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Sample records for smog chamber studies

  1. Acid aerosol measurement method intercomparisons: An outdoor smog chamber study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellestad, T.G.; Barnes, H.M.; Kamens, R.M.; McDow, S.R.; Sickles, J.E. II; Hodson, L.L.; Waldman, J.M.; Randtke, S.J.; Lane, D.D.; Springston, S.R.; Koutrakis, P.; Thurston, G.D.

    1991-01-01

    A workshop on the measurement of acid aerosols indicated that the sampling methods in use had not been intercompared. Following two laboratory pilot studies, EPA sponsored tests in an outdoor smog chamber with a variety of test aerosols, including sulfuric acid only, photochemical smog with added sulfuric acid, photo-chemical smog with added sulfuric acid and dust, and dust followed by photochemical smog with added sulfuric acid. Two experiments of each type were conducted. Six groups, several of which were active in ambient acid aerosol measurements, participated by operating duplicate samplers for each experiment. Five groups employed a similar method, in which ammonia is removed from the sample stream by diffusion, particles are removed by Teflon filter, and hydrogen ion on the Teflon filter is determined by pH electrode. However, differences existed in the method's implementation among groups in physical design, flow rate, procedures, and analysis. The sixth group's method did not use a diffusion denuder for ammonia and had several other important differences. Besides hydrogen ion, seven other species were reported by most of the groups, including particle phase sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate, and gas phase sulfur dioxide, ammonia, nitric acid, and nitrous acid. Results of the inter-comparison will be presented

  2. Smog chamber study on the evolution of fume from residential coal combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Chunmei; Wang, Kun; Wang, Wei; Chen, Jianhua; Liu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Hongjie

    2012-01-01

    Domestic coal stoves are widely used in countryside and greenbelt residents in China for heating and cooking, and emit considerable pollutants to the atmosphere because of no treatment of their exhaust, which can result in deteriorating local air quality. In this study, a dynamic smog chamber was used to investigate the real-time emissions of gaseous and particulate pollutants during the combustion process and a static smog chamber was used to investigate the fume evolution under simulate light irradiation. The real-time emissions revealed that the total hydrocarbon (THC) and CO increased sharply after ignition, and then quickly decreased, indicating volatilization of hydrocarbons with low molecular weight and incomplete combustion at the beginning stage of combustion made great contribution to these pollutants. There was evident shoulder peak around 10 min combustion for both THC and CO, revealing the emissions from vitrinite combustion. Additionally, another broad emission peak of CO after 30 min was also observed, which was ascribed to the incomplete combustion of the inertinite. Compared with THC and CO, there was only one emission peak for NOx, SO2 and particular matters at the beginning stage of combustion. The fume evolution with static chamber simulation indicated that evident consumption of SO2 and NOx as well as new particle formation were observed. The consumption rates for SO2 and NOx were about 3.44% hr(-1) and 3.68% hr(-1), the new particle formation of nuclei particles grew at a rate of 16.03 nm/hr during the first reaction hour, and the increase of the diameter of accumulation mode particles was evident. The addition of isoprene to the diluted mixture of the fume could promote 03 and secondary particle formation.

  3. Smog chamber studies on the air chemistry of biogenic hydrocarbons in the presence of ozone, NOx and SO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolting, F.; Zetzsch, C.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of SO 2 on the photochemical degradation processes of the biogenic hydrocarbon α-pinene was studied with respect to the present forest decline. For that purpose premixed air was irradiated with simulated sunlight in laboratory experiments using a modified smog chamber. The performance of a novel semi continuous analyzer for H 2 SO 4 /sulfate was tested for smog chamber studies of the transformation of SO 2 to sulfuric acid and sulfur containing aerosol. An influence of SO 2 on the formation of ozone was not detected. The rates of degradation cannot be described by gas phase reactions alone, and, in addition, they are faster in the presence of humidity. Depending on humidity, 30-50% of the consumed SO 2 can be recovered in the suspended aerosol. In the presence of 60% relative humidity the nearly exclusive product is sulfur aerosol that needs further characterization. (orig.) With 9 figs., 42 refs [de

  4. [Studies of ozone formation potentials for benzene and ethylbenzene using a smog chamber and model simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Long; Xu, Yong-Fu

    2014-02-01

    Ozone formation potentials from irradiations of benzene-NO(x) and ethylbenzene-NO(x) systems under the conditions of different VOC/NO(x) ratios and RH were investigated using a characterized chamber and model simulation. The repeatability of the smog chamber experiment shows that for two sets of ethylbenzene-NO(x) irradiations with similar initial concentrations and reaction conditions, such as temperature, relative humidity and relative light intensity, the largest difference in O3 between two experiments is only 4% during the whole experimental run. On the basis of smog chamber experiments, ozone formation of photo-oxidation of benzene and ethylbenzene was simulated in terms of the master chemical mechanism (MCM). The peak ozone values for benzene and ethylbenzene simulated by MCM are higher than the chamber data, and the difference between the MCM-simulated results and chamber data increases with increasing RH. Under the conditions of sunlight irradiations, with benzene and ethylbenzene concentrations being in the range of (10-50) x 10(-9) and NO(x) concentrations in the range of (10-100) x 10(-9), the 6 h ozone contributions of benzene and ethylbenzene were obtained to be (3.1-33) x 10(-9) and (2.6-122) x 10(-9), whereas the peak O3 contributions of benzene and ethylbenzene were (3.5-54) x 10(-9) and (3.8-164) x 10(-9), respectively. The MCM-simulated maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) values for benzene and ethylbenzene were 0.25/C and 0.97/C (per carbon), respectively. The maximum ozone reactivity (MOR) values for these two species were obtained to be 0.73/C and 1.03/C, respectively. The MOR value of benzene from MCM is much higher than that obtained by carter from SAPRC, indicating that SAPRC may underestimate the ozone formation potential of benzene.

  5. Knudsen cell and smog chamber study of the heterogeneous uptake of sulfur dioxide on Chinese mineral dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Wang, Weigang; Gai, Yanbo; Ge, Maofa

    2014-12-01

    The heterogeneous uptake processes of sulfur dioxide on two types of Chinese mineral dust (Inner Mongolia desert dust and Xinjiang sierozem) were investigated using both Knudsen cell and smog chamber system. The temperature dependence of the uptake coefficients was studied over a range from 253 to 313 K using the Knudsen cell reactor, the initial uptake coefficients decreased with the increasing of temperature for these two mineral dust samples, whereas the steady state uptake coefficients of the Xinjiang sierozem increased with the temperature increasing, and these temperature dependence functions were obtained for the first time. In the smog chamber experiments at room temperature, the steady state uptake coefficients of SO2 decreased evidently with the increasing of sulfur dioxide initial concentration from 1.72 × 10¹² to 6.15 × 10¹² mol/cm³. Humid air had effect on the steady state uptake coefficients of SO₂onto Inner Mongolia desert dust. Consequences about the understanding of the uptake processes onto mineral dust samples and the environmental implication were also discussed. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Dynamic consideration of smog chamber experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. K. Chuang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of the α-pinene + ozone reaction that address particle nucleation show relatively high molar yields of highly oxidized multifunctional organic molecules with very low saturation concentrations that can form and grow new particles on their own. However, numerous smog-chamber experiments addressing secondary organic aerosol (SOA mass yields, interpreted via equilibrium partitioning theory, suggest that the vast majority of SOA from α-pinene is semivolatile. We explore this paradox by employing a dynamic volatility basis set (VBS model that reproduces the new-particle growth rates observed in the CLOUD experiment at CERN and then modeling SOA mass yield experiments conducted at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU. We find that the base-case simulations do overpredict observed SOA mass but by much less than an equilibrium analysis would suggest; this is because delayed condensation of vapors suppresses the apparent mass yields early in the chamber experiments. We further find that a second VBS model featuring substantial oligomerization of semivolatile monomers can match the CLOUD growth rates with substantially lower SOA mass yields; this is because the lighter monomers have a higher velocity and thus a higher condensation rate for a given mass concentration. The oligomerization simulations are a closer match to the CMU experiments than the base-case simulations, though they overpredict the observations somewhat. However, we also find that if the chemical conditions in CLOUD and the CMU chamber were identical, substantial nucleation would have occurred in the CMU experiments when in fact none occurred. This suggests that the chemical mechanisms differed in the two experiments, perhaps because the high oxidation rates in the SOA formation experiments led to rapid termination of peroxy radical chemistry.

  7. Dynamic consideration of smog chamber experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Wayne K.; Donahue, Neil M.

    2017-08-01

    Recent studies of the α-pinene + ozone reaction that address particle nucleation show relatively high molar yields of highly oxidized multifunctional organic molecules with very low saturation concentrations that can form and grow new particles on their own. However, numerous smog-chamber experiments addressing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass yields, interpreted via equilibrium partitioning theory, suggest that the vast majority of SOA from α-pinene is semivolatile. We explore this paradox by employing a dynamic volatility basis set (VBS) model that reproduces the new-particle growth rates observed in the CLOUD experiment at CERN and then modeling SOA mass yield experiments conducted at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). We find that the base-case simulations do overpredict observed SOA mass but by much less than an equilibrium analysis would suggest; this is because delayed condensation of vapors suppresses the apparent mass yields early in the chamber experiments. We further find that a second VBS model featuring substantial oligomerization of semivolatile monomers can match the CLOUD growth rates with substantially lower SOA mass yields; this is because the lighter monomers have a higher velocity and thus a higher condensation rate for a given mass concentration. The oligomerization simulations are a closer match to the CMU experiments than the base-case simulations, though they overpredict the observations somewhat. However, we also find that if the chemical conditions in CLOUD and the CMU chamber were identical, substantial nucleation would have occurred in the CMU experiments when in fact none occurred. This suggests that the chemical mechanisms differed in the two experiments, perhaps because the high oxidation rates in the SOA formation experiments led to rapid termination of peroxy radical chemistry.

  8. USING 14 C METHODOLOGY IN SMOG CHAMBER RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smog chambers are large enclosures (~ 10-200 m3) that are used to perform laboratory simulations of atmospheric reactions. By dealing with simple systems in which the number of reactants is limited and the conditions are strictly controlled, insights on how reactions ...

  9. SMOG CHAMBERS: A TOOL TO EXAMINE EFFECTS OF PHOTOCHEMICALLY AGED AIR POLLUTANTS ON BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irradiative exposure chambers or 'Smog chambers' have been used at the University of North Carolina for over 30 years to study photochemically active mixtures of volatile organic compounds and their transformation products (a significant sub-set of Hazardous Air Pollutants, HAPs)...

  10. Interferences of commercial NO2 instruments in the urban atmosphere and in a smog chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kleffmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable measurements of atmospheric trace gases are necessary for both, a better understanding of the chemical processes occurring in the atmosphere, and for the validation of model predictions. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2 is a toxic gas and is thus a regulated air pollutant. Besides, it is of major importance for the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere and plays a pivotal role in the formation of ozone and acid precipitation. Detection of NO2 is a difficult task since many of the different commercial techniques used are affected by interferences. The chemiluminescence instruments that are used for indirect NO2 detection in monitoring networks and smog chambers use either molybdenum or photolytic converters and are affected by either positive (NOy or negative interferences (radical formation in the photolytic converter. Erroneous conclusions on NO2 can be drawn if these interferences are not taken into consideration. In the present study, NO2 measurements in the urban atmosphere, in a road traffic tunnel and in a smog-chamber using different commercial techniques, i.e. chemiluminescence instruments with molybdenum or photolytic converters, a Luminol based instrument and a new NO2-LOPAP, were compared with spectroscopic techniques, i.e. DOAS and FTIR. Interferences of the different instruments observed during atmospheric measurements were partly characterised in more detail in the smog chamber experiments. Whereas all the commercial instruments showed strong interferences, excellent agreement was obtained between a new NO2-LOPAP instrument and the FTIR technique for the measurements performed in the smog chamber.

  11. In vitro study of injury on human bronchial epithelial cells caused by gunpowder smog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xiaomei; Feng, Liang; Liu, Yifan; Zhou, Ying; Shao, Lingli; Pang, Wei; Lan, Yating; Wang, Chengbin

    2013-02-01

    Smog inhalation is associated with acute respiratory symptoms in exposed victims. However, despite the evidence from cell injury caused by smog, a stable and practical apparatus used to treat cells with smog is necessary. The aim of this study is to develop a cell research platform of smoke inhalation injury. In the smog-generation device, a wireless electromagnetic heater was used to ignite gunpowder and generate smog. The quality of black powder was checked by the black powder burn rate, and experimental smog was indirectly checked by the amount of cell damage. The temperature and humidity were set at 37 °C ± 1 °C and ≥95% in the smog-cells reaction chamber, respectively. Factors including gunpowder dosages, smog-exposure time, the cell density, modes of exposure, volumes of smog, test durations, volumes of the cell culture medium and combustion velocity were measured. Coefficient variation of different batches of gunpowder and smog were less than 4% and 9%, respectively. With larger gunpowder dosage and longer exposure time, cell injury appeared to increase. When cells were cultured in 4 × 10(4)/well density in culture medium (1 mL/well), exposed to more than 10 L smog with filter screens above plates, detected after 24 h culture in cell incubator and gunpowder burned out within 5 s, smog had the best effect on cell injury. In conclusion, the experimental device can produce test smog stably and safely. The apparatus treating cells with smog can induce cell injury effectively, and the injury is positively correlated with smog concentration and exposure time.

  12. Effect of nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) and toluene on SO2 photooxidation, nucleation and growth: A smog chamber study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kangwei; Chen, Linghong; White, Stephen J.; Han, Ke; Lv, Biao; Bao, Kaiji; Wu, Xuecheng; Gao, Xiang; Azzi, Merched; Cen, Kefa

    2017-08-01

    The formation and growth of new particles has recently been shown to have a significant influence on Chinese haze pollution, and sulfuric acid has long been recognized as a major contributor to new particle formation. In this study, four comparison groups of experiments related to SO2 photooxidation, as well as aerosol nucleation and growth, have been conducted in the CAPS-ZJU (Complex Air Pollution Study-Zhejiang University) smog chamber. These were conducted either under SO2/NOx or SO2/toluene gas-phase environments in the absence of seed particles. During aerosol nucleation and growth process, several physical properties such as mass, size and effective density were measured simultaneously by Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and Differential Mobility Analyzer-Aerosol Particle Mass Analyzer-Condensation Particle Counter (DMA-APM-CPC). The effective density of new particles decreased from 1.8 to 1.35 g/cm3 as the particle size increased from 20 to 65 nm. The single particle mass showed good power-law relationship with mobility diameter, with an average mass-mobility exponent of 2.885. A new algorithm and a reference density of 1.38 g/cm3 based on size-resolved single particle mass (SPM) were proposed to calculate the mass concentration of new particles. Two methods based on Log Normal and Max Concentration were applied to derive particle growth rate (GR), and data merging from both methods was implemented to decrease calculation uncertainty. Meanwhile, both continuous nucleation and inhibition of further growth in sub-20 nm size range were observed in different experiments depending on composition, and possible reasons were analyzed. The presence of NO was found to suppress nucleation and subsequent aerosol growth; while the presence of NO2 or toluene promoted it. It was concluded that decreasing NOx (NO or NO2) or increasing toluene may promote SO2 photooxidation, nucleation and subsequent aerosol growth, all of which is significant for deeper

  13. Smog chamber study on aging of combustion soot in isoprene/SO2/NOx system: Changes of mass, size, effective density, morphology and mixing state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kangwei; Chen, Linghong; Han, Ke; Lv, Biao; Bao, Kaiji; Wu, Xuecheng; Gao, Xiang; Cen, Kefa

    2017-02-01

    Atmospheric soot aging process is always accompanied by secondary particle formation, which is a comprehensive environmental issue that deserves great attention. On one hand, aging of primary soot could change its own physicochemical properties; on the other hand, complex air pollution caused by pollutant emission from various sources (e.g., vehicle exhausts, coal-fired flue gases and biogenic VOCs emission) may contribute to secondary particle formation onto primary particle surface. In this study, aging of combustion soot in isoprene/SO2/NOx system was investigated under controlled laboratory conditions in several smog chamber experiments. During the evolution of soot, several physical properties such as mass, size, effective density, morphology and mixing state were determined simultaneously by an integrated aerosol analytical system of Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), Differential Mobility Analyzer-Aerosol Particle Mass Analyzer-Condensation Particle Counter (DMA-APM-CPC) and Transmission Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy-dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (TEM/EDX) techniques. Here, based on the experimental results of soot aging under different gas-phase composition and relative humidity (RH), we firstly proposed possible aging pathways of soot in isoprene/SO2/NOx system. A synergetic effect was speculated to exist between SO2 and isoprene on soot aging process, which led to more secondary particle formation. At the same time, TEM/EDX analysis showed that a competitive mechanism between H2SO4(g) and isoprene oxidation vapor may exist: H2SO4(g) firstly condensed onto fresh soot, then an acceleration of isoprene oxidation products formed onto H2SO4 pre-coated soot. In isoprene/SO2/NOx system, high RH conditions could contribute to soot aging and new particle formation. The changes of effective density and dynamic shape factor of soot also indicated that high RH conditions could accelerate soot aging process, and led chain-like soot into more spherical

  14. [Characterization of photochemical smog chamber and initial experiments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Long; Xu, Yong-Fu; Shi, Yu-Zhen

    2011-02-01

    A self-made new indoor environmental chamber facility for the study of atmospheric processes leading to the formation of ozone and secondary organic aerosols has been introduced and characterized. The characterization experiments include the measurements of wall effects for reactive species and the determination of chamber dependent * OH radical sources by CO-NO(x) irradiation experiments. Preliminary ethene-NO(x) and benzene-NO(x) experiments were conducted as well. The results of characterization experiments show that the wall effects for O3 and NO2 in a new reactor are not obvious. Relative humidity has a great effect on the wall losses in the old reactor, especially for O3. In the old reactor, the rate constant for O3 wall losses is obtained to be 1.0 x 10(-5) s(-1) (RH = 5%) and 4.0 x10(-5) s(-1) (RH = 91%), whereas for NO2, it is 1.0 x 10(-6) s(-1) (RH = 5%) and 0.6 x 10(-6) s(-1) (RH = 75%). The value for k(NO2 --> HONO) determined by CO-NO(x) irradiation experiments is (4.2-5.2) x 10(-5) s(-1) and (2.3-2.5) x 10(-5) s(-1) at RH = 5% and RH 75% -77%, respectively. The average *OH concentration is estimated to be (2.1 +/- 0.4) x 10(6) molecules/cm3 by using a reaction rate coefficient of CO and * OH. The sensitivity of chamber dependent auxiliary reactions to the O3 formation is discussed. Results show that NO2 --> HONO has the greatest impact on the O3 formation during the initial stage, N2O5 + H2O --> 2HNO3 has a minus effect to maximum O3 concentration, and that the wall losses of both O3 and NO2 have little impact on the O3 formation. The results from the ethene-NO(x) and benzene-NO(x) experiments are in good agreement with those from the MCM simulation, which reflects that the facility for the study of the formation of secondary pollution of ozone and secondary organic aerosols is reliable. This demonstrates that our facility can be further used in the deep-going study of chemical processes in the atmosphere.

  15. [Smog chamber simulation of ozone formation from atmospheric photooxidation of propane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-hua; Mo, Chuang-rong; Xu, Yong-fu; Jia, Long

    2012-08-01

    Atmospheric photochemical reactions of propane and NO, were simulated with a self-made smog chamber. The effects of relative humidity (RH) and [C3H8]0/[NOx]0 ratio on ozone formation were studied. The results showed that both the maximum ozone concentration and the maximum value of incremental reactivity (IRmax) of propane decreased linearly with increasing RH. Under lower RH conditions, the occurrence time of peak ozone concentration was about 22 h after the beginning of reaction, and IRmax varied from 0.0231 to 0.0391, while under higher RH conditions the occurrence time of peak ozone concentration was 16 h, and IRmax ranged from 0.0172 to 0.0320. During the 20 h of reaction, within the first 12 h RH did not significantly affect the yield of acetone, whereas after 12 h the lower RH condition could lead to relatively greater amount of acetone. During the first 4-20 h of experiments, acetone concentrations ranged from 153 x 10(-9) to 364 x 10(-9) at 17% RH and from 167 x 10(-9) to 302 x 10(-9) at 62% RH, respectively. Maximum ozone concentrations decreased with increasing [C3H8]0/[NOx]0 ratio and a better negative linear relationship between them was obtained under the lower RH conditions. The smog chamber data and the results from simulation of the C3H8-NOx reactions using the sub-mechanism of MCM were compared, and a significant deviation was found between these two results.

  16. Exploring the Liquefied Petroleum Gas - Ozone Relation in Guadalajara, Mexico, by Smog Chamber Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Jaimes-López, José Luis; Sandoval-Fernández, Julio; Zambrano-García, Angel

    2005-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) emissions can increase substantially the formation of ozone (O3) in the ambient air. We tested experimentally such hypothesis in Guadalajara's downtown by captive-air irradiation (CAI) techniques. During November 1997-January, 1998, morning ambient air samples were confined in outdoor smog chambers and subjected to the following treatments: 35% addition of commercial LPG or one out of two mixtures of major LPG compounds (propane/buta...

  17. Constraining a hybrid volatility basis-set model for aging of wood-burning emissions using smog chamber experiments: a box-model study based on the VBS scheme of the CAMx model (v5.40)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarelli, Giancarlo; El Haddad, Imad; Bruns, Emily; Aksoyoglu, Sebnem; Möhler, Ottmar; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2017-06-01

    In this study, novel wood combustion aging experiments performed at different temperatures (263 and 288 K) in a ˜ 7 m3 smog chamber were modelled using a hybrid volatility basis set (VBS) box model, representing the emission partitioning and their oxidation against OH. We combine aerosol-chemistry box-model simulations with unprecedented measurements of non-traditional volatile organic compounds (NTVOCs) from a high-resolution proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and with organic aerosol measurements from an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Due to this, we are able to observationally constrain the amounts of different NTVOC aerosol precursors (in the model) relative to low volatility and semi-volatile primary organic material (OMsv), which is partitioned based on current published volatility distribution data. By comparing the NTVOC / OMsv ratios at different temperatures, we determine the enthalpies of vaporization of primary biomass-burning organic aerosols. Further, the developed model allows for evaluating the evolution of oxidation products of the semi-volatile and volatile precursors with aging. More than 30 000 box-model simulations were performed to retrieve the combination of parameters that best fit the observed organic aerosol mass and O : C ratios. The parameters investigated include the NTVOC reaction rates and yields as well as enthalpies of vaporization and the O : C of secondary organic aerosol surrogates. Our results suggest an average ratio of NTVOCs to the sum of non-volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds of ˜ 4.75. The mass yields of these compounds determined for a wide range of atmospherically relevant temperatures and organic aerosol (OA) concentrations were predicted to vary between 8 and 30 % after 5 h of continuous aging. Based on the reaction scheme used, reaction rates of the NTVOC mixture range from 3.0 × 10-11 to 4. 0 × 10-11 cm3 molec-1 s-1. The average enthalpy of vaporization of secondary organic aerosol

  18. Constraining a hybrid volatility basis-set model for aging of wood-burning emissions using smog chamber experiments: a box-model study based on the VBS scheme of the CAMx model (v5.40

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ciarelli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, novel wood combustion aging experiments performed at different temperatures (263 and 288 K in a ∼ 7 m3 smog chamber were modelled using a hybrid volatility basis set (VBS box model, representing the emission partitioning and their oxidation against OH. We combine aerosol–chemistry box-model simulations with unprecedented measurements of non-traditional volatile organic compounds (NTVOCs from a high-resolution proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS and with organic aerosol measurements from an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS. Due to this, we are able to observationally constrain the amounts of different NTVOC aerosol precursors (in the model relative to low volatility and semi-volatile primary organic material (OMsv, which is partitioned based on current published volatility distribution data. By comparing the NTVOC ∕ OMsv ratios at different temperatures, we determine the enthalpies of vaporization of primary biomass-burning organic aerosols. Further, the developed model allows for evaluating the evolution of oxidation products of the semi-volatile and volatile precursors with aging. More than 30 000 box-model simulations were performed to retrieve the combination of parameters that best fit the observed organic aerosol mass and O : C ratios. The parameters investigated include the NTVOC reaction rates and yields as well as enthalpies of vaporization and the O : C of secondary organic aerosol surrogates. Our results suggest an average ratio of NTVOCs to the sum of non-volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds of ∼ 4.75. The mass yields of these compounds determined for a wide range of atmospherically relevant temperatures and organic aerosol (OA concentrations were predicted to vary between 8 and 30 % after 5 h of continuous aging. Based on the reaction scheme used, reaction rates of the NTVOC mixture range from 3.0 × 10−11 to 4. 0 × 10−11 cm3 molec−1 s−1

  19. Effects of relative humidity on the characterization of a photochemical smog chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gaoshuo; Xu, Yongfu; Jia, Long

    2011-01-01

    Water vapor plays an important role in many atmospheric chemical reactions. A self-made indoor environmental smog chamber was used to investigate the effects of relative humidity (RH) on its characterization, which included the wall effects of reactive species such as 03 and NOx, and the determination of chamber-dependent OH radicals in terms of CO-NOx irradiation experiments. Results showed that the rate constant of O3 wall losses increased with increasing RH, and that their relationship was linearly significant. Although RH affected the rate constant of NOx wall losses, their relationship was not statistically significant. Background air generated a small amount of ozone at both high and low RH. When RH varied from 5% to 79%, the apparent rate constant kNO2-->HONO for the conversion of NO2 into gas phase HONO was estimated in the range of 0.70 x 10(-3)-2.5 x 10(-3) min(-1). A linear relationship between kNO2-->HONO and RH was obtained as kNO2-->HONO (10(-3) min(-1)) = -0.0255RH + 2.64, with R2 and P value being 0.978 and < 0.01. To our knowledge, this is the first report on their relationship. The generation mechanism for HONO and OH was also discussed in this work.

  20. Analyzing the Formation, Physicochemical, and Optical Properties of Aging Biomass Burning Aerosol Using an Indoor Smog Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. M.; Fiddler, M. N.; Bililign, S.; Spann, M.

    2017-12-01

    Biomass burning (BB) is recognized as one of the largest sources of absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere and significantly influences the radiative properties of the atmosphere. The chemical composition and physical properties of particles evolve during their atmospheric lifetime due to condensation, oxidation reactions, etc., which alters their optical properties. To this end, an indoor smog chamber was constructed to study aging BB aerosol in a laboratory setting. Injections to the chamber, including NOx, O3, and various biogenic and anthropogenic VOCs, can simulate a variety of atmospheric conditions. These components and some of their oxidation products are monitored during the aging process. A tube furnace is used for combustion of biomass to be introduced to the chamber, while size distributions are taken as the aerosol ages. Online measurements of optical properties are determined using a Cavity Ring-down Spectrometry and Integrating Nephelometry system. Chemical properties are measured from samples captured on filters and analyzed using Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled in-line to both a Diode Array Detector and High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer equipped with electrospray ionization. The measured changes in the optical properties as a function of particle size, aging, and chemical properties are presented for fuel sources used in Africa.

  1. Secondary aerosol formation from photochemical aging of aircraft exhaust in a smog chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Miracolo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were performed to investigate the effects of photo-oxidation on fine particle emissions from an in-use CFM56-2B gas turbine engine mounted on a KC-135 Stratotanker airframe. Emissions were sampled into a portable smog chamber from a rake inlet installed one-meter downstream of the engine exit plane of a parked and chocked aircraft. The chamber was then exposed to sunlight and/or UV lights to initiate photo-oxidation. Separate tests were performed at different engine loads (4, 7, 30, 85 %. Photo-oxidation created substantial secondary particulate matter (PM, greatly exceeding the direct PM emissions at each engine load after an hour or less of aging at typical summertime conditions. After several hours of photo-oxidation, the ratio of secondary-to-primary PM mass was on average 35 ± 4.1, 17 ± 2.5, 60 ± 2.2, and 2.7 ± 1.1 for the 4, 7, 30, and 85 % load experiments, respectively. The composition of secondary PM formed strongly depended on load. At 4 % load, secondary PM was dominated by secondary organic aerosol (SOA. At higher loads, the secondary PM was mainly secondary sulfate. A traditional SOA model that accounts for SOA formation from single-ring aromatics and other volatile organic compounds underpredicts the measured SOA formation by ~60 % at 4 % load and ~40 % at 85 % load. Large amounts of lower-volatiliy organic vapors were measured in the exhaust; they represent a significant pool of SOA precursors that are not included in traditional SOA models. These results underscore the importance of accounting for atmospheric processing when assessing the influence of aircraft emissions on ambient PM levels. Models that do not account for this processing will likely underpredict the contribution of aircraft emissions to local and regional air pollution.

  2. Gas-particle partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) on mixtures of aerosols in a smog chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandramouli, Bharadwaj; Jang, Myoseon; Kamens, Richard M

    2003-09-15

    The partitioning behavior of a set of diverse SOCs on two and three component mixtures of aerosols from different sources was studied using smog chamber experimental data. A set of SOCs of different compound types was introduced into a system containing a mixture of aerosols from two or more sources. Gas and particle samples were taken using a filter-filter-denuder sampling system, and a partitioning coefficient Kp was estimated using Kp = Cp/(CgTSP). Particle size distributions were measured using a differential mobility analyzer and a light scattering detector. Gas and particle samples were analyzed using GCMS. The aerosol composition in the chamber was tracked chemically using a combination of signature compounds and the organic matter mass fraction (f(om)) of the individual aerosol sources. The physical nature of the aerosol mixture in the chamber was determined using particle size distributions, and an aggregate Kp was estimated from theoretically calculated Kp on the individual sources. Model fits for Kp showed that when the mixture involved primary sources of aerosol, the aggregate Kp of the mixture could be successfully modeled as an external mixture of the Kp on the individual aerosols. There were significant differences observed for some SOCs between modeling the system as an external and as an internal mixture. However, when one of the aerosol sources was secondary, the aggregate model Kp required incorporation of the secondary aerosol products on the preexisting aerosol for adequate model fits. Modeling such a system as an external mixture grossly overpredicted the Kp of alkanes in the mixture. Indirect evidence of heterogeneous, acid-catalyzed reactions in the particle phase was also seen, leading to a significant increase in the polarity of the resulting aerosol mix and a resulting decrease in the observed Kp of alkanes in the chamber. The model was partly consistent with this decrease but could not completely explain the reduction in Kp because of

  3. Mobile Smog Simulator: New Capabilities to Study Urban Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    A smog simulator developed by EPA scientists and engineers has unique capabilities that will provide information for assessing the health impacts of relevant multipollutant atmospheres and identify contributions of specific sources.

  4. Mutagenicity in Salmonella of a Simulated Urban-Smog Atmosphere Generated Using a Mobile Reaction Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA Mobile Reaction Chamber (MRC) is a 24-foot trailer containing a 14.3-m3 Teflon lined photochemical chamber used to generate simulated urban atmospheres. Photochemistry in the MRC is catalyzed by 120 fluorescent bulbs evenly mixed with black light bulbs and UV bulbs (300 &...

  5. Evaluation of one-dimensional and two-dimensional volatility basis sets in simulating the aging of secondary organic aerosol with smog-chamber experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Shuxiao; Donahue, Neil M; Chuang, Wayne; Hildebrandt Ruiz, Lea; Ng, Nga L; Wang, Yangjun; Hao, Jiming

    2015-02-17

    We evaluate the one-dimensional volatility basis set (1D-VBS) and two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) in simulating the aging of SOA derived from toluene and α-pinene against smog-chamber experiments. If we simulate the first-generation products with empirical chamber fits and the subsequent aging chemistry with a 1D-VBS or a 2D-VBS, the models mostly overestimate the SOA concentrations in the toluene oxidation experiments. This is because the empirical chamber fits include both first-generation oxidation and aging; simulating aging in addition to this results in double counting of the initial aging effects. If the first-generation oxidation is treated explicitly, the base-case 2D-VBS underestimates the SOA concentrations and O:C increase of the toluene oxidation experiments; it generally underestimates the SOA concentrations and overestimates the O:C increase of the α-pinene experiments. With the first-generation oxidation treated explicitly, we could modify the 2D-VBS configuration individually for toluene and α-pinene to achieve good model-measurement agreement. However, we are unable to simulate the oxidation of both toluene and α-pinene with the same 2D-VBS configuration. We suggest that future models should implement parallel layers for anthropogenic (aromatic) and biogenic precursors, and that more modeling studies and laboratory research be done to optimize the "best-guess" parameters for each layer.

  6. Effect of hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides on ozone formation in smog chambers exposed to solar irradiance of Mexico City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval F, J; Marroquin de la R, O; Jaimes L, J. L; Zuniga L, V. A; Gonzalez O, E; Guzman Lopez-Figueroa, F [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-01-01

    Outdoor smog chambers experiments were performed on air to determine the answer of maximum ozone levels, to changes in the initial hydrocarbons, HC, and nitrogen oxide NO{sub x}. These captive-air experiments under natural irradiation were carried out. Typically, eight chambers were filled with Mexico city air in the morning. In some of those chambers, the initial HC and/or Nox concentrations were varied by {+-}25% to {+-}50% by adding various combinations of a mixture of HC, clean air, or NO{sub x} (perturbed chambers). The O{sub 3} and NO{sub x} concentration in each chamber was monitored throughout the day to determine O{sub 3} (max). The initial HC and NO{sub x} concentration effects were determined by comparing the maximum ozone concentrations measured in the perturbed and unperturbed chambers. Ozone isopleths were constructed from the empirical model obtained of measurements of the eight chambers and plotted in a graph whose axe were the initial HC and NO{sub x} values. For the average initial conditions that were measured in Mexico City, it was found that the most efficient strategy to reduce the maximum concentration of O{sub 3} is the one that reduces NO{sub x}. [Spanish] Se realizaron experimentos de camaras de esmog con el aire de la ciudad de Mexico para determinar las respuestas de los niveles maximos de ozono a los cambios en las concentraciones iniciales de hidrocarburos, HC y oxido de nitrogeno, NO{sub x}. Por lo general, se llenaron 8 bolsas con aire matutino de la Ciudad de Mexico. En algunas camaras, las concentraciones iniciales fueron cambiadas de 25% a 50%, anadiendo varias concentraciones de una mezcla de HC, aire limpio y/o NO{sub x}. La concentracion de O{sub 3} y NO{sub x}, en cada camara, fueron monitoreadas a lo largo del dia para determinar el maximo de O{sub 3}. El efecto de los HC y el NO{sub x} fue determinado por comparacion del maximo de ozono formado en las camaras, que fueron perturbadas por adicion o reduccion de HC y/o Nox

  7. Assessing the influence of NOx concentrations and relative humidity on secondary organic aerosol yields from α-pinene photo-oxidation through smog chamber experiments and modelling calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirnweis, Lisa; Marcolli, Claudia; Dommen, Josef; Barmet, Peter; Frege, Carla; Platt, Stephen M.; Bruns, Emily A.; Krapf, Manuel; Slowik, Jay G.; Wolf, Robert; Prévôt, Andre S. H.; Baltensperger, Urs; El-Haddad, Imad

    2017-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields from the photo-oxidation of α-pinene were investigated in smog chamber (SC) experiments at low (23-29 %) and high (60-69 %) relative humidity (RH), various NOx / VOC ratios (0.04-3.8) and with different aerosol seed chemical compositions (acidic to neutralized sulfate-containing or hydrophobic organic). A combination of a scanning mobility particle sizer and an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer was used to determine SOA mass concentration and chemical composition. We used a Monte Carlo approach to parameterize smog chamber SOA yields as a function of the condensed phase absorptive mass, which includes the sum of OA and the corresponding bound liquid water content. High RH increased SOA yields by up to 6 times (1.5-6.4) compared to low RH. The yields at low NOx / VOC ratios were in general higher compared to yields at high NOx / VOC ratios. This NOx dependence follows the same trend as seen in previous studies for α-pinene SOA. A novel approach of data evaluation using volatility distributions derived from experimental data served as the basis for thermodynamic phase partitioning calculations of model mixtures in this study. These calculations predict liquid-liquid phase separation into organic-rich and electrolyte phases. At low NOx conditions, equilibrium partitioning between the gas and liquid phases can explain most of the increase in SOA yields observed at high RH, when in addition to the α-pinene photo-oxidation products described in the literature, fragmentation products are added to the model mixtures. This increase is driven by both the increase in the absorptive mass and the solution non-ideality described by the compounds' activity coefficients. In contrast, at high NOx, equilibrium partitioning alone could not explain the strong increase in the yields with RH. This suggests that other processes, e.g. reactive uptake of semi-volatile species into the liquid phase, may occur and be

  8. Molecular size evolution of oligomers in organic aerosols collected in urban atmospheres and generated in a smog chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalberer, Markus; Sax, Mirjam; Samburova, Vera

    2006-10-01

    Only a minor fraction of the total organic aerosol mass can be resolved on a molecular level. High molecular weight compounds in organic aerosols have recently gained much attention because this class of compound potentially explains a major fraction of the unexplained organic aerosol mass. These compounds have been identified with different mass spectrometric methods, and compounds with molecular masses up to 1000 Da are found in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from aromatic and terpene precursors in smog chamber experiments. Here, we apply matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to SOA particles from two biogenic precursors, alpha-pinene and isoprene. Similar oligomer patterns are found in these two SOA systems, but also in SOA from trimethylbenzene, an anthropogenic SOA precursor. However, different maxima molecular sizes were measured for these three SOA systems. While oligomers in alpha-pinene and isoprene have sizes mostly below 600-700 Da, they grow up to about 1000 Da in trimethylbenzene-SOA. The final molecular size of the oligomers is reached early during the particle aging process, whereas other particle properties related to aging, such as the overall acid concentration or the oligomer concentration, increase continuously over a much longer time scale. This kinetic behavior of the oligomer molecular size growth can be explained by a chain growth kinetic regime. Similar oligomer mass patterns were measured in aqueous extracts of ambient aerosol samples (measured with the same technique). Distinct differences between summer and winter were observed. In summer a few single mass peaks were measured with much higher intensity than in winter, pointing to a possible difference in the formation processes of these compounds in winter and summer.

  9. SMOG-CHAMBER TOXICOLOGY BETTER ESTIMATES THE TRUE TOXIC POTENTIAL OF ATMOSPHERIC MIXTURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemistry of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) have been studied for many years, yet little is known about how these chemicals, once interacted with urban atmospheres, affect healthy and susceptible individuals. The toxic potential of these very reactive compounds once they int...

  10. A Questionnaire Case Study to Investigate Public Awareness of Smog Pollution in China’s Rural Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jiang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Smog pollution is one of China’s most pressing public health issues today and has therefore received significant attention worldwide. Not only cities but also villages in China are suffering from smog pollution, especially since 2013. However, there is limited information available about public awareness on smog pollution in China, especially for where it concerns the residents living in villages. Based on a questionnaire survey, this study aims to help fill this gap. The results of the study show that the income of the majority of respondents comes from working in the city, accounting for 31.6% of the total income. The percentages for respondents related to access to smog information from various channels are as follows: TV (28.5%, radio (24.2%, neighbors (13.5%, Internet (9.8%, newspapers (8.3% and others (7.8%. As for attitudes regarding the severity degree and main cause of smog pollution, most respondents (33.7% thought smog pollution in villages was somewhat severe, while 26.3% agreed that the main contributor to smog pollution was industrial emissions, followed by coal burning at power plants (20.9% and vehicle emissions (17.7%. The results also indicate that most of the respondents were satisfied with the government’s performance in terms of smog control. However, 67.9% of respondents indicated they would remain silent and not intervene when confronted by an activity that causes smog pollution. This study can help to improve an understanding of public awareness regarding smog pollution in China’s rural areas and thereby activate positive public participation in smog pollution prevention and management in the search for sustainable development.

  11. A chromatographic method to analyze products from photo-oxidation of anthropogenic and biogenic mixtures of volatile organic compounds in smog chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindado Jiménez, Oscar; Pérez Pastor, Rosa M; Vivanco, Marta G; Santiago Aladro, Manuel

    2013-03-15

    A method for quantifying secondary organic aerosol compounds (SOA) and water soluble secondary organic aerosol compounds (WSOA) produced from photo-oxidation of complex mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in smog chambers by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been developed. This method employs a double extraction with water and methanol jointly to a double derivatization with N,O-bis (trimethylsilil) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) and O-(2,3,4,5,6)-pentafluorobenzyl-hydroxylamine hydrochloride (PFBHA) followed by an analysis performed by GC/MS. The analytical procedure complements other methodologies because it can analyze SOA and WSOA compounds simultaneously at trace levels. As application, the methodology was employed to quantify the organic composition of aerosols formed in a smog chamber as a result of photo-oxidation of two different mixtures of volatile organic compounds: an anthropogenic mixture and a biogenic mixture. The analytical method allowed us to quantify up to 17 SOA compounds at levels higher than 20 ng m(-3) with reasonable recovery and a precision below 11%. Values found for applicability, selectivity, linearity, precision, recovery, detection limit, quantification limit and sensitivity demonstrated that the methodology can be satisfactorily applied to quantify SOA and WSOA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamical Networks for Smog Pattern Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zong, Linqi; Gong, Xinyi; Zhu, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Smog, as a form of air pollution, poses as a serious problem to the environment, health, and economy of the world[1-4] . Previous studies on smog mostly focused on the components and the effects of smog [5-10]. However, as the smog happens with increased frequency and duration, the smog pattern which is critical for smog forecast and control, is rarely investigated, mainly due to the complexity of the components, the causes, and the spreading processes of smog. Here we report the first analys...

  13. Smog wars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gospodarek, M.P.

    1979-04-12

    International discussions of transboundary pollution, which have not been able to find a way to effect the agreed-upon principle that no nation should have to suffer another nation's pollution, parallel the smog wars across state boundaries. The states, however, can blame the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as well as each other because of relaxed and unevenly applied standards. Several EPA decisions are cited to illustrate tensions between states and the alienation of the environmental lobby. Of particular concern are the application of smog and ozone standards in rural areas and the effect of offset policy on industrial development.

  14. How Smog Awareness Influences Public Acceptance of Congestion Charge Policies

    OpenAIRE

    Lingyi Zhou; Yixin Dai

    2017-01-01

    Although various studies have investigated public acceptance of congestion charge policies, most of them have focused on behavioral and policy-related factors, and did not consider the moderating influence that individual concern about smog and perceived smog risk may have on public acceptance. This paper takes the congestion charge policy in China, targeted at smog and traffic control, and checks how smog awareness—including smog concerns and perceived smog risks, besides behavioral and poli...

  15. Radiation smog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurny, Z.

    1988-01-01

    The principle is described of the production of radiation smog resulting from radioactive emisions. The differences are discussed in the contamination over the territory of Czechoslovakia following the Chernobyl accident. The higher surface contamination of industrial areas recorded after the accident can be explained by electroprecipitation of industrial impurities with the radicals and ions of the radioactive cloud. (E.S.). 3 figs., 16 refs

  16. Volatile Organic Compounds from Logwood Combustion: Emissions and Transformation under Dark and Photochemical Aging Conditions in a Smog Chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartikainen, Anni; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Tiitta, Petri; Leskinen, Ari; Kortelainen, Miika; Orasche, Jürgen; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Lehtinen, Kari E J; Zimmermann, Ralf; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Sippula, Olli

    2018-04-17

    Residential wood combustion (RWC) emits high amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into ambient air, leading to formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and various health and climate effects. In this study, the emission factors of VOCs from a logwood-fired modern masonry heater were measured using a Proton-Transfer-Reactor Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer. Next, the VOCs were aged in a 29 m 3 Teflon chamber equipped with UV black lights, where dark and photochemical atmospheric conditions were simulated. The main constituents of the VOC emissions were carbonyls and aromatic compounds, which accounted for 50%-52% and 30%-46% of the detected VOC emission, respectively. Emissions were highly susceptible to different combustion conditions, which caused a 2.4-fold variation in emission factors. The overall VOC concentrations declined considerably during both dark and photochemical aging, with simultaneous increase in particulate organic aerosol mass. Especially furanoic and phenolic compounds decreased, and they are suggested to be the major precursors of RWC-originated SOA in all aging conditions. On the other hand, dark aging produced relatively high amounts of nitrogen-containing organic compounds in both gas and particulate phase, while photochemical aging increased especially the concentrations of certain gaseous carbonyls, particularly acid anhydrides.

  17. Public perception of smog: A case study in Ningbo City, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuncheng; Shi, Longyu

    2017-02-01

    Smog has become a public environmental crisis in most areas of China, and in response, research efforts have mainly focused on the chemical properties of smog and its impact on human health. However, in-depth research on the public's perception of smog has not yet been conducted. A survey of residents living around eight state-controlled atmospheric environmental monitoring sites in Ningbo City was conducted using stratified sampling. The data was statistically analyzed to investigate people's views and behavioral tendencies in smog weather, the influence of different media reports on public outlook, and public opinions on the local atmosphere and pollution management in different areas. The results showed that people's perception of smog differs greatly from actual conditions, indicating that the public opinion tends to deviate when faced with a public crisis. Mainstream media (TV, newspaper, etc.), accounting for 67% of all media sources, are the main source for dissemination of smog information. The main sources of pollution, in order of decreasing contribution, according to residents of Ningbo City are as follows: motor vehicle exhaust, industrial coal combustion, large-scale construction, biomass burning, and kitchen fumes. Since 2011, most areas of China have been affected by frequent smog. Most research on smog has been concentrated on its causes, alert systems, and prevention measures, whereas in-depth research on the public perception of smog has not yet been conducted. When a risky environmental event such as smog occurs, consequences may be more serious than the event itself will cause if people take irrational measures because of lacking relevant knowledge. Therefore, investigating people's attitude and response to smog is both theoretically and practically significant.

  18. Modelling winter organic aerosol at the European scale with CAMx: evaluation and source apportionment with a VBS parameterization based on novel wood burning smog chamber experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarelli, Giancarlo; Aksoyoglu, Sebnem; El Haddad, Imad; Bruns, Emily A.; Crippa, Monica; Poulain, Laurent; Äijälä, Mikko; Carbone, Samara; Freney, Evelyn; O'Dowd, Colin; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2017-06-01

    We evaluated a modified VBS (volatility basis set) scheme to treat biomass-burning-like organic aerosol (BBOA) implemented in CAMx (Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions). The updated scheme was parameterized with novel wood combustion smog chamber experiments using a hybrid VBS framework which accounts for a mixture of wood burning organic aerosol precursors and their further functionalization and fragmentation in the atmosphere. The new scheme was evaluated for one of the winter EMEP intensive campaigns (February-March 2009) against aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements performed at 11 sites in Europe. We found a considerable improvement for the modelled organic aerosol (OA) mass compared to our previous model application with the mean fractional bias (MFB) reduced from -61 to -29 %. We performed model-based source apportionment studies and compared results against positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis performed on OA AMS data. Both model and observations suggest that OA was mainly of secondary origin at almost all sites. Modelled secondary organic aerosol (SOA) contributions to total OA varied from 32 to 88 % (with an average contribution of 62 %) and absolute concentrations were generally under-predicted. Modelled primary hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) and primary biomass-burning-like aerosol (BBPOA) fractions contributed to a lesser extent (HOA from 3 to 30 %, and BBPOA from 1 to 39 %) with average contributions of 13 and 25 %, respectively. Modelled BBPOA fractions were found to represent 12 to 64 % of the total residential-heating-related OA, with increasing contributions at stations located in the northern part of the domain. Source apportionment studies were performed to assess the contribution of residential and non-residential combustion precursors to the total SOA. Non-residential combustion and road transportation sector contributed about 30-40 % to SOA formation (with increasing contributions at urban and near

  19. Smog signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fick, S.; Shilts, E.

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) gas is created when fossil fuels are burned. Hot spots of NO 2 pollution in the troposphere have been identified by researchers at the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute. In addition to traffic, the biggest emitters of NO 2 include power plants, heavy industry and oil refineries. The City of Shanghai in China ranks with Los Angeles and Mexico City as the urban areas with the highest NO 2 concentrations in the world. NO 2 combines with particles in the air to create a smog that hangs over larger cities in the summer and plays a role in the production of ground-level ozone, both of which cause a variety of respiratory problems. According to the World Health Organization, such air pollution reduces the life of the average European by 8.6 months. This article included a map indicating NO 2 concentrations around the world. The high levels at Fort McMurray, Alberta can be attributed to the NO 2 emitted by oil sands plants. Individual power plants in Chandrapur and Ramagundam in India and oil refineries around the Persian Gulf also revealed high levels, as did the Highveld area outside of Johannesburg in South Africa, where a number of power plants sit on a plateau. At high altitude, NO 2 lingers longer in the air. In the past decade in Europe and eastern North America, cleaner technology in cars and power plants has led to declines in NO 2 in those regions. However, huge increases in emissions in East Asia mean the air will remain smoggy. 1 fig

  20. Feasibility study of a synchronized-moving-grid (SMOG) system to improve image quality in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lei; Yin, Fang-Fang; Chetty, Indrin J; Jaffray, David A; Jin, Jian-Yue

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a synchronized moving grid (SMOG) system to remove scatter artifacts, improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and reduce image lag artifacts in cone-beam CT (CBCT). The SMOG system proposed here uses a rapidly oscillating, synchronized moving grid attached to the kV source. Multiple partial projections are taken at different grid positions to form a complete projection in each gantry position, before the gantry moves to the next position during a scan. The grid has a low transmission factor, and it is used for both scatter reduction and scatter measurement for postscan scatter correction. Experimental studies using a static grid and an enlarged CATphan phantom were performed to evaluate the potential CNR enhancement for different SMOG exposure numbers (1, 2, and 4). Simulation studies were performed to evaluate the image lag correction for different exposure numbers (2, 3, and 4) and grid interspace widths in SMOG using the data from an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom scan. Imaging dose of SMOG was also estimated by measuring the imaging dose in a CIRS CT dose phantom using a static grid. SMOG can enhance the CNR by 16% and 13% when increasing exposure number from 1 to 2 and from 2 to 4, respectively. This enhancement was more dramatic for larger phantoms and smaller initial exposure numbers. Simulation results indicated that SMOG could reduce the lag to less than 4.3% for 2-exposure mode and to less than 0.8% for 3-exposure mode when the grid interspace width was 1.4 cm. Increasing the number of exposures in SMOG dramatically reduced the residual lag in the image. Reducing the grid interspace width somewhat reduced the residual lag. Skin line artifacts were removed entirely in SMOG. Point dose measurement showed that imaging dose of SMOG at isocenter was similar as that of a conventional CBCT. Compared to our previously developed static-grid dual-rotation method, the proposed SMOG technique has the advantages of enhancing the CNR

  1. Feasibility study of a synchronized-moving-grid (SMOG) system to improve image quality in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Lei; Yin Fangfang; Chetty, Indrin J.; Jaffray, David A.; Jin Jianyue

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of a synchronized moving grid (SMOG) system to remove scatter artifacts, improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and reduce image lag artifacts in cone-beam CT (CBCT). Methods: The SMOG system proposed here uses a rapidly oscillating, synchronized moving grid attached to the kV source. Multiple partial projections are taken at different grid positions to form a complete projection in each gantry position, before the gantry moves to the next position during a scan. The grid has a low transmission factor, and it is used for both scatter reduction and scatter measurement for postscan scatter correction. Experimental studies using a static grid and an enlarged CATphan phantom were performed to evaluate the potential CNR enhancement for different SMOG exposure numbers (1, 2, and 4). Simulation studies were performed to evaluate the image lag correction for different exposure numbers (2, 3, and 4) and grid interspace widths in SMOG using the data from an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom scan. Imaging dose of SMOG was also estimated by measuring the imaging dose in a CIRS CT dose phantom using a static grid. Results: SMOG can enhance the CNR by 16% and 13% when increasing exposure number from 1 to 2 and from 2 to 4, respectively. This enhancement was more dramatic for larger phantoms and smaller initial exposure numbers. Simulation results indicated that SMOG could reduce the lag to less than 4.3% for 2-exposure mode and to less than 0.8% for 3-exposure mode when the grid interspace width was 1.4 cm. Increasing the number of exposures in SMOG dramatically reduced the residual lag in the image. Reducing the grid interspace width somewhat reduced the residual lag. Skin line artifacts were removed entirely in SMOG. Point dose measurement showed that imaging dose of SMOG at isocenter was similar as that of a conventional CBCT. Conclusions: Compared to our previously developed static-grid dual-rotation method, the proposed SMOG technique

  2. How Smog Awareness Influences Public Acceptance of Congestion Charge Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyi Zhou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Although various studies have investigated public acceptance of congestion charge policies, most of them have focused on behavioral and policy-related factors, and did not consider the moderating influence that individual concern about smog and perceived smog risk may have on public acceptance. This paper takes the congestion charge policy in China, targeted at smog and traffic control, and checks how smog awareness—including smog concerns and perceived smog risks, besides behavioral and policy-related factors—might influence public acceptance of the policy. In this paper, we found both a direct and moderating causal relationship between smog awareness and public acceptance. Based on a sample of 574 valid questionnaires in Beijing and Shanghai in 2016, an ordered logistic regression modeling approach was used to delineate the causality between smog awareness and public acceptance. We found that both smog concerns, such as perceived smog risk, and willingness to pay (WTP were both directly and indirectly positively correlated with public acceptance. These findings imply that policymakers should increase policy fairness with environmental-oriented policy design and should express potential policy effectiveness of the smog controlling policy to citizens to increase their acceptance level.

  3. Photochemical smog and plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, T.

    1974-07-01

    Surveys of plant damage due to photochemical smog are summarized. The components of smog which appear to be responsible for plant damage include ozone and peroxyacyl nitrates. Their phytotoxic effects are much greater than those due to sulfur oxides. Damage surveys since 1970 reveal the following symptoms appearing on herbaceous plants (morning glory, cocks comb, dahlia, knotweed, petunia, chickweed, Welsh onion, spinach, Chinese cabbage, chard, taro): yellowish-white leaf discoloration, white and brown spots on matured leaves, and silvering of the lower surfaces of young leaves. Symptoms which appear on arboraceous plants such as zelkova, poplar, ginkgo, planetree, rose mallow, magnolia, pine tree, and rhododendron include early yellowing and reddening, white or brown spots, and untimely leaf-fall. The above plants are now utilized as indicator plants of photochemical smog. Surveys covering a broad area of Tokyo and three other prefectures indicate that plant damage due to photochemical smog extends to relatively unpolluted areas.

  4. Comparative Toxicity of Simulated Smog Atmospheres in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of complex regional multipollutant mixtures on disease expression in susceptible populations are dependent on multiple exposure and susceptibility factors. Differing profiles of ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and particulate matter (PM), which are key components of smog, and other hazardous pollutants may develop as a result of regional-specific geographic and urban environment characteristics. We investigated the pulmonary effects of two smog mixtures with different compositions in a mouse model of allergic airway disease to determine which source profile had the greatest impact on pulmonary endpoints. A hydrocarbon mixture was combined with NO gas in the presence of UV light in a controlled setting. Simulated smog atmosphere 1 (SSA-1) consisted of concentrations of 1070 µg/m3 secondary organic aerosol (SOA), 0.104 ppm O3, and 0.252 ppm NO2. SSA-2 consisted of a starting concentration of 53 µg/m3 SOA, 0.376 ppm O3, and 0.617 ppm NO2. An increased aerosol concentration was noted in the exposure chamber. Healthy and house dust mite (HDM)-sensitized (allergic) female BALB/cJ mice were exposed 4 hr/day for 1 or 5 days to either smog mixture or clean air. Two days after HDM challenge, airway mechanics were tested in anesthetized ventilated mice. Following methacholine aerosol challenge, increased airway resistance and elastance and a decrease in lung compliance were consistently observed in air- and smog-exposed HDM-allergic groups compared with non-a

  5. SMOG CHAMBER STUDIES OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOLS FROM IRRADIATED HYDROCARBONS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the physics and chemistry of aerosols is fundamental to evaluating health risks and developing and evaluating atmospheric models. However, as noted in a recent NRC report only about 10% of the organics in PM2.5 have been identified. A significant portion of the un...

  6. Nova target chamber decontamination study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    An engineering study was performed to determine the most effective method for decontamination of the Nova target chamber. Manual and remote decontamination methods currently being used were surveyed. In addition, a concept that may not require in-situ decontamination was investigated. Based on the presently available information concerning material and system compatibility and particle penetration, it is recommended that a system of removable aluminum shields be considered. It is also recommended that a series of tests be performed to more precisely determine the vacuum compatibility and penetrability of other materials discussed in this report

  7. The Great London Smog of 1952.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivka, Barbara J

    2018-04-01

    : The Great London Smog of December 1952 lasted five days and killed up to 12,000 people. The smog developed primarily because of extensive burning of high-sulfur coal. The health effects were both immediate and long lasting, with a recent study revealing an increased likelihood of childhood asthma development in those exposed to the Great Smog while in utero or during their first year of life. Subsequent pollution legislation-including the U.S. Clean Air Act and its amendments-have demonstrably reduced air pollution and positively impacted health outcomes. With poor air quality events like the Great Smog continuing to occur today, nurses need to be aware of the impact such environmental disasters can have on human health.

  8. Steering smog prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Liere (Robert); J.J. van Wijk (Jack)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe use of computational steering for smog prediction is described. This application is representative for many underlying issues found in steering high performance applications: high computing times, large data sets, and many different input parameters. After a short description of the

  9. Menace of smog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemmerer, J B

    1959-01-01

    In addition to the loss of human and animal lives, smog causes extensive damage to plant life. With the increasing industrialization of the Los Angeles Basin, air pollution is increasing and causing serious damage to lawns, flowering plants, arable and horticultural crops.

  10. [A study on the role of vascular endothelial growth factor in emphysema of rat caused by smog exposure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-long; Ran, Pi-xin

    2003-11-01

    To explore the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in emphysema of rat caused by smog exposure. Thirty-six 12-week male rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: a smog exposure group (S group), and a normal control group (N group). S group rats were randomly subdivided into 3 groups: S(1) group, S(2) group, S(3) group, which were exposed to smog for 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, respectively; N group rats were randomly subdivided into 3 groups: N(1) group, N(2) group, N(3) group, which were raised in normal oxygen condition for 0 week, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, respectively. The expressions of VEGF mRNA and VEGF protein and kinase-insert domain containing receptor (KDR) protein were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and modified SABC immunohistochemistry assay separately. The pathological change in smog exposure rat lung was determined by HE staining. MLI and MAN were determined as an index of emphysema. Variance analysis, nonparametric analysis and correlate analysis were conducted in SPSS 10.0. (1) There were airway inflammation in S group rat lungs, and an early-emphysema-like change in S(3) group rat lungs: MAN in S(3) group was significantly decreased compared with N(3) group, MLI in S(3) group was significantly increased compared with N(3) group (P 0.05). (3) VEGF protein expression in alveolar epithelium and bronchial epithelium had a positive correlation with MAN (r = 0.43, r = 0.37, P Smog exposure decrease the expression of VEGF and KDR in rat lung. VEGF might involve in the pathology of emphysema caused by smog exposure.

  11. D0 central tracking chamber performance studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzuto, D.

    1991-12-01

    The performance of the completed DO central tracking chamber was studied using cosmic rays at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Also studied was a prototype tracking chamber identical in design to the completed DO tracking chamber. The prototype chamber was exposed to a collimated beam of 150 GeV pions at the Fermilab NWA test facility. Results indicate an RΦ tracking resolution compatible with the limitations imposed by physical considerations, excellent 2 track resolution, and a high track reconstruction efficiency along with a good rejection power against γ → e + e - events

  12. Two Simulated-Smog Atmospheres with Different Chemical Compositions Produce Contrasting Mutagenicity in Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone (O3), particulate matter (PM), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are criteria pollutants used to evaluate air quality. Using a 14.3-m3 Teflon-lined smog chamber with 120 UV bulbs to simulate solar radiation, we generated 2 simulated-smog atmospheres (SSA-1 & SSA-2) with differ...

  13. Surviving With Smog and Smoke: Precision Interventions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hua; Wang, Chen

    2017-11-01

    Despite continuous efforts of regional governmental agencies, air pollution remains a major threat to public health worldwide. In January 2017, a severe episode of smog similar to the Great Smog of 1952 occurred in London. The longest episode of Chinese haze also developed in Beijing, during which levels of particulate matter smog and Chinese haze are associated with large numbers of premature deaths each year, at 400,000 and 1.2 million, respectively, primarily from respiratory diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, and ischemic heart diseases. In addition to air pollution, some are exposed to other harmful environmental factors, such as secondhand smoke. For countries with large populations of smokers, such as China, India, the United States, and Russia, surviving both smog and smoke is a serious problem. With novel genomic and epigenomic studies revealing air pollution- and smoking-induced mutational signatures and epigenetic editing in diseases such as lung cancer, it has become feasible to develop precision strategies for early intervention in the disease-causing pathways driven by the specific mutations or epigenetic regulations, or both. New therapies guided by gene-drug interactions and genomic biomarkers may also be developed. We discuss both perspectives regarding the urgent need to manage the toxic effects of smog and smoke for the benefit of global health and the novel concept of precision intervention to protect the exposed individuals when exposure to smog and secondhand smoke cannot be voluntarily avoided or easily modified. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential cardiac effects in rats exposed to atmospheric smog generated from isoprene versus toluene

    Science.gov (United States)

    The results of this study demonstrate that atmospheric smog generated from both isoprene and toluene cause cardiac effects in rats. In addition, it appears that smog from toluene is more toxic in terms of cardiac arrhythmogenicity. Smog, which is a comple...

  15. Comparative cardiopulmonary effects of particulate matter- and ozone-enhanced smog atmospheres in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to compare the cardiac effects of particulate matter (PM)-enhanced and ozone(O3)-enhanced smog atmospheres in mice. We hypothesized that O3-enhanced smog would cause greater cardiac dysfunction than PM-enhanced smog due to the higher concentrations of irr...

  16. Temperature Studies for ATLAS MDT BOS Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Engl, A.; Biebel, O.; Mameghani, R.; Merkl, D.; Rauscher, F.; Schaile, D.; Ströhmer, R.

    Data sets with high statistics taken at the cosmic ray facility, equipped with 3 ATLAS BOS MDT chambers, in Garching (Munich) have been used to study temperature and pressure effects on gas gain and drifttime. The deformation of a thermally expanded chamber was reconstructed using the internal RasNik alignment monitoring system and the tracks from cosmic data. For these studies a heating system was designed to increase the temperature of the middle chamber by up to 20 Kelvins over room temperature. For comparison the temperature effects on gas properties have been simulated with Garfield. The maximum drifttime decreased under temperature raise by -2.21 +- 0.08 ns/K, in agreement with the results of pressure variations and the Garfield simulation. The increased temperatures led to a linear increase of the gas gain of about 2.1% 1/K. The chamber deformation has been analyzed with the help of reconstructed tracks. By the comparison of the tracks through the reference chambers with these through the test chamber ...

  17. Final report for NIF chamber dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnham, A; Peterson, P F; Scott, J M

    1998-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 1.8 MJ, 192 laser beam facility, will have anticipated fusion yields of up to 20 MJ from D-T pellets encased in a gold hohlraum target. The energy emitted from the target in the form of x rays, neutrons, target debris kinetic energy, and target shrapnel will be contained in a 5 m. radius spherical target chamber. various diagnostics will be stationed around the target at varying distances from the target. During each shot, the target will emit x rays that will vaporize nearby target facing surfaces including those of the diagnostics, the target positioner, and other chamber structures. This ablated vapor will be transported throughout the chamber, and will eventually condense and deposit on surfaces in the chamber, including the final optics debris shields. The research at the University of California at Berkeley relates primarily to the NIF chamber dynamics. The key design issues are the ablation of the chamber structures, transport of the vapor through the chamber and the condensation or deposition processes of those vaporized materials. An understanding of these processes is essential in developing a concept for protecting the fina optics debris shields from an excessive coating (> 10 A) of target debris and ablated material, thereby prolonging their lifetime between change-outs. At Berkeley, we have studied the physical issues of the ablation process and the effects of varying materials, the condensation process of the vaporized material, and design schemes that can lower the threat posed to the debris shields by these processes. The work or portions of the work completed this year have been published in several papers and a dissertation [l-5

  18. Smog Yellows Taj Mahal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Built as a monument to the favorite wife of the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan, the Taj Mahal has watched over the city of Agra, India, since the mid-seventeenth century with its pillars of gleaming white marble. By the spring of 2007, however, one of the world's most visited landmarks was turning yellow, and a panel of India's parliament had little trouble identifying the culprit: pollution. The panel blamed particles of soot and dirt suspended high in the atmosphere for the Taj Mahal's dinginess. The Taj Mahal's home, Agra, sits not far from the base of the Himalaya, and smog regularly collects along the southern side of the mountain range. On May 16, 2007, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of the area around Agra, India. The closeup image shows the immediate vicinity of the Taj Majal. The larger image shows the surrounding area. In both pictures, dingy, gray-beige haze obscures the satellite's view of the land surface. India had tried to minimize the adverse impact of air pollution on the famous landmark. According to the BBC, in the late 1990s, India's Supreme Court ordered the closure of thousands of iron foundries and kilns that had belched smoke near the monument. Many of the 3 million tourists who visited the Taj Majal each year approached the monument on horse-drawn carriages or battery-operated buses as fossil-fuel-powered vehicles could not drive within 2 kilometers (1.5 miles). Since those efforts have failed to save the Taj Majal's complexion, Indian officials have considered applying a cleansing mud pack to the monument's surface to draw out the dirt. As India industrializes, smog results, and the Taj Mahal's gleaming whiteness is only one casualty. Pollution has been blamed for a decrease in Indian rice harvests, which had soared during the 'Green Revolution' of the 1960s and 1970s. Haze and dust also appear to bring on the region's monsoon rains earlier than normal.

  19. Toronto Smog Summit Report Card

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This 'report card' provides a summary of actions taken, and progress achieved by the federal government, the provincial government and the City of Toronto, respectively, in response to various previous commitments regarding air quality, sustainable transportation, climate and atmospheric research, investing in green infrastructure (federal government), environmental assessment regulations, transboundary air pollution, improved monitoring and reporting regulations. Ratings also cover efforts in imposing emissions caps on the electric industry, emissions reduction trading system, toll-free public air pollution hotline, regulation of ozone depleting substances (provincial government), public education campaign on smog reduction, energy efficiency initiatives, corporate smog alert response plan, and a number of other environmental issues (City of Toronto)

  20. Estimated emission reductions from California's enhanced Smog Check program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Brett C; Wenzel, Thomas P

    2003-06-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requires that states evaluate the effectiveness of their vehicle emissions inspection and maintenance (I/M) programs. This study demonstrates an evaluation approach that estimates mass emission reductions over time and includes the effect of I/M on vehicle deterioration. It includes a quantitative assessment of benefits from pre-inspection maintenance and repairs and accounts for the selection bias effect that occurs when intermittent high emitters are tested. We report estimates of one-cycle emission benefits of California's Enhanced Smog Check program, ca. 1999. Program benefits equivalent to metric tons per day of prevented emissions were calculated with a "bottom-up" approach that combined average per vehicle reductions in mass emission rates (g/gal) with average per vehicle activity, resolved by model year. Accelerated simulation mode test data from the statewide vehicle information database (VID) and from roadside Smog Check testing were used to determine 2-yr emission profiles of vehicles passing through Smog Check and infer emission profiles that would occur without Smog Check. The number of vehicles participating in Smog Check was also determined from the VID. We estimate that in 1999 Smog Check reduced tailpipe emissions of HC, CO, and NO(x) by 97, 1690, and 81 t/d, respectively. These correspond to 26, 34, and 14% of the HC, CO, and NO(x) that would have been emitted by vehicles in the absence of Smog Check. These estimates are highly sensitive to assumptions about vehicle deterioration in the absence of Smog Check. Considering the estimated uncertainty in these assumptions yields a range for calculated benefits: 46-128 t/d of HC, 860-2200 t/d of CO, and 60-91 t/d of NO(x). Repair of vehicles that failed an initial, official Smog Check appears to be the most important mechanism of emission reductions, but pre-inspection maintenance and repair also contributed substantially. Benefits from removal of nonpassing

  1. Psychopathological Symptoms under Smog: The Role of Emotion Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuquan; Kong, Jiayang; Yu, Feng; Peng, Kaiping

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, major cities in China have suffered from severe air pollution, which is also known as smog. Despite lay considerations that smog might pose risks for psychopathology, it remains unknown whether it is only linked to affective psychopathology or to a broader range of symptomologies. Moreover, whether individual differences in emotion regulation, a transdiagnostic risk factor for psychopathology, would influence the magnitude of pollution-induced symptoms is not well understood. Using a longitudinal design, the current study measured trait emotion regulation and psychopathological symptoms in a sample of university students at Time 1 (without smog, N = 120) and then reassessed for psychopathology at Time 2 (after acute exposure to smog for 1 week, N = 102). The results showed that participants had higher levels of positive symptom distress, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, and psychoticism at Time 2. Moreover, reappraisal is negatively associated with smog-induced elevations in psychopathological symptoms only when participants rely heavily on suppression. We discuss the implications of this investigation for both intervention efforts and future work on the contextual factors surrounding the deployment of emotion regulation strategies.

  2. Psychopathological Symptoms under Smog: The Role of Emotion Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuquan Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, major cities in China have suffered from severe air pollution, which is also known as smog. Despite lay considerations that smog might pose risks for psychopathology, it remains unknown whether it is only linked to affective psychopathology or to a broader range of symptomologies. Moreover, whether individual differences in emotion regulation, a transdiagnostic risk factor for psychopathology, would influence the magnitude of pollution-induced symptoms is not well understood. Using a longitudinal design, the current study measured trait emotion regulation and psychopathological symptoms in a sample of university students at Time 1 (without smog, N = 120 and then reassessed for psychopathology at Time 2 (after acute exposure to smog for 1 week, N = 102. The results showed that participants had higher levels of positive symptom distress, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, and psychoticism at Time 2. Moreover, reappraisal is negatively associated with smog-induced elevations in psychopathological symptoms only when participants rely heavily on suppression. We discuss the implications of this investigation for both intervention efforts and future work on the contextual factors surrounding the deployment of emotion regulation strategies.

  3. Study and analysis of drift chamber parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Laso, L.

    1988-01-01

    The present work deals mainly with drift chambers. In the first chapter a summary of drift chamber properties is presented. The information has been collected from the extensive bibliography available in this field. A very simple calculation procedure of drift chamber parameters has been developed and is presented in detail in the second chapter. Some prototypes have been made following two geometries (multidrift chamber and Z-chambers). Several installations have been used for test and calibration of these prototypes. A complete description of these installations is given in the third chapter. Cosmic rays, beta particles from a Ru106 radiactive source and a test beam in the WA (West Area) of SPS at CERN have been used for experimental purposes. The analysis and the results are described for the different setups. The experimental measurements have been used to produce a complete cell parametrization (position as function of drift time) and to obtain spatial resolution values (in the range of 200-250 um). Experimental results are in good agreement with numerical calculations. (Author)

  4. An historical experiment: Los Angeles smog evolution observed by blimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidy, G M

    2018-02-12

    Observations of smog over the Los Angeles Basin (LAB) links high oxidant mixing ratios with poor visibility, sometimes smog by blimp in a Lagrangian-like format. The experiment on September 6, 1973, demonstrated that a blimp could travel with the wind across the LAB, observing ozone (O 3 ) and precursors, and particles of different size ranges. These included condensation nuclei (CN) concentrations dominated by particles of ≤ 0.1 µm diameter and light scattering coefficient (b sc ) representing mainly particles of 0.1-2.0 µm diameter. The results indicated a pollutant variation similar to that measured at a fixed site. Ozone was produced in an air mass, reaching a maximum of ~400 ppb in the presence of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) and nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), then declined. Although the photochemistry was developing, b sc grew with O 3 mixing ratio to a quasi-steady state at ~9-10 × 10 -4  m -1 , decreasing in value much later with decease in O 3 . The light scattering coefficient was found to be positively associated with the O 3 mixing ratio, whereas CN concentrations were negatively proportional to O 3 mixing ratio. The blimp experiment was supported with aircraft vertical profiles and ground-level observations from a mobile laboratory. The blimp flight obtained combined gas and particle changes aloft that could not be obtained by ground or fixed-wing aircraft measurements alone. The experiment was partially successful in achieving a true Lagrangian characterization of smog chemistry in a constrained or defined "open" air mass. The Los Angeles experiment demonstrated the use of a blimp as a platform for measurement of air pollution traveling with an air mass across an urban area. The method added unique data showing the relationship between photochemical smog chemistry and aerosol dynamics in smog. The method offers an alternative to reliance on smog chamber and modeling observations to designing air quality management strategies for reactive

  5. Interim Report 'Winter smog and traffic'.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, H.; Blom, T.; Bogaard, van den C.; Boluyt, N.; Bree, van L.; Brunekreef, B.; Hoek, G.; Zee, van der S.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents a halfway score of the research project "Winter smog and Traffic", one of the themes of the research programme "Air Pollution and Health". A state of the art is presented of the health effects associated with exposure to winter smog and of the toxicological effects caused by the

  6. Tropospheric Ozone and Photochemical Smog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillman, S.

    2003-12-01

    The question of air quality in polluted regions represents one of the issues of geochemistry with direct implications for human well-being. Human health and well-being, along with the well-being of plants, animals, and agricultural crops, are dependent on the quality of air we breathe. Since the start of the industrial era, air quality has become a matter of major importance, especially in large cities or urbanized regions with heavy automobile traffic and industrial activity.Concern over air quality existed as far back as the 1600s. Originally, polluted air in cities resulted from the burning of wood or coal, largely as a source of heat. The industrial revolution in England saw a great increase in the use of coal in rapidly growing cities, both for industrial use and domestic heating. London suffered from devastating pollution events during the late 1800s and early 1900s, with thousands of excess deaths attributed to air pollution (Brimblecombe, 1987). With increasing use of coal, other instances also occurred in continental Europe and the USA. These events were caused by directly emitted pollutants (primary pollutants), including sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and particulates. They were especially acute in cities with northerly locations during fall and winter when sunlight is at a minimum. These original pollution events gave rise to the term "smog" (a combination of smoke and fog). Events of this type have become much less severe since the 1950s in Western Europe and the US, as natural gas replaced coal as the primary source of home heating, industrial smokestacks were designed to emit at higher altitudes (where dispersion is more rapid), and industries were required to install pollution control equipment.Beginning in the 1950s, a new type of pollution, photochemical smog, became a major concern. Photochemical smog consists of ozone (O3) and other closely related species ("secondary pollutants") that are produced photochemically from directly

  7. Two Simulated-Smog Atmospheres with Different Chemical Compositions Produce Contrasting Mutagenicity in Salmonella**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone (O3), particulate matter (PM), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are criteria pollutants used to evaluate air quality. Using EPA’s Mobile Reaction Chamber (MRC), we generated 2 simulated-smog atmospheres (SSA-1 & SSA-2) with different concentrations of these criteria pol...

  8. Smog episodes, fine particulate pollution and mortality in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Maigeng; He, Guojun; Fan, Maoyong; Wang, Zhaoxi; Liu, Yang; Ma, Jing; Ma, Zongwei; Liu, Jiangmei; Liu, Yunning; Wang, Linhong; Liu, Yuanli

    2015-01-01

    Starting from early January 2013, northern China was hit by multiple prolonged and severe smog events which were characterized by extremely high-level concentrations of ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) with hourly peaks of PM2.5 over 800 µg/m(3). However, the consequences of this severe air pollution are largely unknown. This study investigates the acute effect of the smog episodes and PM2.5 on mortality for both urban and rural areas in northern China. We collected PM2.5, mortality, and meteorological data for 5 urban city districts and 2 rural counties in Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei Province of China from January 1, 2013 through December 31, 2013. We employed the generalized additive models to estimate the associations between smog episodes or PM2.5 and daily mortality for each district/county. Without any meteorological control, the smog episodes are positively and statistically significantly associated with mortality in 5 out of 7 districts/counties. However, the findings are sensitive to the meteorological factors. After controlling for temperature, humidity, dew point and wind, the statistical significance disappears in all urban districts. In contrast, the smog episodes are consistently and statistically significantly associated with higher total mortality and mortality from cardiovascular/respiratory diseases in the two rural counties. In Ji County, a smog episode is associated with 6.94% (95% Confidence Interval, -0.20 to 14.58) increase in overall mortality, and in Ci County it is associated with a 19.26% (95% CI, 6.66-33.34) increase in overall mortality. The smog episodes kill people primarily through its impact on cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. On average, a smog episode is associated with 11.66% (95% CI, 3.12-20.90) increase in cardiovascular and respiratory mortality in Ji County, and it is associated with a 22.23% (95% CI, 8.11-38.20) increase in cardiovascular and respiratory mortality in Ci County. A 10 μg/m(3) increase in PM2

  9. Simulations of photochemical smog formation in complex urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muilwijk, C.; Schrijvers, P. J. C.; Wuerz, S.; Kenjereš, S.

    2016-12-01

    In the present study we numerically investigated the dispersion of photochemical reactive pollutants in complex urban areas by applying an integrated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational Reaction Dynamics (CRD) approach. To model chemical reactions involved in smog generation, the Generic Reaction Set (GRS) approach is used. The GRS model was selected since it does not require detailed modeling of a large set of reactive components. Smog formation is modeled first in the case of an intensive traffic emission, subjected to low to moderate wind conditions in an idealized two-dimensional street canyon with a building aspect ratio (height/width) of one. It is found that Reactive Organic Components (ROC) play an important role in the chemistry of smog formation. In contrast to the NOx/O3 photochemical steady state model that predicts a depletion of the (ground level) ozone, the GRS model predicts generation of ozone. Secondly, the effect of direct sunlight and shadow within the street canyon on the chemical reaction dynamics is investigated for three characteristic solar angles (morning, midday and afternoon). Large differences of up to one order of magnitude are found in the ozone production for different solar angles. As a proof of concept for real urban areas, the integrated CFD/CRD approach is applied for a real scale (1 × 1 km2) complex urban area (a district of the city of Rotterdam, The Netherlands) with high traffic emissions. The predicted pollutant concentration levels give realistic values that correspond to moderate to heavy smog. It is concluded that the integrated CFD/CRD method with the GRS model of chemical reactions is both accurate and numerically robust, and can be used for modeling of smog formation in complex urban areas.

  10. Smog monitored. A review of smog in the Netherlands, 1960-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buijsman, E.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decades, the Dutch air quality has improved dramatically. Quite some time has passe since the last real episode of air pollution in the Netherlands. Nevertheless, the authorities and the media still report regularly about smog. Air pollution is more quickly labeled as smog nowadays. This article offers an overview of the recent past when poor air quality was simply called air pollution and when smog was much more common than today. [nl

  11. Development of a supercritical fluid extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the identification of highly polar compounds in secondary organic aerosols formed from biogenic hydrocarbons in smog chamber experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappini, L; Perraudin, E; Durand-Jolibois, R; Doussin, J F

    2006-11-01

    A new one-step method for the analysis of highly polar components of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been developed. This method should lead to a better understanding of SOA formation and evolution since it enables the compounds responsible for SOA formation to be identified. Since it is based on supercritical fluid extraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, it minimizes the analysis time and significantly enhances sensitivity, which makes it suitable for trace-level compounds, which are constituents of SOA. One of the key features of this method is the in situ derivatisation step: an online silylation allowing the measurement of highly polar, polyfunctional compounds, which is a prerequisite for the elucidation of chemical mechanisms. This paper presents the development of this analytical method and highlights its ability to address this major atmospheric issue through the analysis of SOA formed from the ozonolysis of a biogenic hydrocarbon (sabinene). Ozonolysis of sabinene was performed in a 6 m3 Teflon chamber. The aerosol components were derivatised in situ. More than thirty products, such as sabinaketone, sabinic acid and other multifunctional compounds including dicarboxylic acids and oxoacids, were measured. Nine of them were identified and quantified. The sensitivity and the linearity (0.91

  12. Development of a supercritical fluid extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the identification of highly polar compounds in secondary organic aerosols formed from biogenic hydrocarbons in smog chamber experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiappini, L.; Perraudin, E.; Durand-Jolibois, R.; Doussin, J.F. [Universites Paris, Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques, UMR CNRS 7583, Creteil (France)

    2006-11-15

    A new one-step method for the analysis of highly polar components of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been developed. This method should lead to a better understanding of SOA formation and evolution since it enables the compounds responsible for SOA formation to be identified. Since it is based on supercritical fluid extraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, it minimizes the analysis time and significantly enhances sensitivity, which makes it suitable for trace-level compounds, which are constituents of SOA. One of the key features of this method is the in situ derivatisation step: an online silylation allowing the measurement of highly polar, polyfunctional compounds, which is a prerequisite for the elucidation of chemical mechanisms. This paper presents the development of this analytical method and highlights its ability to address this major atmospheric issue through the analysis of SOA formed from the ozonolysis of a biogenic hydrocarbon (sabinene). Ozonolysis of sabinene was performed in a 6 m{sup 3} Teflon chamber. The aerosol components were derivatised in situ. More than thirty products, such as sabinaketone, sabinic acid and other multifunctional compounds including dicarboxylic acids and oxoacids, were measured. Nine of them were identified and quantified. The sensitivity and the linearity (0.91 < R < 0.98) of the method were both good and detection limits ranged from 1.2 to 6.4 ng for the investigated compounds. (orig.)

  13. Study on the Temperature Separation Phenomenon in a Vortex Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, A Ran; Guang, Zhang; Kim, Heuy Dong [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    A vortex chamber is a simple device that separates compressed gas into a high-temperature stream and a low-temperature stream. It is increasing in popularity as a next-generation heat exchanger, but the flow physics associated with it is not yet well understood. In the present study, both experimental and numerical analyses were performed to investigate the temperature separation phenomenon inside the vortex chamber. Static pressures and temperatures were measured using high-sensitivity pressure transducers and thermocouples, respectively. Computational fluid dynamics was applied to simulate 3D unsteady compressible flows. The simulation results showed that the temperature separation is strongly dependent on the diameter of the vortex chamber and the supply pressure at the inlet ports, where the latter is closely related to the viscous work. The previous concept of a pressure gradient wave may not be a reasoning for temperature separation phenomenon inside the vortex chamber.

  14. Smog induces oxidative stress and microbiota disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tit-Yee

    2017-04-01

    Smog is created through the interactions between pollutants in the air, fog, and sunlight. Air pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, heavy metals, nitrogen oxides, ozone, sulfur dioxide, volatile organic vapors, and particulate matters, can induce oxidative stress in human directly or indirectly through the formation of reactive oxygen species. The outermost boundary of human skin and mucous layers are covered by a complex network of human-associated microbes. The relation between these microbial communities and their human host are mostly mutualistic. These microbes not only provide nutrients, vitamins, and protection against other pathogens, they also influence human's physical, immunological, nutritional, and mental developments. Elements in smog can induce oxidative stress to these microbes, leading to community collapse. Disruption of these mutualistic microbiota may introduce unexpected health risks, especially among the newborns and young children. Besides reducing the burning of fossil fuels as the ultimate solution of smog formation, advanced methods by using various physical, chemical, and biological means to reduce sulfur and nitrogen contains in fossil fuels could lower smog formation. Additionally, information on microbiota disruption, based on functional genomics, culturomics, and general ecological principles, should be included in the risk assessment of prolonged smog exposure to the health of human populations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Metagenomic profiling of ARGs in airborne particulate matters during a severe smog event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jialin; Zhao, Fuzheng; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Li, Kan; Li, Chaoran; Ye, Lin; Li, Mei

    2018-02-15

    Information is currently limited regarding the distribution of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in smog and their correlations with airborne bacteria. This study characterized the diversity and abundance of ARGs in the particulate matters (PMs) of severe smog based on publicly available metagenomic data, and revealed the occurrence of 205 airborne ARG subtypes, including 31 dominant ones encoding resistance to 11 antibiotic types. Among the detectable ARGs, tetracycline, β-lactam and aminoglycoside resistance genes had the highest abundance, and smog and soil had similar composition characteristics of ARGs. During the smog event, the total abundance of airborne ARGs ranged from 4.90 to 38.07ppm in PM 2.5 samples, and from 7.61 to 38.49ppm in PM 10 samples, which were 1.6-7.7 times and 2.1-5.1 times of those in the non-smog day, respectively. The airborne ARGs showed complicated co-occurrence patterns, which were heavily influenced by the interaction of bacterial community, and physicochemical and meteorological factors. Lactobacillus and sulfonamide resistance gene sul1 were determined as keystones in the co-occurrence network of microbial taxa and airborne ARGs. The results may help to understand the distribution patterns of ARGs in smog for the potential health risk evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessing the features of extreme smog in China and the differentiated treatment strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lu; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2018-01-01

    Extreme smog can have potentially harmful effects on human health, the economy and daily life. However, the average (mean) values do not provide strategically useful information on the hazard analysis and control of extreme smog. This article investigates China's smog extremes by applying extreme value analysis to hourly PM2.5 data from 2014 to 2016 obtained from monitoring stations across China. By fitting a generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution to exceedances over a station-specific extreme smog level at each monitoring location, all study stations are grouped into eight different categories based on the estimated mean and shape parameter values of fitted GEV distributions. The extreme features characterized by the mean of the fitted extreme value distribution, the maximum frequency and the tail index of extreme smog at each location are analysed. These features can provide useful information for central/local government to conduct differentiated treatments in cities within different categories and conduct similar prevention goals and control strategies among those cities belonging to the same category in a range of areas. Furthermore, hazardous hours, breaking probability and the 1-year return level of each station are demonstrated by category, based on which the future control and reduction targets of extreme smog are proposed for the cities of Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei as an example.

  17. Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Battaglia, J.M.

    1984-09-01

    GA Technologies has developed a conceptual ICF reactor system based on the Cascade rotating-bed reaction chamber concept. Unique features of the system design include the use of low activation SiC in a reaction chamber constructed of box-shaped tiles held together in compression by prestressing tendons to the vacuum chamber. Circulating Li 2 O granules serve as the tritium breeding and energy transport material, cascading down the sides of the reaction chamber to the power conversion system. The total tritium inventory of the system is 6 kg; tritium recovery is accomplished directly from the granules via the vacuum system. A system for centrifugal throw transport of the hot Li 2 O granules from the reaction chamber to the power conversion system has been developed. A number of issues were evaluated during the course of this study. These include the response of first-layer granules to the intense microexplosion surface heat flux, cost effective fabrication of Li 2 O granules, tritium inventory and recovery issues, the thermodynamics of solids-flow options, vacuum versus helium-medium heat transfer, and the tradeoffs of capital cost versus efficiency for alternate heat exchange and power conversion system option. The resultant design options appear to be economically competitive, safe, and environmentally attractive

  18. High vacuum general purpose scattering chamber for nuclear reaction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh Kumar; Ojha, S.C.

    2003-01-01

    To study the nuclear reactions induced by beam from medium energy accelerators, one of the most common facility required is a scattering chamber. In the scattering chamber, projectile collides with the target nucleus and the scattered reaction products are detected with various type of nuclear detector at different angles with respect to the beam. The experiments are performed under high vacuum to minimize the background reaction and the energy losses of the charged particles. To make the chamber general purpose various requirement of the experiments are incorporated into it. Changing of targets, changing angle of various detectors while in vacuum are the most desired features. The other features like ascertaining the beam spot size and position on the target, minimizing the background counts by proper beam dump, accurate positioning of the detector as per plan etc. are some of the important requirements

  19. Contribution to Diogene detector drift chambers study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drouet, M.

    1981-06-01

    Diogene detector has been brought into operation at Saclay with the collaboration of Strasbourg CRN and Clermont-Ferrand LPC. The Diogene essential characteristic is its solid angle near four pi, allowing complete exclusive measurements. Diogene characteristics allow to detect an important multiplicity of charged particles in coincidence, to measure their impulse until a transverse impulse around 1 GeV/c, and to identify them by their energy loss measurement. These general characteristics are exposed after some brief recalls on charged particle detection and migration counters. Technical aspects of the prototype are examined. It has been built to test fabrication technology, choice exactness and performance estimation validity. These detector performance estimation calculations that may be waited for in tracks reconstruction, impulse and energy loss resolution are exposed. Before, the electrostatics study for the prototype is reviewed. The temporary balance of already carried out tests is made [fr

  20. Relationship between mortality and fine particles during Asian dust, smog-Asian dust, and smog days in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Sun; Kim, Dong-Sik; Kim, Ho; Yi, Seung-Muk

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the association between all-cause/cardiovascular mortality and PM(2.5) as related to Asian dust (AD), smog-AD, smog, and nonevent days and evaluated the differential risks according to specific events for mortality. The daily records of all-cause/cardiovascular mortality and PM(2.5) from March to May 2003-2006 in Seoul, Korea, were used as independent and dependent variables. Differences in the event effects were assessed using a time-series analysis. Both all-cause and cardiovascular mortalities were significantly associated with PM(2.5) during smog-AD and AD days only. Differences in chemical composition emerging during long-range transport to Korea may explain these observations, especially as regards secondary aerosol, metal-sulfate/or nitrate, and metallic components. These results suggest that exposure to PM(2.5) during specific events is differentially associated with human mortality and that changes in the chemical composition of PM(2.5), occurring during long-range transport, represent important factors in such differential effects on health.

  1. GGD-richtlijn medische milieukunde : Smog en gezondheid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier M; van Buggenum S; Burghgraef F; Dijkema M; Fischer P; van den Hout K; Meijerink M; van Brederode NE; IMG; mev

    2012-01-01

    Het RIVM heeft, in opdracht van het ministerie van VWS, met de GGD'en de richtlijn 'Smog en gezondheid' ontwikkeld. Hiermee is de 'GGD-richtlijn smog' uit 2004 herzien. De richtlijn geeft GGD'en informatie over smog, smogregelgeving, effecten op de gezondheid en maatregelen om gezondheidseffecten te

  2. Effects of Isoprene- and Toluene-Generated Smog on Allergic ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactions of organic compounds with nitric oxide (NO) and sunlight produce complex mixtures of pollutants including secondary organic aerosol (SOA), ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and reactive aldehydes. The health effects of these photochemical smog mixtures in susceptible populations including asthmatics are unclear. We assessed effects of smog generated from mixtures of NO with isoprene (IS) or toluene (TL) on allergic inflammatory responses in Balb/cJ mice. House dust mite (HDM)-sensitized or control mice were all challenged with HDM intranasally 1 d prior to whole-body inhalation exposure to IS (chamber average 509 ppb NO2, 246 ppb O3, and 160 g/m3 SOA), TL (217 ppb NO2, 129 ppb O3, and 376 g/m3 SOA), or HEPA-filtered air (4 h/d for 2 days). Mice were necropsied within 3 h after the second exposure (2 d post-HDM challenge). Assessment of breathing parameters during exposure with double-chamber plethysmography showed a trend for increased specific airway resistance and decreased minute volume during the second day of TL exposure in both non-allergic and HDM-allergic mice. HDM-allergic air-exposed mice had significant increases in numbers of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) alveolar macrophages (AM) and eosinophils (EO), and trends for increases in BAL indices of lung injury in comparison with non-allergic air-exposed mice. Exposure to either IS or TL attenuated the increases in AM, EO, and lung injury markers in HDM-allergic mice. The results of this

  3. Computer Modelling of Photochemical Smog Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebert, Barry J.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses a computer program that has been used in environmental chemistry courses as an example of modelling as a vehicle for teaching chemical dynamics, and as a demonstration of some of the factors which affect the production of smog. (Author/GS)

  4. Data Smog: Surviving the Info Glut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenk, David

    1997-01-01

    While the ability to churn out information has exceeded our ability to process it, the goal of the information industry is to convince us that whatever we have is not enough. This article examines the drawbacks of the information age (including "data smog" and "information anxiety") and makes suggestions for limiting exposure…

  5. Study on a drift chamber for high energy experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puget, Maria Augusta Constante

    1993-01-01

    This work deals with the studies of a multiwire gaseous detector operating as a drift chamber, which will be part of the SELEX spectrometer of the experiment Fermilab E781. A prototype was designed to be built and tested at IFUSP. Results are shown of the analysis of data taken with another similar detector whose construction and test were done at Fermilab, with the aim of studying its characterization and performance. (author)

  6. The Mark III vertex chamber: Studies using DME

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitman, D.

    1987-04-01

    Studies have been performed using a prototype of a pressurized wire vertex chamber with 8 mm diameter straw geometry. A 35 μm spatial resolution using dimethyl ether (DME) at 1 bar and 30 μm using argon ethane (50/50 mixture) at 4 bar was obtained. Preliminary studies show the DME to adversely affect such materials as aluminized Mylar and Delrin

  7. Four Channel Mini Wire Chamber to Study Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, J.; Rodriguez, G. J.

    2018-01-01

    Multiwire proportional chamber is a conventional technique to study radiation in general, and cosmic rays in particular. To study cosmic rays, it was planned, designed, constructed, characterized, and tested a four channel mini wire chamber, based on two 3 cm × 3 cm × 0.6 cm Aluminum frames, two 3 cm × 3 cm × 0.6 cm plastic frames, two 3 cm × 3 cm × 0.3 cm Aluminum frames, two electronic planes each with two Tungsten Gold plated 1 mil diameter wires, parallel and 1 cm apart each other at 25 g stretched-each plane was 90° rotated each other in the final assemble- and two Aluminum foil window to define the gas volume; it was operated with Argon 90%-CH4 10% gas mixture at 1 atmosphere and ambient temperature (20°C in the average). It is presented technical details, results on characterization, and preliminary results on cosmic rays detection.

  8. High-repetition-rate hydrogen chamber: Preliminary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    This report is a conclusion to the tests realised with an experimental bubbles chamber in view to study the possibilities to increase the repetition rate. The more important parameters (the evolution of the bubbles, the expansion system) are considered in a theoretical way. Then the hardware is described. To end, experimental results are compared with the first evaluations. The calculations and the experimentation are against an oscillation system for the expansion. A system with a locking is to he considered. (authors) [fr

  9. Engineering photochemical smog through convection towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, S.; Prueitt, M.L.; Bossert, J.E.; Mroz, E.J.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jacobson, M.Z.; Turco, R.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Dept.

    1995-02-01

    Reverse convection towers have attracted attention as a medium for cleansing modern cities. Evaporation of an aqueous mist injected at the tower opening could generate electrical power by creating descent, and simultaneously scavenge unsightly and unhealthful particulates. The study offered here assesses the influence to tower water droplets on the photochemical component of Los Angeles type smog. The primary radical chain initiator OH is likely removed into aqueous phases well within the residence time of air in the tower, and then reacts away rapidly. Organics do not dissolve, but nighttime hydrolysis of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} depletes the nitrogen oxides. A lack of HOx would slow hydrocarbon oxidation and so also ozone production. Lowering of NOx would also alter ozone production rates, but the direction is uncertain. SO{sub 2} is available in sufficient quantities in some urban areas to react with stable oxidants, and if seawater were the source of the mist, the high pH would lead to fast sulfur oxidation kinetics. With an accommodation coefficient of 10{sup {minus}3}, however, ozone may not enter the aqueous phase efficiently. Even if ozone is destroyed or its production suppressed, photochemical recovery times are on the order of hours, so that tower processing must be centered on a narrow midday time window. The cost of building the number of structures necessary for this brief turnover could be prohibitive. The increase in humidity accompanying mist evaporation could be controlled with condensers, but might otherwise counteract visibility enhancements by recreating aqueous aerosols. Quantification of the divergent forcings convection towers must exert upon the cityscape would call for coupled three dimensional modeling of transport, microphysics, and photochemistry. 112 refs.

  10. Planetary Simulation Chambers bring Mars to laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateo-Marti, E.

    2016-07-01

    Although space missions provide fundamental and unique knowledge for planetary exploration, they are always costly and extremely time-consuming. Due to the obvious technical and economical limitations of in-situ planetary exploration, laboratory simulations are among the most feasible research options for making advances in planetary exploration. Therefore, laboratory simulations of planetary environments are a necessary and complementary option to expensive space missions. Simulation chambers are economical, more versatile, and allow for a higher number of experiments than space missions. Laboratory-based facilities are able to mimic the conditions found in the atmospheres and on the surfaces of a majority of planetary objects. Number of relevant applications in Mars planetary exploration will be described in order to provide an understanding about the potential and flexibility of planetary simulation chambers systems: mainly, stability and presence of certain minerals on Mars surface; and microorganisms potential habitability under planetary environmental conditions would be studied. Therefore, simulation chambers will be a promising tools and necessary platform to design future planetary space mission and to validate in-situ measurements from orbital or rover observations. (Author)

  11. Study on target interactions in emulsion chamber - Brasil-Japan emulsion chamber collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, M.; Santos, C.; Bellandi Filho, J.; Chinellato, J. A.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Lattes, C. M. G.; Marques, A.; Menon, M. J.; Navia, C. E.; Sawayanagi, K.

    Experimental results are presented from observations of 80 target nuclear interactions where the total gamma-ray energy is greater than or equal to 20 TeV. Evidence is presented for the existence of two types of interactions; the interpretation is given on the basis of a fire-ball model. Two-story emulsion chambers exposed at Mount Chacaltaya, in Bolivia (5,220 m above sea level), are used. Gamma rays from nuclear interactions in the target layer of petroleum pitch (1/3 of the nuclear mean free path in thickness) are detected through observations of the electron showers generated by them in the lower chamber

  12. Silicon drift-chamber studies for possible use at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humanic, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    It is proposed to continue the program now underway at the University of Pittsburgh to study the feasibility of using silicon drift-chambers as particle tracking devices at RHIC. We are currently testing a UA6-type detector obtained from BNL and plan to also study a new device that will become available this year: a cylindrical geometry detector designed for NA45 (CERN). In addition we propose to fabricate and study a detector to be used in vertex determination for the RHIC OASIS experiment. The two-year budget for this proposal is $246.962. 5 refs., 12 figs

  13. Photochemical smog incident on June 30, 1973

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, S

    1973-01-01

    The first photochemical smog incident in Shizuoka prefecture (June 30, 1973) started in Hamamatsu and extended 100 km northeast as far as Fujinomiya city. This not only involved an extraordinarily large area, but the type of smog was different from that in Tokyo and Osaka. The victims were all pupils exercising at the time in the playgrounds. In Hamamatsu, 1050 children were involved and complained of eye irritation and pain, throat pain, coughs, and headaches between 2 and 3 pm, but there were no serious effects. The damages to agricultural produce were extensive and 70% of the total rice fields (1656 hectares), and 40 hectares of green scallions were affected. In Shizuoka, 716 children were affected about 5:30 pm, but in Fujinomiya, which is located further northeast, 16 children were affected about 4 pm. The movement of the damages, the locations, the extent of damages, and the direction of the wind, were puzzling in the light of the normal pattern of photochemical smogs, and the pollution sources could not be the coastal industrial area or automobile exhaust gases. Meteorological factors were similar to the usual photochemical smog conditions, but the locations of the cities involved and the wind direction from the sea suggested that the pollution source was the Pacific Ocean. Since the wind above 1000 m was northeast, circulation of industrial pollutants by the sea breeze is a possible explanation. The maximum concentration of oxidants was about 0.2 ppm in all areas except for Hamamatsu, where it was a little over 0.2 ppm.

  14. Early-Life Persistent Vitamin D Deficiency Alters Cardiopulmonary Responses to Particulate Matter-Enhanced Atmospheric Smog in Adult Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study demonstrates that early-life persistent vitamin D deficiency alters the cardiopulmonary response to smog in mice and may increase risk of adverse effects. Early life nutritional deficiencies can lead to increased cardiovascular susceptibility to environme...

  15. Microbiological Diversity Demonstrates the Potential which Collaboratively Metabolize Nitrogen Oxides ( NOx) under Smog Environmental Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. Z.; Zhao, X. H.; Chen, X. P.

    2018-03-01

    Recently, smoggy weather has become a daily in large part of China because of rapidly economic growth and accelerative urbanization. Stressed on the smoggy situation and economic growth, the green and environment-friendly technology is necessary to reduce or eliminate the smog and promote the sustainable development of economy. Previous studies had confirmed that nitrogen oxides ( NOx ) is one of crucial factors which forms smog. Microorganisms have the advantages of quickly growth and reproduction and metabolic diversity which can collaboratively Metabolize various NOx. This study will design a kind of bacteria & algae cultivation system which can metabolize collaboratively nitrogen oxides in air and intervene in the local nitrogen cycle. Furthermore, the nitrogen oxides can be transformed into nitrogen gas or assembled in protein in microorganism cell by regulating the microorganism types and quantities and metabolic pathways in the system. Finally, the smog will be alleviated or eliminated because of reduction of nitrogen oxides emission. This study will produce the green developmental methodology.

  16. Chinese haze versus Western smog: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Samet, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution in many Chinese cities has been so severe in recent years that a special terminology, the "Chinese haze", was created to describe China's air quality problem. Historically, the problem of Chinese haze has developed several decades after Western high-income countries have significantly improved their air quality from the smog-laden days in the early- and mid-20(th) century. Hence it is important to provide a global and historical perspective to help China combat the current air pollution problems. In this regard, this article addresses the followings specific questions: (I) What is the Chinese haze in comparison with the sulfurous (London-type) smog and the photochemical (Los Angeles-type) smog? (II) How does Chinese haze fit into the current trend of global air pollution transition? (III) What are the major mitigation measures that have improved air quality in Western countries? and (IV) What specific recommendations for China can be derived from lessons and experiences from Western countries?

  17. Dosimetry, instrumentation and exposure chambers for dc magnetic field studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1979-03-01

    The principal objective of this report is to describe in detail an exposure chamber that was developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for automated, noninvasive studies of rodent physiology during exposure to high DC magnetic fields. A second objective is to discuss some of the unique instrumentation problems that must be overcome in order to record bioelectric signals from laboratory animals in the presence of a magnetic field. Finally, a description will be given of the various dosimetry techniques that can be employed for quantitation of magnetic field strength

  18. The effects of atmospheric processes on tehran smog forming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, H; Cohen, D; Babazadeh, M; Rokni, L

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution is one of the most important problems in urban areas that always threaten citizen's health. Photochemical smog is one of the main factors of air pollution in large cities like Tehran. Usually smog is not only a part of nature, but is being analyzed as an independent matter, which highly affects on the nature. It has been used as relationship between atmospheric elements such as temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed with inversion in the time of smog forming and weather map in 500 Hpa level during 9 years descriptive static by using correlation coefficient in this analyze. Results show that there is a meaningful correlation between atmospheric elements and smog forming. This relation is seen between monthly average of these elements and monthly average of smog forming. However, when temperature decreases, corresponding pressure will increase and result of this will be smog forming. Usually smog increases in cold months of year due to enter cold high pressure air masses in Iran during December and January that is simultaneous with decreasing temperature and air pressure increases and inversion height distance decreases from the earth surface which cause to integrate air pollution under its surface, will cause to form smog in Tehran. It shows a meaningful and strong relation, based on resultant relations by correlation coefficient from inversion height and smog forming, so that obtained figure is more than 60% .

  19. The smog-fog-smog cycle and acid deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandis, Spyros N.; Seinfeld, John H.; Pilinis, Christodoulos

    1990-10-01

    A model including descriptions of aerosol and droplet microphysics, gas and aqueous-phase chemistry, and deposition is used to study the transformation of aerosol to fog droplets and back to aerosol in an urban environment. Fogs in polluted environments have the potential to increase aerosol sulfate concentrations but at the same time to cause reductions in the aerosol concentration of nitrate, chloride, ammonium and sodium and well as in the total aerosol mass concentration. The sulfate produced during fog episodes favors the aerosol particles that have access to most of the fog liquid water which are usually the large particles. Aerosol scavenging efficiencies of around 80 percent are calculated for urban fogs. Sampling and subsequent mixing of fog droplets of different sizes may result in measured concentrations that are not fully representative of the fogwater chemical composition and can introduce errors in the reported values of the ionic species deposition velocities. Differences in the major ionic species deposition velocities can be explained by their distribution over the droplet size spectrum and can be correlated with the species average diameter. Two different expressions are derived for use in fog models for the calculation of the liquid water deposition velocity during fog growth and dissipation stages.

  20. Evaluation of Kinetic and Mechanistic Data for Modeling of Photochemical Smog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, R.; Lloyd, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    This review is a critical evaluation of the rate constants, mechanisms, and products of selected atmospheric reactions of hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and sulfur oxides in air. The evaluation considers eight hydrocarbons (n-butane, 2,3-dimethylbutane, ethene, propene, 1-butene, trans-2-butene, toluene, and m-xylene) for which smog chamber irradiations have been carried out under carefully controlled conditions and which have been the subject of computer modeling studies by more than one research group. The reactions involved are treated in the following categories: inorganic reactions in organic-NO/sub x/-air irradiations; organic reactions of the formaldehyde-NO/sub x/-air system; organic reactions of the acetaldehyde-NO/sub x/-air system; organic reactions of the alkene-NO/sub x/-air systems; organic reactions of the alkane-NO/sub x/-air systems; organic reactions of selected carbonyl-NO/sub x/-air systems; organic reactions of the aromatic-NO/sub x/-air systems; combination reactions of peroxy radicals, and homogeneous gas phase SO 2 reactions. This report considers literature through early 1983

  1. Ambient air pollution, smog episodes and mortality in Jinan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Yao; Cui, Liang-Liang; Liu, Shou-Qin; Yin, Xi-Xiang; Li, Huai-Chen

    2017-09-11

    We aimed to assess the acute effects of ambient air pollution and weather conditions on mortality in the context of Chinese smog episodes. A total of 209,321 deaths were recorded in Jinan, a large city in eastern China, during 2011-15. The mean concentrations of daily particulate matter ≤10 μm (PM 10 ), fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ), sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) and nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) were 169 μg/m 3 , 100 μg/m 3 , 77 μg/m 3 , and 54 μg/m 3 , respectively. Increases of 10 μg/m 3 in PM 10 , PM 2.5 , SO 2 and NO 2 were associated with 1.11% (95% CI 0.96-1.26%), 0.71% (95% CI 0.60-0.82%), 1.69% (95% CI 1.56-1.83%), and 3.12% (95% CI 2.72-3.53%) increases in daily non-accidental mortality rates, respectively. Moreover, the risk estimates for these 4 pollutants were higher in association with respiratory and cardiovascular mortality. The effects of all the evaluated pollutants on mortality were greater in winter than in summer. Smog episodes were associated with a 5.87% (95% CI 0.16-11.58%) increase in the rate of overall mortality. This study highlights the effect of exposure to air pollution on the rate of mortality in China.

  2. Study on the effect factor of the absolute fission rates measured by depleted uranium fission chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Li; Liu Rong; Wang Dalun; Wang Mei; Lin Jufang; Wen Zhongwei

    2003-01-01

    The absolute fission rates was measured by the depleted uranium fission chamber. The efficiency of the fission fragments recorded in the fission chamber was analyzed. The factor influencing absolute fission rates was studied in the experiment, including the disturbing effect between detectors and the effect of the structural of the fission chamber, etc

  3. Silicon drift-chamber studies for possible use at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humanic, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    It is proposed to continue the program now underway at the University of Pittsburgh to study the feasibility of using silicon drift-chambers as particle tracking devices at RHIC. We are currently testing a UA6-type detector obtained from BNL, and propose to also study a new device that will become available this year: a cylindrical geometry detector design for NA45 (CERN). This new detector will be produced at BNL and the MPI-Institute in Munich and will incorporate updated techniques which should result in a reliable device with improved performance over the UA6-type detector. The one-year budget for this proposal is $50,079. 28 refs., 2 figs

  4. Smog exposure and host resistance to respiratory pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA is evaluating the health effects of photochemical smog on respiratory, cardiovascular and metabolic health (https://www.epa.gov/air-research/secondary-organic-aerosol-soas-research). Smog exposure has been associated with an increased risk of allergy and decreased res...

  5. Trends in photochemical smog in the Cape Peninsula and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There has been growing public concern over reports of increasing air pollution in the Cape Peninsula. Attention has been focused on the 'brown haze' and on photochemical smog. Because of deficiencies in the monitoring equipment, information on trends in photochemical smog levels over the past decade is limited.

  6. Review on Climate Control Chamber studies in studying plant environment interaction under climate change scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    Geethalakshmi, V.; Bhuvaneshwari, K.; Lakshmanan, A.

    2011-01-01

    This Technical brief summarizes some of the studies conducted on rice using a climate control chamber and outlines the studies that will be undertaken in the Climate Control Chamber facility that has been established at the Agro Climate Research Center at Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore. In recent years a numbers of technologies have been developed to study the impact of climate change on agricultural systems. Crop response to climate change could be studied by using a climate ...

  7. Study on time response properties of ionization chamber in profile gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhentao; Shen Yixiong; Wang Liqiang; Hao Pengfei

    2011-01-01

    The drift time of ions in the ionization chamber was measured by means of using a shortly pulsed X-ray device and through analyzing the voltage signals on the load resistor of the chamber recorded by a digital oscilloscope. By using this method, the time response properties of the ionization chamber in the profile gauge were studied, results of ion drift time for ionization chambers with different internal structures, different voltages and different gas pressures were introduced and the sources of error were discussed. The experiment results show that the time response of ionization chamber in profile gauge meets the requirement of on-line hot strip measuring. (authors)

  8. Self-contained high-pressure chambers for study on the Moessbauer effect at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, G.N.

    1980-01-01

    Designs of two high-pressure chambers intended for studying the Moessbauer effect at low temperatures are described. The high-pressure chamber of the Bridgman anvil type is made of non magnetic materials and intended for operation at helium temperatures. The chamber employs a superconducting pressure gage. A sample and superconducting pressure gage are surrounded with a liquid medium of a high pressure at a room temperature. Measurements of the pressure were taken during heating the chamber in the vapours of liquid helium according to the known dependence of the lead superconducting transition temperature on pressure. The other high-pressure chamber of the piston-to-cylinder type can be used to study the Moessbauer effect at temperatures ranging from 4 to 300 K. Pressure in the chamber is measured by means of the superconducting pressure gage. The maximum pressure obtained in the chamber constitutes 25 kbar

  9. Development of SMOG-Cro readability formula for healthcare communication and patient education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brangan, Sanja

    2015-03-01

    Effective communication shows a positive impact on patient satisfaction, compliance and medical outcomes, at the same time reducing the healthcare costs. Written information for patients needs to correspond to health literacy levels of the intended audiences. Readability formulas correlate well with the reading and comprehension tests but are considered an easier and quicker method to estimate a text difficulty. SMOG readability formula designed for English language needs to be modified if used for texts in other languages. The aim of this study was to develop a readability formula based on SMOG, that could be used to estimate text difficulty of written materials for patients in Croatian language. Contras- tive analysis of English and Croatian language covering a corpus of almost 100,000 running words showed clear linguis- tic differences in the number of polysyllabic words. The new formula, named SMOG-Cro, is presented as an equation: SMOG-Cro = 2 + √4+ syllables, with the score showing the number of years of education a person needs to be able to understand a piece of writing. The presented methodology could help in the development of readability formulas for other languages. We hope the results of this study are soon put into practice for more effective healthcare communication and patient education, and for development of a health literacy assessment tool in Croatian language.

  10. Oxford engineering students to study new solutions for vacuum chambers

    CERN Multimedia

    Department of Engineering Science - University of Oxford

    2012-01-01

    In April, eleven engineering science students in their third year at Oxford University were invited here to present their design ideas for new vacuum chamber materials to be used in accelerators. We publish below an abstract of the article that the University of Oxford featured on its website.   The 11 Oxford students who worked at CERN on alternatives to beryllium in vacuum chambers. (Photo courtesy of the Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford.) Engineering Science students invited to design for CERN’s Large Hadron Collider In April, eleven Engineering Science students in their third year were invited to the CERN laboratory in Geneva to present their ideas for new vacuum chamber designs for the experiments of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Their design objectives were to propose alternatives to beryllium – the material used for some of the existing experimental vacuum chambers. Beryllium (chemical element with the symbol Be and atomic number 4) is to...

  11. A plant chamber system with downstream reaction chamber to study the effects of pollution on biogenic emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timkovsky, J; Gankema, P; Pierik, R; Holzinger, R

    2014-01-01

    A system of two plant chambers and a downstream reaction chamber has been set up to investigate the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and possible effects of pollutants such as ozone. The system can be used to compare BVOC emissions from two sets of differently treated plants, or to study the photochemistry of real plant emissions under polluted conditions without exposing the plants to pollutants. The main analytical tool is a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) which allows online monitoring of biogenic emissions and chemical degradation products. The identification of BVOCs and their oxidation products is aided by cryogenic trapping and subsequent in situ gas chromatographic analysis.

  12. Supernova cooling in a dark matter smog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yue, E-mail: yuezhang@theory.caltech.edu [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    A light hidden gauge boson with kinetic mixing with the usual photon is a popular setup in theories of dark matter. The supernova cooling via radiating the hidden boson is known to put an important constraint on the mixing. I consider the possible role dark matter, which under reasonable assumptions naturally exists inside supernova, can play in the cooling picture. Because the interaction between the hidden gauge boson and DM is likely unsuppressed, even a small number of dark matter compared to protons inside the supernova could dramatically shorten the free streaming length of the hidden boson. A picture of a dark matter ''smog'' inside the supernova, which substantially relaxes the cooling constraint, is discussed in detail.

  13. Vertical distribution of optical and microphysical properties of smog aerosols measured by multi-wavelength polarization lidar in Xi'an, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Huige; Hua, Hangbo; Cui, Yan; Hua, Dengxin; He, Tingyao; Wang, Yufeng; Yan, Qing

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a multi-wavelength polarization lidar was developed at the Lidar Center for Atmosphere Remote Sensing, in Xi'an, China to study the vertical distribution of the optical and microphysical properties of smog aerosols. To better understand smog, two events with different haze conditions observed in January 2015 were analyzed in detail. Using these data, we performed a vertical characterization of smog evolution using the lidar range-squared-corrected signal and the aerosol depolarization ratio. Using inversion with regularization, we retrieved the vertical distribution of aerosol microphysical properties, including volume size distribution, volume concentration, number concentration and effective radius. We also used the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model to analyze aerosol sources during the two episodes. Our results show that the most polluted area in the lower troposphere during smog episodes is located below a height of 1 km above the ground level; under more severe smog conditions, it can be below 0.5 km. In the case of severe smog, we found a large number of spherical and fine particles concentrated in the very low troposphere, even below 0.5 km. Surprisingly, a dust layer with a slight depolarization ratio was observed above the smog layer.

  14. VUV photoemission studies of candidate LHC vacuum chamber materials

    CERN Document Server

    Baglin, V; Collins, I R

    1998-01-01

    In the context of future accelerators and, in particular, the beam vacuum of the LargeHadron Collider (LHC), a 27 km circumference proton collider to be built at CERN, VUVsynchrotron radiation (SR) has been used to study both qualitatively and quantitatively candidatevacuum chamber materials. Emphasis is given to show that angle and energy resolvedphotoemission is an extremely powerful tool to address important issues relevant to the LHC, suchas the emission of electrons that contribute to the creation of an electron cloud which may causeserious beam instabilities. Here we present not only the measured photoelectron yields (PY)from the proposed materials, prepared on an industrial scale, but also the energy and, in some cases,the angular dependence of the emitted electrons when excited with either a white light (WL)spectrum, simulating that in the arcs of the LHC or monochromatic light in the photon energy rangeof interest. The effects on the materials examined of WL irradiation and/or ion sputtering,simulati...

  15. Early-Life Exposure to the Great Smog of 1952 and the Development of Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Prashant; Zivin, Joshua Graff; Mullins, Jamie T; Neidell, Matthew

    2016-12-15

    Little is known about the long-term effects of air pollution exposure and the root causes of asthma. We use exposure to intense air pollution from the 1952 Great Smog of London as a natural experiment to examine both issues. To determine whether exposure to extreme air pollution in utero or soon after birth affects asthma development later in life. This was a natural experiment using the unanticipated pollution event by comparing the prevalence of asthma between those exposed to the Great Smog in utero or the first year of life with those conceived well before or after the incident and those residing outside the affected area at the time of the smog. Prevalence of asthma during childhood (ages 0-15) and adulthood (ages >15) is analyzed for 2,916 respondents to the Life History portion of the English Longitudinal Study on Aging born from 1945 to 1955. Exposure to the Great Smog in the first year of life increases the likelihood of childhood asthma by 19.87 percentage points (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.37-36.38). We also find suggestive evidence that early-life exposure led to a 9.53 percentage point increase (95% CI, -4.85 to 23.91) in the likelihood of adult asthma and exposure in utero led to a 7.91 percentage point increase (95% CI, -2.39 to 18.20) in the likelihood of childhood asthma. These results are the first to link early-life pollution exposure to later development of asthma using a natural experiment, suggesting the legacy of the Great Smog is ongoing.

  16. The evolution of photochemical smog in a power plant plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Menachem; Valente, Ralph J.; Tanner, Roger L.; Gillani, Noor V.; Imhoff, Robert E.; Mueller, Stephen F.; Olszyna, Kenneth J.; Meagher, James F. Present address: Aeronomy Laboratory, NOAA, 325 Broadway, Boulder CO 80303, USA.)

    The evolution of photochemical smog in a plant plume was investigated with the aid of an instrumented helicopter. Air samples were taken in the plume of the Cumberland Power Plant, located in central Tennessee, during the afternoon of 16 July 1995 as part of the Southern Oxidants Study - Nashville Middle Tennessee Ozone Study. Twelve cross-wind air sampling traverses were made at six distance groups from 35 to 116 km from the source. During the sampling period the winds were from the west-northwest and the plume drifted towards the city of Nashville TN. Ten of the traverses were made upwind of the city, where the power plant plume was isolated, and two traverses downwind of the city when the plumes were possibly mixed. The results revealed that even six hours after the release, excess ozone production was limited to the edges of the plume. Only when the plume was sufficiently dispersed, but still upwind of Nashville, was excess ozone (up to 109 ppbv, 50-60 ppbv above background levels) produced in the center of the plume. The concentrations image of the plume and a Lagrangian particle model suggests that portions of the power plant plume mixed with the urban plume. The mixed urban power plant plume began to regenerate O 3 that peaked at 120 ppbv at a short distance (15-25 km) downwind of Nashville. Ozone productivity (the ratio of excess O 3 to NO y and NO z) in the isolated plume was significantly lower compared with that found in the city plume. The production of nitrate, a chain termination product, was significantly higher in the power plant plume compared to the mixed plume, indicating shorter chain length of the photochemical smog chain reaction mechanism.

  17. The evolution of photochemical smog in a power plant plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luria, M.; The Hebrew University, Jerusalem; Valente, R.J.; Tanner, R.L.; Imhoff, R.E.; Mueller, S.F.; Olszyna, K.J.; Meagher, J.F.; Gillani, N.V.; University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of photochemical smog in a plant plume was investigated with the aid of an instrumented helicopter. Air samples were taken in the plume of the Cumberland Power Plant, located in central Tennessee, during the afternoon of 16 July 1995 as part of the Southern Oxidants Study - Nashville Middle Tennessee Ozone Study. Twelve cross-wind air sampling traverses were made at six distance groups from 35 to 116 km from the source. During the sampling period the winds were from the west-northwest and the plume drifted towards the city of Nashville TN. Ten of the traverses were made upwind of the city, where the power plant plume was isolated, and two traverses downwind of the city when the plumes were possibly mixed. The results revealed that even six hours after the release, excess ozone production was limited to the edges of the plume. Only when the plume was sufficiently dispersed, but still upwind of Nashville, was excess ozone (up to 109 ppbv, 50-60 ppbv above background levels) produced in the center of the plume. The concentrations image of the plume and a Lagrangian particle model suggests that portions of the power plant plume mixed with the urban plume. The mixed urban power plant plume began to regenerate O 3 that peaked at 120 ppbv at a short distance (15-25 km) downwind of Nashville. Ozone productivity (the ratio of excess O 3 to NO y and NO z ) in the isolated plume was significantly lower compared with that found in the city plume. The production of nitrate, a chain termination product, was significantly higher in the power plant plume compared to the mixed plume, indicating shorter chain length of the photochemical smog chain reaction mechanism. (author)

  18. Plant exposure chambers for study of toxic chemical-plant interactions (journal version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, J.C.; Pfleeger, T.

    1987-01-01

    Chambers for the study of plant uptake and phytotoxicity of toxic, radio-labeled chemicals are described. The chambers are designed to meet the criteria of continuously stirred tank reactors while providing containment for toxic chemicals. They are computer managed and operated within a controlled-environment room. Besides providing controlled conditions within the contained spaces, continuous measurements are made of various environmental parameters and plant transpiration, net photosynthesis, and dark respiration in up to 18 separate chambers

  19. Hypobaric chamber for the study of oral health problems in a simulated spacecraft environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    A hypobaric chamber was constructed to house two marmo-sets simultaneously in a space-simulated environment for periods of 14, 28 and 56 days which coincided with the anticipated Skylab missions. This report details the fabrication, operation, and performance of the chamber and very briefly reviews the scientific data from nine chamber trials involving 18 animals. The possible application of this model system to studies unrelated to oral health or space missions is discussed.

  20. Study on the ionization chamber for thickness measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Shili; Miao Qiangwen

    1988-01-01

    The principle, construction and performances of ionization chambers for measuring the thickness of metal and nonmetal materials are introduced. With them the thickness of thin materials (thickness ranging from 10 to 6000 g/m 2 ), the surface layer thickness of composed materials and the thickness of steel plate (thickness ranging from 0 to 32 kg/m 2 ) are measured effectively

  1. Study of energy dependence of a extrapolation chamber in low energy X-rays beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, Fernanda M.; Silva, Teogenes A. da

    2014-01-01

    This work was with the main objective to study the energy dependence of extrapolation chamber in low energy X-rays to determine the value of the uncertainty associated with the variation of the incident radiation energy in the measures in which it is used. For studying the dependence of energy, were conducted comparative ionization current measurements between the extrapolation chamber and two ionization chambers: a chamber mammography, RC6M model, Radcal with energy dependence less than 5% and a 2575 model radioprotection chamber NE Technology; both chambers have very thin windows, allowing its application in low power beams. Measurements were made at four different depths of 1.0 to 4.0 mm extrapolation chamber, 1.0 mm interval, for each reference radiation. The study showed that there is a variable energy dependence on the volume of the extrapolation chamber. In other analysis, it is concluded that the energy dependence of extrapolation chamber becomes smaller when using the slope of the ionization current versus depth for the different radiation reference; this shows that the extrapolation technique, used for the absorbed dose calculation, reduces the uncertainty associated with the influence of the response variation with energy radiation

  2. Monte Carlo studies on Cathode Strip/Pad Chambers for the ALICE Di-Muon Arm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurzinger, R.; Le Bornec, Y.; Willis, N.

    1996-04-01

    A general overview about the properties of Cathode Strip and Pad Chambers is given. Position finding methods are discussed and compared within Monte Carlo studies. Noise contributions and their minimization are discussed. Pad chambers allow a two-dimensional readout with spatial resolution of {sigma} < 100 {mu}m in direction parallel to the anode wire. The resolution normal to the anode wire depends mainly on the wire spacing. Special attention is paid on the double-hit resolution capability of the pad chamber. An outlook is given on the possible utilisation of Cathode Pad Chambers in the Di-Muon Arm of the ALICE detector at LHC. (author). 44 refs.

  3. Investigation and studies on plant damage due to Tokyo photochemical smog. Part II. On the damage of petunia which showed the symptoms like injuries by pan (peroxyacetyl nitrate)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terakado, K.

    1973-10-01

    Twice in the middle of June and in early Aug. 1972, petunia leaves were damaged by peroxyacetyl nitrate in Tokyo. The leaf damage, root activity, and pH and specific conductivity of the soil were studied. Similar plants were exposed experimentally to ozone for comparison. No damage was found on other types of plants in the same greenhouse, and different types of petunias were damaged to different degrees. The damage was studied by microscopy anbd by gross symptoms.

  4. Conceptual design study of the hylife lithium waterfall laser fusion chamber. FY 1978 annual report to Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Conceptual design studies of the target chamber defined the general configuration and dimensions of the chamber and the inlet plenum, orifice plate, and nozzle plate concepts required to generate the desired lithium jet fall. Preliminary studies were performed of the target chamber interfaces with the liquid lithium supply system, the laser system, the pellet injection system, and the target chamber mounting and support system. Target chamber environmental effects resulting from typical thermonuclear burns were evaluated. The outlet region of the target chamber was outlined conceptually, and preliminary design considerations were given to the annular graphite reflector regions of the target chamber and the associated liquid lithium coolant passages

  5. Study of an avalanche-mode resistive plate chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, J.; Ban, Y.; Liu, H.T.; Zhu, Z.M.; Zhu, Z.Y.; Chen, T.; Ma, J.G.; Ye, Y.L.

    2000-01-01

    Resistive plate chambers (RPCs) are widely used to detect high-energy charged particles, especially muons, due to the high gain, moderate time and spatial resolution, simple design and low cost of these detectors. While the simple streamer mode is adequate for cosmic-ray and low-rate accelerator experiments, the avalanche mode is required for high-rate experiments such as CMS at LHC. In this paper construction of a medium-sized double-gap RPC made of Chinese materials is reported. The experimental set-up of cosmic-ray and muon beam tests are introduced. The avalanche mode was clearly observed. Good efficiency and time resolution were obtained from the beam test at CERN under normal irradiation conditions. At very high radiation background the chamber efficiency decreases, indicating the necessity to change the resistivity value of the Chinese bakelites. (author)

  6. study on trace contaminants control assembly for sealed environment chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, L. P.; Wang, J.; Liu, L. K.; Liu, H.

    The biological and Physicochemical P C life support technologies are all important parts to establish a human Closed Ecological Life Support System CELSS for long-duration mission The latter has the advantages of lower power consumption lower mass and higher efficiency therefore researchers often incorporate the use of biological systems with P C life support technologies to continuously recycle air water and part of the solid waste stream generated such as the Russian BLSS and the NASA-sponsored Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project LMLSTP In short these tests were very successful in integrating biological and P C life support technologies for long-duration life support Therefore we should use a combination of integrated biological with P C life support technologies in a human CELSS Human construction materials plants animals and soils release much trace toxic gases in a CELSS and they will inhibit plant growth and badly affect human health when their concentrations rise over their threshold levels The effect of biological trace contaminant control technologies is slower especially for a human sealed chamber because human produce much more methane and other contaminants A regenerative Trace Contaminant Control Subsystem TCCS with P C technology is a more important part in this case to control quickly the airborne contaminants levels and assure human in good condition in a sealed chamber This paper describes a trace contaminant control test facility incorporated a 8 m3 sealed environment chamber a regenerative TCCS with P C

  7. Studies of particle interactions in bubble chamber, spark chambers and counter experiments. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, L.E.; O'Halloran, T.A. Jr.; Simmons, R.O.

    1983-07-01

    During the past six years we have carried out and planned experiments which predominantly studied the production and decay of particles containing charmed quarks. A series of photoproduction and neutron production experiments started with the very early observation of the production of J/psi by neutrons and by photons at Fermilab. From subsequent experiments using these neutral beams and the basic detecting system, we have reported results on the photoproduction of the Λ/sub c/ charmed baryon and the D and D* charmed mesons. More recent runs are studying the high energy photoproduction of vector mesons including the psi'. The present experiment in this sequence is using neutrons to produce a large number of D mesons. Another series of experiments at Fermilab set out to study the hadronic production of charmed mesons. The Chicago Cyclotron facility was modified with a detector sensitive to various possible production mechanisms. The experiments were a success; clean signals of D mesons were observed to be produced by pions, and also the production of chi/sub c/ with the subsequent decay via a γ-ray to psi was observed. The charmonium experiments run this year have better photon resolution for measuring the decays of chi/sub c/ to psi. We are part of a collaboration which is working on the Collider Detector Facility for Fermilab. The CDF at Fermilab is a possible source of (weak) intermediate vector bosons from the collisions of protons and anti-protons. Our responsibilities in the CDF include both the construction of the muon detector and the designing, planning, and testing of the FASTBUS electronics. The second part of our weak interaction program is the Neutrino Oscillation experiment which is now under construction at Brookhaven

  8. Thermal studies on a mechanical prototype of A BIS MDT chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Petridou, C; Wotschack, J; Zisis, A

    1998-01-01

    The deformations of a BIS MDT chamber owing to temperature gradients between the two multilayers and between the two Faraday cages were studied on a mechanical prototype. The influence of thermal insulation on the thermal behaviour of the chamber is also reported.

  9. Transmutation and neutron flux studies with fission chambers in the MEGAPIE target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabod, S.; Foucher, Y.; Letourneau, A.; Marie, F.; Toussaint, J.C.; Blandin, Ch.; Chartier, F.; Fioni, G.

    2005-01-01

    Eight fission micro chambers will be inserted inside the central rod of the 1 MW liquid Pb-Bi MEGAPIE target in order to study the transmutation of two major actinides and to measure the neutron flux at a level of 5%. These chambers were developed for high neutron fluxes and tested at Laue Langevin Institute. (authors)

  10. Study on superhigh energy γ-ray family events with large-scale Fe emulsion chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Jingru; Lu Suiling; Su Shi

    1990-01-01

    Using a large-scale iron emulsion chamber, a big γ-ray family event with observed energy ΣE r = 7631 TeV was obtained. This paper described the advantages of iron emulsion chamber for studying big families and the characteristics of the event observed, together with a comparison with the Monte-Carlo simulation results

  11. IPPSO raises Hydro exports in smog negotiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    The Independent Power Producers of Ontario (IPPSO) requested federal and provincial committees negotiating atmospheric emission standards to review Ontario Hydro's export wheeling plans. IPPSO alleges that Ontario Hydro is preparing to apply pressure on the Canadian export approval process, and is building up a major effort that will increase emissions, contrary to the objectives embodied in a number of environment protection projects such as the Ontario Smog Plan, The Federal-Provincial NOx Management Plan, the Strategic Options Plan, or the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution Draft NOx Protocol Negotiations. IPPSO alleges further that while Ontario Hydro is one of Canada's largest single emitter of greenhouse gases NOx, and SO 2 , and as a public sector corporation it should be the most amenable to serving the public good, the Corporation is doing exactly the opposite: it actively prevents production of electricity from less polluting sources. It is IPPSO's contention that Ontario Hydro's desire to control the Ontario market could come at significant cost to the environment

  12. Simulation studies on a prototype ionization chamber for measurement of personal dose equivalent, Hp(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, J.; Oliveira, C.; Carvalho, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The Metrological Laboratory of lonizing Radiation and Radioactivity (LMRIR) of Nuclear and Technological Institute (ITN) has designed and constructed a prototype ionization chamber for direct measurement of the personal dose equivalent, H p (10), similar to the developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and now commercialized by PTW. Tests already performed had shown that the behaviour of this chamber is very close to the PTB chamber, namely the energy dependence for the x-ray radiation qualities of the ISO 4037-1 narrow series N-30, N-40, N-60, N-80, N-100 and N-120 and also for gamma radiation of 137 Cs and 60 Co. However, the results obtained also show a high dependence on the energy for some incident radiation angles and a low magnitude of the electrical response of the ionization chamber. In order to try to optimize the performance of the chamber, namely to decrease the energy dependence and to improve the magnitude of the electrical response of the ionization chamber, the LMRIR initiated numerical simulation of this ionization chamber using a Monte-Carlo method for simulation of radiation transport using, in a first step, the MCNPX code. So, simulation studies of some physical parameters are been performed in order to optimize the response of the ionization chamber, namely the diameter of the central electrode of the ionization chamber, the thickness of the front wall of the ionization chamber, among others. Preliminary results show that probably the actual geometry of the ionization chamber is not yet the optimized configuration. The simulation study will carry on in order to find the optimum geometry. (author)

  13. Scattering study at free air ionization chamber diaphragm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Alexandre Lo Bianco dos

    2011-01-01

    The maim of this work consisted in the assessment of the correction factor for air kerma, due to scattered radiation in the diaphragm of the free-air ionization chamber model 481. LNMRl measurements were made to acquire x-ray spectra corresponding to the Qualities RQR-M, described in IEC 61627 standards (2005). These spectra were used as input data in the MC simulations. The operational range of energy spectra provide up to 35 keV. This energy range is typically used in diagnostic radiology, although there is not primary standard for air kerma. The determination of this factor is a fundamental process in the primary standardization of the air kerma. These factors were obtained by computer simulation using the Penelope code. The results are k RQR-M1 =0,9946, k RQR -M2 =0,9932, k RQR-M3 =0,9978 and k RQR-M4 =0,9885; with uncertainties of 0,007 and coverage factor equal to 2. lt can be concluded that, with respect to the diaphragm, the chamber can be used in the primary standard of air kerma. (author)

  14. Study of straw chamber lifetime with argon ethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J.; Bolton, T.; Bunnell, K.; Cheu, E.; Grab, C.; Mazaheri, G.; Odian, A.; Pitman, D.; Stockhausen, W.; Toki, W.; Wadley, W.; Wood, C.; Mir, R.

    1989-01-01

    We present detailed laboratory measurements of the lifetime of a small test chamber, simulating the Mark III straw vertex chamber conditions. The tests were carried out with an argon-ethane 50/50 gas mixture at 3 atm absolute pressure and 3.9 kV applied to the wires. After the accumulation of ≅ 0.02 C/cm on a single straw, continuous discharges began. The addition of alcohol or water vapor to the gas mixture was found to extend the lifetime of the straws. Continuous flow of the gas mixture with water vapor through the straws prolonged the lifetime significantly. We present results on the effects of changing the gas mixture inside the straws at regular time intervals. Adding a small percentage of water vapor to the argon-ethane gas and flowing the gas mixture in the straws can improve the lifetime by more than an order of magnitude. An accumulated charge of 1.0 C/cm on a single straw has been obtained. (orig.)

  15. A plant chamber system with downstream reaction chamber to study the effects of pollution on biogenic emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timovsky, J.; Gankema, Paulien; Pierik, Ronald; Holzinger, Rupert

    2014-01-01

    A system of two plant chambers and a downstream reaction chamber has been set up to investigate the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and possible effects of pollutants such as ozone. The system can be used to compare BVOC emissions from two sets of differently treated plants,

  16. Drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Yosuke

    1977-01-01

    Drift chamber is becoming an important detector in high energy physics as a precision and fast position detector because of its high spatial resolution and count-rate. The basic principle is that it utilizes the drift at constant speed of electrons ionized along the tracks of charged particles towards the anode wire in the nearly uniform electric field. The method of measuring drift time includes the analog and digital ones. This report describes about the construction of and the application of electric field to the drift chamber, mathematical analysis on the electric field and equipotential curve, derivation of spatial resolution and the factor for its determination, and selection of gas to be used. The performance test of the chamber was carried out using a small test chamber, the collimated β source of Sr-90, and 500 MeV/C electron beam from the 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron in the Institute of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. Most chambers to date adopted one dimensional read-out, but it is very advantageous if the two dimensional read-out is feasible with one chamber when the resolution in that direction is low. The typical methods of delay line and charge division for two dimensional read-out are described. The development of digital read-out system is underway, which can process the signal of a large scale drift chamber at high speed. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  17. Wire chamber requirements and tracking simulation studies for tracking systems at the superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.G.; Niczyporuk, B.B.; Palounek, A.P.T.

    1989-02-01

    Limitations placed on wire chambers by radiation damage and rate requirements in the SSC environment are reviewed. Possible conceptual designs for wire chamber tracking systems which meet these requirements are discussed. Computer simulation studies of tracking in such systems are presented. Simulations of events from interesting physics at the SSC, including hits from minimum bias background events, are examined. Results of some preliminary pattern recognition studies are given. Such computer simulation studies are necessary to determine the feasibility of wire chamber tracking systems for complex events in a high-rate environment such as the SSC. 11 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  18. Protective effects of edaravone combined puerarin on inhalation lung injury induced by black gunpowder smog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengguan; Li, Ruibing; Liu, Yifan; Liu, Xiaoting; Chen, Wenyan; Xu, Shumin; Guo, Yuni; Duan, Jinyang; Chen, Yihong; Wang, Chengbin

    2015-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the combined effects of puerarin with edaravone on inhalation lung injury induced by black gunpowder smog. Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups (control group, edaravone group, puerarin group, edaravone combined with puerarin group and inhalation group). The severity of pulmonary injuries was evaluated after inducing acute lung injury. Arterial blood gas, inflammatory cytokines, biochemical, parameters, cell counting, W/D weight ratio and histopathology were analyzed. Results in lung tissues, either edaravone or puerarin treatment alone showed significant protective effects against neutrophil infiltration and tissue injury, as demonstrated by myeloperoxidase activity and histopathological analysis (all pedaravone and puerarin demonstrated additive protective effects on smog-induced lung injury, compared with single treatment. Combination of edaravone and puerarin shows promise as a new treatment option for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Silicon drift chamber studies for the RHIC STAR experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humanic, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    The two-hit resolution of a silicon drift chamber is measured using a pulsed Nd:Yag laser and a time digitizer readout. The data is analyzed by forming the covariance matrix in time samples, and transforming to a matrix in amplitude and time variation of each of the two hits. The resolution of the two-hit separation is found to be better than 25 microns with a drift field of 530 V/cm and a separation of more than 500 microns, with the resolution increasing to 50 microns as the separation nears 500 microns. Results are also presented for multiply ionizing tracks, showing a great improvement over single minimum ionizing. 8 refs

  20. Study of plasma in MAGO chamber by own neutron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burenkov, O.M.; Garanin, S.F.; Demin, A.N.; Dudin, I.F.; Korchagin, V.P.; Morozov, I.V.; Mokhov, V.N.; Pavlovskij, E.S.; Chernyshev, V.K.; Yakubov, V.B.

    1996-01-01

    The measured ratio of the DD and DT reaction rates is used for determining the ion temperature in the MAGO hot plasma chamber driven by explosive magnetic generator. The method exploits the differences in the temperature dependence of the DD and DT reaction rates. The reaction rates are estimated from the DD and DT neutron spectra measured by the time-of flight method. In the paper the MAGO experimental arrangement is described in detail, and the problems arising at interpretation of the somewhat contradictory results of neutron diagnostics are discussed. A reasonable value of the ion temperature (5.5 keV maximum) can be obtained when assuming a strong anisotropy of the ion distribution. In order to verify the reported results further more detailed neutron diagnostic experiments are planned. (J.U.). 7 figs., 6 refs

  1. Study of plasma in MAGO chamber by own neutron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burenkov, O M; Garanin, S F; Demin, A N; Dudin, I F; Korchagin, V P; Morozov, I V; Mokhov, V N; Pavlovskij, E S; Chernyshev, V K; Yakubov, V B [All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Arzamas (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The measured ratio of the DD and DT reaction rates is used for determining the ion temperature in the MAGO hot plasma chamber driven by explosive magnetic generator. The method exploits the differences in the temperature dependence of the DD and DT reaction rates. The reaction rates are estimated from the DD and DT neutron spectra measured by the time-of flight method. In the paper the MAGO experimental arrangement is described in detail, and the problems arising at interpretation of the somewhat contradictory results of neutron diagnostics are discussed. A reasonable value of the ion temperature (5.5 keV maximum) can be obtained when assuming a strong anisotropy of the ion distribution. In order to verify the reported results further more detailed neutron diagnostic experiments are planned. (J.U.). 7 figs., 6 refs.

  2. Study of an extrapolation chamber in a standard diagnostic radiology beam by Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedovato, Uly Pita; Silva, Rayre Janaina Vieira; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Santos, William S.; Perini, Ana Paula; Belinato, Walmir

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we studied the influence of the components of an extrapolation ionization chamber in its response. This study was undertaken using the MCNP-5 Monte Carlo code, and the standard diagnostic radiology quality for direct beams (RQR5). Using tally F6 and 2.1 x 10"9 simulated histories, the results showed that the chamber design and material not alter significantly the energy deposited in its sensitive volume. The collecting electrode and support board were the components with more influence on the chamber response. (author)

  3. Study of the replacement correction factors for ionization chamber dosimetry by Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lilie

    In ionization chamber radiation dosimetry, the introduction of the ion chamber into medium will unavoidably distort the radiation field near the chamber because the chamber cavity material (air) is different from the medium. A replacement correction factor, Prepl was introduced in order to correct the chamber readings to give an accurate radiation dose in the medium without the presence of the chamber. Generally it is very hard to measure the values of Prepl since they are intertwined with the chamber wall effect. In addition, the P repl values always come together with the stopping-power ratio of the two media involved. This makes the problem of determining the P repl values even more complicated. Monte Carlo simulation is an ideal method to investigate the replacement correction factors. In this study, four different methods of calculating the values of Prepl by Monte Carlo simulation are discussed. Two of the methods are designated as 'direct' methods in the sense that the evaluation of the stopping-power ratio is not necessary. The systematic uncertainties of the two direct methods are estimated to be about 0.1-0.2% which comes from the ambiguous definition of the energy cutoff Delta used in the Spencer-Attix cavity theory. The two direct methods are used to calculate the values of P repl for both plane-parallel chambers and cylindrical thimble chambers in either electron beams or photon beams. The calculation results are compared to measurements. For electron beams, good agreements are obtained. For thimble chambers in photon beams, significant discrepancies are observed between calculations and measurements. The experiments are thus investigated and the procedures are simulated by the Monte Carlo method. It is found that the interpretation of the measured data as the replacement correction factors in dosimetry protocols are not correct. In applying the calculation to the BIPM graphite chamber in a 60Co beam, the calculated values of P repl differ from those

  4. A system for the study of molecular contamination. [experimental vacuum chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillow, C. F.; Allen, T. H.; Linford, R. M. F.; Richmond, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental vacuum chambers was designed and fabricated to provide a wide range of experimental capability. This work chamber assembly (WCA) was conceived to establish the proof-of-principle of various techniques for studying the kinetics of contaminants and their effects. It incorporates the capability for depositing both optical and contaminant films on temperature-controlled samples, and for in-situ measurements of the vacuum ultraviolet reflectance. Ellipsometer optics are mounted on the chamber for film thickness determinations, and other features include access ports for radiation sources and instrumentation.

  5. Existing Smog in Lahore, Pakistan: An Alarming Public Health Concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Ramsha; Hamid, Khizar

    2018-01-25

    Lahore, the second-largest and most polluted city in Pakistan, has been plagued by a heavy blanket of smog recently. The ever-growing urbanization and industrialization have contributed to the worsening air quality of the city. Smog, being hazardous to health, is leading to a rapid sprout in multiple health-related problems, as well as raising concerns about the long-term deleterious effects on public health. The current situation is expected to worsen due to the lack of an active action plan from the government's side and a failure of concerned authorities to take note of the urgency of the situation. Hence, we aim to highlight this pressing issue in the light of previously published articles, to alert the relevant authorities regarding the detrimental consequences smog can have on public health and urge them to take immediate action to avoid further damage.

  6. Potential oxidative stress in the bodies of electric arc welding operators: effect of photochemical smog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, You-Gen; Zhou, Jun-Fu; Shan, Wei-Ying; Zhou, Pei-Su; Tong, Gui-Zhong

    2004-12-01

    To investigate whether photochemical smog emitted during the process of electric arc welding might cause oxidative stress and potential oxidative damage in the bodies of welding operators. Seventy electric arc welding operators (WOs) and 70 healthy volunteers (HVs) were enrolled in a randomized controlled study design, in which the levels of vitamin C (VC) and vitamin E (VE) in plasma as well as the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and the level of lipoperoxide (LPO) in erythrocytes were determined by spectrophotometry. Compared with the average values of the above experimental parameters in the HVs group, the average values of VC and VE in plasma as well as those of SOD, CAT and GPX in erythrocytes in the WOs group were significantly decreased (P smog the values of VC, VE, SOD, and GPX, except for CAT, in the WOs were decreased gradually (P smog in the bodies of WOs, thereby causing potential oxidative and lipoperoxidative damages in their bodies.

  7. Study of a bubble chamber's pictures automatic analyser: Coccinelle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, J.-J.

    1974-01-01

    The automatic scanning and measuring system ''Coccinelle'' built in the Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire of College de France, is specially made for the pictures of the new large bubble chambers like BEBC and Mirabelle. This device uses the spot of a high precision cathode ray tube for the analysis of the picture according to a scanning window. The signal of a photomultiplier located behind the picture gives, after processing, the useful information in the form of coordinates of the analyzed points. Electronics, connected to a computer, generates the movements of the spot, the backward and forward movement of the films, and gives the right information for the programs of geometrical reconstruction of the tracks. The use of the device is based upon the collaboration of a programmed automaton and a human operator that have conversational facilities: TV display, light-pen and function keyboard. Beyond a detailed description of the whole device, this thesis insists especially on the following electronic parts: sweep generation of the spot, photomultiplier signal processing [fr

  8. A study on models of the inhomogeneity of the decompression in a bubble chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badier, J.

    1961-01-01

    Before building a hydrogen bubble chamber with liquid decompression the 'Saturne' cyclotron department wished to study for this chamber a shape leading to a homogeneous decompression as far as possible, without the production of vortices even after prolonged operation. The 'Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches Aeronautiques' (ONERA) were ready to carry out experiments on a model by strioscopy. The model was filled with air but an attempt was made to simulate the actual conditions as far as possible by varying the speed of the piston. The model was placed at one end of a tunnel, at the other end of which were produced alternatively compression and decompression waves. The study made it possible to conclude that it was necessary to make the base of the chamber round and that, in the space between the decompression cylinder and the body of the chamber it was advantageous to use 5 fins instead of 3. (author) [fr

  9. RGA studies on aluminium chambers for transport line-2 of CLIC facility at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, K.V.A.N.P.S.; Yadav, Praveen Kumar; Sindal, B.K.; Tiwari, S.K.; Tripti, B.; Shukla, S.K.

    2009-01-01

    The Aluminium Chambers for Transport Line-2 (TL-2) of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) facility were developed by RRCAT, Indore under the CERN-DAE collaboration work. The ultimate vacuum required for these chambers is in 10 -10 mbar range. The design and fabrication of the chambers were done at Workshop-A, RRCAT, Indore. Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) Section at RRCAT, Indore was involved in qualifying tests of these chambers for their ultimate vacuum testing and the residual gas spectrum studies as per CERN requirements. The UHV testing part was established and the RGA studies were conducted using Residual Gas Analyser (RGA, 1-100 AMU range, Make: Spectra/MKS, USA). The RGAs were used for vacuum diagnostics like checking for leaks and the vacuum quality in the chambers. Using the RGA, we could also observe out the pumping speed behaviour of a UHV Gauge (Varian UHV-24 type) and the retention-cum-evaluation of captured gases by Sputter Ion Pump was also studied. In this paper, these experiences are reported during ultimate testing of TL-2 chambers for CLIC facility. (author)

  10. Ozone and Botrytis interactions in onion-leaf dieback: open-top chamber studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wukasch, R.T.; Hofstra, G.

    1977-09-01

    Paired open-top chambers were used to study interactions between Botrytis spp. and ozone in field-grown onions. Charcoal filters removed 35 to 65% of the ambient ozone, resulting in six-fold reduction of onion leaf dieback and a 28% increase in onion yield compared with unfiltered chambers. Symptoms of leaf injury appeared soon after ozone levels exceeded 294 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ (0.15 ppm) for 4 hr. Lesions caused by Botrytis were few because no dew formed in the chambers. However, when leaves were wetted with foggers, inoculation with mycelial suspensions of B. sauamosa in late August produced significantly more lesions and leaf dieback in the unfiltered chamber. Botrytis squamosa, B. cinerea, B. allii, and several genera of secondary fungi were isolated from these lesions. Botrytis squamosa was recovered from lesions only, whereas B. cinerea and B. allii were associated more generally with onion leaf tissue regardless of lesions. 25 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  11. An experimental setup for the study of the steady air flow in a diesel engine chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montanero José María

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We present an experimental setup for studying the steady air flow in a diesel engine chamber. An engine block containing the inlet manifold was placed on a test bench. A steady air stream crossed the inlet manifold and entered a glass chamber driven by a fan. A PIV system was set up around the bench to measure the in-chamber flow. An air spray gun was used as seed generator to producing sub-millimeter droplets, easily dragged by the air stream. Images of the in-flow chamber were acquired in the course of the experiments, and processed to measure the velocity field. The pressure drop driven the air current and the mass flow rate were also measured.

  12. Measurement of radioactive gases. Study of SACM type CD2 differential chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benezech, G.

    1963-01-01

    This study aims at precising practical conditions of use of a circulation chamber to measure the activity of beta- and gamma-emitting radioactive gases. Results more particularly concern the SACM type CD 2 differential chamber but can easily be adapted to any other chamber type. Calibration calculations allow the definition of the field of use of this chamber. It appears that this apparatus will not generally allow a fine dosimetry of radioactive gases as the method is not selective and requires the knowledge of the gas nature. The author presents the operation principle, describes the experimental assembly, and discusses its performance in the case of a linear assembly and of a logarithmic assembly. He reports the calibration process and calculations (calculation of the ionization current with respect to gas activity, experimental measurement of this ionization current with respect to activity) [fr

  13. Studies of Helium Based Gas Mixtures Using a Small Cell Drift Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heise, Jaret; British Columbia U.

    2006-01-01

    An international collaboration is currently working on the construction and design of an asymmetric B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center that will be ready to collect data in 1999. The main physics motivation for such a facility is to test the description and mechanism of CP violation in the Standard Model of particle physics and provide insight into the question of why more matter than antimatter is observed in the universe today. In particular, this experiment will measure CP violation in the decay of B mesons. In the early stages of this effort, the Canadian contingent proposed to build the central tracking chamber for the BABAR detector. Presently, a prototype drift chamber is in operation and studies are being performed to test some of the unique features of drift chamber design dictated by the conditions of the experiment. Using cosmic muons, it is possible to study tracking and pattern recognition in the prototype chamber, and therefore calculate the efficiency and spatial resolution of the prototype chamber cells. These performance features will be used to test whether or not the helium-based gas mixtures proposed for the BABAR drift chamber are a viable alternative to the more traditional argon-based gases

  14. 2005 Toronto smog report card : final grade C-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-10-01

    This annual Smog Report Card for Toronto evaluates the progress made by the City toward reducing the environmental and health impacts of smog. The final grade for the City in 2005 was a C-, a decrease over the B+ issued in 2004. The report card evaluates City Council actions based on their clean air commitments. In particular, the performance on initiatives in the following six major areas were graded: energy; transit; walking and biking; fleets and fuels; intergovernmental action; and new air quality strategies. Although Toronto had a record number of smog days due to high-temperatures and high pollution levels, it had a better record on smog and climate change than either the provincial or federal levels. Greenhouse gas emissions in Toronto are actually going down, but they are up 12 and 24 per cent at the federal and provincial levels respectively. In 2005, the City of Toronto developed a new Air Quality Management Strategy to replace the Smog Plan. Future evaluations will depend on whether the strategy is effective. The report recommends that efforts should be made to reduce greenhouse gas emissions which cause global warming, as well measures to reduce the urban heat island effect by planting trees, improving energy efficiency and using lighter-coloured materials for roads, parking lots and roofs. The report card criticized that there has been no green power purchased for the City and that the transit ridership growth strategy is behind schedule. It also noted that the City is not pedestrian or bike friendly. refs., tabs., figs.

  15. Aging studies of resistive bulk Micromegas chambers for the ATLAS muon spectrometer upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Spencer, Katie Louise

    2017-01-01

    A long-term operation study is presented as a probe of the aging properties of two bulk-resistive Micromegas chambers installed at the GIF$^{++}$ Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. Trends in the instantaneous chamber current, recorded over $\\approx$ 500 days of sustained exposure to the GIF$^{++}$ high intensity photon source, are analysed as a function of time in order to identify any signs of detector aging. As part of the study, additional variations in the current due to the changing external conditions of the chambers must be corrected for in order to isolate any aging effects. These include the changing chamber positions with respect to the photon source and the temperature and pressure fluctuations of the detector gas medium. Due to a number of subsets of the total irradiation period in which the exact detector positions are unknown, the aging study at the present time remains inconclusive. As a result, an alternative long-term aging study utilising the instantaneous chamber dark currents is suggested...

  16. The health policy implications of individual adaptive behavior responses to smog pollution in urban China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Jie; Zhou, Lian; Zhang, Yi; Brooke Anderson, G; Li, Tiantian

    2017-09-01

    Smog pollution is a serious public health issue in urban China, where it is associated with public health through a range of respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses. Despite the negative health impacts of smog pollution, individual adaptive behaviors are poorly understood. This knowledge gap hinders the development of effective public policy to support and encourage the adoption of individual adaptive and mitigating behaviors to smog pollution. A questionnaire survey of 1141 randomly sampled individuals in a typical PM 2.5 -polluted Chinese city was designed to establish smog concerns and behavior changes during smog events. The results demonstrate a variety of behavior responses associated with risk perception, experience of smog, age, and gender of respondents. An understanding of these variations is critical to the development of effective public policy and ultimately to the improvement of public health in cities affected by smog. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Study of pulp chamber morphology of primary mandibular molars using spiral computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvakumar, Haridoss; Kavitha, Swaminathan; Vijayakumar, Rajendran; Eapen, Thomas; Bharathan, Rajendran

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pulp chamber morphology in primary mandibular molars using spiral computed tomography (SCT). Sixty extracted primary mandibular molars were scanned using SCT for the (i) distance between the central fissure to furcation, (ii) distance between the central fissure to the floor of the pulp chamber, (iii) height of the pulp chamber (roof-floor), (iv) distance between the floor of the pulp chamber to the furcation. The mean and standard deviation was analyzed using statistical package for the social sciences (SPSS) program. The results of this study show that the average mean distance from the central fissure to the floor of the pulp chamber is 5.07 mm in first mandibular primary molar and 5.54 mm in second mandibular primary molar. It can be concluded that the greatest depth to which a bur can go during access opening without perforating the furcation in first primary mandibular molar is 5.07 mm and 5.54 mm in second primary mandibular molar.

  18. Study of the effect of water vapor on a resistive plate chamber with glass electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Sakai, H H; Teramoto, Y; Nakano, E E; Takahashi, T T

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effects of water vapor on the efficiencies of resistive plate chambers with glass electrodes, operated in the streamer mode. With moisture in the chamber gas that has freon as a component (water vapor approx 1000 ppm), a decrease in the efficiency (approx 20%) has been observed after operating for a period of several weeks to a few months. From our study, the cause of the efficiency decrease was identified as a change on the cathode surface. In addition, a recovery method was found: flushing for 1 day with argon bubbled through water containing >=3% ammonia, followed by a few weeks of training with dry gas.

  19. Conceptual design study of the hylife lithium fall laser fusion chamber. FY 1979 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    In FY 1979, the basic configuration of FY 1978 was used as a reference point. Many studies were then made to either generate more design information concerning this design or to produce new concepts that would lead to a superior configuration. Among these activities were a detailed weight analysis, an assembly sequence, a chamber vibration analysis, a splash baffle stress study, and an analysis of first wall thermal stresses. Then some new concepts were introduced that pertained to the first wall, the lithium inlet nozzle, the chamber supports, the inlet piping, and pressure vessel

  20. Final report for NIF chamber dynamics studies. Final report (May 1997), Subcontract No. B291847

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, P.F.; Jin, H.; Scott, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 1.8 MJ, 192 laser beam facility, will have anticipated fusion yields of up to 20 MJ from D-T pellets encased in a gold hohlraum target. The energy emitted from the target in the form of x rays, neutrons, target debris kinetic energy, and target shrapnel will be contained in a 5 m. radius spherical target chamber. Various diagnostics will be stationed around the target at varying distances from the target. During each shot, the target will emit x rays that will vaporize nearby target facing surfaces including those of the diagnostics, the target positioner, and other chamber structures. This ablated vapor will be transported throughout the chamber, and will eventually condense and deposit on surfaces in the chamber, including the final optics debris shields. The research at the University of California at Berkeley relates primarily to the NIF chamber dynamics. The key design issues are the ablation of the chamber structures, transport of the vapor through the chamber and the condensation or deposition processes of those vaporized materials. An understanding of these processes is essential in developing a concept for protecting the final optics debris shields from an excessive coating (> 10 Angstrom) of target debris and ablated material, thereby prolonging their lifetime between change- outs. At Berkeley, we have studied the physical issues of the ablation process and the effects of varying materials, the condensation process of the vaporized material, and design schemes that can lower the threat posed to the debris shields by these processes. In addition to the work described briefly above, we performed extensive analysis of the target-chamber thermal response to in- chamber CO 2 Cleaning and of work performed to model the behavior of silica vapor. The work completed this year has been published in several papers and a dissertation -6 This report provides a summary of the work completed this year, as well as copies of

  1. Should people be physically active outdoors on smog alert days?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Monica E; Li, Qian; Gingrich, Sarah E; Macfarlane, Ronald G; Cheng, Shouquan

    2005-01-01

    Given the importance of physical activity to well-being, there is a need to encourage people to be physically active year-round. At the same time, many people are vulnerable to adverse health effects from air pollution, especially on smog alert days. This study was undertaken to determine when air pollution levels tend to be lowest so that the public can modify strenuous outdoor activity accordingly. Existing hourly air pollution data for Toronto were analyzed to determine how pollutant levels varied from hour to hour throughout each 24-hour day, to identify the times when pollution levels are at their lowest on average. Pollutant levels vary throughout the day, with concentrations of some pollutants (such as ozone, particles and sulphur dioxide) being highest during mid-day, and others (such as carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide) being highest with morning rush hour. Overall, pollutant concentrations tend to be lowest before seven a.m. and after eight p.m. The public should be encouraged to maintain regular physical activity outdoors while monitoring any air pollution-related symptoms. The intensity of outdoor activity should be reduced, or activities replaced with indoor exercise, at those Air Quality Index (AQI) levels that trigger individual symptoms and when AQI values exceed 50. Where possible, strenuous activity should be taken when and where air pollution levels tend to be lowest, namely early in the morning and in low-traffic areas. More research is required to guide development of health protective advice on exercising when air quality is poor.

  2. Drift velocity studies at a time projection chamber for various water contents in the gas mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoever, F.W.

    2007-03-01

    For the answer of different open questions in high energy physics the construction of a linear e + e - collider with a c. m. energy of up to one TeV is prepared. With this is connected a comprehensive development on detectors, which must satisfy the requirements of the planned experiments. For the track chamber a TPC is considered. Hereby it deals with a gas-based concept, which has already been proved in past experiments and which is at time further developed by means of test chambers. The composition of the gas mixtureplays hereby an important role. Impurities of the gas mixture, especially by oxygen and water from the ambient air are a fact, which occurs every time in the development phase and can scarcely be avoided. From this arose the motivation to study directly the effects of this impurities. The object of the present thesis are correlations between drift velocity and water content in the chamber gas of a TPC

  3. Studies of light emission by continuously sensitive avalanche chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.; Dominik, W.; Fabre, J.P.; Gaudaen, J.; Sauli, F.; Suzuki, M.

    1988-01-01

    The optimal conditions for the optical recording of images of electron avalanches between parallel meshes have been studied. The emission spectra of gas mixtures have been investigated, where triethylamine (TEA), tetrakis(dimethylamine)ethylene (TMAE), and nitrogen, are used as the photon-emitting agents. For a given charge gain, the photon intensity decreases with electric field. This favours amplification between parallel meshes instead of wires. The use of intensified CCD cameras permits the recording of the local energy loss along the tracks. (orig.)

  4. Performance Studies of a Micromegas Chamber in the ATLAS Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Kataoka, Y; Ntekas, K

    2014-01-01

    Five small prototype micromegas detectors were positioned in the ATLAS detector during Large Hadron Collider running at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ and $8\\, \\mathrm{TeV}$. A $9\\times 4.5\\, \\mathrm{cm^2}$ two-gap detector was placed in front of the electromagnetic calorimeter and four $9\\times 10\\, \\mathrm{cm^2}$ detectors on the ATLAS Small Wheel, the first station of the forward muon spectrometer. The one attached to the calorimeter was exposed to interaction rates of about $70\\,\\mathrm{kHz}$ at $\\mathcal{L}=5\\times 10^{33}\\,\\mathrm{cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$ two orders of magnitude higher than the rates in the Small Wheel. We present the results from performance studies carried out using data collected with these detectors and we also compare the currents drawn by the detector installed in front of the electromagnetic calorimeter with the luminosity measurement in ATLAS.

  5. A Preliminary Study on Time Projection Chamber Simulation for Fission Cross Section Measurements with Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Woon; Lee, Youngouk; Kim, Jae Cheon

    2014-01-01

    We present the details of the TPC simulation with Geant4 and show the results. TPC can provide more information than a fission chamber in that it is possible to distinguish different particle types. Simulations are conducted for uranium and plutonium targets with 20MeV neutrons. The simulation results are compared with the reference and show reasonable results. This is the first phase of study for realizing a TPC in the NFS at RAON, and we have more work to do, such as applying an electric field, signal processing in the simulation, and manufacturing of a TPC. The standard in fission cross section measurement is a fission chamber. It is basically just two parallel plates separated by a few centimeters of gas. A power supply connected to the plates sets up a moderate electric field. The target is deposited onto one of the plates. When fission occurs, the fragments ionize the gas, and the electric field causes the produced electrons to drift to the opposite plate, which records the total energy deposited in the chamber. A Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is a gas ionization detector similar to a fission chamber. However, it can measure the charged particle trajectories in the active volume in three dimensions by adding several readouts on the pad plane (fission chamber has only one readout one a pad plane). The specific ionization for each particle track enables the TPC to distinguish different particle types. A TPC will be used for fission cross section measurements in the Neutron Science Facility (NSF) at RAON. As a preliminary study, we present details of TPC simulation with Geant4 and discuss the results

  6. Effects of seasonal smog on asthma and COPD exacerbations requiring emergency visits in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothirat, Chaicharn; Tosukhowong, Apiwat; Chaiwong, Warawut; Liwsrisakun, Chalerm; Inchai, Juthamas

    2016-12-01

    Seasonal smog produces particulate matters that are less than 10 microns in diameter (PM₁₀), which are known to have several impacts on the respiratory system. This study was to determine the association of an increased PM10 level due to seasonal smog in Chiang Mai and emergency visits for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations. A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted between the months of January and March from 2006 until 2009. The association of an increased PM₁₀ level and the daily number of asthma and COPD exacerbations were analyzed using a generalized linear model; a Poisson regression model was fit to the number of daily emergency visits using predictor variables: lags of PM10, day of the week, and time. There were a total of 917 emergency visits for acute exacerbations of asthma and COPD, with a median of 2 visits per day (range 0-10). The median PM₁₀ level during the same interval was 64.5 microgram per cubic meter (μg/m3) (16-304). For every 10 μg/m3 rise in PM10 concentration, there was a lag time of 6 days for asthma exacerbations [Adjusted relative risk (RR)=1.020; 95% confident interval (CI), 1.001-1.040; (p=0.014)], 7 days for COPD exacerbations [RR=1.030; 95%CI, 1.010-1.050 (p=0.024)] and 7 days for all exacerbations [RR=1.030 95%CI, 1.010-1.040 (p<0.001)]. This study confirms the effect of increasing PM₁₀ concentrations from seasonal smog on asthma and COPD exacerbations. However, there was an approximately 1 week lag time between the elevated PM₁₀ levels and time to emergency visits due to disease exacerbation.

  7. Modeling smog along the Los Angeles-Palm Springs trajectory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, S.R.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of smog concentrations and wind patterns during the summer of 1973 in Los Angeles, Pomona, Riverside, Banning, and Palm Springs, California are presented which show that high oxidant concentrations at Banning and Palm Springs are often due to advection of smog from source regions in the more densely populated western part of the Los Angeles basin. At Pomona and Riverside, advection from upwind source regions combines with the effects of local emissions to cause long durations of high oxidant concentrations with peak times in the mid afternoon. An empirical model for the diurnal oxidant variation is suggested which satisfactorily simulates observed concentrations. More complex models which include chemical kinetics systems do not perform very satisfactorily at the rural stations of Banning and Palm Springs, especially at night when observed oxidant concentrations remain high

  8. Toronto smog report card 2003 : final grade C -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-10-01

    An annual Smog Report Card for Toronto has been published annually by the Toronto Environmental Alliance since 1997, evaluating the progress made by the City toward reducing the environmental and health impacts of smog. The final grade for the City in 2003 was a C -, an improvement over last year's D +. The evaluation examined the performance on 33 initiatives in six major areas: leadership, transit, electricity, fleets and fuels, bikes and pedestrians, and public education. Issues that stood out were: a $30 million increase in funding to the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC), and the release of the TTC's Ridership Growth Strategy depicting how transit ridership can be increased through improved service and lower fares. The drive-through and pesticide by-laws were passed by Council, which should result in smog reduction from unnecessary activities. Leadership was found to be lacking at City Hall in the area of clean air, in view of its decision to proceed with the expansion of Island Airport. The decision to move forward on only 20 per cent of planned green power and energy efficiency measures was a low point in 2002. The City's budget process, which effectively screened out most environmental initiatives was in part responsible for the lack of progress. The following grades were awarded: transit and trip reduction (B), energy efficiency and green power received (D), fleets and fuels (C), bikes and pedestrians (C), public education (B). Recommendations for next year included: implementation of the TTC's Ridership Growth Strategy; creation of a Smog Plan Implementation Fund of $20 million per year to invest in energy efficiency, green fleets, green power and other related measures; and stop the expansion of Island Airport

  9. Reactor oscillator project - Theoretical study; operation problems; choice of the ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lolic, B.; Markovic, V.

    1961-01-01

    Theoretical study of the reactor operator covers methods of the danger coefficient and the method based on measuring the phase angle. Operation with the reactor oscillator describes measurement of the cross section and resonance integral, measurement of the fissionable materials properties, measurement of impurities in the graphite sample. A separate chapter is devoted to the choice of the appropriate ionization chamber

  10. Experimental study of the counting loss in an ionization chamber in pulsed radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalez, O.L.; Yanagihara, L.S.; Veissid, V.L.C.P.; Herdade, S.B.; Teixeira, A.N.

    1983-01-01

    The behavior of an ionization chamber gamma ray monitor in a pulsed radiation field at a linear electron accelerator facility was studied experiementally. A loss of sensitivity was observed as expected due to the pulsed nature of the radiation. By fitting the experiemental data to semi-empirical expressions, parameters for the correction of the counting efficiency were obtained. (Author) [pt

  11. Establishment and evaluation of a rat model of inhalation lung injury induced by ship smog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-xin DUAN

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish and evaluate a rat model of inhalation lung injury induced by ship smog. Methods A rat model of inhalation lung injury was established by analyzing the composition of ship materials after combustion. Forty- two healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into normal control group and 2, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72h groups (6 eachafter inhalation, these rats were killed at each time point, and the changes of arterial blood gas, coagulation function, the lung water content (% were detected. Macroscopic and microscopic changes in lung tissues were observed to judge the degree of lung injury. Results The main components after combustion of 7 kinds of nonmetal materials on ship included CO, CO2, H2S, NOx and other harmful gases in this study, AIKE in one gas detector was used to monitor O2, CO, CO2 and H2S, and their concentrations remained relatively stable within 15 minutes, and the injury time was 15 minutes. The rats presented with shortness of breath and mouth breathing. Smoke inhalation caused a significant hypoxemia, the concentration of blood COHb reached a peak value 2h and the lung water content (% did 6h after inhalation (P<0.05. It is metabolic acidosis in the early stage after inhalation, but metabolic acidosis combined with respiratory acidosis in the later period. Histopathological observation showed diffuse hemorrhage, edema and inflammatory cell infiltration in the lung tissue as manifestations of lung injury, and the injury did not recover at 72h after inhalation, the change of blood coagulation function was not statistically significant. Conclusion A rat model of inhalation lung injury induced by ship smog has been successfully established, and has the advantages of easy replication, stability and reliability, thus can be used to research and treat inhalation lung injury induced by ship smog in naval war environment and other cases. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2018.03.14

  12. Thermal Studies of the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Target during Injection into the Fusion Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, R. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Havstad, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LeBlanc, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chang, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Golosker, I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rosso, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-09

    The tests of the external heat transfer coefficient suggests that the values used in the numerical analysis for the temperature distribution within the fusion fuel target following flight into the target chamber are probably valid. The tests of the heat transfer phenomena occurring within the target due the rapid heating of the LEH window for the hot gasses within the fusion chamber show that the heat does indeed convect via the internal helium environment of the target towards the capsule and that the pressure in the front compartment of the target adjacent to the LEH window increases such that t bypass venting of the internal helium into the second chamber adjacent to the capsule is needed to prevent rupture of the membranes. The bypass flow is cooled by the hohlraum during this venting. However, the experiments suggest that our internal heat flow calculations may be low by about a factor of 2. Further studies need to be conducted to investigate the differences between the experiment and the numerical analysis. Future studies could also possibly bring the test conditions closer to those expected in the fusion chamber to better validate the results. A sacrificial layer will probably be required on the LEH window of the target and this can be used to mitigate any unexpected target heating.

  13. Summary of Previous Chamber or Controlled Anthrax Studies and Recommendations for Possible Additional Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2010-12-29

    This report and an associated Excel file(a) summarizes the investigations and results of previous chamber and controlled studies(b) to characterize the performance of methods for collecting, storing and/or transporting, extracting, and analyzing samples from surfaces contaminated by Bacillus anthracis (BA) or related simulants. This report and the Excel are the joint work of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for the Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate. The report was originally released as PNNL-SA-69338, Rev. 0 in November 2009 with limited distribution, but was subsequently cleared for release with unlimited distribution in this Rev. 1. Only minor changes were made to Rev. 0 to yield Rev. 1. A more substantial update (including summarizing data from other studies and more condensed summary tables of data) is underway

  14. Performance Studies of Micromegas Chambers for the New Small Wheel Upgrade Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leontsinis S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ATLAS collaboration has chosen the Micromegas technology along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers for the upgrade of the inner muon station in the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel upgrade project. It will employ eight layers of Micromegas and eight layers of small-strip Thin Gap Chambers per wheel. The New Small Wheel project requires fully efficient Micromegas chambers, able to cope with the maximum expected rate of 15 kHz/cm2 featuring single plane spatial resolution better than 100 μm. The Micromegas detectors will cover a total active area of ~ 1200 m2 and will be operated in a moderate magnetic field (≤ 0.3 T. Moreover, together with their precise tracking capability the New Small Wheel Micromegas chambers will contribute to the ATLAS Level-1 trigger system. Several studies have been performed on small (10 × 10 cm2 and medium (1 × 0.5 m2 size prototypes using medium (1 − 5 GeV/c and high momentum (120 – 150 GeV/c hadron beams at CERN. A brief overview of the results obtained is presented.

  15. The Ussing Chamber Assay to Study Drug Metabolism and Transport in the Human Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisser, Beatrice; Mangelsen, Eva; Wingolf, Caroline; Partecke, Lars Ivo; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Tannergren, Christer; Oswald, Stefan; Keiser, Markus

    2017-06-22

    The Ussing chamber is an old but still powerful technique originally designed to study the vectorial transport of ions through frog skin. This technique is also used to investigate the transport of chemical agents through the intestinal barrier as well as drug metabolism in enterocytes, both of which are key determinants for the bioavailability of orally administered drugs. More contemporary model systems, such as Caco-2 cell monolayers or stably transfected cells, are more limited in their use compared to the Ussing chamber because of differences in expression rates of transporter proteins and/or metabolizing enzymes. While there are limitations to the Ussing chamber assay, the use of human intestinal tissue remains the best laboratory test for characterizing the transport and metabolism of compounds following oral administration. Detailed in this unit is a step-by-step protocol for preparing human intestinal tissue, for designing Ussing chamber experiments, and for analyzing and interpreting the findings. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Study of energy determination of gamma-ray observed with an emulsion chamber with a large gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inui, Tamiki; Otsuka, Taeko; Masaoka, Akiko

    1982-01-01

    The development of large size emulsion chambers has been made to study very high energy events. For this purpose, the chambers with exchangeable light sensitive layers are considered. The chambers have large gap for the exchange. In this case, it becomes hard to determine the energy of cascade shower. In this report, the authors describe on the experimental examples observed at Mt. Chacaltaya. The effect of a gap was investigated by these examples, and the simulation method by Okamoto and Shibata was applied to the chamber. The chamber used for the observation consisted of the top chamber of 11 c.u. and the bottom chamber of 15 c.u. There was a large gap of 170 cm between two chambers. Twelve showers in three families observed by this system were analyzed. The difference between the blackness in the top and bottom films was studied quantitatively. The blackness was calibrated for the electron density. Four methods of energy determination were studied. Among them, a method to employ the sum of the maximum blackness of a top film and that of a bottom one was used for the analysis. This method seemed to be more reliable than the old method. It was found by a simulation calculation that the recovery of shower in the bottom chamber was seen not only by hardrons but also by gamma-ray. (Kato, T.)

  17. A multiwire proportional chamber for precision studies of neutron β decay angular correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, T.M.; Carr, R.; Filippone, B.W.; Martin, J.W.; Plaster, B.; Rybka, G.; Yuan, J.

    2007-01-01

    A new multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) was designed and constructed for precision studies of neutron β decay angular correlations. Its design has several novel features, including the use of low pressure neopentane as the MWPC gas and an entrance window made of thin Mylar sheet reinforced with Kevlar fibers. In the initial off-line performance tests, the gas gain of neopentane and the position resolution were studied

  18. WE-EF-207-04: An Inter-Projection Sensor Fusion (IPSF) Approach to Estimate Missing Projection Signal in Synchronized Moving Grid (SMOG) System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H; Kong, V; Jin, J; Ren, L; Zhang, Y; Giles, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A synchronized moving grid (SMOG) has been proposed to reduce scatter and lag artifacts in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, information is missing in each projection because certain areas are blocked by the grid. A previous solution to this issue is acquiring 2 complimentary projections at each position, which increases scanning time. This study reports our first Result using an inter-projection sensor fusion (IPSF) method to estimate missing projection in our prototype SMOG-based CBCT system. Methods: An in-house SMOG assembling with a 1:1 grid of 3 mm gap has been installed in a CBCT benchtop. The grid moves back and forth in a 3-mm amplitude and up-to 20-Hz frequency. A control program in LabView synchronizes the grid motion with the platform rotation and x-ray firing so that the grid patterns for any two neighboring projections are complimentary. A Catphan was scanned with 360 projections. After scatter correction, the IPSF algorithm was applied to estimate missing signal for each projection using the information from the 2 neighboring projections. Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm was applied to reconstruct CBCT images. The CBCTs were compared to those reconstructed using normal projections without applying the SMOG system. Results: The SMOG-IPSF method may reduce image dose by half due to the blocked radiation by the grid. The method almost completely removed scatter related artifacts, such as the cupping artifacts. The evaluation of line pair patterns in the CatPhan suggested that the spatial resolution degradation was minimal. Conclusion: The SMOG-IPSF is promising in reducing scatter artifacts and improving image quality while reducing radiation dose

  19. WE-EF-207-04: An Inter-Projection Sensor Fusion (IPSF) Approach to Estimate Missing Projection Signal in Synchronized Moving Grid (SMOG) System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H; Kong, V; Jin, J [Georgia Regents University Cancer Center, Augusta, GA (Georgia); Ren, L; Zhang, Y; Giles, W [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A synchronized moving grid (SMOG) has been proposed to reduce scatter and lag artifacts in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, information is missing in each projection because certain areas are blocked by the grid. A previous solution to this issue is acquiring 2 complimentary projections at each position, which increases scanning time. This study reports our first Result using an inter-projection sensor fusion (IPSF) method to estimate missing projection in our prototype SMOG-based CBCT system. Methods: An in-house SMOG assembling with a 1:1 grid of 3 mm gap has been installed in a CBCT benchtop. The grid moves back and forth in a 3-mm amplitude and up-to 20-Hz frequency. A control program in LabView synchronizes the grid motion with the platform rotation and x-ray firing so that the grid patterns for any two neighboring projections are complimentary. A Catphan was scanned with 360 projections. After scatter correction, the IPSF algorithm was applied to estimate missing signal for each projection using the information from the 2 neighboring projections. Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm was applied to reconstruct CBCT images. The CBCTs were compared to those reconstructed using normal projections without applying the SMOG system. Results: The SMOG-IPSF method may reduce image dose by half due to the blocked radiation by the grid. The method almost completely removed scatter related artifacts, such as the cupping artifacts. The evaluation of line pair patterns in the CatPhan suggested that the spatial resolution degradation was minimal. Conclusion: The SMOG-IPSF is promising in reducing scatter artifacts and improving image quality while reducing radiation dose.

  20. Endoscopic biopsies in Ussing chambers evaluated for studies of macromolecular permeability in the human colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallon, Conny; Braaf, Ylva; Wolving, Mats; Olaison, Gunnar; Söderholm, Johan D

    2005-05-01

    Studies of mucosal permeability to protein antigens in humans are limited to in vitro techniques. The use of surgical specimens for such studies has major shortcomings. Endoscopic biopsies in Ussing chambers have been introduced as a means of studying secretion and transepithelial permeability, but have not been evaluated for studies of protein antigen uptake in human intestine. Standard forceps biopsies from the sigmoid colon of 24 healthy volunteers were mounted in Ussing chambers with an exposed tissue area of 1.76 mm2. 51Cr-EDTA (paracellular probe) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP; 45 kDa protein antigen) were used as permeability markers. Mucosal permeability, electrophysiology, histology and energy contents of the biopsies were studied over time. To evaluate the ability of the technique to detect permeability changes, the mucosa was modulated with capric acid, a medium-chain fatty acid, known to affect tight junctions. In the Ussing chamber the mucosal biopsies were viable for 160 min with stable levels of ATP and lactate, and only minor changes in morphology. Steady-state permeability with low variability was seen for both markers during the 30-90 min period. Exposure to capric acid induced a rapid decrease in short-circuit current (Isc) and a slower reversible decrease in transepithelial resistance (TER), as well as an increased permeability to 51Cr-EDTA and HRP. Endoscopic biopsies of human colon are viable in Ussing chambers and are reliable tools for studies of mucosal permeability to protein antigens. The technique offers a broad potential for studies of mucosal function in the pathophysiology of human gastrointestinal diseases.

  1. Study of a proportional chamber for the detection of muons in the CELLO experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, Alain.

    1978-01-01

    The physics of e + e - interactions that the CELLO experiment is proposing to do requires good μ detection. For this, the prototype of a wire type proportional chamber with integrated logical system read-out is under study. The various phenomena that govern the working of a wire type proportional chamber are recalled first of all. Section II deals with the various working and read-out modes. Section III is devoted to the description of the method chosen and its advantages. In Sections IV and V, the two more specifically studied read-out methods are presented and it is shown that the read-out method by delay line proves to be much more delicate to use than the integrated electronic method finally selected [fr

  2. A study of the air-shower response of current-limited spark chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, M.R.; Hodson, A.L.; Bull, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    The efficiency of current-limited spark chambers (discharge chambers) and their relative response to shower electrons and photons are investigated. A stack of six horizontal 1m x 10 cm discharge chambers, above one another, is triggered by air showers falling on an adjacent discharge-chamber array. Particular combinations of discharges show that the efficiency of the chambers is very high and that a significant fraction of the discharges is due to incident photons

  3. Study of influence of gas mixture composition on the multistep avalanche chambers characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdushukurov, D.A.; Zanevskij, Yu.V.; Peshekhonov, V.D.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of the concentration of organic quenchers on the operation of multistep avalanche chambers /MSAC/ has been studied. An empirical dependence of the gas amplification factor of MSAC on the quencher concentration has been derived. Measures are considered to increase the stability of the MSAC operation. To improve the MSAC operation argon + n-heptane, neon + methane and neon + argon + methane mixtures are suggested

  4. Ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilbert, P.H.

    1975-01-01

    The invention concerns ionization chambers with particular reference to air-equivalent ionization chambers. In order to ensure that similar chambers have similar sensitivities and responses the surface of the chamber bounding the active volume carries a conducting material, which may be a colloidal graphite, arranged in the form of lines so that the area of the conducting material occupies only a small proportion of the area of said surface. (U.S.)

  5. A study of the response of a gas ionization chamber to different sources of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamble-Dieguez, F.E.

    1988-05-01

    The response of the TAMU Forward Hadron Calorimeter Chambers to neutrons from a 2 39Pu-Be source was investigated in hope of developing a strategy to reduce the effects of the background events called /open quotes/Texas towers/close quotes/ in the CDF trigger for the next run. The response to a standard ( 5 5Fe γ-ray) energy source was also studied and found to be similar to that of the chambers installed at CDF. In addition, the effects of different sampling gases and intermediate absorbers on the rate of large energy pulses were investigated. The neutron data were compared with the energy spectrum measured in CDF and that simulated using Monte Carlo techniques. It was found that the large energy pulse frequency can be reduced by as much as 50% if a non-hydrogenous sampling gas is used in conjunction with a neutron moderator

  6. Study of behaviour of the monitor chambers of a linear accelerator for medical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosed, A.; Lopez-Bote, M.A.; Blanco, M.A.; Galvez, M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental procedure to study the nature and behaviour of the monitor chambers of a linear accelerator for medical use is presented. The procedure has been applied to a Siemens accelerator, Mevatron-77, that has two different types of monitor chambers: sealed for the photon beam and unsealed for the electron ones. As it was expected, no deviations in the dose per monitor unit has been obtained for the photon beam. Variations in the absorbed dose per monitor unit have been observed for the electron beams up to 6% along the working day. Practical solutions compensating this fact are pointed out and the standard recommendations on the control of dose per monitor unit are discussed. (Author)

  7. A Monte Carlo study of radon detection in cylindrical diffusion chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickards, Jorge, E-mail: rickards@fisica.unam.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica, Ciudad Universitaria, Delegacion Coyoacan, 04520 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Golzarri, Jose-Ignacio, E-mail: golzarri@fisica.unam.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica, Ciudad Universitaria, Delegacion Coyoacan, 04520 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Espinosa, Guillermo, E-mail: espinosa@fisica.unam.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica, Ciudad Universitaria, Delegacion Coyoacan, 04520 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-05-15

    The functioning of radon diffusion chambers was studied using the Monte Carlo code RAMMX developed here. The alpha particles from radon are assumed randomly produced in the volume of the cylinder, and those from the progeny are assumed to originate randomly at the cylindrical surface. The energy spectrum, the distribution of incident angles, and the distribution of path lengths of the alpha particles on the detector were obtained. These quantities vary depending on input parameters such as initial alpha particle energy, radius and depth of the diffusion chamber, detector size and atmospheric pressure. The calculated energy spectrum for both {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn was compared with experiment, permitting the identification of each peak and its origin, and a better understanding of radon monitoring. Three aspects not considered in previous calculations are progeny alphas coming from surfaces of the monitor, taking into account the atmospheric pressure, and including the isotope {sup 220}Rn.

  8. The Chamber for Studying Rice Response to Elevated Nighttime Temperature in Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An in situ temperature-controlled field chamber was developed for studying a large population of rice plant under different nighttime temperature treatments while maintaining conditions similar to those in the field during daytime. The system consists of a pipe hoop shed-type chamber with manually removable covers manipulated to provide a natural environment at daytime and a relatively stable and accurate temperature at night. Average air temperatures of 22.4 ± 0.3°C at setting of 22°C, 27.6 ± 0.4°C at 27°C, and 23.8 ± 0.7°C ambient conditions were maintained with the system. No significant horizontal and vertical differences in temperature were found and only slight changes in water temperatures were observed between the chambers and ambient conditions at 36 days after transplanting. A slight variation in CO2 concentration was observed at the end of the treatment during the day, but the 10-μmol CO2 mol−1 difference was too small to alter plant response. The present utilitarian system, which only utilizes an air conditioner/heater, is suitable for studying the effect of nighttime temperature on plant physiological responses with minimal perturbation of other environmental factors. At the same time, it will enable in situ screening of many rice genotypes.

  9. Test chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2009-01-01

    A test chamber for measuring electromagnetic radiation emitted by an apparatus to be tested or for exposing an apparatus to be tested to an electromagnetic radiation field. The test chamber includes a reverberation chamber made of a conductive tent fabric. To create a statistically uniform field in

  10. Performance studies of resistive Micromegas chambers for the upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntekas, Konstantinos

    2018-02-01

    The ATLAS collaboration at LHC has endorsed the resistive Micromegas technology (MM), along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC), for the high luminosity upgrade of the first muon station in the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel (NSW) project. The NSW requires fully efficient MM chambers, up to a particle rate of ˜ 15 kHz/cm2, with spatial resolution better than 100 μm independent of the track incidence angle and the magnetic field (B ≤ 0.3 T). Along with the precise tracking the MM should be able to provide a trigger signal, complementary to the sTGC, thus a decent timing resolution is required. Several tests have been performed on small (10 × 10 cm2) MM chambers using medium (10 GeV/c) and high (150 GeV/c) momentum hadron beams at CERN. Results on the efficiency and position resolution measured during these tests are presented demonstrating the excellent characteristics of the MM that fulfil the NSW requirements. Exploiting the ability of the MM to work as a Time Projection Chamber a novel method, called the μTPC, has been developed for the case of inclined tracks, allowing for a precise segment reconstruction using a single detection plane. A detailed description of the method along with thorough studies towards refining the method's performance are shown. Finally, during 2014 the first MM quadruplet (MMSW) following the NSW design scheme, comprising four detection planes in a stereo readout configuration, has been realised at CERN. Test-beam results of this prototype are discussed and compared to theoretical expectations.

  11. Intensive irradiation studies, monitoring and commissioning data analysis on the ATLAS MDT chambers

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2071390; Susinno, Giancarlo

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS MDT chambers have been extensively studied, starting from irradiation test to commissioning activities. First, a detailed description of high rate and high background tests is given. These tests have been carried out on a small ATLAS-like MDT chamber, by the Cosenza and Roma TRE groups. The precision tracking chambers of the muon spectrometer, in fact, have to operate for more than 10 years in the harsh LHC background, due mainly to low energy neutrons and photons. Aging effects, such as the deterioration of the tube themselves can appear and difficulties in pattern recognition and tracking may occur. Moreover an upgrade to Super-LHC is foreseen. Then, there is an accurate description of the MDTGnam package, the official software for the on-line monitoring of MDT performances. When dealing with a complex apparatus, such as the ATLAS experiment, an on-line monitoring system is a fundamental tool. The GNAM project, developed by Cosenza, Pavia, Pisa and Napoli groups, is a monitoring framework to be us...

  12. Development of fission micro-chambers for nuclear waste incineration studies

    CERN Document Server

    Fadil, M; Christophe, S; Deruelle, O; Fioni, G; Marie, F; Mounier, C; Ridikas, D; Trapp, J P

    2002-01-01

    The Incineration by Accelerator (INCA) project of the Directorate for Science of Matter of the French Atomic Energy Authority (CEA/DSM) aims to outline the ideal physical conditions to transmute minor actinides in a high intensity neutron flux obtained either by hybrid systems or innovative critical reactors. To measure on-line the incineration rates of minor actinides, we are developing an innovative Double Deposit Fission Chamber (DDFC) working in current mode. Our method is based on a comparison between the isotope under study and a reference material whose nuclear parameters are well known, as sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U and sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu. This new fission chamber will be used in the High Flux Reactor in Grenoble/France in a neutron flux of 1.2x10 sup 1 sup 5 n cm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 for 50 days, the operating cycle of the reactor. These specific experimental conditions require substantial modifications of the existing chambers. The first experiment will be carried out in fall 2000.

  13. Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Bourque, R.F.

    1985-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of the second year of a two-year study on the design and evaluation of the Cascade concept as a commercial inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. We developed a reactor design based on the Cascade reaction chamber concept that would be competitive in terms of both capital and operating costs, safe and environmentally acceptable in terms of hazard to the public, occupational exposure and radioactive waste production, and highly efficient. The Cascade reaction chamber is a double-cone-shaped rotating drum. The granulated solid blanket materials inside the rotating chamber are held against the walls by centrifugal force. The fusion energy is captured in a blanket of solid carbon, BeO, and LiAlO 2 granules. These granules are circulated to the primary side of a ceramic heat exchanger. Primary-side granule temperatures range from 1285 K at the LiAlO 2 granule heat exchanger outlet to 1600 K at the carbon granule heat exchanger inlet. The secondary side consists of a closed-cycle gas turbine power conversion system with helium working fluid, operating at 1300 K peak outlet temperature and achieving a thermal power conversion efficiency of 55%. The net plant efficiency is 49%. The reference design is a plant producing 1500 MW of D-T fusion power and delivering 815 MW of electrical power for sale to the utility grid. 88 refs., 44 figs., 47 tabs

  14. Study of Parameters Effect on Hydrodynamics of a Gas-Solid Chamber Experimentally and Numerically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahimzadeh Hassan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research, gas velocity, initial static bed height and particle size effect on hydrodynamics of a non-reactive gas–solid fluidized bed chamber were studied experimentally and computationally. A multi fluid Eulerian model incorporating the kinetic theory for solid particles was applied to simulate the unsteady state behavior of this chamber and momentum exchange coefficients were calculated by using the Syamlal- O’Brien drag functions. Simulation results were compared with the experimental data in order to validate the CFD model. Pressure drops predicted by the simulations at different particle sizes and initial static bed height were in good agreement with experimental measurements at superficial gas velocity higher than the minimum fluidization velocity. Simulation results also indicated that small bubbles were produced at the bottom of the bed. These bubbles collided with each other as they moved upwards forming larger bubbles. Furthermore, this comparison showed that the model can predict hydrodynamic behavior of gas solid fluidized bed chambers reasonably well.

  15. Microbial volatile organic compounds in moldy interiors: a long-term climate chamber study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchardt, Sven; Strube, Andrea

    2013-06-01

    The present study simulated large-scale indoor mold damage in order to test the efficiency of air sampling for the detection of microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs). To do this, a wallpaper damaged by condensation was stored in a climate chamber (representing a hypothetical test room of 40 m(3) volume) and was inoculated with 14 typical indoor fungal strains. The chamber ventilation conditions were adjusted to common values found in moldy homes, and the mold growth was allowed to continue to higher than average values. The MVOC content of the chamber air was analyzed daily for a period of 105 days using coupled gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). This procedure guarantees MVOC profiling without external factors such as outdoor air, building materials, furniture, and occupants. However, only nine MVOCs could be detected during the sampling period, which indicates that the very low concentrated MVOCs are hardly accessible, even under these favorable conditions. Furthermore, most of the MVOCs that were detected cannot be considered as reliable indicators of mold growth in indoor environments. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Free Air Quality Alerts Help New Englanders Prepare for Summer Smog Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the onset of warm summer weather, the USEPA advises New Englanders to be aware of the increased risk of ground-level ozone and fine particle air pollution (when combined, often referred to as smog), & take health precautions when smog levels are high.

  17. A single exposure to photochemical smog causes airway irritation and cardiac dysrhythmia in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The data presented here shows that a single exposure to photochemical smog causes airway irritation and cardiac dysrhythmia in mice. Smog, which is a complex mixture of particulate matter and gaseous irritants (ozone, sulfur dioxide, reactive aldehydes), as well as components whi...

  18. 2006 Toronto smog report card : final grade C-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This annual report card evaluated the progress made by the City of Toronto toward reducing the environmental and health impacts of smog. The final grade for 2006 was a C-, the same as for 2005. The highest grade of B+ was issued in 2004. The report card evaluated City Council actions based on their clean air commitments. Although the summer of 2006 was one of the best on record, with only 11 smog days, the grade of C- was issued because the performance of the City's Air Quality Improvement record was poor. Toronto Environmental Alliance strongly recommended that important changes be made to improve air quality, transit and waste disposal. It recommended that the City should address the real causes of unclean air, which are motor vehicle exhaust and toxic pollution. This report card graded the performance on initiatives in the following six major areas: energy; transit; air quality plan; walking and biking; fleets and fuels; and, intergovernmental action. The report recommended that efforts should be made to reduce greenhouse gas emissions which cause global warming. refs., tabs., figs.

  19. Study on time response character for high pressure gas ionization chamber of krypton and xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Chunming; Wu Haifeng; Qing Shangyu; Wang Liqiang

    2006-01-01

    The time response character for Kr and Xe high pressure gas ionization chamber is analyzed and deduced. Compared with the measure data of pulse rising time for three gas-filled ionization chambers, the calculated and experimental results are equal to each other. The rising time less than 10 ms for this kind of ionization chamber can be achieved, so this ionization chamber is able to meet the requirement for imaging detection. (authors)

  20. [Study of high energy nucleus-nucleus interactions with a Magnetic-Interferometric-Emulsion-Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki.

    1990-01-01

    The Nuclear Physics group at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) has been analyzing 200 GeV/n S + Pb collision events with a Magnetic-Interactive-Emulsion-Chamber (MAGIC). The objectives of the research are to learn the nature of nuclear matter at high density of particles and to develop an all-particle tracking system for very high particle densities. To advance the study further, the detector capability has been improved so as to allow the best utilization of all-particle measurements. A design study for Pb + Pb interactions at 160 GeV/n was made for planned experiments in 1993

  1. Preliminary study of silica aerogel as a gas-equivalent material in ionization chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caresana, M.; Zorloni, G.

    2017-12-01

    Since about two decades, a renewed interest on aerogels has risen. These peculiar materials show fairly unique properties. Thus, they are under investigation for both scientific and commercial purposes and new optimized production processes are studied. In this work, the possibility of using aerogel in the field of radiation detection is explored. The idea is to substitute the gas filling in a ionization chamber with the aerogel. The material possesses a density about 100 times greater than ambient pressure air. Where as the open-pore structure should allow the charge carriers to move freely. Small hydrophobic silica aerogel samples were studied. A custom ionization chamber, capable of working both with aerogel or in the classic gas set up, was built. The response of the chamber in current mode was investigated using an X-ray tube. The results obtained showed, under proper conditions, an enhancement of about 60 times of the current signal in the aerogel configuration with respect to the classic gas one. Moreover, some unusual behaviours were observed, i.e. time inertia of the signal and super-/sub-linear current response with respect to the dose rate. While testing high electric fields, aerogel configuration seemed to enhance the Townsend's effects. In order to represent the observed trends, a trapping-detrapping model is proposed, which is capable to predict semi-empirically the steady state currents measured. The time evolution of the signal is semi-quantitatively represented by the same model. The coefficients estimated by the fits are in agreement with similar trapping problems in the literature. In particular, a direct comparison between the benchmark of the FET silica gates and aerogel case endorses the idea that the same type of phenomenon occurs in the studied case.

  2. Feasibility study of incore fission chamber application for neutron flux measurements on the NET blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertalot, L.

    1987-01-01

    A feasibility study has been carried out on the use of in-core fission chambers as neutron diagnostic tools to perform neutron flux measurements on the blanket component of NET. The high neutron and gamma fluxes and the severe thermal-mechanical and magnetic conditions of the blanket structure have been taken into account in this analysis. Preliminary design criteria and specifications of an in-core detector are presented for NET application. A research and development programme is outlined which aims to obtain more information on the tecnological constraints arising from the severe conditions of the NET blanket

  3. A multi-chamber microfluidic intestinal barrier model using Caco-2 cells for drug transport studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Hsih-Yin; Trier, Sofie; Rahbek, Ulrik L

    2018-01-01

    with platinum wires, enabling parallel real-time monitoring of barrier integrity for the eight chambers. Additionally, the translucent porous Teflon membrane enabled optical monitoring of cell monolayers. The device was developed and tested with the Caco-2 intestinal model, and compared to the conventional...... through permeability studies of mannitol, dextran and insulin, alone or in combination with the absorption enhancer tetradecylmaltoside (TDM). The thiol-ene-based microchip material and electrodes were highly compatible with cell growth. In fact, Caco-2 cells cultured in the device displayed...

  4. A case study to estimate thermal conductivity of ABS in Cold Climate Chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Mughal, Umair Najeeb; Makarova, Marina; Virk, Muhammad Shakeel; Polanco Pinerez, Geanette

    2015-01-01

    Open Access (Romeo Green journal), publishers version / PDF may be used http://www.scirp.org/journal/wjet/ Non steady state thermal conductivity of ABS was estimated using an analytical approach in a Cold Climate Chamber at ?10?C and ?14?C. Two hollow cylinders of ABS of varying thickness were used to estimate the conductivity. The material was porous but the porosity was unknown. This paper is a case study to understand, if it is reasonable to estimate the thermal conductivity using th...

  5. Study of micro-strip gas ionisation chambers substrates for CMS experiment at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallares, A.

    1996-01-01

    High luminosity, expected interaction and dose rates of the future LHC collider require the development of micro-strips gas chambers. In addition to optimization of this new detector, this work is concerned with understanding of gain loss phenomena. Influence of the gas substrate is carefully analysed, as well as theoretical concepts concerning glasses and their behaviour under polarization and irradiation, and the consequence on detection operations.Electron spin resonance is used to study, in standard glass, creation of radiation induced defects which may be charged. (D.L.)

  6. Use of Clinical UV Chamber to Disinfect Dental Impressions: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeran, Himanshu; Sharma, Sakshi; Kumar, Varun; Gupta, Neelu

    2015-08-01

    Dental impressions are potential source of infection in a prosthodontic practice. Risk of transmission of infection through saliva, blood etc is considered as hazard for both dentist as well as dental auxiliary staff. A number of methods are currently employed for disinfecting the impressions which are technique sensitive and time consuming. This study focuses on disinfecting impression using dental UV chamber which is commonly employed for storing sterilized instruments. The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate the use of clinical UV chamber to disinfect various impression materials at different time intervals and its comparison with 2% glutaraldehyde using standard immersion technique. Total sample size of 180 specimens was taken from three different impression materials. The impressions were made from 30 dentulous subjects. A total of ten impressions were made for each impression material i.e. alginate, addition silicone and polyether impression material. Six punch samples were taken from each impression. Out of 6 punch sample, one was kept as control, second was disinfected by immersing in freshly prepared 2% glutaraldehyde solution for 10 minutes and remaining four were exposed to UV rays for 3 minutes, 6 minutes, 10 minutes and 15 minutes using dental UV chamber. Amount of disinfection achieved was evaluated by counting the colonies over the culture plates with the help of digital colony. The results showed that the mean CFUs for alginate were found to be i.e. 11797.40 ± 5989.73 (mean ± SD). The mean CFUs for addition silicone impression material was found 7095.40 with a standard deviation of 4268.83 and the mean CFUs for polyether impression material was found to be 2168.92 ± 1676 (mean ± SD). For alginate and addition silicone impression material, disinfection was achieved on exposure to UV rays for a period of 10 minutes. However, for polyether impression material 3 minutes of exposure to UV rays was sufficient to cause complete disinfection.

  7. VUV photoemission studies of candidate Large Hadron Collider vacuum chamber materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cimino

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available In the context of future accelerators and, in particular, the beam vacuum of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC, a 27 km circumference proton collider to be built at CERN, VUV synchrotron radiation (SR has been used to study both qualitatively and quantitatively candidate vacuum chamber materials. Emphasis is given to show that angle and energy resolved photoemission is an extremely powerful tool to address important issues relevant to the LHC, such as the emission of electrons that contributes to the creation of an electron cloud which may cause serious beam instabilities and unmanageable heat loads on the cryogenic system. Here we present not only the measured photoelectron yields from the proposed materials, prepared on an industrial scale, but also the energy and in some cases the angular dependence of the emitted electrons when excited with either a white light (WL spectrum, simulating that in the arcs of the LHC, or monochromatic light in the photon energy range of interest. The effects on the materials examined of WL irradiation and /or ion sputtering, simulating the SR and ion bombardment expected in the LHC, were investigated. The studied samples exhibited significant modifications, in terms of electron emission, when exposed to the WL spectrum from the BESSY Toroidal Grating Monochromator beam line. Moreover, annealing and ion bombardment also induce substantial changes to the surface thereby indicating that such surfaces would not have a constant electron emission during machine operation. Such characteristics may be an important issue to define the surface properties of the LHC vacuum chamber material and are presented in detail for the various samples analyzed. It should be noted that all the measurements presented here were recorded at room temperature, whereas the majority of the LHC vacuum system will be maintained at temperatures below 20 K. The results cannot therefore be directly applied to these sections of the machine until

  8. Study of Electromagnetic Interactions in the MicroBooNE Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caratelli, David [Columbia U.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis presents results on the study of electromagnetic (EM) activity in the MicroBooNE Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) neutrino detector. The LArTPC detector technology provides bubble-chamber like information on neutrino interaction final states, necessary to perform precision measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters. Accelerator-based oscillation experiments heavily rely on the appearance channel ! e to make such measurements. Identifying and reconstructing the energy of the outgoing electrons from such interactions is therefore crucial for their success. This work focuses on two sources of EM activity: Michel electrons in the 10-50 MeV energy range, and photons from 0 decay in the 30-300 MeV range. Studies of biases in the energy reconstruction measurement, and energy resolution are performed. The impact of shower topology at different energies is discussed, and the importance of thresholding and other reconstruction effects on producing an asymmetric and biased energy measurement are highlighted. This work further presents a study of the calorimetric separation of electrons and photons with a focus on the shower energy dependence of the separation power.

  9. Electro smog. Health risks, limiting values, consumer protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karus, M.; Ebert, L.; Schneider, W.; Koehnecke, W.; Loefflad, H.; Plotzke, O.; Niessen, P.

    1994-01-01

    At first, the popular book describes physical facts. All terms and units being necessary for the comprehension of electro smog are presented and referred to practice: Which electric and magnetic fields of natural and technical origin appear in everyday life? The main part of the book occupies physical effects. The current scientific state of the research is presented: Are electric and magnetic fields a physical risk factor? In the chapter 'limiting values', the valid limiting values and their conceptional and political basis are discussed. The last part of the book addresses consumer protection: How can the own load be reduced through electric and magnetic fields of electric devices and installations, computers and mobile telephones without renouncing of electric comfort. (VHE) [de

  10. Experimental study of acoustic damping induced by gas-liquid scheme injectors in a combustion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hak Soon; Sohn, Chae Hoon

    2007-01-01

    In a liquid rocket engine, acoustic damping induced by gas-liquid scheme injectors is studied experimentally for combustion stability by adopting linear acoustic test. In the previous work, it has been found that gas-liquid scheme injector can play a significant role in acoustic damping or absorption when it is tuned finely. Based on this finding, acoustic-damping characteristics of multi-injectors are intensively investigated. From the experimental data, it is found that acoustic oscillations are almost damped out by multi-injectors when they have the tuning length proposed in the previous study. The length corresponds to a half wavelength of the first longitudinal overtone mode traveling inside the injector with the acoustic frequency intended for damping in the chamber. But, new injector-coupled acoustic modes show up in the chamber with the injectors of the tuning length although the target mode is nearly damped out. And, appreciable frequency shift is always observed except for the case of the worst tuned injector. Accordingly, it is proposed that the tuning length is adjusted to have the shorter length than a half wavelength when these phenomena are considered

  11. Using the thermal diffusion cloud chamber to study the ion-induced nucleation by radon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yefei.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal diffusion cloud chamber is steady-state device and has been extensively used for nucleation research. In order to study the ion-induced nucleation by radon decay, a new chamber was designed with improved both upper and bottom plates, the system of circulating fluid, the gasketting, the temperature measurement and the insulation. An alternative method of using oxygen as carrier gas was examined. Therefore, the heavy carrier gas including nitrogen, oxygen, neon, argon and air can be used to study radon radiolysis-induced nucleation for the water or organic compounds in the TDCC. The effects of the pressure and temperature ranges on the density, supersaturation, temperature and partial pressure profile for the water-oxygen-helium in the TDCC have been examined. Based on the classical theory, the rate profile of ion-induced nucleation by radon decays was calculated and compared with the homogeneous nucleation. From measured indoor concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC), thermodynamic theory models were used to assess the possibility that these compounds will form ultrafine particles in indoor air by ion-induced nucleation. The energy, number of molecules and equilibrium radius of clusters have been calculated based on Such and Thomson theories. These two sets of values have been compared. Ion cluster radii corresponding to 1--3 VOC molecules are in range of 3--5 x 10 -8 cm. 43 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs

  12. Performance, operation and detector studies with the ATLAS Resistive Plate Chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aielli, G; Bindi, M; Polini, A

    2013-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers provide the barrel region of the ATLAS detector with an independent muon trigger and a two-coordinate measurement. The chambers, arranged in three concentric double layers, are operated in a strong magnetic toroidal field and cover a surface area of about 4000 m 2 . During 2011 the LHC has provided proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV in the center-of-mass frame with a steady increase in instantaneous luminosity, summing up to about 5 fb −1 . The operational experience for this running period is presented along with studies of the detector performance as a function of luminosity, environmental conditions and working point settings. Non-event based information including in particular the large number of gas gap currents, individually monitored with nA accuracy, have been used to study the detector behavior with growing luminosity and beam currents. These data are shown to provide, when calibrated, an independent luminosity measurement and a crucial handle for understanding the ATLAS backgrounds well beyond the scope of muon triggering and detection. The measurements presented here allow to plan a strategy for the data taking in the next years and make some predictions about the detector performance at higher luminosities. They also improve the knowledge on RPC detector physics.

  13. Epidemiological and morphological studies of double-chambered right ventricle in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Ryuji; Tanaka, Ryou; Suzuki, Shuji; Hamabe, Rina; Machida, Noboru; Nakao, Shu; Saida, Yuto; Takashima, Kazuaki; Matsumoto, Hirotaka; Koyama, Hidekazu; Hirose, Hisashi; Yamane, Yoshihisa

    2011-10-01

    The double-chambered right ventricle (DCRV) is a rare congenital cardiac disease in dogs, and its detailed epidemiological and morphological features are not clearly understood. By investigating the profile, clinical signs, and characteristics of examination findings of eleven dogs with DCRV by means of a retrospective study, we attempted to clarify the epidemiology and morphology of the condition. The study group consisted of nine males and two females. Breeds included Pug (n=3), Miniature Dachshund (n=1), French Bull-dog (n=1), Shiba (n=1), and Retrievers (n=5). The attachment site of the anomalous muscular bundle was continuous with the cardiac apex in nine dogs, and it was attached to the right ventricle free wall in the other two dogs. In dogs with DCRV, at least one of the following conditions was present concurrently: congenital or acquired tricuspid valve regurgitation (TR), ventricular septal defect, and atrial septal defect. Also, the pressure difference between the two chambers increased over time, and progressive right-sided heart failure was observed. In summary, DCRV occurs in small breeds of dog as well as in large breeds of dog and it may be more prevalent in males. The existence of two types of DCRV in dogs was established. Dog with DCRVs will have a high incidence of concurrent cardiac abnormalities. Concurrent TR may be either congenital or acquired. DCRV is a congenital disorder, but the clinical condition progresses as the dog develops.

  14. Ussing Chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, J.; Wortelboer, H.; Verhoeckx, K.

    2015-01-01

    The Ussing chamber system is named after the Danish zoologist Hans Ussing, who invented the device in the 1950s to measure the short-circuit current as an indicator of net ion transport taking place across frog skin (Ussing and Zerahn, Acta Physiol Scand 23:110-127, 1951). Ussing chambers are

  15. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Proportional multi-wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle. Proportional wire chambers allow a much quicker reading than the optical or magnetoscriptive readout wire chambers.

  16. Mortality during winter smog episodes 1982, 1985, 1987 and 1993 in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínková, J; Branis, M

    2001-10-01

    Severe air pollution episodes were recorded during the 1980s and early 1990s in the Czech Republic as a result of widespread combustion of brown coal. A population-based retrospective study investigated the relationship between air pollution and daily mortality in six highly polluted areas of the Czech Republic during smog episodes in 1982, 1985, 1987, and 1993. Total daily mortality, mortality by gender and age, cardiovascular mortality, respiratory mortality, data on weekly incidence of acute respiratory diseases and daily mean concentrations of sulphur dioxide and suspended particulate matter were used in the model. The effects of smog on daily mortality were estimated by multiple linear regression analysis. Significant increases in mortality were observed for the 1982 and 1987 episodes (6% and 9%). In 1982, mortality was significantly associated with mean concentration of sulphur dioxide (SO2) of the current and the preceding days and with the 4-day moving average. In the 1985 episode a significant increase in respiratory mortality in men and in both genders together, lagging by 2 and 3 days, was detected. During the 1987 episode significant associations of total daily mortality, mortality in persons over 65 years of age and mortality from cardiovascular or respiratory diseases with 4-day moving average of both pollutants were found. For the 1993 episode a significant association between mortality in women under 65, lagging by 3 days, and mean concentration of suspended particulate matter (SPM) was observed. Most of the results are consistent with other studies aimed at episodic air pollution during the 1950s and 1960s in Western Europe and the USA, in which outdoor air pollution was shown to be a significant predictor of mortality. However, non-significant or opposite associations between air pollution and mortality indicate that other factors may also play an important role. A stronger effect on men under 65 years of age, suggested by a previous Czech study

  17. UBM-guided chamber angle surgery for glaucoma management: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietlein, T S; Engels, B F; Jacobi, P C; Krieglstein, G K

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the potential of ultrasound bimicroscopy (UBM)-guided chamber angle surgery as an alternative or supplement to gonioscopy and intraocular microendoscopy for intraoperative control. In 15 porcine cadaver eyes, mechanical goniopuncture or punctual Er:YAG laser trabecular ablation was performed without operating microscope or gonioscopy, but with real-life ultrasound biomicroscopy monitoring with a 50 MHz transducer. Intraoperative localization of the microsurgical instruments and tissue-instrument contact were qualitatively evaluated. The instruments could be clearly visualized within the chamber angle and disturbing artefacts were only minimal when using mechanically fixed instruments in slow motion. Topographic localization, tissue contact, and penetration depth of the instruments entering the scleral were well illustrated as far as the technical resolution limits of UBM would allow. UBM can be used intraoperatively to monitor the correct manoeuvring of microsurgical instruments in selected ab interno procedures. Some adaptations and further modifications of the technique presented here will be necessary before UBM-guided surgery can be considered for clinical use in humans.

  18. Cardiac chamber quantification using magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla - a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian von; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Frauenrath, Tobias; Hezel, Fabian; Prothmann, Marcel; Dieringer, Matthias A.; Niendorf, Thoralf; Renz, Wolfgang; Kretschel, Kerstin

    2010-01-01

    Interest in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) at 7 T is motivated by the expected increase in spatial and temporal resolution, but the method is technically challenging. We examined the feasibility of cardiac chamber quantification at 7 T. A stack of short axes covering the left ventricle was obtained in nine healthy male volunteers. At 1.5 T, steady-state free precession (SSFP) and fast gradient echo (FGRE) cine imaging with 7 mm slice thickness (STH) were used. At 7 T, FGRE with 7 mm and 4 mm STH were applied. End-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, ejection fraction and mass were calculated. All 7 T examinations provided excellent blood/myocardium contrast for all slice directions. No significant difference was found regarding ejection fraction and cardiac volumes between SSFP at 1.5 T and FGRE at 7 T, while volumes obtained from FGRE at 1.5 T were underestimated. Cardiac mass derived from FGRE at 1.5 and 7 T was larger than obtained from SSFP at 1.5 T. Agreement of volumes and mass between SSFP at 1.5 T and FGRE improved for FGRE at 7 T when combined with an STH reduction to 4 mm. This pilot study demonstrates that cardiac chamber quantification at 7 T using FGRE is feasible and agrees closely with SSFP at 1.5 T. (orig.)

  19. Study of the collecting electrode material of an extrapolation chamber by Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedovato, Uly Pita; Santos, William S.; Perini, Ana Paula; Belinato, Walmir

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the influence of different materials of the collecting electrode on the response of an extrapolation ionization chamber, was evaluated. This ionization chamber was simulated with the MCNP-4C Monte Carlo code and the spectrum of a standard diagnostic radiology beam (RQR5) was utilized. The different results are due to interactions of photons with different materials of the collecting electrode contributing with different values of energy deposited in the sensitive volume of the ionization chamber, which depends on the atomic number of the evaluated materials. The material that presented the least influence was graphite, the original constituent of the ionization chamber. (author)

  20. CLINICAL STUDY OF POSTERIOR CHAMBER PHAKIC IOL PLACEMENT IN MYOPIC PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar P

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of posterior chamber phakic IOL in Myopic patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS This prospective interventional study included 50 eyes of 50 patients with myopia. Patients of age more than 18 yrs. Stable refraction, Myopia, Mild to Moderate keratoconus and absence of any ocular pathology and any history of ocular surgeries were included in this study. Prior to starting treatment certain parameters like visual acuity, AC depth, Iridocorneal Angle Aperture, Endothelial cell count, Central corneal thickness and IOP were considered. Intervention- Implantation of the phakic IOL. Main outcome Measures- Uncorrected Visual Acuity (UCVA, best spectacle corrected visual acuity (BSCVA, AS OCT AC depthbetween endothelium and phakic IOL, IOP and Endothelial cell count were recorded. RESULTS Postoperative examinations conducted at day 1, day 3, after 1 week, 1 month and after 3 months .out of 50 patients, 4 patients had striate keratopathy, 2 patients had shallow ac during immediate post-operative period. During the postoperative follow up 10 patients had BCVA of 6/9-6/6 (20%, 14 patients had 6/9-6/12 (28%, 24 patients had 6/12-6/24(48% and remaining 2 patients had <6/24 which was better than their preoperative uncorrected visual acuity. CONCLUSION Based on this prospective clinical study and on comparison with other clinical studies posterior chamber phakic IOL corrective procedures are safe and effective for treatment of myopia. It also shows that it can provide sharp and clear vision in 96% of our study population. It does not induce dry eye syndrome as in other refractive surgeries. Short term complications like endothelial damage, angle closure glaucoma, iritis, anterior capsule injury/lens changes were not encountered during our study. But still long term follow up is required to confirm long term safety of the implant.

  1. A Structural Study of Escherichia coli Cells Using an In Situ Liquid Chamber TEM Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studying cell microstructures and their behaviors under living conditions has been a challenging subject in microbiology. In this work, in situ liquid chamber TEM was used to study structures of Escherichia coli cells in aqueous solutions at a nanometer-scale resolution. Most of the cells remained intact under electron beam irradiation, and nanoscale structures were observed during the TEM imaging. The analysis revealed structures of pili surrounding the E. coli cells; the movements of the pili in the liquid were also observed during the in situ tests. This technology also allowed the observation of features of the nucleoid in the E. coli cells. Overall, in situ TEM can be applied as a valuable tool to study real-time microscopic structures and processes in microbial cells residing in native aqueous solutions.

  2. Study of 2 proton radioactivity of 54Zn with a time projection chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascher, P.

    2011-11-01

    The study of nuclei at the proton drip-line is a recent and efficient tool to prove the nuclear structure far from stability. In particular, the two-proton radioactivity phenomenon predicted in 1960 has been discovered in 2002. This work concerns an experiment performed at GANIL, in order to study the two-proton radioactivity of 54 Zn with a time projection chamber, developed for the individual detection of each proton and the reconstruction of their tracks in three dimensions. The data analysis allowed to determine the correlations in energy and angle between the two protons. They have been compared to a theoretical model, which takes into account the dynamics of the emission, giving information about the structure of the emitter. However, due to the very low statistics, the interpretation of the results is limited but these results open very interesting prospects for further studies of nuclei at the limits of the existence. (author)

  3. Variation of atmospheric aerosol components and sources during smog episodes in Debrecen, Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angyal, A.; Kertész, Zs.; Szoboszlai, Z.; Szikszai, Z.; Ferenczi, Z.; Furu, E.; Tõrõk, Zs.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Atmospheric particulate matter (APM) pollution is one of the leading environmental problems in densely populated urban environments. In most cities all around the world high aerosol pollution levels occurs regularly. Debrecen, an average middle-European city is no exception. Every year there are several days when the aerosol pollution level exceeds the alarm threshold value (100 μ-g/m 3 for PM10 in 24- hours average). When the PM10 pollution level remains over this limit value for days, it is called 'smog' by the authorities. In this work we studied the variation of the elemental components and sources of PM10, PM2.5 and PM coarse and their dependence on meteorological conditions in Debrecen during two smog episodes occurred in November 2011. Aerosol samples were collected with 2-hours time resolution with a PIXE International sequential streaker in an urban background site in the downtown of Debrecen. In order to get information about the size distribution of the aerosol elemental components 9-stage cascade impactors were also employed during the sampling campaigns. The elemental composition (Z ≥ 13) were determined by Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) at the IBA Laboratory of Atomki. Concentrations of elemental carbon were measured with a smoke stain reflectometer. On this data base source apportionment was carried out by using the positive matrix factorisation (PMF) method. Four factors were identified for both size fractions, including soil dust, traffic, domestic heating, and oil combustion. The time pattern of the aerosol elemental components and PM sources exhibited strong dependence on the mixing layer thickness. We showed that domestic heating had a major contribution to the aerosol pollution. (This work was carried out in the frame of the János Bolyai Research Scholarship of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and TÁMOP-4.2.2/B-10/1-2010-0024 project). (author)

  4. Wire Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  5. Wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1967-01-01

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber.Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  6. Simulation study of the photon quality correction factors of ionization chambers for FiR 1 epithermal neutron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koivunoro, H.; Uusi-Simola, J.; Savolainen, S.; Kotiluoto, P.; Auterinen, I.; Kosunen, A.

    2006-01-01

    At FiR 1 BNCT facility in Finland, neutron-insensitive Mg(Ar) ionization chambers are used for photon dose measurements in an epithermal neutron beam. Previously, photon sensitivity factors for the chamber for the measurements in a water phantom in FiR 1 beam have been determined experimentally from measurements in 60 Co gamma and in a 6 MV clinical accelerator photon beams. However, the response of the ionization chamber in a water phantom depends on energy spectrum and angle of the photons and the secondary electrons created inside the phantom and may differ depending on type of the irradiation source (accelerator vs. an epithermal neutron beam). Also, the experimental sensitivity factor does not take into account the possible perturbations in the photon production in phantom caused by the ionization chamber materials. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the photon quality correction factors (k Qγ ) for the Mg(Ar) chamber at the FiR 1 beam through computer simulations. In this study, the k Qγ factors have been determined for Mg(Ar) chamber from Monte Carlo calculations of absorbed photon dose at two depths in a water phantom using MCNP code. The k qγ factors obtained with this method are compared to the sensitivity factors determined with measurements in an accelerator photon beam and to the k Qγ factors published previously. (author)

  7. Multigap resistive plate chambers for EAS study in the EEE Project

    CERN Document Server

    An, S; Badalà, A; Zichichi, A

    2007-01-01

    The EEE (Extreme Energy Events) Project, conceived by its leader Antonino Zichichi, is an experiment to study very high-energetic air showers (EAS) through the detection of the shower's muon component using a network of tracking detectors, installed in Italian high schools. The single tracking telescope is composed of three large area () Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPCs). The data collected by the telescopes will be used for studies of air showers and also for the search of time correlations between sites which are far apart. The first telescope, recently installed in the Liceo B. Touschek in Grottaferrata (Rome), is successfully running, and other telescopes are going to be installed in a short time in other towns, opening up the way for the first search of long-distance coincidences over a total area of .

  8. SMOG programme version for np (E=1-5 GeV) experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotorobaj, F.

    1975-01-01

    The SMOG program, which can be used for NPD robot scanning in the described experiment, is described. A new modifiaction, set up so as to ensure its reliable use on the CDC-1604A, is considered. The program was designed for and used in processing the np (E=1-5 GeV) experiment. SMOG uses three magnetic tapes at the input (one at the extension) and one at the output containing the assembled collected events. A new SMOG variant with origination of errors according to parity during the recording time is attempted in order to continue to write the given zone five times. A short description of the work with the new SMOG program version is given

  9. Bio-mimic design of PM2.5 anti-smog masks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Jing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic property of anti-smog masks is to block PM2.5 with excellent air permeability. A multi-layer nanofiber woven fabric with hierarchical structure is the best candidate for this purpose.

  10. Effects of Isoprene- and Toluene-Generated Smog on Allergic Inflammation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactions of organic compounds with nitric oxide (NO) and sunlight produce complex mixtures of pollutants including secondary organic aerosol (SOA), ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and reactive aldehydes. The health effects of these photochemical smog mixtures in susceptible ...

  11. Efficiency profile method to study the hit efficiency of drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abyzov, A.; Bel'kov, A.; Lanev, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Walter, M.; Hulsbergen, W.

    2002-01-01

    A method based on the usage of efficiency profile is proposed to estimate the hit efficiency of drift chambers with a large number of channels. The performance of the method under real conditions of the detector operation has been tested analysing the experimental data from the HERA-B drift chambers

  12. Study of the performance of a 4 π γ ionisation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, J.J.

    1960-01-01

    Description of a well-type γ chamber for routine measurements of sources between 1 μcurie and 1 curie. Approximate calculation of some geometrical parameters by which the zone of constant sensitivity may be increased. Calculation of the sensitivity of such a chamber and comparison with the experimental results. (author) [fr

  13. Ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    An improved ionization chamber type X-ray detector comprises a heavy gas at high pressure disposed between an anode and a cathode. An open grid structure is placed next to the anode and is maintained at a voltage intermediate between the cathode and anode potentials. The electric field which is produced by positive ions drifting towards the cathode is thus shielded from the anode. Current measuring circuits connected to the anode are, therefore, responsive only to electron current flow within the chamber and the recovery time of the chamber is shortened. The grid structure also serves to shield the anode from electrical currents which might otherwise be induced by mechanical vibrations in the ionization chamber structure

  14. Ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boag, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Although a variety of solid-state and chemical methods for measuring radiation dose have been developed in recent decades and calorimetry can now provide an absolute standard of reference, ionization dosimetry retains its position as the most widely used, most convenient, and, in most situations, most accurate method of measuring either exposure or absorbed dose. The ionization chamber itself is the central element in this system of dosimetry. In this chapter the principles governing the construction and operation of ionization chambers of various types are examined. Since the ionization chambers now in general use are nearly all of commercial manufacture, the emphasis is on operating characteristics and interpretation of measurements rather than on details of construction, although some knowledge of the latter is often required when applying necessary corrections to the measured quantities. Examples are given of the construction of typical chambers designed for particular purposes, and the methods of calibrating them are discussed

  15. Climatic chamber ergometer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Atkins, AR

    1968-01-01

    Full Text Available The design and calibration of an ergometer for exercising subjects during calorimetric studies in the climate chamber, are described. The ergometer is built into the climatic chamber and forms an integral part of the whole instrumentation system foe...

  16. [Effects of elevated ozone on Pinus armandii growth: a simulation study with open-top chamber].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Fu; Liu, Chen; He, Xing-Yuan; Ruan, Ya-Nan; Xu, Sheng; Chen, Zhen-Ju; Peng, Jun-Jie; Li, Teng

    2013-10-01

    By using open-top chamber (OTC) and the techniques of dendrochronology, this paper studied the growth of Pinus armandii under elevated ozone, and explored the evolution dynamics and adaptation mechanisms of typical forest ecosystems to ozone enrichment. Elevated ozone inhibited the stem growth of P. armandii significantly, with the annual growth of the stem length and diameter reduced by 35.0% and 12.9%, respectively. The annual growth of tree-ring width and the annual ring cells number decreased by 11.5% and 54.1%, respectively, but no significant change was observed in the diameter of tracheid. At regional scale, the fluctuation of ozone concentration showed significant correlation with the variation of local vegetation growth (NDVI).

  17. Source reconciliation of atmospheric gas-phase and particle-phase pollutants during a severe photochemical smog episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, James J; Fraser, Matthew P; Cass, Glen R; Simoneit, Bernd R T

    2002-09-01

    A comprehensive organic compound-based receptor model is developed that can simultaneously apportion the source contributions to atmospheric gas-phase organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, fine particle organic compounds, and fine particle mass. The model is applied to ambient data collected at four sites in the south coast region of California during a severe summertime photochemical smog episode, where the model determines the direct primary contributions to atmospheric pollutants from 11 distinct air pollution source types. The 11 sources included in the model are gasoline-powered motor vehicle exhaust, diesel engine exhaust, whole gasoline vapors, gasoline headspace vapors, organic solvent vapors, whole diesel fuel, paved road dust, tire wear debris, meat cooking exhaust, natural gas leakage, and vegetative detritus. Gasoline engine exhaust plus whole gasoline vapors are the predominant sources of volatile organic gases, while gasoline and diesel engine exhaust plus diesel fuel vapors dominate the emissions of semivolatile organic compounds from these sources during the episode studied at all four air monitoring sites. The atmospheric fine particle organic compound mass was composed of noticeable contributions from gasoline-powered motor vehicle exhaust, diesel engine exhaust, meat cooking, and paved road dust with smaller but quantifiable contributions from vegetative detritus and tire wear debris. In addition, secondary organic aerosol, which is formed from the low-vapor pressure products of gas-phase chemical reactions, is found to be a major source of fine particle organic compound mass under the severe photochemical smog conditions studied here. The concentrations of secondary organic aerosol calculated in the present study are compared with previous fine particle source apportionment results for less intense photochemical smog conditions. It is shown that estimated secondary organic aerosol concentrations correlate fairly well with the

  18. Characteristics of activated carbon remove sulfur particles against smog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shengbo; Liu, Zhenling; Furuta, Yuzo; Peng, Wanxi

    2017-09-01

    Sulfur particles, which could cause diseases, were the main powder of smog. And activated carbon had the very adsorption characteristics. Therefore, five sulfur particles were adsorbed by activated carbon and were analyzed by FT-IR. The optimal adsorption time were 120 min of Na 2 SO 3 , 120 min of Na 2 S 2 O 8 , 120 min of Na 2 SO 4 , 120 min of Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 and 120 min of S. FT-IR spectra showed that activated carbon had the eight characteristic absorption of S-S stretch, H 2 O stretch, O-H stretch, -C-H stretch, conjugated C 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 111111111111 000000000000 111111111111 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 O stretch or CC stretch, CH 2 bend, C-O stretch and acetylenic C-H bend vibrations at 3850 cm -1 , 3740 cm -1 , 3430 cm -1 , 2920 cm -1 , 1630 cm -1 , 1390 cm -1 , 1110 cm -1 and 600 cm -1 , respectively. For Na 2 SO 3 , the peaks at 2920 cm -1 , 1630 cm -1 , 1390 cm -1 and 1110 cm -1 achieved the maximum at 20 min. For Na 2 S 2 O 8 , the peaks at 3850 cm -1 , 3740 cm -1 and 2920 cm -1 achieved the maximum at 60 min. The peaks at 1390 cm -1 , 1110 cm -1 and 600 cm -1 achieved the maximum at 40 min. For Na 2 SO 4 , the peaks at 3430 cm -1 , 2920 cm -1 , 1630 cm -1 , 1390 cm -1 , 1110 cm -1 and 600 cm -1 achieved the maximum at 60 min. For Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 , the peaks at 1390 cm -1 , 1110 cm -1 and 600 cm -1 achieved the maximum at 20 min. For S, the peaks at 1630 cm -1 , 1390 cm -1 and 600 cm -1 achieved the maximum at 120 min. It provided that activated carbon could remove sulfur particles from smog air to restrain many anaphylactic diseases.

  19. A steady-state continuous flow chamber for the study of daytime and nighttime chemistry under atmospherically relevant NO levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Ortega, John; Huang, Yuanlong; Shertz, Stephen; Tyndall, Geoffrey S.; Orlando, John J.

    2018-05-01

    Experiments performed in laboratory chambers have contributed significantly to the understanding of the fundamental kinetics and mechanisms of the chemical reactions occurring in the atmosphere. Two chemical regimes, classified as high-NO vs. zero-NO conditions, have been extensively studied in previous chamber experiments. Results derived from these two chemical scenarios are widely parameterized in chemical transport models to represent key atmospheric processes in urban and pristine environments. As the anthropogenic NOx emissions in the United States have decreased remarkably in the past few decades, the classic high-NO and zero-NO conditions are no longer applicable to many regions that are constantly impacted by both polluted and background air masses. We present here the development and characterization of the NCAR Atmospheric Simulation Chamber, which is operated in steady-state continuous flow mode for the study of atmospheric chemistry under intermediate NO conditions. This particular chemical regime is characterized by constant sub-ppb levels of NO and can be created in the chamber by precise control of the inflow NO concentration and the ratio of chamber mixing to residence timescales. Over the range of conditions achievable in the chamber, the lifetime of peroxy radicals (RO2), a key intermediate from the atmospheric degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), can be extended to several minutes, and a diverse array of reaction pathways, including unimolecular pathways and bimolecular reactions with NO and HO2, can thus be explored. Characterization experiments under photolytic and dark conditions were performed and, in conjunction with model predictions, provide a basis for interpretation of prevailing atmospheric processes in environments with intertwined biogenic and anthropogenic activities. We demonstrate the proof of concept of the steady-state continuous flow chamber operation through measurements of major first-generation products

  20. A steady-state continuous flow chamber for the study of daytime and nighttime chemistry under atmospherically relevant NO levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Experiments performed in laboratory chambers have contributed significantly to the understanding of the fundamental kinetics and mechanisms of the chemical reactions occurring in the atmosphere. Two chemical regimes, classified as high-NO vs. zero-NO conditions, have been extensively studied in previous chamber experiments. Results derived from these two chemical scenarios are widely parameterized in chemical transport models to represent key atmospheric processes in urban and pristine environments. As the anthropogenic NOx emissions in the United States have decreased remarkably in the past few decades, the classic high-NO and zero-NO conditions are no longer applicable to many regions that are constantly impacted by both polluted and background air masses. We present here the development and characterization of the NCAR Atmospheric Simulation Chamber, which is operated in steady-state continuous flow mode for the study of atmospheric chemistry under intermediate NO conditions. This particular chemical regime is characterized by constant sub-ppb levels of NO and can be created in the chamber by precise control of the inflow NO concentration and the ratio of chamber mixing to residence timescales. Over the range of conditions achievable in the chamber, the lifetime of peroxy radicals (RO2, a key intermediate from the atmospheric degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, can be extended to several minutes, and a diverse array of reaction pathways, including unimolecular pathways and bimolecular reactions with NO and HO2, can thus be explored. Characterization experiments under photolytic and dark conditions were performed and, in conjunction with model predictions, provide a basis for interpretation of prevailing atmospheric processes in environments with intertwined biogenic and anthropogenic activities. We demonstrate the proof of concept of the steady-state continuous flow chamber operation through measurements of major first

  1. Morphological studies on the Gaseous Chambers of the African-Catfish (Clarias gariepinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman A. Eshra

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to find out the morpho-functional correlations of supra-branchial gaseous chambers (SC and gas bladder (GB in Clarias gariepinus. Gross, and Histological observations were made on ten different ontogenetic stages ranged from 10 mm SL (Standard length to 100 mm SL, and mature fish 330 mm-333 mm SL. Computed tomography (CT was performed on five mature fishes at 130 K Volt and 80 Ma, different CT windows were adjusted as follows: Soft tissue (WL: 40, WW: 300, Bone (2000: 400, and Air-chambers (-600:1200. Each SC lodged mid-constricted membranous sac, communicated to gill cavity via single opening. The GB was an oval sac surrounded by incomplete bony capsule, it touched the skin laterally, otic capsule medially and SC anteriorly. The SC membrane was three layered with a gill like mucosa (respiratory mucosa; GB has an inner layer of simple squamous epithelium and an outer layer of dense irregular connective tissue. Collectively, the larval stages were adult like, but differ in proportions; in stages from 10 to 26 mm, SC adventitia was ill defined or absent and SC musculosa was well developed relatively to the total thickness of the membrane. In CT images, there was a clear communication between the otic capsule and GB at the level of anterior-medial fissures of complex vertebra; disc–shaped fat pads appeared as hypodense bilateral areas dorso-medial to GB and caudo-posterior to SC. Results Concluded that GB and SC had an accessory auditory role related to their anatomical structure, position and communications.

  2. The influence of aerosols on photochemical smog in Mexico City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, T.; Mar, B. [UNAM, Mexico, Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera (Mexico); Madronich, S.; Rivale, S. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Muhlia, A. [UNAM, Mexico, Inst. de Geofysica (Mexico)

    2001-04-01

    Aerosols in the Mexico City atmosphere can have a non-negligible effect on the ultraviolet radiation field and hence on the formation of photochemical smog. We used estimates of aerosol optical depths from sun photometer observations in a detailed radiative transfer model, to calculate photolysis rate coefficients (J{sub NO2}) for the key reaction NO{sub 2}+h{nu}{yields}NO+O ({lambda}<430nm). The calculated values are in good agreement with previously published measurements of J{sub NO2} at two sites in Mexico City: Palacio de Mineria (19 degrees 25'59''N, 99 degrees 07'58''W, 2233masl), and IMP (19 degrees 28'48''N, 99 degrees 11'07''W, 2277masl) and in Tres Marias, a town near Mexico City (19 degrees 03'N, 99 degrees 14'W, 2810masl). In particular, the model reproduces very well the contrast between the two urban sites and the evidently much cleaner Tres Marias site. For the measurement days, reductions in surface J{sub NO2} by 10-30% could be attributed to the presence of aerosols, with considerable uncertainty due largely to lack of detailed data on aerosol optical properties at ultraviolet wavelengths (esp. the single scattering albedo). The potential impact of such large reductions in photolysis rates on surface ozone concentrations is illustrated with a simple zero-dimensional photochemical model. (Author)

  3. A new pressure chamber to study the biosynthetic response of articular cartilage to mechanical loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmeyer, J; Torzilli, P A; Burton-Wurster, N; Lust, G

    1993-01-01

    A prototype chamber was used to apply a precise cyclic or static load on articular cartilage explants under sterile conditions. A variable pressure, pneumatic controller was constructed to power the chamber's air cylinder, capable of applying, with a porous load platen, loads of up to 10 MPa at cycles ranging from 0 to 10 Hz. Pig articular cartilage explants were maintained successfully in this chamber for 2 days under cyclic mechanical loading of 0.5 Hz, 0.5 MPa. Explants remained sterile, viable and metabolically active. Cartilage responded to this load with a decreased synthesis of fibronectin and a small but statistically significant elevation in proteoglycan content. Similar but less extensive effects on fibronectin synthesis were observed with the small static load (0.016 MPa) inherent in the design of the chamber.

  4. Radiation aging studies of CO2 hydrocarbon mixtures for the SLD drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venuti, J.P.; Chadwick, G.B.

    1988-10-01

    The SLD drift chamber requires a 'slow' drifting gas and low diffusion to allow wave form digitization. CO 2 provides this but requires an admixture of a quencher to provide more gain. A test chamber with an 8 sense wire cell, such as will appear in the final chamber, was exposed to an x-ray tube while containing a variety of binary admixtures of Co 2 : 8% isobutane, 8% ethane, and 2% isopropanol. It was determined that adding small fractions of water (≤0.66%) or isopropanol (1--2%) to the Co 2 : 8% ethane, or 8% isobutane extended the useful life of the chamber so that integrated charge collections of /approximately/1 C/cm are permissible. Results and discussions are presented. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  5. Chamber with punches made from polycrystal cubic boron nitrides for Moessbauer study at high hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapitanov, E.V.; Yakovlev, E.N.

    1978-01-01

    The design of a high hydrostatic pressure chamber with polycrystallic boron nitride dies weakly absorbing gamma radiation with energies of more than 14 keV is described. The use of this material permits to investigate single- and polycrystal bodies using the Moessbauer effect when the geometry of the experiment remains unchanged and the hydrostatic pressure is up to 70 kbar. The basic units of the chamber are a teflon capsule placed in a container made of a pressed boron and epoxide resin mixture, electric inputs and a die of polycrystal cubic boron nitride. The pressure is transferred to the sample tested through a liquid (petrol or the 4 to 1 mixture of methanole and ethanole) which does not become solid at a pressure below 37 kbar. Basic dimensions of the chamber are given and the dependence of the pressure in the capsule on the force applied to the chamber is also presented

  6. A study of energy resolution in a gridded ionization chamber filled with tetramethylsilane and tetramethylgermanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, H.; Ohnuma, H.; Hoshi, Y.; Yuta, H.; Abe, K.; Suekane, F.; Neichi, M.; Nakajima, T.; Masuda, K.

    1998-01-01

    The energy resolutions of 976 keV conversion electrons from a 207 Bi source are measured in a gridded ionization chamber filled with tetramethylsilane (TMS) and tetramethylgermanium (TMG), and are found to be about 5.7 and 5.5% (rms) for TMS and TMG, respectively. We also deduce a simple method of estimating the electron lifetime using a gridded ionization chamber. The electron lifetime, free ion yield and thermalization length for these liquids are measured by this simple method

  7. Cloud Chamber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gfader, Verina

    Cloud Chamber takes its roots in a performance project, titled The Guests 做东, devised by Verina Gfader for the 11th Shanghai Biennale, ‘Why Not Ask Again: Arguments, Counter-arguments, and Stories’. Departing from the inclusion of the biennale audience to write a future folk tale, Cloud Chamber......: fiction and translation and translation through time; post literacy; world picturing-world typing; and cartographic entanglements and expressions of subjectivity; through the lens a social imaginary of worlding or cosmological quest. Art at its core? Contributions by Nikos Papastergiadis, Rebecca Carson...

  8. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  9. Wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  10. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  11. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Was used in ISR (Intersecting Storage Ring) split field magnet experiment. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  12. Study of gas mixtures and ageing of the multigap resistive plate chamber used for the ALICE TOF

    CERN Document Server

    Akindinov, A; Anselmo, F; Antonioli, P; Basile, M; Cara Romeo, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cosenza, F; D'Antone, I; De Caro, A; De Pasquale, S; Di Bartolomeo, A; Fusco-Girard, M; Golovine, V; Guerzoni, M; Guida, M; Hatzifotiadou, D; Kaidalov, A B; Kim, D H; Kim, D W; Kisselev, S M; Laurenti, G; Lioublev, E; Lee, K; Lee, S C; Luvisetto, M L; Margotti, A; Martemyanov, A N; Massera, F; Meneghini, S; Michinelli, R; Nania, R; Otiougova, P; Pancaldi, G; Pesci, A; Pilastrini, R; Pinazza, O; Polozov, P A; Rizzi, M; Scapparone, E; Scioli, G; Sellitto, S B; Semeria, F; Serra, S; Smirnitsky, A V; Tchoumakov, M M; Ugolini, E; Usenko, E; Valenti, G; Voloshin, K G; Williams, M C S; Zagreev, B V; Zampolli, C; Zichichi, A; Zucchini, A; Zuffa, M

    2004-01-01

    We present in this paper a study of the ALICE-TOF Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) performance by using several gas mixtures. We also present a search for possible ageing effects, by studying two MRPCs irradiated at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility.

  13. Feasibility study for the development of a Dose Calibrator with a well ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arista Romeu, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    Dose calibrators are intended for the metrological assurance of medical diagnostic studies in which radiopharmaceuticals are used. It is the final link in the national system of standards to ensure quality control and the radiation safety of the dose administered to patients while using these nuclear techniques. The wide utilization of radiopharmaceuticals in our country in several modules of nuclear medicine and other laboratories where radio-isotopic preparations are used, as well as the existence of the National Center of Isotopes to produce them determine the necessity of national production of dose calibration equipment. In this paper, it is presented the result of a feasibility study to develop a dose calibrator with a well-type ionization chamber for nuclear medicine services of the National Health System with gamma camera. It is specifically intended to contribute to monitor and control the activity of the prepared samples to be administered to patients under studies with gamma cameras to ensure compliance with the current requirements of quality and radiation safety. (Author)

  14. Laboratory and Cloud Chamber Studies of Formation Processes and Properties of Atmospheric Ice Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisner, T.; Abdelmonem, A.; Benz, S.; Brinkmann, M.; Möhler, O.; Rzesanke, D.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Wagner, R.

    2009-04-01

    The formation of ice in tropospheric clouds controls the evolution of precipitation and thereby influences climate and weather via a complex network of dynamical and microphysical processes. At higher altitudes, ice particles in cirrus clouds or contrails modify the radiative energy budget by direct interaction with the shortwave and longwave radiation. In order to improve the parameterisation of the complex microphysical and dynamical processes leading to and controlling the evolution of tropospheric ice, laboratory experiments are performed at the IMK Karlsruhe both on a single particle level and in the aerosol and cloud chamber AIDA. Single particle experiments in electrodynamic levitation lend themselves to the study of the interaction between cloud droplets and aerosol particles under extremely well characterized and static conditions in order to obtain microphysical parameters as freezing nucleation rates for homogeneous and heterogeneous ice formation. They also allow the observation of the freezing dynamics and of secondary ice formation and multiplication processes under controlled conditions and with very high spatial and temporal resolution. The inherent droplet charge in these experiments can be varied over a wide range in order to assess the influence of the electrical state of the cloud on its microphysics. In the AIDA chamber on the other hand, these processes are observable under the realistic dynamic conditions of an expanding and cooling cloud- parcel with interacting particles and are probed simultaneously by a comprehensive set of analytical instruments. By this means, microphysical processes can be studied in their complex interplay with dynamical processes as for example coagulation or particle evaporation and growth via the Bergeron - Findeisen process. Shortwave scattering and longwave absorption properties of the nucleating and growing ice crystals are probed by in situ polarised laser light scattering measurements and infrared extinction

  15. Radiation studies on resistive bulk-micromegas chambers at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Camerlingo, Maria Teresa; Farina, Edoardo; Iengo, Paolo; Longo, Luigi; Samarati, Jerome; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Wotschack, Joerg

    2018-01-01

    With the growing diffusion of resistive Micromegas detectors in HEP experiments the study of long-term aging behaviour is becoming more and more relevant. Two resistive bulk-Micromegas detectors were installed in May 2015 at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility and exposed to an intense gamma irradiation with the aim to study the detector behavior under high irradiation and the long-term aging. The detectors have an active area of 10 × 10 cm 2 , readout strip pitch of 400 μ m , amplification gap of 128 μ m and drift gap of 5 mm. The desired accumulated charge of more than 0.2 C/cm 2 has been reached for both chambers, equivalent to 10 years of HL-LHC operation. The efficiency, amplification, and resolution of the Micromegas after this long-term irradiation period is compared with the performance of a non irradiated detector. In addition, the latest results of the measured particle rate as a function of the amplification voltage is presented and compared with those obtained in 2015.

  16. Study of the design variables for a wet-chamber gas meter prototype (MGCH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patino, Carlos Hernando; Romero, Luis Said; Quiroga, Jabid

    2004-01-01

    This paper established the most important variables and their correlation that affect design and operation of wet-chamber gas meter (MGCH), focused on the gas pressure difference along the meter and the sealing-liquid level. In order to study variable behavior a simulation was carried out based on computational systems The mathematical model developed was built taking into account common features in present wet test gas meter as their internal configuration. Therefore, this work can be understood as a general analysis and its conclusions can be extended to whichever meter of this type. Software was developed to facilitate the analysis of the variables involved in this physical process; besides the drum sizing was modeling using CAD software. As a result of this investigation, theoretical basis were established for the analyzing and designing of a MGCH meter, as a previous phase to the construction and evaluation of the prototype. Uncertainty analysis of each variable implicates in this model was beyond the scope of this study

  17. Distribution of radioactively labelled myobacterium tuberculosis (65Zn, 35S-BCG) after injection into the anterior chamber. Studies in rabbits with and without anterior chamber sensitisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabillion, M.

    1985-01-01

    The rabbit model was used to study the behaviour of antigens in the eye as well as their spread to extraocular regions. Prior to the investigations, a test dose of 35 S-labelled and 65 Zn-labelled BCG (Bacille Calmette Guerin) had been injected into the anterior chamber of the eyes of sensitised and non-sensitised rabbits. The percentage of BCG escaping from the aqueous humor and iris was mostly not dependent of the test dose given, nor did the rate of its spread show any relation to the occurrence of an antigen-antibody reaction. On the 32nd day p.i., there were still acid-resisting rods in the uvea, which could be proven by histological examination. As shown by the levels of activity in the iris and ciliary body, the bacteria appear to migrate mostly to these organs and, in the second place, to the choroid membrane. The spread of bacteria in previously sensitised rabbits was not different from the observed in non-sensitised animals. Theories claiming that more antigens are formed in sensitised tissue as compared to non-sensitised tissue cannot be confirmed by the findings revealed here. (TRV) [de

  18. Tritons for the study of the charge-exchange reactions with the LHE streamer chamber: status and some possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avramenko, S.A.; Belikov, Yu.A.; Golokhvastov, A.I.; Kirillov, A.D.; Khorozov, S.A.; Komolov, L.N.; Lukstin'sh, Yu.; Rukoyatkin, P.A.

    1997-01-01

    The 6 and 9 GeV/c secondary tritons, produced in the 4 He+A→ 3 H+X reaction, were used to study the charge-exchange reactions using a streamer chamber in magnetic field. The triton formation schemes, the beam parameters achieved as well as a way to reduce the beam momentum spread are given in the paper

  19. DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF A PARALLEL-PLATE FLOW CHAMBER FOR STUDYING CELLULAR ADHESION TO SOLID-SURFACES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANKOOTEN, TG; SCHAKENRAAD, JM; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    A parallel-plate flow chamber is developed in order to study cellular adhesion phenomena. An image analysis system is used to observe individual cells exposed to flow in situ and to determine area, perimeter, and shape of these cells as a function of time and shear stress. With this flow system the

  20. Double beta decays studied by β-γ spectroscopy with a drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, K.; Ejiri, H.; Shibata, T.

    1986-01-01

    A large scale ultra low background β-γ spectrometer ELEGANTS-V for studying double beta decays(ββ) of /sup 100/Mo and/or /sup 150/Nd is designed and is now under construction. It consists of drift chambers for identification of tracks and vertex of two β-rays, thin NaI(T1) or plastic scintillators for β-rays energy and NaI(T1) counters for γ- and cosmic-rays. Specifications of the spectrometer; energy resolution, detection efficiency, possible background counting rate and available ββ sources, have been evaluated. The spectrometer has extremely high sensitivities of the neutrinoless ββ decays (0νββ), two neutrino ββ decays (2νββ) and neutrinoless ββ decays followed one boson (Majoron). It may detect 0νββ decays with half lives up to T/sub 1/2/ = 1.2- 1.7 . 10/sup 23/ year. This limit corresponds to one part of million for the Majoran neutrino mass in units of the electron mass and for the right-handed weak current in units of the left handed one

  1. Study of Anterior Chamber Aqueous Tube Shunt by Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhui Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This cross-sectional, observational study used Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT to examine the position, patency, and the interior entrance site of anterior chamber (AC aqueous tube shunts. Methods. The OCT, slitlamp biomicroscopy, and gonioscopy findings of 23 eyes of 18 patients with AC shunts were collected and compared. Results. OCT images demonstrated the shunt position and patency in all 23 eyes, and the details of the AC entrance in 16 eyes. The position of the tube varied, with the majority (14/23 on the surface of the iris. The exact position of the AC entrance relative to Schwalbe’s line (SL could be determined in 9 eyes (posterior to SL in 7 eyes, anterior in 2 eyes. At the AC entrance, growth of fibrous scar tissue was present between the tube and the corneal endothelium in all 16 eyes in which the entrance could be clearly visualized. It’s a new finding that could not be visualized by slitlamp examination or lower resolution OCT. Conclusion. Compared to slitlamp examination, Fourier-domain OCT of AC tube shunts provided more detailed anatomic information regarding the insertion level relative to SL, scar tissue between the tube and the corneal endothelium, and patency of the tube opening.

  2. VUV photoemission studies of candidate Large Hadron Collider vacuum chamber materials

    CERN Document Server

    Cimino, R; Baglin, V

    1999-01-01

    In the context of future accelerators and, in particular, the beam vacuum of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 27 km circumference proton collider to be built at CERN, VUV synchrotron radiation (SR) has been used to study both qualitatively and quantitatively candidate vacuum chamber materials. Emphasis is given to show that angle and energy resolved photoemission is an extremely powerful tool to address important issues relevant to the LHC, such as the emission of electrons that contributes to the creation of an electron cloud which may cause serious beam instabilities and unmanageable heat loads on the cryogenic system. Here we present not only the measured photoelectron yields from the proposed materials, prepared on an industrial scale, but also the energy and in some cases the angular dependence of the emitted electrons when excited with either a white light (WL) spectrum, simulating that in the arcs of the LHC, or monochromatic light in the photon energy range of interest. The effects on the materials ...

  3. Study of proton-proton and deuteron-proton interactions by a bubble chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Fumiya; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Sai, Fuminori

    1981-01-01

    A preliminary report on the analysis of bubble chamber data at the energy of 1.35 and 1.55 GeV/c is described. The purpose of this study is to investigate the behavior of π production cross section in p-p interaction. The total elastic cross sections are 25.0 mb at 1.35 GeV/c and 25.5 mb at 1.55 GeV/c. The cross-sections of π-production such as pp-pnπ + and pp-ppπ 0 were directly obtained. The values were 11.9 mb for pnπ + and 3.5 mb for ppπ 0 at 1.35 GeV/c, and 17.3 mb for pnπ + and 4.7 mb for ppπ 0 at 1.55 GeV/c. The values of ppπ 0 did not agree with previously reported data at high energy. In the production of (delta) 2+ in the pp-pnπ + reaction, Monte Carlo calculation explains well this mass distribution. A preliminary experiment of dp reaction was done at the deuteron energy of 2 GeV/c. The tagging of spectator will be done. (Kato, T.)

  4. Study of reconstruction methods for a time projection chamber with GEM gas amplification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diener, R.

    2006-12-15

    A new e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider with an energy range up to 1TeV is planned in an international collaboration: the International Linear Collider (ILC). This collider will be able to do precision measurements of the Higgs particle and of physics beyond the Standard Model. In the Large Detector Concept (LDC) - which is one proposal for a detector at the ILC - a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is foreseen as the main tracking device. To meet the requirements on the resolution and to be able to work in the environment at the ILC, the application of new gas amplification technologies in the TPC is necessary. One option is an amplification system based on Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs). Due to the - in comparison with older technologies - small spatial width of the signals, this technology poses new requirements on the readout structures and the reconstruction methods. In this work, the performance and the systematics of different reconstruction methods have been studied, based on data measured with a TPC prototype in high magnetic fields of up to 4T and data from a Monte Carlo simulation. The latest results of the achievable point resolution are presented and their limitations have been investigated. (orig.)

  5. [Contribution of confocal microscopy and anterior chamber OCT to the study of corneal endothelial pathologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, N; Labbé, A; Dupont-Monod, S; Dupas, B; Baudouin, C

    2007-04-01

    To describe the appearance of various endothelial diseases with in vivo confocal microscopy and anterior chamber optical coherence tomography (AC OCT). In this study, ten patients with five different corneal endothelial pathologies were evaluated. Three patients had cornea guttata, three had corneal endothelial precipitates, two had irido-corneo-endothelial (ICE) syndrome, one had endothelial folds, and one had breaks in the Descemet membrane. All patients had bilateral ophthalmologic examinations, in vivo confocal microscopy, and AC OCT analysis. In cases of cornea guttata, AC OCT showed a finely embossed line corresponding to the empty intercellular cavities found with in vivo confocal microscopy. Corneal endothelium precipitates had the aspect of round formations suspended with the endothelium. Iris atrophy and irido-corneal synechiae resulting from ICE syndrome were precisely visualized with the AC OCT. High-resolution images of the anterior segment could be obtained using the AC OCT. Associated with in vivo confocal microscopy, these two new imaging techniques provide a precise evaluation of endothelial pathologies.

  6. Total OH reactivity study from VOC photochemical oxidation in the SAPHIR chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Z.; Tillmann, R.; Hohaus, T.; Fuchs, H.; Novelli, A.; Wegener, R.; Kaminski, M.; Schmitt, S. H.; Wahner, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that hydroxyl radicals (OH) act as a dominant reactive species in the degradation of VOCs in the atmosphere. In recent field studies, directly measured total OH reactivity often showed poor agreement with OH reactivity calculated from VOC measurements (e.g. Nölscher et al., 2013; Lu et al., 2012a). This "missing OH reactivity" is attributed to unaccounted biogenic VOC emissions and/or oxidation products. The comparison of total OH reactivity being directly measured and calculated from single component measurements of VOCs and their oxidation products gives us a further understanding on the source of unmeasured reactive species in the atmosphere. This allows also the determination of the magnitude of the contribution of primary VOC emissions and their oxidation products to the missing OH reactivity. A series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, to explore in detail the photochemical degradation of VOCs (isoprene, ß-pinene, limonene, and D6-benzene) by OH. The total OH reactivity was determined from the measurement of VOCs and their oxidation products by a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) with a GC/MS/FID system, and directly measured by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) at the same time. The comparison between these two total OH reactivity measurements showed an increase of missing OH reactivity in the presence of oxidation products of VOCs, indicating a strong contribution to missing OH reactivity from uncharacterized oxidation products.

  7. Study of reconstruction methods for a time projection chamber with GEM gas amplification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diener, R.

    2006-12-01

    A new e + e - linear collider with an energy range up to 1TeV is planned in an international collaboration: the International Linear Collider (ILC). This collider will be able to do precision measurements of the Higgs particle and of physics beyond the Standard Model. In the Large Detector Concept (LDC) - which is one proposal for a detector at the ILC - a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is foreseen as the main tracking device. To meet the requirements on the resolution and to be able to work in the environment at the ILC, the application of new gas amplification technologies in the TPC is necessary. One option is an amplification system based on Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs). Due to the - in comparison with older technologies - small spatial width of the signals, this technology poses new requirements on the readout structures and the reconstruction methods. In this work, the performance and the systematics of different reconstruction methods have been studied, based on data measured with a TPC prototype in high magnetic fields of up to 4T and data from a Monte Carlo simulation. The latest results of the achievable point resolution are presented and their limitations have been investigated. (orig.)

  8. On The Development of One-way Nesting of Air-pollution Model Smog Into Numerical Weather Prediction Model Eta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halenka, T.; Bednar, J.; Brechler, J.

    The spatial distribution of air pollution on the regional scale (Bohemian region) is simulated by means of Charles University puff model SMOG. The results are used for the assessment of the concentration fields of ozone, nitrogen oxides and other ozone precursors. Current improved version of the model covers up to 16 groups of basic compounds and it is based on trajectory computation and puff interaction both by means of Gaussian diffusion mixing and chemical reactions of basic species. Gener- ally, the method used for trajectory computation is valuable mainly for episodes sim- ulation, nevertheless, climatological study can be solved as well by means of average wind rose. For the study being presented huge database of real emission sources was incorporated with all kind of sources included. Some problem with the background values of concentrations was removed. The model SMOG has been nested into the forecast model ETA to obtain appropriate meteorological data input. We can estimate air pollution characteristics both for episodes analysis and the prediction of future air quality conditions. Necessary prognostic variables from the numerical weather pre- diction model are taken for the region of the central Bohemia, where the original puff model was tested. We used mainly 850 hPa wind field for computation of prognos- tic trajectories, the influence of surface temperature as a parameter of photochemistry reactions as well as the effect of cloudness has been tested.

  9. Performance studies under high irradiation of resistive bulk-micromegas chambers at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Bortfeldt, J; Farina, E; Iengo, P; Longo, L; Sidiropoulou, O; Wotschack, J

    2017-01-01

    Radiation studies on several resistive bulk-Micromegas chambers produced at CERN will be viewed in this document. Two resistive bulk-Micromegas chambers have been installed at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++) exposed to an intense gamma irradiation with the aim of evaluating the detector behaviour under high irradiation and carrying out a long-term age- ing study. The chambers under study have an active area of 10 x 10 cm 2 , a strip pitch of 400 m m , an ampli- fication gap of 128 m m , and a drift gap of 5 mm. The results on the detector performance as a function of the photon flux up to 44 MHz/cm 2 will be shown as well as the ageing properties as function of the integrated charge and the current intensity and its stability with time. In addition, the results of the efficiency measurements before, during, and after the irradiation will also be presented as a function of the amplification voltage at which the chambers are operated.

  10. Evaluation of transport ventilators at mild simulated altitude: a bench study in a hypobaric chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussen, Salah; Coulange, Mathieu; Fournier, Marc; Gainnier, Marc; Michelet, Pierre; Micoli, Christophe; Negrel, Lionel

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies on ventilators used for air transport showed significant effects of altitude, in particular with regard to accuracy of the tidal volume (VT) and breathing frequency. The aim of the study was to evaluate transport ventilators under hypobaric conditions. We conducted a bench study of 6 transport ventilators in a Comex hypobaric chamber to simulate mild altitude (1,500 m [4,920 feet] and 2,500 m [8,200 feet]). The ventilators were connected to a test lung to evaluate their accuracy: (1) to deliver a set VT under normal resistance and compliance conditions at F(IO2) = 0.6 and 1, (2) to establish a set PEEP (0, 5, 10, and 15 cm H2O), and (3) to establish a set inspiratory pressure in pressure controlled mode, (4) at a F(IO2) setting, and (5) and at a frequency setting. Four ventilators kept an average relative error in VT of ventilator was affected by the altitude only at F(IO2) = 1. The Osiris 3 ventilator had > 40% error even at 1,500 m. We found no change in frequency as a function of altitude for any ventilators studied. No clinically important differences were found between all altitudes with the PEEP or inspiratory pressure setting. Although F(IO2) was affected by altitude, the average error did not exceed 11%, and it is unclear whether this fact is an experimental artifact. We have shown that most of the new transport ventilators tested require no setting adjustment at moderate altitude and are as safe at altitude as at sea level under normal respiratory conditions. Older technologies still deliver more volume with altitude in volumetric mode.

  11. A study of the response of ionization chambers to mammography beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, G.; Burns, D.T.; Buermann, L.; Prez, L.A. de

    2007-03-01

    Some simulated mammography radiation beams have been established at the BIPM using a low-energy x-ray tube with a tungsten anode and molybdenum as a filter. The response of two ionization chambers of different types to these beams is compared with that obtained in mammography beams at the PTB and the NMi which were produced with x-ray tubes with molybdenum anodes and molybdenum filters. The relative differences between the chamber responses to these two different types of beams were less than 7 x 10 -3 which implies the uncertainty for the transfer of a calibration from one type of beam to the other. (authors)

  12. Development of the Experiment Control System and Performance Study of the Muon Chambers for the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Antunes Nobrega, R; Penso, G; Pinci, D

    2010-01-01

    The work of this thesis practically opened three fronts of the LHCb muon system : the development of the control and monitoring system of the readout electronics; the study of noise and threshold of the detector; and the study of the performance of the muon chambers. The LHCb muon readout apparatus is made 1368 Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPC) and 24 Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) chambers connected to approximately 7500 16-channel front-end boards, resulting in 120000 output channels. The large-scale of this system naturally led to a complex control and monitoring system made of about 600 microcontrollers which are directly connected to the front-end electronics and handled by six computers. The development of this control system was accomplished within this thesis; the microcontroller’s firmware and the high level software, operating on the six local computers, were implemented. Besides configuring and monitoring the on-chamber readout electronics, a set of calibration and debugging oriented procedu...

  13. Portable mini-chamber for temperature dependent studies using small angle and wide angle x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Arun Singh; Kumar, Dileep; Potdar, Satish; Pandit, Pallavi; Roth, Stephan V.; Gupta, Ajay

    2018-04-01

    The present work describes the design and performance of a vacuum compatible portable mini chamber for temperature dependent GISAXS and GIWAXS studies of thin films and multilayer structures. The water cooled body of the chamber allows sample annealing up to 900 K using ultra high vacuum compatible (UHV) pyrolytic boron nitride heater, thus making it possible to study the temperature dependent evolution of structure and morphology of two-dimensional nanostructured materials. Due to its light weight and small size, the chamber is portable and can be accommodated at synchrotron facilities worldwide. A systematic illustration of the versatility of the chamber has been demonstrated at beamline P03, PETRA-III, DESY, Hamburg, Germany. Temperature dependent grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering (GIWAXS) measurements were performed on oblique angle deposited Co/Ag multilayer structure, which jointly revealed that the surface diffusion in Co columns in Co/Ag multilayer enhances by increasing temperature from RT to ˜573 K. This results in a morphology change from columnar tilted structure to densely packed morphological isotropic multilayer.

  14. Study of the performance of ATLAS muon drift-tube chambers in magntic fields and at high irradiation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valderanis, Chrysostomos

    2012-07-26

    The performance of ATLAS muon drift-tube (MDT) chambers has been studied in detail using high-energy muon beams. The measurements of the drift tube properties in magnetic fields showed that inelastic collisions of the drifting electrons with the CO{sub 2} molecules in the Ar:CO{sub 2} (93:7) gas mixture of the MDT chambers have to be taken into account in the simulation of the drift properties. Such inelastic collisions are now correctly treated by the Garfield simulation programme from version 9 providing an accurate description of the behaviour of the ATLAS muon drift tubes, in particular in the magnetic field. Measurements at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN were performed to study the performance of the MDT chambers in the presence of high {gamma} ray background fluences. The chambers have a spatial resolution better than 40 {mu}m at the nominal background rates expected at the Large Hadron Collider design luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and a resolution better than 50 {mu}m for up to five times higher background rates. Efficient muon detection up to background counting rates of 500 kHz per tube corresponding to 35% occupancy was demonstrated.

  15. Subluxation of suture-fixated posterior chamber intraocular lenses a clinicopathologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Parag; Green, W Richard; Stark, Walter J; Akpek, Esen Karamursel

    2007-02-01

    To report the occurrence of subluxation of suture-fixated posterior chamber (PC) intraocular lenses (IOL) and elucidate the mechanisms involved. Prospective clinicopathologic study. A single 10-0 Prolene suture explanted from a patient who experienced subluxation of his PC-IOL, 11.5 years after placement. Furthermore, multiple 10-0 Prolene sutures and PC-IOLs used for iris fixation were studied as controls. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to analyze the surface of the explanted suture. In addition, randomly selected 10-0 Prolene sutures cut with Vannas scissors and cut with the positioning holes of a randomly selected PC-IOL identical to that implanted in the patient's eye were examined as controls. Finally, the positioning holes of several randomly selected, iris-fixated PC-IOLs were studied using SEM with particular attention to surface quality and edge finish. Presence of any signs of suture degradation, the character of the cut edge of the suture, as well as the characteristics of the positioning holes of the PC-IOLs. Scanning electron microscopy of the explanted suture revealed sharply cut edges, without significant degradation of the suture, and no intact loop. Scanning electron microscopy of the control suture cut with a PC-IOL demonstrated a similarly cut edge. The positioning holes of the examined PC-IOLs had a sharp edge, and some also had an imperfect finish. We conclude that the surface properties of the positioning holes lead to cutting of the suture, and subsequent subluxation of the PC-IOL.

  16. Chamber personnel's use of Nitrox 50 during hyperbaric oxygen treatment: a quality study--research report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Marco B; Jansen, Tejs; Sifakis, Michael B; Hyldegaard, Ole; Jansen, Erik C

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of using Nitrox 50 as breathing gas during attendance in a multiplace hyperbaric chamber. Paper logs between Jan.-Dec. 2011 were reviewed to analyze nitrogen gas-loading, actual bottom time, total bottom time and surface interval time. With the use of the Norwegian Diving Tables nitrogen gas-loading was converted to Repetitive Group Letters. Symptoms of decompression sickness and health problems related to hyperbaric exposures were registered at weekly staff meetings. The chamber personnel breathed chamber air or Nitrox 50. 1,207 hyperbaric exposures were distributed to five chamber attendants and technicians, 14 doctors, and six nurses. Nitrox 50 was inhaled on 978 occasions (81.0%). Median nitrogen gas-loading after first pressurization complied with Repetitive Group Letter A (range A-E), second to C (range A-F), third to D (range A-F), fourth to E (range C-H), fifth to F (range C-H), and sixth to E (range B-G). No symptoms of decompression sickness were reported (95% CI 0.00-0.33%). Breathing Nitrox 50 during repetitive hyperbaric sessions seems to be feasible and safe while meeting high demands in number of treatment sessions and patient flow and with fewer people employed in the hyperbaric unit.

  17. Calculational-theoretical studies of the system of local automated regulators and lateral ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksakov, A.N.; Emel'yanov, I.Ya.; Nikolaev, E.V.; Panin, V.M.; Podlazov, L.N.; Rogova, V.D.

    1987-01-01

    Methods of engineering synthesis of the systems for nuclear reactor local automated power regulation and radial-azimuthal energy distribution stabilization operating according to lateral ionization chamber signals are described. Results of calculational-theoretical investigations into the system efficiency and peculiarities of its reaction to some perturbations typical of the RBMK type reactors are considered

  18. Performance study of the primary standard ionization chamber for deployment of the diagnostic radiology qualities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Ricardo de Souza; Bossio, Francisco; Quaresma, Daniel da Silva; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Activities radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology and radiation protection, require knowledge of physical and dosimetric parameters, to be applied safely. Aiming to meet demand in Brazil, the National Laboratory of Metrology of Ionising Radiation - LNMRI - is deploying the primary standard for the calibration of secondary standard chambers, used in quality control in hospitals, clinics and industries. (author)

  19. A low-pressure cloud chamber to study the spatial distribution of ionizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodges, D.C.; Marshall, M.

    1977-01-01

    To further the understanding of the biological effects of radiation a knowledge of the spatial distribution of ionizations in small volumes is required. A cloud chamber capable of resolving the droplets formed on individual ions in the tracks of low-energy electrons has been constructed. It is made to high-vacuum specifications and contains a mixture of permanent gases and vapours, unsaturated before expansion, at a total pressure of 10 kPa. Condensation efficiencies close to 100% are obtained without significant background from condensation on uncharged particles and molecular aggregates. This paper describes the chamber, associated equipment and method of operation and discusses the performance of the system. Photographs of the droplets produced from the interaction of low-energy X-rays in the chamber gas for various modes of operation are presented. The mean energy loss per ion pair for electrons produced by the interaction of Al X-rays in the chamber gas (8130 Pa H 2 , 700 Pa C 2 H 5 OH, 690 Pa H 2 O, 400 Pa He, 70 Pa air) has been measured as 29.8 +- 0.7 eV per ion pair compared with a calculated value of 29.6 +- 0.4 eV per ion pair. (author)

  20. Long term performance studies of large oil-free bakelite resistive plate chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganai, R.; Roy, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Choudhury, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Shiroya, M.K.; Agarwal, K.

    2016-01-01

    Several high energy physics and neutrino physics experiments worldwide require large-size RPCs to cover wide acceptances. The muon tracking systems in the Iron calorimeter (ICAL) experiment in the India based Neutrino Observatory (INO), India and the near detector in Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) at Fermilab are two such examples. A single gap bakelite RPC of dimension 240 cm × 120 cm, with gas gap of 0.2 cm, has been built and tested at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata, using indigenous materials procured from the local market. No additional lubricant, like oil has been used on the electrode surfaces for smoothening. The chamber is in operation for > 365 days. We have tested the chamber for its long term operation. The leakage current, bulk resistivity, efficiency, noise rate and time resolution of the chamber have been found to be quite stable during the testing peroid. It has shown an efficiency > 95% with an average time resolution of ∼ 0.83 ns at the point of measurement at ∼ 8700 V throughout the testing period. Details of the long term performance of the chamber have been discussed.

  1. Long term performance studies of large oil-free bakelite resistive plate chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganai, R.; Roy, A.; Shiroya, M. K.; Agarwal, K.; Ahammed, Z.; Choudhury, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2016-09-01

    Several high energy physics and neutrino physics experiments worldwide require large-size RPCs to cover wide acceptances. The muon tracking systems in the Iron calorimeter (ICAL) experiment in the India based Neutrino Observatory (INO), India and the near detector in Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) at Fermilab are two such examples. A single gap bakelite RPC of dimension 240 cm × 120 cm, with gas gap of 0.2 cm, has been built and tested at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata, using indigenous materials procured from the local market. No additional lubricant, like oil has been used on the electrode surfaces for smoothening. The chamber is in operation for > 365 days. We have tested the chamber for its long term operation. The leakage current, bulk resistivity, efficiency, noise rate and time resolution of the chamber have been found to be quite stable during the testing peroid. It has shown an efficiency > 95% with an average time resolution of ~ 0.83 ns at the point of measurement at ~ 8700 V throughout the testing period. Details of the long term performance of the chamber have been discussed.

  2. Chemical Composition Based Aerosol Optical Properties According to Size Distribution and Mixture Types during Smog and Asian Dust Events in Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chang Hoon; Lee, Ji Yi; Um, Junshik; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Yong Pyo

    2018-02-01

    This study investigated the optical properties of aerosols involved in different meteorological events, including smog and Asian dust days. Carbonaceous components and inorganic species were measured in Seoul, Korea between 25 and 31 March 2012. Based on the measurements, the optical properties of aerosols were calculated by considering composition, size distribution, and mixing state of aerosols. To represent polydisperse size distributions of aerosols, a lognormal size distribution with a wide range of geometric mean diameters and geometric standard deviations was used. For the optical property calculations, the Mie theory was used to compute single-scattering properties of aerosol particles with varying size and composition. Analysis of the sampled data showed that the water-soluble components of organic matter increased on smog days, whereas crustal elements increased on dust days. The water content significantly influenced the optical properties of aerosols during the smog days as a result of high relative humidity and an increase in the water-soluble component. The absorption coefficients depended on the aerosol mixture type and the aerosol size distributions. Therefore, to improve our knowledge on radiative impacts of aerosols, especially the regional impacts of aerosols in East Asia, accurate measurements of aerosols, such as size distribution, composition, and mixture type, under different meteorological conditions are required.

  3. METs in adults while playing active video games: a metabolic chamber study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyachi, Motohiko; Yamamoto, Kenta; Ohkawara, Kazunori; Tanaka, Shigeho

    2010-06-01

    Active video game systems controlled through arm gestures and motions (Nintendo Wii Sports) and video games controlled through force plate (Wii Fit Plus) are becoming increasingly popular. This study was performed to determine the energy expenditure (EE) during Wii Fit Plus and Wii Sports game activities. Twelve adult men and women performed all the activities of Wii Sports (five activities: golf, bowling, tennis, baseball, and boxing) and Wii Fit Plus (63 activities classified as yoga, resistance, balance, and aerobic exercises). Each activity was continued for at least 8 min to obtain a steady-state EE. Because EE was assessed in an open-circuit indirect metabolic chamber consisting of an airtight room (20,000 or 15,000 L), subjects were freed of apparatus to collect expired gas while playing the games. MET value was calculated from resting EE and steady-state EE during activity. The mean MET values of all 68 activities were distributed over a wide range from 1.3 METs (Lotus Focus) to 5.6 METs (single-arm stand). The mean MET values in yoga, balance, resistance, and aerobic exercise of Wii Fit Plus and Wii Sports were 2.1, 2.0, 3.2, 3.4, and 3.0 METs, respectively. Forty-six activities (67%) were classified as light intensity (6.0 METs). Time spent playing one-third of the activities supplied by motion- and gesture-controlled video games can count toward the daily amount of exercise required according to the guidelines provided by the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association, which focus on 30 min of moderate-intensity daily physical activity 5 d x wk(-1).

  4. Nasal hyperresponders and atopic subjects report different symptom intensity to air quality: a climate chamber study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, L; Andersson, K; Bønløkke, J H; Mølhave, L; Kjaergaard, S K; Stridh, G; Juto, J-E; Sigsgaard, T

    2009-06-01

    Short-term exposure to dust and dust added with beta-(1,3)-d-glucan or aldehydes may cause sensory reactions. In random order, we exposed 36 volunteers in a climate chamber to clean air, office dust, dust with glucan, and dust with aldehydes. Three groups of subjects were exposed, eleven were non-atopic with nasal histamine hyperreactivity, 13 were non-atopic, and 12 were atopic. Subjective ratings of symptoms and general health were registered four times during four 6-h exposure sessions. Six symptom intensity indices were constructed. The nasal hyperreactive group had a high and time-dependent increase of mucous membrane irritations, whereas the atopic group had a low and stable rate of irritations with exposure time, close to the reference group (P = 0.02 for differences between the groups with respect to time under exposure for Weak Inflammatory Responses and P = 0.05 for Irritative Body Perception, significance mainly because of the nasal hyperreactive group). Exposure to dust, with or without glucan or aldehydes, showed increased discomfort measured by the index for Constant Indoor Climate, and dust with glucan had a similar effect for the index for Lower Respiratory Effects. For Psychological and Neurological Effects these were dependent on group affiliation, thus preventing a uniform statement of exposure effects for all three investigated groups. Opportunities for identifying persons with high or low sensitivity to low-level exposures are important in preventive medicine and will reduce intra-group variability and thus increase the power of experimental and epidemiological studies searching for correlations between exposures and health effects. The contrast between nasal hyperreactive on one side and atopic and reference subjects on the other side is particularly important. The atopic group indicated a non-homogenous reaction depending on their hyperreactive status, a finding that could be important but needs further confirmation.

  5. Air quality plans unveiled at Toronto's first Smog Summit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2000-06-23

    New federal and provincial initiatives to improve air quality were announced at the recent first-ever Toronto Smog Summit. An initial one million dollars have been pledged by the federal Minister of the Environment to support a framework for extending daily air quality forecasting across Canada, to begin within the next year. The funding will be used to increase the information base of existing air quality advisory programs in Ontario, and to create a daily air quality index immediately in other areas of the country most affected by smog. Existing air quality assessment programs will be expanded to include air quality models incorporating measurement and reporting of particulate matter levels. A second federal initiative also announced at the is meeting will be a corporate smog action plan, led by the Ontario regional offices of the federal departments of the Environment, Health Canada, and Public Works and Government Services. This program will include rapid response by federal government departments during Smog Alerts Days and measures to reduce the federal government's contribution to causing smog through encouragement of low or no emission options for employees, educational programs on best practices at home and at the office, reduction of employee travel through flextime and telecommuting, conversion of government vehicles to natural gas and other alternatives, and retrofitting government buildings for greater energy and water efficiency. A federal commitment of at least $200,000 was also announced by the Minister of Transport to support six sustainable transportation projects. The provincial Minister of the Environment announced the membership of the province's Anti-Smog Action Plan, which involves some 50 partners from industry associations, companies, government agencies and non-government organizations to help Ontario to meet its commitment to reduces nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds emissions by 45 per cent by 2015. A strategy for

  6. The Effectiveness of the Smog Index in Determining the Reading Levels of Business and Distributive Education Texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheis, Robert A.; Anderson, Roberta

    1982-01-01

    McLaughlin's Smog Index was compared to the Dale-Chall formula for the determination of reading levels of 48 textbooks in business and distributive education. A Modified Smog Index proved a valid substitute for the Dale-Chall formula when used to evaluate the reading levels of business and distributive education narrative. (Author/CT)

  7. The Impact of the 2013 Eastern China Smog on Outpatient Visits for Coronary Heart Disease in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fang; Chen, Renjie; Shen, Yuetian; Kan, Haidong; Kuang, Xingya

    2016-06-23

    There have been relatively few opportunities to examine the cardiovascular effects of an extreme air pollution event in China. We aimed to examine the impact of the 2013 Eastern China Smog occurring from 2 to 9 December 2013, on outpatient visits for coronary heart diseases (CHD) in a typical hospital in Shanghai, China. We used the over-dispersed, generalized additive model to estimate the relative risk (RR) of the 2013 Eastern China Smog on the outpatient visits by comparing the smog period (2-9 December 2013; 8 days) to the non-smog period (1 November-1 December 2013, and 10 December-28 February 2014; 112 days). This model also controlled for time trends, days of the week, holidays, and meteorological factors. A stratification analysis was performed to estimate sex- and age-specific RRs. The daily average PM2.5 (fine particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm) concentrations during the smog period were 212 μg/m³, which were three times higher than during the non-smog period (76 μg/m³). The smog in Eastern China in 2013 was significantly associated with an increased risk of outpatient visits for CHD. For example, the RR was 1.18 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.32) on lag 0 day. There were similar effects on males and females. Our analyses provided preliminary evidence that smog constituted a significant risk factor of CHD in China.

  8. The Impact of the 2013 Eastern China Smog on Outpatient Visits for Coronary Heart Disease in Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Huang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There have been relatively few opportunities to examine the cardiovascular effects of an extreme air pollution event in China. We aimed to examine the impact of the 2013 Eastern China Smog occurring from 2 to 9 December 2013, on outpatient visits for coronary heart diseases (CHD in a typical hospital in Shanghai, China. We used the over-dispersed, generalized additive model to estimate the relative risk (RR of the 2013 Eastern China Smog on the outpatient visits by comparing the smog period (2–9 December 2013; 8 days to the non-smog period (1 November–1 December 2013, and 10 December–28 February 2014; 112 days. This model also controlled for time trends, days of the week, holidays, and meteorological factors. A stratification analysis was performed to estimate sex- and age-specific RRs. The daily average PM2.5 (fine particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm concentrations during the smog period were 212 μg/m3, which were three times higher than during the non-smog period (76 μg/m3. The smog in Eastern China in 2013 was significantly associated with an increased risk of outpatient visits for CHD. For example, the RR was 1.18 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.32 on lag 0 day. There were similar effects on males and females. Our analyses provided preliminary evidence that smog constituted a significant risk factor of CHD in China.

  9. Criteria of choice in the planning of a solar radiation lamp arrangement, in climatic chambers for plant physiology studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materassi, A.; Fasano, G.; Vincenzi, M. De

    2006-01-01

    This technical note is an integration of the previous study: Climatic chambers for plant physiology: a new project concept. This note gives details regarding the planning of the lamp arrangement and demonstrates how mixing, in appropriate quantities, the radiative range of various types of lamps can give apparently contrasting results: to maximize radiation in maximum absorption range of chlorophylls and carotenoids; to minimize heat emission in the climatic chamber. With nine daylight fluorescent tubes, four sunlight metallic halide spotlights and nine red-blue fluorescent tubes, for a total of 562 W mE-2 (electric), mounted on the ceiling of a 2 m high chamber with a 4 square m surface area, on the chamber floor about 130 W mE-2 total solar radiation equivalent was obtained. This means a power emitted, in the bands of chlorophylls and carotenoids absorption, from a total solar radiation (black body of 5,500 K) of about 130 W mE-2. This radiation is sufficient to grow a large number of plant species. In the lamp arrangement there are seven other light fixtures, for fluorescent tubes, defined as auxiliary because tubes can be inserted which either integrate active radiation on the photoreceptors or produce particular spectral ranges. In the above cited work, fluorescent tubes producing in the ultraviolet B range were mounted in these auxiliary fixtures. Less thermal energy emitted in the climatic chamber means that it is possible to use a less powerful conditioning system and, thus, have lower costs of set-up and management. The efficiency of the lighting system is demonstrated by the fact that during 15 days of experimentation on 18-month-old, potted poplar plants (Populus alba), symptoms of insufficient light were not detected [it

  10. Chemical and physical transformations of organic aerosol from the photo-oxidation of open biomass burning emissions in an environmental chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. J. Hennigan; M. A. Miracolo; G. J. Engelhart; A. A. May; A. A. Presto; T. Lee; A. P. Sullivan; G. R. McMeeking; H. Coe; C. E. Wold; W.-M. Hao; J. B. Gilman; W. C. Kuster; J. de Gouw; B. A. Schichtel; J. L. Collett; S. M. Kreidenweis; A. L. Robinson

    2011-01-01

    Smog chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the chemical and physical transformations of organic aerosol (OA) during photo-oxidation of open biomass burning emissions. The experiments were carried out at the US Forest Service Fire Science Laboratory as part of the third Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME III). We investigated emissions from 12 different...

  11. A study of various types of electronics for drift chambers: development of a test bench and results for 1500 channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostarakis, Panayotis.

    1976-01-01

    An electronic chain to be connected with drift chambers is studied for use in High Energy Physics. Studies have been made to define the best components to be put into the elements (amplifiers, cables, TDC...). Measurements have been done to determine the characteristics of the chosen elements. A test apparatus has been built to control each channel (about 1550). Finally all chain elements have been tested [fr

  12. Studies of field distortions in a time projection chamber for the International Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenker, Klaus

    2014-12-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will allow to do precision measurements of Standard Model parameter and to search for new physics. The ILD detector concept, which is developed for the ILC, uses a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) as central tracking device. The momentum resolution goal for the ILD TPC is δ(1/p t ) ≅ 10 -4 (GeV/c) -1 at a magnetic field of B=3.5 T. Field distortions of the magnetic or electric field inside the sensitive volume of the TPC distort the momentum measurements. Therefore, one needs to keep them under control and correct them with high precision. In this thesis the main sources of field distortions in the TPC are identified and their effects are determined. Furthermore, possibilities to reduce the identified field distortions are presented. One known source of distortions of the electric field are ions, produced by the gas amplification in the TPC anode, that drift into the sensitive volume of the TPC. In the first part of this work the creation of these ions in Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM), which are used for the gas amplification, is studied. It will be shown that the resulting field distortions are not acceptable at the ILD TPC. By tuning the parameters of the gas amplification at the anode the field distortion can be reduced, which is shown in measurements and simulations. In addition measurements using a modified GEM show that it is possible to further reduce the field distortions with such a GEM. In the second part of this work field distortions arising at boundaries between individual readout modules are investigated using simulation studies. It will be shown in simulations, which are verified by measurement results, that these field distortions significantly influence the readout module performance. Based on the simulation results the GEM based readout module developed at DESY is optimised and the field distortions are reduced. These performance improvements could also be verified in measurements. Finally, a laser

  13. Studies on the beam system for the calibration of the OPAL jet chamber with laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maringer, G.

    1988-07-01

    UV laser beams are an important tool for the calibration of the OPAL jet chamber. A beam transport system containing about 350 mirrors in total guides the beams from the laser outside the detector into the chamber. Four of the mirrors are moveable under remote control allowing to guide the beams into each of the 24 sectors and to correct the beam path in case of deviations. A program to control these moveable mirrors has been developed. Drift velocity measurements will be performed by means of double beams which are generated by appropriate beamsplitters. Accurate knowledge of the double beam distances is essential to obtain the desired accuracy of better than 0.1% or 10 μm. Using a CCD device with a pixel size of 23x23 μm 2 the beam distance could be measured with errors below the required limit. (orig.)

  14. Automation of the reading of an ionization chamber: study and design of a data transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RANDRIAMAHOLISOA, C.O.

    1999-01-01

    Management of information obtained through ionization chamber, type of detector the most employed in centers or institutions using ionizing radiation machines and radioactive sources, is done manually because data are fed into computers from keyboard. This procedure presents hazards of loss and bad transcription of information. A more practical way of getting over this handicap is the setting up of a system that transfers data from ionization chamber into computer. Thereafter, it will be easier for the user to adjust his data processing software to the system underconsideration. This system, even though not directly designed to process data, that being a specific task of each user, is constituted of an electronic aspect which plays the interface part between them. It takes account parameters having relevance to the quality and the quantity of information put out by the detector [fr

  15. Study of charm and bottom particle production using a holographic bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experimental arrangement consists mainly of a small, rapid cycling, heavy liquid bubble chamber, HOBC, equipped for holography and a muon detector. The high spatial resolution which can be obtained in a small holographic bubble chamber (5-10 $\\mu$m) allows a good efficiency for the detection of shortlived particles like charm and bottom particles. With the one muon trigger the proportion of these particles is greatly enhanced. \\\\\\\\For the first phase of the experiment the emphasis is on the determination of charm cross-sections. The aim is to determine the production cross-sections at 100, 200 and 300 GeV/c for different incident particles, and consequently determine the energy dependence of the charm cross-sections.

  16. Experimental study of improvement on combustion control of fluidized bed combustion chamber; Ryudosho shokyakuro no nenshosei no kaizen ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumiya, T.; Baba, K.; Koshida, H.; Uetani, J.; Furuta, M.

    1998-10-29

    Nippon Steel Corporation has carried out an experimental study using the Yawata waste incinerator plant in order to improve combustion control of a fluidized bed combustion chamber. For controlling the forming of dioxin, combustion control is very important in addition to conventional methods. In this paper, we report two studies about improvements on combustion control. In the first study, we verified improvement on combustion control by modifying gas flow at the freeboard. The operational results of the experiments were studied using the numerical model of the combustion chamber. The modification of gas flow at freeboard was confirmed to be effective to obtain a compact design of fluidized bed combustion chamber for municipal waste. In the second, study we improved combustion control for sewage combustion with municipal waste. In burning municipal waste and sewage, it is especially required to take combustion control into careful consideration. In this experiment, we developed a new device for supplying sewage for the appropriate controlling combustion, and verified its effectiveness to combustion control and an effective reduction of dioxin. (author)

  17. Performance Study of the CMS Barrel Resistive Plate Chambers with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; 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Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    In October and November 2008, the CMS collaboration conducted a programme of cosmic ray data taking, which has recorded about 270 million events. The Resistive Plate Chamber system, which is part of the CMS muon detection system, was successfully operated in the full barrel. More than 98% of the channels were operational during the exercise with typical detection efficiency of 90%. In this paper, the performance of the detector during these dedicated runs is reported.

  18. A straw drift chamber spectrometer for studies of rare kaon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, K.; Ambrose, D.; Arroyo, C.; Bachman, M.; Connor, D.; Eckhause, M.; Ecklund, K.M.; Graessle, S.; Hamela, M.; Hamilton, S.; Hancock, A.D.; Hartman, K.; Hebert, M.; Hoff, C.H.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Irwin, G.M.; Kane, J.R.; Kanematsu, N.; Kuang, Y.; Lee, R.; Marcin, M.; Martin, R.D.; McDonough, J.; Milder, A.; Molzon, W.R.; Ouimette, D.; Pommot-Maia, M.; Proga, M.; Riley, P.J.; Ritchie, J.L.; Rubin, P.D.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Ware, B.; Welsh, R.E.; Wojcicki, S.G.; Worm, S.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the design, construction, readout, tests, and performance of planar drift chambers, based on 5-mm-diameter copperized Mylar and Kapton straws, used in an experimental search for rare kaon decays. The experiment took place in the high-intensity neutral beam at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron of Brookhaven National Laboratory, using a neutral beam stop, two analyzing dipoles, and redundant particle identification to remove backgrounds

  19. Study on a cellmap for the reconstruction of cosmic ray tracks in drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Yu; Ma Yuqian

    2005-01-01

    Taking 13 Cosmic experiment (L3+C) as an example, the authors discussed a new Cellmap to reconstruct the hit in drift chamber of magnetic spectrometer for the very inclined comic-ray tracks, and compared the reconstruction results with the standard Cellmap of L3+C. It shows that, for the very inclined cosmic-ray tracks, the new Cellmap can reconstruct more hits than the standard Cellmap, and the distribution of χ 2 of track reconstruction is also improved. (authors)

  20. Performance studies under high irradiation and ageing properties of resistive bulk Micromegas chambers at the new CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidiropoulou, O.; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez; Bianco, M.; Farina, E.M.; Iengo, P.; Longo, L.; Pfeiffer, D.; Wotschack, J.

    2017-01-01

    Resistive bulk Micromegas chambers, produced at CERN, have been installed at the new CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++) in order to study the effects of ageing and to evaluate the detector behaviour under high irradiation. The chambers have an active area of 10×10 cm 2 , strip pitch of 400 μm and an amplification gap of 128 μm. We present the detector performance as a function of the background rate of up to 20 MHz/cm 2 . - Highlights: • Small-size resistive bulk Micromegas detectors have been exposed to the new GIF++. • 9 months irradiation to γ up to 20 Mhz/cm 2 . 0.09 C/cm 2 collected integrated charge. • Νo degradation of the detector performance was observed. • Muon tracks successfully reconstructed up to 68 kHz/cm 2 gamma background. • Higher background rates will be studied in the coming months.

  1. Chamber transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, Craig L.

    2001-01-01

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system

  2. Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions inthe Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Lunden, Melissa M.; Singer, Brett C.; Coleman,Beverly K.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2005-10-01

    Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 x 10{sup 5} molecules cm{sup -3} were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1-25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products.

  3. Simulation studies for a high resolution time projection chamber at the international linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muennich, A.

    2007-03-26

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is planned to be the next large accelerator. The ILC will be able to perform high precision measurements only possible at the clean environment of electron positron collisions. In order to reach this high accuracy, the requirements for the detector performance are challenging. Several detector concepts are currently under study. The understanding of the detector and its performance will be crucial to extract the desired physics results from the data. To optimise the detector design, simulation studies are needed. Simulation packages like GEANT4 allow to model the detector geometry and simulate the energy deposit in the different materials. However, the detector response taking into account the transportation of the produced charge to the readout devices and the effects ofthe readout electronics cannot be described in detail. These processes in the detector will change the measured position of the energy deposit relative to the point of origin. The determination of this detector response is the task of detailed simulation studies, which have to be carried out for each subdetector. A high resolution Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with gas amplification based on micro pattern gas detectors, is one of the options for the main tracking system at the ILC. In the present thesis a detailed simulation tool to study the performance of a TPC was developed. Its goal is to find the optimal settings to reach an excellent momentum and spatial resolution. After an introduction to the present status of particle physics and the ILC project with special focus on the TPC as central tracker, the simulation framework is presented. The basic simulation methods and implemented processes are introduced. Within this stand-alone simulation framework each electron produced by primary ionisation is transferred through the gas volume and amplified using Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs). The output format of the simulation is identical to the raw data from a

  4. SMOG 2: A Versatile Software Package for Generating Structure-Based Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Jeffrey K; Levi, Mariana; Raghunathan, Mohit; Lammert, Heiko; Hayes, Ryan L; Onuchic, José N; Whitford, Paul C

    2016-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations with coarse-grained or simplified Hamiltonians have proven to be an effective means of capturing the functionally important long-time and large-length scale motions of proteins and RNAs. Originally developed in the context of protein folding, structure-based models (SBMs) have since been extended to probe a diverse range of biomolecular processes, spanning from protein and RNA folding to functional transitions in molecular machines. The hallmark feature of a structure-based model is that part, or all, of the potential energy function is defined by a known structure. Within this general class of models, there exist many possible variations in resolution and energetic composition. SMOG 2 is a downloadable software package that reads user-designated structural information and user-defined energy definitions, in order to produce the files necessary to use SBMs with high performance molecular dynamics packages: GROMACS and NAMD. SMOG 2 is bundled with XML-formatted template files that define commonly used SBMs, and it can process template files that are altered according to the needs of each user. This computational infrastructure also allows for experimental or bioinformatics-derived restraints or novel structural features to be included, e.g. novel ligands, prosthetic groups and post-translational/transcriptional modifications. The code and user guide can be downloaded at http://smog-server.org/smog2.

  5. SMOG 2: A Versatile Software Package for Generating Structure-Based Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey K Noel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations with coarse-grained or simplified Hamiltonians have proven to be an effective means of capturing the functionally important long-time and large-length scale motions of proteins and RNAs. Originally developed in the context of protein folding, structure-based models (SBMs have since been extended to probe a diverse range of biomolecular processes, spanning from protein and RNA folding to functional transitions in molecular machines. The hallmark feature of a structure-based model is that part, or all, of the potential energy function is defined by a known structure. Within this general class of models, there exist many possible variations in resolution and energetic composition. SMOG 2 is a downloadable software package that reads user-designated structural information and user-defined energy definitions, in order to produce the files necessary to use SBMs with high performance molecular dynamics packages: GROMACS and NAMD. SMOG 2 is bundled with XML-formatted template files that define commonly used SBMs, and it can process template files that are altered according to the needs of each user. This computational infrastructure also allows for experimental or bioinformatics-derived restraints or novel structural features to be included, e.g. novel ligands, prosthetic groups and post-translational/transcriptional modifications. The code and user guide can be downloaded at http://smog-server.org/smog2.

  6. A preliminary inter-centre comparison study for photon, thermal neutron and epithermal neutron responses of two pairs of ionisation chambers used for BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, Antoaneta; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Wojnecki, Cecile; Green, Stuart; Nievaart, Sander; Ghani, Zamir; Moss, Ray

    2009-01-01

    The dual ionisation chamber technique is the recommended method for mixed field dosimetry of epithermal neutron beams. This paper presents initial data from an ongoing inter-comparison study involving two identical pairs of ionisation chambers used at the BNCT facilities of Petten, NL and of University of Birmingham, UK. The goal of this study is to evaluate the photon, thermal neutron and epithermal neutron responses of both pairs of TE(TE) (Exradin T2 type) and Mg(Ar) (Exradin M2 type) ionisation chambers in similar experimental conditions. At this stage, the work has been completed for the M2 type chambers and is intended to be completed for the T2 type chambers in the near future.

  7. Aging study for resistive plate chambers of the CMS muon trigger detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abbrescia, M; Iaselli, G; Loddo, F; Maggi, M; Marangelli, B; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Pugliese, G; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Altieri, S; Belli, G; Bruno, G; Guida, R; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vitulo, P

    2003-01-01

    A long-term aging test of a Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) was carried out with an intense gamma **1**3**7Cs source. The detector was operated in avalanche mode and had the bakelite surface treated with linseed oil. After the irradiation the estimated dose, charge and fluence were approximately equal to the expected values after 10 years of operation in the CMS barrel region. During and after the irradiation, the RPC performance was monitored with cosmic muons and showed no relevant aging effects. Moreover, no variation of the bakelite resistance was observed.

  8. Aging study for resistive plate chambers of the CMS muon trigger detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbrescia, M.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G. E-mail: gabriella.pugliese@ba.infn.it; Ranieri, A.; Romano, F.; Altieri, S.; Belli, G.; Bruno, G.; Guida, R.; Ratti, S.P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P

    2003-12-01

    A long-term aging test of a Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) was carried out with an intense gamma {sup 137}Cs source. The detector was operated in avalanche mode and had the bakelite surface treated with linseed oil. After the irradiation the estimated dose, charge and fluence were approximately equal to the expected values after 10 years of operation in the CMS barrel region. During and after the irradiation, the RPC performance was monitored with cosmic muons and showed no relevant aging effects. Moreover, no variation of the bakelite resistance was observed.

  9. Nasal hyperresponders and atopic subjects report different symptom intensity to air quality: a climate chamber study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodin, Lennart; Andersson, K.; Bønløkke, Jakob Hjort

    2009-01-01

    Short-term exposure to dust and dust added with beta-(1,3)-d-glucan or aldehydes may cause sensory reactions. In random order, we exposed 36 volunteers in a climate chamber to clean air, office dust, dust with glucan, and dust with aldehydes. Three groups of subjects were exposed, eleven were non......, significance mainly because of the nasal hyperreactive group). Exposure to dust, with or without glucan or aldehydes, showed increased discomfort measured by the index for Constant Indoor Climate, and dust with glucan had a similar effect for the index for Lower Respiratory Effects. For Psychological...

  10. A Controlled-Environment Chamber for Atmospheric Chemistry Studies Using FT-IR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    necessary and identify by block number) FELD GROUP SUB-GROUP i >Chamber, controlled environment; long-path cell ; 07 04 FT-IR; Hydrazine decay...modification doubles the useable path length of the original multipass cell described by White (Reference 8). The pattern of images formed on the nesting...system is shown in Figure 13. 24 z C C02, Ibm, El4 944 C3 ta) caC E-4- 252 14 $4 41) 41) 0. 0 04 04 4 41) ~0 to 0.0 V-4 (A q14 0~ 1% 4-r4 $4 0 u P416 4 4

  11. Retrospective Study of Vitreous Tap Technique Using Needle Aspiration for Management of Shallow Anterior Chamber during Phacoemulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Ahmed Nossair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the technique of vitreous tap using needle aspiration for management of anterior chamber shallowness during phacoemulsification. Methods. A retrospective study included 26 eyes of 17 patients who underwent phacoemulsification in which vitreous tap was performed using a 27-gauge needle attached to a 5 ml syringe, inserted 3.5 mm from the limbus to aspirate 0.2 ml of liquefied vitreous if a cohesive (OVD failed to sufficiently deepen the anterior chamber. Results. Preoperative anterior chamber depth was 2.31 ± 0.26 mm, axial length was 21.7 ± 0.67 mm, lens thickness was 4.5 ± .19 mm, and cataract grade was 3.77 ± 1.4. Preoperative CDVA in LogMAR units was 0.98 ± 0.75. Coexisting angle closure glaucoma was present in 7 patients (26.92% preoperatively. Vitreous needle tap was successful in vitreous removal on the first attempt in 26 eyes (100%. Postoperative follow-up period was 22.88 ± 10.24 (4–39 months. The final postoperative CDVA in LogMAR units was 0.07 ± 0.1, while the final postoperative IOP was 16.54 ± 1.45 mmHg. No complications related to vitreous tap were noted. Conclusion. Vitreous needle tap is a simple, cost-effective, and safe technique for management of shallow anterior chamber in phacoemulsification.

  12. Reverse pupillary block after implantation of a scleral-sutured posterior chamber intraocular lens: a retrospective, open study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Seung Pil; Joo, Choun-Ki; Jun, Jong Hwa

    2017-03-29

    To report the clinical features of patients with reverse pupillary block (RPB) after scleral-sutured posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC IOL) implantation and biometric changes after laser peripheral iridotomy (LPI). Eight patients attending our hospital's ophthalmology outpatient clinic, who developed RPB after implantation of a scleral-sutured PC IOL due to subluxation of the crystalline lens or IOL, were investigated in this retrospective, observational study. Preoperative evaluations showed angle pigmentation in all cases and iridodonesis in 2 cases. Two subjects had used an α 1A -adrenoceptor antagonist for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Pars plana or anterior partial vitrectomy was performed in all cases. All eyes showed an extremely deep anterior chamber, a concave iris configuration, and contact between the IOL optic and the iris at the pupillary margin. Pupil capture was detected in 2 cases. The mean (± SD) anterior chamber angle (ACA) was 89.91 ± 10.06°, and the anterior chamber depth (ACD) was 4.42 ± 0.16 mm before LPI. After LPI, the iris immediately became flat with a decreased ACA (51.70 ± 2.59°; P = 0.018) and ACD (4.14 ± 0.15 mm; P = 0.012). After LPI, the intraocular pressure decreased from 19.75 ± 3.77 mmHg to 15.63 ± 4.30 mmHg (P = 0.011), and the spherical equivalent decreased from -0.643 ± 0.385 D to - 0.875 ± 0.505 D (P = 0.016). Concomitant vitrectomy, angle pigmentation, and iridodonesis may be risk factors for RPB after scleral-sutured PC IOL implantation. LPI is effective for relieving the RPB.

  13. A study of an optimal technological solution for the electronics of particle position sensitive gas detectors (multiwire proportional chambers)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zojceski, Z.

    1997-01-01

    This work aims at optimizing the electronics for position sensitive gas detectors. The first part is a review of proportional chamber operation principles and presents the different possibilities for the architecture of the electronics. The second part involves electronic signal processing for best signal-to-noise ratio. We present a time-variant filter based on a second order base line restorer.It allows a simple pole-zero and tail cancellation at high counting rates. Also, various interpolating algorithms for cathode strip chambers have been studied. The last part reports the development of a complete electronic system, from the preamplifiers up to the readout and control interface, for the cathode strip chambers in the focal plane of the BBS Spectrometer at KVI, Holland. The system is based on application specific D-size VXI modules. In all modules, the 16-bit ADCs and FIFO memory are followed by a Digital Signal Processor, which performs data filtering and cathode induced charge interpolation. Very good analog noise performance is obtained in a multi-processor environment. (author)

  14. Reproduction and evaluation of a rat model of inhalation lung injury caused by black gunpowder smog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-fan LIU

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To reproduce and evaluate a rat model of inhalation lung injury caused by black gunpowder smog. Methods The smog composition was analyzed and a rat model of inhalation lung injury was reproduced. Forty two healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into normal control (NC group and 1h, 2h, 6h, 24h, 48h and 96h after inhalation group (n=6. The arterial blood gas, wet to dry weight ratio (W/D of lung, leukocyte count, and protein concentration in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF were determined. Macroscopic and microscopic changes in lung tissue were observed. Results The composition of black gunpowder smog was composed mainly of CO2 and CO, and their concentrations remained stable within 12 minutes. Smog inhalation caused a significant hypoxemia, the concentration of blood COHb reached a peak value 1h, and the W/D of lung reached peak value 2h after inhalation (P<0.05. The amount of leukocytes and content of protein in BALF increased significantly within 24h after inhalation (P<0.05. Histopathological observation showed diffuse hemorrhage, edema and inflammatory cell infiltration in lung tissue as manifestations of acute lung injury, and the injury did not recover at 96h after inhalation. Conclusion The rat model of inhalation lung injury can be reproduced using black gunpowder smog, and it has the advantages of its readiness for reproduction, reliability and stability, and it could be used for the experiment of inhalation injury in a battlefield environment.

  15. Study of the performance of the Micromegas chambers for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00237763; The ATLAS Muon collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Micromegas (MICRO MEsh GAseous Structure) chambers are Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detectors designed to provide a high spatial resolution in highly irradiated environments. In 2007 an ambitious long-term R&D activity was started in the context of the ATLAS experiment, at CERN: the Muon ATLAS Micromegas Activity (MAMMA). After years of tests on prototypes and technology breakthroughs, Micromegas chambers were chosen as tracking detectors for an upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. These novel detectors will be installed in 2018 and 2019 during the second long shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider, and will serve as precision detectors in the innermost part of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. Eight layers of Micromegas modules of unprecedented size, up to 3 $\\rm{{m^2}}$, will cover a surface of 150 $\\rm{{m^2}}$ for a total active area of about 1200 $\\rm{{m^2}}$. This upgrade will be crucial to ensure high quality performance for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer in view of the third run of the Large Hadron Collider and...

  16. Performance Studies of Micromegas Chambers for the New Small Wheel Upgrade Project

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00349891; The ATLAS collaboration; Leontsinis, Stefanos

    2015-01-01

    Micromegas, an abbreviation for Micro MEsh Gaseous Structure (MM), is a robust detector with excellent spatial resolution and high rate capability. An $R\\&D$ activity, called Muon ATLAS MicroMegas Activity (MAMMA), was initiated in 2007 in order to explore the potential of the MM technology for use in the ATLAS experiment. After several years of prototyping and testing, the ATLAS collaboration has chosen the MM technology along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) for the upgrade of the inner muon station in the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel (NSW) upgrade project. It will employ eight layers of MM and eight layers of sTGC detectors per wheel. The NSW project requires fully efficient MM chambers, able to cope with the maximum expected rate of $15\\,\\mathrm{kHz/cm^2}$ featuring single plane spatial resolution better than $100\\,\\mu\\mathrm{m}$. The MM detectors will cover a total active area of $\\sim1200\\,\\mathrm{m^2}$ and will be operated in a moderate magnetic field with intens...

  17. Chamber study of PCB emissions from caulking materials and light ballasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Guo, Zhishi; Krebs, Kenneth A; Stinson, Rayford A; Nardin, Joshua A; Pope, Robert H; Roache, Nancy F

    2015-10-01

    The emissions of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners from thirteen caulk samples were tested in a micro-chamber system. Twelve samples were from PCB-contaminated buildings and one was prepared in the laboratory. Nineteen light ballasts collected from buildings that represent 13 different models from five manufacturers were tested in 53-L environmental chambers. The rates of PCB congener emissions from caulking materials and light ballasts were determined. Several factors that may have affected the emission rates were evaluated. The experimentally determined emission factors showed that, for a given PCB congener, there is a linear correlation between the emission factor and the concentration of the PCB congener in the source. Furthermore, the test results showed that an excellent log-linear correlation exists between the normalized emission factor and the vapor pressure (coefficient of determination, r(2)⩾0.8846). The PCB congener emissions from ballasts at or near room temperature were relatively low with or without electrical load. However, the PCB congener emission rates increased significantly as the temperature increased. The results of this research provide new data and models for ranking the primary sources of PCBs and supports the development and refinement of exposure assessment models for PCBs. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Oxidation of a new Biogenic VOC: Chamber Studies of the Atmospheric Chemistry of Methyl Chavicol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloss, William; Alam, Mohammed; Adbul Raheem, Modinah; Rickard, Andrew; Hamilton, Jacqui; Pereira, Kelly; Camredon, Marie; Munoz, Amalia; Vazquez, Monica; Vera, Teresa; Rodenas, Mila

    2013-04-01

    The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) leads to formation of ozone and SOA, with consequences for air quality, health, crop yields, atmospheric chemistry and radiative transfer. Recent observations have identified Methyl Chavicol ("MC": Estragole; 1-allyl-4-methoxybenzene, C10H12O) as a major BVOC above pine forests in the USA, and oil palm plantations in Malaysian Borneo. Palm oil cultivation, and hence MC emissions, may be expected to increase with societal food and bio fuel demand. We present the results of a series of simulation chamber experiments to assess the atmospheric fate of MC. Experiments were performed in the EUPHORE facility, monitoring stable product species, radical intermediates, and aerosol production and composition. We determine rate constants for reaction of MC with OH and O3, and ozonolysis radical yields. Stable product measurements (FTIR, PTRMS, GC-SPME) are used to determine the yields of stable products formed from OH- and O3- initiated oxidation, and to develop an understanding of the initial stages of the MC degradation chemistry. A surrogate mechanism approach is used to simulate MC degradation within the MCM, evaluated in terms of ozone production measured in the chamber experiments, and applied to quantify the role of MC in the real atmosphere.

  19. An experimental study on removal efficiency of bio-particles in an airtight decontamination chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yanju [School of Environment Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); National Biological Protection Engineering Center, Tianjin (China); Hao, Limei; Wang, Shuang; Hou, Lili; Zhang, Jinming; Qi, Jiancheng [National Biological Protection Engineering Center, Tianjin (China)

    2009-11-15

    Many bacteria and viruses lead to global dissemination of respiratory diseases, such as SARS, influenza, tuberculosis, pneumonia and asthma, by clinging to particles and transmission through aerosol. In this paper, an experiment was conducted to investigate the removal efficiency of bio-particles when exposed to ventilation in an airtight decontamination chamber made of stainless steel. After the bio-particles (Serratia marcescens) exposure condition was established in the chamber, the bio-particles removal efficiency was investigated. And a comparison experiment was then conducted with polystyrene latex spheres (PSL) as general particles under the same environmental condition. The comparison results indicate that the removal efficiency of bio-particles is lower than that of PSL during the first 300 s, but both removal efficiencies reached 90% almost at the same time. Furthermore, the differences between bio-particles and PSL, the influence of bio-particle size, environmental velocity, temperature and relative humidity on bio-particle removal efficiency were analyzed and discussed comprehensively. These data could not only underpin future numerical simulations of bio-particles, but also give information to aid in decisions for decreasing the risk of bio-particles pollution in a microbe exposure environment. (author)

  20. Comparison of temperature rise in the pulp chamber with different light curing units: An in-vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Ebenezar A; Anilkumar R; Indira R; Ramachandran S; Srinivasan M

    2010-01-01

    Aims/Objectives : This in vitro study was designed to measure and compare the temperature rise in the pulp chamber with different light curing units. Materials and Methods : The study was done in two settings-in-vitro and in-vivo simulation. In in-vitro setting, 3mm and 6mm acrylic spacers with 4mm tip diameter thermocouple was used and six groups were formed according to the light curing source- 3 Quartz-Tungsten-Halogen (QTH) units and 3 Light-Emitting-Diode (LED) units. For the LED units...

  1. Comparison of temperature rise in the pulp chamber with different light curing units: An in-vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Ebenezar, A V; Anilkumar, R; Indira, R; Ramachandran, S; Srinivasan, M R

    2010-01-01

    Aims/Objectives: This in vitro study was designed to measure and compare the temperature rise in the pulp chamber with different light curing units. Materials and Methods: The study was done in two settings-in-vitro and in-vivo simulation. In in-vitro setting, 3mm and 6mm acrylic spacers with 4mm tip diameter thermocouple was used and six groups were formed according to the light curing source- 3 Quartz-Tungsten-Halogen (QTH) units and 3 Light-Emitting-Diode (LED) units. For the LED units, th...

  2. Peak nasal inspiratory flow as outcome for provocation studies in allergen exposure chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boelke, Georg; Berger, Uwe; Bergmann, Karl-Christian

    2017-01-01

    : In a randomized controlled blinded setting subjects suffering from allergic rhinitis were exposed to grass pollen, birch pollen, house dust mite and/or placebo in the GA(2)LEN chamber. Different allergen concentrations were used to evaluate symptom severities. Patients had to perform PNIF before and every 30 min...... during a challenge using a portable PNIF meter. RESULTS: 86 subjects participated in 203 challenges, altogether. House dust mite provocations caused the greatest reduction in PNIF values, followed by grass pollen and birch pollen. Provocations with every allergen or pollen concentration led...... symptoms. CONCLUSION: PNIF is a helpful and feasible tool for conducting provocation trials with allergens, especially grass pollen and house dust mite, in an AEC....

  3. SπRIT: A time-projection chamber for symmetry-energy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shane, R.; McIntosh, A.B.; Isobe, T.; Lynch, W.G.; Baba, H.; Barney, J.; Chajecki, Z.; Chartier, M.; Estee, J.; Famiano, M.; Hong, B.; Ieki, K.; Jhang, G.; Lemmon, R.; Lu, F.; Murakami, T.; Nakatsuka, N.; Nishimura, M.; Olsen, R.; Powell, W.

    2015-01-01

    A time-projection chamber (TPC) called the SAMURAI Pion-Reconstruction and Ion-Tracker (SπRIT) has recently been constructed at Michigan State University as part of an international effort to constrain the symmetry-energy term in the nuclear Equation of State (EoS). The SπRIT TPC will be used in conjunction with the SAMURAI spectrometer at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) at RIKEN to measure yield ratios for pions and other light isospin multiplets produced in central collisions of neutron-rich heavy ions, such as 132 Sn+ 124 Sn. The SπRIT TPC can function both as a TPC detector and as an active target. It has a vertical drift length of 50 cm, parallel to the magnetic field. Gas multiplication is achieved through the use of a multi-wire anode plane. Image charges, produced in the 12096 pads, are read out with the recently developed Generic Electronics for TPCs

  4. Numerical study on turbulent flow inside a channel with an extended chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Tae; Lim, Hee Chang

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a LES numerical simulation of turbulent flow around an extended chamber. The simulations are carried out on a series of 3-dimensional cavities placed in a turbulent boundary layer at a Reynolds number of 1.0x10 5 based on U and h, which are the velocity at the upper top of the cavity and the depth height, respectively. In order to get an appropriate solution in the Filtered Navier-Stokes equation for the incompressible flow, the computational mesh is densely attracted to the cavity surface and coarsely far-field, as this aids saving the computation cost and rapid convergence. The Boussinesq hypothesis is employed in the subgrid-scale turbulence model. In order to obtain the subgrid-scale turbulent viscosity, the Smagorinsky-Lilly SGS model is applied and the CFL number for time marching is 1.0. The results include the flow variations inside a cavity with the different sizes and shapes.

  5. A large area position-sensitive ionization chamber for heavy-ion-induced reaction studies

    CERN Document Server

    Pant, L M; Dinesh, B V; Thomas, R G; Saxena, A; Sawant, Y S; Choudhury, R K

    2002-01-01

    A large area position-sensitive ionization chamber with a wide dynamic range has been developed to measure the mass, charge and energy of the heavy ions and the fission fragments produced in heavy-ion-induced reactions. The split anode geometry of the detector makes it suitable for both particle identification and energy measurements for heavy ions and fission fragments. The detector has been tested with alpha particles from sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am- sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu source, fission fragments from sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf and the heavy-ion beams from the 14UD Mumbai Pelletron accelerator facility. Using this detector, measurements on mass and total kinetic energy distributions in heavy-ion-induced fusion-fission reactions have been carried out for a wide range of excitation energies. Results on deep inelastic collisions and mass-energy correlations on different systems using this detector setup are discussed.

  6. Study on dosimetric characteristics of ionizing chambers with an electrostatic relay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuryatin, E.N.; Fominykh, V.I.; Shumshurov, V.I.; Tel'tsov, M.V.

    1979-01-01

    The metrologic characteristics of the ionization integral-pulse dosimeters with the electrostatic relay, IC-5B and IC-14 (ionization chambers) are investigated. The dosimeter sizes are as followi IC-5ng 6B -m diameter, 80 mm height; IC-14 - 42 mm diameter, 67 mm height. The ionization volume is filled with argon. The electrostatic relay converts the charge (or current) of the ionization chamber into the succession of electric pulses and so the charge (or current) measurement comes to the calculation of the pulse number. The dosimeter stability is investigated in the beam of 137 Cs γ-radiation source. Distribution of results of operation for 8 hours does not exceed 3 and 1.2%, for 6 days - 1.5 and 2% respectively for IC-5B and IC-14. Sensitivity rate at the dosimeter rotation about the symmetry axis does not exceed +-2.5% at various effective energies of 137 Cs and 60 Co γ-radiations. At the dosimeter rotation about the axis, perpendicular to the symmetry axis, the dosage sensitivity twice as much at the radiation energy lower than 10O keV. The dosimeter sensitivity in the power range of exposure doze of 0.56-195 R/h changes not more than over 5%. The dosimeter dosage sensitivity to the X-ray radiation with the effective energy of 40 keV exceeds approximately 10 times the dosage sensitivity to 137 Cs γ-radiation. The obtained results are useful at the data analysis on the radiation situation of different cosmic devices

  7. The KLOE drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, A.

    2002-01-01

    The design and construction of the large drift chamber of the KLOE experiment is presented. The track reconstruction is described, together with the calibration method and the monitoring systems. The stability of operation and the performance are studied with samples of e + e - , K S K L and K + K - events

  8. Peltier-based cloud chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nar, Sevda Yeliz; Cakir, Altan

    2018-02-01

    Particles produced by nuclear decay, cosmic radiation and reactions can be identified through various methods. One of these methods that has been effective in the last century is the cloud chamber. The chamber makes visible cosmic particles that we are exposed to radiation per second. Diffusion cloud chamber is a kind of cloud chamber that is cooled by dry ice. This traditional model has some application difficulties. In this work, Peltier-based cloud chamber cooled by thermoelectric modules is studied. The new model provided uniformly cooled base of the chamber, moreover, it has longer lifetime than the traditional chamber in terms of observation time. This gain has reduced the costs which spent each time for cosmic particle observation. The chamber is an easy-to-use system according to traditional diffusion cloud chamber. The new model is portable, easier to make, and can be used in the nuclear physics experiments. In addition, it would be very useful to observe Muons which are the direct evidence for Lorentz contraction and time expansion predicted by Einsteins special relativity principle.

  9. Automation and instrument control applied to an experimental study of electron transport dynamics in an avalanche mode resistive plater chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R.

    2009-01-01

    In this work it is presented a computer based instrumentation system which was developed to perform data acquisition and integrate the control of different devices in an experimental study of electron transport dynamics in an avalanche mode resistive plate chamber detector in the Radiation Technology Center (CTR) at IPEN/CNEN-SP. System control and data acquisition was performed by a computer program called RPCLabOperator written in MatLab environment running on a LeCroy WavePro 7000 digital oscilloscope. (author)

  10. Study of microstrip gas chambers for CMS experiment and measurement of the W boson mass in the DELPHI experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripp-Baudot, I.

    2004-06-01

    In this document the author describes 3 fields of his research activities: first, the development and validation tests of micro-strip gas chambers for the CMS experiment; secondly, the measurements of the W boson mass and width by analysing the events: e + e - → W + W - → qq-bar qq-bar whose data have been collected in the DELPHI experiment (at the LEP-2 accelerator); and thirdly, the tagging of b-jets that is an essential tool for the study of the top quark. The last chapter is dedicated to what is expected from LHC experiments concerning the properties of the quark top: mass, spin, production and decay channels

  11. Primary pollutants and potential photochemical smog formation in Makkah, Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasralla, M.M.; Seroji, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    This study was conducted in Mina Valley and the central district of the holy city, Makkah, during the pilgrimage (Hajj) season of 1424 Hijri (2004). During this season, more than 2.5 million people gathered in Makkah to perform the Hajj rituals. Two mobile air pollution laboratories were used to monitor NO, NO2, NOx, non-methane hydrocarbons and ozone (O3) in the atmosphere in Mina and Makkah. Instruments were calibrated periodically against standard gases. The present investigation showed clearly an ideal diurnal cycle of local ozone formation. Although the intensity of the incoming UV radiation was the lowest compared with other months of the year, recorded ozone levels approached the maximum allowable levels of 150 ug/m3 in Mina, and exceeded 160 ug/m3 in Makkah during the pilgrimage period. The problem was intensified by the high record levels NOx, sometimes reaching more than 800 ug/m3, 1h average, coupled with 1h average concentration of about 3 ppm non-methane hydrocarbons. Furthermore, the average maximum hourly ozone concentrations increased gradually from less than 60 ug/m3 during February to reach more than 200 ug/m3 (as an indication of smog formation) during some days of May. This coincides with the increase in the intensity of the incoming UV radiation reaching its maximum level in May. Consequently, it can be concluded that Makkah may face severe air pollution episodes when the pilgrimage season shifts to the summer months in the next few years. This may pose acute health problems for the elderly people and those with respiratory health problems. Good air quality and transportation management as well as the use of alternative clean fuel are highly recommended. (author)

  12. Effect of Propafenone on the Contractile Activity of Latissimus Dorsi Muscle Isolated in an Organ Chamber: Experimental Study in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Simões

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of propafenone on the contractile function of latissimus dorsi muscle isolated from rats in an organ chamber. METHODS: We studied 20 latissimus dorsi muscles of Wistar rats and divided them into 2 groups: group I (n=10, or control group - we studied the feasibility of muscle contractility; group II (n=10, in which the contralateral muscles were grouped - we analyzed the effect of propafenone on muscle contractility. After building a muscle ring, 8 periods of sequential 2-minute baths were performed, with intervals of preprogrammed electrical stimulation using a pacemaker of 50 stimuli/min. In group II, propafenone, at the concentration of 9.8 µg/mL, was added to the bath in period 2 and withdrawn in period 4. RESULTS: In group I, no significant depression in muscle contraction occurred up to period 5 (p>0.05. In group II, a significant depression occurred in all periods, except between the last 2 periods (p0.05. CONCLUSION: Propafenone had a depressing effect on the contractile function of latissimus dorsi muscle isolated from rats and studied in an organ chamber.

  13. Studies of gaseous multiplication coefficient in isobutane using a resistive plate chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Botelho, Suzana; Tobias, Carmen C.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUC/SP), SP (Brazil); Lima, Iara B.; Vivaldini, Tulio C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Lab. do Acelerador Linear; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dept. de fisica. Lab. de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Due to the increasing demands concerning High Energy Physics, Nuclear Medicine and other Nuclear Applications about gaseous detectors operating in high electric fields, many efforts have been done about the choice of filling gases that fulfill these requirements. In this context, the electron transport parameters in gases, as the gaseous multiplication coefficient, play an important role not only for detector design but also for simulation and modeling of discharges, allowing the validation of electron impact cross-sections. In the present work the preliminary measurements of gaseous multiplication coefficient, as function of the reduced electric field (from 36V/cm.Torr until 93V/cm.Torr), for isobutane are presented. Among several filling gases, isobutane is widely used in resistive plate chambers RPCs, and other gaseous detectors, due to its timing properties. Although its characteristics, there is a lack of swarm parameters data in literature for this gas, mainly at high electric fields. The experimental method used is based on the Pulsed Townsend technique, which follows from Townsend equation solution for a uniform electric field. Considering the ratio between the current (I), measured in avalanche mode, and the primary ionization current (I{sub 0}), the effective multiplication coefficient can be determined, since alpha = d{sup -1}ln(I/I{sub 0}), where d is the gap between the electrodes. In our configuration, the experimental setup consists of two parallel plates enclosure in a stainless steel chamber at gas flow regime. The anode, is made of a high resistivity (2.10{sup 12}{omega}.cm) glass (3mm thick and 14mm diameter), while the cathode is of aluminium (40mm diameter). Primary electrons are produced by irradiating the cathode with a nitrogen laser (LTB MNL200-LD) and are accelerated toward the anode by means of a high voltage power supply (Bertan 225-30). In order to validate the technique and to analyze effects of non-uniformity, results for

  14. Doriot Climatic Chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Doriot Climatic Chambers are two, 60-feet long, 11-feet high, 15-feet wide chambers that are owned and operated by NSRDEC. The Doriot Climatic Chambers are among...

  15. Increases of Chamber Height and Base Diameter Have Contrasting Effects on Grazing Rate of Two Cladoceran Species: Implications for Microcosm Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ying; Zhang, Yunshu; Peng, Yan; Zhao, Qinghua; Sun, Shucun

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic microcosm studies often increase either chamber height or base diameter (to increase water volume) to test spatial ecology theories such as “scale” effects on ecological processes, but it is unclear whether the increase of chamber height or base diameter have the same effect on the processes, i.e., whether the effect of the shape of three-dimensional spaces is significant. We orthogonally manipulated chamber height and base diameter and determined swimming activity, average swimming velocity and grazing rates of the cladocerans Daphnia magna and Moina micrura (on two algae Scenedesmus quadricauda and Chlorella vulgaris; leading to four aquatic algae-cladoceran systems in total) under different microcosm conditions. Across all the four aquatic systems, increasing chamber height at a given base diameter significantly decreased the duration and velocity of horizontal swimming, and it tended to increase the duration but decrease the velocity of vertical swimming. These collectively led to decreases in both average swimming velocity and grazing rate of the cladocerans in the tall chambers (at a given base diameter), in accordance with the positive relationship between average swimming velocity and grazing rate. In contrast, an increase of base diameter at a given chamber height showed contrasting effects on the above parameters. Consistently, at a given chamber volume increasing ratio of chamber height to base diameter decreased the average swimming velocity and grazing rate across all the aquatic systems. In general, increasing chamber depth and base diameter may exert contrasting effects on zooplankton behavior and thus phytoplankton-zooplankton interactions. We suggest that spatial shape plays an important role in determining ecological process and thus should be considered in a theoretical framework of spatial ecology and also the physical setting of aquatic microcosm experiments. PMID:26273836

  16. The little holographic bubble chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herve, A.

    1983-01-01

    The lifetime study of the charmed particles has readvanced the idea to use holography for the little fast-cycle bubble chambers. A pilot experiment has been realised in 1982 with a little bubble chamber filled up with freon-115. 40000 holograms have been recorded [fr

  17. Impact of choice of future climate change projection on growth chamber experimental outcomes: a preliminary study in potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisner, Courtney P.; Wood, Joshua C.; Vaillancourt, Brieanne; Tang, Ying; Douches, Dave S.; Robin Buell, C.; Winkler, Julie A.

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the impacts of climate change on agriculture is essential to ensure adequate future food production. Controlled growth experiments provide an effective tool for assessing the complex effects of climate change. However, a review of the use of climate projections in 57 previously published controlled growth studies found that none considered within-season variations in projected future temperature change, and few considered regional differences in future warming. A fixed, often arbitrary, temperature perturbation typically was applied for the entire growing season. This study investigates the utility of employing more complex climate change scenarios in growth chamber experiments. A case study in potato was performed using three dynamically downscaled climate change projections for the mid-twenty-first century that differ in terms of the timing during the growing season of the largest projected temperature changes. The climate projections were used in growth chamber experiments for four elite potato cultivars commonly planted in Michigan's major potato growing region. The choice of climate projection had a significant influence on the sign and magnitude of the projected changes in aboveground biomass and total tuber count, whereas all projections suggested an increase in total tuber weight and a decrease in specific gravity, a key market quality trait for potato, by mid-century. These results demonstrate that the use of more complex climate projections that extend beyond a simple incremental change can provide additional insights into the future impacts of climate change on crop production and the accompanying uncertainty.

  18. Studies of cosmic ray events in ATLAS sTGC muon chamber prototypes

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2097847; Warburton, Andreas

    Four years after its first long shutdown in 2015, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be shut down once more for a luminosity upgrade. During that time, the ATLAS detector on the LHC ring will also follow an upgrade program, one upgrade being the replacement of the Small Muon Wheels for a New Small Wheel containing small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGCs). The sTGCs built in Canada will be tested at McGill University before their installation in ATLAS. A testing facility has been constructed and a 40 × 60 cm^2 sTGC prototype has been used to deliver preliminary measurements from cosmic rays. This thesis will present the development of a robust tracking algorithm which can handle extra clusters and multiple tracks in an sTGC detector. This algorithm also categorizes events based on their number of clusters and tracks. By modifying the trigger time window of the sTGC prototype, the evolution of the distribution of events over this categorization is shown.

  19. Study of D+ → K-π+π+ selection using the vertex drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, K.

    1986-01-01

    Use of the vertex chamber information allows us to select D + → K - α + α + decays in Z → c anti c (Z → b anti b) events with an overall efficiency of about 15% (9%) for a signal-to-background ratio of about 4 (2). The physics which can be done with these selected decays depends on the size of the Z sample. In a sample of 10,000 hadronic Z decays, we could expect to tag about 16 D + from Z → c anti c and 11 D + from Z → b anti b events. There would be a few clean examples of b → c cascade decays where both decay vertices are well measured. With 100,000 Z decays, a good measurement of the D + production rate and x/sub D/ distribution in Z → c anti c and Z → b anti b decays could be made. We also may be able to make a reasonable measurement of the fraction of D + which have neutral parents. The D + sample could be combined with other b and c quark tagged samples to measure the Z decay assymmetry. With 1,000,000 Z decays we would have a fair chance to measure the average D + parent lifetime in Z → b anti b events. If the fraction of D + decays having neutral parents is sufficiently close to one, we could measure the charged and neutral B lifetimes

  20. Simulations of smog-chamber experiments using the two-dimensional volatility basis set: linear oxygenated precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Madrid, Heber J; Murphy, Benjamin N; Pandis, Spyros N; Donahue, Neil M

    2012-10-16

    We use a two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) box model to simulate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass yields of linear oxygenated molecules: n-tridecanal, 2- and 7-tridecanone, 2- and 7-tridecanol, and n-pentadecane. A hybrid model with explicit, a priori treatment of the first-generation products for each precursor molecule, followed by a generic 2D-VBS mechanism for later-generation chemistry, results in excellent model-measurement agreement. This strongly confirms that the 2D-VBS mechanism is a predictive tool for SOA modeling but also suggests that certain important first-generation products for major primary SOA precursors should be treated explicitly for optimal SOA predictions.

  1. Effect of latitude on the potential for formation of photochemical smog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neiboer, H [Central Laboratorium TNO, Delft, Netherlands; Carter, W P.L.; Lloyd, A C; Pitts, Jr, J N

    1976-01-01

    The effect of latitude on the potential for the formation of photochemical smog has been assessed. Calculations suggest that at the summer solstice, the integrated sunlight intensity at Rotterdam or Fairbanks (Alaska) is very similar to that in Los Angeles. Computations carried out, assuming the same pollutant emission inventory for the three locations, showed that ozone and PAN dosages depend more on the integrated light intensity than on the nature of the light intensity distribution with time. Therefore, if factors such as emissions and meteorological conditions are equal, the potential for significant photochemical smog formation during the summer months is similar for Los Angeles (34/sup 0/N) and northern cities such as Rotterdam (52/sup 0/N) and Nome or Fairbanks, Alaska (65/sup 0/N).

  2. Electro-smog; Elektrosmog. Ein Thema in aller Munde, doch viele Quellen sind wenig bekannt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thalmann, K. [Ecosens AG, Wallisellen (Switzerland); Gugler, M. [Schaffner EMV AG, Luterbach (Switzerland)

    2007-07-01

    This article deals with the topic of electro-smog - the non-ionising radiation produced by technical installations in low and high-frequency ranges. Various sources such as mobile telephones, radio and television and newer sources such as WLAN and Bluetooth are discussed. The correct installation of electrical circuits in buildings is considered as being a simple and effective means of reducing mains-frequency electro-smog. Effects on human beings are discussed and regulations concerning protection against non-ionising radiation are examined. The fact that certain electrical and magnetic fields such as those caused by cookers, vacuum cleaners and hair-dryers are short term, whereas radio-alarms, laptops and charging stations are quasi-continuous sources. Also the placing of boilers and refrigerators is considered. The specific absorption rate (SAR) value for mobile telephones is also looked at and recommendations are made on keeping distance to electro-magnetic sources.

  3. Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber comprises a power anechoic chamber and one transverse electromagnetic cell for characterizing radiofrequency (RF) responses of...

  4. Multiple chamber ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, E.E.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-chambered ionisation detector enables the amount of radiation entering each chamber from a single radioactive, eg β, source to be varied by altering the proportion of the source protruding into each chamber. Electrodes define chambers and an extended radioactive source is movable to alter the source length in each chamber. Alternatively, the source is fixed relative to outer electrodes but the central electrode may be adjusted by an attached support altering the chamber dimensions and hence the length of source in each. Also disclosed are a centrally mounted source tiltable towards one or other chamber and a central electrode tiltable to alter chamber dimensions. (U.K.)

  5. Liquid Wall Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  6. Comparison of Geometrical Layouts for a Multi-Box Aerosol Model from a Single-Chamber Dispersion Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander C. Ø. Jensen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Models are increasingly used to estimate and pre-emptively calculate the occupational exposure of airborne released particulate matter. Typical two-box models assume instant and fully mixed air volumes, which can potentially cause issues in cases with fast processes, slow air mixing, and/or large volumes. In this study, we present an aerosol dispersion model and validate it by comparing the modelled concentrations with concentrations measured during chamber experiments. We investigated whether a better estimation of concentrations was possible by using different geometrical layouts rather than a typical two-box layout. A one-box, two-box, and two three-box layouts were used. The one box model was found to underestimate the concentrations close to the source, while overestimating the concentrations in the far field. The two-box model layout performed well based on comparisons from the chamber study in systems with a steady source concentration for both slow and fast mixing. The three-box layout was found to better estimate the concentrations and the timing of the peaks for fluctuating concentrations than the one-box or two-box layouts under relatively slow mixing conditions. This finding suggests that industry-relevant scaled volumes should be tested in practice to gain more knowledge about when to use the two-box or the three-box layout schemes for multi-box models.

  7. Applications of the three-dimensional air quality system to western U.S. air quality: IDEA, smog blog, smog stories, airquest, and the remote sensing information gateway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Raymond; Zhang, Hai; Jordan, Nikisa; Prados, Ana; Engel-Cox, Jill; Huff, Amy; Weber, Stephanie; Zell, Erica; Kondragunta, Shobha; Szykman, James; Johns, Brad; Dimmick, Fred; Wimmers, Anthony; Al-Saadi, Jay; Kittaka, Chieko

    2009-08-01

    A system has been developed to combine remote sensing and ground-based measurements of aerosol concentration and aerosol light scattering parameters into a three-dimensional view of the atmosphere over the United States. Utilizing passive and active remote sensors from space and the ground, the system provides tools to visualize particulate air pollution in near real time and archive the results for retrospective analyses. The main components of the system (Infusing satellite Data into Environmental Applications [IDEA], the U.S. Air Quality Weblog [Smog Blog], Smog Stories, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's AIRQuest decision support system, and the Remote Sensing Information Gateway [RSIG]) are described, and the relationship of how data move from one system to another is outlined. To provide examples of how the results can be used to analyze specific pollution episodes, three events (two fires and one wintertime low planetary boundary layer haze) are discussed. Not all tools are useful at all times, and the limitations, including the sparsity of some data, the interference caused by overlying clouds, etc., are shown. Nevertheless, multiple sources of data help a state, local, or regional air quality analyst construct a more thorough picture of a daily air pollution situation than what one would obtain with only surface-based sensors.

  8. SMOG@ctbp: simplified deployment of structure-based models in GROMACS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Jeffrey K; Whitford, Paul C; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y; Onuchic, José N

    2010-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations with coarse-grained and/or simplified Hamiltonians are an effective means of capturing the functionally important long-time and large-length scale motions of proteins and RNAs. Structure-based Hamiltonians, simplified models developed from the energy landscape theory of protein folding, have become a standard tool for investigating biomolecular dynamics. SMOG@ctbp is an effort to simplify the use of structure-based models. The purpose of the web server is two fold. First, the web tool simplifies the process of implementing a well-characterized structure-based model on a state-of-the-art, open source, molecular dynamics package, GROMACS. Second, the tutorial-like format helps speed the learning curve of those unfamiliar with molecular dynamics. A web tool user is able to upload any multi-chain biomolecular system consisting of standard RNA, DNA and amino acids in PDB format and receive as output all files necessary to implement the model in GROMACS. Both C(alpha) and all-atom versions of the model are available. SMOG@ctbp resides at http://smog.ucsd.edu.

  9. Particle number concentration, size distribution and chemical composition during haze and photochemical smog episodes in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuemei; Chen, Jianmin; Cheng, Tiantao; Zhang, Renyi; Wang, Xinming

    2014-09-01

    The aerosol number concentration and size distribution as well as size-resolved particle chemical composition were measured during haze and photochemical smog episodes in Shanghai in 2009. The number of haze days accounted for 43%, of which 30% was severe (visibilitysmog episodes, about 5.89 times and 4.29 times those of clean days. The particle volume concentration and surface concentration in haze, photochemical smog and clean days were 102, 49, 15μm(3)/cm(3) and 949, 649, 206μm(2)/cm(3), respectively. As haze events got more severe, the number concentration of particles smaller than 50nm decreased, but the particles of 50-200nm and 0.5-1μm increased. The diurnal variation of particle number concentration showed a bimodal pattern in haze days. All soluble ions were increased during haze events, of which NH4(+), SO4(2-) and NO3(-) increased greatly, followed by Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Cl(-). These ions were very different in size-resolved particles during haze and photochemical smog episodes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. An improvement study on the closed chamber distillation system for recovery of renewable salts from salt wastes containing radioactive rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eun, H.C.; Cho, Y.Z.; Lee, T.K.; Kim, I.T.; Park, G.I.; Lee, H.S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an improvement study on the closed chamber distillation system for recovery of renewable salts from salt wastes containing radioactive rare earth compounds was performed to determine optimum operating conditions. It was very important to maintain the pressure in the distillation chamber below 10 Torr for a high efficiency (salt recovery >99 %) of the salt distillation. This required increasing the salt vaporization and condensation rates in the distillation system. It was confirmed that vaporization and condensation rates could be improved controlling the given temperature of top of the condensation chamber. In the distillation tests of the salt wastes containing rare earth compounds, the operation time at a given temperature was greatly reduced changing the given temperature of top of the condensation chamber from 780 to 700 deg C. (author)

  11. Establishment of a radon test chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chingjiang; Liu Chichang; Lin Yuming

    1993-01-01

    A walk-in type radon test chamber of 23 m 3 has been built for testing and calibration of radon measurement instruments. The environmental conditions of the test chamber can be varied within a wide range of values. The design objectives specification, monitoring instruments and testing results of this chamber are discussed. This test chamber is available for domestic radon researchers and its accuracy can be traced to the international standard. A routine intercomparison study will be held annually by using this chamber. Other tests like radon progeny and thoron standard may also be performed in this chamber. (1 fig.)

  12. Laser damage study of material of the first wall of target chamber of the future laser Megajoule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubern, Christelle

    1999-01-01

    Study on damage of carbon-like, boron carbide, and stainless steel materials by ultraviolet laser light, has been carried out at CEA/CESTA in France. This work was performed to help designing and dimensioning the target chamber of the future Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) facility to be used for Inertial Confinement Fusion research. The study revealed that depending the laser fluence, the considered materials were ablated in different manners. lt was demonstrated that at low fluence, damage of carbon-like and boron carbide occurs through a thermal-mechanical mechanism resulting in sputtering of material. At higher fluence, damage was driven by a thermal mechanism, dissipating heat inside material until phase change developed. For stainless steel material, failures were the result of heat absorption associated to physical changes only. To explain and validate the proposed mechanisms, theoretical and experimental works were performed and satisfactory results came out. (author) [fr

  13. Technical Note: A numerical test-bed for detailed ice nucleation studies in the AIDA cloud simulation chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Cotton

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere aerosol and cloud chamber of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe can be used to test the ice forming ability of aerosols. The AIDA chamber is extensively instrumented including pressure, temperature and humidity sensors, and optical particle counters. Expansion cooling using mechanical pumps leads to ice supersaturation conditions and possible ice formation. In order to describe the evolving chamber conditions during an expansion, a parcel model was modified to account for diabatic heat and moisture interactions with the chamber walls. Model results are shown for a series of expansions where the initial chamber temperature ranged from −20°C to −60°C and which used desert dust as ice forming nuclei. During each expansion, the initial formation of ice particles was clearly observed. For the colder expansions there were two clear ice nucleation episodes. In order to test the ability of the model to represent the changing chamber conditions and to give confidence in the observations of chamber temperature and humidity, and ice particle concentration and mean size, ice particles were simply added as a function of time so as to reproduce the observations of ice crystal concentration. The time interval and chamber conditions over which ice nucleation occurs is therefore accurately known, and enables the model to be used as a test bed for different representations of ice formation.

  14. Aging of plumes from emission sources based on chamber simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Deng, W.; Fang, Z.; Bernard, F.; Zhang, Y.; Yu, J.; Mellouki, A.; George, C.

    2017-12-01

    Study on atmospheric aging of plumes from emission sources is essential to understand their contribution to both secondary and primary pollutants occurring in the ambient air. Here we directly introduced vehicle exhaust, biomass burning plume, industrial solvents and cooking plumes into a smog chamber with 30 m3 fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon film reactor housed in a temperature-controlled enclosure, for characterizing primarily emitted air pollutants and for investigating secondarily formed products during photo-oxidation. Moreover, we also initiated study on the formation of secondary aerosols when gasoline vehicle exhaust is mixed with typical coal combustion pollutant SO2 or typical agricultural-related pollutant NH3. Formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from typical solvent toluene was also investigated in ambient air matrix in comparison with purified air matrix. Main findings include: 1) Except for exhaust from idling gasoline vehicles, traditional precursor volatile organic compounds could only explain a very small fraction of SOA formed from vehicle exhaust, biomass burning or cooking plumes, suggesting knowledge gap in SOA precursors; 2) There is the need to re-think vehicle emission standards with a combined primary and/or secondary contribution of vehicle exhaust to PM2.5 or other secondary pollutants such as ozone; 3) When mixed with SO2, the gasoline vehicle exhaust revealed an increase of SOA production factor by 60-200% and meanwhile SO2 oxidation rates increased about a factor of 2.7; when the aged gasoline vehicle exhaust were mixing with NH3, both particle number and mass concentrations were increasing explosively. These phenomenons implied the complex interaction during aging of co-existing source emissions. 4) For typical combination of "tolune+SO2+NOx", when compared to chamber simulation with purified air as matrix, both SOA formation and SO2 oxidation were greatly enhanced under ambient air matrix, and the enhancement

  15. Hybrid-bubble-chamber study of nucleon diffractive dissociation in 14-GeV/c π+-p collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, G.B.; Carroll, J.T.; Chaloupka, V.; Ballam, J.; Bouchez, J.; Herquet, P.; Linglin, D.; Moffeit, K.C.; Stevens, R.; Davidson, V.; Firestone, A.; Nagy, F.; Peck, C.; Rosenfeld, L.; Ely, R.; Grether, D.; Oddone, P.

    1978-01-01

    Two experiments to study the low-mass diffractive enhancement recoiling against a fast forward pion from π + p and π - p collisions at 14 GeV/c are described. Photographs of the SLAC 40-in. hydrogen bubble chamber were triggered by a downstream spectrometer when the missing mass, calculated on-line, was above 1.1 GeV. Evidence for a nonresonant mass peak at 1.35 GeV is presented, as well as for production of resonances at about 1.5 and 1.68 GeV. The data are presented as distributions in mass and momentum transfer, as well as moments and isocline plots of the decay angular distributions. Model-independent features are emphasized

  16. Growing and analyzing biofilms in flow chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the setup of flow chamber systems for the study of microbial biofilms, and methods for the analysis of structural biofilm formation. Use of flow chambers allows direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The biofilms in flow chambers develop under hydrodynamic......, and disassembly and cleaning of the system. In addition, embedding and fluorescent in situ hybridization of flow chamber-grown biofilms are addressed....

  17. Sensitivity of gaseous xenon ionisation chambers (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuhl, C.

    1960-01-01

    It seems advantageous to fill an ionization chamber with xenon gas when this chamber is used for measuring a low intensity and high energy electron or positron beam, or monitoring a gamma beam. In the study of 5 to 50 MeV electrons, xenon allows for the ionization chamber yield, an improvement of a factor 4,5. (author) [fr

  18. Glove box chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, M.E.; Cox, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    An environmental chamber is described which enables an operator's hands to have direct access within the chamber without compromising a special atmosphere within such chamber. A pair of sleeves of a flexible material are sealed to the chamber around associated access apertures and project outwardly from such chamber. Each aperture is closed by a door which is openable from within the sleeve associated therewith so that upon an operator inserting his hand and arm through the sleeve, the operator can open the door to have access to the interior of the chamber. A container which is selectively separable from the remainder of the chamber is also provided to allow objects to be transferred from the chamber without such objects having to pass through the ambient atmosphere. An antechamber permitting objects to be passed directly into the chamber from the ambient atmosphere is included. (auth)

  19. Running a marathon from -45°C to +55°C in a climate chamber: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kälin, Kaspar; Knechtle, Beat; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Mydlak, Karsten; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We describe a runner who completed a self-paced marathon (42.195 km) in a climate chamber with a temperature difference of 100°C, starting at an ambient temperature (Tambient) of -45°C and finishing at an Tambient of +55°C. Tambient was set at -45°C at the start, and was steadily increased at a rate of 1°C at 4.5-minute intervals to +55°C. Before the start, after every 10.5 km, and at the end of the marathon, body mass, urine, and sweat production were measured and samples of venous blood and urine were collected. The runner's temperature was recorded every 10 seconds at four sites, ie, the rectum for body core temperature (Tcore), and at the forehead, right wrist, and right ankle for surface temperatures (Tskin). The subject took 6.5 hours to complete the marathon, during which Tcore varied by 0.9°C (start 37.5°C, peak 38.4°C). The largest difference (∆) of Tskin was recorded at the ankle (∆16°C). The calculated amount of sweat produced increased by 888% from baseline. In the blood samples, myoglobin (+250%) showed the highest change. Of the pituitary hormones, somatotropic hormone (+391%) and prolactin (+221%) increased the most. Regarding fluid regulation hormones, renin (+1145%) and aldosterone (+313%) showed the greatest increase. These results show that running a marathon in a climate chamber with a total ∆Tambient of 100°C is possible, and that the Tambient to Tcore relationship is maintained. These results may offer insight into regulatory mechanisms to avoid hypothermia and hyperthermia. The same study is to be performed using more subjects with the same characteristics to validate the present findings.

  20. The OPAL vertex drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.R.; Elcombe, P.A.; Hill, J.C.; Roach, C.M.; Armitage, J.C.; Carnegie, R.K.; Estabrooks, P.; Hemingway, R.; Karlen, D.; McPherson, A.; Pinfold, J.; Roney, J.M.; Routenburg, P.; Waterhouse, J.; Hargrove, C.K.; Klem, D.; Oakham, F.G.; Carter, A.A.; Jones, R.W.L.; Lasota, M.M.B.; Lloyd, S.L.; Pritchard, T.W.; Wyatt, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    A high precision vertex drift chamber has been installed in the OPAL experiment at LEP. The design of the chamber and the associated readout electronics is described. The performance of the system has been studied using cosmic ray muons and the results of these studies are presented. A space resolution of 50 μm in the drift direction is obtained using the OPAL central detector gas mixture at 4 bar. (orig.)

  1. Dorsal skinfold chamber models in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schreiter, Jeannine

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/purpose: The use of dorsal skinfold chamber models has substantially improved the understanding of micro-vascularisation in pathophysiology over the last eight decades. It allows pathophysiological studies of vascularisation over a continuous period of time. The dorsal skinfold chamber is an attractive technique for monitoring the vascularisation of autologous or allogenic transplants, wound healing, tumorigenesis and compatibility of biomaterial implants. To further reduce the animals’ discomfort while carrying the dorsal skinfold chamber, we developed a smaller chamber (the Leipzig Dorsal Skinfold Chamber and summarized the commercial available chamber models. In addition we compared our model to the common chamber. Methods: The Leipzig Dorsal Skinfold Chamber was applied to female mice with a mean weight of 22 g. Angiogenesis within the dorsal skinfold chamber was evaluated after injection of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran with an Axio Scope microscope. The mean vessel density within the dorsal skinfold chamber was assessed over a period of 21 days at five different time points. The gained data were compared to previous results using a bigger and heavier dorsal skinfold model in mice. A PubMed and a patent search were performed and all papers related to “dorsal skinfold chamber” from 1 of January 2006 to 31 of December 2015 were evaluated regarding the dorsal skinfold chamber models and their technical improvements. The main models are described and compared to our titanium Leipzig Dorsal Skinfold Chamber model.Results: The Leipzig Dorsal Skinfold Chamber fulfils all requirements of continuous models known from previous chamber models while reducing irritation to the mice. Five different chamber models have been identified showing substantial regional diversity. The newly elaborated titanium dorsal skinfold chamber may replace the pre-existing titanium chamber model used in Germany so far, as it is smaller and lighter

  2. Characterization of PM10 and PM2.5 and associated heavy metals at the crossroads and urban background site in Zabrze, Upper Silesia, Poland, during the smog episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuszka, Jozef S; Rogula-Kozłowska, Wioletta; Zajusz-Zubek, Elwira

    2010-09-01

    The concentrations of seven heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Pb) associated with PM10 and PM2.5 at the crossroads and the background sites have been studied in Zabrze, Poland, during smog episodes. Although the background level was unusually elevated due to both high particulate emission from the industrial and municipal sources and smog favorable meteorological conditions, significant increase of the concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 as well as associated heavy metals in the roadside air compared to the urban background has been documented. The average daily difference between the roadside and corresponding urban background aerosol concentration was equal to 39.5 microg m(-3) for PM10 and 41.2 microg m(-3) for PM2.5. The highest levels of the studied metals in Zabrze appeared for iron carried by PM10 particles: 1,706 (background) and 28,557 ng m(-3) (crossroads). The lowest concentration level (in PM10) has been found for cadmium: 7 and 77 ng m(-3) in the background and crossroads site, respectively. Also the concentrations of heavy metals carried by the fine particles (PM2.5) were very high in Zabrze during the smog episodes. Concentrations of all studied metals associated with PM10 increased at the roadside compared to the background about ten times (one order) while metals contained in PM2.5 showed two to three times elevated concentrations (except Fe-five times and Cr-no increase).

  3. A compact multi-chamber setup for degradation and lifetime studies of organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gevorgyan, Suren; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Krebs, Frederik C

    2011-01-01

    A controlled atmosphere setup designed for long-term degradation studies of organic solar cells under illumination is presented. The setup was designed with ease-of-use and compactness in mind and allows for multiple solar cells distributed on four glass substrates to be studied in four different...

  4. The central drift chamber of the SAPHIR detector - implementation into the experiment and study of its properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    At the Bonn accelerator facility ELSA the large solid angle detector SAPHIR was built for the investigation of photon induced reactions. A main component of SAPHIR is the central drift chamber (CDC) matching the magneto gap of 1m 3 . The diameter of the in total 1828 hexagonal drift cells is about 18 mm. The subject of this paper is the implementation of the CDC in the experiment. After the description of the hardware follows the presentation of the software tools for filtering and monitoring the data, which have been developed and tested. An algorithm for extracting the space time relationship is presented. The properties of the chamber with an improved gas mixture (Helium/Neon/Isobutane8 21.25:63.75:15) have been investigated. A spatial resolution of about 200 μm was achieved. The efficiency of the chamber is 97% at a tagged photon of 5x10 4 per second crossing the chamber. (orig.) [de

  5. Inhalation of Simulated Smog Atmospheres Affects Cardiac Function in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The health effects of individual criteria air pollutants have been well investigated. However, little is known about the health effects of air pollutant mixtures that more realistically represent environmental exposures. The present study was designed to evaluate the cardiac eff...

  6. Inhalation of Simulated Smog Affects Cardiac Function in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: The health effects of individual criteria air pollutants have been well investigated. Little is known about health effects of inhaled multi-pollutant mixtures that more realistically represent environmental exposures. The present study was designed to evaluate the card...

  7. Smog episodes in the Lodz agglomeration in the years 2014-17

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wielgosiński Grzegorz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, in the winter season we are alarmed about the poor air quality in Poland and significantly exceeded permissible concentrations of certain pollutants, especially PM10 and PM2.5, which are a result of so-called low emissions. The authors analyze smog episodes in the Lodz agglomeration by comparing the recorded values of selected pollutant concentrations at monitoring stations of the Regional Inspectorate for Environmental Protection in Lodz with the meteorological conditions prevailing at this time. The analysis covers data from the years 2014-2017.

  8. Smog episodes in the Lodz agglomeration in the years 2014-17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielgosiński, Grzegorz; Czerwińska, Justyna; Namiecińska, Olga; Cichowicz, Robert

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, in the winter season we are alarmed about the poor air quality in Poland and significantly exceeded permissible concentrations of certain pollutants, especially PM10 and PM2.5, which are a result of so-called low emissions. The authors analyze smog episodes in the Lodz agglomeration by comparing the recorded values of selected pollutant concentrations at monitoring stations of the Regional Inspectorate for Environmental Protection in Lodz with the meteorological conditions prevailing at this time. The analysis covers data from the years 2014-2017.

  9. Relationship between subjective symptom classifications in photochemical smog incidents and air pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noushi, H; Nagasaki, M; Mizoguchi, I

    1973-04-01

    Investigation was conducted twice on 74 and 50 junior high school students having subjective symptoms of injury from smog on June 25 and July 8 of 1972. Among the first group there were 27 cases of headache, 18 cases of weakness, 13 cases of malaise, 11 cases of eye irritation, 9 cases of throat pain, and others. The second group showed a comparable number of cases for each individual symptom. Classification of the symptoms and pollution index showed relationships between oxidants and breathing difficulties, numbness of hands and legs, and throat pain, and also relationships between sulfur dioxide and eye irritation, throat pain, weakness, malaise, coughing, and dizziness.

  10. Systematic studies on the reconstruction efficiency and accuracy of a track drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelshaeuser, H.

    1993-02-01

    The author has studied the reconstruction efficiency of the NA35-TPC by means of a simulation of the tracks by means of laser radiation. He has obtained results on the diffusion constant and the track resolution. (HSI) [de

  11. Vacuum Chamber Construction and Contamination Study of A Micro Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Debevec, Jacob H

    2006-01-01

    .... This study examines the deposition profile and rate of particle emission from the thruster so that satellite designers understand any potential contamination issues with sensitive instruments and solar panels...

  12. Study of abrasive wear process of lining of grinding chamber of vortex-acoustic disperser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelygin, D. N.

    2018-03-01

    The theoretical and experimental studies of the process of gas-abrasive wear of the lining of a vortex-acoustic disperser made it possible to establish the conditions and patterns of their occurrence and also to develop proposals for its reduction.

  13. Tackling Air Pollution in China—What do We Learn from the Great Smog of 1950s in LONDON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyong Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the prolonged, severe smog that blanketed many Chinese cities in first months of 2013, living in smog has become “normal” to most people living in mainland China. This has not only caused serious harm to public health, but also resulted in massive economic losses in many other ways. Tackling the current air pollution has become crucial to China’s long-term economic and social sustainable development. This paper aims to find the causes of the current severe air quality and explore the possible solutions by reviewing the current literature, and by comparing China’s air pollution regulations to that of the post London Killer Smog of 1952, in the United Kingdom (UK. It is hoped that China will learn the lesson from the UK, and decouple its economic growth from the detrimental impact of environment. Policy suggestions are made.

  14. Study on alumina-alumina brazing for application in vacuum chambers of proton synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, D.P.; Kaul, R.; Ganesh, P.; Shiroman, Ram; Tiwari, Pragya; Sridhar, R.; Kukreja, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes an experimental study to standardize vacuum brazing process to obtain satisfactory high purity alumina brazed joints for application in rapid cycle proton synchrotron machine. Two different brazing routes, adopted for making alumina-alumina brazed joints, included (i) multi-step Mo-Mn metallization and brazing with BVAg-8 alloy and (ii) advanced single-step active brazing with CuSil-ABA alloy. Brazed alumina specimens, prepared by both the routes, yielded ultra high vacuum compatible, helium leak tight and bakeable joints. Active-brazed specimens exhibited satisfactory strength values in tensile and four-point bend tests. Metallized-brazed specimens, although exhibited relatively lower tensile strength than the targeted value, displayed satisfactory flexural strength in four-point bend test. The results of the study demonstrated that active brazing is the simple and cost effective alternative to conventional metallization route for producing satisfactory brazed joints for application in rapid cycle proton synchrotron machine. (author)

  15. Study of gas emission from the internal chambers of cryogenic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyash, Y.I.; Fel'dman, R.G.; Ivakhnenko, Z.N.; Myasnikov, V.M.

    1986-01-01

    One of the methods of improving the efficiency of cryogenic gas equipment (CGE) is adsorption purification of the working medium. The type and quantity of adsorben can be decided after knowing the qualitative and quantitative nature of gas emissions. Gas emissions were studied by the chromatographic method using a heat-conduction detectory. This method made it possible to determine simultaneously the impurities which differ significantly in terms of physicochemical properties. It was established that carbon dioxide and hydrocarbons are continuously emitted in the gaseous medium of the CGE at a constant rate. For the type of machine which was studied, the rates of gas emission were as follows: carbon dioxide and ethane - 0.2 mg/h; ethylene and methane - 0.1 mg/h; propylene, N-butane, and isobutane - 0.2 mg/h

  16. Studies of MicroMeGas Chambers for the New Small Wheel using Cosmic Muons

    CERN Document Server

    Klapdor-kleingrothaus, Thorwald; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Micromesh Gaseous Detectors (MicroMeGas) will be implemented in the ATLAS detector in the framework of the New Small Wheel Upgrade during the long shut down II in 2019/20. These detectors are used for position measurement and have a high spatial resolution of 100 μm. In parallel to the ongoing constructions of the later modules, additional performance studies with small MicroMeGas prototypes of a size of 10 × 10 cm$^2$ are performed. These studies include a cosmic muon test setup in combination with a scalable readout system, such that the influences of variations in the pressure of the operation gas or changes in the humidity at the lower ppm level to the detector performance are investigated. These parameters will impact the later design of the slow control system at the New Small Wheel in ATLAS.

  17. Studies of MicroMegas Chamber for the New Small Wheel using Cosmic Muons

    CERN Document Server

    Klapdor-kleingrothaus, Thorwald; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Micromesh Gaseous (MicroMegas) Detectors will be implemented in the ATLAS detector in the framework of the New Small Wheel Upgrade during the long shut down II in 2019/20. These detectors are used for position measurement and have a high spatial resolution of 100$\\mu$m. In parallel to the ongoing constructions of the later modules, additional performance studies with small MicroMegas prototypes of a size of 10 $\\times$ 10 cm$^2$ are performed. The studies include a cosmic muon test stand in combination with a scalable readout system, such that the influences of variations in the pressure of the operation gas or changes in the humidity at the lower ppm level to the detector performance are investigated. These parameters will impact the later design of detector slow control system at the New Small Wheel in ATLAS.

  18. Study on out-gassing by baking and glow discharge during wall conditioning of vacuum chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiwen; Wei Weixing; Zhao Yuanqing; He Yanhe; Liao Yikui

    2007-01-01

    The model of out-gassing by baking and glow discharge cleaning (GDC) is set up. The properties of them are studied. Out-gassing by baking is from bulk and it obeys the diffusion equation. Out-gassing of glow discharge cleaning is mainly on surface, it is inducement out-gassing by sputtering. Thus the properties of out-gassing for baking and GDC on the HL-1M tokamak are analyzed. Some empirical formulas are given. (authors)

  19. A two-dimensional numerical study of the flow inside the combustion chamber of a motored rotary engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, T. I-P.; Yang, S. L.; Schock, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to investigate the unsteady, multidimensional flow inside the combustion chambers of an idealized, two-dimensional, rotary engine under motored conditions. The numerical study was based on the time-dependent, two-dimensional, density-weighted, ensemble-averaged conservation equations of mass, species, momentum, and total energy valid for two-component ideal gas mixtures. The ensemble-averaged conservation equations were closed by a K-epsilon model of turbulence. This K-epsilon model of turbulence was modified to account for some of the effects of compressibility, streamline curvature, low-Reynolds number, and preferential stress dissipation. Numerical solutions to the conservation equations were obtained by the highly efficient implicit-factored method of Beam and Warming. The grid system needed to obtain solutions were generated by an algebraic grid generation technique based on transfinite interpolation. Results of the numerical study are presented in graphical form illustrating the flow patterns during intake, compression, gaseous fuel injection, expansion, and exhaust.

  20. A two-dimensional numerical study of the flow inside the combustion chambers of a motored rotary engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, T. I. P.; Yang, S. L.; Schock, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to investigate the unsteady, multidimensional flow inside the combustion chambers of an idealized, two-dimensional, rotary engine under motored conditions. The numerical study was based on the time-dependent, two-dimensional, density-weighted, ensemble-averaged conservation equations of mass, species, momentum, and total energy valid for two-component ideal gas mixtures. The ensemble-averaged conservation equations were closed by a K-epsilon model of turbulence. This K-epsilon model of turbulence was modified to account for some of the effects of compressibility, streamline curvature, low-Reynolds number, and preferential stress dissipation. Numerical solutions to the conservation equations were obtained by the highly efficient implicit-factored method of Beam and Warming. The grid system needed to obtain solutions were generated by an algebraic grid generation technique based on transfinite interpolation. Results of the numerical study are presented in graphical form illustrating the flow patterns during intake, compression, gaseous fuel injection, expansion, and exhaust.

  1. Dual ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallory, J.; Turlej, Z.

    1981-01-01

    Dual ionization chambers are provided for use with an electronic smoke detector. The chambers are separated by electrically-conductive partition. A single radiation source extends through the partition into both chambers, ionizing the air in each. The mid-point current of the device may be balanced by adjusting the position of the source

  2. Is smog innocuous? Air pollution and cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundeep Mishra

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is a significant environmental and health hazard. Earlier studies had examined the adverse health effects associated with short- and long-term exposure to particulate matter on respiratory disease. However, later studies demonstrated that was actually cardiovascular disease that accounted for majority of mortality. Furthermore, it was not gaseous pollutants like oxides of nitrate, sulfur, carbon mono-oxide or ozone but the particulate matter or PM, of fine or coarse size (PM2.5 and PM10 which was linearly associated with mortality; PM2.5 with long term and PM10 with short term. Several cardiovascular diseases are associated with pollution; acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias, atherosclerosis and cardiac arrest. The ideal way to address this problem is by adhering to stringent environmental standards of pollutants but some individual steps like choosing to stay indoors (on high pollution days, reducing outdoor air permeation to inside, purifying indoor air using air filters, and also limiting outdoor physical activity near source of air pollution can help. Nutritional anti-oxidants like statins or Mediterranean diet, and aspirin have not been associated with reduced risk but specific nutritional agents like broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower or brussels sprouts, fish oil supplement may help. Use of face-mask has been controversial but may be useful if particulate matter load is higher.

  3. Is smog innocuous? Air pollution and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sundeep

    Air pollution is a significant environmental and health hazard. Earlier studies had examined the adverse health effects associated with short- and long-term exposure to particulate matter on respiratory disease. However, later studies demonstrated that was actually cardiovascular disease that accounted for majority of mortality. Furthermore, it was not gaseous pollutants like oxides of nitrate, sulfur, carbon mono-oxide or ozone but the particulate matter or PM, of fine or coarse size (PM 2.5 and PM 10 ) which was linearly associated with mortality; PM 2.5 with long term and PM 10 with short term. Several cardiovascular diseases are associated with pollution; acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias, atherosclerosis and cardiac arrest. The ideal way to address this problem is by adhering to stringent environmental standards of pollutants but some individual steps like choosing to stay indoors (on high pollution days), reducing outdoor air permeation to inside, purifying indoor air using air filters, and also limiting outdoor physical activity near source of air pollution can help. Nutritional anti-oxidants like statins or Mediterranean diet, and aspirin have not been associated with reduced risk but specific nutritional agents like broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower or brussels sprouts, fish oil supplement may help. Use of face-mask has been controversial but may be useful if particulate matter load is higher. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Study of (α , p) and (α , n) reactions with a Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, M. L.; Rehm, K. E.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Dickerson, C.; Hoffman, C. R.; Jiang, C. L.; Kay, B. P.; Lai, J.; Nusair, O.; Pardo, R. C.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.; Talwar, R.; Ugalde, C.

    2017-07-01

    A large number of (α , p) and (α , n) reactions are known to play a fundamental role in nuclear astrophysics. This work presents a novel technique to study these reactions with the active target system MUSIC whose segmented anode allows the investigation of a large energy range of the excitation function with a single beam energy. In order to verify the method, we performed direct measurements of the previously measured reactions 17O (α , n) 20Ne, 23Na (α , p) 26Mg, and 23Na (α , n) 26Al. These reactions were investigated in inverse kinematics using 4He gas in the detector to study the excitation functions in the energy range of about 2-6 MeV in the center of mass. We found good agreement between the cross sections of the 17O (α , n) 20Ne reaction measured in this work and previous measurements. Furthermore we have successfully performed a simultaneous measurement of the 23Na (α , p) 26Mg and 23Na (α , n) 26Al reactions.

  5. Social acceptance towards the air pollution in China: Evidence from public's willingness to pay for smog mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Chuanwang; Yuan, Xiang; Yao, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution is one of the most predominant challenges in China. In order to ensure the smog governance projects could be promoted smoothly and the public shoulder the environmental responsibilities consciously, it is necessary for the policymakers to take public attitude into consideration, and understand the public willingness to pay (WTP) for smog mitigation. This paper adopts a CV method framework to assess the value of WTP and analyze the determinants. Given the consideration of the possible presence of the selectivity bias caused by protest responses, the bivariate sample selection model is constructed for estimation. Results show that up to 14% of respondents hold the protest responses, and neglecting the selection bias caused by protest responses would lead to downward biased estimates. The mean value of WTP for the smog mitigation is 1590.36 RMB per year, accounting for about 1% of annual income. Moreover, the NIMBY (not in my backyard) attitude among public is found to be significantly correlated with their WTP, and the other determinants such as household annual income, energy expenditure and economic loss caused by smog could also substantially affect the value of WTP. We further recommend grading governance and policy transparency to address the smog crisis. - Highlights: •Evaluating the social acceptance towards the air pollution in China. •Up to 14% of respondents hold the protest responses. •WTP for the smog mitigation accounts for about 1% of income. •Household energy expenditure is closely related with public's WTP. •The grading governance and policy transparency are recommended.

  6. Numerical Study on Turbulent Flow Inside a Channel with an Extended Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Tae; Lim, Hee Chang

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) study of turbulent flow around a cavity. A series of three-dimensional cavities placed in a turbulent boundary layer are simulated at a Reynolds number of 1.0 x 10 5 by considering U and h, which represent the velocity at the top and the depth of the cavity, respectively. In order to obtain the appropriate solution for the filtered Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible flow, the computational mesh forms dense close to the wall of the cavity but relatively coarse away from the wall; this helps reduce computation cost and ensure rapid convergence. The Boussinesq hypothesis is employed in the subgrid-scale turbulence model. In order to determine the subgrid-scale turbulent viscosity, the Smagorinsky-Lilly SGS model is applied and the CFL number for time marching is set as 1.0. The results show the flow variations inside cavities of different sizes and shapes

  7. Chamber propagation physics for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    Chamber transport is an important area of study for heavy ion fusion. Final focus and chamber-transport are high leverage areas providing opportunities to significantly decrease the cost of electricity from a heavy ion fusion power plant. Chamber transport in two basic regimes is under consideration. In the low chamber density regime (approx-lt 0.003 torr), ballistic or nearly-ballistic transport is used. Partial beam neutralization has been studied to offset the effects of beam stripping. In the high chamber density regime (approx-gt.1 torr), two transport modes (pinched transport and channel transport) are under investigation. Both involve focusing the beam outside the chamber then transporting it at small radius (∼ 2 mm). Both high chamber density modes relax the constraints on the beam quality needed from the accelerator which will reduce the driver cost and the cost of electricity

  8. Chamber propagation physics for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    Chamber transport is a key area of study for heavy ion fusion. Final focus and chamber transport are high leverage areas providing opportunities to decrease significantly the cost of electricity from a heavy ion fusion power plant. Chamber transport in two basic regimes is under consideration. In the low chamber density regime (below about 0.003 Torr), ballistic or nearly ballistic transport is used. Partial beam neutralization has been studied to offset the effects of beam stripping. In the high chamber density regime (above about 0.1 Torr), two transport modes (pinched transport and channel transport) are under investigation. Both involve focusing the beam outside the chamber and then transporting it at small radius (about 2 mm). Both high chamber density modes relax the constraints on the beam quality needed from the accelerator which will reduce the driver cost and the cost of electricity. (orig.)

  9. Study of Rare Beauty Decays with ATLAS Detector at LHC and MDT Chamber Perfomances

    CERN Document Server

    Policicchio, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a proton-proton collider that will operate at a center of mass energy of $14~TeV$ and at a maximum luminosity of $L=10^{34}cm^{-2}s^{-1}$. The LHC will reproduce interactions similar to those which existed when the universe was only $\\sim 10^{-12}s$ old, conditions which have not been achieved in any previous collider. The primary goals of the LHC project are to discover the origin of particle masses, to explain why different particles have different masses and to search for new phenomena beyond the Standard Model. Also heavy quark systems and precision measurements on Standard Model parameters will be subject of LHC physics studies. ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) is one of the two LHC general purpose experiments. The guiding principle in optimizing the ATLAS experiment has been maximizing the discovery potential for New Physics such as Higgs bosons and supersymmetric particles, while keeping the capability of high precision measurements of known objects such as heavy quar...

  10. Study of fast operating readout electronics and charge interpolation technique for micro cathode strip chambers (MCSC)

    CERN Document Server

    Kashchuk, A; Sagidova, Nailia

    1998-01-01

    Study of the factors limiting the spatial resolution of the MCSC caused by nonlinearity of the cathode-charge interpolation technique has been carried out using a special test arrangement that imitates the charge distribution on the cathode strips as a real MCSC and allows high precision comparison of the coordinates determined by the charge interpolation technique with the known values. We considered a MCSC with a 0.6 mm gap between the anode and the cathode strip planes and with the strip pitch of 0.9 mm. Various charge interpolation algorithms have been tested. It was demonstrated that the systematics errors in the coordinate measurements as low as 5 microns can be achieved, after applying some simple corrections, even with rather coarse sampling, when the coordinates is determined only by 2 or 3 adjacent strips. These results have been obtained with the readout electronics specially designed for fast operation of the MCSCs with the signal peaking time of 20 ns. The equivalent noise charge ss 1600e (r.m.s....

  11. Numerical studies of the integration of a trapped vortex combustor into traditional combustion chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrignani, L.; Losurdo, M.; Bruno, C. [Sapienza Univ. de Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    Exhaust emissions from furnace burners can be reduced by premixing reactants with combustion products. This paper discussed the use of a trapped vortex combustor (TVC) as a very promising technology for gas turbines. The TVC can reduce emissions and ensure that the temperature is uniform in the exhaust products, which is a key aspect for certain types of heat treatments, such as in steel rolling mills. The TVC for gas turbines is configured to mix air, fuel and hot products at turbulent scales fine enough to render the combustion mode flameless, or close to flameless. The vortex ensures a high recirculation factor between hot combustion products and reactants, and ultimately flame stability. In this study, the TVC configuration for an existing gas turbine was numerically investigated by means of RANS and LES. According to preliminary results of the fast-flameless combustion (FFC) strategy, the proposed TVC is a suitable candidate to reduce nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions while keeping the pressure drop below 1 per cent. Both RANS and LES show that too much fuel burns along the main duct. Better fuel splitting or a different position for the injectors may enhance combustion inside the recirculation zone. Behaviour of the main vortices showed that a more accurate design of the internal shape of the combustor is needed to prevent excessive velocity fluctuation or vortex instabilities and therefore emissions. 13 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Study of the linearity of CABRI experimental ionization chambers during RIA transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecerf, J.; Garnier, Y.; Hudelot, JP.; Duc, B.; Pantera, L.

    2018-01-01

    CABRI is an experimental pulse reactor operated by CEA at the Cadarache research center and funded by the French Nuclear Safety and Radioprotection Institute (IRSN). For the purpose of the CABRI International Program (CIP), operated and managed by IRSN under an OECD/NEA framework it has been refurbished since 2003 to be able to provide experiments in prototypical PWR conditions (155 bar, 300 °C) in order to study the fuel behavior under Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) conditions. This paper first reminds the objectives of the power commissioning tests performed on the CABRI facility. The design and location of the neutron detectors monitoring the core power are also presented. Then it focuses on the different methodologies used to calibrate the detectors and check the consistency and co-linearity of the measurements. Finally, it presents the methods used to check the linearity of the neutron detectors up to the high power levels ( 20 GW) reached during power transients. Some results obtained during the power tests campaign are also presented.

  13. Comparison of temperature rise in the pulp chamber with different light curing units: An in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh Ebenezar, A V; Anilkumar, R; Indira, R; Ramachandran, S; Srinivasan, M R

    2010-07-01

    This in vitro study was designed to measure and compare the temperature rise in the pulp chamber with different light curing units. The study was done in two settings-in-vitro and in-vivo simulation. In in-vitro setting, 3mm and 6mm acrylic spacers with 4mm tip diameter thermocouple was used and six groups were formed according to the light curing source- 3 Quartz-Tungsten-Halogen (QTH) units and 3 Light-Emitting-Diode (LED) units. For the LED units, three modes of curing like pulse-cure mode, fast mode and ramp mode were used. For in-vivo simulation, 12 caries free human third molar tooth with fused root were used. K-type thermocouple with 1 mm tip diameter was used. Occlusal cavity was prepared, etched, rinsed with water and blot dried; bonding agent was applied and incremental curing of composite was done. Thermal emission for each light curing agent was noted. Temperature rise was very minimal in LED light cure units than in QTH light cure units in both the settings. Temperature rise was minimal at 6mm distance when compared to 3 mm distance. Among the various modes, fast mode produces the less temperature rise. Temperature rise in all the light curing units was well within the normal range of pulpal physiology. Temperature rise caused due to light curing units does not result in irreversible pulpal damage.

  14. Experimental and numerical study of premixed hydrogen/air flame propagating in a combustion chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Huahua; Sun, Jinhua; Chen, Peng

    2014-03-15

    An experimental and numerical study of dynamics of premixed hydrogen/air flame in a closed explosion vessel is described. High-speed shlieren cinematography and pressure recording are used to elucidate the dynamics of the combustion process in the experiment. A dynamically thickened flame model associated with a detailed reaction mechanism is employed in the numerical simulation to examine the flame-flow interaction and effect of wall friction on the flame dynamics. The shlieren photographs show that the flame develops into a distorted tulip shape after a well-pronounced classical tulip front has been formed. The experimental results reveal that the distorted tulip flame disappears with the primary tulip cusp and the distortions merging into each other, and then a classical tulip is repeated. The combustion dynamics is reasonably reproduced in the numerical simulations, including the variations in flame shape and position, pressure build-up and periodically oscillating behavior. It is found that both the tulip and distorted tulip flames can be created in the simulation with free-slip boundary condition at the walls of the vessel and behave in a manner quite close to that in the experiments. This means that the wall friction could be unimportant for the tulip and distorted tulip formation although the boundary layer formed along the sidewalls has an influence to a certain extent on the flame behavior near the sidewalls. The distorted tulip flame is also observed to be produced in the absence of vortex flow in the numerical simulations. The TF model with a detailed chemical scheme is reliable for investigating the dynamics of distorted tulip flame propagation and its underlying mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Vertical gradients of nitrous acid (HONO) measured in Beijing during winter smog events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Louisa; Crilley, Leigh; Thomson, Steven; Bloss, William; Tong, Shengrui

    2017-04-01

    HONO is an important atmospheric constituent, as the photolysis of HONO leads to the formation of OH radicals in the boundary layer, with contributions of up to 60% in urban regions. This is particularly important in mega-cities, such as Beijing, where measured HONO levels can reach parts per billion. Research has shown that direct emissions, homogeneous gas phase reactions and heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on surfaces all contribute to HONO in urban areas. There are, however, still uncertainties regarding the magnitude of these sources, and models are still unable to account for total measured HONO mixing ratios. To assess the sources of HONO, vertical profile measurements were performed up to an altitude of 260 m on the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP) Meteorological Tower in Beijing. These measurements were performed as part of the Air Pollution and Human Health (APHH) project, during Nov/Dec 2016. Here we present HONO profile measurements using a long-path absorption photometer (LOPAP), during both clear and hazy days. HONO levels near the ground were very high during smog events with concentrations over 10 ppb observed. The data show a strong negative gradient with altitude, suggesting a source close to the surface. The largest gradients were observed overnight during smog events, with differences in HONO between the ground and the highest level up to 6 ppb.

  16. Double chamber ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uman, M.F.; Winnard, J.R.; Winters, H.F.

    1978-01-01

    The ion source is comprised of two discharge chambers one of which is provided with a filament and an aperture leading into the other chamber which in turn has an extraction orifice. A low voltage arc discharge is operated in an inert gas atmosphere in the filament chamber while an arc of higher voltage is operated in the second ionization chamber which contains a vapor which will give the desired dopant ion species. The entire source is immersed in an axial magnetic field parallel to a line connecting the filament, the aperture between the two chambers and the extraction orifice. (author)

  17. Stability of Streamer Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Toshiaki; Ogawa, Masato; Takahashi, Kaoru; Sugiyama, Tsunetoshi; Kobayashi, Shigeharu; Kohno, Hirobumi

    1982-08-01

    The quality of tracks obtained from a streamer chamber is studied through the measurement of the streamer brightness. The stability of streamer tracks depends on the value of the high voltage applied and its shape. By using a single conical-type spark gap as the pulse shaper, stable brightness of the streamer tracks is attained. The data on the streamer brightness are compared with the result by Bulos et al. and it is found that the brightness is more strongly affected by field parameters than in their result.

  18. Stability of streamer chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Toshiaki; Ogawa, Masato; Takahashi, Kaoru; Sugiyama, Tsunetoshi; Kobayashi, Shigeharu; Kohno, Hirobumi.

    1982-01-01

    The quality of tracks obtained from a streamer chamber is studied through the measurement of the streamer brightness. The stability of streamer tracks depends on the value of the high voltage applied and its shape. By using a single conical-type spark gap as the pulse shaper, stable brightness of the streamer tracks is attained. The data on the streamer brightness are compared with the result by Bulos et al. and it is found that the brightness is more strongly affected by field parameters than in their result. (author)

  19. Reactor oscillator project - Theoretical study; operation problems; choice of the ionization chamber; Projekat reaktorskog oscilatora - Teorijska razmatranja; Problematika rada, Izbor jonizacione komore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lolic, B; Markovic, V [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za fiziku reaktora, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Theoretical study of the reactor operator covers methods of the danger coefficient and the method based on measuring the phase angle. Operation with the reactor oscillator describes measurement of the cross section and resonance integral, measurement of the fissionable materials properties, measurement of impurities in the graphite sample. A separate chapter is devoted to the choice of the appropriate ionization chamber.

  20. Effect of photochemical smog associated with synoptic weather patterns on cardiovascular and respiratory hospital admissions in metropolitan Taipei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Li-Wei

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the relationship between photochemical smog (PS) (hourly ozone conc. >100 ppb), PS-related diseases, and the synoptic weather patterns during 2005-2009 in metropolitan Taipei. The results show that compared to respiratory ailments (ICD code 460-519) and asthma (ICD code 493), cardiovascular ailments (ICD code 390-459) were more clearly influenced by PS events. On the PS event day, the number of admissions of babies, children, and adults increased by 0.04 [95% CI 0.01-0.06], 0.03 [95% CI 0.00-0.07], and 1.12 [95% CI 0.36-1.89] (P < 0.05), respectively. The investigation showed that more than 70% of the PS events were associated primarily with the peripheral circulation of typhoons, Pacific pressure, and discrete Pacific pressure. PS events are a threat to public health. To avoid the ill effects of air pollution, residents should be informed about the daily weather patterns and air quality.

  1. Inhalable microorganisms in Beijing's PM2.5 and PM10 pollutants during a severe smog event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chen; Jiang, Wenjun; Wang, Buying; Fang, Jianhuo; Lang, Jidong; Tian, Geng; Jiang, Jingkun; Zhu, Ting F

    2014-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) air pollution poses a formidable public health threat to the city of Beijing. Among the various hazards of PM pollutants, microorganisms in PM2.5 and PM10 are thought to be responsible for various allergies and for the spread of respiratory diseases. While the physical and chemical properties of PM pollutants have been extensively studied, much less is known about the inhalable microorganisms. Most existing data on airborne microbial communities using 16S or 18S rRNA gene sequencing to categorize bacteria or fungi into the family or genus levels do not provide information on their allergenic and pathogenic potentials. Here we employed metagenomic methods to analyze the microbial composition of Beijing's PM pollutants during a severe January smog event. We show that with sufficient sequencing depth, airborne microbes including bacteria, archaea, fungi, and dsDNA viruses can be identified at the species level. Our results suggested that the majority of the inhalable microorganisms were soil-associated and nonpathogenic to human. Nevertheless, the sequences of several respiratory microbial allergens and pathogens were identified and their relative abundance appeared to have increased with increased concentrations of PM pollution. Our findings may serve as an important reference for environmental scientists, health workers, and city planners.

  2. Inhalable Microorganisms in Beijing’s PM2.5 and PM10 Pollutants during a Severe Smog Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) air pollution poses a formidable public health threat to the city of Beijing. Among the various hazards of PM pollutants, microorganisms in PM2.5 and PM10 are thought to be responsible for various allergies and for the spread of respiratory diseases. While the physical and chemical properties of PM pollutants have been extensively studied, much less is known about the inhalable microorganisms. Most existing data on airborne microbial communities using 16S or 18S rRNA gene sequencing to categorize bacteria or fungi into the family or genus levels do not provide information on their allergenic and pathogenic potentials. Here we employed metagenomic methods to analyze the microbial composition of Beijing’s PM pollutants during a severe January smog event. We show that with sufficient sequencing depth, airborne microbes including bacteria, archaea, fungi, and dsDNA viruses can be identified at the species level. Our results suggested that the majority of the inhalable microorganisms were soil-associated and nonpathogenic to human. Nevertheless, the sequences of several respiratory microbial allergens and pathogens were identified and their relative abundance appeared to have increased with increased concentrations of PM pollution. Our findings may serve as an important reference for environmental scientists, health workers, and city planners. PMID:24456276

  3. Studies of tungsten erosion at the inner and outer main chamber wall of the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabasso, A.; Maier, H.; Roth, J.; Krieger, K.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2001-03-01

    A critical issue for the choice of main chamber first wall materials in future fusion devices such as ITER is the erosion rate due to bombardment by charge-exchange (CX) neutrals. Due to the relatively small flux density of impacting particles, respective measurements are only possible using long term samples (LTS) exposed for a full experimental campaign. In ASDEX Upgrade, CX erosion has been studied extensively for tungsten on the inner heat shield by placing four W coated tiles at different poloidal positions in one toroidal sector. During the same campaign, several LTS were placed at different poloidal and toroidal positions of the outer wall. 13C and Cu coated graphite probes were also used in order to test and compare W low and medium Z alternatives. The erosion results from the probes are compared with the calculated erosion [W. Eckstein, C. Garcia-Rosales, J. Roth, W. Ottenberger IPP Report, IPP 9/82]; [H. Verbeek, J. Stober, D. Coster, W. Eckstein, R. Schneider Nucl. Fus. 38 (1998) 12] and a figure of merit (F. of M.) between several materials is proposed which also takes into account the plasma isotope effect in CX erosion.

  4. Studies of tungsten erosion at the inner and outer main chamber wall of the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabasso, A.; Maier, H.; Roth, J.; Krieger, K.

    2001-01-01

    A critical issue for the choice of main chamber first wall materials in future fusion devices such as ITER is the erosion rate due to bombardment by charge-exchange (CX) neutrals. Due to the relatively small flux density of impacting particles, respective measurements are only possible using long term samples (LTS) exposed for a full experimental campaign. In ASDEX Upgrade, CX erosion has been studied extensively for tungsten on the inner heat shield by placing four W coated tiles at different poloidal positions in one toroidal sector. During the same campaign, several LTS were placed at different poloidal and toroidal positions of the outer wall. 13 C and Cu coated graphite probes were also used in order to test and compare W low and medium Z alternatives. The erosion results from the probes are compared with the calculated erosion [W. Eckstein, C. Garcia-Rosales, J. Roth, W. Ottenberger IPP Report, IPP 9/82]; [H. Verbeek, J. Stober, D. Coster, W. Eckstein, R. Schneider Nucl. Fus. 38 (1998) 12] and a figure of merit (F. of M.) between several materials is proposed which also takes into account the plasma isotope effect in CX erosion

  5. Studies of ageing effects of Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00425540; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will be increased by up to seven times its design value by undergoing an extensive upgrade program over the coming decade. The largest upgrade project for the ATLAS Muon System is the replacement of the present first station in the forward regions with the so-called New Small Wheels (NSWs), to be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2019-2020. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) detectors are one chosen technology to provide fast trigger and high precision muon tracking under the high luminosity LHC conditions. The basic sTGC structure consists of a grid of gold-plated tungsten wires sandwiched between two resistive cathode planes at a small distance from the wire plane. We study ageing effects of sTGC detectors with a gas mixture of 55\\% of CO$_{2}$ and 45\\% of n-pentane. A sTGC detector was irradiated with beta-rays from a 10~mCi~$^{90}$Sr source. Three different gas flow rates were tested. We observed no deterioration on pulse height o...

  6. Studies of ageing effects of Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gignac, Matthew; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will be increased up to a factor of five with respect to the design value by undergoing an extensive upgrade program over the coming decade. The largest upgrade project for the ATLAS Muon System is the replacement of the present first station in the forward regions with the so-called New Small Wheels (NSWs), to be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2019/20. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) detectors are one chosen technology to provide fast trigger and high precision muon tracking under the high luminosity LHC conditions. The basic sTGC structure consists of a grid of gold-plated tungsten wires sandwiched between two resistive cathode planes at a small distance from the wire plane. We study ageing effects of sTGC detectors with a gas mixture of 55% of CO_2 and 45% of n-pentane. A sTGC detector was irradiated with beta-rays from a Sr-90 source. Three different gas flow rates were tested. We observed no deterioration on pulse height of...

  7. Study on the dose response characteristics of a scanning liquid ion-chamber electronic portal imaging device

    CERN Document Server

    Ma Shao Gang; Song Yi Xin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the dose response characteristics and the influence factors such as gantry angle, field size and acquisition mode on the dosimetric response curves, when using a scanning liquid ion-chamber electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for dose verification. Methods: All experiments were carried out on a Varian 600 C/D accelerator (6 MV X-ray) equipped with a Varian PortalVision sup T sup M MK2 type EPID. To obtain the dose response curve, the relationship between the incident radiation intensity to the detector and the pixel value output from the EPID were established. Firstly, the different dose rates of 6 MV X-rays were obtained by varying SSD. Secondly, three digital portal images were acquired for each dose rate using the EPID and averaged to avoid the influence of the dose rate fluctuations of the accelerator. The pixel values of all images were read using self-designed image analysis software, and and average for a region consisting of 11 x 11 pixels around the center was taken as the res...

  8. High-repetition-rate hydrogen chamber: Preliminary studies; Chambre a hydrogene a haut taux de repetition: Etudes preliminaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1967-01-01

    This report is a conclusion to the tests realised with an experimental bubbles chamber in view to study the possibilities to increase the repetition rate. The more important parameters (the evolution of the bubbles, the expansion system) are considered in a theoretical way. Then the hardware is described. To end, experimental results are compared with the first evaluations. The calculations and the experimentation are against an oscillation system for the expansion. A system with a locking is to he considered. (authors) [French] Ce rapport est une conclusion aux essais realises avec une chambre a bulles experimentale en vue d'etudier les possibilites d'accroitre les taux de repetition. Les parametres les plus importants (evolution des bulles, mecanique de la detente) sont etudies par voie theorique. Puis l'appareillage est decrit. Enfin, les resultats experimentaux sont compares aux evaluations donnees au debut. Ces calculs et cette experimentation ne sont pas en faveur d'un systeme oscillant pour la detente et il faut envisager un systeme avec verrouillage. (auteurs)

  9. An Experimental Study on the Macroscopic Spray Characteristics of Biodiesel and Diesel in a Constant Volume Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhan Xie

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the macroscopic spray characteristics of different 0%–100% blends of biodiesel derived from drainage oil and diesel (BD0, BD20, BD50, BD80, BD100, such as spray tip penetration, average tip velocity at penetration, spray angle, average spray angle, spray evolution process, spray area and spray volume under different injection pressures (60, 70, 80, 90, 100 MPa and ambient pressures (0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9 MPa using a common rail system equipped with a constant volume chamber. The characteristic data was extracted from spray images grabbed by a high speed visualization system. The results showed that the ambient pressure and injection pressure had significant effects on the spray characteristics. As the ambient pressure increased, the spray angle increased, while the spray tip penetration and the peak of average tip velocity decreased. As the injection pressure increased, the spray tip penetration, spray angle, spray area and spray volume increased. The increasing blend ratio of biodiesel brought about a shorter spray tip penetration and a smaller spray angle compared with those of diesel. This is due to the comparatively higher viscosity and surface tension of biodiesel, which enhanced the friction effect between fuel and the injector nozzle surface and inhibited the breakup of the liquid jet.

  10. Analytical study on water hammer pressure in pressurized conduits with a throttled surge chamber for slow closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-liang Zhang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analytical investigation of water hammer in a hydraulic pressurized pipe system with a throttled surge chamber located at the junction between a tunnel and a penstock, and a valve positioned at the downstream end of the penstock. Analytical formulas of maximum water hammer pressures at the downstream end of the tunnel and the valve were derived for a system subjected to linear and slow valve closure. The analytical results were then compared with numerical ones obtained using the method of characteristics. There is agreement between them. The formulas can be applied to estimating water hammer pressure at the valve and transmission of water hammer pressure through the surge chamber at the junction for a hydraulic pipe system with a surge chamber.

  11. A study to assess the long-term stability of the ionization chamber reference system in the LNMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade Filho, O. L.; Conceição, D. A.; da Silva, C. J.; Delgado, J. U.; de Oliveira, A. E.; Iwahara, A.; Tauhata, L.

    2018-03-01

    Ionization chambers are used as secondary standard in order to maintain the calibration factors of radionuclides in the activity measurements in metrology laboratories. Used as radionuclide calibrator in nuclear medicine clinics to control dose in patients, its long-term performance is not evaluated systematically. A methodology for long-term evaluation for its stability is monitored and checked. Historical data produced monthly of 2012 until 2017, by an ionization chamber, electrometer and 226Ra, were analyzed via control chart, aiming to follow the long-term performance. Monitoring systematic errors were consistent within the limits of control, demonstrating the quality of measurements in compliance with ISO17025.

  12. A study to assess the long-term stability of the ionization chamber reference system in the LNMRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filho, Octavio L.T.; Conceição, Dayana A. da; Silva, Carlos J. da; Delgado, José U.; Oliveira, Antônio E. de; Iwahara, Akira; Tauhata, Luiz, E-mail: octavio@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Ionization chambers are used as secondary standard in order to maintain the calibration factors of radionuclides in the activity measurements in metrology laboratories. Used as radionuclide calibrator in nuclear medicine clinics to control dose in patients, its long-term performance is not evaluated systematically. A methodology for long-term evaluation for its stability is monitored and checked. Historical data were analyzed via control chart, produced between 2012-2017 by an ionization chamber, electrometer and {sup 226}Ra, aiming to follow the long-term performance. The results for monitoring systematic errors were consistent within the limits of control, demonstrating the quality of measurements in compliance with ISO17025. (author)

  13. The vacuum chamber in the interaction region of particle colliders a historical study and developments implementations in the LHCb experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Knaster, J R; Gamez-Mejias, L

    2004-01-01

    The history of particle colliders begins in the early 60's when an idea previously patented by R. Wideroe in 1953 is constructed. The design of the vacuum chamber in their experimental area became essential as it was the rst physical barrier that the particles to be detected needed to traverse. The interaction of the products of the collisions with the vacuum chamber structural materials, hindered the identification of the significative events. This Thesis analyses the historical evolution of the experimental vacuum chambers and summarizes the technical criteria that are to be fulfilled. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) presently under construction at CERN is the last generation of particle colliders. Four big experiments will be in operation (ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and LHCb) in the LHC with diferent physics objectives. In particular, LHCb will be devoted to the study of CP violation and the design of its vacuum chamber is the scope of this Thesis. Physics simulations with an initial design consisting of a conical ...

  14. Ferrets’ (Mustela putorius furo) enrichment priorities and preferences as determined in a seven-chamber consumer demand study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijgwart, Marsinah Lusanne; Vinke, C.M.; Hendriksen, C.F.M.; Van Der Meer, Miriam; Schoemaker, N.J.; van Zeeland, Y.R.A.

    Knowledge of species-specific motivation and preferences for enrichment options is necessary to put in place an appropriate enrichment plan. This knowledge is currently lacking for ferrets. Therefore, seven female ferrets were consecutively housed in a seven-chamber closed economy consumer demand

  15. Algorithm for study on the stressed-strained state of thermonuclear device vacuum chambers under dynamic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuravleva, A.M.; Litvinov, V.B.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of dynamic analysis of stressed-strained state of vacuum chambers is vital for large thermonuclear devices during the stall of the plasma-filament apd other tpansitional operation regimes when loading for a chamber are nonstationary. To plot a mathematical model the design of the vacuum chamber is discreted on the basis of the method of final elements. To approximate vacuum shell, a plate triangular element with 3 joint points and 5 parameters in the joint is used. It is obtained due to the unity of the bemded element and the element for the flat problem. To investigate nonstationary oscillations of vacuum chambers discreted on the basis of the method of final elements, it is suggested to use the numeric conversion of the Japlace transformation. On the basis of the algorithm suggested a program of numerical function conversion is developed. Test calculations have shown a good stability of the algorithm when selecting the values of transformation parameter in the range of lower intrinsic system frequencies. The advantage of the above method is in the fact that the time-structure shift function is found instantly in the form of the series for the whole time interval and does not require temporary steps, which bring about large expenses of counting time and error accumulation

  16. Study on the stability of waterpower-speed control system for hydropower station with air cushion surge chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, W C; Yang, J D; Chen, J P; Teng, Y

    2014-01-01

    According to the fact that the effects of penstock, unit and governor on stability of water level fluctuation for hydropower station with air cushion surge chamber are neglected in previous researches, in this paper, Thoma assumption is broken through, the complete mathematical model of waterpower-speed control system for hydropower station with air cushion surge chamber is established, and the comprehensive transfer function and linear homogeneous differential equation that characterize the dynamic characteristics of system are derived. The stability domain that characterizes the good or bad of stability quantitatively is drawn by using the stability conditions. The effects of the fluid inertia in water diversion system, the air cushion surge chamber parameters, hydraulic turbine characteristics, generator characteristics, and regulation modes of governor on the stability of waterpower-speed control system are analyzed through stability domain. The main conclusions are as follows: The fluid inertia in water diversion system and hydraulic turbine characteristics have unfavorable effects on the system while generator characteristics have favorable effect. The stability keeps getting better with the increase of chamber height and basal area and the decrease of air pressure and air polytropic exponent. The stability of power regulation mode is obviously better than that of frequency regulation mode

  17. SU-E-I-08: An Inpaint-Based Interpolation Technique to Recover Blocked Information for Cone Beam CT with a Synchronized Moving Grid (SMOG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, V; Zhang, H; Jin, J; Ren, L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Synchronized moving grid (SMOG) is a promising technique to reduce scatter and ghost artifacts in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, the grid blocks part of image information in each projection, and multiple projections at the same gantry angle have to been taken to obtain full information. Because of the continuity of a patient's anatomy in the projection, the blocked information may be estimated by interpolation. This study aims to evaluate an inpainting-based interpolation approach to recover the missing information for CBCT reconstruction. Method: We used a simple region-based inpainting approach to interpolate the missing information. For a pixel to be interpolated, we divided the nearby regions having image information into 6 sub-regions: up-left, up-middle, up-right, down-left, down-middle, and down-right, each with 9 pixels. The average pixel value of each sub-region was calculated. These average values, along with the pixel location, were used to determine the interpolated pixel value. We compared our approach with the Criminisi Exemplar (CE) and total variation (TV) based inpainting techniques. Projection images of Catphan and a head phantom were used for the comparison. The SMOG was simulated by erasing the information (filling with “0”) of the areas in each projection corresponding to the grid. Results: For the Catphan, the processing time was 178, 45 and 0.98 minutes for CE, TV and our approach, respectively. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) was 19.4, 18.5 and 26.4 db, correspondingly. For the head phantom, the processing time was 222, 45 and 0.93 minutes for CE, TV and our approach, respectively. The SNR was 24.6, 20.2 and 26.2db correspondingly. Conclusion: We have developed a simple inpainting based interpolation approach, which can recover some of the image information for the SMOG-based CBCT imaging. This study is supported by NIH/NCI grant 1R01CA166948-01

  18. Plasma chemistry in wire chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, J.

    1990-05-01

    The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an 55 Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed

  19. Streamer chamber: pion decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    The real particles produced in the decay of a positive pion can be seen in this image from a streamer chamber. Streamer chambers consist of a gas chamber through which a strong pulsed electric field is passed, creating sparks as a charged particle passes through it. A magnetic field is added to cause the decay products to follow curved paths so that their charge and momentum can be measured.

  20. Prototype multiwire proportional chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    Chambers of this type were initially developed within the Alpha project (finally not approved). They were designed such to minimize the radiation length with a view to a mass spectrometer of high resolution meant to replace the Omega detector. The chambers were clearly forerunners for the (drift) chambers later built for R606 with the novel technique of crimping the wires. See also photo 7510039X.

  1. Electromagnetic reverberation chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Besnier, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Dedicated to a complete presentation on all aspects of reverberation chambers, this book provides the physical principles behind these test systems in a very progressive manner. The detailed panorama of parameters governing the operation of electromagnetic reverberation chambers details various applications such as radiated immunity, emissivity, and shielding efficiency experiments.In addition, the reader is provided with the elements of electromagnetic theory and statistics required to take full advantage of the basic operational rules of reverberation chambers, including calibration proc

  2. Evaluation of anterior chamber angle under dark and light conditions in angle closure glaucoma: An anterior segment OCT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, Habibeh; Jafarzadehpur, Ebrahim; Esmaeili, Alireza; Abolbashari, Fereshteh; Ahmadi Hosseini, Seyed Mahdi

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate changes of nasal and temporal anterior chamber angle (ACA) in subjects with angle closure glaucoma using Spectralis AS-OCT (SAS-OCT) under dark and light conditions. Based on dark-room gonioscopy, 24 subjects with open angles and 86 with narrow angles participated in this study. The nasal and temporal angle opening distance at 500 μm anterior to the scleral spur (AOD500), nasal and temporal ACA were measured using SAS-OCT in light and dark conditions. In 2 groups, ACA and AOD500 in nasal and temporal quadrants were significantly greater in light compared to dark (all with p=0.000). The AOD500 and ACA were significantly higher in nasal than temporal in measured conditions for 2 groups except the ACA and AOD500 of normal group measured in light. The difference between nasal and temporal in dark (29.07 ± 65.71 μm for AOD500 and 5.7 ± 4.07° for ACA) was greater than light (24.86 ± 79.85 μm for AOD500 and 2.09 ± 7.21° for ACA) condition. But the difference was only significant for ACA (p=0.000). The correlation analysis showed a negative correlation between AOD500 and pupil diameter in temporal and nasal quadrants (both with p=0.000). While temporal AOD500 difference correlated with spherical equivalent, temporal and asal gonioscopy, nasal AOD correlated with IOP, temporal and nasal gonioscopy. Clinically important changes in ACA structure could be detected with SAS-OCT in nasal and temporal quadrants under different illumination intensity. The results could help in improvement of examination condition for better and more accurate assessment of individuals with angle closure glaucoma. Copyright © 2014 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of a Configurable Growth Chamber with a Computer Vision System to Study Circadian Rhythm in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Egea-Cortines

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant development is the result of an endogenous morphogenetic program that integrates environmental signals. The so-called circadian clock is a set of genes that integrates environmental inputs into an internal pacing system that gates growth and other outputs. Study of circadian growth responses requires high sampling rates to detect changes in growth and avoid aliasing. We have developed a flexible configurable growth chamber comprising a computer vision system that allows sampling rates ranging between one image per 30 s to hours/days. The vision system has a controlled illumination system, which allows the user to set up different configurations. The illumination system used emits a combination of wavelengths ensuring the optimal growth of species under analysis. In order to obtain high contrast of captured images, the capture system is composed of two CCD cameras, for day and night periods. Depending on the sample type, a flexible image processing software calculates different parameters based on geometric calculations. As a proof of concept we tested the system in three different plant tissues, growth of petunia- and snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus flowers and of cladodes from the cactus Opuntia ficus-indica. We found that petunia flowers grow at a steady pace and display a strong growth increase in the early morning, whereas Opuntia cladode growth turned out not to follow a circadian growth pattern under the growth conditions imposed. Furthermore we were able to identify a decoupling of increase in area and length indicating that two independent growth processes are responsible for the final size and shape of the cladode.

  4. Oxidative potential of secondary organic aerosols produced from photooxidation of different hydrocarbons using outdoor chamber under ambient sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huanhuan; Jang, Myoseon; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Robinson, Sarah E.

    2016-04-01

    The oxidative potential of various secondary organic aerosols (SOA) was measured using dithiothreitol (DTT) assay to understand how organic aerosols react with cellular materials. SOA was produced via the photooxidation of four different hydrocarbons (toluene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, isoprene and α-pinene) in the presence of NOx using a large outdoor photochemical smog chamber. The DTT consumption rate was normalized by the aerosol mass, which is expressed as DTTmass. Toluene SOA and isoprene SOA yielded higher DTTmass than 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene SOA or α-pinene SOA. In order to discover the correlation between the molecular structure and oxidative potential, the DTT responses of selected model compounds were also measured. Among them, conjugated aldehydes, quinones, and H2O2 showed considerable DTT response. To investigate the correlation between DTT response and cell responses in vitro, the expression of biological markers, i.e. IL-6, IL-8, and HMOX-1 were studied using small airway epithelial cells. Higher cellular expression of IL-8 was observed with toluene SOA exposure compared to 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene SOA exposure, which aligned with the results from DTT assay. Our study also suggests that within the urban atmosphere, the contribution of toluene SOA and isoprene SOA to the oxidative potential of ambient SOA will be more significant than that of α-pinene SOA.

  5. DORIOT CLIMATIC CHAMBERS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Doriot Climatic Chambers reproduce environmental conditions occurring anywhere around the world. They provide an invaluable service by significantly reducing the...

  6. Gas microstrip chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, P.M.; Barasch, E.F.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Demroff, H.P.; Elliott, S.M.; Howe, M.R.; Lee, B.; Mazumdar, T.K.; Pang, Y.; Smith, D.D.; Wahl, J.; Wu, Y.; Yue, W.K.; Gaedke, R.M.; Vanstraelen, G.

    1992-01-01

    The gas microstrip chamber has been developed from concept to experimental system during the past three years. A pattern of anode and grid lines are microfabricated onto a dielectric substrate and configured as a high-resolution MWPC. Four recent developments are described: Suitable plastic substrates and lithography techniques for large-area chambers; non-planar silicon-based chambers for 20 μm resolution; integrated on-board synchronous front-end electronics and data buffering; and a porous silicon active cathode for enhanced efficiency and time response. The microstrip chamber appears to be a promising technology for applications in microvertex, tracking spectrometer, muon spectrometer, and transition radiation detection. (orig.)

  7. Interaction of light and atmospheric photochemical products (smog) within plants. [Phaseolius vulgaris; Petunia hydrida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, O C; Dugger, W M; Cardiff, E A; Darley, E F

    1961-12-02

    Damage to plants from ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate, two photochemically formed components of smog, has been described. However, variations in symptom expression and the degree of damage caused by a given concentration of these components, whether of synthetic or natural origin, have complicated development of an adequate biological assay method for these materials. These observed variations in symptomatology have implicated stomatal action, inorganic nutrition temperature, genetics, ascorbic acid content, physiological age of tissue and photoperiod. Plants grown under artificial illumination differ in their response to the photochemically formed pollutants as compared with plants grown in the greenhouse. Interactions between light and oxidants from the polluted atmosphere within plants, as reported here, might well explain some of the variabilities in symptomatology observed in earlier controlled experiments as well as the unexplained natural variability observed in the Los Angeles area. The results presented also emphasize the importance of standardizing plant growth conditions for future work of this nature. 10 references.

  8. Study on a drift chamber for high energy experiments; Estudos sobre uma camara de arrasto para um experimento de altas energias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puget, Maria Augusta Constante

    1993-12-31

    This work deals with the studies of a multiwire gaseous detector operating as a drift chamber, which will be part of the SELEX spectrometer of the experiment Fermilab E781. A prototype was designed to be built and tested at IFUSP. Results are shown of the analysis of data taken with another similar detector whose construction and test were done at Fermilab, with the aim of studying its characterization and performance. (author) 35 refs., 54 figs., 17 tabs.

  9. Study on a drift chamber for high energy experiments; Estudos sobre uma camara de arrasto para um experimento de altas energias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puget, Maria Augusta Constante

    1994-12-31

    This work deals with the studies of a multiwire gaseous detector operating as a drift chamber, which will be part of the SELEX spectrometer of the experiment Fermilab E781. A prototype was designed to be built and tested at IFUSP. Results are shown of the analysis of data taken with another similar detector whose construction and test were done at Fermilab, with the aim of studying its characterization and performance. (author) 35 refs., 54 figs., 17 tabs.

  10. The Mark III vertex chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J.; Bolton, T.; Bunnell, K.

    1987-07-01

    The design and construction of the new Mark III vertex chamber is described. Initial tests with cosmic rays prove the ability of track reconstruction and yield triplet resolutions below 50 μm at 3 atm using argon/ethane (50:50). Also performed are studies using a prototype of a pressurized wire vertex chamber with 8 mm diameter straw geometry. Spatial resolution of 35mm was obtained using dimethyl ether (DME) at 1 atm and 30 μm using argon/ethane (50/50 mixture) at 4 atm. Preliminary studies indicate the DME to adversely affect such materials as aluminized Mylar and Delrin

  11. Study of a particle detector with very high spatial precision (drift chambers), and analysis of the physical phenomena governing the operation of this detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, Guy.

    1976-01-01

    The physical principles of drift chambers are studied and various measurements which can be performed with these chambers are described. The laws governing the passage of particles through matter are first reviewed and different transport coefficients, (velocity, scattering coefficient, characteristic energy ...) of the electrons under the influence of an electric field for different gases (argon, CO 2 , isobutane, methane, methylal) are studied. The theoretical predictions are then compared with the experimental results. The different amplification processes in the gas and the space charge effect of the positive ions on electron multiplication for large particle fluxes are also studied as well as the mobility of positive ions in different gases. After these results, the operating characteristics (efficiency, linearity of the space-time ratio, spatial resolution), with and without an external magnetic field are determined [fr

  12. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed

  13. An electrodeless drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.; Barlow, R.J.; Bowdery, C.K.; Duerdoth, I.; Rowe, P.G.

    1982-01-01

    We describe a chamber in which the drift field is controlled by the deposition of electrostatic charge on an insulating surface. The chamber operates with good efficiency and precision for observed drift distances of up to 45 cm, promises to be extremely robust and adaptable and offers a very cheap way of making particle detectors. (orig.)

  14. High resolution drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 μm resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs

  15. Plastic flashtube chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisken, W.R.

    1977-01-01

    A brief discussion is given of the use and operation of plastic flashtube chambers. Gas leaks, electric pulsing, the glow discharge, and readout methods are considered. Three distinct problems with high rate applications deal with resolving time, dead time, and polarization/neutralization of the chamber

  16. BEBC bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    Looking up into the interior of BEBC bubble chamber from the expansion cylinder. At the top of the chamber two fish-eye lenses are installed and three other fish-eye ports are blanked off. In the centre is a heat exchanger.

  17. The Mobile Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  18. DELPHI time projection chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The time projection chamber is inserted inside the central detector of the DELPHI experiment. Gas is ionised in the chamber as a charged particle passes through, producing an electric signal from which the path of the particle can be found. DELPHI, which ran from 1989 to 2000 on the LEP accelerator, was primarily concerned with particle identification.

  19. In Vitro Study of Temperature Changes in Pulp Chamber During Root Planing Procedure Using Er:YAG Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaneva, Blagovesta K; Zagorchev, Plamen I; Firkova, Elena I; Glavinkov, Ivan T

    2016-09-01

    To assess temperature changes at specified time intervals during Er:YAG laser scaling and root planing of surfaces with dental calculus. Fifteen single-rooted teeth with advanced periodontal disease were extracted and fixed in a cylinder thermostat filled with distilled water at constant temperature (35.5°C). A specially designed thermal probe (type K thermocouple) accurate to ±0.1°C over the range from 20°C to 80°C was fitted into the pulp chamber of tooth sample. Scaling and root planing of the mesial and distal root surfaces was performed using an Er:YAG laser (Lite Touch, Syneron Dental, Israel) with a wavelength of 2940 nm, provided with a chisel tip, and at the following settings: output energy 100 mJ and 50 Hz, duration of irradiation - 40 sec, the tip in contact mode oblique to the root surface at an angle of approximately 10-15 degrees and water spray level 5-6. The temperature inside the pulp chamber was measured every 10 sec. The temperature in the pulp chamber taken every 10 seconds and compared with the temperature of 35.5°C at baseline decreased by 1.6°C, 2.4°C, 2.5°C, and 2.5°C for the first, second, third and fourth measurement, respectively. These changes did not reach statistical significance. The Er:YAG laser does not increase the temperature inside the pulp chamber. The assessed changes do not depend on the duration of irradiation which was kept within 40 seconds. Therefore, this treatment modality causes no thermal damage to the pulp under the above defined conditions and can be considered safe.

  20. Measurements of ion mobility and GEM discharge studies for the upgrade of the ALICE time projection chamber

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00507268

    2018-02-20

    ALICE is one of the four experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The quark-gluon plasma, which is predominantly produced in lead-lead collisions at LHC, is of particular interest for ALICE. After the long shut-down 2 (2019-2021) the LHC will provide lead-lead collisions at an increased interaction rate of 50 kHz. In order to examine every event at this interaction rate the ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) needs to be upgraded. The TPC’s ReadOut Chambers (ROCs) are currently multi-wire proportional chambers. To prevent space charge build-up of slow ions, drifting from the ROCs into the TPC, a gating grid is used. The corresponding closure time imposes a dead time on the TPC read out, which prohibits data taking at a readout rate higher than 3 kHz. New ROCs have therefore been designed, relying on stacks of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) foils for the gas amplification, allowing for continuous readout. With the new ROCs, a certain fraction of ions will be drifting at all time into the TPC. Knowing t...

  1. Laser-filament-induced snow formation in a subsaturated zone in a cloud chamber: experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jingjing; Sun, Haiyi; Sridharan, Aravindan; Wang, Tie-Jun; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan; Chin, See Leang

    2013-12-01

    1 kHz, 2 mJ, 45 fs, 800 nm laser pulses were fired into a laboratory diffusion cloud chamber through a subsaturated zone (relative humidity ∼73%, T ∼ 4.3 °C). After 60 min of laser irradiation, an oval-shaped snow pile was observed right below the filament center and weighed ∼12.0 mg. The air current velocity at the edge of the vortices was estimated to be ∼16.5 cm/s. Scattering scenes recorded from the side show that filament-induced turbulence were formed inside the cloud chamber with two vortices below the filament. Two-dimensional simulations of the air flow motion in two cross sections of the cloud chamber confirm that the turbulent vortices exist below the filament. Based upon this simulation, we deduce that the vortices indeed have a three-dimensional elliptical shape. Hence, we propose that inside vortices where the humidity was supersaturated or saturated the condensation nuclei, namely, HNO(3), N(2)(+), O(2)(+) and other aerosols and impurities, were activated and grew in size. Large-sized particles would eventually be spun out along the fast moving direction towards the cold plate and formed an oval-shaped snow pile at the end.

  2. Preliminary study of the primary nozzle position of a supersonic air ejector with a constant-area mixing chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kracik Jan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at investigating the primary nozzle position in a proposed supersonic air ejector device. The ejector is primarily made up of a supersonic primary nozzle, which is located in the axis of the ejector, a suction chamber or secondary stream inlet, a mixing chamber and a diffuser. The ejector design allows to translate the primary nozzle in the axis direction and fix it in a chosen distance from the beginning of the mixing chamber and hence influence the secondary mass flow rate. In a limit case, it is possible to set the nozzle to such a position where no secondary flow occurs. If we ignore the case where no secondary flow occurs, five different nozzle distances have been investigated in this paper. Some cases seem to be alike and there are no significant dissimilarities between them. Courses of relative back-pressure ratio are carried out against the entrainment ratio and transition between on-design and off-design regimes is determined. Measurements of the mixed flow based on the standard ISO 5167 are performed by means of orifice plate method. In addition, a comparison between experiments and simulations performed by Ansys Fluent software is presented in order to indicate further improvements to the numerical model.

  3. Study of cavity effect in micro-Pirani gauge chamber with improved sensitivity for high vacuum regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohe Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-low pressure application of Pirani gauge needs significant improvement of sensitivity and expansion of measureable low pressure limit. However, the performance of Pirani gauge in high vacuum regime remains critical concerns since gaseous thermal conduction with high percentage is essential requirement. In this work, the heat transfer mechanism of micro-Pirani gauge packaged in a non-hermetic chamber was investigated and analyzed compared with the one before wafer-level packaging. The cavity effect, extremely important for the efficient detection of low pressure, was numerically and experimentally analyzed considering the influence of the pressure, the temperature and the effective heat transfer area in micro-Pirani gauge chamber. The thermal conduction model is validated by experiment data of MEMS Pirani gauges with and without capping. It is found that nature gaseous convection in chamber, determined by the Rayleigh number, should be taken into consideration. The experiment and model calculated results show that thermal resistance increases in the molecule regime, and further increases after capping due to the suppression of gaseous convection. The gaseous thermal conduction accounts for an increasing percentage of thermal conduction at low pressure while little changes at high pressure after capping because of the existence of cavity effect improving the sensitivity of cavity-effect-influenced Pirani gauge for high vacuum regime.

  4. Venturi vacuum systems for hypobaric chamber operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R; Swaby, G; Sutton, T; Fife, C; Powell, M; Butler, B D

    1997-11-01

    Physiological studies of the effects of high altitude on man often require the use of a hypobaric chamber to simulate the reduced ambient pressures. Typical "altitude" chambers in use today require complex mechanical vacuum systems to evacuate the chamber air, either directly or via reservoir system. Use of these pumps adds to the cost of both chamber procurement and maintenance, and service of these pumps requires trained support personnel and regular upkeep. In this report we describe use of venturi vacuum pumps to perform the function of mechanical vacuum pumps for human and experimental altitude chamber operations. Advantages of the venturi pumps include their relatively low procurement cost, small size and light weight, ease of installation and plumbing, lack of moving parts, and independence from electrical power sources, fossil fuels and lubricants. Conversion of three hyperbaric chambers to combined hyper/hypobaric use is described.

  5. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosset, J.

    1984-01-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive)

  6. Evaluation of temperature variation in pulp chamber after high power diode laser irradiation (λ=830 nm) on dental enamel: 'in vitro' study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macri, Rodrigo Teixeira

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the variation of temperature in the pulp chamber caused by irradiation of a commercial diode laser operating in continuous wave with wavelength 830 nm over the dental enamel. In the first part of this study, two types of tooth models were tested: 3,5 mm slice and whole tooth. In the second part, we irradiated the buccal si de of the enamel in 2 primary lower incisors from cattle with Opus 10 diode laser for 10 s with power levels of 1 W and 2 W, always using an absorber. Two thermocouples were used. The first one was inserted in the dentin wall closest to the irradiation site, while the second was inserted in the middle of the pulp chamber. It was observed that the thermocouples registered different temperatures. Always, the dentin thermocouple registered higher temperatures. Considering the dentin records, the irradiation of 1 W for 10 s can be safe for the pulp. Further studies must be developed related to the correct positioning of the thermocouples inside the pulp chamber. This was a first step of using diode laser in enamel, and in this study, we concluded that the Opus 10 diode laser shown to be safe for this use, with 1 W power for 10 S. (author)

  7. Performance studies of a time projection chamber at the ILC and search for lepton flavour violation at HERA II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, M.E.

    2008-05-15

    It is expected, that new physics beyond the Standard Model can be discovered in the energy range of 1TeV. One of the next projects in high energy physics will be a linear collider. A proposal for such a machine is the International Linear Collider (ILC), where electrons and positrons are brought to collision with a centre of mass energy up to 500 GeV with the possibility to upgrade it to 1 TeV. The precision measurement of this new physics sets high requirements on the performance of the detector at the ILC. As the main tracking device for a detector at the ILC, a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) has been proposed. To reach these requirements a new amplification techniques based on Micro Pattern Gas Detectors (MPGD) is under investigation. In this thesis, data are analysed, that were taken using the prototype MediTPC, whose amplification system is based on Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM). Different magnetic fields of up to 4 T, two gas mixtures and differed arrangement of the pads have also been investigated. The main part of this thesis deals with the study of the performance of two different approaches to determine track parameters. A new method based on a likelihood fit of the expected charge to the measured one is compared to a traditional approach using reconstructed space points and a {chi}{sup 2} minimisation technique. Different aspects such as the performance in the presence of non working channels and the angular dependency are investigated. Finally the determined spatial resolution (in the r{phi}-plane) is presented. At zero drift length a resolution of the order of 100 {mu}m can be achieved. In the second part of this thesis the results of a search for lepton flavour violation mediated by leptoquarks is presented. Data of electron-proton collisions with a centre-of-mass energy of 320 GeV taken with the H1 experiment are investigated. The analysis concentrates of the e{sup -}p data of the HERAII phase, which were taken in the years 2004-2006. They correspond

  8. The Mark II Vertex Drift Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.P.; Baggs, R.; Fujino, D.

    1989-03-01

    We have completed constructing and begun operating the Mark II Drift Chamber Vertex Detector. The chamber, based on a modified jet cell design, achieves 30 μm spatial resolution and 2 gas mixtures. Special emphasis has been placed on controlling systematic errors including the use of novel construction techniques which permit accurate wire placement. Chamber performance has been studied with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber located both inside and outside the Mark II. Results on spatial resolution, average pulse shape, and some properties of CO 2 mixtures are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  9. Investigation of very long jet chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burckhart, H J; Va' vra, J; Zankel, K; Dudziak, U; Schaile, D; Schaile, O; Igo-Kemenes, P; Lennert, P

    1986-04-01

    The electrostatic properties and the performances of very long jet chambers have been investigated. Using 100 MHz FADC wave form digitisers, the tracking accuracy, the charge division and the dE/dx performance of two chambers, one with 4.5 m long tungsten wires and one with 4 m long highly resistive ''NiCoTi'' wires have been studied. The geometry of the chambers was chosen to define some of the design parameters of the jet chamber for the OPAL detector for LEP. (orig.).

  10. Investigation of very long jet chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burckhart, H J; Va' vra, J; Zankel, K; Dudziak, U; Schaile, D; Schaile, O; Igo-Kemenes, P; Lennert, P

    1986-04-01

    The electrostatic properties and the performances of very long jet chambers have been investigated. Using 100 MHz FADC wave form digitisers, the tracking accuracy, the charge division and the dE/dx performance of two chambers, one with 4.5 m long tungsten wires and one with 4 m long highly resistive ''NiCoTi'' wires have been studied. The geometry of the chambers was chosen to define some of the design parameters of the jet chamber for the OPAL detector for LEP.

  11. A comparative study of the work involved in measuring profiles using ion chambers, a linear diode array and film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rykers, K.L.; RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC; Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW; Geso, M.; Brown, G.M.; Olilver, L.D.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The usefulness of film to perform dosimetric measurement is a topic often discussed and not clearly agreed upon. While single point measurement detectors give consistent and reliable results for physically wedged fields they cannot be easily used to measure intensity modulated fields. In this work a method of using film to measure profiles for dynamically wedged (DW) fields is presented. The method of positioning film for the subsequent generation of a conversion function to allow for the variation in films' response with energy is outlined. Furthermore, the profiles determined by film measurement are compared with those measured with single point measurement detector and an array of silicon diodes. Both Leavitt et. al. 8 and Weber et. al. 7 have reported on the successful use of the linear diode array (LDA) in measuring dynamic wedge data. This claim will be investigated. The film used in this work was Kodak X-Omat V. The solid water was RW3 with high water equivalency in the range from 137 CS to 50 MV for photons and electrons. All films were processed in an automatic processor. Both the Wellhoefer and the Scanditronix RFA 300 densitometers were used to take film readings. Wedged field and open field profiles measurements were taken in water using both the Wellhoefer IC-10 chamber, the Scanditronix RFA 300 RK chamber and the Scanditronix LDA . The energy investigated was 6 MV at 1.5, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0 and 20.0 cm for a Varian 2100C machine. More consistent density readings were obtained when films were processed with the edge of the film that was parallel to the beam axis was fed into the processor first; rather than when the beam incident edge was fed into the processor first. Comparing the position of the central axis (CAX) of open films from the geometric method developed in this work to the software determined CAX (as available with the Wellhoefer software), it was found that the difference in CAX positions varied between -0.03 to +0.04 cm at 2.5 cm

  12. A study of photochemical againg of ambient air using Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) chamber under the different sources and types of emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T.; Son, J.; Kim, J.; Kim, S.; Sung, K.; Park, G.; Link, M.; Park, T.; Kim, K.; Kang, S.; Ban, J.; Kim, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    Recent research proposed that Secondary Aerosol (SA) is important class of predicting future climate change scenarios, health effect, and a general air quality. However, there has been lack of studies to investigate SA formation all over the world. This study tried to focus on understanding potential secondary aerosol formation and its local impact by the photochemical aging of inorganic and organic aerosols in the ambient air using the Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) chamber under the different sources and types of emissions. PAM chamber manufactured by Aerodyne make an oxidizing environment that simulates oxidation processes on timescales of 12-15 hrs in the atmosphere. Chemical compositions of ambient aerosol and aerosol that was aged in the PAM chamber were alternately measured every 2-minutes using the High Resolution-Time of Flight-Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). HR-ToF-AMS provides non-refractory aerosol mass concentrations including nitrate, sulfate, hydrocarbon-like and oxygenated organic aerosol in real time. This study includes a residence area of mixture of sources, a forest site of dominant source of biogenic VOCs, an underground parking lot of dominant vehicle emission, and laboratory experiment of vehicle emissions under different fuels and speeds using the chassis dynamometer. As a result, it was revealed that gasoline and LPG vehicle relatively made more potential SA than diesel vehicle.

  13. Photochemical smog modeling for assessment of potential impacts of different management strategies on air quality of the Bangkok Metropolitan Region, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oanh, Nguyen Thi Kim; Zhang, Baoning

    2004-10-01

    A photochemical smog model system, the Variable-Grid Urban Airshed Model/Systems Applications International Mesoscale Model (UAM-V/SAIMM), was used to investigate photochemical pollution in the Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR). The model system was first applied to simulate a historical photochemical smog episode of two days (January 13-14, 1997) using the 1997 anthropogenic emission database available at the Pollution Control Department and an estimated biogenic emission. The output 1-hr ozone (O3) for BMR, however, did not meet the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency suggested performance criteria. The simulated minimum and maximum O3 values in the domain were much higher than the observations. Multiple model runs with different precursor emission reduction scenarios showed that the best model performance with the simulated 1-hr O3 meeting all the criteria was obtained when the volatile organic compound (VOC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission from mobile source reduced by 50% and carbon monoxide by 20% from the original database. Various combinations of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions in Bangkok and surrounding provinces were simulated to assess the contribution of different sources to O3 pollution in the city. O3 formation in Bangkok was found to be more VOC-sensitive than NOx-sensitive. To attain the Thailand ambient air quality standard for 1-hr O3 of 100 ppb, VOC emission in BMR should be reduced by 50-60%. Management strategies considered in the scenario study consist of Stage I, Stage II vapor control, replacement of two-stroke by four-stroke motorcycles, 100% compressed natural gas bus, 100% natural gas-fired power plants, and replacement of methyltertiarybutylether by ethanol as an additive for gasoline.

  14. Use of a Remote Car Starter in Relation to Smog and Climate Change Perceptions: A Population Survey in Québec (Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkacem Abdous

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Remote car starters encourage motorists to warm up their vehicles by idling the motor – thus increasing atmospheric pollutants, including several greenhouse gas (GHG with impacts on public health. This study about climate change (CC adaptation and mitigation actions examined perceptions on air pollution and climate change and individual characteristics associated with the use of a remote car starter. A telephone survey (n = 2,570; response rate: 70% of adults living in Québec (Canada measured the respondents’ beliefs and current behaviours regarding CC. Approximately 32.9% (daily car users and 27.4% (occasional users reported using a remote car starter during winter. The odds of the use of a remote car starter was higher in the less densely populated central (OR: 1.5 and peripheral regions (OR: 2.7 compared to the urban centers (ex. Montreal. The odds was also higher in population with a mother tongue other than English or French (OR: 2.6 and francophones than anglophones (OR: 2.1, women than men (OR: 1.5, daily drivers than occasional ones (OR: 1.2, and respondents who at least sometimes consulted temperature/humidity reports than those who consulted them less often (OR: 1.5. In multivariate analysis, the perception of living in a region susceptible to winter smog, being aware of smog warnings, or the belief in the human contribution to CC did not significantly influence the use of a remote car starter. The use of remote car starters encourages idling which produces increased atmospheric pollution and GHG production and it should be more efficiently and vigorously managed by various activities. A five-minute daily reduction in idling is equivalent to reducing the total car emissions by 1.8%. This would constitute a “no-regrets” approach to CC as it can simultaneously reduce GHG, air pollution and their health impacts.

  15. Use of a remote car starter in relation to smog and climate change perceptions: a population survey in Québec (Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Diane; Gosselin, Pierre; Valois, Pierre; Germain, Stéphane; Abdous, Belkacem

    2009-02-01

    Remote car starters encourage motorists to warm up their vehicles by idling the motor--thus increasing atmospheric pollutants, including several greenhouse gas (GHG) with impacts on public health. This study about climate change (CC) adaptation and mitigation actions examined perceptions on air pollution and climate change and individual characteristics associated with the use of a remote car starter. A telephone survey (n = 2,570; response rate: 70%) of adults living in Québec (Canada) measured the respondents' beliefs and current behaviours regarding CC. Approximately 32.9% (daily car users) and 27.4% (occasional users) reported using a remote car starter during winter. The odds of the use of a remote car starter was higher in the less densely populated central (OR: 1.5) and peripheral regions (OR: 2.7) compared to the urban centers (ex. Montreal). The odds was also higher in population with a mother tongue other than English or French (OR: 2.6) and francophones than anglophones (OR: 2.1), women than men (OR: 1.5), daily drivers than occasional ones (OR: 1.2), and respondents who at least sometimes consulted temperature/humidity reports than those who consulted them less often (OR: 1.5). In multivariate analysis, the perception of living in a region susceptible to winter smog, being aware of smog warnings, or the belief in the human contribution to CC did not significantly influence the use of a remote car starter. The use of remote car starters encourages idling which produces increased atmospheric pollution and GHG production and it should be more efficiently and vigorously managed by various activities. A five-minute daily reduction in idling is equivalent to reducing the total car emissions by 1.8%. This would constitute a "no-regrets" approach to CC as it can simultaneously reduce GHG, air pollution and their health impacts.

  16. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  17. DNA bulky adducts in a Mediterranean population correlate with environmental ozone concentration, an indicator of photochemical smog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palli, Domenico; Saieva, Calogero; Grechi, Daniele; Masala, Giovanna; Zanna, Ines; Barbaro, Antongiulio; Decarli, Adriano; Munnia, Armelle; Peluso, Marco

    2004-03-01

    Ozone (O(3)), the major oxidant component in photochemical smog, mostly derives from photolysis of nitrogen dioxide. O(3) may have biologic effects directly and/or via free radicals reacting with other primary pollutants and has been reported to influence daily mortality and to increase lung cancer risk. Although DNA damage may be caused by ozone itself, only other photochemical reaction products (as oxidised polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) may form bulky DNA adducts, a reliable biomarker of genotoxic damage and cancer risk, showing a seasonal trend. In a large series consisting of 320 residents in the metropolitan area of Florence, Italy, enrolled in a prospective study for the period 1993-1998 (206 randomly sampled volunteers, 114 traffic-exposed workers), we investigated the correlation between individual levels of DNA bulky adducts and a cumulative O(3) exposure score. The average O(3) concentrations were calculated for different time windows (0-5 to 0-90 days) prior to blood drawing for each participant, based on daily measurements provided by the local monitoring system. Significant correlations between DNA adduct levels and O3 cumulative exposure scores in the last 2-8 weeks before enrollment emerged in never smokers. Correlations were highest in the subgroup of never smokers residing in the urban area and not occupationally exposed to vehicle traffic pollution, with peak values for average concentrations 4-6 weeks before enrollment (r = 0.34). Our current findings indicate that DNA adduct formation may be modulated by individual characteristics and by the cumulative exposure to environmental levels of ozone in the last 4-6 weeks, possibly through ozone-associated reactive pollutants. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. OPAL Jet Chamber Prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the dirfferent parts of the tracking system. This piece is a prototype of the jet chambers

  19. PS wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    A wire chamber used at CERN's Proton Synchrotron accelerator in the 1970s. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  20. Introduction to the study of boiling in swimming-pool reactors. Measurement of the efficiency of a CC5 chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froelicher, B.

    1967-01-01

    The efficiency of a CC5 ionisation chamber has been evaluated by a rough measurement: by integrating the relationship P(f) = ε F0 (1 + ε A) over the band width of the apparatus, it is possible to show the influence of ε. This conventional method of operation is not very precise and so a more realistic value of the efficiency will be derived later using the plot of the low power transfer function of the reactor Ulysse, this being a more exact method. (author) [fr

  1. Measurements of the relative backscatter contribution to the monitor chamber for modern medical linear accelerators; A multi-center study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibolt, Patrik; Cronholm, Rickard O.; Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg

    2015-01-01

    Conversion to absolute dose in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of MV radiotherapy beams needs correct modeling of backscatter (BS) to the linear accelerator (linac) monitor chamber. For some linacs the BS depends largely on jaw settings. The backscattered fraction (BSF) of radiation can be determined...... BSF measurements were compared with MC simulations performed using the BEAMnrc user code. For flattened beams on the Varian linacs, the measured BSF exhibited a clear linear correlation with square jaw settings (correlation coefficient r > 0.9 with p

  2. Environmental aging in polycrystalline-Si photovoltaic modules: comparison of chamber-based accelerated degradation studies with field-test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, T.; Biggie, R.; Brooks, A.; Potter, B. G.; Simmons-Potter, K.

    2015-09-01

    Lifecycle degradation testing of photovoltaic (PV) modules in accelerated-degradation chambers can enable the prediction both of PV performance lifetimes and of return-on-investment for installations of PV systems. With degradation results strongly dependent on chamber test parameters, the validity of such studies relative to fielded, installed PV systems must be determined. In the present work, accelerated aging of a 250 W polycrystalline silicon module is compared to real-time performance degradation in a similar polycrystalline-silicon, fielded, PV technology that has been operating since October 2013. Investigation of environmental aging effects are performed in a full-scale, industrial-standard environmental chamber equipped with single-sun irradiance capability providing illumination uniformity of 98% over a 2 x 1.6 m area. Time-dependent, photovoltaic performance (J-V) is evaluated over a recurring, compressed night-day cycle providing representative local daily solar insolation for the southwestern United States, followed by dark (night) cycling. This cycle is synchronized with thermal and humidity environmental variations that are designed to mimic, as closely as possible, test-yard conditions specific to a 12 month weather profile for a fielded system in Tucson, AZ. Results confirm the impact of environmental conditions on the module long-term performance. While the effects of temperature de-rating can be clearly seen in the data, removal of these effects enables the clear interpretation of module efficiency degradation with time and environmental exposure. With the temperature-dependent effect removed, the normalized efficiency is computed and compared to performance results from another panel of similar technology that has previously experienced identical climate changes in the test yard. Analysis of relative PV module efficiency degradation for the chamber-tested system shows good comparison to the field-tested system with ~2.5% degradation following

  3. Chambers versus Relaxed Eddy Accumulation: an intercomparison study of two methods for short-term measurements of biogenic CO2 fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasek, Alina; Zimnoch, Miroslaw; Gorczyca, Zbigniew; Chmura, Lukasz; Necki, Jaroslaw

    2014-05-01

    The presented work is a part of comprehensive study aimed at thorough characterization of carbon cycle in the urban environment of Krakow, southern Poland. In the framework of this study two independent methods were employed to quantify biogenic CO2 flux in the city: (i) closed chambers, and (ii) Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA). The results of a three-day intensive intercomparison campaign performed in July 2013 and utilizing both measurement methods are reported here. The chamber method is a widely used approach for measurements of gas exchange between the soil and the atmosphere. The system implemented in this study consisted of a single chamber operating in a closed-dynamic mode, combined with Vaisala CarboCAP infrared CO2 sensor in a mobile setup. An alternative flux measurement method, covering larger area is represented by REA, which is a modification of the eddy covariance method. It consists of a 3D anemometer (Gill Windmaster Pro) and the system collecting updraft and downdraft samples to 5-litre Tedlar bags. The CO2 mixing ratios in the collected samples are measured by Picarro G2101i analyzer. The setup consists of two sets of bags so that the sampling can be performed continuously with 15-min temporal resolution. A 48-hectares open meadow located close the city center was chosen as a test site for comparison of the two methods of CO2 flux measurements outlined above. In the middle of the meadow a 3-metre high tripod was installed with the anemometer and REA inlet system. For a period of 46 hours the system was measuring net CO2 flux from the surrounding area. A meteorological conditions and intensity of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) were also recorded. In the same time, CO2 flux from several points around the REA inlet was measured with the chamber system, resulting in 93 values for both respiration and net CO2 flux. Chamber results show rather homogenous distribution of the soil CO2 flux (the mean value equal to 40.9 ± 2.2 mmol/m2h), with

  4. A practical approach to estimate emission rates of indoor air pollutants due to the use of personal combustible products based on small-chamber studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulejko, Jan E; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    As emission rates of airborne pollutants are commonly measured from combusting substances placed inside small chambers, those values need to be re-evaluated for the possible significance under practical conditions. Here, a simple numerical procedure is investigated to extrapolate the chamber-based emission rates of formaldehyde that can be released from various combustible sources including e-cigarettes, conventional cigarettes, or scented candles to their concentration levels in a small room with relatively poor ventilation. This simple procedure relies on a mass balance approach by considering the masses of pollutants emitted from source and lost through ventilation under the assumption that mixing occurs instantaneously in the room without chemical reactions or surface sorption. The results of our study provide valuable insights into re-evaluation procedure of chamber data to allow comparison between extrapolated and recommended values to judge the safe use of various combustible products in confined spaces. If two scented candles with a formaldehyde emission rate of 310 µg h(-1) each were lit for 4 h in a small 20 m(3) room with an air change rate of 0.5 h(-1), then the 4-h (candle lit) and 8-h (up to 8 h after candle lighting) TWA [FA] were determined to be 28.5 and 23.5 ppb, respectively. This is clearly above the 8-h NIOSH recommended exposure limit (REL) time weighted average of 16 ppb. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Acoustic-Levitation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Granett, D.; Lee, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Uncontaminated environments for highly-pure material processing provided within completely sealed levitation chamber that suspends particles by acoustic excitation. Technique ideally suited for material processing in low gravity environment of space.

  6. Optical spark chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1971-01-01

    An optical spark chamber developed for use in the Omega spectrometer. On the left the supporting frame is exceptionally thin to allow low momentum particles to escape and be detected outside the magnetic field.

  7. Vacuum chamber 'bicone'

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    This chamber is now in the National Museum of History and Technology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, USA, where it was exposed in an exhibit on the History of High Energy Accelerators (1977).

  8. Miniature ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexeev, V.I.; Emelyanov, I.Y.; Ivanov, V.M.; Konstantinov, L.V.; Lysikov, B.V.; Postnikov, V.V.; Rybakov, J.V.

    1976-01-01

    A miniature ionization chamber having a gas-filled housing which accommodates a guard electrode made in the form of a hollow perforated cylinder is described. The cylinder is electrically associated with the intermediate coaxial conductor of a triaxial cable used as the lead-in of the ionization chamber. The gas-filled housing of the ionization chamber also accommodates a collecting electrode shaped as a rod electrically connected to the center conductor of the cable and to tubular members. The rod is disposed internally of the guard electrode and is electrically connected, by means of jumpers passing through the holes in the guard electrode, to the tubular members. The tubular members embrace the guard electrode and are spaced a certain distance apart along its entire length. Arranged intermediate of these tubular members are spacers secured to the guard electrode and fixing the collecting electrode throughout its length with respect to the housing of the ionization chamber

  9. Reference ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golnik, N.; Zielczynski, M.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the design of ionization chamber devoted for the determination of the absolute value of the absorbed dose in tissue-equivalent material. The special attention was paid to ensure that the volume of the active gas cavity was constant and well known. A specific property of the chamber design is that the voltage insulators are 'invisible' from any point of the active volume. Such configuration ensures a very good time stability of the electrical field and defines the active volume. The active volume of the chamber was determined with accuracy of 0.3%. This resulted in accuracy of 0.8% in determination of the absorbed dose in the layer of material adherent to the gas cavity. The chamber was applied for calibration purposes at radiotherapy facility in Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna (Russia) and in the calibration laboratory of the Institute of Atomic Energy in Swierk. (author)

  10. Gridded ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    An improved ionization chamber type x-ray detector comprises a heavy gas at high pressure disposed between an anode and a cathode. An open grid structure is disposed adjacent the anode and is maintained at a voltsge intermediate between the cathode and anode potentials. The electric field which is produced by positive ions drifting toward the cathode is thus shielded from the anode. Current measuring circuits connected to the anode are, therefore, responsive only to electron current flow within the chamber and the recovery time of the chamber is shortened. The grid structure also serves to shield the anode from electrical currents which might otherwise be induced by mechanical vibrations in the ionization chamber structure

  11. ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Lippmann, C

    2013-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main device in the ALICE 'central barrel' for the tracking and identification (PID) of charged particles. It has to cope with unprecedented densities of charges particles.

  12. Scattering study at free air ionization chamber diaphragm; Estudo do espalhamento no diafragma da camara de ionizacao de ar livre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Alexandre Lo Bianco dos

    2011-07-01

    The maim of this work consisted in the assessment of the correction factor for air kerma, due to scattered radiation in the diaphragm of the free-air ionization chamber model 481. LNMRl measurements were made to acquire x-ray spectra corresponding to the Qualities RQR-M, described in IEC 61627 standards (2005). These spectra were used as input data in the MC simulations. The operational range of energy spectra provide up to 35 keV. This energy range is typically used in diagnostic radiology, although there is not primary standard for air kerma. The determination of this factor is a fundamental process in the primary standardization of the air kerma. These factors were obtained by computer simulation using the Penelope code. The results are k{sub RQR-M1}=0,9946, k{sub RQR} {sub -M2}=0,9932, k{sub RQR-M3}=0,9978 and k{sub RQR-M4}=0,9885; with uncertainties of 0,007 and coverage factor equal to 2. lt can be concluded that, with respect to the diaphragm, the chamber can be used in the primary standard of air kerma. (author)

  13. Gridded Ionization Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manero Amoros, F.

    1962-01-01

    In the present paper the working principles of a gridded ionization chamber are given, and all the different factors that determine its resolution power are analyzed in detail. One of these devices, built in the Physics Division of the JEN and designed specially for use in measurements of alpha spectroscopy, is described. finally the main applications, in which the chamber can be used, are shown. (Author) 17 refs

  14. Bubble chamber: antiproton annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    These images show real particle tracks from the annihilation of an antiproton in the 80 cm Saclay liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. A negative kaon and a neutral kaon are produced in this process, as well as a positive pion. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  15. Gas and particle phase chemical characterization of photochemical smog in Beijing and Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallquist, Mattias; Le Breton, Michael; Guo, Song; Zhen Yu, Jian; Hallquist, Åsa. M.; Pathak, Ravi K.; Liu, Qianyun; Wang, Yuchen; Li, Jinjian; Chan, Chak K.; Wang, Yujue; Zheng, Jing; Yang, Yudong; Lu, Keding; Wu, Zhijun; Hu, Min

    2017-04-01

    Secondary chemistry transforming primary pollutants is of high relevance for Chinese photochemical smog. In particular, formation of ozone (O3) and particulate matter (PM), including Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA), are of major concern regarding impacts on health, climate and ecosystems. The atmospheric oxidation processes leading to SOA formation are complex and involves thousands of different compounds, both of biogenic and anthropogenic origin. Furthermore, for a thorough understanding both the gas and the particle phase need to be considered. As part of an intercollaborative project to assess the photochemical smog in China, two major field campaigns were arranged in 2016; in Changping, Bejing during springtime and at HKUST, Hong Kong during the autumn. Alongside with other advanced instrumentations, a Time of Flight Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (ToF CIMS) utilising the Filiter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) was used to chemically characterize the gas and the particle phase. This specific instrument applies soft ionization limiting the fragmentation and one can usually identify molecular composition of hundreds of different parent molecules. In both Beijing and Hong Kong the iodide ionization scheme was utilised, making it possible to specifically detect oxygenated compounds such as carboxylic acids, organic nitrates and sulphates as well as some inorganic compounds e.g. N2O5, ClNO2, and HONO. For numerous compounds significant levels were detected in both the gas and particle phase enabling evaluation of partitioning and gas-to-particle transformation and its relationship to atmospheric conditions and estimated vapour pressures. Furthermore, the detection of molecular markers such as levoglucosan, C6H5NO3, C10H16NSO7, C5H8SO7, C5H8O4 can support source apportionment and atmospheric process description. In order to further investigate atmospheric ageing/processing a portable laminar flow reactor (Go:PAM) was for selected periods utilized to

  16. A multi-component parallel-plate flow chamber system for studying the effect of exercise-induced wall shear stress on endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Xia; Xiang, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Zhu, Yong; Luan, Yong; Liu, Shu-Tian; Qin, Kai-Rong

    2016-12-28

    In vivo studies have demonstrated that reasonable exercise training can improve endothelial function. To confirm the key role of wall shear stress induced by exercise on endothelial cells, and to understand how wall shear stress affects the structure and the function of endothelial cells, it is crucial to design and fabricate an in vitro multi-component parallel-plate flow chamber system which can closely replicate exercise-induced wall shear stress waveforms in artery. The in vivo wall shear stress waveforms from the common carotid artery of a healthy volunteer in resting and immediately after 30 min acute aerobic cycling exercise were first calculated by measuring the inner diameter and the center-line blood flow velocity with a color Doppler ultrasound. According to the above in vivo wall shear stress waveforms, we designed and fabricated a parallel-plate flow chamber system with appropriate components based on a lumped parameter hemodynamics model. To validate the feasibility of this system, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) line were cultured within the parallel-plate flow chamber under abovementioned two types of wall shear stress waveforms and the intracellular actin microfilaments and nitric oxide (NO) production level were evaluated using fluorescence microscope. Our results show that the trends of resting and exercise-induced wall shear stress waveforms, especially the maximal, minimal and mean wall shear stress as well as oscillatory shear index, generated by the parallel-plate flow chamber system are similar to those acquired from the common carotid artery. In addition, the cellular experiments demonstrate that the actin microfilaments and the production of NO within cells exposed to the two different wall shear stress waveforms exhibit different dynamic behaviors; there are larger numbers of actin microfilaments and higher level NO in cells exposed in exercise-induced wall shear stress condition than resting wall shear stress condition

  17. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, M Allen [Berkeley, CA; Beeman, Barton V [San Mateo, CA; Benett, William J [Livermore, CA; Hadley, Dean R [Manteca, CA; Landre, Phoebe [Livermore, CA; Lehew, Stacy L [Livermore, CA; Krulevitch, Peter A [Pleasanton, CA

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  18. Diogene: A 4π detector, based on a time projection chamber, for studying central collisions of relativistic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosset, J.

    1981-01-01

    'Diogene' is the name we have chosen for a 4π solid angle detector, based on a Time Projection Chamber, designed to perform exclusive measurements of charged particles emitted in central collisions or relativistic heavy ions. This detector is being developed by a collaboration between physicists from Saclay, Strasbourg and Clermont Ferrand, to be installed at the Saturne Synchrotron in Saclay. I first give the motivations for our choice of a TPC rather than any other kind of detector, then I recall the principle of such a detector, before describing it with more detail and describing its present status and forsean capabilities, including some discussion about the possible extension of such a detector towards higher energies and/or heavier beams. (orig.)

  19. Diogene: a 4π detector, based on a time projection chamber, for studying central collisions of relativistic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosset, J.

    1980-10-01

    'Diogene' is the name we have chosen for a 4π solid angle detector, based on a Time Projection Chamber (TPC), designed to perform exclusive measurements of charged particles emitted in central collisions or relativistic heavy ions This detector is being developed by a collaboration between physicists from Saclay, Strasbourg and Clermont-Ferrand, to be installed at the Saturne Synchrotron in Saclay. I shall first give the motivations for our choice of a TPC rather than any other kind of detector, than recall the principle of such a detector, before describing it with more detail and describing its present status and forsean capabilities, including some discussion about the possible extension of such a detector towards higher energies and/or heavier beams

  20. Studi Numerik Karakterisasi Aliran 3 Dimensi Multifase (Gas-Solid) Pada Gravity Settling Chamber Dengan Variasi Kecepatan Inlet Dan Diameter Partikel Pada Aliran Dilute Phase

    OpenAIRE

    Isa’i, Adi Mochammad; Widodo, Wawan Aries

    2013-01-01

    Kegiatan pemilahan pada aktivitas produksi merupakan salah satu kegiatan yang banyak dilakukan pada dunia industri. Penggunaan gravity settling chamber merupakan teknologi pemilahan partikel yang paling sedehana dan murah. Maka dalam perancangan suatu gravity settling chamber perlu diketahui parameter yang mempengaruhi kinerja dari alat tersebut. Analisa karakteristik aliran pada gravity settling chamber dilakukan dengan metode simulasi numerik menggunakan persamaan Eularian-Lagrangian. Sebu...

  1. Studi Numerik Karakterisasi Aliran 3 Dimensi Multifase (Gas-Solid) Pada Gravity Settling Chamber Dengan Variasi Kecepatan Inlet Dan Diameter Partikel Pada Aliran Dilute Phase

    OpenAIRE

    Adi Mochammad Isa’i; Wawan Aries Widodo

    2013-01-01

    Kegiatan  pemilahan pada aktivitas produksi merupakan salah satu kegiatan yang banyak dilakukan pada dunia industri. Penggunaan gravity settling chamber merupakan teknologi pemilahan partikel yang paling sedehana dan murah. Maka dalam perancangan suatu gravity settling chamber perlu diketahui parameter yang mempengaruhi kinerja dari alat tersebut. Analisa karakteristik aliran pada gravity settling chamber dilakukan dengan metode simulasi numerik menggunakan persamaan Eularian-Lagrangian. Sebu...

  2. Fission Product Yield Study of 235U, 238U and 239Pu Using Dual-Fission Ionization Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C.; Tornow, W.; Gooden, M.; Kelley, J.; Arnold, C.; Bond, E.; Bredeweg, T.; Fowler, M.; Moody, W.; Rundberg, R.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D.; Wilhelmy, J.; Becker, J.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M.; Tonchev, A.

    2014-05-01

    To resolve long-standing differences between LANL and LLNL regarding the correct fission basis for analysis of nuclear test data [M.B. Chadwick et al., Nucl. Data Sheets 111, 2891 (2010); H. Selby et al., Nucl. Data Sheets 111, 2891 (2010)], a collaboration between TUNL/LANL/LLNL has been established to perform high-precision measurements of neutron induced fission product yields. The main goal is to make a definitive statement about the energy dependence of the fission yields to an accuracy better than 2-3% between 1 and 15 MeV, where experimental data are very scarce. At TUNL, we have completed the design, fabrication and testing of three dual-fission chambers dedicated to 235U, 238U, and 239Pu. The dual-fission chambers were used to make measurements of the fission product activity relative to the total fission rate, as well as for high-precision absolute fission yield measurements. The activation method was employed, utilizing the mono-energetic neutron beams available at TUNL. Neutrons of 4.6, 9.0, and 14.5 MeV were produced via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction, and for neutrons at 14.8 MeV, the 3H(d,n)4He reaction was used. After activation, the induced γ-ray activity of the fission products was measured for two months using high-resolution HPGe detectors in a low-background environment. Results for the yield of seven fission fragments of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu and a comparison to available data at other energies are reported. For the first time results are available for neutron energies between 2 and 14 MeV.

  3. General cavity theory in the dosimetry of X-rays. Experimental study with a high-pressure chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, A.; Eggermont, G.; Jacobs, R.

    1978-01-01

    Consistent models have been constructed for the calculation of the stopping power ratio in the limiting cases of small and large cavity sizes. The direct application of this theory is inhibited by the lack of data on isotropic backscatter coefficients and the uncertainty in the appropriate interpolation procedure between the limiting cases. An experimental arrangement has been set up to yield confirmation of the theory and to provide the missing information. Measurements have been made of the ionization density in a parallel-plate chamber with gold walls, filled with air pressurized from 1 to 25 atm. The plate separation is 4 mm and the effective energy of the heavily filtered X-rays is 170 keV, such that quite a large of cavity sizes is covered, from about one tenth of the average electron range to about the maximum range. The collecting plate of the chamber consists of a 10 cm dia. collecting electrode surrounded by a 5 cm guard ring, such that no side wall effects occur. Through attenuation of the X-rays in the walls of the pressure vessel, the air mass and the gold foils, a large fluence of secondary photons is produced, which has been calculated with great accuracy. The experimental data and the calculated values of the stopping power ratio (air to gold) show good agreement, within the limits of confidence of the energy absorption coefficients. Further analysis of the data shows the need to use a 24% smaller value for the ratio of absorption coefficients (air to gold), and determines the energy backscatter coefficient of gold (bsub(en)=0.49) and the interpolation procedure. The consequences of applying cavity theory in dosimetry are discussed. (author)

  4. Effects of Simulated Smog Atmospheres in Rodent Models of Metabolic and Immunologic Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee Hargrove, Marie; Snow, Samantha J; Luebke, Robert W; Wood, Charles E; Krug, Jonathan D; Krantz, Q Todd; King, Charly; Copeland, Carey B; McCullough, Shaun D; Gowdy, Kymberly M; Kodavanti, Urmila P; Gilmour, M Ian; Gavett, Stephen H

    2018-03-06

    Air pollution is a diverse and dynamic mixture of gaseous and particulate matter, limiting our understanding of associated adverse health outcomes. The biological effects of two simulated smog atmospheres (SA) with different compositions but similar air quality health indexes were compared in a nonobese diabetic rat model (Goto-Kakizaki, GK) and three mouse immune models (house dust mite (HDM) allergy, antibody response to heat-killed pneumococcus, and resistance to influenza A infection). In GK rats, both SA-PM (high particulate matter) and SA-O 3 (high ozone) decreased cholesterol levels immediately after a 4-h exposure, whereas only SA-O 3 increased airflow limitation. Airway responsiveness to methacholine was increased in HDM-allergic mice compared with nonallergic mice, but exposure to SA-PM or SA-O 3 did not significantly alter responsiveness. Exposure to SA-PM did not affect the IgM response to pneumococcus, and SA-O 3 did not affect virus titers, although inflammatory cytokine levels were decreased in mice infected at the end of a 7-day exposure. Collectively, acute SA exposures produced limited health effects in animal models of metabolic and immune diseases. Effects of SA-O 3 tended to be greater than those of SA-PM, suggesting that gas-phase components in photochemically derived multipollutant mixtures may be of greater concern than secondary organic aerosol PM.

  5. Note: Small anaerobic chamber for optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvet, Adrien A. P., E-mail: adrien.chauvet@gmail.com; Chergui, Majed [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Ultrarapide, ISIC, Faculté des Sciences de Base, Station 6, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Agarwal, Rachna; Cramer, William A. [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The study of oxygen-sensitive biological samples requires an effective control of the atmosphere in which they are housed. In this aim however, no commercial anaerobic chamber is adequate to solely enclose the sample and small enough to fit in a compact spectroscopic system with which analysis can be performed. Furthermore, spectroscopic analysis requires the probe beam to pass through the whole chamber, introducing a requirement for adequate windows. In response to these challenges, we present a 1 l anaerobic chamber that is suitable for broad-band spectroscopic analysis. This chamber has the advantage of (1) providing access, via a septum, to the sample and (2) allows the sample position to be adjusted while keeping the chamber fixed and hermetic during the experiment.

  6. On different experimental behaviour of fast secondary particles produced in 12C interactions at relativistic energies as studied with radiochemistry and in a propane chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulakov, B.A.; Karachuk, J.; Gelovani, L.K.; Gridnev, T.G.; Sosnin, A.N.; Brandt, R.

    1998-01-01

    Energetic secondary fragments produced in the interaction of (41-44) GeV 12 C ions with copper exhibit experimentally a broader angular distribution as compared to energetic secondary fragments produced in the interactions at a lower 12 C-energy (15-25) GeV when studied with radiochemical techniques. Such a different experimental behaviour of secondary fragments produced by 12 C ions of the same two energy groups is not observed, when these secondary fragments are investigated with a propane bubble chamber. Separation of secondary particles is described

  7. Wire chambers: Trends and alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regler, Meinhard

    1992-05-15

    The subtitle of this year's Vienna Wire Chamber Conference - 'Recent Trends and Alternative Techniques' - signalled that it covered a wide range of science and technology. While an opening Vienna talk by wire chamber pioneer Georges Charpak many years ago began 'Les funerailles des chambres a fils (the burial of wire chambers)', the contrary feeling this year was that wire chambers are very much alive!.

  8. DELPHI Barrel Muon Chamber Module

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The module was used as part of the muon identification system on the barrel of the DELPHI detector at LEP, and was in active use from 1989 to 2000. The module consists of 7 individual muons chambers arranged in 2 layers. Chambers in the upper layer are staggered by half a chamber width with respect to the lower layer. Each individual chamber is a drift chamber consisting of an anode wire, 47 microns in diameter, and a wrapped copper delay line. Each chamber provided 3 signal for each muon passing through the chamber, from which a 3D space-point could be reconstructed.

  9. Can machine learning complement traditional medical device surveillance? A case-study of dual-chamber implantable cardioverter–defibrillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross JS

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Joseph S Ross,1–4 Jonathan Bates,4 Craig S Parzynski,4 Joseph G Akar,4,5 Jeptha P Curtis,4,5 Nihar R Desai,4,5 James V Freeman,4,5 Ginger M Gamble,4 Richard Kuntz,6 Shu-Xia Li,4 Danica Marinac-Dabic,7 Frederick A Masoudi,8 Sharon-Lise T Normand,9,10 Isuru Ranasinghe,11 Richard E Shaw,12 Harlan M Krumholz2–5 1Section of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, 2Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program, Yale School of Medicine, 3Department of Health Policy and Management, Yale School of Public Health, 4Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Yale–New Haven Hospital, 5Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 6Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, MN, 7Division of Epidemiology, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, US Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD, 8Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, 9Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, 10Department of Biostatistics, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; 11Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 12Department of Clinical Informatics, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USA Background: Machine learning methods may complement traditional analytic methods for medical device surveillance.Methods and results: Using data from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry for implantable cardioverter–defibrillators (ICDs linked to Medicare administrative claims for longitudinal follow-up, we applied three statistical approaches to safety-signal detection for commonly used dual-chamber ICDs that used two propensity score (PS models: one specified by subject-matter experts (PS-SME, and the other one by machine learning-based selection (PS-ML. The first approach used PS-SME and cumulative incidence (time-to-event, the second approach used PS-SME and cumulative risk (Data Extraction and

  10. Radon diffusion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretzsch, G.; Boerner, E.; Lehmann, R.; Sarenio, O.

    1986-01-01

    The invention relates to the detection of radioactive gases emitting alpha particles like radon, thoron and their alpha-decaying daughters by means of a diffusion chamber with a passive detector, preferably with a solid state track detector. In the chamber above and towards the detector there is a single metallized electret with negative polarity. The distance between electret and detector corresponds to the range of the alpha particles of radon daughters in air at the most. The electret collects the positively charged daughters and functions as surface source. The electret increases the sensitivity by the factor 4

  11. The Honeycomb Strip Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graaf, Harry van der; Buskens, Joop; Rewiersma, Paul; Koenig, Adriaan; Wijnen, Thei

    1991-06-01

    The Honeycomb Strip Chamber (HSC) is a new position sensitive detector. It consists of a stack of folded foils, forming a rigid honeycomb structure. In the centre of each hexagonal cell a wire is strung. Conducting strips on the foils, perpendicular to the wires, pick up the induced avalanche charge. Test results of a prototype show that processing the signals form three adjacent strips nearest to the track gives a spatial resolution better than 64 μm for perpendicular incident tracks. The chamber performance is only slightly affected by a magnetic field. (author). 25 refs.; 21 figs

  12. Multiple chamber ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, E.E.

    1982-01-01

    An ionization smoke detector employs a single radiation source in a construction comprising at least two chambers with a center or node electrode. The radioactive source is associated with this central electrode, and its positioning may be adjusted relative to the electrode to alter the proportion of the source that protrudes into each chamber. The source may also be mounted in the plane of the central electrode, and positioned relative to the center of the electrode. The central electrode or source may be made tiltable relative to the body of the detector

  13. Charpak hemispherical wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    pieces. Mesures are of the largest one. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  14. micro strip gas chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    About 16 000 Micro Strip Gas Chambers like this one will be used in the CMS tracking detector. They will measure the tracks of charged particles to a hundredth of a millimetre precision in the region near the collision point where the density of particles is very high. Each chamber is filled with a gas mixture of argon and dimethyl ether. Charged particles passing through ionise the gas, knocking out electrons which are collected on the aluminium strips visible under the microscope. Such detectors are being used in radiography. They give higher resolution imaging and reduce the required dose of radiation.

  15. Preliminary Study on a Cylindrical Ambient Dose-equivalent Chamber%圆柱形周围剂量当量电离室的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李德红; 杨健; 邬蒙蒙; 李兴东; 杨元第

    2013-01-01

    根据国际辐射单位和测量委员会(ICRU)报告中对环境监测中新的实用辐射量定义,对一种圆柱形周围剂量当量电离室进行了初步研究.结果表明在正常工作条件下,收集极的材料和尺寸对于能量响应的影响并不明显;铝质电离室的能量响应特性好于有机玻璃的电离室.可以考虑同时采用有机玻璃和铝作为制作电离室的材料,通过理论计算并优化几何尺寸得到较好的能量响应曲线.%According to definitions of the new operational radiation quantities for area monitoring recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) report,a cylindrical ambient dose equivalent ionization chamber is designed and preliminary studied.The results show that the effect by the material and the size of the collector to the energy response is not obvious,energy response characteristic of the aluminum ionization chamber is better than that of the plexiglass.Through the theoretical calculation and geometry optimization,the cylindrical ambient dose equivalent ionization chamber made from ptexiglass as a shell and lined with an appropriate thickness of the aluminum layer will get a better energy response curve.

  16. Characterization of a tubular flow chamber for studying platelet interaction with biologic and prosthetic materials: deposition of indium 111-labeled platelets on collagen, subendothelium, and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badimon, L.; Turitto, V.; Rosemark, J.A.; Badimon, J.J.; Fuster, V.

    1987-01-01

    A plastic (Plexiglas) chamber for evaluating platelet deposition under controlled hemodynamic conditions has been developed. The perfusion chamber has been designed to retain the cylindrical shape typical of the vasculature, to be flexible enough to accept a variety of biologic and prosthetic materials, and to simulate a broad range of physiologic flow conditions in either an ex vivo or in vitro perfusion system. Three type of surfaces were exposed to blood flowing directly from the carotid artery of a heparinized pig through the perfusion chamber: de-endothelialized pig aorta, collagen strips from rabbit Achilles tendon, and an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene material (Gore-Tex). Platelets, previously radiolabeled with indium 111 and injected into the animal, were quantified on the material surface, and the total number of deposited platelets determined for a range of blood flow rates (5 to 40 ml/min) and exposure times (0.5 to 20 minutes). The deposition rates were correlated with theory for describing the mass transport of platelets to the test surface. At the wall shear rates investigated (105 to 850 sec-1), the deposition of platelets on subendothelium was strongly dependent on the local flow conditions. Values of deposition on Gore-Tex obtained at similar flow conditions (105 to 425 sec-1) were reduced compared with that observed on subendothelium and showed a markedly weaker dependence on the shear rate. In contrast, deposition of platelets on collagen was more than an order of magnitude greater than on subendothelium and showed a dependence on flow only at the lowest flow rate studied (10 ml/min). The results indicate that collagen is much more reactive than subendothelium and Gore-Tex with respect to the growth and stability of platelet aggregates and moreover suggest that flow mechanisms for depositing platelets on various surface may be substantially different

  17. Characterization of a tubular flow chamber for studying platelet interaction with biologic and prosthetic materials: deposition of indium 111-labeled platelets on collagen, subendothelium, and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badimon, L.; Turitto, V.; Rosemark, J.A.; Badimon, J.J.; Fuster, V.

    1987-12-01

    A plastic (Plexiglas) chamber for evaluating platelet deposition under controlled hemodynamic conditions has been developed. The perfusion chamber has been designed to retain the cylindrical shape typical of the vasculature, to be flexible enough to accept a variety of biologic and prosthetic materials, and to simulate a broad range of physiologic flow conditions in either an ex vivo or in vitro perfusion system. Three type of surfaces were exposed to blood flowing directly from the carotid artery of a heparinized pig through the perfusion chamber: de-endothelialized pig aorta, collagen strips from rabbit Achilles tendon, and an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene material (Gore-Tex). Platelets, previously radiolabeled with indium 111 and injected into the animal, were quantified on the material surface, and the total number of deposited platelets determined for a range of blood flow rates (5 to 40 ml/min) and exposure times (0.5 to 20 minutes). The deposition rates were correlated with theory for describing the mass transport of platelets to the test surface. At the wall shear rates investigated (105 to 850 sec-1), the deposition of platelets on subendothelium was strongly dependent on the local flow conditions. Values of deposition on Gore-Tex obtained at similar flow conditions (105 to 425 sec-1) were reduced compared with that observed on subendothelium and showed a markedly weaker dependence on the shear rate. In contrast, deposition of platelets on collagen was more than an order of magnitude greater than on subendothelium and showed a dependence on flow only at the lowest flow rate studied (10 ml/min). The results indicate that collagen is much more reactive than subendothelium and Gore-Tex with respect to the growth and stability of platelet aggregates and moreover suggest that flow mechanisms for depositing platelets on various surface may be substantially different.

  18. Calibration of the ATLAS precision muon chambers and study of the decay {tau} {yields} {mu}{mu}{mu} at the large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeben, Joerg Horst Jochen von

    2010-07-07

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide protons at centre-of-mass energies of up to 14 TeV. One of the two general purpose experiments at the LHC is ATLAS, built to probe a broad spectrum of physics processes of the Standard Model of particle physics and beyond. ATLAS is equipped with a muon spectrometer comprising three superconducting air-core toroid magnets and 1150 precision drift tube (MDT) chambers measuring muon trajectories with better than 50 {mu}m position resolution. The accuracy of the space-to-drift-time relationships of the MDT chambers is one of the main contributions to the momentum resolution. In this thesis, an improved method for the calibration of the precision drift tube chambers in magnetic fields has been developed and tested using curved muon track segments. An accuracy of the drift distance measurement of better than 20 {mu}m is achieved leading to negligible deterioration of the muon momentum resolution. The second part of this work is dedicated to the study of the lepton flavour violating decay {tau}{yields}{mu}{mu}{mu}. Lepton flavour violation is predicted by almost every extension of the Standard Model. About 10{sup 12}{tau} leptons are produced per year at an instantaneous luminosity of 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. Simulated data samples have been used to evaluate the sensitivity of the ATLAS experiment for {tau}{yields}{mu}{mu}{mu} decays with an integrated luminosity of 10 fb{sup -1}. Taking theoretical and experimental systematic uncertainties into account an upper limit on the signal branching ratio of B({tau}{yields}{mu}{mu}{mu}) <5.9 x 10{sup -7} at 90% confidence level is achievable. This result represents the first estimation in ATLAS. (orig.)

  19. Study of Interaction of Low-Energy Antiprotons with H$^{2}$,He$^{3}$,He$^{4}$,Ne-Nuclei Using a Streamer Chamber in Magnetic Field

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is the systematic study of the interaction between low-energy antiprotons and the H|2,~He|3,~He|4,~Ne-nuclei using a self shunted streamer chamber in a magnetic field exposed to the antiproton beam of the LEAR facility. The properties of the self shunted streamer chamber, which allows the use of the filling gas (hydrogen, helium, neon at a pressure of l~atm) as a target, permit to carry out experiments also in the very low-energy region. \\\\ \\\\ The experimental apparatus is suitable for a large programme of measurements. We plan to measure the @*H|2 cross section and the spectator momentum distributions at @* momenta lower than 250~MeV/c, where data are lacking. It is interesting to study for the first time the @*He|3 and @*He|4 interactions measuring the cross sections and the emitted particle distributions. Among other things the knowledge of the branching ratio of the @*He|4 annihilation channels clarifies some open cosmological questions. The study of the process of nuclear absor...

  20. The impact of insonation angle on four-chamber view image quality: an observational study on 2866 routine scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaudi, Suha; Fries, Nicolas; Tezenas du Montcel, Sophie; Dommergues, Marc

    2015-04-01

    To determine insonation angles achieved in routine screening practice and their impact on image quality. Prospective cross-sectional observational survey of 2866 four-chamber views produced by 287 senor ultrasonographers, from unselected routine second-trimester screening scans. Images were scored from 0 to 5 according to whether two atria, two ventricles, the heart crux, the apex, and the descending aorta were seen. Images were considered adequate if two atria, two ventricles, and the heart crux were seen. The insonation angle was classified as apical, basal, or lateral according to the orientation of the fetal heart to the ultrasound beam. There were 1612 (56.3%) apical, 869 (30.3%) basal, and 385 (13.4%) lateral views. The mean score and the rate of adequate images were significantly greater in the apical group (4.56 and 81.8%) than in the basal group (4.19 and 71.1 %) and were significantly greater in the basal group than in the lateral one (3.6 and 30.9%), p John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.