. Often, students find that these technologies, so prevalent in their lives outside of school, are unwelcome in their classrooms. Many teachers can tell stories about the disruptive influence of video…

  2. Remote Instrument Control with CIMA Web Services and Web 2.0 Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas John du Boulay

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The Common Instrument Middleware Architecture (CIMA model for Web services based monitoring of remote scientific instruments is being extended and enhanced to provide a capability for remote instrument control. X-ray diffraction has been selected as an ideal domain for prototype development, with the goal being a comprehensive and feature rich portal system for access to remote instruments and their data. The system has two principle components, one of which serves the instrument and data, and the second serves the client user. Plugin modules are used to provide flexibility and re-use, and the notion of plugin control is being developed. The architecture supports remote access to multiple instruments from a single portal. The use of Web 2.0 Pushlet and AJAX technologies has been introduced for push based portlet refresh and updating. An X3D based 3D virtual representation of the instrument provides data collection simulation and (pseudo real time instrument representation.

  3. Creating experiential learning activities using Web 2.0 tools and technologies: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brixey, Juliana J; Warren, Judith J

    2009-01-01

    Learning is no longer an internal individual activity but occurs through networks and connections. The aim of this project was to teach online health informatics students to use Web 2.0 tools and technologies to form networks and connections through experiential learning assignments. Web 2.0 tools and technologies were evaluated using a criteria checklist prior to implementation for students enrolled in health informatics classes at the University of Kansas School of Nursing. Health informatics students have developed competencies using an instant message service, blogging, concept mapping, social bookmarking, and interacting a virtual environment. In the future, health care professionals will have to work in rapidly changing environments and keep abreast of new innovations and tools, learn to use those tools, and to teach others about the tools.

  4. A Generic Framework for Extraction of Knowledge from Social Web Sources (Social Networking Websites) for an Online Recommendation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathick, Javubar; Venkat, Jaya

    2015-01-01

    Mining social web data is a challenging task and finding user interest for personalized and non-personalized recommendation systems is another important task. Knowledge sharing among web users has become crucial in determining usage of web data and personalizing content in various social websites as per the user's wish. This paper aims to design a…

  5. Science and Technology Parks in the Context of Social Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgaras Leichteris

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to present a new approach to science and technology park concept and the development prospects in the context of social technologies. Globalization and the spread of social technologies are expanding the influence of science and technology parks on national innovation systems. It opens new directions for research in this area, as well as the practical use of social technologies in the development of science and technology parks. The paper also examines the science and technology park as an institutionalized concept of social technology. In this article the interdisciplinary approach for analyzing the complex concept of science and technology parks is used to explore the theoretical relationships with the social technologies concept. The possible links are identified and illustrated by practical examples ofLithuanian science and technology parks. Finally suggestions for further research are made. Based on the analysis and synthesis of scientific literature in both fields (science and technology parks; social technologies three possible theoretical links are established: a the use of social technologies in science and technology parks b the role of a science park as an intermediate body in the humanization and socialization of technologies c science and technology parks as an institutionalized concept of social technology. The theoretical model is supported by empirical illustrations from the development of Lithuanian science and technology parks, therefore further research in all three directions is feasible and needed. As this research takes a merely theoretical approach to the social systems investigation, it can be qualified only as a preparational stage for further research. The practical examples used in the article are more illustrative than evidence based and shall not be considered as case studies. The research offers an initial framework for researching science and technology parks in the context of social technologies

  6. Science and Technology Parks in the Context of Social Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgaras Leichteris

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary. This article aims to present a new approach to science and technology park concept and the development prospects in the context of social technologies. Globalization and the spread of social technologies are expanding the influence of science and technology parks on national innovation systems. It opens new directions for research in this area, as well as the practical use of social technologies in the development of science and technology parks. The paper also examines the science and technology park as an institutionalized concept of social technology. In this article the interdisciplinary approach for analyzing the complex concept of science and technology parks is used to explore the theoretical relationships with the social technologies concept. The possible links are identified and illustrated by practical examples of Lithuanian science and technology parks. Finally suggestions for further research are made. Based on the analysis and synthesis of scientific literature in both fields (science and technology parks; social technologies three possible theoretical links are established: a the use of social technologies in science and technology parks b the role of a science park as an intermediate body in the humanization and socialization of technologies c science and technology parks as an institutionalized concept of social technology. The theoretical model is supported by empirical illustrations from the development of Lithuanian science and technology parks, therefore further research in all three directions is feasible and needed. As this research takes a merely theoretical approach to the social systems investigation, it can be qualified only as a preparational stage for further research. The practical examples used in the article are more illustrative than evidence based and shall not be considered as case studies. The research offers an initial framework for researching science and technology parks in the context of social

  7. Inquiry-Based Learning and Technology: Designing and Exploring WebQuests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacina, Jan

    2007-01-01

    A WebQuest is an inquiry-based technology activity designed by Bernie Dodge and Tom March at San Diego State University in 1995. Dodge and March describe WebQuests as activities in which most, or all, of the information used by learners is drawn from the Web. WebQuests are a powerful instructional activity for teachers and students. Students will…

  8. Harnessing modern web application technology to create intuitive and efficient data visualization and sharing tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan eWood

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuroscientists increasingly need to work with big data in order to derive meaningful results in their field. Collecting, organizing and analyzing this data can be a major hurdle on the road to scientific discovery. This hurdle can be lowered using the same technologies that are currently revolutionizing the way that cultural and social media sites represent and share information with their users. Web application technologies and standards such as RESTful webservices, HTML5 and high-performance in-browser JavaScript engines are being utilized to vastly improve the way that the world accesses and shares information. The neuroscience community can also benefit tremendously from these technologies. We present here a web application that allows users to explore and request the complex datasets that need to be shared among the neuroimaging community. The COINS (Collaborative Informatics and Neuroimaging Suite Data Exchange uses web application technologies to facilitate data sharing in three phases: Exploration, Request/Communication, and Download. This paper will focus on the first phase, and how intuitive exploration of large and complex datasets is achieved using a framework that centers around asynchronous client-server communication (AJAX and also exposes a powerful API that can be utilized by other applications to explore available data. First opened to the neuroscience community in August 2012, the Data Exchange has already provided researchers with over 2500 GB of data.

  9. Harnessing modern web application technology to create intuitive and efficient data visualization and sharing tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Dylan; King, Margaret; Landis, Drew; Courtney, William; Wang, Runtang; Kelly, Ross; Turner, Jessica A; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscientists increasingly need to work with big data in order to derive meaningful results in their field. Collecting, organizing and analyzing this data can be a major hurdle on the road to scientific discovery. This hurdle can be lowered using the same technologies that are currently revolutionizing the way that cultural and social media sites represent and share information with their users. Web application technologies and standards such as RESTful webservices, HTML5 and high-performance in-browser JavaScript engines are being utilized to vastly improve the way that the world accesses and shares information. The neuroscience community can also benefit tremendously from these technologies. We present here a web application that allows users to explore and request the complex datasets that need to be shared among the neuroimaging community. The COINS (Collaborative Informatics and Neuroimaging Suite) Data Exchange uses web application technologies to facilitate data sharing in three phases: Exploration, Request/Communication, and Download. This paper will focus on the first phase, and how intuitive exploration of large and complex datasets is achieved using a framework that centers around asynchronous client-server communication (AJAX) and also exposes a powerful API that can be utilized by other applications to explore available data. First opened to the neuroscience community in August 2012, the Data Exchange has already provided researchers with over 2500 GB of data.

  10. Using Web 2.0 for health promotion and social marketing efforts: lessons learned from Web 2.0 experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Jennifer Allyson; Jones, Sandra C; Iverson, Don

    2014-01-01

    Web 2.0 experts working in social marketing participated in qualitative in-depth interviews. The research aimed to document the current state of Web 2.0 practice. Perceived strengths (such as the viral nature of Web 2.0) and weaknesses (such as the time consuming effort it took to learn new Web 2.0 platforms) existed when using Web 2.0 platforms for campaigns. Lessons learned were identified--namely, suggestions for engaging in specific types of content creation strategies (such as plain language and transparent communication practices). Findings present originality and value to practitioners working in social marketing who want to effectively use Web 2.0.

  11. Corporate Social Responsibility In Turkey: An Analysis Through Web Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu EKER AKGÖZ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In today’s business environment, there is no chance for a corporation to be succeeded simply by doing profit oriented business. Corporations are the living entities along with their stakeholders therefore corporations are expected to be responsive on the cultural, environmental and economic issues of society. Socially responsible programs that corporations execute would contribute the corporate image and reputation. Furthermore, these programs benefit both corporations and society. The aim of this study is to examine the presence and organization of information on corporate responsibility present on the corporate web sites of companies which are in the Capital top 500 list. We will choose the top 100 companies on the top 500 list. By using content analysis, identified corporate responsibility issues will be analyzed. In this study, the information given in the web sites of these top 100 companies will be analyzed. We will be examining how the information is organized, presented, and related to the corporate responsibilities.

  12. The Implementation of Web 2.0 Technology for Information Literacy Instruction in Thai University Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawetrattanasatian, Oranuch

    2014-01-01

    Web 2.0 technology has drawn much attention recently as a fascinating tool for Information Literacy Instruction (ILI), especially in academic libraries. This research was aimed to investigate the implementation of Web 2.0 technology for ILI in Thai university libraries, in terms of information literacy skills being taught, types of Web 2.0…

  13. Web3D Technologies in Learning, Education and Training: Motivations, Issues, Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittaro, Luca; Ranon, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Web3D open standards allow the delivery of interactive 3D virtual learning environments through the Internet, reaching potentially large numbers of learners worldwide, at any time. This paper introduces the educational use of virtual reality based on Web3D technologies. After briefly presenting the main Web3D technologies, we summarize the…

  14. Improving Logistics Processes in Industry Using Web Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jánošík Ján

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to propose the concept of a system that takes advantage of web technologies and integrates them into the management process and management of internal stocks which may relate to external applications and creates the conditions to transform a Computerized Control of Warehouse Stock (CCWS in the company. The importance of implementing CCWS is in the elimination of the claims caused by the human factor, as well as to allow the processing of information for analytical purposes and their subsequent use to improve internal processes. Using CCWS in the company would also facilitate better use of the potential tools Business Intelligence and Data Mining.

  15. Modelling prediction of unemployment statistics using web technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popescu Mioara

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The global diffusion of Internet involves economic, political and demographic factors that can predict in real time. In this article, we demonstrate that according to data provided by EUROSTAT, the number of people looking for a job in Romania it is correlated with specific query terms using Google Trends. Search engine data is used to “predict the present” values of different economic indicators. The obtained results are compared with the classical method of developing the economic indicators, with official EUROSTAT employment data. In this paper, we demonstrate that the new methods to extract the economic indicators from web technologies are accurate.

  16. Accessing multimedia content from mobile applications using semantic web technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutel, Jörn; Gerlach, Andrea; Klekamp, Stefanie; Schulz, Kristin

    2014-02-01

    We describe the ideas and results of an applied research project that aims at leveraging the expressive power of semantic web technologies as a server-side backend for mobile applications that provide access to location and multimedia data and allow for a rich user experience in mobile scenarios, ranging from city and museum guides to multimedia enhancements of any kind of narrative content, including e-book applications. In particular, we will outline a reusable software architecture for both server-side functionality and native mobile platforms that is aimed at significantly decreasing the effort required for developing particular applications of that kind.

  17. SOA and Web Technology for Building BSE Market Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu VINTE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Visual representation as a map of the stock market data can offer access, in a quick and rele-vant manner for human participants, to the overall state of the market at a given point in time. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of our academic research upon building the market map for Bucharest Stock Exchange (BSE. We will focus on the algorithm for generat-ing the market map, the system architecture, and web technology employed for capturing the required data and making the map publicly available through the portal www.bursa.ase.ro. Mathematics Subject Classification: 68M14 (Distributed Systems

  18. Technological risks and social conflicts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, J.; Krebsbach-Gnath, C.

    1980-12-01

    This volume of materials is part of the report on 'Technological risks and social conflicts. Political risk strategies in the field of nuclear power'. The interested reader who wants to deepen his knowledge on the results and reasoning of the main report, will here find detailed explanations and brief drafts of subprojects; fundamental aspects of problems are presented in detail, and theoretical-conceptional, methodological and scientific-political points of view are explained. Furthermore it contains general reflections on the application-oriented research by order, a review of the status of risk research, historical considerations on the nuclear energy conflict, and finally explanations are attempted for the nuclear energy conflict. (orig./HSCH) [de

  19. An Intelligent Web Digital Image Metadata Service Platform for Social Curation Commerce Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Yong Hong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Information management includes multimedia data management, knowledge management, collaboration, and agents, all of which are supporting technologies for XML. XML technologies have an impact on multimedia databases as well as collaborative technologies and knowledge management. That is, e-commerce documents are encoded in XML and are gaining much popularity for business-to-business or business-to-consumer transactions. Recently, the internet sites, such as e-commerce sites and shopping mall sites, deal with a lot of image and multimedia information. This paper proposes an intelligent web digital image information retrieval platform, which adopts XML technology for social curation commerce environment. To support object-based content retrieval on product catalog images containing multiple objects, we describe multilevel metadata structures representing the local features, global features, and semantics of image data. To enable semantic-based and content-based retrieval on such image data, we design an XML-Schema for the proposed metadata. We also describe how to automatically transform the retrieval results into the forms suitable for the various user environments, such as web browser or mobile device, using XSLT. The proposed scheme can be utilized to enable efficient e-catalog metadata sharing between systems, and it will contribute to the improvement of the retrieval correctness and the user’s satisfaction on semantic-based web digital image information retrieval.

  20. Social networks, web-based tools and diseases: implications for biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Fabricio F

    2013-03-01

    Advances in information technology have improved our ability to gather, collect and analyze information from individuals online. Social networks can be seen as a nonlinear superposition of a multitude of complex connections between people where the nodes represent individuals and the links between them capture a variety of different social interactions. The emergence of different types of social networks has fostered connections between individuals, thus facilitating data exchange in a variety of fields. Therefore, the question posed now is "can these same tools be applied to life sciences in order to improve scientific and medical research?" In this article, I will review how social networks and other web-based tools are changing the way we approach and track diseases in biomedical research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Social Software and Academic Practice: Postgraduate Students as Co-Designers of Web 2.0 Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Patrick; Burchmore, Helen

    2010-01-01

    In order to develop potentially transformative Web 2.0 tools in higher education, the complexity of existing academic practices, including current patterns of technology use, must be recognised. This paper describes how a series of participatory design activities allowed postgraduate students in education, social sciences and computer sciences to…

  2. Learning a Language with Web 2.0: Exploring the Use of Social Networking Features of Foreign Language Learning Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Megan P.; Liu, Min

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an online survey and a usability test performed on three foreign language learning websites that use Web 2.0 technology. The online survey was conducted to gain an understanding of how current users of language learning websites use them for learning and social purposes. The usability test was conducted to gain…

  3. Semantic web implications for technologies and business practices

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book examines recent developments in semantic systems that can respond to situations and environments and events. The contributors to this book cover how to design, implement, and utilize disruptive technologies from the semantic and Web 3.0 arena. The editor and the contributors discuss two fundamental sets of disruptive technologies: the development of semantic technologies including description logics, ontologies, and agent frameworks; and the development of semantic information rendering including graphical forms of displays of high-density time-sensitive data to improve situational awareness. Beyond practical illustrations of emerging technologies, the goal of this book is to help readers learn about managing information resources in new ways and reinforcing the learning as they read on.   ·         Examines the contrast of competing paradigms and approaches to problem solving and decision-making using technology tools and techniques ·         Covers how to use semantic principle...

  4. Dance, Technology, and the Web Culture of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jon D.

    2012-01-01

    Media and technological advances over the past decade have significantly influenced teaching--its design, delivery, and interactivity. At the same time, social media now dominates the ways in which most of the students encounter and engage the world. The implications of these developments present a number of critical questions about teaching…

  5. Hyphe, a Curation-Oriented Approach to Web Crawling for the Social Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Jacomy, Mathieu; Girard, Paul; Ooghe, Benjamin; Venturini, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    The web is a field of investigation for social sciences, and platform-based studies have long proven their relevance. However the generic web is rarely studied in itself though it contains crucial aspects of the embodiment of social actors: personal blogs, institutional websites, hobby-specific media… We realized that some sociologists see existing web crawlers as “black boxes” unsuitable for research though they are willing to study the broad web. In this paper we present Hyphe, a crawler de...

  6. Introduction to Webometrics Quantitative Web Research for the Social Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Thelwall, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Webometrics is concerned with measuring aspects of the web: web sites, web pages, parts of web pages, words in web pages, hyperlinks, web search engine results. The importance of the web itself as a communication medium and for hosting an increasingly wide array of documents, from journal articles to holiday brochures, needs no introduction. Given this huge and easily accessible source of information, there are limitless possibilities for measuring or counting on a huge scale (e.g., the number of web sites, the number of web pages, the number of blogs) or on a smaller scale (e.g., the number o

  7. Expertise bewerben und finden im Social Semantic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polleres, Axel; Mochol, Malgorzata

    Im vorliegenden Beitrag diskutieren wir Rahmenbedingungen zur Kombination, Wiederverwendung und Erweiterung bestehender RDFVokabulare im Social Semantic Web. Hierbei konzentrieren wir uns auf das Anwendungsszenario des Auffindens und Bewerbens von Experten im Web oder Intranet. Wir präsentieren, wie RDF-Vokabulare einerseits und de facto Standardformate andererseits, die von täglich verwendeten Applikationen benutzt werden (z. B. vCard, iCal oder Dublin Core), kombiniert werden können, um konkrete Anwendungsfälle der Expertensuche und zum Management von Expertise zu lösen. Unser Fokus liegt darauf aufzuzeigen, dass für praktische Anwendungsszenarien nicht notwendigerweise neue Ontologien entwickelt werden müssen, sondern der Schlüssel vielmehr in der Integration von bestehenden, weit verbreiteten und sich ergänzenden Formaten zu einem kohärenten Netzwerk von Ontologien liegt. Dieser Ansatz garantiert sowohl direkte Anwendbarkeit von als auch niedrige Einstiegsbarrieren in Semantic Web-Technologien sowie einfache Integrierbarkeit in bestehende Applikationen. Die im Web verfügbaren und verwendeten RDFFormate decken zwar einen großen Bereich der Aspekte zur Beschreibung von Personen und Expertisen ab, zeigen aber auch signifikante Überlappungen. Bisher gibt es wenig systematische Ansätze, um diese Vokabulare zu verbinden, sei es in Form von allgemeingültigen Praktiken, die definieren, wann welches Format zu benutzen ist, oder in Form von Regeln, die Überlappungen zwischen einzelnen Formaten formalisieren. Der vorliegende Artikel analysiert, wie bestehende Formate zur Beschreibung von Personen, Organisationen und deren Expertise kombiniert und, wo nötig, erweitert werden können. Darüber hinaus diskutieren wir Regelsprachen zur Beschreibung von Formatüberlappungen sowie deren praktische Verwendbarkeit zur Erstellung eines Ontologie-Netzwerks zur Beschreibung von Experten.

  8. The social function of technology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddle, F. P.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of preserving the uneasy balance between a dynamic society and the equilibrium of man-environment society is discussed. Four sets of activities involved in technology assessment are considered: (1) Technology forecasting is necessary to warn of future dangers and opportunities, for effective timing, and to identify tradeoffs and alternatives. But forecasting is also chancy at best. (2) Social indicators need to be developed for the characterization of social status and measurement of social progress, as well as a better understanding of social needs. (3) With respect to technology assessment, the conflict between profitable directions of innovations and socially desirable directions is described, and a systematic way is needed to determine in advance what is technologically feasible to meet social needs. (4) National goals with respect to scientific and technological developments are also required.

  9. Weaving a Personal Web: Using online technologies to create customized, connected, and dynamic learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica McElvaney

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores how personal web technologies (PWTs can be used by learners and the relationship between PWTs and connectivist learning principles. Descriptions and applications of several technologies including social bookmarking tools, personal publishing platforms, and aggregators are also included. With these tools, individuals can create and manage personal learning environments (PLEs and personal learning networks (PLNs, which have the potential to become powerful resources for academic, professional, and personal development. Résumé : Cet article explore les diverses façons dont les technologies Web personnelles peuvent être utilisées par les apprenants, ainsi que la relation entre ces technologies et les principes d’apprentissage connectivistes. Y sont également présentées les descriptions et les applications de plusieurs technologies, y compris les outils sociaux de mise en signet, les plateformes de publication personnelles et les agrégateurs. Ainsi outillées, les personnes peuvent créer et gérer des environnements d’apprentissage personnels (EAP et des réseaux d’apprentissage personnels (RAP qui recèlent le potentiel de devenir de puissantes ressources de perfectionnement sur les plans universitaire, professionnel et personnel.

  10. Open access web technology for mathematics learning in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Carmen González-Videgaray

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Problems with mathematics learning, “math anxiety” or “statistics anxiety” among university students can be avoided by using teaching strategies and technological tools. Besides personal suffering, low achievement in mathematics reduces terminal efficiency and decreases enrollment in careers related to science, technology and mathematics. This paper has two main goals: 1 to offer an organized inventory of open access web resources for math learning in higher education, and 2 to explore to what extent these resources are currently known and used by students and teachers. The first goal was accomplished by running a search in Google and then classifying resources. For the second, we conducted a survey among a sample of students (n=487 and teachers (n=60 from mathematics and engineering within the largest public university in Mexico. We categorized 15 high-quality web resources. Most of them are interactive simulations and computer algebra systems. ResumenLos problemas en el aprendizaje de las matemáticas, como “ansiedad matemática” y “ansiedad estadística” pueden evitarse si se usan estrategias de enseñanza y herramientas tecnológicas. Además de un sufrimiento personal, el bajo rendimiento en matemáticas reduce la eficiencia terminal y decrementa la matrícula en carreras relacionadas con ciencia, tecnología y matemáticas. Este artículo tiene dos objetivos: 1 ofrecer un inventario organizado de recursos web de acceso abierto para aprender matemáticas en la universidad, y 2 explorar en qué medida estos recursos se usan actualmente entre alumnos y profesores. El primer objetivo se logró con un perfil de búsqueda en Google y una clasificación. Para el segundo, se condujo una encuesta en una muestra de estudiantes (n=487 y maestros (n=60 de matemáticas e ingeniería de la universidad más grande de México. Categorizamos 15 recursos web de alta calidad. La mayoría son simulaciones interactivas y

  11. Semantic Integration for Marine Science Interoperability Using Web Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, C.; Bermudez, L.; Graybeal, J.; Isenor, A. W.

    2008-12-01

    The Marine Metadata Interoperability Project, MMI (http://marinemetadata.org) promotes the exchange, integration, and use of marine data through enhanced data publishing, discovery, documentation, and accessibility. A key effort is the definition of an Architectural Framework and Operational Concept for Semantic Interoperability (http://marinemetadata.org/sfc), which is complemented with the development of tools that realize critical use cases in semantic interoperability. In this presentation, we describe a set of such Semantic Web tools that allow performing important interoperability tasks, ranging from the creation of controlled vocabularies and the mapping of terms across multiple ontologies, to the online registration, storage, and search services needed to work with the ontologies (http://mmisw.org). This set of services uses Web standards and technologies, including Resource Description Framework (RDF), Web Ontology language (OWL), Web services, and toolkits for Rich Internet Application development. We will describe the following components: MMI Ontology Registry: The MMI Ontology Registry and Repository provides registry and storage services for ontologies. Entries in the registry are associated with projects defined by the registered users. Also, sophisticated search functions, for example according to metadata items and vocabulary terms, are provided. Client applications can submit search requests using the WC3 SPARQL Query Language for RDF. Voc2RDF: This component converts an ASCII comma-delimited set of terms and definitions into an RDF file. Voc2RDF facilitates the creation of controlled vocabularies by using a simple form-based user interface. Created vocabularies and their descriptive metadata can be submitted to the MMI Ontology Registry for versioning and community access. VINE: The Vocabulary Integration Environment component allows the user to map vocabulary terms across multiple ontologies. Various relationships can be established, for example

  12. Social Movements and Their Technologies: Wiring Social Change. - Paperback edition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milan, S.

    2016-01-01

    Now in paperback for the first time, Social Movements and their Technologies explores the interplay between social movements and their 'liberated technologies'. It analyzes the rise of low-power radio stations and radical internet projects ('emancipatory communication practices') as a political

  13. Exploring Home and School Involvement of Young Children with Web 2.0 and Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Diane

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on young children's use of Web 2.0 and social media. A background is provided about the use of Web 2.0 and social media among young children. Strengths and concerns are discussed as well as home and school use of Web 2.0 and social media. Exemplary websites are shared. The article concludes with potential changes in the…

  14. Web 2.0 Technologies: The Best-Fit Model for Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundson, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies facilitate teacher partnerships in today's diverse classrooms. Teacher preparation programs are seeking the factors to support their students desire to use these technologies. A total of 590 preservice teachers reported the factors that lead to their behavioral intentions to use Web 2.0 technologies. Using the theoretical…

  15. Social and Technological Development in Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian

    1997-01-01

    This papers studies the processes developing technology and its social "sorroundings", the social networks. Positions in the debate on technological change is discussed. A central topic is the enterprise external development and decision processes and their interplay with the enterprise internal...

  16. Social Shaping in Danish Technology Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Grethe; Clausen, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The term ‘social shaping of technology’ has been used broadly as a response to techno-economic deterministic understandings of the relations between technology and society. Social shaping has brought together analysts from different backgrounds who share a common interest in the role of social an...... in these projects contributed to new insights into the processes of technological change and thus to policy formulation. The social shaping perspective and technology assessment experiences are suggested as important guides to future technology strategies....... and political action for technology change. The authors of this article suggest that the social shaping perspective draws on lessons from technology assessments of earlier decades, lessons about the role of technology debate, participation and democratic control. We suggest that these are important......The term ‘social shaping of technology’ has been used broadly as a response to techno-economic deterministic understandings of the relations between technology and society. Social shaping has brought together analysts from different backgrounds who share a common interest in the role of social...

  17. WEB APPLICATION TO MANAGE DOCUMENTS USING THE GOOGLE WEB TOOLKIT AND APP ENGINE TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velázquez Santana Eugenio César

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of new information technologies such as Google Web Toolkit and App Engine are making a difference in the academic management of Higher Education Institutions (IES, who seek to streamline their processes as well as reduce infrastructure costs. However, they encounter the problems with regard to acquisition costs, the infrastructure necessary for their use, as well as the maintenance of the software; It is for this reason that the present research aims to describe the application of these new technologies in HEIs, as well as to identify their advantages and disadvantages and the key success factors in their implementation. As a software development methodology, SCRUM was used as well as PMBOK as a project management tool. The main results were related to the application of these technologies in the development of customized software for teachers, students and administrators, as well as the weaknesses and strengths of using them in the cloud. On the other hand, it was also possible to describe the paradigm shift that data warehouses are generating with respect to today's relational databases.

  18. Delivery of laboratory data with World Wide Web technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, A W; Leon, M A; Klein-Leon, S; Allen, G K; Boon, G D; Patrick, T B; Klimczak, J C

    1997-01-01

    We have developed an experimental World Wide Web (WWW) based system to deliver laboratory results to clinicians in our Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital. Laboratory results are generated by the clinical pathology section of our Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory and stored in a legacy information system. This system does not interface directly to the hospital information system, and it cannot be accessed directly by clinicians. Our "meta" system first parses routine print reports and then instantiates the data into a modern, open-architecture relational database using a data model constructed with currently accepted international standards for data representation and communication. The system does not affect either of the existing legacy systems. Location-independent delivery of patient data is via a secure WWW based system which maximizes usability and allows "value-added" graphic representations. The data can be viewed with any web browser. Future extensibility and intra- and inter-institutional compatibility served as key design criteria. The system is in the process of being evaluated using accepted methods of assessment of information technologies.

  19. Research on Web Search Behavior: How Online Query Data Inform Social Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kaisheng; Lee, Yan Xin; Chen, Hao; Yu, Rongjun

    2017-10-01

    The widespread use of web searches in daily life has allowed researchers to study people's online social and psychological behavior. Using web search data has advantages in terms of data objectivity, ecological validity, temporal resolution, and unique application value. This review integrates existing studies on web search data that have explored topics including sexual behavior, suicidal behavior, mental health, social prejudice, social inequality, public responses to policies, and other psychosocial issues. These studies are categorized as descriptive, correlational, inferential, predictive, and policy evaluation research. The integration of theory-based hypothesis testing in future web search research will result in even stronger contributions to social psychology.

  20. Social Touch Technology: A Survey of Haptic Technology for Social Touch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Gijs

    2017-01-01

    This survey provides an overview of work on haptic technology for social touch. Social touch has been studied extensively in psychology and neuroscience. With the development of new technologies, it is now possible to engage in social touch at a distance or engage in social touch with artificial

  1. Adaptive Semantic and Social Web-based learning and assessment environment for the STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaie, Hassan; Atchison, Chris; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar

    2014-05-01

    We are building a cloud- and Semantic Web-based personalized, adaptive learning environment for the STEM fields that integrates and leverages Social Web technologies to allow instructors and authors of learning material to collaborate in semi-automatic development and update of their common domain and task ontologies and building their learning resources. The semi-automatic ontology learning and development minimize issues related to the design and maintenance of domain ontologies by knowledge engineers who do not have any knowledge of the domain. The social web component of the personal adaptive system will allow individual and group learners to interact with each other and discuss their own learning experience and understanding of course material, and resolve issues related to their class assignments. The adaptive system will be capable of representing key knowledge concepts in different ways and difficulty levels based on learners' differences, and lead to different understanding of the same STEM content by different learners. It will adapt specific pedagogical strategies to individual learners based on their characteristics, cognition, and preferences, allow authors to assemble remotely accessed learning material into courses, and provide facilities for instructors to assess (in real time) the perception of students of course material, monitor their progress in the learning process, and generate timely feedback based on their understanding or misconceptions. The system applies a set of ontologies that structure the learning process, with multiple user friendly Web interfaces. These include the learning ontology (models learning objects, educational resources, and learning goal); context ontology (supports adaptive strategy by detecting student situation), domain ontology (structures concepts and context), learner ontology (models student profile, preferences, and behavior), task ontologies, technological ontology (defines devices and places that surround the

  2. Social Touch Technology: A Survey of Haptic Technology for Social Touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Gijs

    2017-01-01

    This survey provides an overview of work on haptic technology for social touch. Social touch has been studied extensively in psychology and neuroscience. With the development of new technologies, it is now possible to engage in social touch at a distance or engage in social touch with artificial social agents. Social touch research has inspired research into technology mediated social touch, and this line of research has found effects similar to actual social touch. The importance of haptic stimulus qualities, multimodal cues, and contextual factors in technology mediated social touch is discussed. This survey is concluded by reflecting on the current state of research into social touch technology, and providing suggestions for future research and applications.

  3. U.S. Public Libraries and the Use of Web Technologies. A Closer Look

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietzau, Zeth

    2009-01-01

    The use of interactive web technologies on public library web sites in the United States has been a topic of much discussion in recent years, and a shift in certain types of user services is underway. Terms like "Web 2.0" and even "Library 2.0" have become common in library literature and at conferences as those on the early…

  4. Multi-dimensional technology-enabled social learning approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petreski, Hristijan; Tsekeridou, Sofia; Prasad, Neeli R.

    2013-01-01

    in learning while socializing within their learning communities. However, their “educational” usage is still limited to facilitation of online learning communities and to collaborative authoring of learning material complementary to existing formal (e-) learning services. If the educational system doesn......’t respond to this systemic and structural changes and/or challenges and retains its status quo than it is jeopardizing its own existence or the existence of the education, as we know it. This paper aims to precede one step further by proposing a multi-dimensional approach for technology-enabled social...... content on the Web, using social networks to keep in touch, express, distribute and publish their experiences, views and ideas. Although, since their birth, most of the social media tools were not intended for educational purposes, educational organizations have started to recognize their added value...

  5. Web 2.0 and internet social networking: a new tool for disaster management?--lessons from Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Min; Chan, Edward; Hyder, Adnan A

    2010-10-06

    Internet social networking tools and the emerging web 2.0 technologies are providing a new way for web users and health workers in information sharing and knowledge dissemination. Based on the characters of immediate, two-way and large scale of impact, the internet social networking tools have been utilized as a solution in emergency response during disasters. This paper highlights the use of internet social networking in disaster emergency response and public health management of disasters by focusing on a case study of the typhoon Morakot disaster in Taiwan. In the case of typhoon disaster in Taiwan, internet social networking and mobile technology were found to be helpful for community residents, professional emergency rescuers, and government agencies in gathering and disseminating real-time information, regarding volunteer recruitment and relief supplies allocation. We noted that if internet tools are to be integrated in the development of emergency response system, the accessibility, accuracy, validity, feasibility, privacy and the scalability of itself should be carefully considered especially in the effort of applying it in resource poor settings. This paper seeks to promote an internet-based emergency response system by integrating internet social networking and information communication technology into central government disaster management system. Web-based networking provides two-way communication which establishes a reliable and accessible tunnel for proximal and distal users in disaster preparedness and management.

  6. Information Technology and Web use Characteristics of Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Observation, website analysis and questionnaire survey were used to collect data, with. ... to understand conventional global requirements for the development and deployment of websites and web resources in order to develop the web content and use characteristics that would improve their web presence and visibility.

  7. Recommender systems and the social web leveraging tagging data for recommender systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gedikli, Fatih

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for recommender systems due to the information overload users are facing on the Web. The goal of a recommender system is to provide personalized recommendations of products or services to users. With the advent of the Social Web, user-generated content has enriched the social dimension of the Web. As user-provided content data also tells us something about the user, one can learn the user's individual preferences from the Social Web. This opens up completely new opportunities and challenges for recommender systems research. Fatih Gedikli deals with the question of

  8. Using Web Crawler Technology for Text Analysis of Geo-Events: A Case Study of the Huangyan Island Incident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H.; Ge, Y. J.

    2013-11-01

    With the social networking and network socialisation have brought more text information and social relationships into our daily lives, the question of whether big data can be fully used to study the phenomenon and discipline of natural sciences has prompted many specialists and scholars to innovate their research. Though politics were integrally involved in the hyperlinked word issues since 1990s, automatic assembly of different geospatial web and distributed geospatial information systems utilizing service chaining have explored and built recently, the information collection and data visualisation of geo-events have always faced the bottleneck of traditional manual analysis because of the sensibility, complexity, relativity, timeliness and unexpected characteristics of political events. Based on the framework of Heritrix and the analysis of web-based text, word frequency, sentiment tendency and dissemination path of the Huangyan Island incident is studied here by combining web crawler technology and the text analysis method. The results indicate that tag cloud, frequency map, attitudes pie, individual mention ratios and dissemination flow graph based on the data collection and processing not only highlight the subject and theme vocabularies of related topics but also certain issues and problems behind it. Being able to express the time-space relationship of text information and to disseminate the information regarding geo-events, the text analysis of network information based on focused web crawler technology can be a tool for understanding the formation and diffusion of web-based public opinions in political events.

  9. On the Use of Social Networks in Web Services: Application to the Discovery Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maamar, Zakaria; Wives, Leandro Krug; Boukadi, Khouloud

    This chapter discusses the use of social networks in Web services with focus on the discovery stage that characterizes the life cycle of these Web services. Other stages in this life cycle include description, publication, invocation, and composition. Web services are software applications that end users or other peers can invoke and compose to satisfy different needs such as hotel booking and car rental. Discovering the relevant Web services is, and continues to be, a major challenge due to the dynamic nature of these Web services. Indeed, Web services appear/disappear or suspend/resume operations without prior notice. Traditional discovery techniques are based on registries such as Universal Description, Discovery and Integration (UDDI) and Electronic Business using eXtensible Markup Language (ebXML). Unfortunately, despite the different improvements that these techniques have been subject to, they still suffer from various limitations that could slow down the acceptance trend of Web services by the IT community. Social networks seem to offer solutions to some of these limitations but raise, at the same time, some issues that are discussed in this chapter. The contributions of this chapter are three: social network definition in the particular context of Web services; mechanisms that support Web services build, use, and maintain their respective social networks; and social networks adoption to discover Web services.

  10. The Influences of Social Collaboration on Web 2.0 Self-Efficacy for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turky, Mohamed Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    The present study tries to research the relationship between Social Collaboration Activity and Web 2.0 Self-Efficacy for Higher Education student. It additionally looks to decide how Social Collaboration adds to the forecast of their sense Web 2.0 Self-Efficacy. The study reported in this paper was led to inspect the relationship Social…

  11. Designing Web-Based Educative Curriculum Materials for the Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Cory; Saye, John; Brush, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a design experiment of web-based curriculum materials explicitly created to help social studies teachers develop their professional teaching knowledge. Web-based social studies curriculum reform efforts, human-centered interface design, and investigations into educative curriculum materials are reviewed, as well as…

  12. The Like economy: the politics of data and dataflows in the social web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmond, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper I would like to draw attention to the various actors involved in creating and maintaining a particular infrastructure of the social web, which is currently enabled by Facebook’s social plugins and Open Graph. This infrastructure allows the platform to transform web activities, in the

  13. Social Responsibility and Corporate Web Pages: Self-Presentation or Agenda-Setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrock, Stuart L.; Leichty, Greg B.

    1998-01-01

    Examines how corporate entities use the Web to present themselves as socially responsible citizens and to advance policy positions. Samples randomly "Fortune 500" companies, revealing that, although 90% had Web pages and 82% of the sites addressed a corporate social responsibility issue, few corporations used their pages to monitor…

  14. The use of web internet technologies to distribute medical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deller, A.L.; Cheal, D.; Field, J.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: In the past, internet browsers were considered ineffective for image distribution. Today we have the technology to use internet standards for picture archive and communication systems (PACS) and teleradiology effectively. Advanced wavelet compression and state-of-the-art JAVA software allows us to distribute images on normal computer hardware. The use of vendor and database neutral software and industry-standard hardware has many advantages. This standards base approach avoids the costly rapid obsolescence of proprietary PACS and is cheaper to purchase and maintain. Images can be distributed around a hospital site, as well as outside the campus, quickly and inexpensively. It also allows integration between the Hospital Information System (HIS) and the Radiology Information System (RIS). Being able to utilize standard internet technologies and computer hardware for PACS is a cost-effective alternative. A system based on this technology can be used for image distribution, archiving, teleradiology and RIS integration. This can be done without expensive specialized imaging workstations and telecommunication systems. Web distribution of images allows you to send images to multiple places concurrently. A study can be within your Medical Imaging Department, as well as in the ward and on the desktop of referring clinicians - with a report. As long as there is a computer with an internet access account, high-quality images can be at your disposal 24 h a day. The importance of medical images for patient management makes them a valuable component of the patient's medical record. Therefore, an efficient system for displaying and distributing images can improve patient management and make your workplace more effective

  15. Effects of Commercial Web Videos on Students' Attitude toward Learning Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yaming; Ting, Yu-Liang

    2015-01-01

    This study values the broad range of web videos produced by businesses to introduce new technologies while also promoting their products. When the promoted technology is related to the topic taught in a school course, it may be beneficial for students to watch such videos. However, most students view the web as a source for entertainment, and may…

  16. Web 2.0 Technologies and Building Online Learning Communities: Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmalak, Mariam Mousa Matta

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this action research was to explore students' perspectives regarding using Web 2.0 technologies to develop a community of learners. The course described in this study was a fully online course in an Educational Learning Technologies master's program at a medium-sized university in the U.S. Southwest. A variety of Web 2.0 tools…

  17. Using Web-Based Technologies and Tools in Future Choreographers' Training: British Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidyuk, Dmytro

    2016-01-01

    In the paper the problem of using effective web-based technologies and tools in teaching choreography in British higher education institutions has been discussed. Researches on the usage of web-based technologies and tools for practical dance courses in choreographers' professional training at British higher education institutions by such British…

  18. An Integrated WebGIS Framework for Volunteered Geographic Information and Social Media in Soil and Water Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werts, Joshua D.; Mikhailova, Elena A.; Post, Christopher J.; Sharp, Julia L.

    2012-04-01

    Volunteered geographic information and social networking in a WebGIS has the potential to increase public participation in soil and water conservation, promote environmental awareness and change, and provide timely data that may be otherwise unavailable to policymakers in soil and water conservation management. The objectives of this study were: (1) to develop a framework for combining current technologies, computing advances, data sources, and social media; and (2) develop and test an online web mapping interface. The mapping interface integrates Microsoft Silverlight, Bing Maps, ArcGIS Server, Google Picasa Web Albums Data API, RSS, Google Analytics, and Facebook to create a rich user experience. The website allows the public to upload photos and attributes of their own subdivisions or sites they have identified and explore other submissions. The website was made available to the public in early February 2011 at http://www.AbandonedDevelopments.com and evaluated for its potential long-term success in a pilot study.

  19. Technological change as social proces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The article distinguishes between different meanings that technology has as well as the different 'roles' that technologies play in society. udfoldes tre forståelser af teknologisk forandring. Der sigtes på at fremstille forskellige meningsdannelser, som i sit samspil konstituerer et samfunds opf...

  20. Social Media Technology Management in College of Technology in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Himanshu; Pillai, Sunil Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the constructs--utilitarian, hedonic and social value on the perceptions of the full-time instructors related to their social media technology (SMT) management for learning and teaching practices at workplace. Design/methodology/approach: A survey is used to gather the data from 180…

  1. Social Media and Web Assistant | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Assistant supports the Web Officer by contributing to the repurposing of content and in maintaining, updating, and uploading of web-based and digital content; providing preliminary advice on appropriate design and layout; and ensuring quality control of web content. Also, the Assistant coordinates the production of ...

  2. Do altmetrics work? Twitter and ten other social web services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelwall, Mike; Haustein, Stefanie; Larivière, Vincent; Sugimoto, Cassidy R

    2013-01-01

    Altmetric measurements derived from the social web are increasingly advocated and used as early indicators of article impact and usefulness. Nevertheless, there is a lack of systematic scientific evidence that altmetrics are valid proxies of either impact or utility although a few case studies have reported medium correlations between specific altmetrics and citation rates for individual journals or fields. To fill this gap, this study compares 11 altmetrics with Web of Science citations for 76 to 208,739 PubMed articles with at least one altmetric mention in each case and up to 1,891 journals per metric. It also introduces a simple sign test to overcome biases caused by different citation and usage windows. Statistically significant associations were found between higher metric scores and higher citations for articles with positive altmetric scores in all cases with sufficient evidence (Twitter, Facebook wall posts, research highlights, blogs, mainstream media and forums) except perhaps for Google+ posts. Evidence was insufficient for LinkedIn, Pinterest, question and answer sites, and Reddit, and no conclusions should be drawn about articles with zero altmetric scores or the strength of any correlation between altmetrics and citations. Nevertheless, comparisons between citations and metric values for articles published at different times, even within the same year, can remove or reverse this association and so publishers and scientometricians should consider the effect of time when using altmetrics to rank articles. Finally, the coverage of all the altmetrics except for Twitter seems to be low and so it is not clear if they are prevalent enough to be useful in practice.

  3. Do altmetrics work? Twitter and ten other social web services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Thelwall

    Full Text Available Altmetric measurements derived from the social web are increasingly advocated and used as early indicators of article impact and usefulness. Nevertheless, there is a lack of systematic scientific evidence that altmetrics are valid proxies of either impact or utility although a few case studies have reported medium correlations between specific altmetrics and citation rates for individual journals or fields. To fill this gap, this study compares 11 altmetrics with Web of Science citations for 76 to 208,739 PubMed articles with at least one altmetric mention in each case and up to 1,891 journals per metric. It also introduces a simple sign test to overcome biases caused by different citation and usage windows. Statistically significant associations were found between higher metric scores and higher citations for articles with positive altmetric scores in all cases with sufficient evidence (Twitter, Facebook wall posts, research highlights, blogs, mainstream media and forums except perhaps for Google+ posts. Evidence was insufficient for LinkedIn, Pinterest, question and answer sites, and Reddit, and no conclusions should be drawn about articles with zero altmetric scores or the strength of any correlation between altmetrics and citations. Nevertheless, comparisons between citations and metric values for articles published at different times, even within the same year, can remove or reverse this association and so publishers and scientometricians should consider the effect of time when using altmetrics to rank articles. Finally, the coverage of all the altmetrics except for Twitter seems to be low and so it is not clear if they are prevalent enough to be useful in practice.

  4. Individual Learner Differences In Web-based Learning Environments: From Cognitive, Affective and Social-cultural Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa KOC

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Individual Learner DifferencesIn Web-based Learning Environments:From Cognitive, Affective and Social-cultural Perspectives Mustafa KOCPh.D Candidate Instructional TechnologyUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUrbana, IL - USA ABSTRACT Throughout the paper, the issues of individual differences in web-based learning, also known as online instruction, online training or distance education were examined and implications for designing distance education were discussed. Although the main purpose was to identify differences in learners’ characteristics such as cognitive, affective, physiological and social factors that affect learning in a web-enhanced environment, the questions of how the web could be used to reinforce learning, what kinds of development ideas, theories and models are currently being used to design and deliver online instruction, and finally what evidence for the effectiveness of using World Wide Web (WWW for learning and instruction has been reported, were also analyzed to extend theoretical and epistemogical understanding of web-based learning.

  5. New Web Technologies for the LHCb Online Monitoring Displays

    CERN Document Server

    Lagou, Charalampia

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb Online Monitoring Displays is a web application, that gives access to real-time measurements and status information about the LHCb detector and its components, without the need to login. It is hosted at CERN on the computer lbcomet.cern.ch. The system is architecturally complex, based on the Comet technology for the data-transfer and the STOMP protocol for the communication between the clients and the message broker. The application is functional, however concerns are expressed over the future maintenance of the system’s architecture as is. The cause of these concerns are firstly the fact that the STOMP JavaScript client package is outdated and flagged by the original author flagged as non-maintained and secondly that todays modern browsers support real-time bi-directional communication which, at the time of development was not compatible even with some of the major browsers. Therefore, the objective of this project is to investigate modern data-push mechanisms, which could complement or replace...

  6. Interoperability and FAIRness through a novel combination of Web technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D. Wilkinson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Data in the life sciences are extremely diverse and are stored in a broad spectrum of repositories ranging from those designed for particular data types (such as KEGG for pathway data or UniProt for protein data to those that are general-purpose (such as FigShare, Zenodo, Dataverse or EUDAT. These data have widely different levels of sensitivity and security considerations. For example, clinical observations about genetic mutations in patients are highly sensitive, while observations of species diversity are generally not. The lack of uniformity in data models from one repository to another, and in the richness and availability of metadata descriptions, makes integration and analysis of these data a manual, time-consuming task with no scalability. Here we explore a set of resource-oriented Web design patterns for data discovery, accessibility, transformation, and integration that can be implemented by any general- or special-purpose repository as a means to assist users in finding and reusing their data holdings. We show that by using off-the-shelf technologies, interoperability can be achieved atthe level of an individual spreadsheet cell. We note that the behaviours of this architecture compare favourably to the desiderata defined by the FAIR Data Principles, and can therefore represent an exemplar implementation of those principles. The proposed interoperability design patterns may be used to improve discovery and integration of both new and legacy data, maximizing the utility of all scholarly outputs.

  7. Experimenting with semantic web services to understand the role of NLP technologies in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, V

    2006-01-01

    NLP technologies can play a significant role in healthcare where a predominant segment of the clinical documentation is in text form. In a graduate course focused on understanding semantic web services at West Virginia University, a class project was designed with the purpose of exploring potential use for NLP-based abstraction of clinical documentation. The role of NLP-technology was simulated using human abstractors and various workflows were investigated using public domain workflow and semantic web service technologies. This poster explores the potential use of NLP and the role of workflow and semantic web technologies in developing healthcare IT environments.

  8. Medical technologies: flows, frictions and new socialities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardon, A.; Moyer, E.

    2014-01-01

    While social scientists often highlight the way medical technologies mediate biomedical hegemony, this special issue focuses on the creative and often unexpected ways in which medical technologies are appropriated by diverse actors in homes, clinics and communities. The authors highlight key

  9. Social media, new technologies and history education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribbens, Kees; Haydn, Terry; Carretero, Mario; Berger, Stefan; Grever, Maria

    This chapter explores the implications of recent developments in technology and social media, having a significant impact on the way in which young people learn history in schools and outside schools. New technology not only has a positive influence on education, it also has unintended negative

  10. Cambios en los estilos de aprendizaje inducidos por el uso de la web social

    OpenAIRE

    García Laborda, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The web has revolutionized the field of language teaching in recent years. This article intends to show how the web 2.0 or social web beyond being a powerful innovation in the teaching field, has caused some significant effects in the way students learn. The resources of the web 2.0 for the teaching of foreign languages -such as wikis, blogs, Google Docs and others- promote an educational commitment that goes beyond the simple informative use of the web like it has been up to now and emphasiz...

  11. Hospital-based nurses' perceptions of the adoption of Web 2.0 tools for knowledge sharing, learning, social interaction and the production of collective intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Adela S M

    2011-11-11

    Web 2.0 provides a platform or a set of tools such as blogs, wikis, really simple syndication (RSS), podcasts, tags, social bookmarks, and social networking software for knowledge sharing, learning, social interaction, and the production of collective intelligence in a virtual environment. Web 2.0 is also becoming increasingly popular in e-learning and e-social communities. The objectives were to investigate how Web 2.0 tools can be applied for knowledge sharing, learning, social interaction, and the production of collective intelligence in the nursing domain and to investigate what behavioral perceptions are involved in the adoption of Web 2.0 tools by nurses. The decomposed technology acceptance model was applied to construct the research model on which the hypotheses were based. A questionnaire was developed based on the model and data from nurses (n = 388) were collected from late January 2009 until April 30, 2009. Pearson's correlation analysis and t tests were used for data analysis. Intention toward using Web 2.0 tools was positively correlated with usage behavior (r = .60, P Web 2.0 tools and enable them to better plan the strategy of implementation of Web 2.0 tools for knowledge sharing, learning, social interaction, and the production of collective intelligence.

  12. Hospital-Based Nurses’ Perceptions of the Adoption of Web 2.0 Tools for Knowledge Sharing, Learning, Social Interaction and the Production of Collective Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Web 2.0 provides a platform or a set of tools such as blogs, wikis, really simple syndication (RSS), podcasts, tags, social bookmarks, and social networking software for knowledge sharing, learning, social interaction, and the production of collective intelligence in a virtual environment. Web 2.0 is also becoming increasingly popular in e-learning and e-social communities. Objectives The objectives were to investigate how Web 2.0 tools can be applied for knowledge sharing, learning, social interaction, and the production of collective intelligence in the nursing domain and to investigate what behavioral perceptions are involved in the adoption of Web 2.0 tools by nurses. Methods The decomposed technology acceptance model was applied to construct the research model on which the hypotheses were based. A questionnaire was developed based on the model and data from nurses (n = 388) were collected from late January 2009 until April 30, 2009. Pearson’s correlation analysis and t tests were used for data analysis. Results Intention toward using Web 2.0 tools was positively correlated with usage behavior (r = .60, P Web 2.0 tools and enable them to better plan the strategy of implementation of Web 2.0 tools for knowledge sharing, learning, social interaction, and the production of collective intelligence. PMID:22079851

  13. Building social implications into technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbeld, L.

    2006-01-01

    We are intuitively aware of the privacy issues involved in telemonitoring and telemedicine. The actual details, however, can only be determined by investigating the socio-legal aspects involved and the manner in which patients adopt the new technology. For Lynsey Dubbeld, it is vital to establish a

  14. Innovations: Scientific, Technological, and Social.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, Dennis

    Dr. Gabor, the inventor of holography (lenseless photography), defines "innovation" as a methodical creation of the human spirit, a novelty that once created can be usefully and repeatedly applied. He describes and evaluates 100 important technological and biological inventions that can probably be expected within the next 50 years. He also…

  15. Plant gene technology: social considerations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    exogenous fertilizers. This process, in addition to increasing yield, may maintain the soil ecosystem undisturbed by chemical fertilizers. Modern ... money that was used to buy insecticidal chemicals, this technology is environmentally very friendly. Improving the quality of food products: It has become possible to delay the ...

  16. Teaching and learning and technology: Does WebCT help ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings showed that customers view WebCT as a supplementary service rather than a replacement to classroom teaching and learning. This is in line with the organisational goals related to the enhancement of teaching and learning. The complexities of implementing WebCT, that is, technical problems, staff work load, ...

  17. The Role of Web-Based Simulations in Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Tom

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the theoretical underpinning and main aspects of the development and application of the web-orientation agent (WOA) and presents preliminary results concerning its use in university studies. The web-orientation agent (WOA) is a software based tool which produces an interactive learning environment offering support and guidance…

  18. Beyond Native Apps: Web Technologies to the Rescue! (Keynote)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malavolta, Ivano

    2016-01-01

    As of today, mobile software development teams can follow a number of different development and distribution strategies, ranging from native apps, to mobile web apps, hybrid apps, and the recently emerging progressive web apps. This talk provides a state-of-the-art overview of the development

  19. Utilizing Web Technologies in a Master of Counselling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Dawn Lorraine; Davis, Lynn Ashley

    2009-01-01

    This article outlines Canada's first web based/residential Master of Counselling program. Since the program is open to students from around the world, the program is designed to be accessible, innovative and flexible. To meet these operational goals, the program is structured around interactive online discussion forums, video web-conferencing,…

  20. Addressing social resistance in emerging security technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchener-Nissen, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    In their efforts to enhance the safety and security of citizens, governments and law enforcement agencies look to scientists and engineers to produce modern methods for preventing, detecting, and prosecuting criminal activities. Whole body scanners, lie detection technologies, biometrics, etc., are all being developed for incorporation into the criminal justice apparatus. Yet despite their purported security benefits these technologies often evoke social resistance. Concerns over privacy, ethics, and function-creep appear repeatedly in analyses of these technologies. It is argued here that scientists and engineers continue to pay insufficient attention to this resistance; acknowledging the presence of these social concerns yet failing to meaningfully address them. In so doing they place at risk the very technologies and techniques they are seeking to develop, for socially controversial security technologies face restrictions and in some cases outright banning. By identifying sources of potential social resistance early in the research and design process, scientists can both engage with the public in meaningful debate and modify their security technologies before deployment so as to minimize social resistance and enhance uptake.

  1. CIS5/405: Web Technology in Healthcare - Delivering Electronic Records Using the Clinical Intranet

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, M

    1999-01-01

    Introduction The development of electronic records - EPR & EHR (Electronic Patient Records & Electronic Health Records) - requires the use of innovative technology. With the emergence of web enabled applications, that technology is now available. In this paper, we consider the opportunities afforded by web technology and articulate their vision for making electronic records an affordable reality through the use of the ViewMax Integration Server. It is designed to be used as a discussion docum...

  2. Embedded Web Technology: Internet Technology Applied to Real-Time System Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Carl J.

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is developing software tools to bridge the gap between the traditionally non-real-time Internet technology and the real-time, embedded-controls environment for space applications. Internet technology has been expanding at a phenomenal rate. The simple World Wide Web browsers (such as earlier versions of Netscape, Mosaic, and Internet Explorer) that resided on personal computers just a few years ago only enabled users to log into and view a remote computer site. With current browsers, users not only view but also interact with remote sites. In addition, the technology now supports numerous computer platforms (PC's, MAC's, and Unix platforms), thereby providing platform independence.In contrast, the development of software to interact with a microprocessor (embedded controller) that is used to monitor and control a space experiment has generally been a unique development effort. For each experiment, a specific graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed. This procedure works well for a single-user environment. However, the interface for the International Space Station (ISS) Fluids and Combustion Facility will have to enable scientists throughout the world and astronauts onboard the ISS, using different computer platforms, to interact with their experiments in the Fluids and Combustion Facility. Developing a specific GUI for all these users would be cost prohibitive. An innovative solution to this requirement, developed at Lewis, is to use Internet technology, where the general problem of platform independence has already been partially solved, and to leverage this expanding technology as new products are developed. This approach led to the development of the Embedded Web Technology (EWT) program at Lewis, which has the potential to significantly reduce software development costs for both flight and ground software.

  3. Mining the Social Web Analyzing Data from Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Other Social Media Sites

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Want to tap the tremendous amount of valuable social data in Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+? This refreshed edition helps you discover who's making connections with social media, what they're talking about, and where they're located. You'll learn how to combine social web data, analysis techniques, and visualization to find what you've been looking for in the social haystack-as well as useful information you didn't know existed. Each standalone chapter introduces techniques for mining data in different areas of the social Web, including blogs and email. All you need to get started

  4. Product Variety, Consumer Preferences, and Web Technology: Can the Web of Data Reduce Price Competition and Increase Customer Satisfaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Martin

    E-Commerce on the basis of current Web technology has created fierce competition with a strong focus on price. Despite a huge variety of offerings and diversity in the individual preferences of consumers, current Web search fosters a very early reduction of the search space to just a few commodity makes and models. As soon as this reduction has taken place, search is reduced to flat price comparison. This is unfortunate for the manufacturers and vendors, because their individual value proposition for a particular customer may get lost in the course of communication over the Web, and it is unfortunate for the customer, because he/she may not get the most utility for the money based on her/his preference function. A key limitation is that consumers cannot search using a consolidated view on all alternative offers across the Web. In this talk, I will (1) analyze the technical effects of products and services search on the Web that cause this mismatch between supply and demand, (2) evaluate how the GoodRelations vocabulary and the current Web of Data movement can improve the situation, (3) give a brief hands-on demonstration, and (4) sketch business models for the various market participants.

  5. Discourses for Social Justice Education: The Web of Racism and the Web of Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozas, Lisa Werkmeister; Miller, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    This article presents two conceptual frames to help with teaching about issues of race and racism. First the concept of the web of racism describes a matrix that helps students understand the depth of damage racism has instilled in contemporary U.S. society. Second, the web of resistance offers a model of anti-racist activities to help students…

  6. A Web-based Multi-user Interactive Visualization System For Large-Scale Computing Using Google Web Toolkit Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, R. M.; McLane, J. C.; Yuen, D. A.; Wang, S.

    2009-12-01

    We have created a web-based, interactive system for multi-user collaborative visualization of large data sets (on the order of terabytes) that allows users in geographically disparate locations to simultaneous and collectively visualize large data sets over the Internet. By leveraging asynchronous java and XML (AJAX) web development paradigms via the Google Web Toolkit (http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/), we are able to provide remote, web-based users a web portal to LCSE's (http://www.lcse.umn.edu) large-scale interactive visualization system already in place at the University of Minnesota that provides high resolution visualizations to the order of 15 million pixels by Megan Damon. In the current version of our software, we have implemented a new, highly extensible back-end framework built around HTTP "server push" technology to provide a rich collaborative environment and a smooth end-user experience. Furthermore, the web application is accessible via a variety of devices including netbooks, iPhones, and other web- and javascript-enabled cell phones. New features in the current version include: the ability for (1) users to launch multiple visualizations, (2) a user to invite one or more other users to view their visualization in real-time (multiple observers), (3) users to delegate control aspects of the visualization to others (multiple controllers) , and (4) engage in collaborative chat and instant messaging with other users within the user interface of the web application. We will explain choices made regarding implementation, overall system architecture and method of operation, and the benefits of an extensible, modular design. We will also discuss future goals, features, and our plans for increasing scalability of the system which includes a discussion of the benefits potentially afforded us by a migration of server-side components to the Google Application Engine (http://code.google.com/appengine/).

  7. Web 2.0 Technologies in Companies: Attitudes of B&H Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Mabić

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the study was to investigate what managers think about the impact of Web 2.0 technologies on business operations. The empirical research was conducted among top and middle managers in companies in Bosnia and Herzegovina during May and June 2015. The results show that, although all respondents do not use these technologies, they have a relatively positive opinion on the application of Web 2.0 technologies in business. According to their opinion, Web 2.0 technologies make the most important contribution to data and information sharing in company and have a significant impact on the quality of communication, both internal and external. These results encourage further research on the application of Web 2.0 technologies in business and the use of all the advantages and benefits they can provide to someone actively using them.

  8. Information and Communication Technologies in Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Brian E.; Taylor, Harry O.; Glass, Joseph E.; Margerum-Leys, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are electronic tools used to convey, manipulate and store information. The exponential growth of Internet access and ICTs greatly influenced social, political, and economic processes in the United States, and worldwide. Regardless of the level of practice, ICTs will continue influencing the careers of social workers and the clients they serve. ICTs have received some attention in the social work literature and curriculum, but we argue that this level of attention is not adequate given their ubiquity, growth and influence, specifically as it relates to upholding social work ethics. Significant attention is needed to help ensure social workers are responsive to the technological changes in the health care system, including the health care infrastructure and use of technology among clients. Social workers also need ICT competencies in order to effectively lead different types of social change initiatives or collaborate with professionals of other disciplines who are using ICTs as part of existing strategies. This paper also identifies potential pitfalls and challenges with respect to the adoption of ICTs, with recommendations for advancing their use in practice, education, and research. PMID:21691444

  9. Information and Communication Technologies in Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E. Perron

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Information and communication technologies (ICTs are electronic tools used to convey, manipulate and store information. The exponential growth of Internet access and ICTs greatly influenced social, political, and economic processes in the United States, and worldwide. Regardless of the level of practice, ICTs will continue influencing the careers of social workers and the clients they serve. ICTs have received some attention in the social work literature and curriculum, but we argue that this level of attention is not adequate given their ubiquity, growth and influence, specifically as it relates to upholding social work ethics. Significant attention is needed to help ensure social workers are responsive to the technological changes in the health care system, including the health care infrastructure and use of technology among clients. Social workers also need ICT competencies in order to effectively lead different types of social change initiatives or collaborate with professionals of other disciplines who are using ICTs as part of existing strategies. This paper also identifies potential pitfalls and challenges with respect to the adoption of ICTs, with recommendations for advancing their use in practice, education, and research.

  10. Information and Communication Technologies in Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Brian E; Taylor, Harry O; Glass, Joseph E; Margerum-Leys, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are electronic tools used to convey, manipulate and store information. The exponential growth of Internet access and ICTs greatly influenced social, political, and economic processes in the United States, and worldwide. Regardless of the level of practice, ICTs will continue influencing the careers of social workers and the clients they serve. ICTs have received some attention in the social work literature and curriculum, but we argue that this level of attention is not adequate given their ubiquity, growth and influence, specifically as it relates to upholding social work ethics. Significant attention is needed to help ensure social workers are responsive to the technological changes in the health care system, including the health care infrastructure and use of technology among clients. Social workers also need ICT competencies in order to effectively lead different types of social change initiatives or collaborate with professionals of other disciplines who are using ICTs as part of existing strategies. This paper also identifies potential pitfalls and challenges with respect to the adoption of ICTs, with recommendations for advancing their use in practice, education, and research.

  11. Tobacco-prevention messages online: social marketing via the Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Carolyn A; Hullman, Gwen A

    2005-01-01

    Antitobacco groups have joined millions of other commercial or noncommercial entities in developing a presence on the Web. These groups primarily represent the following different sponsorship categories: grassroots, medical, government, and corporate. To obtain a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses in the message design of antitobacco Web sites, this project analyzed 100 antitobacco Web sites ranging across these four sponsorship categories. The results show that the tobacco industry sites posted just enough antismoking information to appease the antismoking publics. Medical organizations designed their Web sites as specialty sites and offered mostly scientific information. While the government sites resembled a clearinghouse for antitobacco related information, the grassroots sites represented the true advocacy outlets. In general, the industry sites provided the weakest persuasive messages and medical sites fared only slightly better. Government and grassroots sites rated most highly in presenting their antitobacco campaign messages on the Web.

  12. Semantic Web Technologies to Reconcile Privacy and Context Awareness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gandon, Fabien L; Sadeh, Norman M

    2003-01-01

    ...; they may use different calendar systems, etc. In this article, we describe work on a Semantic e-Wallet aimed at supporting automated identification and access of personal resources, each represented as a Semantic Web Service...

  13. Using Web-Based Technologies for Network Management Tools

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agami, Arie

    1997-01-01

    .... New solutions to current network management tools problems may be found in the increasingly popular World Wide Web, Internet tools such as Java, and remote database access through the Internet...

  14. Semantic Web Technologies for Mobile Context-Aware Services

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sadeh, Norman M

    2006-01-01

    The emergence of Semantic Web Services and automated service discovery, access and composition functionality will enable higher levels of interoperability and automation across a broad range of contexts (e.g...

  15. Technological risks and social conflicts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, J.; Krebsbach-Gnath, C.

    1980-12-01

    Research on acceptance, perception and assessment of risks clearly shows that perception of risk by the public is based more on subjective assessments than on scientifically objective risk values. Risk perception by the public is influenced by a number of factors. Risk is still a central point in the conflict and always plays a major role in the opposition toward dangerous technologies. Risk forms the thematic focus for the controversy. The development of the actual conflict, the positions, interests, adaptation problems and processes of the various societal institutions, the conditions, prospects, and forms of antinuclear protest and the subjects and structures, symmetries and changes of argument in the public discussion on nuclear energy are analyzed and represented in detail in this report. (orig./HSCH) [de

  16. Evaluating Web 2.0 Technologies in Higher Education Using Students' Perceptions and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvounidis, T.; Chimos, K.; Bersimis, S.; Douligeris, C.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, Web 2.0 technologies in higher education are evaluated using students' perceptions, satisfaction, performance and behaviour. The study evaluates the Web 2.0 tools as stand-alone entities as well in terms of their cross-operability and integration (confluence) to synergistic contributions towards the enhancement of student…

  17. Factors Influencing the Acceptance of Web-Based Training in Malaysia: Applying the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Junaidah

    2008-01-01

    Companies in Malaysia are beginning to use web-based training to reduce the cost of training and to provide employees with greater access to instruction. However, some people are uncomfortable with technology and prefer person-to-person methods of training. This study examines the acceptance of web-based training among a convenience sample of 261…

  18. Web 2.0 Technologies and Applications in the Best Practice Networks and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagiene, Valentina; Kurilovas, Eugenijus

    2010-01-01

    The paper is aimed to analyse the external expert evaluation results of eContent"plus" programme's iCOPER (Interoperable Content for Performance in a Competency-driven Society) project's deliverables, especially quality control and Web 2.0 technologies report. It is a suitability report for better practice concerning the use of Web 2.0…

  19. Applying Adaptive Swarm Intelligence Technology with Structuration in Web-Based Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yueh-Min; Liu, Chien-Hung

    2009-01-01

    One of the key challenges in the promotion of web-based learning is the development of effective collaborative learning environments. We posit that the structuration process strongly influences the effectiveness of technology used in web-based collaborative learning activities. In this paper, we propose an ant swarm collaborative learning (ASCL)…

  20. Web-sharing Sociality and Cooperative Prey Capture in a Malagasy Spitting Spider (Araneae: Scytodidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Web-sharing sociality and cooperative prey capture are reported for Scytodes socialis, sp. nov., a spitting spider discovered in a dry deciduous forest in Eastern Madagascar. Transect-based sampling was used to investigate colony demographics, estimate web volume and stratigraphic position, and

  1. Cambios en los estilos de aprendizaje inducidos por el uso de la web social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús García Laborda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available La web ha revolucionado el campo de la enseñanza de idiomas en los últimos años. Este artículo trata de mostrar cómo la web 2.0 o web social más allá de ser una potente innovación en el campo de la enseñanza, ha provocado unos efectos significativos en el tipo de aprendizaje del alumno. Los recursos de web 2.0 para la enseñanza de lenguas extranjeras como wikis, blogs, Google Docs y otros promueven un compromiso educativo que va más allá del simple uso informativo de la web como se venía haciendo hasta ahora y enfatiza aspectos colaborativos con una responsabilidad compartida entre todos los usuarios. Este artículo comienza por indicar brevemente los cambios que han llevado de la web tradicional a la social. A continuación se centra en varias herramientas y programas de la web social y finalmente, en la sección de conclusiones, sugiere varias líneas de estudio en torno a la web social.

  2. Key Technologies and Applications of Satellite and Sensor Web-coupled Real-time Dynamic Web Geographic Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Nengcheng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The geo-spatial information service has failed to reflect the live status of spot and meet the needs of integrated monitoring and real-time information for a long time. To tackle the problems in observation sharing and integrated management of space-borne, air-borne, and ground-based platforms and efficient service of spatio-temporal information, an observation sharing model was proposed. The key technologies in real-time dynamic geographical information system (GIS including maximum spatio-temporal coverage-based optimal layout of earth-observation sensor Web, task-driven and feedback-based control, real-time access of streaming observations, dynamic simulation, warning and decision support were detailed. An real-time dynamic Web geographical information system (WebGIS named GeoSensor and its applications in sensing and management of spatio-temporal information of Yangtze River basin including navigation, flood prevention, and power generation were also introduced.

  3. Reports of the 2015 Workshops Held at the International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, David; Halegoua, Germaine; Mejova, Yelena; Perra, Nicola; Pfeffer, Jürgen; Ruths, Derek; Weber, Ingmar; West, Robert; Zia, Leila

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 workshops at the International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media were held on May 26 in Oxford, UK. The workshop program included seven workshops, including Auditing Algorithms From the Outside: Methods and Implications, Digital Placemaking: Augmenting Physical Places with Contextual Social Data, Modeling and Mining Temporal Interactions Religion on Social Media, Standards and Practices in Large-Scale Social Media Research, Wikipedia, a Social Pedia: Research Challenges and Opp...

  4. How to Use Web 2.0 and Social Networking Sites Securely

    CERN Document Server

    Team, ITG Research

    2009-01-01

    Given the widespread use of Web 2.0 technologies and their impact in terms of the number and types of incidents and the cost of them, controlling Web 2.0 risks needs to be a high priority for all organisations. This pocket guide provides recommendations for organisations that will help them ensure that their employees are using Web 2.0 sites in a secure manner, and that their personal and confidential corporate data is protected.

  5. e-Dermatology: social networks and other web based tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taberner, R

    2016-03-01

    The use by patients of social networking sites and the Internet to look for health related information has already become an everyday phenomenon. If, as dermatologists, we want to be part of this new conversation and provide quality content, we will have to adapt to digital media and find new ways of communicating with both our patients and our colleagues. Dozens of Spanish dermatologists have already ventured into the online space and have begun to provide important content through blogs, which they also disseminate via the social media. However, the use of these new technologies can also pose certain risks from the standpoint of ethics and our codes of practice and even place an individual's digital reputation in jeopardy. Another aspect of this new situation is that the Internet produces information saturation, and the appropriate use of certain tools can help to improve our productivity and prevent such information overload or infoxication. Copyright © 2015 AEDV. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. A Proposal to Manage Lessons Learned in Projects: Web 2.0 Technologies to Promote Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcirio Silveira Chaves

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The web 2.0 is transforming the project management in organizations by improving communication and collaboration. The new generation of web-based collaborative tools provides much better experience than the traditional software package allowing document sharing, integrated task tracking, enforcing team processes and agile planning. Despite of the indubitable benefits brought by web 2.0, the use of these technologies to promote knowledge management remains unexplored. For many project managers to obtain and integrate information from different tools of previous similar projects in global organizations remains a challenge. This theoretical paper presents a proposal that suggests an innovation in the knowledge management area applying web 2.0 technologies. The main goal is to provide an integrated vision of a set of technologies that could be used by organizations in order to promote better management of lessons learned. The proposal includes the lessons learned processes (e.g. capture, share and dissemination, the process-based (e.g. project review and after action review and documentation-based (e.g. micro article and learning histories methods. Results show how web 2.0 technologies can help project managers and team project to cope with the main lessons learned processes and methods to learn from experience. Moreover, recommendations are made for the effective use of web 2.0 components promoting innovation and supporting lessons learned management in projects.Keywords: Project management; Lessons learned processes; lessons learned methods; project learning; web 2.0 technologies; innovation.

  7. [Technology development as social process: prospects and frontiers of social scientific elucidation of technological advancement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierkes, M

    1990-05-01

    This article provides an overview of the new developments in social scientific technology research which have changed considerably as a result of public debate and reactions to the importance of advancements in technology. The shift in emphasis, away from the effects of technology to its shaping, is described and certain hypotheses and concepts of advancement in the study of the social conditions underlying technical development processes are presented.

  8. Political and social aspects of radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    The political and social aspects of radiation technology are presented. The importance of radiation processing to economies dependent on the storage, transportation and sale of produce is emphasised. Efforts by pressure groups in Canada, to discredit food irradiation processes are discussed. Methods used to overcome objections to food irradiation and radiation technology by public information and education through the media are presented. (U.K.)

  9. The Potential Transformative Impact of Web 2.0 Technology on the Intelligence Community

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Werner, Adrienne

    2008-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies can transform and improve interagency collaboration in the Intelligence Community in many of the same ways that have marked their use through the internet in the public domain and private industry...

  10. T-Check in Technologies for Interoperability: Business Process Management in a Web Services Context

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hueppi, Fabian; Wrage, Lutz; Lewis, Grace A

    2008-01-01

    .... Composition languages are one type of BPM technology. Through the use of composition languages, business processes that are implemented through software and available as web services can be combined into new processes...

  11. LearnWeb 2.0. Integrating Social Software for Lifelong Learning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marenzi, Ivana; Demidova, Elena; Nejdl, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Marenzi, I., Demidova, E., & Nejdl, W. (2008). LearnWeb 2.0. Integrating Social Software for Lifelong Learning. Proceedings of the ED-Media 2008. World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications. June, 30 - July, 4, 2008, Austria, Vienna.

  12. Social networking for language learners: Creating meaningful output with Web 2.0 tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Chartrand

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Internet has the potential to provide language learners with vast resources of authentic written, audio, and video materials to supplement lessons. Educators can find a wide assortment of materials for learners to study in class or after class for independent learning and to encourage learner autonomy. More recently, however, the immense popularity of social networking websites has created new opportunities for language learners to interact in authentic ways that were previously difficult to achieve. Advances in technology mean that today, learners of a language can easily interact with their peers in meaningful practice that helps foster language acquisition and motivation. That is, tasks that make use of Web 2.0 interactivity can significantly raise students’ potential to generate meaningful output and stimulate their interest in language learning.

  13. Applying Semantic Web technologies to improve the retrieval, credibility and use of health-related web resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Miguel A; Karampiperis, Pythagoras; Kukurikos, Antonis; Karkaletsis, Vangelis; Stamatakis, Kostas; Villarroel, Dagmar; Leis, Angela

    2011-06-01

    The number of health-related websites is increasing day-by-day; however, their quality is variable and difficult to assess. Various "trust marks" and filtering portals have been created in order to assist consumers in retrieving quality medical information. Consumers are using search engines as the main tool to get health information; however, the major problem is that the meaning of the web content is not machine-readable in the sense that computers cannot understand words and sentences as humans can. In addition, trust marks are invisible to search engines, thus limiting their usefulness in practice. During the last five years there have been different attempts to use Semantic Web tools to label health-related web resources to help internet users identify trustworthy resources. This paper discusses how Semantic Web technologies can be applied in practice to generate machine-readable labels and display their content, as well as to empower end-users by providing them with the infrastructure for expressing and sharing their opinions on the quality of health-related web resources.

  14. Web journaling. Using informational technology to teach reflective practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Judy A; Welch, Lorraine M

    2002-01-01

    Reflection is a process by which we think about experiences and relieve them. Web journaling is a tool that gives students opportunities to use reflection when they are away from the immediate clinical environment. Through such reflection the student's personal knowledge that informs their practice is revealed. The revelation of personal knowledge is key to structuring subsequent faculty guidance. The web journal is a vehicle for student/faculty dialogue aimed at expanding both the faculty's responses to students' learning needs and the students' responses to persons in their care. Questions formulated in the dialogue direct the student's web-based search for new information. Faculty guidance subsequently focuses on the student's decisions regarding the use of information to direct clinical practice. Web journaling done over several nursing courses reinforces a model of learning, which is increasingly more deliberative and intentional. Web journaling may contribute to the development of practice throughout a nursing career because it becomes a way for self-directed learning.

  15. Sensor Web Technology Challenges and Advancements for the Earth Science Decadal Survey Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Charles D.; Moe, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the Earth science decadal survey era and the role ESTO developed sensor web technologies can contribute to the scientific observations. This includes hardware and software technology advances for in-situ and in-space measurements. Also discussed are emerging areas of importance such as the potential of small satellites for sensor web based observations as well as advances in data fusion critical to the science and societal benefits of future missions, and the challenges ahead.

  16. Use of Dynamic Technologies for Web-enabled Database Management Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanova, Galina; Todorov, Todor; Blagoev, Dimitar; Todorova, Mirena

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we consider two computer systems and the dynamic Web technologies they are using. Different contemporary dynamic web technologies are described in details and their advantages and disadvantages have been shown. Specific applications are developed, clinic and studying systems, and their programming models are described. Finally we implement these two applications in the students education process: Online studying has been tested in the Technical University – Va...

  17. The role of social networking web sites in influencing residency decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Justin; Hannan, Alexander; Coren, Joshua

    2012-10-01

    Social networking Web sites such as Facebook have grown rapidly in popularity. It is unknown how such sites affect the ways in which medical trainees investigate and interact with graduate medical education (GME) programs. To evaluate the use of social networking Web sites as a means for osteopathic medical students, interns, residents, and fellows to interact with GME programs and report the degree to which that interaction impacts a medical trainee's choice of GME program. An anonymous, 10-item electronic survey on social networking Web sites was e-mailed to osteopathic medical student, intern, resident, and fellow members of the American College of Osteopathic Family Physicians. The weighted least squares test and the Fisher exact test were used for data analysis. A total of 9606 surveys were distributed, and 992 (10%) were completed. Nine hundred twenty-eight (93%) of the respondents used social networking Web sites, with the most popular services being Facebook (891 [90%]; P=.03), the Student Doctor Network (278 [28%]), and LinkedIn (89 [9%]; P=.03). Three hundred fifty-three respondents (36%; P=.52) were connected with a professional organization and 673 (68%; P=.73) used social networking Web sites for job searching related to GME programs or postresidency employment. Within the population of 497 third-, fourth-, and fifth-year osteopathic medical students, 136 (27%) reported gleaning information about programs through social networking Web sites (P=.01). Within the total population, 100 of 992 (10%) reported that this information influenced their decisions (P=.07). Of note, 144 (14%) of the total 992 respondents reported that the programs they applied to did not have any presence on social networking Web sites (P=.05). Our results indicate that social networking Web sites have a present and growing influence on how osteopathic medical students, interns, residents, and fellows learn about and select a GME program.

  18. Social Media Marketing: Challenges and Opportunities in the Web 2.0 Marketplace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constantinides, Efthymios; Lin, A.; Foster, J.; Scifleet, P.

    2013-01-01

    The present stage in the evolution of the Internet, commonly called Web 2.0, has revolutionized the way people communicate, interact, and share information and has radically changed the way customers search for and buy products. The increasing adoption of Web 2.0 applications and technologies has

  19. A Learning Content Authoring Approach Based on Semantic Technologies and Social Networking: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesic, Sasa; Gasevic, Dragan; Jazayeri, Mehdi; Landoni, Monica

    2011-01-01

    Semantic web technologies have been applied to many aspects of learning content authoring including semantic annotation, semantic search, dynamic assembly, and personalization of learning content. At the same time, social networking services have started to play an important role in the authoring process by supporting authors' collaborative…

  20. Social Media and Networking Technologies: An Analysis of Collaborative Work and Team Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Ephraim A.; Hausman, Angela; Washington, Melvin C.

    2012-01-01

    Digital communication increases students' learning outcomes in higher education. Web 2.0 technologies encourages students' active engagement, collaboration, and participation in class activities, facilitates group work, and encourages information sharing among students. Familiarity with organizational use and sharing in social networks aids…

  1. The Social Construction of Imported Technologies: Reflections on the Social History of Technology in Modern Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyungsub

    2017-01-01

    Can imported technologies be socially constructed? Starting from this puzzling question, this essay reflects on the various methodologies with which one can narrate the stories of technology in modern Korea. A focus on technological innovations and how they have been shaped by their societal milieu forces one to leave out a large part of the technological experience, especially when the bulk of the technologies-in-use have been imported from abroad. This poses a serious problem for the history of technology in Korea, a nation that relied heavily on foreign technologies as it went through rapid economic growth in the latter twentieth century.

  2. Governance in Blockchain Technologies & Social Contract Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessel Reijers

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is placed in the context of a growing number of social and political critiques of blockchain technologies. We focus on the supposed potential of blockchain technologies to transform political institutions that are central to contemporary human societies, such as money, property rights regimes, and systems of democratic governance. Our aim is to examine the way blockchain technologies canbring about - and justify - new models of governance. To do so, we draw on the philosophical works of Hobbes, Rousseau, and Rawls, analyzing blockchain governance in terms of contrasting social contract theories. We begin by comparing the justifications of blockchain governance offered by members of the blockchain developers’ community with the justifications of governance presented within social contract theories. We then examine the extent to which the model of governance offered by blockchain technologies reflects key governance themes and assumptions located within social contract theories, focusing on the notions of sovereignty, the initial situation, decentralization and distributive justice.

  3. The ARCOMEM Architecture for Social- and Semantic-Driven Web Archiving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Risse

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The constantly growing amount ofWeb content and the success of the SocialWeb lead to increasing needs for Web archiving. These needs go beyond the pure preservationo of Web pages. Web archives are turning into “community memories” that aim at building a better understanding of the public view on, e.g., celebrities, court decisions and other events. Due to the size of the Web, the traditional “collect-all” strategy is in many cases not the best method to build Web archives. In this paper, we present the ARCOMEM (From Future Internet 2014, 6 689 Collect-All Archives to Community Memories architecture and implementation that uses semantic information, such as entities, topics and events, complemented with information from the Social Web to guide a novel Web crawler. The resulting archives are automatically enriched with semantic meta-information to ease the access and allow retrieval based on conditions that involve high-level concepts.

  4. The Social Shaping Approach to Technology Foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Jørgensen, Ulrik; Clausen, Christian

    2009-01-01

    herein: structure versus contingency, actor-network approach, laboratory programmes, techno-economic networks, actor worlds, development arenas. Experiences based on a recent Danish green technology foresight project concerned with environmental risks and opportunities related to nano-, bio......The social shaping of technology (SST) approach has been developed as a response and extension to the ideas of techno-economic rationality and linear conceptions of technology development and its consequences. The SST approach seems especially promising in areas of technology where visions...... are manifold, societal interests conflicting, and applications and markets are non-existing or still under construction. The emerging high technology areas and several areas of more sustainable development like organic food production and renewable energy are examples of this kind, where techno...

  5. A Study of the Demographics of Web-Based Health-Related Social Media Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadah, Shouq A; Shahbazi, Moloud; Wiley, Matthew T; Hristidis, Vagelis

    2015-08-06

    The rapid spread of Web-based social media in recent years has impacted how patients share health-related information. However, little work has studied the demographics of these users. Our aim was to study the demographics of users who participate in health-related Web-based social outlets to identify possible links to health care disparities. We analyze and compare three different types of health-related social outlets: (1) general Web-based social networks, Twitter and Google+, (2) drug review websites, and (3) health Web forums. We focus on the following demographic attributes: age, gender, ethnicity, location, and writing level. We build and evaluate domain-specific classifiers to infer missing data where possible. The estimated demographic statistics are compared against various baselines, such as Internet and social networks usage of the population. We found that (1) drug review websites and health Web forums are dominated by female users, (2) the participants of health-related social outlets are generally older with the exception of the 65+ years bracket, (3) blacks are underrepresented in health-related social networks, (4) users in areas with better access to health care participate more in Web-based health-related social outlets, and (5) the writing level of users in health-related social outlets is significantly lower than the reading level of the population. We identified interesting and actionable disparities in the participation of various demographic groups to various types of health-related social outlets. These disparities are significantly distinct from the disparities in Internet usage or general social outlets participation.

  6. Aspectos de seguridad en Web 2.0 y redes sociales

    OpenAIRE

    Caballero Velasco, María Ángeles

    2011-01-01

    Este proyecto final de carrera de universidad va enfocado a la seguridad en la Web 2.0 y las redes sociales. El documento se divide en dos partes. La primera parte define la visión principal del mundo 2.0, cómo nació y que implicaciones tiene hoy en día en la sociedad. Se definen las características de la Web 2.0 y su historia. Se analizan las diferencias entre la Web 2.0 y la Web 1.0, llegando hasta la Web 3.0. Se clasifican los tipos de Web 2.0 por uso y por aplicación y se analizan todas l...

  7. Social Networking Web Sites as a Tool for Student Transitions: Purposive Use of Social Networking Web Sites for the First-Year Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbone, David P.; Kovach, Ronald J.; Fish, Jessica N.; McCoy, Kelsey M.; Jones, Kathryn E.; Wright, Hillary Rawlings

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigated the potential role that social networking Web sites (e.g., Facebook) played in creating both actual and virtual learning communities within the first-year seminar. Researchers conducted a 2-year longitudinal study to assess whether students who were connected within a university-founded virtual network persisted in…

  8. Do College Faculty Embrace Web 2.0 Technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siha, Samia M.; Bell, Reginald Lamar; Roebuck, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The authors sought to determine if Rogers's Innovation Decision Process model could analyze Web 2.0 usage within the collegiate environment. The key independent variables studied in relationship to this model were gender, faculty rank, course content delivery method, and age. Chi-square nonparametric tests on the independent variables across…

  9. Using Web Speech Technology with Language Learning Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the history of human-to-computer interaction based upon the design of sophisticated computerized speech recognition algorithms. Advancements such as the arrival of cloud-based computing and software like Google's Web Speech API allows anyone with an Internet connection and Chrome browser to take advantage of…

  10. Sociale teknologier og web 2.0 som vidensmedier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav

    2011-01-01

    Artiklen fokuserer på effekten af brugen af sociale teknologier i folkebibliotekerne med fokus på i hvilken udstrækning de sociale teknologier lader sig forstå og analysere som vidensmedier, kommunikationsmønstre ved brug af sociale medier, de sociale mediers virkninger i undervisningssammenhænge...

  11. [Improving vaccination social marketing by monitoring the web].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, A; Bonanni, P; Castiglia, P; Montante, A; Colucci, M; Miotto, S; Siddu, A; Murrone, L; Baldo, V

    2014-01-01

    Immunisation is one of the most important and cost- effective interventions in Public Health because of their significant positive impact on population health.However, since Jenner's discovery there always been a lively debate between supporters and opponents of vaccination; Today the antivaccination movement spreads its message mostly on the web, disseminating inaccurate data through blogs and forums, increasing vaccine rejection.In this context, the Società Italiana di Igiene (SItI) created a web project in order to fight the misinformation on the web regarding vaccinations, through a series of information tools, including scientific articles, educational information, video and multimedia presentations The web portal (http://www.vaccinarsi.org) was published in May 2013 and now is already available over one hundred web pages related to vaccinations Recently a Forum, a periodic newsletter and a Twitter page have been created. There has been an average of 10,000 hits per month. Currently our users are mostly healthcare professionals. The visibility of the site is very good and it currently ranks first in the Google's search engine, taping the word "vaccinarsi" The results of the first four months of activity are extremely encouraging and show the importance of this project; furthermore the application for quality certification by independent international Organizations has been submitted.

  12. Can social semantic web techniques foster collaborative curriculum mapping in medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreckelsen, Cord; Finsterer, Sonja; Cremer, Jan; Schenkat, Hennig

    2013-08-15

    formative usability study yielded positive results (median rating of 2 ("good") in all 7 general usability items) and produced valuable qualitative feedback, especially concerning navigation and comprehensibility. Although not asked to, the participants (n=5) detected critical aspects of the curriculum (similar learning objectives addressed repeatedly and missing objectives), thus proving the system's ability to support curriculum revision. The SMW-based approach enabled an agile implementation of computer-supported knowledge management. The approach, based on standard Social Semantic Web formats and technology, represents a feasible and effectively applicable compromise between answering to the individual requirements of curriculum management at a particular medical school and using proprietary systems.

  13. Technology assessment and social science research on technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thienen, V. von

    1983-01-01

    In a first step this bibliography wants to overcome the want of systematic scientific data compilations and evaluations of experiences in studies on technology assessment. It concentrates on the social and political aspects of the development of technologies and the decision on their utilization by presenting titles which have been published in English- and German-speaking countries in the past decade. The bibliography is divided into various chapters and subchapters. The index part contains authors' indexes and publishers' indexes, subject indexes, other bibliographies and selected periodicals. (orig.) With 1647 refs [de

  14. Using Web Crawler Technology for Geo-Events Analysis: A Case Study of the Huangyan Island Incident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Hu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Social networking and network socialization provide abundant text information and social relationships into our daily lives. Making full use of these data in the big data era is of great significance for us to better understand the changing world and the information-based society. Though politics have been integrally involved in the hyperlinked world issues since the 1990s, the text analysis and data visualization of geo-events faced the bottleneck of traditional manual analysis. Though automatic assembly of different geospatial web and distributed geospatial information systems utilizing service chaining have been explored and built recently, the data mining and information collection are not comprehensive enough because of the sensibility, complexity, relativity, timeliness, and unexpected characteristics of political events. Based on the framework of Heritrix and the analysis of web-based text, word frequency, sentiment tendency, and dissemination path of the Huangyan Island incident were studied by using web crawler technology and the text analysis. The results indicate that tag cloud, frequency map, attitudes pie, individual mention ratios, and dissemination flow graph, based on the crawled information and data processing not only highlight the characteristics of geo-event itself, but also implicate many interesting phenomenon and deep-seated problems behind it, such as related topics, theme vocabularies, subject contents, hot countries, event bodies, opinion leaders, high-frequency vocabularies, information sources, semantic structure, propagation paths, distribution of different attitudes, and regional difference of net citizens’ response in the Huangyan Island incident. Furthermore, the text analysis of network information with the help of focused web crawler is able to express the time-space relationship of crawled information and the information characteristic of semantic network to the geo-events. Therefore, it is a useful tool to

  15. Application of World Wide Web (W3) Technologies in Payload Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Charles; Windrem, May; Picinich, Lou

    1996-01-01

    World Wide Web (W3) technologies are considered in relation to their application to space missions. It is considered that such technologies, including the hypertext transfer protocol and the Java object-oriented language, offer a powerful and relatively inexpensive framework for distributed application software development. The suitability of these technologies for payload monitoring systems development is discussed, and the experience gained from the development of an insect habitat monitoring system based on W3 technologies is reported.

  16. Analysis and visualization of Arabidopsis thaliana GWAS using web 2.0 technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu S; Horton, Matthew; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J; Seren, Umit; Meng, Dazhe; Meyer, Christopher; Ali Amer, Muhammad; Borevitz, Justin O; Bergelson, Joy; Nordborg, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    With large-scale genomic data becoming the norm in biological studies, the storing, integrating, viewing and searching of such data have become a major challenge. In this article, we describe the development of an Arabidopsis thaliana database that hosts the geographic information and genetic polymorphism data for over 6000 accessions and genome-wide association study (GWAS) results for 107 phenotypes representing the largest collection of Arabidopsis polymorphism data and GWAS results to date. Taking advantage of a series of the latest web 2.0 technologies, such as Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML), GWT (Google-Web-Toolkit), MVC (Model-View-Controller) web framework and Object Relationship Mapper, we have created a web-based application (web app) for the database, that offers an integrated and dynamic view of geographic information, genetic polymorphism and GWAS results. Essential search functionalities are incorporated into the web app to aid reverse genetics research. The database and its web app have proven to be a valuable resource to the Arabidopsis community. The whole framework serves as an example of how biological data, especially GWAS, can be presented and accessed through the web. In the end, we illustrate the potential to gain new insights through the web app by two examples, showcasing how it can be used to facilitate forward and reverse genetics research. Database URL: http://arabidopsis.usc.edu/

  17. Teaching strategies in web technologies for virtual learning environments

    OpenAIRE

    Ilber Dario Saza-Garzón

    2016-01-01

    The virtual learning environments (AVAs) have been a subject of discussion and questions mainly on finding the best teaching practices, which tools you can use them and how to achieve optimum utilization have better results in virtual education, for Therefore in this paper some elements about the characteristics, history, teaching, studies have virtual environments and web applications as tools to support teaching and learning, are set for a virtual tutor note the when planning, designing, cr...

  18. Social network extraction based on Web: 3. the integrated superficial method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, M. K. M.; Sitompul, O. S.; Noah, S. A.

    2018-03-01

    The Web as a source of information has become part of the social behavior information. Although, by involving only the limitation of information disclosed by search engines in the form of: hit counts, snippets, and URL addresses of web pages, the integrated extraction method produces a social network not only trusted but enriched. Unintegrated extraction methods may produce social networks without explanation, resulting in poor supplemental information, or resulting in a social network of durmise laden, consequently unrepresentative social structures. The integrated superficial method in addition to generating the core social network, also generates an expanded network so as to reach the scope of relation clues, or number of edges computationally almost similar to n(n - 1)/2 for n social actors.

  19. Landscaping climate change: a mapping technique for understanding science and technology debates on the world wide web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogers, R.; Marres, N.

    2000-01-01

    New World Wide Web (web) mapping techniques may inform and ultimately facilitate meaningful participation in current science and technology debates. The technique described here "landscapes" a debate by displaying key "webby" relationships between organizations. "Debate-scaping" plots two

  20. Media Literacy, Social Networking, and the Web 2.0 Environment for the K-12 Educator. Minding the Media: Critical Issues for Learning and Teaching. Volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, Belinha S.

    2011-01-01

    This book, a resource for educators, uses the theme of media literacy as a lens through which to view and discuss social networking and Web 2.0 environments. There is ongoing and positive research on the participatory culture created by youth who are heavily involved in the new digital technologies, yet schools tend to avoid these mediums for fear…

  1. Demographic-Based Content Analysis of Web-Based Health-Related Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadah, Shouq A; Shahbazi, Moloud; Wiley, Matthew T; Hristidis, Vagelis

    2016-06-13

    An increasing number of patients from diverse demographic groups share and search for health-related information on Web-based social media. However, little is known about the content of the posted information with respect to the users' demographics. The aims of this study were to analyze the content of Web-based health-related social media based on users' demographics to identify which health topics are discussed in which social media by which demographic groups and to help guide educational and research activities. We analyze 3 different types of health-related social media: (1) general Web-based social networks Twitter and Google+; (2) drug review websites; and (3) health Web forums, with a total of about 6 million users and 20 million posts. We analyzed the content of these posts based on the demographic group of their authors, in terms of sentiment and emotion, top distinctive terms, and top medical concepts. The results of this study are: (1) Pregnancy is the dominant topic for female users in drug review websites and health Web forums, whereas for male users, it is cardiac problems, HIV, and back pain, but this is not the case for Twitter; (2) younger users (0-17 years) mainly talk about attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depression-related drugs, users aged 35-44 years discuss about multiple sclerosis (MS) drugs, and middle-aged users (45-64 years) talk about alcohol and smoking; (3) users from the Northeast United States talk about physical disorders, whereas users from the West United States talk about mental disorders and addictive behaviors; (4) Users with higher writing level express less anger in their posts. We studied the popular topics and the sentiment based on users' demographics in Web-based health-related social media. Our results provide valuable information, which can help create targeted and effective educational campaigns and guide experts to reach the right users on Web-based social chatter.

  2. An Integrated Framework Of Web 2.0 Technology And A Collaborative Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Madar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper contributes to the suitability of web 2.0 technology in implementing collaborative learning and proposes an integrated framework of Web 2.0 tools and collaborative learning activities. This paper is also identifying the mismatch between adopting web 2.0 technologies and the delivery of the curriculum on the cloud or via the Internet. It is found that Web 2.0 and a collaborative learning are two platforms to be easily synchronized due to their common attributes that enable their complementariness. This paper argues that integrated framework of Web 2.0 and CL allow users exploit teachinglearning materials maximally and at the same upsurges learners understanding in the subject knowledge. Suitable of Web 2.0 in implementing curriculum was also encouraged since the proposed framework consists of both components of Web 2.0 functions and activities of collaborative learning environment. Pedagogically there has been a mismatch between E-learning technologies and mode of delivery for instance E-learning platforms are widely used to increase content accessibility only while now this framework introduces that Web 2.0 technology of E-learning can also be used to create share knowledge among users. The proposed framework if efficiently exploited will also allow users at all levels create personalized learning environment which suits perspective teachinglearning styles of the users. Apart from academic achievement or enhancements of the teaching and learning processes the proposed framework also would help learners develop generic skills which are very important in the workplaces. As a result of this fast and independent learning technically depend on technology based pedagogy and in this case this proposed model has two dimensions which are very crucial to the enrichment of students learning activities.

  3. Web-Based Social Work Courses: Guidelines for Developing and Implementing an Online Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Beverly Araujo; Fenster, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Although web-based courses in schools of social work have proliferated over the past decade, the literature contains few guidelines on steps that schools can take to develop such courses. Using Knowles's framework, which delineates tasks and themes involved in implementing e-learning in social work education, this article describes the cultivation…

  4. Internet and Surveillance. The Challenges of Web 2.0 and Social Media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, C.; Boersma, F.K.; Albrechtslund, A.; Sandoval, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Internet has been transformed in the past years from a system primarily oriented on information provision into a medium for communication and community-building. The notion of “Web 2.0”, social software, and social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter and MySpace have emerged in this

  5. Joyfully Map Social Dynamics When Designing Web-Based Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamer, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a concept and a notation for optimizing the design of social processes in gaming and learning for individuals, groups of individuals and society as a whole. Traditional approaches to the mapping and designing of the emerging social dynamics in a joyful, social education setting have fallen short of producing desirable results…

  6. The Like economy: the social web in transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerlitz, C.; Helmond, A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg claimed that the social will be the future organizing principle of economies. This paper will examine how platforms increasingly connect economic value and the social by focusing on the role of social buttons. Drawing on digital methods, we explore the

  7. Perception on Adoption and Application of Web 2.0 Technologies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    wemafr

    .000] between awareness and use of Web 2.0 technologies in non-library operations and an insignificant negative correlation ... "Unprecedented developments in the field of information and Communication Technology and the rapid advancements in ...... experiences at Tallinn. University, Estonia", Program, 42, (3), 262 - 274.

  8. U.S. Public Libraries and the Use of Web Technologies, 2012. A Closer Look

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanucha, Meghan; Hofschire, Linda

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, researchers at the Library Research Service (LRS) undertook the "U.S. Public Libraries and the Use of Web Technologies" study, with the intent to document the use of various Internet technologies on the websites of public libraries throughout the nation (Lietzau, 2009). The results of that study set a baseline for the adoption…

  9. E-Learning 2.0 Technologies and Web Applications in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelet, Jean-Eric, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Once considered the traditional approach to education, brick and mortar institutions are no longer the norm due to e-learning technologies. Populations are turning into ubiquitous human beings, and educational practices are reflecting this change. "E-Learning 2.0 Technologies and Web Applications in Higher Education" compiles the latest…

  10. Facilitating Teamwork with Lean Six Sigma and Web-Based Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Tim

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author outlines a variety of ways of defining, making explicit, and supporting effective team-based projects through the basic tenets of Lean Six Sigma and the use of Web-based technologies. A combination of Lean Six Sigma and a handful of project management technologies not only help in fostering the communication central to…

  11. State-of-the-art WEB -technologies and ecological safety of nuclear power engineering facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batij, V.G.; Batij, E.V.; Rud'ko, V.M.; Kotlyarov, V.T.

    2004-01-01

    Prospects of web-technologies using in the field of improvement radiation safety level of nuclear power engineering facilities is seen. It is shown that application of such technologies will enable entirely using the data of all information systems of radiation control

  12. Angel or Devil: Face-Off of Web 2.0 Technologies for Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Eunjyu

    2014-01-01

    Aiming at empowering students with the NCTE's 21st century literacies, this discussion investigated what role Web 2.0 technologies play in first-year college students' writing practices and what challenges students face while using computer technology for writing. Based on input from a national sample of 37 writing teachers, pedagogical…

  13. The UMLS Knowledge Source Server: an experience in Web 2.0 technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Karen E; Bangalore, Anantha K; Browne, Allen C

    2007-10-11

    The UMLS Knowledge Source Server (UMLSKS), developed at the National Library of Medicine (NLM), makes the knowledge sources of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) available to the research community over the Internet. In 2003, the UMLSKS was redesigned utilizing state-of-the-art technologies available at that time. That design offered a significant improvement over the prior version but presented a set of technology-dependent issues that limited its functionality and usability. Four areas of desired improvement were identified: software interfaces, web interface content, system maintenance/deployment, and user authentication. By employing next generation web technologies, newer authentication paradigms and further refinements in modular design methods, these areas could be addressed and corrected to meet the ever increasing needs of UMLSKS developers. In this paper we detail the issues present with the existing system and describe the new system's design using new technologies considered entrants in the Web 2.0 development era.

  14. Social technologies : Cross-disciplinary reflections on technologies in and from the social sciences Introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, Maarten; Vikkelso, Signe; Beaulieu, Anne

    In this introduction, we explore the relevance to critical psychology of the ideas about technology that have come from science and technology studies (STS), which we argue allow a new look at a classic theme in critical approaches in psychology. Rather than seeing psychical and social reality as

  15. Social technologies: Cross-disciplinary reflections on technologies in and from the social sciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, Maarten; Vikkelsø, S.; Beaulieu, Julianie

    2012-01-01

    In this introduction, we explore the relevance to critical psychology of the ideas about technology that have come from science and technology studies (STS), which we argue allow a new look at a classic theme in critical approaches in psychology. Rather than seeing psychical and social reality as

  16. Remote monitoring using technologies from the Internet and World Wide Web

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puckett, J.M.; Burczyk, L.

    1997-11-01

    Recent developments in Internet technologies are changing and enhancing how one processes and exchanges information. These developments include software and hardware in support of multimedia applications on the World Wide Web. In this paper the authors describe these technologies as they have applied them to remote monitoring and show how they will allow the International Atomic Energy Agency to efficiently review and analyze remote monitoring data for verification of material movements. The authors have developed demonstration software that illustrates several safeguards data systems using the resources of the Internet and Web to access and review data. This Web demo allows the user to directly observe sensor data, to analyze simulated safeguards data, and to view simulated on-line inventory data. Future activities include addressing the technical and security issues associated with using the Web to interface with existing and planned monitoring systems at nuclear facilities. Some of these issues are authentication, encryption, transmission of large quantities of data, and data compression.

  17. Remote monitoring using technologies from the Internet and World Wide Web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puckett, J.M.; Burczyk, L.

    1997-01-01

    Recent developments in Internet technologies are changing and enhancing how one processes and exchanges information. These developments include software and hardware in support of multimedia applications on the World Wide Web. In this paper the authors describe these technologies as they have applied them to remote monitoring and show how they will allow the International Atomic Energy Agency to efficiently review and analyze remote monitoring data for verification of material movements. The authors have developed demonstration software that illustrates several safeguards data systems using the resources of the Internet and Web to access and review data. This Web demo allows the user to directly observe sensor data, to analyze simulated safeguards data, and to view simulated on-line inventory data. Future activities include addressing the technical and security issues associated with using the Web to interface with existing and planned monitoring systems at nuclear facilities. Some of these issues are authentication, encryption, transmission of large quantities of data, and data compression

  18. Wild about Social Media and Technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santascoy, S. J.

    2011-09-01

    It's tempting to jump on the social media bandwagon and insist your organization needs Facebook, twitter, etc. But, when funds are limited, social media and related publicity must be carefully thought out. The NASA Night Sky Network, which is managed by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, has developed widgets for websites and blogs, an iPhone app, and a Facebook presence. This is all to attract, inform, and reach the next generation of amateur astronomers, with no additional work needed from the amateur astronomy community who are members of the Night Sky Network. Outreach professionals will gain valuable insight from our experience, and may replicate this model to design their own social media and technology plan.

  19. Integration of Web Technologies in Software Applications. Is Web 2.0 a Solution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezar Liviu CERVINSCHI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the idea that Web 2.0 represents “the era of dynamic web”, the paper proposes to provide arguments (demonstrated by physical results regarding the question that is at the foundation if this article. Due to the findings we can definitely affirm that Web 2.0 is a solution to building powerful and robust software, since the Internet has become more than just a simple presence on the users’ desktop that develops easy access to information, services, entertainment, online transactions, e-commerce, e-learning and so on, but basically every kind of human or institutional interaction can happen online. This paper seeks to study the impact of two of these braches upon the user – e-commerce and e-testing. The statistic reports will be made on different sets of people, while the conclusions are the results of a detailed research and study of the applications’ behaviour in the actual operating environment.

  20. UrbanWeb: a Platform for Mobile Context-aware Social Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frank Allan; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2010-01-01

    UrbanWeb is a novel Web-based context-aware hypermedia plat- form. It provides essential mechanisms for mobile social comput- ing applications: the framework implements context as an exten- sion to Web 2.0 tagging and provides developers with an easy to use platform for mobile context......-aware applications. Services can be statically or dynamically defined in the user’s context, data can be pre-cached for data intensive mobile applications, and shared state supports synchronization between running applications such as games. The paper discusses how UrbanWeb acquires cues about the user’s context...... from sensors in mobile phones, ranging from GPS data, to 2D barcodes, and manual entry of context in- formation, as well as how to utilize this context in applications. The experiences show that the UrbanWeb platform efficiently supports a rich variety of urban computing applications in differ- ent...

  1. Opening up Global Value Chains : Web 2.0 Technologies and SME ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project will examine how the range of technologies known as Web 2.0 tools can be used to expand exports on the part of SMEs. It will do so by developing a platform called Export 2.0 to promote Web 2.0 among Costa Rican SMEs willing to enter into new international markets. The platform is expected to serve more ...

  2. THE CURRENT STATE OF USING WEB INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES WITHIN THE WORLD PADAGOGICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor O. Chernenko

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available 110 educational projects represented by innovative teachers during Microsoft Worldwide Innovative Education Forum 2010 Cape Town (South Africa are analysed in the article. Web services and resources used for educational projects realization are described. The main functions of those means in the process of ITC-enriched project-based learning are formulated. The typology of web services and resources utilized by the teachers for organizing the learning process is worked out. The priorities for implementing web informational-communicational technologies within the educational sphere are identified.

  3. Lessons learned: the effect of prior technology use on Web-based interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Joanne C; Wade, Shari L; Wolfe, Christopher R

    2008-04-01

    This study examined the role of regular prior technology use in treatment response to an online family problem-solving (OFPS) intervention and an Internet resource intervention (IRI) for pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants were 150 individuals in 40 families of children with TBI randomly assigned to OFPS intervention or an IRI. All families received free computers and Internet access to TBI resources. OFPS families received Web-based sessions and therapist-guided synchronous videoconferences focusing on problem solving, communication skills, and behavior management. All participants completed measures of depression, anxiety, and computer usage. OFPS participants rated treatment satisfaction, therapeutic alliance, and Web site and technology comfort. With the OFPS intervention, depression and anxiety improved significantly more among technology using parents (n = 14) than nontechnology users (n = 6). Technology users reported increasing comfort with technology over time, and this change was predictive of depression at followup. Satisfaction and ease-of-use ratings did not differ by technology usage. Lack of regular prior home computer usage and nonadherence were predictive of anxiety at followup. The IRI was not globally effective. However, controlling for prior depression, age, and technology at work, there was a significant effect of technology at home for depression. Families with technology experience at home (n = 11) reported significantly greater improvements in depression than families without prior technology experience at home (n = 8). Although Web-based OFPS was effective in improving caregiver functioning, individuals with limited computer experience may benefit less from an online intervention due to increased nonadherence.

  4. Harnessing the social web for health and wellness: issues for research and knowledge translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kendall

    2014-02-11

    Social media is a powerful, rapid, and popular way of communication amongst people around the world. How can health professionals and patients use this strategy to achieve optimal disease management and prevention and attainment of wellness? An interdisciplinary group at University of British Columbia, supported by a grant from UBC Peter Wall Institute of Advanced Studies, conducted a research workshop in February 2013 to explore what is known and yet to be researched in using social media for nurturing the growth of virtual communities of people for health and wellness. This two and a half day workshop brought together a group of 30 multidisciplinary experts in closed discussions to reflect on five research themes in detail: (1) individual information acquisition and application, (2) community genesis and sustainability, (3) technological design issues, (4) knowledge management, dissemination, and renewal, and (5) research designs. In addition, a public forum for the general public, which attracted over 195 live participants, over 100 participants via Web casting, 1004 tweets, and 1,124,886 impressions following the #HCSMForum hash tag on Twitter, demonstrated the keen interest of the general public in this topic. Key concepts were captured in JMIR publications in this issue, and future directions, including research, knowledge translation approaches, and strategic partnerships of interdisciplinary researchers with policy makers and industries emerged from the workshop proceedings.

  5. A prototype to increase social networking between staff : A web application for companies

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Temin; Brunner, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Companies and organizations are predominantly divided into several departments. The departments are generally isolated from each other since the members often work with different projects internally and are constrained from socializing with others outside their department. Therefore, as a result, lack of social engagement within the departments and organizations is induced[1]. The focus of this study is to develop a web application and implement it at a company to encourage staff to socialize...

  6. Examining the Presence of Social Media on University Web Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, social networking has exploded into a massive medium that has captured the attention of a large portion of the American population. The ever-growing social networking site(s) (SNS) movement has filled a networking gap and thus, has presented higher education institutions with unique opportunities (Reid 2009) to further…

  7. Web data display system based on data segment technology of MDSplus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Rui; Zhang Ming; Wen Chuqiao; Zheng Wei; Zhuang Ge; Yu Kexun

    2014-01-01

    Long pulse operation is the main character of advanced Tokamak, so the technology of data storage and human-data interaction are vital for dealing with the large data generated in long pulse experiment. The Web data display system was designed. The system is based on the ASP. NET architecture, and it reads segmented-record data from MDSplus database by segmented-record technology and displays the data on Web page by using NI Measurement Studio control library. With the segmented-record technology, long pulse data could be divided into many small units, data segments. Users can read the certain data segments from the long pulse data according to their special needs. Also, the system develops an efficient strategy for reading segmented record data, showing the waveforms required by users accurately and quickly. The data display Web system was tested on J-TEXT Tokamak, and was proved to be reliable and efficient to achieve the initial design goal. (authors)

  8. Measurement of social media Web 1.0 and Web 2.0.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Gregor

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays social media gather millions of users and virtual communities have become the core of the Internet. Thanks to various forms of communications (both the standard and more invasive ones the function of social media undergoes changes. What initially was meant to make new virtual friends, now more and more often is implemented in enterprises’ activities, thus opening new opportunities to build a dialogue with buyers, to strengthen a positive image of science and to boost sales. The key to conduct effective actions in the social media are the measurements of what is happening in them. The application of these measurements allows to make better adjustments in the strategies of companies’ presence in the social portals. The aim of the article is to define the most important areas/subjects of the measurements used in this regard and the tools that are used to monitor the Internet.

  9. Using Web 2.0 technologies to enhance evidence-based medical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Miriam J; Flanagin, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    This article invokes research on information seeking and evaluation to address how providers of evidence-based medical information can use Web 2.0 technologies to increase access to, enliven users' experiences with, and enrich the quality of the information available. In an ideal scenario, evidence-based medical information can take appropriate advantage of community intelligence spawned by Web 2.0 technologies, resulting in the ideal combination of scientifically sound, high-quality information that is imbued with experiential insights from a multitude of individuals. To achieve this goal, the authors argue that people will engage with information that they can access easily, and that they perceive as (a) relevant to their information-seeking goals and (b) credible. The authors suggest the utility of Web 2.0 technologies for engaging stakeholders with evidence-based medical information through these mechanisms, and the degree to which the information provided can and should be trusted. Last, the authors discuss potential problems with Web 2.0 information in relation to decision making in health contexts, and they conclude with specific and practical recommendations for the dissemination of evidence-based health information via Web 2.0 technologies.

  10. Teaching strategies in web technologies for virtual learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilber Dario Saza-Garzón

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The virtual learning environments (AVAs have been a subject of discussion and questions mainly on finding the best teaching practices, which tools you can use them and how to achieve optimum utilization have better results in virtual education, for Therefore in this paper some elements about the characteristics, history, teaching, studies have virtual environments and web applications as tools to support teaching and learning, are set for a virtual tutor note the when planning, designing, creating and implementing online courses. Thus the reader will find concepts, explanations and different evolutionary processes that wins ICT and how are you have been involved in the educational context, spotting potential applications from mediation of teaching, plus some suggestions of how to carry out exposed use thereof in virtual learning environments to strengthen the different processes of teaching and learning.

  11. La televisión social: Ficción y Web 2.0

    OpenAIRE

    Castro Mariño, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    La tesis doctoral "La televisión social: Ficción y Web 2.0" se centra en el estudio de la extensión de la ficción española a la Red. Con una estructura que parte de lo general a lo particular, el primer capítulo ("Aproximación a la Web 2.0") ofrece una taxonomía conceptual de los espacios que constituyen la Web 2.0, así como una panorámica de su influencia en cuatro ámbitos sociales (comunicación, política, movimientos sociales y e-comercio). El segundo capítulo ("Ficción televisiva, webserie...

  12. HyQue: evaluating hypotheses using Semantic Web technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callahan Alison

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Key to the success of e-Science is the ability to computationally evaluate expert-composed hypotheses for validity against experimental data. Researchers face the challenge of collecting, evaluating and integrating large amounts of diverse information to compose and evaluate a hypothesis. Confronted with rapidly accumulating data, researchers currently do not have the software tools to undertake the required information integration tasks. Results We present HyQue, a Semantic Web tool for querying scientific knowledge bases with the purpose of evaluating user submitted hypotheses. HyQue features a knowledge model to accommodate diverse hypotheses structured as events and represented using Semantic Web languages (RDF/OWL. Hypothesis validity is evaluated against experimental and literature-sourced evidence through a combination of SPARQL queries and evaluation rules. Inference over OWL ontologies (for type specifications, subclass assertions and parthood relations and retrieval of facts stored as Bio2RDF linked data provide support for a given hypothesis. We evaluate hypotheses of varying levels of detail about the genetic network controlling galactose metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to demonstrate the feasibility of deploying such semantic computing tools over a growing body of structured knowledge in Bio2RDF. Conclusions HyQue is a query-based hypothesis evaluation system that can currently evaluate hypotheses about the galactose metabolism in S. cerevisiae. Hypotheses as well as the supporting or refuting data are represented in RDF and directly linked to one another allowing scientists to browse from data to hypothesis and vice versa. HyQue hypotheses and data are available at http://semanticscience.org/projects/hyque.

  13. Social Technologies and Informal Knowledge Sharing within and across Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrahi, Mohammad Hosein

    2013-01-01

    This doctoral dissertation is focused on both empirical and conceptual contributions relative to the roles social technologies play in informal knowledge sharing practices, both within and across organizations. Social technologies include (a) traditional social technologies (e.g., email, phone and instant messengers), (b) emerging social…

  14. Use of Technologies and Social Nets in the Formative Process of Superior Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Virginia Mero Suárez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Social networks and the uses of technologies for the training process have become indispensable tools in each of the educational scenarios of Higher Education. These resources together with what the web provides become new way of teaching and learning, in which learners become the protagonists of the teaching processes. The present work aimed to analyze the relevance of social networks and the uses of technologies in the educational function in each of the training scenarios in higher education. The importance of social networks was described, as well as the uses of new technologies, highlighting what is related to the strengthening of the new lists of the teacher and student, the interaction of students through each of the resources provided by the Web, and collaborative work, which has substantially favored learning. It was concluded that social networks plow tools that together with the new technologies plows welcomed by the students, constitute to support for the formation process, strengthening autonomy, cooperative work and knowledge management, converting new innovative spaces for new forms of teaching and learning. In addition to the great impact that the internet have and will in the development of new social networks in different contexts; and therefore, teachers cannot ignore them. In this sense, it should also be considered that teachers plow responsible for this change of attitude with respect to the new educational models where it there is the mission to it produces changes in the communicative environment before social uses of the network.

  15. End-User Evaluations of Semantic Web Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCool, Rob; Cowell, Andrew J.; Thurman, David A.

    2005-11-07

    Stanford University's Knowledge Systems Laboratory (KSL) is working in partnership with Battelle Memorial Institute and IBM Watson Research Center to develop a suite of technologies for information extraction, knowledge representation & reasoning, and human-information interaction, in unison entitled 'Knowledge Associates for Novel Intelligence' (KANI). We have developed an integrated analytic environment composed of a collection of analyst associates, software components that aid the user at different stages of the information analysis process. An important part of our participatory design process has been to ensure our technologies and designs are tightly integrate with the needs and requirements of our end users, To this end, we perform a sequence of evaluations towards the end of the development process that ensure the technologies are both functional and usable. This paper reports on that process.

  16. Predicting Middle School Students' Use of Web 2.0 Technologies out of School Using Home and School Technological Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Joan E.; Read, Michelle F.; Jones, Sara; Mahometa, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This study used multiple regression to identify predictors of middle school students' Web 2.0 activities out of school, a construct composed of 15 technology activities. Three middle schools participated, where sixth- and seventh-grade students completed a questionnaire. Independent predictor variables included three demographic and five computer…

  17. Web of Deception: Social Media and Implications for Military Deception

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    additional deception and OPSEC concerns. 35 Beyond just the open source intelligence ( OSINT ) that can be collected by other entities, there is also a...witting participants, in an effort to mislead or confuse the enemy. Just as the United States would be monitoring social media for OSINT , the...deception. Exploiting adversary use of social media OSINT through DISO is another lower threat avenue to examine as a starting point. As previously

  18. A Generic Framework for Extraction of Knowledge from Social Web Sources (Social Networking Websites for an Online Recommendation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javubar Sathick

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mining social web data is a challenging task and finding user interest for personalized and non-personalized recommendation systems is another important task. Knowledge sharing among web users has become crucial in determining usage of web data and personalizing content in various social websites as per the user’s wish. This paper aims to design a framework for extracting knowledge from web sources for the end users to take a right decision at a crucial juncture. The web data is collected from various web sources and structured appropriately and stored as an ontology based data repository. The proposed framework implements an online recommender application for the learners online who pursue their graduation in an open and distance learning environment. This framework possesses three phases: data repository, knowledge engine, and online recommendation system. The data repository possesses common data which is attained by the process of acquiring data from various web sources. The knowledge engine collects the semantic data from the ontology based data repository and maps it to the user through the query processor component. Establishment of an online recommendation system is used to make recommendations to the user for a decision making process. This research work is implemented with the help of an experimental case study which deals with an online recommendation system for the career guidance of a learner. The online recommendation application is implemented with the help of R-tool, NLP parser and clustering algorithm.This research study will help users to attain semantic knowledge from heterogeneous web sources and to make decisions.

  19. Considerable Web-2.0-Potential for energy suppliers. Social Media as focus glass; Erhebliches Web-2.0-Potenzial fuer Energieversorger. Social Media wirkt als Brennglas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyserlingk, Archibald Graf von; Lampe, Tobias [Keylens Management Consultants, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-06-27

    The past decade has witnessed a momentous transformation in the way people interact and exchange information with each other. Content is now co-produced, shared, classified, and rated by millions of people, while attention has become the ephemeral and valuable resource that everyone seeks to acquire. This talk will describe the ways through which social attention determines the production and consumption of content within both the scientific community and social media, how its dynamics can be used to predict the future, and its role in affecting the public agenda. Keylens Management Consultants at Dusseldorf has investigated the Status Quo of Social Media-activities and interpreted experiences from customer projects. Focus lays on Social Web, Twitter, Youtube, BLogging and Facebook. (GL)

  20. PHOTON2: A web-based professional development model for photonics technology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Nicholas M.; Washburn, Barbara A.; Kehrhahn, Marijke; Donnelly, Judith F.; Hanes, Fenna D.

    2004-10-01

    In this paper, we present a web-based teacher professional development model for photonics technology education funded by the National Science Foundation Advanced Technology Education (ATE) program. In response to the rapidly growing demand for skilled photonics technicians, the PHOTON2 project will increase the number of high school teachers and community college faculty across the US proficient in teaching photonics technology at their own institutions. The project will also focus on building the capacity of educators to engage in lifelong learning through web-based professional development. Unlike the traditional professional development model whereby educators receive training through intensive short-term workshops, the PHOTON2 project team has developed a pedagogical framework designed specifically for adult learners in which technical content, curriculum development, and learner self-regulatory development are integrated into an active, collaborative, and sustained online learning environment. In Spring 2004, two cohorts of science and technology educators, career/guidance counselors, and industry mentors from eleven states including California, Pennsylvania, Texas, Arizona, Hawaii, and the six New England states commenced participation in the three-year project. Qualitative and quantitative research, focused on individual and environmental factors related to web-based learning, will examine the viability of web-based teacher/faculty professional development in engineering technology education.

  1. Democracy as a social technology on schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    " democracy. The democratic influence in schools thus spans from "big" parliamentary democracy to small participatoruy democracy - a dichotomy schooll leadership must maneuvre within using democratic procedures and leadership as social technologies. This article argues that a positive coinnectiion exists......On a formal level, the influence og "big" parlamentary democracy is enhanced because parliamentary control in individual schools has become stronger; and the formal democratic influence of parents has been strengthned by their membership on school boards, the latter being an example of "small...

  2. Social and technological aspects of disaster resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giuliani, Luisa; Revez, Alexandra; Sparf, Jorgen

    2016-01-01

    Large scale projects tasked with designing infrastructures and urban networks resilient to disasters face a common challenge, i.e. the need to address concomitant technological issues and social problems. What is more, conflicting technologies and the diverse philosophical underpinnings of distinct...... academic disciplines pose difficulties in the collaboration among experts of different fields. These difficulties and possible ways to tackle them have been highlighted by a questionnaire developed in the framework of an EU project named ANDROID (Academic Network for Disaster Resilience to Optimize...... Educational Development). More specifically, the project investigated the level of interdisciplinary work in current research and educational projects within the field of disaster resilience. Findings illustrate the number and types of disciplines involved in disaster resilience projects and suggest...

  3. Rare disease diagnosis: A review of web search, social media and large-scale data-mining approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenstrup, Dan; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Winther, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Physicians and the general public are increasingly using web-based tools to find answers to medical questions. The field of rare diseases is especially challenging and important as shown by the long delay and many mistakes associated with diagnoses. In this paper we review recent initiatives on the use of web search, social media and data mining in data repositories for medical diagnosis. We compare the retrieval accuracy on 56 rare disease cases with known diagnosis for the web search tools google.com, pubmed.gov, omim.org and our own search tool findzebra.com. We give a detailed description of IBM's Watson system and make a rough comparison between findzebra.com and Watson on subsets of the Doctor's dilemma dataset. The recall@10 and recall@20 (fraction of cases where the correct result appears in top 10 and top 20) for the 56 cases are found to be be 29%, 16%, 27% and 59% and 32%, 18%, 34% and 64%, respectively. Thus, FindZebra has a significantly (p < 0.01) higher recall than the other 3 search engines. When tested under the same conditions, Watson and FindZebra showed similar recall@10 accuracy. However, the tests were performed on different subsets of Doctors dilemma questions. Advances in technology and access to high quality data have opened new possibilities for aiding the diagnostic process. Specialized search engines, data mining tools and social media are some of the areas that hold promise.

  4. Trust and Involvement in Tourism Social Media and Web-Based Travel Information Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munar, Ana Maria; KR. Steen Jacobsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    While utilisation of electronic social media is increasingly relevant as tourism practices, there is still a deficiency of empirical research on tourists' creation and use of various types of online content. This study maps and explores Scandinavian tourists' perceptions of Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 in...... intensity, hedonic aspects and utilitarian values of tourist information in relation to interaction aspects of social media, in a context of holiday choices and online booking.......While utilisation of electronic social media is increasingly relevant as tourism practices, there is still a deficiency of empirical research on tourists' creation and use of various types of online content. This study maps and explores Scandinavian tourists' perceptions of Web 1.0 and Web 2.......0 information sources and scrutinises influence of electronic social media on holidaymakers' information sharing, based on a summer season survey in the mature and well-known destination of Mallorca, Spain. Empirical evidence is presented on perceived trustworthiness of social media platforms and other Internet...

  5. Geothermal technology in Australia: Investigating social acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowd, Anne-Maree; Boughen, Naomi; Ashworth, Peta; Carr-Cornish, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Issues of social acceptance, such as lack of awareness and negative community perceptions and reactions, can affect low emission energy technology development, despite general support observed for reducing carbon emissions and mitigating climate change. Negative community reactions and lack of understanding have affected geothermal developments, as demonstrated by the fearful community reactions and negative media experienced in response to seismic disturbances caused by 'hot rock' geothermal energy generation in Switzerland and Germany. Focusing on geothermal energy, this paper presents the results of using a participatory action research methodology to engage diverse groups within the Australian public. A key finding is that the majority of the Australian public report limited the knowledge or understanding of geothermal technology and have various concerns including water usage and seismic activity instigated by geothermal drilling. However, geothermal energy receives general support due to a common trend to champion renewable energy sources in preference to traditional forms of energy generation and controversial technologies. This paper also demonstrates the effectiveness of using an engagement process to explore public understanding of energy technologies in the context of climate change, and suggests a way forward for governments and industry to allocate resources for greatest impact when communicating about geothermal technology. - Highlights: → Majority of Australians have limited knowledge or understanding of geothermal technology. → Various concerns, including water usage and seismic activity instigated by drilling, were raised. → Geothermal energy has general support due to a common trend to champion renewable energy sources. → Methodology shows the effectiveness of an engagement process to explore public understanding. → Participants expressed intention to change behaviours, which can be a catalyst for change.

  6. The Concept of “Web Science” in the Social Realm: Building Bridges between a new Interdisciplinary Field and the Cultural “Wealth of Networks”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Dick

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Discourse in the field of “cyber culture” largely does not take into account the major shift in constituent technology that has begun to advance the Web from one based solely on human-understandable hypertext documents to one based on machine-understandable data. Such innovation includes the refinement of new search engine technology to mine data in Web services applications (the “Deep Web” coupled with the desire to annotate data with mark-up languages that facilitate greater interactivity and infer meaning within either user-created knowledge representation models (“folksonomies” as a part of “Web 2.0” or more rigid ontological structures (part of the “Semantic Web” or “Web 3.0”. In this paper, I consider this overall evident and predicted shift from a “Web of documents” to a “Web of data” to be the central element in the creation of the next-generation of the Web, and the recent drive to study it within an integrated framework known as “Web Science”. Central to this shift is the need to reconsider not only the cultural aspects of the medium, but also the interactions between cultural theory and technical texts. I conclude that with the emergence of certain new technology the entire concept of intellectual property, and more specifically where value ultimately lies in terms of the creation of cultural product, is also changing. Within, I thus focus on alternative frameworks (namely the work of Yochai Benkler to conceptualize knowledge production, in order to re-examine issues of Web-enabled participatory culture. In order to highlight new cultural paradigms, opportunities and challenges, I discuss how the concept of “social production” may foster a “cultural democracy” that transcends traditional hegemonic conditions that encumber publics.

  7. IMPLEMENTATION OF OPEN-SOURCE WEB MAPPING TECHNOLOGIES TO SUPPORT MONITORING OF GOVERNMENTAL SCHEMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Pulsani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Several schemes are undertaken by the government to uplift social and economic condition of people. The monitoring of these schemes is done through information technology where involvement of Geographic Information System (GIS is lacking. To demonstrate the benefits of thematic mapping as a tool for assisting the officials in making decisions, a web mapping application for three government programs such as Mother and Child Tracking system (MCTS, Telangana State Housing Corporation Limited (TSHCL and Ground Water Quality Mapping (GWQM has been built. Indeed the three applications depicted the distribution of various parameters thematically and helped in identifying the areas with higher and weaker distributions. Based on the three applications, the study tends to find similarities of many government schemes reflecting the nature of thematic mapping and hence deduces to implement this kind of approach for other schemes as well. These applications have been developed using SharpMap Csharp library which is a free and open source mapping library for developing geospatial applications. The study highlights upon the cost benefits of SharpMap and brings out the advantage of this library over proprietary vendors and further discusses its advantages over other open source libraries as well.

  8. Implementation of Open-Source Web Mapping Technologies to Support Monitoring of Governmental Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsani, B. R.

    2015-10-01

    Several schemes are undertaken by the government to uplift social and economic condition of people. The monitoring of these schemes is done through information technology where involvement of Geographic Information System (GIS) is lacking. To demonstrate the benefits of thematic mapping as a tool for assisting the officials in making decisions, a web mapping application for three government programs such as Mother and Child Tracking system (MCTS), Telangana State Housing Corporation Limited (TSHCL) and Ground Water Quality Mapping (GWQM) has been built. Indeed the three applications depicted the distribution of various parameters thematically and helped in identifying the areas with higher and weaker distributions. Based on the three applications, the study tends to find similarities of many government schemes reflecting the nature of thematic mapping and hence deduces to implement this kind of approach for other schemes as well. These applications have been developed using SharpMap Csharp library which is a free and open source mapping library for developing geospatial applications. The study highlights upon the cost benefits of SharpMap and brings out the advantage of this library over proprietary vendors and further discusses its advantages over other open source libraries as well.

  9. Models of change and the adoption of web technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørn Flohr

    2008-01-01

    it connects the change motors. The analysis questions the assumption that participation always helps in overcoming resistance to change. Participation often leads to tensions and conflicts, especially when multiple motors and different change efforts are operating simultaneously. Practically, this application......This article illustrates how advanced theories of change are useful in understanding the actual adoption of emergent Internet technologies drawing on surveys of Nordic banks. The point of departure is Van de Ven and Poole's identification of four basic types of theories of change: life cycle......, teleological (including planned change), dialectical, and evolutionary theories. These theories are shown to provide a useful framework for examining the adoption and implementation of Internet technology at different stages. Especially, it is shown how participation can be included in the models and how...

  10. WEB TECHNOLOGIES USED TO FORECAST FUTURE WASTE QUANTITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriu LUPU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article the authors propose a modality of prognosis of the quantities of waste generated in a certain period. The proposition was finalized by achieving a model of prognosis present on a site hosted by a Web server. The software solve the problem for the general case, depending on the input data after analysis. After analyzing input data sets are used with one, two or three components (trend, seasonality and residual variable. According to the input data the adjustment model regarding the description of the analyzed phenomenon (additive and multiplying is chosen. If the chronogram of the analyzed phenomenon indicates an oscillating evolution, of sinusoidal nature, the additive model (+ is chosen, otherwise the multiplying model (  is chosen. The seasonal component is estimated and the deseasonalized chronological series is determined. The seasonality is determined by: the procedure of arithmetical means, the procedure of moving averages and the procedure of analytical tendency. The adjustment function is specified regarding the tendency of the phenomenon and its parameters are estimated. The significance of the adjustment function is verified specifying the significance threshold with which it may be accepted as significant. The estimation of the parameters of the adjustment function is made on the basis of the application of the method of least squares. The values of the phenomenon on two or three trimesters/ months are estimated for the processed data (by using time series with two or three steps ahead. Several types of waste specified by the value of the meter for waste from the database may be accepted. The model proposed makes decisions and justifies if the data prognosticated is accepted or not. All information from the input data to the final data is stored in a MySQL database.

  11. Building a Better Book in the Browser (Using Semantic Web technologies and HTML5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A. Clark

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The library as place and service continues to be shaped by the legacy of the book. The book itself has evolved in recent years, with various technologies vying to become the next dominant book form. In this article, we discuss the design and development of our prototype software from Montana State University (MSU Library for presenting books inside of web browsers. The article outlines the contextual background and technological potential for publishing traditional book content through the web using open standards. Our prototype demonstrates the application of HTML5, structured data with RDFa and Schema.org markup, linked data components using JSON-LD, and an API-driven data model. We examine how this open web model impacts discovery, reading analytics, eBook production, and machine-readability for libraries considering how to unite software development and publishing.

  12. Teleconsultation in school settings: linking classroom teachers and behavior analysts through web-based technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieder, Jessica E; Peterson, Stephanie M; Woodward, Judy; Crane, Jaelee; Garner, Marlane

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a technically driven, collaborative approach to assessing the function of problem behavior using web-based technology. A case example is provided to illustrate the process used in this pilot project. A school team conducted a functional analysis with a child who demonstrated challenging behaviors in a preschool setting. Behavior analysts at a university setting provided the school team with initial workshop trainings, on-site visits, e-mail and phone communication, as well as live web-based feedback on functional analysis sessions. The school personnel implemented the functional analysis with high fidelity and scored the data reliably. Outcomes of the project suggest that there is great potential for collaboration via the use of web-based technologies for ongoing assessment and development of effective interventions. However, an empirical evaluation of this model should be conducted before wide-scale adoption is recommended.

  13. Australian health professionals' social media (Web 2.0) adoption trends: early 21st century health care delivery and practice promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Wayne T

    2012-01-01

    This study was concerned with identifying reasons behind patterns of social media (Web 2.0) usage associated with eight of Australia's major health professions. Attention was given to uncovering some of the more significant motivations for the resistance or adoption of Web 2.0 technologies for health care delivery and practice promotion by Australian health professionals. Surveys were developed from a common set of questions with specific variations between professions negotiated with professional health societies. Survey questions were constructed in an attempt to identify Web 2.0 adoption trends. An online survey (www.limesurvey.org) was used to collect data. Initial data preparation involved the development of one integrated SPSS file to incorporate all responses from the eight surveys undertaken. Initial data analysis applied Frequencies and Crosstabs to the identified groups and provided a profile of respondents by key business and demographic characteristics. Of the 935 respondents, 9.5% of participants indicated that they used Web 2.0 for their professional work, 19.1% of them did not use it for work but used it for their personal needs and 71.3% of them did not use Web 2.0 at all. Participants have indicated that the main reason for 'choosing not to adopt' Web 2.0 applications as a way of delivering health care to their patients is due to the health professionals' lack of understanding of Web 2.0 (83.3%), while the main reason for 'choosing to adopt' Web 2.0 applications is the perception of Web 2.0 as a quick and effective method of communication (73.0%). This study has indicated that Australian health professionals 'choose not to adopt' Web 2.0 usage as a way of delivering health care primarily due to 'a lack of understanding as to how social media would be used in health care' (83.3%). This study identifies that Australian health professionals are interacting with Web 2.0 technologies in their private lives but are failing to see how such technologies

  14. An Enhanced Personal Learning Environment Using Social Semantic Web Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimi, Khaled; Seridi-Bouchelaghem, Hassina; Faron-Zucker, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Compared with learning in classrooms, classical e-learning systems are less adaptive and once a system that supports a particular strategy has been designed and implemented, it is less likely to change according to student's interactions and preferences. Remote educational systems should be developed to ensure as much as necessary the…

  15. Technology: Cookies, Web Profilers, Social Network Cartography, and Proxy Servers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, Royal

    2004-01-01

    The Internet was designed as an open system that promoted the two-way flow of information. In other words, everything that is sent has a return address called an IP or Internet Protocol address of the form: 000.11.222.33. Whenever you connect to a website, the site learns your IP address. It also learns the type of computer you are using, the…

  16. Implications of the Social Web Environment for User Story Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancott, Terrill; Kamthan, Pankaj; Shahmir, Nazlie

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, user stories have emerged in academia, as well as industry, as a notable approach for expressing user requirements of interactive software systems that are developed using agile methodologies. There are social aspects inherent to software development, in general, and user stories, in particular. This paper presents directions and…

  17. Internet Resources: Using Web Pages in Social Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Jack

    1999-01-01

    Contends that students in social studies classes can utilize Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) as a presentation and collaborative tool by developing websites. Presents two activities where students submitted webpages for country case studies and created a timeline for the French Revolution. Describes how to use HTML by discussing the various tags.…

  18. Social Imaginary in web advertising of e-readers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Marcela Angelozzi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the imaginary meanings that appear in the advertising discourses on e-book reading devices commonly known as e-readers. It starts from the assumption that imaginary meanings are associated with both: the imaginary associated to digital technologies (Cabrera, 2006, 2011 and to the imaginary of "order of books" (Chartier, 2000, 2005. In order to carry out the exploration, the advertising discourses in the homepages of three cases are analized: The Amazon Kindle, Kobo and MovistarBq brands. The conclusion is that e-readers are devices that participate of the imaginary of the digital technologies as other devices in the complex of digital technologies in everyday life, and also refers strongly to the imaginary meanings related to printed books.

  19. ForistomApp a Web application for scientific and technological information management of Forsitom foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra-Duarte, L. A.; Angarita-Jerardino, A.; Ruiz, P. A.; Dulce-Moreno, H. J.; Vera-Rivera, F. H.; V-Niño, E. D.

    2017-12-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) are essential in the transfer of knowledge, and the Web tools, as part of ICT, are important for institutions seeking greater visibility of the products developed by their researchers. For this reason, we implemented an application that allows the information management of the FORISTOM Foundation (Foundation of Researchers in Science and Technology of Materials). The application shows a detailed description, not only of all its members also of all the scientific production that they carry out, such as technological developments, research projects, articles, presentations, among others. This application can be implemented by other entities committed to the scientific dissemination and transfer of technology and knowledge.

  20. Usage, Barriers, and Training of Web 2.0 Technology Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, Christopher G.; Pritchett, Christal C.; Wohleb, Elisha C.

    2013-01-01

    This research study was designed to determine the degree of use of Web 2.0 technology applications by certified education professionals and examine differences among various groups as well as reasons for these differences. A quantitative survey instrument was developed to gather demographic information and data. Participants reported they would be…

  1. Competence and Usage of Web 2.0 Technologies by Higher Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Kamal Ahmed; Zai, Sajid Yousuf; Jafri, Iftikhar Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Literature on Web 2.0 experiences of higher education faculty in developing countries such as Pakistan is very limited. An insight on awareness and practices of higher education faculty with these tools can be helpful to map strategies and plan of action for adopting latest technologies to support teaching-learning processes in higher education of…

  2. Making Learning and Web 2.0 Technologies Work for Higher Learning Institutions in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwoga, Edda

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to assess the extent to which learning and Web 2.0 technologies are utilised to support learning and teaching in Africa's higher learning institutions, with a specific focus on Tanzania's public universities. Design/methodology/approach: A combination of content analysis and semi-structured interviews was used to collect…

  3. Factors Predicting Pre-Service Teachers' Adoption of Web 2.0 Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Jongpil; Coward, Fanni; Song, Jaeki; Lim, Sunho

    2012-01-01

    Classrooms full of "digital natives" represent the norm in U. S. schools, but like their predecessors, they mostly inhabit spaces characterized by a traditional view of teaching and learning. Understanding contributors to this mismatch, and especially teachers' role, is especially critical as Web 2.0 technologies enable greater learner…

  4. WISE Science: Web-based Inquiry in the Classroom. Technology, Education--Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotta, James D.; Linn, Marcia C.

    2009-01-01

    This book shares the lessons learned by a large community of educational researchers and science teachers as they designed, developed, and investigated a new technology-enhanced learning environment known as WISE: The Web-Based Inquiry Science Environment. WISE offers a collection of free, customizable curriculum projects on topics central to the…

  5. Just-in-Time Teaching Techniques through Web Technologies for Vocational Students' Reading and Writing Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantoem, Rewadee; Rattanavich, Saowalak

    2016-01-01

    This research compares the English language achievements of vocational students, their reading and writing abilities, and their attitudes towards learning English taught with just-in-time teaching techniques through web technologies and conventional methods. The experimental and control groups were formed, a randomized true control group…

  6. Using Web 2.0 Technologies: Exploring Perspectives of Students, Teachers and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingmei; Yuen, Allan H. K.; Park, Jae

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to explore the perspectives of students, teachers, and parents in using Web 2.0 technologies. Design/methodology/approach: This study is based on the focus group interview data collected from two groups of students, two groups of teachers, and one group of parents in a secondary school in Hong Kong. Findings:…

  7. An Intelligent Semantic E-Learning Framework Using Context-Aware Semantic Web Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weihong; Webster, David; Wood, Dawn; Ishaya, Tanko

    2006-01-01

    Recent developments of e-learning specifications such as Learning Object Metadata (LOM), Sharable Content Object Reference Model (SCORM), Learning Design and other pedagogy research in semantic e-learning have shown a trend of applying innovative computational techniques, especially Semantic Web technologies, to promote existing content-focused…

  8. Enabling Problem Based Learning through Web 2.0 Technologies: PBL 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambouris, Efthimios; Panopoulou, Eleni; Tarabanis, Konstantinos; Ryberg, Thomas; Buus, Lillian; Peristeras, Vassilios; Lee, Deirdre; Porwol, Lukasz

    2012-01-01

    Advances in Information and Communications Technology (ICT), particularly the so-called Web 2.0, are affecting all aspects of our life: How we communicate, how we shop, how we socialise, how we learn. Facilitating learning through the use of ICT, also known as eLearning, is a vital part of modern educational systems. Established pedagogical…

  9. Students’ Views about the Problem Based Collaborative Learning Environment Supported By Dynamic Web Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan ÜNAL

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to design a problem based collaborative learning environment supported by dynamic web technologies and examine students’ views about this learning environment. The study was designed as a qualitative research. 36 students who took Object Oriented Programming I-II course from a public university at the department of computer programming participated in the study. During the research process, the Object Oriented Programming I-II course was designed with incorporating different dynamic web technologies (Edmodo, Google Services, and Mind42 and Nelson (1999’s collaborative problem solving method. At the end of the course, there were focus group interviews in regards to the students’ views on a learning environment supported by dynamic web technologies and collaborative problem solving method. At the end of the focus group interviews, 4 themes were obtained from the students’ views, including positive aspects of the learning environment, difficulties faced in the learning environment, advantages of the learning environment, and skills gained as a result of the project. The results suggest that problem based collaborative learning methods and dynamic web technologies can be used in learning environments in community colleges.

  10. Students' Views about the Problem Based Collaborative Learning Environment Supported by Dynamic Web Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Erhan; Çakir, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a problem based collaborative learning environment supported by dynamic web technologies and to examine students' views about this learning environment. The study was designed as a qualitative research. Some 36 students who took an Object Oriented Programming I-II course at the department of computer…

  11. Encouraging the Use of Technology in the Classroom: The WebQuest Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Anne D'Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Contends it is increasingly important that new teachers be comfortable with new uses of technology. Discusses "The WebQuest Connection," a cooperative effort between children and teachers in a local school district and university students enrolled in a secondary reading methods course. Explains that this project allows preservice teachers to…

  12. Optimizing Citizen Engagement During Emergencies Through Use of Web 2.0 Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    avalanches or damage to levees. The eyes and ears of the public can alert emergency responders and other residents about developing hazardous...earthquake on July 29, 2008, residents who received instantaneous information about the quake were those who turned to Twitter, a Web 2.0 technology...geographic area has used mashup technology. As you click on an icon (house) you get a description of the property pulled from a database (price or square

  13. Web technologies in a collaborative platform for clinical trials - DOI: 10.3395/reciis.v3i4.236en

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Akemi Manabe Capretz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Web technologies have changed software development. The changes affect a full range of applications as well as the way users interact with computers. In the health domain, clinical research demands a lot of investment, effort and information in order to safely commercialize a new drug. The WebInVivo project aims at providing automated support for clinical research based on Web technologies. It includes mechanisms for sharing and reusing clinical trial information, such as protocols, protocol data, workflows and workflow metadata and for controlling the protocol life cycle, from modeling to execution. In this project, knowledge from the biomedical area permeates three segments of Brazilian society: (a research and development, (b health agents, and (c the population. This knowledge will be made available through social networks for these segments of Brazilian society.

  14. Research and Scientific Edition in the Social Web: The Shared Science

    OpenAIRE

    Zapata-Ros, Miguel; Lizenberg, Nora

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the social web as a work context for scientific research and the methodological features accrued to researchers by those work contexts are analyzed. Associated concepts to e-Science, Science 2.0 and Shared Science and their characteristics are proposed. Virtual Research Environments (VREs) are defined and analyzed taking into account their historical development since the first primitive environments based on messaging service and gopher, up to the current ones that use social...

  15. Theoretical Insights for Developing the Concept of Social Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Skaržauskaitė

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—Social technologies continue to grow in popularity in society. Even though the term “social technology” is most commonly used to refer to new social media such as Twitter and Facebook, a redefinition of this concept based on the original definition is needed. Nowadays the concept of “social technology” has several aspects, which destabilize the dominant image of technology. It emphasizes the social sciences and the humanities as shapers of society, reconsiders the strength of “soft technologies.” The aim of this paper is to provide rich insight into the concept of social technologies’ and to develop the meaning of social technologies in information and knowledge society by analysing new needs and application forms of social technologies.Findings—the research contributed to the understanding of the concept of social technologies. Based on the analysis and synthesis of the scientific literature, a theoretical framework for defining social technologies was developed.Research limitations/implications—the research is limited in a few aspects. For a deeper understanding of social technologies and for developing technological perspectives in social sciences a broader theoretical, as well as empirical, research is necessary. In order to generalise the research findings, further research should include different dimensions from the perspective of other sciences.

  16. Theoretical Insights for Developing the Concept of Social Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rūta Tamošiūnaitė

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—Social technologies continue to grow in popularity in society. Even though the term “social technology” is most commonly used to refer to new social media such as Twitter and Facebook, a redefinition of this concept based on the original definition is needed. Nowadays the concept of “social technology” has several aspects, which destabilize the dominant image of technology. It emphasizes the social sciences and the humanities as shapers of society, reconsiders the strength of “soft technologies.” The aim of this paper is to provide rich insight into the concept of social technologies’ and to develop the meaning of social technologies in information and knowledge society by analysing new needs and application forms of social technologies. Findings—the research contributed to the understanding of the concept of social technologies. Based on the analysis and synthesis of the scientific literature, a theoretical framework for defining social technologies was developed. Research limitations/implications—the research is limited in a few aspects. For a deeper understanding of social technologies and for developing technological perspectives in social sciences a broader theoretical, as well as empirical, research is necessary. In order to generalise the research findings, further research should include different dimensions from the perspective of other sciences. Article Type: conceptual paper.

  17. Paradoxes of Social Networking in a Structured Web 2.0 Language Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiseau, Mathieu; Zourou, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    This paper critically inquires into social networking as a set of mechanisms and associated practices developed in a structured Web 2.0 language learning community. This type of community can be roughly described as learning spaces featuring (more or less) structured language learning resources displaying at least some notions of language learning…

  18. Enhancing competence development for social inclusion Using the TENCompetence Web tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louys, Amelie; Hernández-Leo, Davinia; Sligte, Henk; Pérez-Sanagustín, Mar; Schoonenboom, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Louys, A., Hernández-Leo, D., Sligte, H., Pérez-Sanagustín, M., & Schoonenboom, J. (2010). Enhancing competence development for social inclusion Using the TENCompetence Web tools. In D. Griffiths, & R. Koper (Eds.), Rethinking Learning and Employment at a Time of Economic Uncertainty. Proceedings of

  19. Information Exchange and Information Disclosure in Social Networking Web Sites: Mediating Role of Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mital, Monika; Israel, D.; Agarwal, Shailja

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating effect of trust on the relationship between the type of information exchange (IE) and information disclosure (ID) on social networking web sites (SNWs). Design/methodology/approach: Constructs were developed for type of IE and trust. To understand the mediating role of trust a…

  20. All Together Now: Social Bookmarking Offers a New Way to Store and Share Web Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesRoches, Donna

    2007-01-01

    Social bookmarking allows multiple users to save their favorite sites, articles, and even podcasts on the Web--instead of inside one's browser--making them accessible from home, school, the library, or anywhere with Internet access. It's quickly becoming a popular way for teachers and students to store, classify, share, and search links, all of…

  1. Project Leadership Lived Experiences with Web-Based Social Networking: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scroggins, Charles W.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the lived experiences of project leaders adopting and using Web-2.0 social networking collaboration applications for their project leadership activities. The experiences of 20 project leaders in a Fortune 500 aerospace and defense enterprise in the northeastern United States of America were explored using a qualitative…

  2. Emerging Instructional Technologies: Exploring the Extent of Faculty Use of Web 2.0 Tools at a Midwestern Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Tareq; Lazarevic, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to provide insight into the several aspects of instructional use of emerging web-based technologies. The study first explores the extent of Web 2.0 technology integration into face-to-face classroom activities. In this phase, the main focus of research interests was on the types and dynamics of Web 2.0 tools used by…

  3. Examining the Theoretical Factors That Influence University Students to Adopt Web 2.0 Technologies: The Australian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Otaibi, Yasser D.; Houghton, Luke

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is (1) to examine Australian university students' awareness of the benefits of Web 2.0 technologies and (2) to investigate the factors that influence students to adopt Web 2.0 technologies to supplement in-class learning, using the theoretical foundations of both Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) and Decomposed Theory of…

  4. Integrating Space Communication Network Capabilities via Web Portal Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Lee, Carlyn-Ann; Lau, Chi-Wung; Cheung, Kar-Ming; Levesque, Michael; Carruth, Butch; Coffman, Adam; Wallace, Mike

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a service portal prototype as part of an investigation into the feasibility of using Java portlet technology as a means of providing integrated access to NASA communications network services. Portal servers provide an attractive platform for this role due to the various built-in collaboration applications they can provide, combined with the possibility to develop custom inter-operating portlets to extent their functionality while preserving common presentation and behavior. This paper describes various options for integration of network services related to planning and scheduling, and results based on use of a popular open-source portal framework. Plans are underway to develop an operational SCaN Service Portal, building on the experiences reported here.

  5. Innovative Methodologies for 21st Century Learning, Teaching and Assessment: A Convenience Sampling Investigation into the Use of Social Media Technologies in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivunja, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The advent of the Web as a social technology has created opportunities for the creation of informal learning environments, which have potential for innovative methodologies in learning, teaching and assessment. However, as Wolfe (2001) admonishes, "contrary to the rhetoric of cheerleaders, the Web places greater demands on students than…

  6. Recommendation of standardized health learning contents using archetypes and semantic web technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legaz-García, María del Carmen; Martínez-Costa, Catalina; Menárguez-Tortosa, Marcos; Fernández-Breis, Jesualdo Tomás

    2012-01-01

    Linking Electronic Healthcare Records (EHR) content to educational materials has been considered a key international recommendation to enable clinical engagement and to promote patient safety. This would suggest citizens to access reliable information available on the web and to guide them properly. In this paper, we describe an approach in that direction, based on the use of dual model EHR standards and standardized educational contents. The recommendation method will be based on the semantic coverage of the learning content repository for a particular archetype, which will be calculated by applying semantic web technologies like ontologies and semantic annotations.

  7. Usage and applications of Semantic Web techniques and technologies to support chemistry research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkum, Mark I; Frey, Jeremy G

    2014-01-01

    The drug discovery process is now highly dependent on the management, curation and integration of large amounts of potentially useful data. Semantics are necessary in order to interpret the information and derive knowledge. Advances in recent years have mitigated concerns that the lack of robust, usable tools has inhibited the adoption of methodologies based on semantics. THIS PAPER PRESENTS THREE EXAMPLES OF HOW SEMANTIC WEB TECHNIQUES AND TECHNOLOGIES CAN BE USED IN ORDER TO SUPPORT CHEMISTRY RESEARCH: a controlled vocabulary for quantities, units and symbols in physical chemistry; a controlled vocabulary for the classification and labelling of chemical substances and mixtures; and, a database of chemical identifiers. This paper also presents a Web-based service that uses the datasets in order to assist with the completion of risk assessment forms, along with a discussion of the legal implications and value-proposition for the use of such a service. We have introduced the Semantic Web concepts, technologies, and methodologies that can be used to support chemistry research, and have demonstrated the application of those techniques in three areas very relevant to modern chemistry research, generating three new datasets that we offer as exemplars of an extensible portfolio of advanced data integration facilities. We have thereby established the importance of Semantic Web techniques and technologies for meeting Wild's fourth "grand challenge".

  8. Guide on Project Web Access of SFR R and D and Technology Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Uk; Won, Byung Chool; Lee, Yong Bum; Kim, Young In; Hahn, Do Hee

    2008-09-01

    The SFR R and D and technology monitoring system based on the MS enterprise project management is developed for systematic effective management of 'Development of Basic Key Technologies for Gen IV SFR' project which was performed under the Mid- and Long-term Nuclear R and D Program sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology. This system is a tool for project management based on web access. Therefore this manual is a detailed guide for Project Web Access(PWA). Section 1 describes the common guide for using of system functions such as project server 2007 client connection setting, additional outlook function setting etc. The section 2 describes the guide for system administrator. It is described the guide for project management in section 3, 4

  9. Guide on Project Web Access of SFR R and D and Technology Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Uk; Won, Byung Chool; Lee, Yong Bum; Kim, Young In; Hahn, Do Hee

    2008-09-15

    The SFR R and D and technology monitoring system based on the MS enterprise project management is developed for systematic effective management of 'Development of Basic Key Technologies for Gen IV SFR' project which was performed under the Mid- and Long-term Nuclear R and D Program sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology. This system is a tool for project management based on web access. Therefore this manual is a detailed guide for Project Web Access(PWA). Section 1 describes the common guide for using of system functions such as project server 2007 client connection setting, additional outlook function setting etc. The section 2 describes the guide for system administrator. It is described the guide for project management in section 3, 4.

  10. A Model of Socially Connected Web Objects for IoT Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Ali

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Internet of Things (IoT is evolving with the connected objects at an unprecedented rate, bringing about enormous opportunities for the future IoT applications as well as challenges. One of the major challenges is to handle the complexity generated by the interconnection of billions of objects. However, Social Internet of Things (SIoT, emerging from the conglomeration of IoT and social networks, has realized an efficient way to facilitate the development of complex future IoT applications. Nevertheless, to fully utilize the benefits of SIoT, a platform that can provide efficient services using social relations among heterogeneous objects is highly required. The web objects enabled IoT environment promotes SIoT features by enabling virtualization using virtual objects and supporting the modularity with microservices. To realize SIoT services, this article proposes an architecture that provides a foundation for the development of lightweight microservices based on socially connected web objects. To efficiently discover web objects and reduce the complexity of service provisioning processes, a social relationship model is presented. To realize the interoperable service operations, a semantic ontology model has been developed. Finally, to evaluate the proposed design, a prototype has been implemented based on a use case scenario.

  11. Gestión del aprendizaje en Educación Superior y web social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Zapata Ros

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo tiene su origen en una propuesta de rasgos e indicadores de calidad, publicado en el trabajo “Evaluación de la calidad en entornos sociales de aprendizaje” (Zapata-Ros, 2011 sobre la integración de sistemas de gestión del aprendizaje y entornos de web social en la ES. Se plantea con él la validación de los indicadores y la necesidad de un marco de modelo pedagógico y de diseño instruccional. También ante la insuficiencia, en el contexto de generalización de la web social como medio singular de comunicación y de convivencia de estudiantes y profesores, de políticas instituciones que las integren.

  12. The communicative ecology of Web 2.0 @ work : Social networking in the workspace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davison, R.M.; Ou, C.X.J.; Martinsons, M.G.; Zhao, A.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Social media have transformed social interactions and now look set to transform workplace communications. In this exploratory study, we investigate how employees use and get value from a variety of social networking technologies. The context of this research is 4 software firms located in China.

  13. Programming Social Applications Building Viral Experiences with OpenSocial, OAuth, OpenID, and Distributed Web Frameworks

    CERN Document Server

    LeBlanc, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Social networking has made one thing clear: websites and applications need to provide users with experiences tailored to their preferences. This in-depth guide shows you how to build rich social frameworks, using open source technologies and specifications. You'll learn how to create third-party applications for existing sites, build engaging social graphs, and develop products to host your own socialized experience. Programming Social Apps focuses on the OpenSocial platform, along with Apache Shindig, OAuth, OpenID, and other tools, demonstrating how they work together to help you solve pra

  14. Defining a National Web Sphere over time from the Perspectives of Collection Technology and Scholarship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zierau, Eld; Brügger, Niels; Moesgaard, Jakob

    the framework aims at a definition that can be reused independent of changed behaviours on the net, changes in jurisdiction and changes in technology. A crucial point in this framework is that the perspectives of collection, technology and Scholarship are present in decision making. The framework origins from...... decisions. In this paper this definition is based on input from three important fields represented by each of the authors, representing the perspectives of scholarship, the Danish web Archive, and computer science. This represents the perspectives of collection, technology and scholarship, which are all...

  15. From legacy systems via client/server to web browser technology in hospital informatics in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpela, M

    1998-01-01

    The majority of hospital information system installations in Finland are based on a legacy technology from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). This paper presents an architecture and a tool set which provide a migration path from terminal-based to client/server technology, conserving much of the investments in existing applications. It is argued, though, that a new technological revolution is required in the form of extending the web browser/server technology to operational information systems in hospitals. A blueprint is presented for a further migration path from client/server to browser/server technology. The browser technology is regarded as a major challenge to hospital information systems in the next few years.

  16. Using Technology of .Net Web Services in the Area of Automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hnik

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with a technology for data exchange XML Web Services and its application to specific tasks. One of the applications created allows you to monitor and control the real thermal process through a number of client devices, independent of the operating system, the type or their location. The thermal process can be controlled, for example, by another process, a website or a mobile phone. The system is designed from its base and contains three main parts. The hardware part consists from a measuring card, actuators and temperature sensors. The core application is a server that is running the XML Web Service, Windows Service and SQL Server. Client software for mobile phones and web sites was also created.

  17. Technological change as a trade-off between social construction and technological paradigms

    OpenAIRE

    Engen, Ole Andreas; Olsen, Odd Einar

    2007-01-01

    Made available from Technology in Society, 29/4, Odd Einar Olsen, & Ole Andreas Engen, Technological change as a trade-off between social construction and technological paradigms, Pages No. 456-468, Copyright 2007, with permission from Elsevier. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/0160791X The theory of social construction of technology (SCOT) and the theory of technological paradigms (TTP) are normally regarded as competing or even incompatible perspectives on technological ch...

  18. Do you web 2.0? public libraries and social networking

    CERN Document Server

    Berube, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Web 2.0 technology is a hot topic at the moment, and public librarians in particular are beginning to feel the pressure to apply these tools. Indeed, Web 2.0 has the potential to transform library services, but only if the policy and strategy for those services are ready to be transformed. The author not only reviews these tools and provides practical advice and case studies on how they can be applied in the public library setting, but also recommends the policies and business cases that begin to create a new strategy for public libraries.particularly geared to the public library settingadvice

  19. Ajax, XSLT and SVG: Displaying ATLAS conditions data with new web technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Roe, S A

    2010-01-01

    The combination of three relatively recent technologies is described which allows an easy path from database retrieval to interactive web display. SQL queries on an Oracle database can be performed in a manner which directly return an XML description of the result, and Ajax techniques (Asynchronous JavaScript And XML) are used to dynamically inject the data into a web display accompanied by an XSLT transform template which determines how the data will be formatted. By tuning the transform to generate SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) a direct graphical representation can be produced in the web page while retaining the database data as the XML source, allowing dynamic links to be generated in the web representation, but programmatic use of the data when used from a user application. With the release of the SVG 1.2 Tiny draft specification, the display can also be tailored for display on mobile devices. The technologies are described and a sample application demonstrated, showing conditions data from the ATLAS Sem...

  20. Ajax, XSLT and SVG: Displaying ATLAS conditions data with new web technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roe, S A

    2010-01-01

    The combination of three relatively recent technologies is described which allows an easy path from database retrieval to interactive web display. SQL queries on an Oracle database can be performed in a manner which directly return an XML description of the result, and Ajax techniques (Asynchronous JavaScript And XML) are used to dynamically inject the data into a web display accompanied by an XSLT transform template which determines how the data will be formatted. By tuning the transform to generate SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) a direct graphical representation can be produced in the web page while retaining the database data as the XML source, allowing dynamic links to be generated in the web representation, but programmatic use of the data when used from a user application. With the release of the SVG 1.2 Tiny draft specification, the display can also be tailored for display on mobile devices. The technologies are described and a sample application demonstrated, showing conditions data from the ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker.

  1. Ajax, XSLT and SVG: Displaying ATLAS conditions data with new web technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, S. A.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2010-04-01

    The combination of three relatively recent technologies is described which allows an easy path from database retrieval to interactive web display. SQL queries on an Oracle database can be performed in a manner which directly return an XML description of the result, and Ajax techniques (Asynchronous JavaScript And XML) are used to dynamically inject the data into a web display accompanied by an XSLT transform template which determines how the data will be formatted. By tuning the transform to generate SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) a direct graphical representation can be produced in the web page while retaining the database data as the XML source, allowing dynamic links to be generated in the web representation, but programmatic use of the data when used from a user application. With the release of the SVG 1.2 Tiny draft specification, the display can also be tailored for display on mobile devices. The technologies are described and a sample application demonstrated, showing conditions data from the ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker.

  2. From XML to RDF: how semantic web technologies will change the design of 'omic' standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoshu; Gorlitsky, Robert; Almeida, Jonas S

    2005-09-01

    With the ongoing rapid increase in both volume and diversity of 'omic' data (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and others), the development and adoption of data standards is of paramount importance to realize the promise of systems biology. A recent trend in data standard development has been to use extensible markup language (XML) as the preferred mechanism to define data representations. But as illustrated here with a few examples from proteomics data, the syntactic and document-centric XML cannot achieve the level of interoperability required by the highly dynamic and integrated bioinformatics applications. In the present article, we discuss why semantic web technologies, as recommended by the World Wide Web consortium (W3C), expand current data standard technology for biological data representation and management.

  3. Defining a National Web Sphere over time from the Perspectives of Collection, Technology and Scholarship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zierau, Eld; Brügger, Niels; Moesgaard, Jakob

    This paper describes a framework supporting definition of how to automatically identify national webpages outside a country’s top level domain. The framework aims at a definition that can be put into operation in order to make automatic detection of national web pages. At the same time...... the framework aims at a definition that can be reused independent of changed behaviours on the net, changes in jurisdiction and changes in technology. A crucial point in this framework is that the perspectives of collection, technology and Scholarship are present in decision making. The framework origins from...... harvests from the Danish national web archive, Netarkivet. However in both cases a definition of national webpages was needed. Thus the creation of the framework was a prerequisite for the rest of this study. Motivation of the study and framework is based on the fact that human communication activities...

  4. Social shaping of technology in TA and HTA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Christian; Yoshinaka, Yutaka

    2004-01-01

    The paper discusses how the social shaping of technology (SST) approach may be useful in understanding the role played by technology assessment within the context of technological development and change. It is proposed that an SST perspective on TA (or HTA) yields particular insight, regardless...... of whether or not the TA activity bases itself on a social shaping understanding of technology. This is because SST addresses the socially negotiated character of technological development, where TA itself may be construed as an element influencing the process of such negotiation. At the same time, TA...... is a construction, that is, itself a product of negotiations involving social actors. Thus, an understanding that TA is socially shaped, and is involved in the shaping of technology, opens up for a perspective on TA as both entailing constraints and enablements within the context of the particular agenda...

  5. The social comfort of wearable technology and gestural interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Lucy E; Profita, Halley; Zeagler, Clint; Clawson, James; Gilliland, Scott; Do, Ellen Yi-Luen; Budd, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The "wearability" of wearable technology addresses the factors that affect the degree of comfort the wearer experiences while wearing a device, including physical, psychological, and social aspects. While the physical and psychological aspects of wearing technology have been investigated since early in the development of the field of wearable computing, the social aspects of wearability have been less fully-explored. As wearable technology becomes increasingly common on the commercial market, social wearability is becoming an ever-more-important variable contributing to the success or failure of new products. Here we present an analysis of social aspects of wearability within the context of the greater understanding of wearability in wearable technology, and focus on selected theoretical frameworks for understanding how wearable products are perceived and evaluated in a social context. Qualitative results from a study of social acceptability of on-body interactions are presented as a case study of social wearability.

  6. Examining social media usage: Technology clusters and social network site membership

    OpenAIRE

    Schrock, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The popularization of “social media” has raised questions of how and why young people use these various technologies in their daily lives. This exploratory study proposes a classification system based on Rogers’ concept of technology clusters, which posits that likelihood of adoption is based around similar perceived characteristics of a technology or medium. Results from a survey administered to 401 undergraduates at a large southern university indicated that social and non-social technology...

  7. Lessons Learned: The Effect of Prior Technology Use On Web-Based Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    CAREY, JOANNE C.; WADE, SHARI L.; WOLFE, CHRISTOPHER R.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the role of regular prior technology use in treatment response to an online family problem-solving (OFPS) intervention and an Internet resource intervention (IRI) for pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants were 150 individuals in 40 families of children with TBI randomly assigned to OFPS intervention or an IRI. All families received free computers and Internet access to TBI resources. OFPS families received Web-based sessions and therapist-guided synchronous ...

  8. Investigation and application of recent web-based technologies to the teaching of electrical engineering courses

    OpenAIRE

    Low, Koon Huat

    2000-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis is part of an effort by the Department of Electrical and Computer (ECE) Engineering to implement distributed learning to better serve its students. Distributed learning is especially useful for a modem technologically- oriented military, which is geographically distributed. The goal of this thesis is to develop a prototype web-based course, specifically, EC2820 - Digital Logic Design. A primary sub-goal is to quantify time ...

  9. Adoption of Internet and Web Technology for Hotel Marketing: A Study of Hotels in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Suree Khemthong; Linda M. Roberts

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of three groups of characteristics: organisational, technological, and environmental on the adoption of Internet and Web based marketing activities (IWMA) in the hotel industry by using data collected from a sample of 152 hotels in Thailand. The adoption of IWMA has been categorised into two levels: 1) non-early adopter hotels, and 2) early adopter hotels. The results indicate that Thai hotels that adopted IWMA at the early adopter stage were larger in size, and...

  10. Analysis on Transport of Food Logistics Based on Web and GIS Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Xu

    2015-01-01

    The transport of food logistics has higher requirements on the design and selection, path customer’s geographical information positioning, etc. The application of network and GIS technology in the field of logistics transportation of food will enhance the efficiency of delivering food logistics, which can lower the cost of the transportation logistic of food at the same time. This study is based on Web and GIS, taking them as the key point, through the analysis of the effect of network and GI...

  11. [The contribution of Web 2.0 technologies to the empowerment of active patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver-Mora, Martí; Iñiguez-Rueda, Lupicinio

    2017-03-01

    The Spanish health system has recently been marked by the emergence of more active patients who are characterized as being better informed about their disease, having a more participatory attitude, wanting to have a greater influence in making decisions about their health and asserting their rights as patients. Therefore, this article aims to report on how the introduction of Web 2.0 technologies can contribute to the empowering of more active patients. To achieve this, 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients and representatives of patient associations who have used Web 2.0 technologies to interact with other patients or to communicate with health professionals. From the results obtained, we highlight the fact that Web 2.0 technologies provide greater access to health-related information, improve communication between patients and health professionals, and enable the creation of new spaces of interaction among patients. All of the facts above contribute to the formation of a more active role on the part of patients.

  12. Problems of teaching students to use the featured technologies in the area of semantic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, V. V.; Chernyshov, A. A.; Balandina, A. I.; Kostkina, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    The following paper contains the description of up-to-date technologies in the area of web-services development, service-oriented architecture and the Semantic Web. The paper contains the analysis of the most popular and widespread technologies and methods in the semantic web area which are used in the developed educational course. In the paper, we also describe the problem of teaching students to use these technologies and specify conditions for the creation of the learning and development course. We also describe the main exercise for personal work and skills, which all the students learning this course have to gain. Moreover, in the paper we specify the problem with software which students are going to use while learning this course. In order to solve this problem, we introduce the developing system which will be used to support the laboratory works. For this moment this system supports only the fourth work execution, but our following plans contain the expansion of the system in order to support the leftover works.

  13. The World Wide Web and Technology Transfer at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Bianco, David J.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) began using the World Wide Web (WWW) in the summer of 1993, becoming the first NASA installation to provide a Center-wide home page. This coincided with a reorganization of LaRC to provide a more concentrated focus on technology transfer to both aerospace and non-aerospace industry. Use of the WWW and NCSA Mosaic not only provides automated information dissemination, but also allows for the implementation, evolution and integration of many technology transfer applications. This paper describes several of these innovative applications, including the on-line presentation of the entire Technology Opportunities Showcase (TOPS), an industrial partnering showcase that exists on the Web long after the actual 3-day event ended. During its first year on the Web, LaRC also developed several WWW-based information repositories. The Langley Technical Report Server (LTRS), a technical paper delivery system with integrated searching and retrieval, has proved to be quite popular. The NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS), an outgrowth of LTRS, provides uniform access to many logically similar, yet physically distributed NASA report servers. WWW is also the foundation of the Langley Software Server (LSS), an experimental software distribution system which will distribute LaRC-developed software with the possible phase-out of NASA's COSMIC program. In addition to the more formal technology distribution projects, WWW has been successful in connecting people with technologies and people with other people. With the completion of the LaRC reorganization, the Technology Applications Group, charged with interfacing with non-aerospace companies, opened for business with a popular home page.

  14. E-Learning 3.0 = E-Learning 2.0 + Web 3.0?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Fehmida

    2012-01-01

    Web 3.0, termed as the semantic web or the web of data is the transformed version of Web 2.0 with technologies and functionalities such as intelligent collaborative filtering, cloud computing, big data, linked data, openness, interoperability and smart mobility. If Web 2.0 is about social networking and mass collaboration between the creator and…

  15. Innovative technologies and social inequalities in health: A scoping review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Daniel; Rydland, Håvard T; Øversveen, Emil; Jensen, Magnus Rom; Solhaug, Solvor; Krokstad, Steinar

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the range, nature, and extent of current research activity exploring the influence of innovative health-related technologies on social inequalities in health, with specific focus on a deeper understanding of the variables used to measure this connection and the pathways leading to the (re)production of inequalities. A review process was conducted, based on scoping review techniques, searching literature published from January 1, 1996 to November 25, 2016 using MEDLINE, Scopus, and ISI web of science. Search, sorting, and data extraction processes were conducted by a team of researchers and experts using a dynamic, reflexive examination process. Of 4139 studies collected from the search process, a total of 33 were included in the final analysis. Results of this study include the classification of technologies based on how these technologies are accessed and used by end users. In addition to the factors and mechanisms that influence unequal access to technologies, the results of this study highlight the importance of variations in use that importantly shape social inequalities in health. Additionally, focus on health care services technologies must be accompanied by investigating emerging technologies influencing healthy lifestyle, genomics, and personalized devices in health. Findings also suggest that choosing one measure of social position over another has important implications for the interpretation of research results. Furthermore, understanding the pathways through which various innovative health technologies reduce or (re)produce social inequalities in health is context dependent. In order to better understand social inequalities in health, these contextual variations draw attention to the need for critical distinctions between technologies based on how these various technologies are accessed and used. The results of this study provide a comprehensive starting point for future research to further investigate

  16. CRITERIA OF OPEN WEB-OPERATED TECHNOLOGIES OF TEACHING THE FUNDAMENTALS OF PROGRAMS OF FUTURE TEACHERS OF INFORMATICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg M. Spirin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the criteria for the selection of open web-oriented technologies for the study of the basics of programming of future teachers of computer science. An analysis of available open-source web-based learning technologies for the basics of programming for future IT teachers has allowed them to be divided into: compilers automated programming task control systems, and intelligent maps. Each of them has defined criteria and relevant indicators: for designing and functional criteria for web-oriented compilers and smart cards, designing, informational and communication criteria are allocated for web-oriented automated programming verification tasks. The comparative tables for separate web-oriented technologies for the study of the basics of programming of future teachers of informatics based on certain criteria and indicators are given.

  17. DECENTRALIZED SOCIAL NETWORK SERVICE USING THE WEB HOSTING SERVER FOR PRIVACY PRESERVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonho Nam

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the number of subscribers of the social network services such as Facebook and Twitter has increased rapidly. In accordance with the increasing popularity of social network services, concerns about user privacy are also growing. Existing social network services have a centralized structure that a service provider collects all the user’s profile and logs until the end of the connection. The information collected typically useful for commercial purposes, but may lead to a serious user privacy violation. The user’s profile can be compromised for malicious purposes, and even may be a tool of surveillance extremely. In this paper, we remove a centralized structure to prevent the service provider from collecting all users’ information indiscriminately, and present a decentralized structure using the web hosting server. The service provider provides only the service applications to web hosting companies, and the user should select a web hosting company that he trusts. Thus, the user’s information is distributed, and the user’s privacy is guaranteed from the service provider.

  18. Internet and Surveillance The Challenges of Web 2.0 and Social Media

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Christian; Albrechtslund, Anders; Sandoval, Marisol

    2012-01-01

    The Internet has been transformed in the past years from a system primarily oriented on information provision into a medium for communication and community-building. The notion of "Web 2.0", social software, and social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter and MySpace have emerged in this context. With such platforms comes the massive provision and storage of personal data that are systematically evaluated, marketed, and used for targeting users with advertising. In a world of global economic competition, economic crisis, and fear of terrorism after 9/11, both corporations and state insti

  19. People in a Technology Driven Future: On the Social Relations of New Information Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.

    This keynote address examines the social relations of information technology in the future. Examples of the recent history of technology related to transportation, printing, and nuclear energy are presented. Some troubling examples of the social relations of new information technologies that are emerging on a global scale are then discussed,…

  20. The Social Construction of Technological Systems: New Directions in the Sociology and History of Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijker, W.E.; Hughes, Thomas P.; Pinch, Trevor J.

    2012-01-01

    This pioneering book, first published in 1987, launched the new field of social studies of technology. It introduced a method of inquiry--social construction of technology, or SCOT--that became a key part of the wider discipline of science and technology studies. The book helped the MIT Press shape

  1. Science Fiction in Social Education: Exploring Consequences of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lance E.

    2013-01-01

    An NCSS Technology Position Statement and Guidelines, published in 2006 (an updated version is published in this issue of "Social Education"), affirms that social studies students should critically examine relations between technology and society. This article describes how teachers can use science fiction to introduce critical questions…

  2. Beyond individual-centric privacy : Information technology in social systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, W.

    2017-01-01

    In the public debate, social implications of information technology are mainly seen through the privacy lens. Impact assessments of information technology are also often limited to privacy impact assessments, which are focused on individual rights and well-being, as opposed to the social

  3. Technology and Disciplined Inquiry in the Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Mark J.; Swan, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    More than 15 years ago, Martorella (1997) asked what has now become a seminal question in the field of social studies and technology; that is, "Which way to the sleeping giant?" (p. 511). He suggested a number of roles that technology can play in the social studies classroom. Although these roles are certainly relevant in 2014, the roles…

  4. Social Technologies for Online Learning: Theoretical and Contextual Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kear, Karen; Jones, Allan; Holden, Georgina; Curcher, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Three exemplars are presented of social technologies deployed in educational contexts: wikis; a photo-sharing environment; and a social bookmarking tool. Students were found to engage with the technologies selectively, sometimes rejecting them, in the light of their prior conceptions of education. Some students (a minority in all the studies) were…

  5. Technology in Social Work Education: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wretman, Christopher J.; Macy, Rebecca J.

    2016-01-01

    Given the growing prevalence of technology-based instruction, social work faculty need a clear understanding of the strengths and limitations of these methods. We systematically examined the evidence for technology-based instruction in social work education. Using comprehensive and rigorous methods, 38 articles were included in the review. Of…

  6. Technologies for Social Inclusion and Public Policies in Latin America

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Latin American governments, academics and nongovernmental organizations are paying increasing attention to poverty, inequality and social inclusion, and the role that technological change plays in these phenomenon. Rather than solving specific deficits, they are interested in how social technologies can generate ...

  7. Models of Change, Organizational Redesign, and the Adoption of Web Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørn Flohr

    2006-01-01

    change processes. This chapter attempts to close this gap by illustrating how recent developments in change theory may be useful in understanding the actual adoption and implementation of emergent Internet technologies. Empirically, the paper draws on two surveys of Internet-technology adoption by Nordic...... actual processes and outcomes, including how organizational change emerges and develop in adapting to Internet technology based on characteristics of organizations at different stages of Internet adoption. They may also help to explain the apparently small impact of participation. In a practical......Theories of organizational design provide limited guidance in the ongoing adjustment to web technologies. There is also a gap between the rather sophisticated theories of change that analyze how and why change occurs and the practice-oriented focus of the implementation and guidance of actual...

  8. The Perception of Web 2.0 Technologies on Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelick, Stacia A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine faculty members' perception of Web 2.0 technologies on teaching and learning in higher education compared to traditional classroom teaching methods in programs at a higher education institutions to establish if relationships prevailed in their delivery of courses through the use of Web 2.0 technologies…

  9. Education and Technology in the 21st Century Experiences of Adult Online Learners Using Web 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Wanda L.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of a knowledge-based and technology-driven economy has prompted adults to seek additional knowledge and skills that will enable them to participate effectively in society. The rapid growth and popularity of the internet tools such as Web 2.0 tools have revolutionized adult learning. Through the rich support of Web 2.0 tools, adult…

  10. Interpreting User's Choice of Technologies: A Quantitative Research on Choosing the Best Web-Based Communication Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebiaye, Richmond

    2010-01-01

    The proliferation of web-based communication tools like email clients vis-a-vis Yahoo mail, Gmail, and Hotmail have led to new innovations in web-based communication. Email users benefit greatly from this technology, but lack of security of these tools can put users at risk of loss of privacy, including identity theft, corporate espionage, and…

  11. Does social desirability compromise self-reports of physical activity in web-based research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göritz Anja S

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study investigated the relation between social desirability and self-reported physical activity in web-based research. Findings A longitudinal study (N = 5,495, 54% women was conducted on a representative sample of the Dutch population using the Marlowe-Crowne Scale as social desirability measure and the short form of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Social desirability was not associated with self-reported physical activity (in MET-minutes/week, nor with its sub-behaviors (i.e., walking, moderate-intensity activity, vigorous-intensity activity, and sedentary behavior. Socio-demographics (i.e., age, sex, income, and education did not moderate the effect of social desirability on self-reported physical activity and its sub-behaviors. Conclusions This study does not throw doubt on the usefulness of the Internet as a medium to collect self-reports on physical activity.

  12. Use of Web 2.0 Social Media Platforms to Promote Community-Engaged Research Dialogs: A Preliminary Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez Soto, Miguel; Balls-Berry, Joyce E; Bishop, Shawn G; Aase, Lee A; Timimi, Farris K; Montori, Victor M; Patten, Christi A

    2016-09-09

    Community-engaged research is defined by the Institute of Medicine as the process of working collaboratively with groups of people affiliated by geographic proximity, special interests, or similar situations with respect to issues affecting their well-being. Traditional face-to-face community-engaged research is limited by geographic location, limited in resources, and/or uses one-way communications. Web 2.0 technologies including social media are novel communication channels for community-engaged research because these tools can reach a broader audience while promoting bidirectional dialogs. This paper reports on a preliminary program evaluation of the use of social media platforms for promoting engagement of researchers and community representatives in dialogs about community-engaged research. For this pilot program evaluation, the Clinical and Translational Science Office for Community Engagement in Research partnered with the Social Media Network at our institution to create a WordPress blog and Twitter account. Both social media platforms were facilitated by a social media manager. We used descriptive analytics for measuring engagement with WordPress and Twitter over an 18-month implementation period during 2014-2016. For the blog, we examined type of user (researcher, community representative, other) and used content analysis to generate the major themes from blog postings. For use of Twitter, we examined selected demographics and impressions among followers. There were 76 blog postings observed from researchers (48/76, 64%), community representatives (23/76, 32%) and funders (5/76, 8%). The predominant themes of the blog content were research awareness and dissemination of community-engaged research (35/76, 46%) and best practices (23/76, 30%). For Twitter, we obtained 411 followers at the end of the 18-month evaluation period, with an increase of 42% (from 280 to 411) over the final 6 months. Followers reported varied geographic location (321/411, 78

  13. Use of Web 2.0 Social Media Platforms to Promote Community-Engaged Research Dialogs: A Preliminary Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez Soto, Miguel; Bishop, Shawn G; Aase, Lee A; Timimi, Farris K; Montori, Victor M; Patten, Christi A

    2016-01-01

    Background Community-engaged research is defined by the Institute of Medicine as the process of working collaboratively with groups of people affiliated by geographic proximity, special interests, or similar situations with respect to issues affecting their well-being. Traditional face-to-face community-engaged research is limited by geographic location, limited in resources, and/or uses one-way communications. Web 2.0 technologies including social media are novel communication channels for community-engaged research because these tools can reach a broader audience while promoting bidirectional dialogs. Objective This paper reports on a preliminary program evaluation of the use of social media platforms for promoting engagement of researchers and community representatives in dialogs about community-engaged research. Methods For this pilot program evaluation, the Clinical and Translational Science Office for Community Engagement in Research partnered with the Social Media Network at our institution to create a WordPress blog and Twitter account. Both social media platforms were facilitated by a social media manager. We used descriptive analytics for measuring engagement with WordPress and Twitter over an 18-month implementation period during 2014-2016. For the blog, we examined type of user (researcher, community representative, other) and used content analysis to generate the major themes from blog postings. For use of Twitter, we examined selected demographics and impressions among followers. Results There were 76 blog postings observed from researchers (48/76, 64%), community representatives (23/76, 32%) and funders (5/76, 8%). The predominant themes of the blog content were research awareness and dissemination of community-engaged research (35/76, 46%) and best practices (23/76, 30%). For Twitter, we obtained 411 followers at the end of the 18-month evaluation period, with an increase of 42% (from 280 to 411) over the final 6 months. Followers reported varied

  14. Construction of an ortholog database using the semantic web technology for integrative analysis of genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Hirokazu; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, various types of biological data, including genomic sequences, have been rapidly accumulating. To discover biological knowledge from such growing heterogeneous data, a flexible framework for data integration is necessary. Ortholog information is a central resource for interlinking corresponding genes among different organisms, and the Semantic Web provides a key technology for the flexible integration of heterogeneous data. We have constructed an ortholog database using the Semantic Web technology, aiming at the integration of numerous genomic data and various types of biological information. To formalize the structure of the ortholog information in the Semantic Web, we have constructed the Ortholog Ontology (OrthO). While the OrthO is a compact ontology for general use, it is designed to be extended to the description of database-specific concepts. On the basis of OrthO, we described the ortholog information from our Microbial Genome Database for Comparative Analysis (MBGD) in the form of Resource Description Framework (RDF) and made it available through the SPARQL endpoint, which accepts arbitrary queries specified by users. In this framework based on the OrthO, the biological data of different organisms can be integrated using the ortholog information as a hub. Besides, the ortholog information from different data sources can be compared with each other using the OrthO as a shared ontology. Here we show some examples demonstrating that the ortholog information described in RDF can be used to link various biological data such as taxonomy information and Gene Ontology. Thus, the ortholog database using the Semantic Web technology can contribute to biological knowledge discovery through integrative data analysis.

  15. Finding Citations to Social Work Literature: The Relative Benefits of Using "Web of Science," "Scopus," or "Google Scholar"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Elaine M. Lasda

    2012-01-01

    Past studies of citation coverage of "Web of Science," "Scopus," and "Google Scholar" do not demonstrate a consistent pattern that can be applied to the interdisciplinary mix of resources used in social work research. To determine the utility of these tools to social work researchers, an analysis of citing references to well-known social work…

  16. An Exploratory Study of Indian University Students' Use of Social Networking Web Sites: Implications for the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Shailja; Mital, Monika

    2009-01-01

    Social networking Web sites (SNWs) are online tools that have transformed the virtual encounters of the past that were technical and impersonal to today's virtual socialization that is truly nontechnical, social, and interpersonal. This article presents an exploratory study of Indian University students' use of SNWs. The results indicated that…

  17. Awareness and use of Web 2.0 technologies in sharing of agricultural knowledge in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulystan P. Mtega

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigated the extent to which agricultural researchers and extension workers were aware of Web 2.0 technologies and put them into practice in their daily work. The study involved 107 respondents in the first phase and 148 in the second phase. Respondents were from agricultural research and training institutions as well as agricultural extension departments from selected districts across the country. Structured questionnaires were administered to selected respondents. Findings show that 43.9% of the respondents were aware of Web 2.0 while 56.1% knew nothing about this concept. Facebook and Wikipedia were found to be the most used Web 2.0 tools by many respondents while Delicious, Pbworks, Picasa and Digg were identified as among the less commonly used tools by majority of the respondents. The study recommends the need for providing appropriate Web 2.0 training packages to agricultural extension workers, researchers, trainers and other stakeholders in order to enhance knowledge sharing among them for improved agricultural productivity in the country.

  18. Optimizing the Information Presentation on Mining Potential by using Web Services Technology with Restful Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdillah, T.; Dai, R.; Setiawan, E.

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to develop the application of Web Services technology with RestFul Protocol to optimize the information presentation on mining potential. This study used User Interface Design approach for the information accuracy and relevance as well as the Web Service for the reliability in presenting the information. The results show that: the information accuracy and relevance regarding mining potential can be seen from the achievement of User Interface implementation in the application that is based on the following rules: The consideration of the appropriate colours and objects, the easiness of using the navigation, and users’ interaction with the applications that employs symbols and languages understood by the users; the information accuracy and relevance related to mining potential can be observed by the information presented by using charts and Tool Tip Text to help the users understand the provided chart/figure; the reliability of the information presentation is evident by the results of Web Services testing in Figure 4.5.6. This study finds out that User Interface Design and Web Services approaches (for the access of different Platform apps) are able to optimize the presentation. The results of this study can be used as a reference for software developers and Provincial Government of Gorontalo.

  19. Social Media and New Technology: A Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Marjorie; Strasburger, Victor C

    2018-04-01

    Social media and new media are becoming increasingly important in the lives of preteens and teens. This article reviews what is currently known about positive and negative effects of social media, social networking, and internet use and what safety measures should be considered.

  20. Organizational Application of Social Networking Information Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppert, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this qualitative research study using the Delphi method is to provide a framework for leaders to develop their own social networks. By exploring concerns in four areas, leaders may be able to better plan, implement, and manage social networking systems in organizations. The areas addressed are: (a) social networking using…

  1. SOCIOLOGY OF INNOVATION: SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF TECHNOLOGY PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SARA YOUSEFIKHAH

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This theoretical paper describes the effect of social action on technological artifacts and explores how innovation may flourish or be diminished in society. Using the Social Construction of Technology (SCOT perspective, three main elements namely, flexibility of interpretation, relevant social groups and technological frame are described and their impact on innovation is discussed. The paper proposes that in developing societies, flexibility is hardly pressed by technological frames and concrete social norms do not allow the alternative designs and the useage of artifacts. This paper proposes that innovation might flourish in a society if technological frame change, and entrepreneurship become technological frames that can change the fixed meaning of artifacts and create a path for alternative designs and interpretations.

  2. Paradigm Shift or Annoying Distraction: Emerging Implications of Web 2.0 for Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Spallek, H.; O’Donnell, J.; Clayton, M.; Anderson, P.; Krueger, A.

    2010-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies, known as social media, social technologies or Web 2.0, have emerged into the mainstream. As they grow, these new technologies have the opportunity to influence the methods and procedures of many fields. This paper focuses on the clinical implications of the growing Web 2.0 technologies. Five developing trends are explored: information channels, augmented reality, location-based mobile social computing, virtual worlds and serious gaming, and collaborative research network...

  3. A Dataset of Factors That Influence Preservice Teachers' Intentions to Use Web 2.0 Technologies in Future Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusop, Farrah Dina

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have focused on investigating factors that influence preservice teachers' utilization of Web 2.0 technologies in their classrooms. Findings indicate that preservice teachers' intentions, beliefs and attitudes toward technology are important determinants of the success of future technology integration. However, studies…

  4. A case study of data integration for aquatic resources using semantic web technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Janice M.; Chkhenkeli, Nina; Govoni, David L.; Lightsom, Frances L.; Ostroff, Andrea C.; Schweitzer, Peter N.; Thongsavanh, Phethala; Varanka, Dalia E.; Zednik, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Use cases, information modeling, and linked data techniques are Semantic Web technologies used to develop a prototype system that integrates scientific observations from four independent USGS and cooperator data systems. The techniques were tested with a use case goal of creating a data set for use in exploring potential relationships among freshwater fish populations and environmental factors. The resulting prototype extracts data from the BioData Retrieval System, the Multistate Aquatic Resource Information System, the National Geochemical Survey, and the National Hydrography Dataset. A prototype user interface allows a scientist to select observations from these data systems and combine them into a single data set in RDF format that includes explicitly defined relationships and data definitions. The project was funded by the USGS Community for Data Integration and undertaken by the Community for Data Integration Semantic Web Working Group in order to demonstrate use of Semantic Web technologies by scientists. This allows scientists to simultaneously explore data that are available in multiple, disparate systems beyond those they traditionally have used.

  5. Use of Social Media for Professional Development by Health Care Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Web-Based Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Alsobayel, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Background Social media can be used in health care settings to enhance professional networking and education; patient communication, care, and education; public health programs; organizational promotion; and research. Objective The aim of this study was to explore the use of social media networks for the purpose of professional development among health care professionals in Saudi Arabia using a purpose-designed Web-based survey. Methods A cross-sectional web-based survey was undertaken. A lin...

  6. Semantics empowered web 3.0 managing enterprise, social, sensor, and cloud-based data and services for advanced applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sheth, Amit

    2012-01-01

    After the traditional document-centric Web 1.0 and user-generated content focused Web 2.0, Web 3.0 has become a repository of an ever growing variety of Web resources that include data and services associated with enterprises, social networks, sensors, cloud, as well as mobile and other devices that constitute the Internet of Things. These pose unprecedented challenges in terms of heterogeneity (variety), scale (volume), and continuous changes (velocity), as well as present corresponding opportunities if they can be exploited. Just as semantics has played a critical role in dealing with data h

  7. System of Interactions of Social Actors in Public Communication of Science and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Graciela Miquilena

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a research aimed at explaining the system of interactions of social actors in Public Communication of Science and Technology (PCST, in the context of a social web defined by the novel systems of communication sustained on informational and communication technologies. The study’s theoretical framework highlights the strategic importance of a Public Communication  which focuses on promoting public appropriation of Science and Technology, going beyond the role of Journalism and Science Communication that informs a qualified public, to one that stablishes a bond with policies and decision making in the area, made with participation of international agencies, governments, producers of science and technology, journalists’ associations, educational institutions, and citizens. The research relies on Explicative Methodology. A revision of pertinent bibliography leads to the conclusion that the system of social interactions mediated by personal, interpersonal and grupal global communications, define the relationships in the communicational exchange of the social actor with regard to public communication of science and technology and policies aimed at its appropriation.

  8. Research on the Extraction Technology of Hot-words in Tibetan WebPages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chang-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction of Tibetan corpus is the field of Tibetan information processing of basic work. This paper uses the technology of web crawler and pretreatment and real-time acquisition of web sites to obtain a large number of Tibetan corpus in short time. The hot words reflected the hotspot of Tibetan people’s attention in a certain period of time. The paper draws lessons from the TFIDF for Tibetan text information extraction and the words of different locations are given different weights to extract the hot words. It is really effective to realize the construction of the raw Tibetan corpus and the extraction of the hot-words by self-made software.

  9. Exploiting Semantic Web Technologies to Develop OWL-Based Clinical Practice Guideline Execution Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarpour, Borna; Abidi, Samina Raza; Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    2016-01-01

    Computerizing paper-based CPG and then executing them can provide evidence-informed decision support to physicians at the point of care. Semantic web technologies especially web ontology language (OWL) ontologies have been profusely used to represent computerized CPG. Using semantic web reasoning capabilities to execute OWL-based computerized CPG unties them from a specific custom-built CPG execution engine and increases their shareability as any OWL reasoner and triple store can be utilized for CPG execution. However, existing semantic web reasoning-based CPG execution engines suffer from lack of ability to execute CPG with high levels of expressivity, high cognitive load of computerization of paper-based CPG and updating their computerized versions. In order to address these limitations, we have developed three CPG execution engines based on OWL 1 DL, OWL 2 DL and OWL 2 DL + semantic web rule language (SWRL). OWL 1 DL serves as the base execution engine capable of executing a wide range of CPG constructs, however for executing highly complex CPG the OWL 2 DL and OWL 2 DL + SWRL offer additional executional capabilities. We evaluated the technical performance and medical correctness of our execution engines using a range of CPG. Technical evaluations show the efficiency of our CPG execution engines in terms of CPU time and validity of the generated recommendation in comparison to existing CPG execution engines. Medical evaluations by domain experts show the validity of the CPG-mediated therapy plans in terms of relevance, safety, and ordering for a wide range of patient scenarios.

  10. The SURA Coastal Ocean Observing and Prediction (SCOOP) Program: Adapting Web 2.0 technologies to power next generation science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogden, P.; Partners, S.

    2008-12-01

    The Web 2.0 has helped globalize the economy and change social interactions, but the full impact on coastal sciences has yet to be realized. The SCOOP program (www.OpenIOOS.org/about/sura.html), an initiative of the Coastal Research Committee of the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA), has been using Web 2.0 technologies to create infrastructure for a multi-disciplinary Distributed Coastal Laboratory (DCL). In the spirit of the Web 2.0, SCOOP strives to provide an open-access virtual facility where "virtual visiting" scientists can log in, perform experiments (e.g., evaluate new wetting/drying algorithms in several different inundation models), potentially contribute to the assembly of resources (e.g., leave their algorithms for others), and then move on. The SCOOP prototype has focused on storm surge and waves (the initial science focus), and integrates a real-time data network to evaluate the predictions. The multi-purpose SCOOP components support a sensor-web initiative (www.OOSTethys.org) that is co-led by SURA. SCOOP also includes portals with real-time visualization, workflow configuration and decision-tool prototypes (www.OpenIOOS.org), powered by distributed computing resources from multiple universities across the nation (www.sura.org/SURAgrid). Based on our experience, we propose three key ingredients for initiatives to have the biggest impact on coastal science: (1) standards, (2) working prototypes and (3) communities of interest. We strongly endorse the Open Geospatial Consortium - a geospatial analog of the World Wide Web consortium - and other international consensus-standards bodies that engage government, private sector and academic involvement. But these standards are often highly complex, which can be an impediment to their use. We have overcome such hurdles with the second key ingredient: a focused working prototype. The prototype should include guides and resources that make it easy for others to apply, test, and revise the

  11. PRACTICE-ORIENTED TRAINING BASED ON DISTANCE LEARNING WEB-TECHNOLOGIES (THE EXAMPLE OF WEB-PLATFORM FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP EDUCATION IN UNIVERSITY OF NIZHNY NOVGOROD, IGENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga R. Chepyuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the possibility of organizing a practice-based learning using modern web-based technologies of distance learning like cMOOC. The authors share their experience of practical implementation of proprietary technology in the organization of a University course of innovative entrepreneurship. Based on their practice results authors propose the concept of a new generation of educational platforms based on the four vectors of development. 

  12. Science, Technology and Social Change Course's Effects on Technological Literacy Levels of Social Studies Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, E. Ozlem

    2013-01-01

    Social studies curricula are required in order to prepare to educate children who continue to learn after their formal training, and it is vital that teachers receive an education properly. In Social Studies Education Departments of Education Faculties Science, Technology and Social Change course is convenient to this aim and it contributes to…

  13. Modeling Temporal Variation in Social Network: An Evolutionary Web Graph Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Susanta; Bagchi, Aditya

    A social network is a social structure between actors (individuals, organization or other social entities) and indicates the ways in which they are connected through various social relationships like friendships, kinships, professional, academic etc. Usually, a social network represents a social community, like a club and its members or a city and its citizens etc. or a research group communicating over Internet. In seventies Leinhardt [1] first proposed the idea of representing a social community by a digraph. Later, this idea became popular among other research workers like, network designers, web-service application developers and e-learning modelers. It gave rise to a rapid proliferation of research work in the area of social network analysis. Some of the notable structural properties of a social network are connectedness between actors, reachability between a source and a target actor, reciprocity or pair-wise connection between actors with bi-directional links, centrality of actors or the important actors having high degree or more connections and finally the division of actors into sub-structures or cliques or strongly-connected components. The cycles present in a social network may even be nested [2, 3]. The formal definition of these structural properties will be provided in Sect. 8.2.1. The division of actors into cliques or sub-groups can be a very important factor for understanding a social structure, particularly the degree of cohesiveness in a community. The number, size, and connections among the sub-groups in a network are useful in understanding how the network, as a whole, is likely to behave.

  14. A methodology for incorporating web technologies into a computer-based patient record, with contributions from cognitive science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Charles

    2002-12-18

    Cognitive science is a rich source of insight for creative use of new Web technologies by medical informatics workers. I outline a project to Web-enable an existing computer-based patient record (CPR) in the context of ideas from philosophy, linguistics, artificial intelligence, and cognitive psychology. Web prototypes play an important role (a) because Web technology lends itself to rapid prototype development, and (b) because prototypes help team members bridge among disparate medical, computing, and business ontologies. Six Web-enabled CPR prototypes were created and ranked. User scenarios were generated using a user communication matrix. Resulting prototypes were compared according to the degree to which they satisfied medical, computing, and business constraints. In a different organization, or at different time, candidate prototypes and their ranking might have been different. However, prototype generation and comparison are fundamentally influenced by factors usefully understood in a cognitive science framework.

  15. Social network analysis for startups finding connections on the social web

    CERN Document Server

    Tsvetovat, Maksim

    2011-01-01

    Does your startup rely on social network analysis? This concise guide provides a statistical framework to help you identify social processes hidden among the tons of data now available. Social network analysis (SNA) is a discipline that predates Facebook and Twitter by 30 years. Through expert SNA researchers, you''ll learn concepts and techniques for recognizing patterns in social media, political groups, companies, cultural trends, and interpersonal networks. You''ll also learn how to use Python and other open source tools-such as NetworkX, NumPy, and Matplotlib-to gather, analyze, and vis

  16. An Algebraic Specification of the Semantic Web

    OpenAIRE

    Ksystra, Katerina; Triantafyllou, Nikolaos; Stefaneas, Petros; Frangos, Panayiotis

    2011-01-01

    We present a formal specification of the Semantic Web, as an extension of the World Wide Web using the well known algebraic specification language CafeOBJ. Our approach allows the description of the key elements of the Semantic Web technologies, in order to give a better understanding of the system, without getting involved with their implementation details that might not yet be standardized. This specification is part of our work in progress concerning the modeling the Social Semantic Web.

  17. Distributed nuclear medicine applications using World Wide Web and Java technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, P.; Hoell, K.; Koriska, K.; Mirzaei, S.; Koehn, H.

    2000-01-01

    At present, medical applications applying World Wide Web (WWW) technology are mainly used to view static images and to retrieve some information. The Java platform is a relative new way of computing, especially designed for network computing and distributed applications which enables interactive connection between user and information via the WWW. The Java 2 Software Development Kit (SDK) including Java2D API, Java Remote Method Invocation (RMI) technology, Object Serialization and the Java Advanced Imaging (JAI) extension was used to achieve a robust, platform independent and network centric solution. Medical image processing software based on this technology is presented and adequate performance capability of Java is demonstrated by an iterative reconstruction algorithm for single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). (orig.)

  18. Web-based lecture technologies: blurring the boundaries between face-to-face and distance learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Woo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Web-based lecture technologies (WBLT have gained popularity amongst universities in Australia as a tool for delivering lecture recordings to students in close to real time. This paper reports on a selection of results from a larger research project investigating the impact of WBLT on teaching and learning. Results show that while staff see the advantages for external students, they question the extent to which these advantages apply to internal students. In contrast both cohorts of students were positive about the benefits of the technologies for their learning and they adopted similar strategies for their use. With the help of other technologies, some external students and staff even found WBLT useful for fostering communication between internal and external students. As such, while the traditional boundary between internal and external students seems to remain for some staff, students seem to find the boundary much less clear.

  19. Evaluating a Web-Based Social Anxiety Intervention Among University Students: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Hugh Cameron; Richardson, Chris G; Helgadottir, Fjola Dogg; Chen, Frances S

    2018-03-21

    Treatment rates for social anxiety, a prevalent and potentially debilitating condition, remain among the lowest of all major mental disorders today. Although computer-delivered interventions are well poised to surmount key barriers to the treatment of social anxiety, most are only marginally effective when delivered as stand-alone treatments. A new, Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention called Overcome Social Anxiety was recently created to address the limitations of prior computer-delivered interventions. Users of Overcome Social Anxiety are self-directed through various CBT modules incorporating cognitive restructuring and behavioral experiments. The intervention is personalized to each user's symptoms, and automatic email reminders and time limits are used to encourage adherence. The purpose of this study was to conduct a randomized controlled trial to investigate the effectiveness of Overcome Social Anxiety in reducing social anxiety symptoms in a nonclinical sample of university students. As a secondary aim, we also investigated whether Overcome Social Anxiety would increase life satisfaction in this sample. Following eligibility screening, participants were randomly assigned to a treatment condition or a wait-list control condition. Only those assigned to the treatment condition were given access to Overcome Social Anxiety; they were asked to complete the program within 4 months. The social interaction anxiety scale (SIAS), the fear of negative evaluation scale (FNE), and the quality of life enjoyment and satisfaction questionnaire-short form (Q-LES-Q-SF) were administered to participants from both conditions during baseline and 4-month follow-up lab visits. Over the course of the study, participants assigned to the treatment condition experienced a significant reduction in social anxiety (SIAS: Psocial anxiety in the 2 conditions over the course of the study showed that those assigned to the treatment condition experienced significantly

  20. Content relatedness in the social web based on social explicit semantic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntalianis, Klimis; Otterbacher, Jahna; Mastorakis, Nikolaos

    2017-06-01

    In this paper a novel content relatedness algorithm for social media content is proposed, based on the Explicit Semantic Analysis (ESA) technique. The proposed scheme takes into consideration social interactions. In particular starting from the vector space representation model, similarity is expressed by a summation of term weight products. In this paper, term weights are estimated by a social computing method, where the strength of each term is calculated by the attention the terms receives. For this reason each post is split into two parts, title and comments area, while attention is defined by the number of social interactions such as likes and shares. The overall approach is named Social Explicit Semantic Analysis. Experimental results on real data show the advantages and limitations of the proposed approach, while an initial comparison between ESA and S-ESA is very promising.

  1. The relationship between persuasive technology principles, adherence and effect of web-Based interventions for mental health: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildeboer, Gina; Kelders, Saskia M; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E W C

    2016-12-01

    the web-based interventions. With regard to the number of persuasive technology principles, the differences between the effect sizes in the subgroups were significant in the WG subgroup analyses for the total number of principles and for the number of principles in the three categories Primary Task Support, Dialogue Support, and Social Support. In the BG subgroup analyses only the difference in Primary Task Support was significant. An increase in the total number of principles and Dialogue Support principles yielded larger effect sizes in the WG subgroup analysis, indicating that more principles lead to better outcomes. The number of principles in the Primary Task Support (WG and BG) and Social Support (WG) did not show an upward trend but had varying effect sizes. We identified a number of combinations of principles that were more effective, but only in the WG analyses. The association between adherence and effectiveness was not significant. There is a relationship between the number of persuasive technology principles and the effectiveness of web-based interventions concerning mental health, however this does not always mean that implementing more principles leads to better outcomes. Regarding the combinations of principles, specific principles seemed to work well together (e.g. tunneling and tailoring; reminders and similarity; social learning and comparison), but adding another principle can diminish the effectiveness (e.g. tunneling, tailoring and reduction). In this study, an increase in adherence was not associated with larger effect sizes. The findings of this study can help developers to decide which persuasive principles to include to make web-based interventions more persuasive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Web-Based Medical Service: Technology Attractiveness, Medical Creditability, Information Source, and Behavior Intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan Huei

    2017-08-02

    Web-based medical service (WBMS), a cooperative relationship between medical service and Internet technology, has been called one of the most innovative services of the 21st century. However, its business promotion and implementation in the medical industry have neither been expected nor executed. Few studies have explored this phenomenon from the viewpoint of inexperienced patients. The primary goal of this study was to explore whether technology attractiveness, medical creditability, and diversified medical information sources could increase users' behavior intention. This study explored the effectiveness of web-based medical service by using three situations to manipulate sources of medical information. A total of 150 questionnaires were collected from people who had never used WBMS before. Hierarchical regression was used to examine the mediation and moderated-mediation effects. Perceived ease of use (P=.002) and perceived usefulness (P=.001) significantly enhance behavior intentions. Medical credibility is a mediator (P=.03), but the relationship does not significantly differ under diverse manipulative information channels (P=.39). Medical credibility could explain the extra variation between technology attractiveness and behavior intention, but not significant under different moderating effect of medical information sources. ©Shan Huei Wang. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 02.08.2017.

  3. A Critical Review on the Concept of Social Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Leibetseder

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—A critical analysis of the term social technology from a social science point of view.Design/Methodology/Approach—Review of the term “social technology” from a social science point of perspective in connection to the study of governmentality and power in a Foucauldian way.Findings—The article covers the perspective that social technology provides social science knowledge for a purpose. Such a notion allows an in depth debate about the meaning of social order in modern societies. Establishing distinctive techniques now forms the basis of the modern state and governance. Social technology forms the basis of governmental decisions; it allows for a use of social theories and methods for a purpose in politics and introduces a specific conception of power between the individual and public powers. Therefore, it alters government in three ways: It provides expert power to define solutions for social problems based on social science knowledge. It transforms government. Social technology exemplifies a support system for an ordered method of the way of government, it allows for the conduct of others and self based on scientific expertise. It can define new areas of problems in need of a change of government.Research limitations/implications—Consequently, social technology requests a critical analysis using a governmental approach. Such an approach focuses on problems on the governed subject and how governing works and why it has evolved in that way towards the subject and what kind of ideas and thinking lies within the discourse.Research type—general review.

  4. Application of the Technology Web 2.0 in a drug information centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez Giménez, J C; Puyal González, C; Valdivia Vadell, C; Palacio Lacambra, M E; Vidal Otero, J; Cerqueira Dapena, M J

    2011-01-01

    To develop a Web 2.0 resource map and select those that may be useful in a Drug Information Centre at a Hospital Pharmacy Department (CIMSF). A multidisciplinary working group under the Biomedical Information Commission selected some of the Web 2.0 resources included in the Guía d'usos i estil a les xarxes Socials guide of the Catalonian Government. Six resources were selected: Netvibes, Delicious, Google groups, Google Docs, Slideshare and Twitter. These tools were used for 5 months to manage biomedical information for the medical staff, and to provide external visibility by providing information to other health professionals. More than a thousand hits were recorded on the portal Netvibes and more than 100 professionals followed CIMSF on Twitter. The Web 2.0 offers useful, user-friendly and cost-efficient tools which could be implemented in a CIMSF, while also enabling participation in external networks of pharmacotherapeutic interest, increasing its visibility to other professionals. Copyright © 2011 SEFH. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. ResearchEHR: use of semantic web technologies and archetypes for the description of EHRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Montserrat; Fernández-Breis, Jesualdo Tomás; Maldonado, Jose A; Moner, David; Martínez-Costa, Catalina; Bosca, Diego; Menárguez-Tortosa, Marcos

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present the ResearchEHR project. It focuses on the usability of Electronic Health Record (EHR) sources and EHR standards for building advanced clinical systems. The aim is to support healthcare professional, institutions and authorities by providing a set of generic methods and tools for the capture, standardization, integration, description and dissemination of health related information. ResearchEHR combines several tools to manage EHR at two different levels. The internal level that deals with the normalization and semantic upgrading of exiting EHR by using archetypes and the external level that uses Semantic Web technologies to specify clinical archetypes for advanced EHR architectures and systems.

  6. Designing a patient monitoring system for bipolar disorder using Semantic Web technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermolia, Chryssa; Bei, Ekaterini S; Petrakis, Euripides G M; Kritsotakis, Vangelis; Tsiknakis, Manolis; Sakkalis, Vangelis

    2015-01-01

    The new movement to personalize treatment plans and improve prediction capabilities is greatly facilitated by intelligent remote patient monitoring and risk prevention. This paper focuses on patients suffering from bipolar disorder, a mental illness characterized by severe mood swings. We exploit the advantages of Semantic Web and Electronic Health Record Technologies to develop a patient monitoring platform to support clinicians. Relying on intelligently filtering of clinical evidence-based information and individual-specific knowledge, we aim to provide recommendations for treatment and monitoring at appropriate time or concluding into alerts for serious shifts in mood and patients' non response to treatment.

  7. Biological knowledge management: the emerging role of the Semantic Web technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antezana, Erick; Kuiper, Martin; Mironov, Vladimir

    2009-07-01

    New knowledge is produced at a continuously increasing speed, and the list of papers, databases and other knowledge sources that a researcher in the life sciences needs to cope with is actually turning into a problem rather than an asset. The adequate management of knowledge is therefore becoming fundamentally important for life scientists, especially if they work with approaches that thoroughly depend on knowledge integration, such as systems biology. Several initiatives to organize biological knowledge sources into a readily exploitable resourceome are presently being carried out. Ontologies and Semantic Web technologies revolutionize these efforts. Here, we review the benefits, trends, current possibilities, and the potential this holds for the biosciences.

  8. Teaching Web 2.0 beyond the library: adventures in social media, the class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Ann M; Mayer, Susan H; Rethlefsen, Melissa L

    2011-01-01

    Librarians at the Mayo Clinic developed customized Web 2.0 courses for library staff, health science faculty, and nurse educators. As demand for this type of training spread across the institution, a single, self-paced class was developed for all employees. The content covered the typical Web 2.0 and social media tools (e.g., blogs, really simple syndication [RSS], wikis, social networking tools) emphasizing the organization's social media guidelines. The team consulted with the public affairs department to develop the class and coordinate marketing and advertising. The eight-module, blog-based course was introduced to all employees in 2010. Employees completing each module and passing a brief assessment receive credit on their employee transcript. Libraries staff provided support to participants throughout the duration of the course through chat widgets, e-mail, and blog comments. The results show that even though a high number of learners accessed the course, the completion percentage was low since there was no requirement to complete the course. Deploying a single, self-paced course for a large institution is an enormous undertaking, requiring the support of high level administration, managers, and employees.

  9. Leveraging Digital Technology in Social Studies Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy, Sarah Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Today's K-12 classrooms are increasingly comprised of students who accomplish much of their informal learning through digital media and technology. In response, a growing number of educators are considering how they might draw upon these informal learning experiences to support student engagement and learning in the classroom through technology.…

  10. Mining the human phenome using semantic web technologies: a case study for Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Jyotishman; Kiefer, Richard C; Bielinski, Suzette J; Chute, Christopher G

    2012-01-01

    The ability to conduct genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has enabled new exploration of how genetic variations contribute to health and disease etiology. However, historically GWAS have been limited by inadequate sample size due to associated costs for genotyping and phenotyping of study subjects. This has prompted several academic medical centers to form "biobanks" where biospecimens linked to personal health information, typically in electronic health records (EHRs), are collected and stored on large number of subjects. This provides tremendous opportunities to discover novel genotype-phenotype associations and foster hypothesis generation. In this work, we study how emerging Semantic Web technologies can be applied in conjunction with clinical and genotype data stored at the Mayo Clinic Biobank to mine the phenotype data for genetic associations. In particular, we demonstrate the role of using Resource Description Framework (RDF) for representing EHR diagnoses and procedure data, and enable federated querying via standardized Web protocols to identify subjects genotyped with Type 2 Diabetes for discovering gene-disease associations. Our study highlights the potential of Web-scale data federation techniques to execute complex queries.

  11. Assessing cancer survivors' needs using web-based technology: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie Smith, Ellen M; Skalla, Karen; Li, Zhongze; Onega, Tracy; Rhoda, June; Gates, Charlene; Litterini, Amy; Scott, Mary R

    2012-02-01

    Development of cancer survivor resources has been hampered by lack of knowledge regarding survivors' needs. The main study aim was to pilot test a Web-based cancer survivor needs assessment survey. The second aim was to pilot three sampling approaches. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Norris Cotton Cancer Center and nine community-based clinics serving urban and rural populations. Population-based and convenience sampling approaches were used to recruit 547 participants over 4 months. Participants completed a Web-based cancer survivor needs assessment survey. Respondents were mainly white (98%), married (71%) women (80%) with a college education (96%). Although most (66%) (n = 362) had been diagnosed with breast cancer, other cancer diagnoses were represented. Participants reported fatigue (47%), forgetfulness (39%), joint pain (34%), anxiety (31%), trouble sleeping (28%), peripheral neuropathy (27%), inflexibility (23%), and weight gain (23%). Survivors with nonbreast solid tumor malignancies reported more problems than those with breast or hematologic malignancies (P range = .037 to losing weight (74.2%), decreasing fatigue (50%), and improving flexibility (69.3%), sleep (68.5%), and memory (60.2%). Results supported that cancer survivors struggle with many enduring problems. Web-based technology will facilitate future exploration of unmet needs.

  12. Is there a role for social technologies in collaborative healthcare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigalupe, Gonzalo

    2011-03-01

    The exponential growth, variety, and sophistication of the information communication technologies (ICTs) plus their growing accessibility are transforming how clinical practitioners, patients, and their families can work together. Social technologies are the ICTs tools that augment the ability of people to communicate and collaborate despite obstacles of geography and time. There is still little empirical research on the impact of social technologies in the case of collaborative health. Defining a set of social technologies with potential for developing, sustaining, and strengthening the collaborative health agenda should prove useful for practitioners and researchers. This paper is based on an extensive review of the literature focusing on emerging technologies and the experience of the author as a consultant to health care professionals learning about social technologies. A note of caution is required: the phenomenon is complex and hard to describe in writing (a medium very different from the technologies themselves). Hardware and software are in continuous development and the iterative adaptation of the emergent social technologies for new forms of virtual communication. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  13. Diferencias entre usuarios y no usuarios de redes sociales virtuales en la Web 2.0

    OpenAIRE

    María Alarcón; Carlota Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    La Web 2.0 ha supuesto una revolución en el mundo de las redes digitales, debido al papel activo de los usuarios en aportar contenidos y conocimientos. En este nuevo entorno de Internet surgen las redes sociales virtuales (RSV), principal medio de comunicación online, que ofrecen múltiples ventajas para el mundo empresarial, que con el fin de obtener máxima rentabilidad, se ven obligadas a utilizar las redes para conocer mejor a los usuarios que participan en ellas. Este trabajo refleja el re...

  14. Text and structural data mining of influenza mentions in Web and social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corley, Courtney D; Cook, Diane J; Mikler, Armin R; Singh, Karan P

    2010-02-01

    Text and structural data mining of web and social media (WSM) provides a novel disease surveillance resource and can identify online communities for targeted public health communications (PHC) to assure wide dissemination of pertinent information. WSM that mention influenza are harvested over a 24-week period, 5 October 2008 to 21 March 2009. Link analysis reveals communities for targeted PHC. Text mining is shown to identify trends in flu posts that correlate to real-world influenza-like illness patient report data. We also bring to bear a graph-based data mining technique to detect anomalies among flu blogs connected by publisher type, links, and user-tags.

  15. PREDOSE: A Semantic Web Platform for Drug Abuse Epidemiology using Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Delroy; Smith, Gary A.; Daniulaityte, Raminta; Sheth, Amit P.; Dave, Drashti; Chen, Lu; Anand, Gaurish; Carlson, Robert; Watkins, Kera Z.; Falck, Russel

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The role of social media in biomedical knowledge mining, including clinical, medical and healthcare informatics, prescription drug abuse epidemiology and drug pharmacology, has become increasingly significant in recent years. Social media offers opportunities for people to share opinions and experiences freely in online communities, which may contribute information beyond the knowledge of domain professionals. This paper describes the development of a novel Semantic Web platform called PREDOSE (PREscription Drug abuse Online Surveillance and Epidemiology), which is designed to facilitate the epidemiologic study of prescription (and related) drug abuse practices using social media. PREDOSE uses web forum posts and domain knowledge, modeled in a manually created Drug Abuse Ontology (DAO) (pronounced dow), to facilitate the extraction of semantic information from User Generated Content (UGC). A combination of lexical, pattern-based and semantics-based techniques is used together with the domain knowledge to extract fine-grained semantic information from UGC. In a previous study, PREDOSE was used to obtain the datasets from which new knowledge in drug abuse research was derived. Here, we report on various platform enhancements, including an updated DAO, new components for relationship and triple extraction, and tools for content analysis, trend detection and emerging patterns exploration, which enhance the capabilities of the PREDOSE platform. Given these enhancements, PREDOSE is now more equipped to impact drug abuse research by alleviating traditional labor-intensive content analysis tasks. Methods Using custom web crawlers that scrape UGC from publicly available web forums, PREDOSE first automates the collection of web-based social media content for subsequent semantic annotation. The annotation scheme is modeled in the DAO, and includes domain specific knowledge such as prescription (and related) drugs, methods of preparation, side effects, routes of

  16. PREDOSE: a semantic web platform for drug abuse epidemiology using social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Delroy; Smith, Gary A; Daniulaityte, Raminta; Sheth, Amit P; Dave, Drashti; Chen, Lu; Anand, Gaurish; Carlson, Robert; Watkins, Kera Z; Falck, Russel

    2013-12-01

    The role of social media in biomedical knowledge mining, including clinical, medical and healthcare informatics, prescription drug abuse epidemiology and drug pharmacology, has become increasingly significant in recent years. Social media offers opportunities for people to share opinions and experiences freely in online communities, which may contribute information beyond the knowledge of domain professionals. This paper describes the development of a novel semantic web platform called PREDOSE (PREscription Drug abuse Online Surveillance and Epidemiology), which is designed to facilitate the epidemiologic study of prescription (and related) drug abuse practices using social media. PREDOSE uses web forum posts and domain knowledge, modeled in a manually created Drug Abuse Ontology (DAO--pronounced dow), to facilitate the extraction of semantic information from User Generated Content (UGC), through combination of lexical, pattern-based and semantics-based techniques. In a previous study, PREDOSE was used to obtain the datasets from which new knowledge in drug abuse research was derived. Here, we report on various platform enhancements, including an updated DAO, new components for relationship and triple extraction, and tools for content analysis, trend detection and emerging patterns exploration, which enhance the capabilities of the PREDOSE platform. Given these enhancements, PREDOSE is now more equipped to impact drug abuse research by alleviating traditional labor-intensive content analysis tasks. Using custom web crawlers that scrape UGC from publicly available web forums, PREDOSE first automates the collection of web-based social media content for subsequent semantic annotation. The annotation scheme is modeled in the DAO, and includes domain specific knowledge such as prescription (and related) drugs, methods of preparation, side effects, and routes of administration. The DAO is also used to help recognize three types of data, namely: (1) entities, (2

  17. Semantic Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lamandini

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The semantic Web is a technology at the service of knowledge which is aimed at accessibility and the sharing of content; facilitating interoperability between different systems and as such is one of the nine key technological pillars of TIC (technologies for information and communication within the third theme, programme specific cooperation of the seventh programme framework for research and development (7°PQRS, 2007-2013. As a system it seeks to overcome overload or excess of irrelevant information in Internet, in order to facilitate specific or pertinent research. It is an extension of the existing Web in which the aim is for cooperation between and the computer and people (the dream of Sir Tim Berners –Lee where machines can give more support to people when integrating and elaborating data in order to obtain inferences and a global sharing of data. It is a technology that is able to favour the development of a “data web” in other words the creation of a space in both sets of interconnected and shared data (Linked Data which allows users to link different types of data coming from different sources. It is a technology that will have great effect on everyday life since it will permit the planning of “intelligent applications” in various sectors such as education and training, research, the business world, public information, tourism, health, and e-government. It is an innovative technology that activates a social transformation (socio-semantic Web on a world level since it redefines the cognitive universe of users and enables the sharing not only of information but of significance (collective and connected intelligence.

  18. Study on risk communication by using web system for the social consensus toward HLW final disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugo, Akihide; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Uda, Akinobu; Wakabayashi, Yasunaga; Ito, Kyoko

    2008-01-01

    The web site that has illustrated characters to navigate information pertaining to unfamiliar issue such as high-level radioactive waste geological disposal is an effective method. However, since the information was provided mainly from a pro-nuclear power generation group, it resulted in frustration for the web site user because viewpoints outside the group were not considered nor the explanations were based on only rational aspects, the persuasive explanation based on technical viewpoints in other words. To close this communication gap, this research aims to enhance a better sense of involvement and social collaboration by creating an interactive communication model promoting emotional acceptance and independent thinking with Web system. This purpose was accomplished by the dialog-mode explanation and the scenarios with norm activation theory supported by facial expressions of the illustrated navigators to stimulate the emotional involvement of viewers and the specialists' reliable response on the electrical bulletin board system, then we conducted preparatory experiments concerning its effects and assessed its affectiveness by making this model available over the Internet. (author)

  19. Diferencias entre usuarios y no usuarios de redes sociales virtuales en la Web 2.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Alarcón

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available La Web 2.0 ha supuesto una revolución en el mundo de las redes digitales, debido al papel activo de los usuarios en aportar contenidos y conocimientos. En este nuevo entorno de Internet surgen las redes sociales virtuales (RSV, principal medio de comunicación online, que ofrecen múltiples ventajas para el mundo empresarial, que con el fin de obtener máxima rentabilidad, se ven obligadas a utilizar las redes para conocer mejor a los usuarios que participan en ellas. Este trabajo refleja el resultado de una investigación acerca del comportamiento de los internautas en las RSV. A partir de una muestra no probabilística de internautas se analizaron las principales diferencias entre usuarios y no usuarios de RSV, comprobando que los usuarios de estos sitios participan en la Web 2.0 de una forma más activa que los no usuarios, quienes a través de comunidades de conocimientos generan contenidos en la Web que permite a los consumidores descubrir nuevos bienes y servicios.

  20. www.kerntechnik.info = annual meeting on nuclear technology on the web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2009-01-01

    The ANNUAL MEETING ON NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY can be found under the new Internet address of www.kerntechnik.info as of now. The Web site offers systematic access to all important information and features about this largest European specialized meeting of its kind. Pages showing the program of the Conference with its plenary session, topical sessions, technical sessions, and the ''Nuclear Power Campus'' and ''Competency Workshop'' special events, are updated continuously. In addition, contributions to the technical sessions may be submitted on line at an early point in time; registrating for the meeting as well as booking hotel accommodation are also possible on line. The next ANNUAL MEETING ON NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY will be held at the Berlin Congress Center in Berlin/Germany on May 4-6, 2010. (orig.)

  1. Future Connections: The potential of Web service and Portal technologies for the historic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Waller

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Where the other papers in this special edition of Internet Archaeology look at the experiences and achievements of the ARENA project this paper looks to the future. Portal technologies like those used by the ARENA portal are already moving into new and exciting areas, areas such as web services and portlet technologies in particular. This paper considers the work of the ADS in projects such as ARENA, but also HEIRPORT and CREE, work that has revealed new and exciting paths towards data sharing on a European scale. Are these the paths that any new ARENA project will have to follow to sustain the dream of interoperable data sharing for European archaeology?

  2. WILGA Photonics and Web Engineering, January 2012; EuCARD Sessions on HEP and Accelerator Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2012-01-01

    Wilga Sessions on HEP experiments and accelerator technology were organized under the umbrella of the EU FP7 Project EuCARD – European Coordination for Accelerator Research and Development. The paper presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from technical universities during the SPIE-IEEE Wilga January 2012 Symposium on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposium embraced, among others, new technologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonics-electronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JET and pi-of-the sky experiments development. The symposium held two times a year is a summary in the development of numerable Ph.D. theses carried out in this country in the area of advanced electronic and photonic systems. It is also a great occasion for SPIE, IEEE, OSA and PSP st...

  3. Express: a Web-based technology to support human and computational experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Peter; Cooper, Richard P

    2003-11-01

    Experimental cognitive psychology has been greatly assisted by the development of general computer-based experiment presentation packages. Typically, however, such packages provide little support for running participants on different computers. It is left to the experimenter to ensure that group sizes are balanced between conditions and to merge data gathered on different computers once the experiment is complete. Equivalent issues arise in the evaluation of parameterized computational models, where it is frequently necessary to test a model's behavior over a range of parameter values (which amount to between-subjects factors) and where such testing can be speeded up significantly by the use of multiple processors. This article describes Express, a Web-based technology for coordinating "clients" participants or computational models) and collating client data. The technology provides an experiment design editor, client coordination facilities (e.g., automated randomized assignment of clients to groups so that group sizes are balanced), general data collation and tabulation facilities, a range of basic statistical functions (which are constrained by the specified experimental design), and facilities to export data to standard statistical packages (such as SPSS). We report case studies demonstrating the utility of Express in both human and computational experiments. Express may be freely downloaded from the Express Web site (http://express.psyc.bbk.ac.uk/).

  4. Empowering Personalized Medicine with Big Data and Semantic Web Technology: Promises, Challenges, and Use Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahiazar, Maryam; Taslimitehrani, Vahid; Jadhav, Ashutosh; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2014-10-01

    In healthcare, big data tools and technologies have the potential to create significant value by improving outcomes while lowering costs for each individual patient. Diagnostic images, genetic test results and biometric information are increasingly generated and stored in electronic health records presenting us with challenges in data that is by nature high volume, variety and velocity, thereby necessitating novel ways to store, manage and process big data. This presents an urgent need to develop new, scalable and expandable big data infrastructure and analytical methods that can enable healthcare providers access knowledge for the individual patient, yielding better decisions and outcomes. In this paper, we briefly discuss the nature of big data and the role of semantic web and data analysis for generating "smart data" which offer actionable information that supports better decision for personalized medicine. In our view, the biggest challenge is to create a system that makes big data robust and smart for healthcare providers and patients that can lead to more effective clinical decision-making, improved health outcomes, and ultimately, managing the healthcare costs. We highlight some of the challenges in using big data and propose the need for a semantic data-driven environment to address them. We illustrate our vision with practical use cases, and discuss a path for empowering personalized medicine using big data and semantic web technology.

  5. Web technology in the separation of strontium and cesium from INEL-ICPP radioactive acid waste (WM-185)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, L.A.; Brown, G.N.

    1995-01-01

    Strontium and cesium were successfully removed from radioactive acidic waste (WM-185) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), with web technology from 3M and IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc. (IBC). A technical team from Pacific Northwest Laboratory, ICPP, 3M and IBC conducted a very successful series of experiments from August 15 through 18, 1994. The ICPP, Remote Analytical Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, provided the hot cell facilities and staff to complete these milestone experiments. The actual waste experiments duplicated the initial 'cold' simulated waste results and confirmed the selective removal provided by ligand-particle web technology

  6. Informal Tools in Formal Context: Adoption of Web 2.0 Technologies among Geography Student Teachers in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyamfi, Stephen Adu

    2017-01-01

    Despite the popularity of Web 2.0 technologies and their educational benefits in the 21st century classroom environment, their use for teaching and learning purposes is still very limited. This study extended the technology acceptance model (TAM) to empirically examine factors that determine Ghanaian geography student teachers' acceptance of Web…

  7. DIDACTIC ASPECTS OF USING WEB 2.0 TECHNOLOGY IN TRAINING EXPERTS IN PHYSICAL CULTURE AND SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А А Азевич

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses techniques for using Web 2.0 technologies in modern education. Based on practical experience suggests approaches to the formation of didactic means of implementing the requirements of the GEF training in the field of physical culture and sports with the use of information and communication technologies, in particular Internet services.

  8. AHEAD OF THE GAME: ADOPTING 21ST CENTURY LEARNING APPROACHES SUPPORTED BY VIDEO-BASED WEB CONFERENCING TECHNOLOGY IN A ROMANIAN PROFESSIONAL TRAINING MILITARY CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula CHARBONNEAU-GOWDY

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent major political uprisings are indicating the extent to which social learning Web 2.0 technologies, can infl uence change in informal learning settings. Recognition and a discussion of the potential of that infl uence in formal learning settings have only just begun. This article describes a study of an international distance learning project in 2004, using a variety of Web 2.0 technologies, including video-based web conferencing, that sought to initiate and respond to this urgent need for dialogue in the research. Self-selected participants took part in a 5-week English as a foreign language (EFL program, a joint NATO sponsored Canadian and Romanian Ministry of Defense-supported initiative. Clear evidence of linguistic knowledge construction and of important changes to participants’ learner identities, indicates the power of these technologies to support the kind of learning that can lead to the development of global citizens and the skills they will increasingly require in the 21st century.

  9. Creating Social Technologies to Assist and Understand Social Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Rienks, R.J.; Whitworth, Brian; de Moor, Aldo

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss a particular approach to the creation of Social Technical Systems for the meeting domain. Besides presenting a methodology this chapter will present applications that have been constructed on the basis of the method and applications that can be envisioned. Throughout the

  10. Which One Triggers the Other? Technological or Social Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Cagri; Eren, Hakan; Halac, Duygu Seckin

    2013-01-01

    The term "innovation" has sometimes been used as a synonym for technological innovation until the concept of "social innovation" attracted academic attention. Since then, these two types of innovation have been investigated individually. It can be claimed that, despite the great importance of social innovation studies,…

  11. Social Media as a Learning Technology for University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Irshad; Cakir, Ozlem; Candeger, Ümmügülsüm

    2018-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the role of social media as a learning technology for university students and highlights their problems associated with its use. The population of the study consisted of Masters' and Bachelor Studies students studying in their final semesters in the departments of Social Sciences at The Islamia University of Bahawalpur,…

  12. Marketing Social Service Programs Using Political Campaign Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Discusses how human services agencies can use strategies and information technologies similar to those used in political campaigns to identify needs and attitudes for social services campaigns. Marketing for social services programs is described, and the use of computers for a political campaign and for a teenage pregnancy program is compared.…

  13. Applying Social Capital Theory and the Technology Acceptance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Applying Social Capital Theory and the Technology Acceptance Model in information and knowledge sharing research. ... Inkanyiso: Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences ... The paper explains the components, relevance and practical applicability of the two theories to information and knowledge sharing research.

  14. Mobile Inverted Constructivism: Education of Interaction Technology in Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Jia-Xiang; Fan, Kuo-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    The combination of social media and invert teaching is a new path to inverting interation technology education and reconstructing the curriculum of context. In this paper, based on the theory of constructivism learning, a model named Mobile Inverted Constructivism (MIC) is provided. Moreover, in view of the functional quality of social media in…

  15. Influence of Social Reform Ideologies on Industrial/Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireh, Maduakolam

    2016-01-01

    The founding of industrial/technology education in Ameria represents the convergence of many influences dating back to the pre-industrial revolution era. Social reform movement, one of these influences, set out to change conditions considered to be causes of poverty and other social problems through active engagements in political, educational,…

  16. A Sample Application for Use of Biography in Social Studies; Science, Technology and Social Change Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Harun

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the opinions of social studies teacher candidates on use of biography in science, technology and social change course given in the undergraduate program of social studies education. In this regard, convergent parallel design as a mixed research pattern was used to make use of both qualitative and quantitative…

  17. Epistemologia social e cultura digital: reflexões em torno das formas de escritas na web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Maria Marteleto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available O artigo apresenta alguns eixos teóricos e metodológicos a fim de refletir sobre a produção, mediação e apropriação de conhecimentos e a configuração de dispositivos de informação e comunicação na web, no contexto de uma ‘cultura digital’. Para tanto recupera a ideia de epistemologia social, cunhada por dois fundadores do campo de estudos da informação, J. Shera e M. Egan, atualizada por autores das áreaa da informação e da filosofia, com o propósito de refletir sobre como as formas epistêmicas estão relacionadas às práticas sociais e institucionais. Considerou-se esse um caminho promissor para explorar e compreender os modos de ser dos espaços digitais e suas mídias. Por fim, exploram-se alguns estudos da linha francesa das Ciências da Informação e Comunicação, mais especificamente os conceitos, de dispositivo infocomunicacional; cultura digital; texto; hipertexto e arquitexto, a fim de refletir sobre as formas estruturais das escritas e leituras na web. Se a epistemologia social orienta um programa de estudos sobre as questões de acesso, produção e apropriação de conhecimentos, as pesquisas sobre as formas de escrita indica caminhos teórico-práticos para entender e praticas as escritas na web.

  18. Development and Validation of the Social Information Processing Application: A Web-Based Measure of Social Information Processing Patterns in Elementary School-Age Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupersmidt, Janis B.; Stelter, Rebecca; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of an audio computer-assisted self-interviewing Web-based software application called the Social Information Processing Application (SIP-AP) that was designed to assess social information processing skills in boys in RD through 5th grades. This study included a racially and…

  19. Foreign Language Acquisition: Fostering Social Justice and Internalization within Web 2.0 environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Lojacono

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the field of mobile teaching the winds of change are coming from the “Steve Job Galaxy” confirming the vision Illich described in Deschooling Society (1971. The success of mobile learning is primarily due to easily searchable databases. Therefore a Copernican Revolution is on the go and will revise the way educational contents are accessed. In this paper we discuss a specific aspect of this the radical shift: collaborative teaching through globally networked learning environments. Within educational institutions, collaboration means the ability to harness ideas, resources and educational practioners from across boundaries. While it is clear that collaboration is acknowledged as a required win-win practice for any business organizations, in the field of education the most important outcome brought by Web 2.0 tools is social justice, in terms of equity in mobility and cross-cultural experiences. Therefore this paper describes practices aimed at fostering social justice within a language learning framework. Internet-based tools are analyzed in terms of hardware and software requirements as well as in terms of second language acquisition theories and cognitive approaches. In sum, this paper is aimed at serving the innovative teacher in the exploration of collaborative teaching in a Web 2.0 context.

  20. Sexpectations: male college students' views about displayed sexual references on females' social networking web sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Megan A; Swanson, Michael J; Royer, Heather; Roberts, Linda J

    2011-04-01

    Sexual reference display on a social networking web site (SNS) is associated with self-reported sexual intention; females are more likely to display sexually explicit content on SNSs. The purpose of this study was to investigate male college students' views towards sexual references displayed on publicly available SNSs by females. Focus groups. One large state university. Male college students age 18-23. All tape recorded discussion was fully transcribed, then discussed to determine thematic consensus. A trained male facilitator asked participants about views on sexual references displayed on SNSs by female peers and showed examples of sexual references from female's SNS profiles to facilitate discussion. A total of 28 heterosexual male participants participated in seven focus groups. Nearly all participants reported using Facebook to evaluate potential female partners. Three themes emerged from our data. First, participants reported that displays of sexual references on social networking web sites increased sexual expectations. Second, sexual reference display decreased interest in pursuing a dating relationship. Third, SNS data was acknowledged as imperfect but valuable. Females who display sexual references on publicly available SNS profiles may be influencing potential partners' sexual expectations and dating intentions. Future research should examine females' motivations and beliefs about displaying such references and educate women about the potential impact of these sexual displays. Copyright © 2011 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.