WorldWideScience

Sample records for smart room environments

  1. TOF Imaging in Smart Room Environments towards Improved People Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guðmundsson, Sigurjón Árni; Larsen, Rasmus; Aanæs, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    In this Paper we present the use of Time-of-Flight (TOF) cameras in Smart-rooms and how this leads to improved results in segmenting the people in the room from the background and consequently better 3D reconstruction of the people. A calibrated rig of one Swissranger SR3100 Time-of-flight range ...

  2. Improved 3D reconstruction in smart-room environments using ToF imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guðmundsson, Sigurjón Árni; Pardas, Montse; Casas, Josep R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the use of Time-of-Flight (ToF) cameras in smart-rooms and how this leads to improved results in segmenting the people in the room from the background and consequently better 3D reconstruction of foreground objects. A calibrated rig consisting of one Swissranger SR3100 Time-of...

  3. Smart Environment Program, Smart Way to Smart City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutik Rachmawati

    2017-06-01

    which play important role as the leading sectors of the smart environment program were the key resources of this research. The data were collected from 30 interviews. This research gave its reader a new perspective in understanding the concept and the practices of smart city in the public administration perspective.

  4. Persistent Authentication in Smart Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads Syska; Kirschmeyer, Martin; Jensen, Christian D.

    2008-01-01

    Inhabitants in smart environments are often authenticated when they enter the smart environment, e.g., through biometrics or smart-/swipe-card systems. It may sometimes be necessary to re-authenticate when an inhabitant wishes to enter a restricted area or access ambient services or location based...... information, e.g., it is common to have swipe card terminals placed next to doors to restricted areas. This means that all access to protected resources must have individual means of authenticating users, which makes the access control system more expensive and less flexible, because access controls...... will not be installed unless it is absolutely necessary. The cost of installing and maintaining an authentication infrastructure and the inconvenience of repeatedly authenticating toward different location based service providers mean that new models of authentication are needed in smart environments. This paper...

  5. Interactive Environment Design in Smart City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, DeXiang; Chen, LanSha; Zhou, Xi

    2017-08-01

    The interactive environment design of smart city is not just an interactive progress or interactive mode design, rather than generate an environment such as the “organic” life entity as human beings through interactive design, forming a smart environment with perception, memory, thinking, and reaction.

  6. Conditions for effective smart learning environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koper, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Reference: Koper, E.J.R. (2014) Conditions for effective smart learning environments. Smart Learning Environments,1(5), 1-17. http://www.slejournal.com/content/1/1/5/abstract doi:10.1186/s40561-014-0005-4

  7. Electricity Usage Scheduling in Smart Building Environments Using Smart Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunji Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the recent advances in smart grid technologies as well as the increasing dissemination of smart meters, the electricity usage of every moment can be detected in modern smart building environments. Thus, the utility company adopts different price of electricity at each time slot considering the peak time. This paper presents a new electricity usage scheduling algorithm for smart buildings that adopts real-time pricing of electricity. The proposed algorithm detects the change of electricity prices by making use of a smart device and changes the power mode of each electric device dynamically. Specifically, we formulate the electricity usage scheduling problem as a real-time task scheduling problem and show that it is a complex search problem that has an exponential time complexity. An efficient heuristic based on genetic algorithms is performed on a smart device to cut down the huge searching space and find a reasonable schedule within a feasible time budget. Experimental results with various building conditions show that the proposed algorithm reduces the electricity charge of a smart building by 25.6% on average and up to 33.4%.

  8. Electricity usage scheduling in smart building environments using smart devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunji; Bahn, Hyokyung

    2013-01-01

    With the recent advances in smart grid technologies as well as the increasing dissemination of smart meters, the electricity usage of every moment can be detected in modern smart building environments. Thus, the utility company adopts different price of electricity at each time slot considering the peak time. This paper presents a new electricity usage scheduling algorithm for smart buildings that adopts real-time pricing of electricity. The proposed algorithm detects the change of electricity prices by making use of a smart device and changes the power mode of each electric device dynamically. Specifically, we formulate the electricity usage scheduling problem as a real-time task scheduling problem and show that it is a complex search problem that has an exponential time complexity. An efficient heuristic based on genetic algorithms is performed on a smart device to cut down the huge searching space and find a reasonable schedule within a feasible time budget. Experimental results with various building conditions show that the proposed algorithm reduces the electricity charge of a smart building by 25.6% on average and up to 33.4%.

  9. Mixed reality participants in smart meeting rooms and smart home enviroments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Zwiers, Jakob; Peciva, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Human–computer interaction requires modeling of the user. A user profile typically contains preferences, interests, characteristics, and interaction behavior. However, in its multimodal interaction with a smart environment the user displays characteristics that show how the user, not necessarily

  10. Meetings, Gatherings and Events in Smart Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Spencer, S.N

    2004-01-01

    We survey our research on smart meeting rooms and its relevance for augmented reality meeting support and virtual reality generation of meetings in real-time or off-line. Our aim is to research representations of what takes place during meetings in order to allow generation, e.g. in virtual reality,

  11. Meetings and Meeting Modeling in Smart Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.; Heylen, Dirk K.J.

    In this paper we survey our research on smart meeting rooms and its relevance for augmented reality meeting support and virtual reality generation of meetings in real time or off-line. The research reported here forms part of the European 5th and 6th framework programme projects multi-modal meeting

  12. Human-Computer Interaction in Smart Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravati, Gianluca; Gatteschi, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Here, we provide an overview of the content of the Special Issue on “Human-computer interaction in smart environments”. The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight technologies and solutions encompassing the use of mass-market sensors in current and emerging applications for interacting with Smart Environments. Selected papers address this topic by analyzing different interaction modalities, including hand/body gestures, face recognition, gaze/eye tracking, biosignal analysis, speech and activity recognition, and related issues.

  13. Building Information Modelling for Smart Built Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Jianchao Zhang; Boon-Chong Seet; Tek Tjing Lie

    2015-01-01

    Building information modelling (BIM) provides architectural 3D visualization and a standardized way to share and exchange building information. Recently, there has been an increasing interest in using BIM, not only for design and construction, but also the post-construction management of the built facility. With the emergence of smart built environment (SBE) technology, which embeds most spaces with smart objects to enhance the building’s efficiency, security and comfort of its occupants, th...

  14. SAT based Enforcement of Domotic Effects in Smart Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Razzak, Faisal; Corno, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of economically viable and efficient sensor technology provided impetus to the development of smart devices (or appliances). Modern smart environments are equipped with a multitude of smart devices and sensors, aimed at delivering intelligent services to the users of smart environments. The presence of these diverse smart devices has raised a major problem of managing environments. A rising solution to the problem is the modeling of user goals and intentions, and then interactin...

  15. Situative Space Tracking within Smart Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surie, Dipak; Jäckel, Florian; Janlert, Lars-Erik

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes our efforts in modeling and tracking a human agent’s situation based on his/her possibilities to perceive and act upon objects (both physical and virtual) within smart environments. A Situative Space Model is proposed. WLAN signal-strength-based situative space tracking syste......-laboratory smart home environment where a global precision of 83.4% and a global recall of 88.6% were obtained.......This paper describes our efforts in modeling and tracking a human agent’s situation based on his/her possibilities to perceive and act upon objects (both physical and virtual) within smart environments. A Situative Space Model is proposed. WLAN signal-strength-based situative space tracking system...

  16. Building Information Modelling for Smart Built Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianchao Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Building information modelling (BIM provides architectural 3D visualization and a standardized way to share and exchange building information. Recently, there has been an increasing interest in using BIM, not only for design and construction, but also the post-construction management of the built facility. With the emergence of smart built environment (SBE technology, which embeds most spaces with smart objects to enhance the building’s efficiency, security and comfort of its occupants, there is a need to understand and address the challenges BIM faces in the design, construction and management of future smart buildings. In this paper, we investigate how BIM can contribute to the development of SBE. Since BIM is designed to host information of the building throughout its life cycle, our investigation has covered phases from architecture design to facility management. Firstly, we extend BIM for the design phase to provide material/device profiling and the information exchange interface for various smart objects. Next, we propose a three-layer verification framework to assist BIM users in identifying possible defects in their SBE design. For the post-construction phase, we have designed a facility management tool to provide advanced energy management of smart grid-connected SBEs, where smart objects, as well as distributed energy resources (DERs are deployed.

  17. Collaborative Systems for Smart Environments: Trends and Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camarinha-Matos, L.M.; Afsarmanesh, H.; Camarinha-Matos, L.M.; Afsarmanesh, H.

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative systems will form the warp for smart networked environments wherein humans, organizations, intelligent agents, and devices collaborate. The smart environments of near future will be context sensitive systems within which the physical world is richly and transparently interwoven with

  18. Smart Technology Applications in Business Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Issa, Tomayess; Kommers, Petrus A.M.; Issa, Theodora; Isaías, Pedro; Issa, Touma B.

    2017-01-01

    Technology continues to make great strides in society by providing opportunities for advancement, inclusion, and global competency. As new systems and tools arise, novel applications are created as well. Smart Technology Applications in Business Environments is an essential reference source for the

  19. Human-Computer Interaction in Smart Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Paravati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Here, we provide an overview of the content of the Special Issue on “Human-computer interaction in smart environments”. The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight technologies and solutions encompassing the use of mass-market sensors in current and emerging applications for interacting with Smart Environments. Selected papers address this topic by analyzing different interaction modalities, including hand/body gestures, face recognition, gaze/eye tracking, biosignal analysis, speech and activity recognition, and related issues.

  20. Humor Engineering in Smart Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Fukuda, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    Enjoyment is one of the positive emotions we expect to have when visiting environments that have been designed to provide us with entertainment experiences. However, enjoyment is also part of our daily life, whether we are at home, in our office environment, in public environments or on the move

  1. Learning under uncertainty in smart home environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; McClean, Sally; Scotney, Bryan; Nugent, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Technologies and services for the home environment can provide levels of independence for elderly people to support 'ageing in place'. Learning inhabitants' patterns of carrying out daily activities is a crucial component of these technological solutions with sensor technologies being at the core of such smart environments. Nevertheless, identifying high-level activities from low-level sensor events can be a challenge, as information may be unreliable resulting in incomplete data. Our work addresses the issues of learning in the presence of incomplete data along with the identification and the prediction of inhabitants and their activities under such uncertainty. We show via the evaluation results that our approach also offers the ability to assess the impact of various sensors in the activity recognition process. The benefit of this work is that future predictions can be utilised in a proposed intervention mechanism in a real smart home environment.

  2. Modeling and Formal Verification of Smart Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Corno, Fulvio; Muhammad Sanaullah

    2014-01-01

    Smart Environments (SmE) are a growing combination of various computing frameworks (ubiquitous, pervasive etc), devices, control algorithms and a complex web of interactions. It is at the core of user facilitation in a number of industrial, domestic and public areas. Based on their application areas, SmE may be critical in terms of correctness, reliability, safety, security etc. To achieve error-free and requirement-compliant implementation, these systems are designed resorting to various mod...

  3. Smart Bugs and Digital Banana Peels: Accidental Humor in Smart Environments?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Streitz, N.; Markopoulos, P.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we look at possibilities to introduce humorous situations in smart environments. The assumption is that in future smart environments we have the possibility to configure and even real-time reconfigure environments in a way that humorous situations can be created or that conditions for

  4. Handle system integration as an enabler in an internet of things smart environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Coetzee, L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available in the room can be affected by heating or cooling the temperature sensor and by preventing/allowing light on the lux sensor. The smart environment can further be controlled through access from instant messaging (XMPP). Through this communication channel... in ThingMemory Index 2: URL for Command to be executed Index 3: URL for Command to be executed 10913/SE_COOLER : http://things.meraka.csir.co.za/memory/thingView.seam?thingId=284 http://se-room1-controller.meraka.csir.co.za/?cooler=on http://se-room1...

  5. CULTURAL HERITAGE IN SMART CITY ENVIRONMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    M. Angelidou; E. Karachaliou; T. Angelidou; E. Stylianidis

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates how the historical and cultural heritage of cities is and can be underpinned by means of smart city tools, solutions and applications. Smart cities stand for a conceptual technology-and-innovation driven urban development model. By becoming ‘smart’, cities seek to achieve prosperity, effectiveness and competitiveness on multiple socio-economic levels. Although cultural heritage is one of the many issues addressed by existing smart city strategies, and despite the docum...

  6. Cultural Heritage in Smart City Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelidou, M.; Karachaliou, E.; Angelidou, T.; Stylianidis, E.

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates how the historical and cultural heritage of cities is and can be underpinned by means of smart city tools, solutions and applications. Smart cities stand for a conceptual technology-and-innovation driven urban development model. By becoming `smart', cities seek to achieve prosperity, effectiveness and competitiveness on multiple socio-economic levels. Although cultural heritage is one of the many issues addressed by existing smart city strategies, and despite the documented bilateral benefits, our research about the positioning of urban cultural heritage within three smart city strategies (Barcelona, Amsterdam, and London) reveals fragmented approaches. Our findings suggest that the objective of cultural heritage promotion is not substantially addressed in the investigated smart city strategies. Nevertheless, we observe that cultural heritage management can be incorporated in several different strategic areas of the smart city, reflecting different lines of thinking and serving an array of goals, depending on the case. We conclude that although potential applications and approaches abound, cultural heritage currently stands for a mostly unexploited asset, presenting multiple integration opportunities within smart city contexts. We prompt for further research into bridging the two disciplines and exploiting a variety of use cases with the purpose of enriching the current knowledge base at the intersection of cultural heritage and smart cities.

  7. Aeroheating Environments for a Mars Smart Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Liechty, Derek S.; Hollis, Brian R.; Alter, Stephen J.; Loomis, Mark P.

    2002-01-01

    A proposed Mars Smart Lander is designed to reach the surface via lifting-body atmospheric entry (alpha = 16 deg) to within 10 km of the target site. CFD (computational fluid dynamics) predictions of the forebody aeroheating environments are given for a direct entry from a 2005 launch. The solutions were obtained using an 8-species gas in thermal and chemical nonequilibrium with a radiative-equilibrium wall temperature boundary condition. Select wind tunnel data are presented from tests at NASA Langley Research Center. Turbulence effects are included to account for both smooth body transition and turbulence due to heatshield penetrations. Natural transition is based on a momentum-thickness Reynolds number value of 200. The effects of heatshield penetrations on turbulence are estimated from wind tunnel tests of various cavity sizes and locations. Both natural transition and heatshield penetrations are predicted to cause turbulence prior to the nominal trajectory peak heating time. Laminar and turbulent CFD predictions along the trajectory are used to estimate heat rates and loads. The predicted peak turbulent heat rate of 63 W/sq cm on the heatshield leeward flank is 70% higher than the laminar peak. The maximum integrated heat load for a fully turbulent heat pulse is 38% higher than the laminar load on the heatshield nose. The predicted aeroheating environments with uncertainty factors will be used to design a thermal protection system.

  8. CULTURAL HERITAGE IN SMART CITY ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Angelidou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates how the historical and cultural heritage of cities is and can be underpinned by means of smart city tools, solutions and applications. Smart cities stand for a conceptual technology-and-innovation driven urban development model. By becoming ‘smart’, cities seek to achieve prosperity, effectiveness and competitiveness on multiple socio-economic levels. Although cultural heritage is one of the many issues addressed by existing smart city strategies, and despite the documented bilateral benefits, our research about the positioning of urban cultural heritage within three smart city strategies (Barcelona, Amsterdam, and London reveals fragmented approaches. Our findings suggest that the objective of cultural heritage promotion is not substantially addressed in the investigated smart city strategies. Nevertheless, we observe that cultural heritage management can be incorporated in several different strategic areas of the smart city, reflecting different lines of thinking and serving an array of goals, depending on the case. We conclude that although potential applications and approaches abound, cultural heritage currently stands for a mostly unexploited asset, presenting multiple integration opportunities within smart city contexts. We prompt for further research into bridging the two disciplines and exploiting a variety of use cases with the purpose of enriching the current knowledge base at the intersection of cultural heritage and smart cities.

  9. User Interfaces and HCI for Ambient Intelligence and Smart Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, Andreas

    As this book clearly demonstrates, there are many ways to create smart environments and to realize the vision of ambient intelligence. But whatever constitutes this smartness or intelligence, has to manifest itself to the human user through the human senses. Interaction with the environment can only take place through phenomena which can be perceived through these senses and through physical actions xecuted by the human. Therefore, the devices which create these phenomena (e.g., light, sound, force, …) or sense these actions are the user's contact point with the underlying smartness or intelligence.

  10. Smart Sensor Network System For Environment Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Ali Baloch

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available SSN (Smart Sensor Network systems could be used to monitor buildings with modern infrastructure, plant sites with chemical pollution, horticulture, natural habitat, wastewater management and modern transport system. To sense attributes of phenomena and make decisions on the basis of the sensed value is the primary goal of such systems. In this paper a Smart Spatially aware sensor system is presented. A smart system, which could continuously monitor the network to observe the functionality and trigger, alerts to the base station if a change in the system occurs and provide feedback periodically, on demand or even continuously depending on the nature of the application. The results of the simulation trials presented in this paper exhibit the performance of a Smart Spatially Aware Sensor Networks.

  11. Enhanced Environment Interaction with Use of RFID Smart Labels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejc SUHADOLNIK

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Smart labels are devices with sensors which can interact with existing RIFD (radio frequency identification infrastructure. Sensors can be integrated in tag chips or can be connected externally. Smart labels have been used in numerous applications to improve transportation and product control. In this work we have summarized some of our applications in which smart tags are used to enhance interaction with environment. Smart labels can be used to control temperature in fish supply cold chain, control fruit ripening process in plantation, control medical staff disinfection in hospitals or be used to measure sweat contents on a patch worn on human skin. We presented a smart tag with digital sensor interface and two example sensor nodes. First with 4 environmental sensors and second with accelerometer and gyroscope. The sensor nodes have been used for wireless data collection.

  12. Visual Development Environment for Semantically Interoperable Smart Cities Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Roukounaki, Aikaterini; Soldatos, John; Petrolo, Riccardo; Loscri, Valeria; Mitton, Nathalie; Serrano, Martin

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents an IoT architecture for the semantic interoperability of diverse IoT systems and applications in smart cities. The architecture virtualizes diverse IoT systems and ensures their modelling and representation according to common standards-based IoT ontologies. Furthermore, based on this architecture, the paper introduces a first-of-a-kind visual development environment which eases the development of semantically interoperable applications in smart cit...

  13. Development of a Smart Grid Simulation Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delamare, J; Bitachon, B.; Peng, Z.; Wang, Y.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.; Jongerden, M.R.

    With the increased integration of renewable energy sources the interaction between energy producers and consumers has become a bi-directional exchange. Therefore, the electrical grid must be adapted into a smart grid which effectively regulates this two-way interaction. With the aid of simulation,

  14. Development of a Smart Grid Simulation Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delamare, J; Bitachon, B.; Peng, Z.; Wang, Y.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.; Jongerden, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    With the increased integration of renewable energy sources the interaction between energy producers and consumers has become a bi-directional exchange. Therefore, the electrical grid must be adapted into a smart grid which effectively regulates this two-way interaction. With the aid of simulation,

  15. Smart sensors for health and environment monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book covers two most important applications of smart sensors, namely bio-health sensing and environmental monitoring.   The approach taken is holistic and covers the complete scope of the subject matter from the principles of the sensing mechanism, through device physics, circuit and system implementation techniques, and energy issues  to wireless connectivity solutions. It is written at a level suitable mainly for post-graduate level researchers interested in practical applications. The chapters are independent but complementary to each other, and the book works within the wider perspective of essential smart sensors for the Internet of Things (IoT).   This is the second of three books based on the Integrated Smart Sensors research project, which describe the development of innovative devices, circuits, and system-level enabling technologies.  The aim of the project was to develop common platforms on which various devices and sensors can be loaded, and to create systems offering significant improve...

  16. Preserving Differential Privacy for Similarity Measurement in Smart Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Seng Wong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in both sensor technologies and network infrastructures have encouraged the development of smart environments to enhance people’s life and living styles. However, collecting and storing user’s data in the smart environments pose severe privacy concerns because these data may contain sensitive information about the subject. Hence, privacy protection is now an emerging issue that we need to consider especially when data sharing is essential for analysis purpose. In this paper, we consider the case where two agents in the smart environment want to measure the similarity of their collected or stored data. We use similarity coefficient function FSC as the measurement metric for the comparison with differential privacy model. Unlike the existing solutions, our protocol can facilitate more than one request to compute FSC without modifying the protocol. Our solution ensures privacy protection for both the inputs and the computed FSC results.

  17. Preserving differential privacy for similarity measurement in smart environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kok-Seng; Kim, Myung Ho

    2014-01-01

    Advances in both sensor technologies and network infrastructures have encouraged the development of smart environments to enhance people's life and living styles. However, collecting and storing user's data in the smart environments pose severe privacy concerns because these data may contain sensitive information about the subject. Hence, privacy protection is now an emerging issue that we need to consider especially when data sharing is essential for analysis purpose. In this paper, we consider the case where two agents in the smart environment want to measure the similarity of their collected or stored data. We use similarity coefficient function (F SC) as the measurement metric for the comparison with differential privacy model. Unlike the existing solutions, our protocol can facilitate more than one request to compute F SC without modifying the protocol. Our solution ensures privacy protection for both the inputs and the computed F SC results.

  18. The SmartOR: a distributed sensor network to improve operating room efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Albert Y; Joerger, Guillaume; Fikfak, Vid; Salmon, Remi; Dunkin, Brian J; Bass, Barbara L; Garbey, Marc

    2017-02-24

    Despite the significant expense of OR time, best practice achieves only 70% efficiency. Compounding this problem is a lack of real-time data. Most current OR utilization programs require manual data entry. Automated systems require installation and maintenance of expensive tracking hardware throughout the institution. This study developed an inexpensive, automated OR utilization system and analyzed data from multiple operating rooms. OR activity was deconstructed into four room states. A sensor network was then developed to automatically capture these states using only three sensors, a local wireless network, and a data capture computer. Two systems were then installed into two ORs, recordings captured 24/7. The SmartOR recorded the following events: any room activity, patient entry/exit time, anesthesia time, laparoscopy time, room turnover time, and time of preoperative patient identification by the surgeon. From November 2014 to December 2015, data on 1003 cases were collected. The mean turnover time was 36 min, and 38% of cases met the institutional goal of ≤30 min. Data analysis also identified outlier cases (>1 SD from mean) in the domains of time from patient entry into the OR to intubation (11% of cases) and time from extubation to patient exiting the OR (11% of cases). Time from surgeon identification of patient to scheduled procedure start time was 11 min (institution bylaws require 20 min before scheduled start time), yet OR teams required 22 min on average to bring a patient into the room after surgeon identification. The SmartOR automatically and reliably captures data on OR room state and, in real time, identifies outlier cases that may be examined closer to improve efficiency. As no manual entry is required, the data are indisputable and allow OR teams to maintain a patient-centric focus.

  19. Designing User Interfaces for Smart-Applications for Operating Rooms and Intensive Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindsmüller, Martin Christof; Haar, Maral; Schulz, Hannes; Herczeg, Michael

    Today’s physicians and nurses working in operating rooms and intensive care units have to deal with an ever increasing amount of data. More and more medical devices are delivering information, which has to be perceived and interpreted in regard to patient status and the necessity to adjust therapy. The combination of high information load and insufficient usability creates a severe challenge for the health personnel with respect to proper monitoring of these devices respective to acknowledging alarms and timely reaction to critical incidents. Smart Applications are a new kind of decision support systems that incorporate medical expertise in order to help health personnel in regard to diagnosis and therapy. By means of a User Centered Design process of two Smart Applications (anaesthesia monitor display, diagnosis display), we illustrate which approach should be followed and which processes and methods have been successfully applied in fostering the design of usable medical devices.

  20. Overview of the LHD central control room data monitoring environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emoto, M., E-mail: emoto.masahiko@nifs.ac.jp; Yoshinuma, M.; Yoshida, M.; Nakanishi, H.; Iwata, C.; Ohsuna, M.; Nonomura, M.; Imazu, S.; Yokota, M.; Aoyagi, M.; Ogawa, H.; Ida, K.; Watanabe, K.; Kaneko, O.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • In this paper, the data monitoring environments in the LHD central control room, for example, summary data graph and video monitoring tools are introduced. Also, the environments for the remote participants are introduced. - Abstract: During the Large Helical Device (LHD) experiments, many scientists and technical staff are working in the central control room to operate the experiment. They must manage the diagnostics and controlling devices referring to the results of the last plasma shot. Also, the experiment coordinator must decide the conditions for the subsequent experiments using the results. Furthermore, many scientists are participating in the experiment from remote sites. Therefore, it is important to share the information in the control room quickly, such as the results of the last plasma discharge, with the remote user as well as with the staff in the room. In this paper, the data monitoring environment in the LHD central control room is introduced.

  1. Discovering Activities to Recognize and Track in a Smart Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Parisa; Cook, Diane J; Holder, Lawrence B; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    The machine learning and pervasive sensing technologies found in smart homes offer unprecedented opportunities for providing health monitoring and assistance to individuals experiencing difficulties living independently at home. In order to monitor the functional health of smart home residents, we need to design technologies that recognize and track activities that people normally perform as part of their daily routines. Although approaches do exist for recognizing activities, the approaches are applied to activities that have been pre-selected and for which labeled training data is available. In contrast, we introduce an automated approach to activity tracking that identifies frequent activities that naturally occur in an individual's routine. With this capability we can then track the occurrence of regular activities to monitor functional health and to detect changes in an individual's patterns and lifestyle. In this paper we describe our activity mining and tracking approach and validate our algorithms on data collected in physical smart environments.

  2. Multimodal Dialogue for Ambient Intelligence and Smart Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cózar, Ramón; Callejas, Zoraida

    Ambient Intelligence (AmI) and Smart Environments (SmE) are based on three foundations: ubiquitous computing, ubiquitous communication and intelligent adaptive interfaces [41]. This type of systems consists of a series of interconnected computing and sensing devices which surround the user pervasively in his environment and are invisible to him, providing a service that is dynamically adapted to the interaction context, so that users can naturally interact with the system and thus perceive it as intelligent.

  3. Multiple sensors-based kernel machine learning in smart environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-Bao; Pan, Jeng-Shyang

    2017-01-01

    Sensor-based monitoring systems use multiple sensors to identify high-level information based on the events that take place in a monitored environment. Identification and health care are important tasks in the smart environment. This paper presents a framework for multisensory multimedia data analysis using a kernel optimization-based principal analysis for identification and health care in a smart environment. Images of faces, palmprints, and fingerprints are used to identify a person, and a wrist pulse signal is used to analyze the person's health condition. The recognition performance evaluations are implemented on the complex dataset of face, palmprint, fingerprint, and wrist pulse signals. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithms perform well for identification and heath analysis.

  4. Game theory: applications for surgeons and the operating room environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, David W; Tsai, Mitchell; Kadry, Bassam; Souba, Wiley W

    2012-11-01

    Game theory is an economic system of strategic behavior, often referred to as the "theory of social situations." Very little has been written in the medical literature about game theory or its applications, yet the practice of surgery and the operating room environment clearly involves multiple social situations with both cooperative and non-cooperative behaviors. A comprehensive review was performed of the medical literature on game theory and its medical applications. Definitive resources on the subject were also examined and applied to surgery and the operating room whenever possible. Applications of game theory and its proposed dilemmas abound in the practicing surgeon's world, especially in the operating room environment. The surgeon with a basic understanding of game theory principles is better prepared for understanding and navigating the complex Operating Room system and optimizing cooperative behaviors for the benefit all stakeholders. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Buoyancy driven acceleration in a hospital operating room indoor environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, James; Hertzberg, Jean; Zhai, John

    2011-11-01

    In hospital operating rooms, centrally located non-isothermal ceiling jets provide sterile air for protecting the surgical site from infectious particles in the room air as well as room cooling. Modern operating rooms are requiring larger temperature differences to accommodate increasing cooling loads for heat gains from medical equipment. This trend may lead to significant changes in the room air distribution patterns that may sacrifice the sterile air field across the surgical table. Quantitative flow visualization experiments using laser sheet illumination and RANS modeling of the indoor environment were conducted to demonstrate the impact of the indoor environment thermal conditions on the room air distribution. The angle of the jet shear layer was studied as function of the area of the vena contracta of the jet, which is in turn dependent upon the Archimedes number of the jet. Increases in the buoyancy forces cause greater air velocities in the vicinity of the surgical site increasing the likelihood of deposition of contaminants in the flow field. The outcome of this study shows the Archimedes number should be used as the design parameter for hospital operating room air distribution in order to maintain a proper supply air jet for covering the sterile region. This work is supported by ASHRAE.

  6. PUCK: An Automated Prompting System for Smart Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Barnan; Cook, Diane J.; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Seelye, Adriana M.

    2014-01-01

    The growth in popularity of smart environments has been quite steep in the last decade and so has the demand for smart health assistance systems. A smart home-based prompting system can enhance these technologies to deliver in-home interventions to users for timely reminders or brief instructions describing the way a task should be done for successful completion. This technology is in high demand given the desire of people who have physical or cognitive limitations to live independently in their homes. In this paper, with the introduction of the “PUCK” prompting system, we take an approach to automate prompting-based interventions without any predefined rule sets or user feedback. Unlike other approaches, we use simple off-the-shelf sensors and learn the timing for prompts based on real data that is collected with volunteer participants in our smart home test bed. The data mining approaches taken to solve this problem come with the challenge of an imbalanced class distribution that occurs naturally in the data. We propose a variant of an existing sampling technique, SMOTE, to deal with the class imbalance problem. To validate the approach, a comparative analysis with Cost Sensitive Learning is performed. PMID:25364323

  7. Authentication Method for Privacy Protection in Smart Grid Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do-Eun Cho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the interest in green energy is increasing as a means to resolve problems including the exhaustion of the energy source and, effective management of energy through the convergence of various fields. Therefore, the projects of smart grid which is called intelligent electrical grid for the accomplishment of low carbon green growth are being carried out in a rush. However, as the IT is centered upon the electrical grid, the shortage of IT also appears in smart grid and the complexity of convergence is aggravating the problem. Also, various personal information and payment information within the smart grid are gradually becoming big data and target for external invasion and attack; thus, there is increase in concerns for this matter. The purpose of this study is to analyze the security vulnerabilities and security requirement within smart grid and the authentication and access control method for privacy protection within home network. Therefore, we propose a secure access authentication and remote control method for user’s home device within home network environment, and we present their security analysis. The proposed access authentication method blocks the unauthorized external access and enables secure remote access to home network and its devices with a secure message authentication protocol.

  8. Smart training environment for power electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinov, Nikolay; Hranov, Tsveti

    2017-12-01

    The idea of the paper is to present a successful symbiosis of the products of the leading firms in the electronics - National Instruments and Texas Instruments. The developed test bench is composed of hardware for data acquisition and control (sbRIO), working with the LabVIEW environment and the novel Power Management Lab Kit (PMLK) educational boards. The manipulation of these hi-tech boards becomes more accessible for a broader range of students, including undergraduates in schools, with the use of LabVIEW virtual instruments (VI), which assist the trainees in the manipulation of the kits - for example if a incompatible working configuration is set, the VI will pop up a message describing the result if its execution. Moreover it will provide guidance for choosing the right setup along the active decisions from the student and also with the VI can be taken measurements, without the need of external hardware.

  9. Control of the Environment in the Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jonathan D

    2017-10-01

    There is a direct relationship between the quality of the environment of a workplace and the productivity and efficiency of the work accomplished. Components such as temperature, humidity, ventilation, drafts, lighting, and noise each contribute to the quality of the overall environment and the sense of well-being of those who work there.The modern operating room is a unique workplace with specific, and frequently conflicting, environmental requirements for each of the inhabitants. Even minor disturbances in the internal environment of the operating room can have serious ramifications on the comfort, effectiveness, and safety of each of the inhabitants. A cool, well-ventilated, and dry climate is optimal for many members of the surgical team. Any significant deviation from these objectives raises the risk of decreased efficiency and productivity and adverse surgical outcomes. A warmer, more humid, and quieter environment is necessary for the patient. If these requirements are not met, the risk of surgical morbidity and mortality is increased. An important task for the surgical team is to find the correct balance between these 2 opposed requirements. Several of the components of the operating room environment, especially room temperature and airflow patterns, are easily manipulated by the members of the surgical team. In the following discussion, we will examine these elements to better understand the clinical ramifications of adjustments and accommodations that are frequently made to meet the requirements of both the surgical staff and the patient.

  10. Design And Implementation Of Smart Living Room Wireless Control For Safety Purpose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aeindra Myint Lwin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This research presents the microcontroller controlled smart living room system using Bluetooth wireless technology from mobile phone.An android apk is created in mobile for controlling the living room system. A 16F877A microcontroller is interfaced serially to a bluetooth module transceiver. It is used for controlling fan speed control dim light control lighting ONOFF and window angle control. An arduino controller is used for keypad control door security. It is connected to DC motor control circuit and switching circuit for opening and closing of the door keypad for entering password and serial LCD for displaying the update status of the door.User can control the home appliances by using bluetooth connection from mobile phone in its range. User can adjust the dim light fan speed window angle and light bulbs from android apk. An internal EEPROM is built in 16F877A microcontroller and it stores the last requested data of the appliances. If userwants to recover the former conditions of the appliances he can recall them from android apk.

  11. NFC-Based User Interface for Smart Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Spinsante

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The physical support of a home automation system, joined with a simplified user-system interaction modality, may allow people affected by motor impairments or limitations, such as elderly and disabled people, to live safely and comfortably at home, by improving their autonomy and facilitating the execution of daily life tasks. The proposed solution takes advantage of the Near Field Communications technology, which is simple and intuitive to use, to enable advanced user interaction. The user can perform normal daily activities, such as lifting a gate or closing a window, through a device enabled to read NFC tags containing the commands for the home automation system. A passive Smart Panel is implemented, composed of multiple Near Field Communications tags properly programmed, to enable the execution of both individual commands and so-called scenarios. The work compares several versions of the proposed Smart Panel, differing for interrogation and composition of the single command, number of tags, and dynamic user interaction model, at a parity of the number of commands to issue. Main conclusions are drawn from the experimental results, about the effective adoption of Near Field Communications in smart assistive environments.

  12. EXAMINATION OF THE SCOPE OF ACADEMIC USE ON SMART DEVICE IN THE ISRAELI ACADEMIC ENVIRONMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Yom-Tov Alona*, Bouhnik Dan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the phenomenon of using smart devices for studying anytime, anywhere, has grown rapidly. The objective of this study is to examine the scope of the academic use of smart devices in the Israeli academic environment. A Smart device refers to a portable device that is capable of connecting to the internet such as: Smartphones, Tablets, E-Readers and PDA. The current study addressed two research questions: RQ1: How do students use smart devices for academic purposes? R...

  13. Smart Home : A Social, Technological and Virtual Learning and Development Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Heimovaara-Kotonen, Essi (toim.)

    2014-01-01

    All people have the right to good housing regardless of their age or functional capacity. The objective of the Smart Home environment is to present solutions that enable accessible and safe housing and promote meaningful assistance and life at home. The goal of building the Smart Home environment was to find a useroriented, comprehensive solution for the client, which maintains the client’s own control over his or her home environment. The Smart Home was also built to serve the developme...

  14. Action Research to Improve Methods of Delivery and Feedback in an Access Grid Room Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Lynne C.; Klass, Lara; Eberhard, Andrew; Stacey, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative study which was undertaken to improve the delivery methods and feedback opportunity in honours mathematics lectures which are delivered through Access Grid Rooms. Access Grid Rooms are facilities that provide two-way video and audio interactivity across multiple sites, with the inclusion of smart boards. The…

  15. The effects of the smart environment on the information divide experienced by people with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Su-Jung; Park, Eun-Young

    2017-04-01

    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is connected with every aspect of social, cultural, economic, educational, and commercial activity. Smart devices in particular have changed society and are necessary goods for modern people. Smart device usage is rapidly growing in everyday life, so the ability to use a smart device is increasingly important, yet there is little data supporting increased digital inclusion of people with disabilities in mobile device use. This study investigates the effects of the smart environment on the information divide experienced by people with disabilities. Data from the 2013 Information Divide Index Data of the National Information Society Agency was analyzed regarding three aspects: access, skill, and competence. The accessibility difference was investigated by comparing access to a PC or smart device in two groups. The effects of a smart environment on the information divide were analyzed using General Linear Modeling (GLM). The access rate was higher for the general group than for that of those with disabilities, and this difference appeared to be greater in the smart environment. The results of the GLM showed that disability and device access had statistically significant effects on skill and all aspects of competence. These results provide evidence that the smart environment further creates the information divide for people with disabilities. Strategies should be formed to reduce this divide, particularly within smart environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Building environment assessment and energy consumption estimation using smart phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangli; Zhang, Li; Jia, Yingqi; Wang, Zihan; Jin, Xin; Zhao, Xuefeng

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, an APP for building indoor environment evaluation and energy consumption estimation based on Android platform is proposed and established. While using the APP, the smart phone built-in sensors are called for real-time monitoring of the building environmental information such as temperature, humidity and noise, etc. the built-in algorithm is developed to calculate the heat and power consumption, and questionnaires, grading and other methods are used to feed back to the space heating system. In addition, with the application of the technology of big data and cloud technology, the data collected by users will be uploaded to the cloud. After the statistics of the uploaded data, regional difference can be obtained, thus providing a more accurate basis for macro-control and research of energy, thermal comfort, greenhouse effect.

  17. A Model of Smart Environment for E-learning Based on Crowdsourcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Simić

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the application of the concepts of Internet of Things and its application in creating smart environments. The specific goal is to design a smart environment for enhancing the teaching and learning processes at universities. The environment should integrate adequate concepts of smart buildings and smart classrooms with e-learning systems, in order to provide students with advanced e-learning services and services that improve the overall quality of students' experience. In addition, the model is based on the concept of crowdsourcing, where students actively participate in gathering the information, designing and implementing the e-services. Finally, the paper describes a prototype of the designed smart environment implemented at the Department for e-Business, at University of Belgrade.

  18. Smart environment architecture for emotion detection and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Caballero, Antonio; Martínez-Rodrigo, Arturo; Pastor, José Manuel; Castillo, José Carlos; Lozano-Monasor, Elena; López, María T; Zangróniz, Roberto; Latorre, José Miguel; Fernández-Sotos, Alicia

    2016-12-01

    This paper introduces an architecture as a proof-of-concept for emotion detection and regulation in smart health environments. The aim of the proposal is to detect the patient's emotional state by analysing his/her physiological signals, facial expression and behaviour. Then, the system provides the best-tailored actions in the environment to regulate these emotions towards a positive mood when possible. The current state-of-the-art in emotion regulation through music and colour/light is implemented with the final goal of enhancing the quality of life and care of the subject. The paper describes the three main parts of the architecture, namely "Emotion Detection", "Emotion Regulation" and "Emotion Feedback Control". "Emotion Detection" works with the data captured from the patient, whereas "Emotion Regulation" offers him/her different musical pieces and colour/light settings. "Emotion Feedback Control" performs as a feedback control loop to assess the effect of emotion regulation over emotion detection. We are currently testing the overall architecture and the intervention in real environments to achieve our final goal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Comprehensive Smart Grid Planning in a Regulated Utility Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Matthew; Liao, Yuan; Du, Yan

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the tools and exercises used during the Kentucky Smart Grid Roadmap Initiative in a collaborative electric grid planning process involving state regulators, public utilities, academic institutions, and private interest groups. The mandate of the initiative was to assess the existing condition of smart grid deployments in Kentucky, to enhance understanding of smart grid concepts by stakeholders, and to develop a roadmap for the deployment of smart grid technologies by the jurisdictional utilities of Kentucky. Through involvement of many important stakeholder groups, the resultant Smart Grid Deployment Roadmap proposes an aggressive yet achievable strategy and timetable designed to promote enhanced availability, security, efficiency, reliability, affordability, sustainability and safety of the electricity supply throughout the state while maintaining Kentucky's nationally competitive electricity rates. The models and methods developed for this exercise can be utilized as a systematic process for the planning of coordinated smart grid deployments.

  20. Time Delay Estimation in Room Acoustic Environments: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benesty Jacob

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Time delay estimation has been a research topic of significant practical importance in many fields (radar, sonar, seismology, geophysics, ultrasonics, hands-free communications, etc.. It is a first stage that feeds into subsequent processing blocks for identifying, localizing, and tracking radiating sources. This area has made remarkable advances in the past few decades, and is continuing to progress, with an aim to create processors that are tolerant to both noise and reverberation. This paper presents a systematic overview of the state-of-the-art of time-delay-estimation algorithms ranging from the simple cross-correlation method to the advanced blind channel identification based techniques. We discuss the pros and cons of each individual algorithm, and outline their inherent relationships. We also provide experimental results to illustrate their performance differences in room acoustic environments where reverberation and noise are commonly encountered.

  1. Video Streaming Transfer in a Smart Satellite Mobile Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedo Celandroni

    2009-01-01

    satellite link for transmitting video streams to a bus, where they are relayed to passengers' devices. We say that a bus works in smart mode if it takes advantage of the knowledge of the exact points where fixed obstacles will prevent receiving the satellite signal for a certain time period. This information is sent to the hub via a return channel. The hub, in its turn, suspends the transmissions to that specific bus for the given time interval, thus avoiding information losses and unnecessary bandwidth occupation. Buffering video packets, without any quality of service (QoS degradation, seamlessly compensates channel blockages up to a given duration. We determine the most appropriate transmission parameters for video streaming with good video QoS in a mobile satellite environment; moreover, we evaluate how “smart” the system can be in terms of bandwidth saving, by comparing it with the situation where the bus does not exploit the description of its route, still maintaining the same QoS requirements.

  2. IoT Privacy and Security Challenges for Smart Home Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huichen Lin; Neil W Bergmann

    2016-01-01

    .... In domestic environments, human issues may be as important as technical issues. After surveying existing solutions for enhancing IoT security, the paper identifies key future requirements for trusted Smart Home systems...

  3. Islam and the healthcare environment: designing patient rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopec, D A K; Han, Li

    2008-01-01

    Islam and the Muslim population are often the source of much misunderstanding and media-influenced misconceptions. Muslim patients who enter the healthcare environment are often weak and likely to experience feelings of vulnerability. Because of the complex and interwoven nature of culture and religion in a person's identity, it is important to consider patient belief systems and values when designing a patient's immediate environment. Through an exploration of literature related to culture and diversity and the beliefs and value system of the Muslim population, the authors were able to identify flexible design initiatives that could accommodate an array of cultural and spiritual practices. Islam and the Muslim population were chosen as the points of reference for this study because of the strong influence of the religion on the culture, and because of the many nuances that differ from the dominant culture within the United States. From these points of reference, a hypothetical design was developed for a patient room that considers differing notions of privacy, alternatives for cultural and religious practices, and ways to include symbolic meaning derived from attributes such as color.

  4. Annotating smart environment sensor data for activity learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewcyzk, S; Dwan, K; Minor, B; Swedlove, B; Cook, D

    2009-01-01

    The pervasive sensing technologies found in smart homes offer unprecedented opportunities for providing health monitoring and assistance to individuals experiencing difficulties living independently at home. In order to monitor the functional health of smart home residents, we need to design technologies that recognize and track the activities that people perform at home. Machine learning techniques can perform this task, but the software algorithms rely upon large amounts of sample data that is correctly labeled with the corresponding activity. Labeling, or annotating, sensor data with the corresponding activity can be time consuming, may require input from the smart home resident, and is often inaccurate. Therefore, in this paper we investigate four alternative mechanisms for annotating sensor data with a corresponding activity label. We evaluate the alternative methods along the dimensions of annotation time, resident burden, and accuracy using sensor data collected in a real smart apartment.

  5. Smart sustainable energy for the rural built environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Szewczuk, S

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available robust methodology to adapt innovative and renewable smart grid technologies to deliver real and sustainable decentralised energy solutions for remote and rural communities, thereby improving livelihoods and opportunities for inclusive growth...

  6. Feasibility of BCI Control in a Realistic Smart Home Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Kosmyna

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Smart homes have been an active area of research, however despite considerable investment, they are not yet a reality for end-users. Moreover, there are still accessibility challenges for the elderly or the disabled, two of the main potential targets for home automation. In this exploratory study we design a control mechanism for smart homes based on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI and apply it in the Domus smart home platform in order to evaluate the potential interest of users about BCIs at home. We enable users to control lighting, a TV set, a coffee machine and the shutters of the smart home. We evaluate the performance (accuracy, interaction time, usability and feasibility (USE questionnaire on 12 healthy subjects and 2 disabled subjects. We find that healthy subjects achieve 77% task accuracy. However, disabled subjects achieved a better accuracy (81% compared to 77%.

  7. Feasibility of BCI Control in a Realistic Smart Home Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmyna, Nataliya; Tarpin-Bernard, Franck; Bonnefond, Nicolas; Rivet, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Smart homes have been an active area of research, however despite considerable investment, they are not yet a reality for end-users. Moreover, there are still accessibility challenges for the elderly or the disabled, two of the main potential targets for home automation. In this exploratory study we design a control mechanism for smart homes based on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) and apply it in the “Domus”1 smart home platform in order to evaluate the potential interest of users about BCIs at home. We enable users to control lighting, a TV set, a coffee machine and the shutters of the smart home. We evaluate the performance (accuracy, interaction time), usability and feasibility (USE questionnaire) on 12 healthy subjects and 2 disabled subjects. We find that healthy subjects achieve 77% task accuracy. However, disabled subjects achieved a better accuracy (81% compared to 77%). PMID:27616986

  8. Feasibility of BCI Control in a Realistic Smart Home Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmyna, Nataliya; Tarpin-Bernard, Franck; Bonnefond, Nicolas; Rivet, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Smart homes have been an active area of research, however despite considerable investment, they are not yet a reality for end-users. Moreover, there are still accessibility challenges for the elderly or the disabled, two of the main potential targets for home automation. In this exploratory study we design a control mechanism for smart homes based on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) and apply it in the "Domus" smart home platform in order to evaluate the potential interest of users about BCIs at home. We enable users to control lighting, a TV set, a coffee machine and the shutters of the smart home. We evaluate the performance (accuracy, interaction time), usability and feasibility (USE questionnaire) on 12 healthy subjects and 2 disabled subjects. We find that healthy subjects achieve 77% task accuracy. However, disabled subjects achieved a better accuracy (81% compared to 77%).

  9. Discovering Activities to Recognize and Track in a Smart Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Rashidi, Parisa; Cook, Diane J.; Holder, Lawrence B.; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    The machine learning and pervasive sensing technologies found in smart homes offer unprecedented opportunities for providing health monitoring and assistance to individuals experiencing difficulties living independently at home. In order to monitor the functional health of smart home residents, we need to design technologies that recognize and track activities that people normally perform as part of their daily routines. Although approaches do exist for recognizing activities, the approaches ...

  10. Enhanced ID-Based Authentication Scheme Using OTP in Smart Grid AMI Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Soo Yeo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the vulnerabilities analyses of KL scheme which is an ID-based authentication scheme for AMI network attached SCADA in smart grid and proposes a security-enhanced authentication scheme which satisfies forward secrecy as well as security requirements introduced in KL scheme and also other existing schemes. The proposed scheme uses MDMS which is the supervising system located in an electrical company as a time-synchronizing server in order to synchronize smart devices at home and conducts authentication between smart meter and smart devices using a new secret value generated by an OTP generator every session. The proposed scheme has forward secrecy, so it increases overall security, but its communication and computation overhead reduce its performance slightly, comparing the existing schemes. Nonetheless, hardware specification and communication bandwidth of smart devices will have better conditions continuously, so the proposed scheme would be a good choice for secure AMI environment.

  11. Auditory virtual environment with dynamic room characteristics for music performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Daniel Dhaham

    A room-adaptive system was designed to simulate an electro-acoustic space that changes room characteristics in real-time according to the content of sound. In this specific case, the focus of the sound components is on the different styles and genres of music. This system is composed of real-time music recognition algorithms that analyze the different elements of music, determine the desired room characteristics, and output the acoustical parameters via multi-channel room simulation mechanisms. The system modifies the acoustic properties of a space and enables it to "improvise" its acoustical parameters based on the sounds of the music performances.

  12. Design Time Methodology for the Formal Modeling and Verification of Smart Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Sanaullah, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Smart Environments (SmE) are intelligent and complex due to smart connectivity and interaction of heterogeneous devices achieved by complicated and sophisticated computing algorithms. Based on their domotic and industrial applications, SmE system may be critical in terms of correctness, reliability, safety, security and other such vital factors. To achieve error-free and requirement-compliant implementation of these systems, it is advisable to enforce a design process that may guarantee these...

  13. VO2 /TiN Plasmonic Thermochromic Smart Coatings for Room-Temperature Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qi; Li, Wan; Xu, Huiyan; Wang, Jiawei; Yin, Yin; Wang, Huaiyu; Ma, Libo; Ma, Fei; Jiang, Xuchuan; Schmidt, Oliver G; Chu, Paul K

    2018-01-19

    Vanadium dioxide/titanium nitride (VO2 /TiN) smart coatings are prepared by hybridizing thermochromic VO2 with plasmonic TiN nanoparticles. The VO2 /TiN coatings can control infrared (IR) radiation dynamically in accordance with the ambient temperature and illumination intensity. It blocks IR light under strong illumination at 28 °C but is IR transparent under weak irradiation conditions or at a low temperature of 20 °C. The VO2 /TiN coatings exhibit a good integral visible transmittance of up to 51% and excellent IR switching efficiency of 48% at 2000 nm. These unique advantages make VO2 /TiN promising as smart energy-saving windows. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. It's Safe to Be Smart: Strategies for Creating a Supportive Classroom Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Thomas P.; Corcoran, Jamie A.; Coté, John M.; Ene, Mihaela C.; Leighton, Elizabeth A.; Holmes, Ashley M.; Padula, Diane D.

    2014-01-01

    Gifted teenagers in middle and high school benefit from classroom environments that support their social and emotional development. Teachers of gifted adolescents may create classroom environments in which young people know it is safe to be smart and where they feel valued and respected for their intellect, creativity, and passions. By utilizing…

  15. Impact of imaging room environment: staff job stress and satisfaction, patient satisfaction, and willingness to recommend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xiaobo; Joseph, Anjali; Ensign, Janet C

    2012-01-01

    The built environment significantly affects the healthcare experiences of patients and staff. Healthcare administrators and building designers face the opportunity and challenge of improving healthcare experience and satisfaction through better environmental design. The purpose of the study was to evaluate how a novel environmental intervention for imaging rooms, which integrated multiple elements of healing environments including positive distractions and personal control over environment, affects the perceptions and satisfactions of its primary users-patients and staff. Anonymous questionnaire surveys were conducted to compare patient and staff perceptions of the physical environment, satisfaction, and stress in two types of imaging rooms: imaging rooms with the intervention installed (intervention rooms) and traditionally designed rooms without the intervention (comparison rooms). Imaging technologists and patients perceived the intervention rooms to be significantly more pleasant-looking. Patients in the intervention rooms reported significantly higher levels of environmental control and were significantly more willing to recommend the intervention rooms to others. The environmental intervention was effective in improving certain aspects of the imaging environment: pleasantness and environmental control. Further improvement of the imaging environment is needed to address problematic areas such as noise.

  16. A hybrid rule and machine learning based generic alerting platform for smart environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Joseph; Synnott, Jonathan; Nugent, Chris

    2016-08-01

    Existing smart environment based alert solutions have adopted a relatively complex and tailored approach to supporting individuals. These solutions have involved sensor based monitoring, activity recognition and assistance provisioning. Traditionally they have suffered from a number of issues, rooted in scalability and performance, associated with complex activity recognition processes. This paper introduces a generic approach to realizing an alerting platform within a smart environment. The core concept of this approach is presented and placed within the context of related work. A description of the approach is provided, followed by an evaluation. This evaluation shows the approach offers reasonable accuracy, future work will increase accuracy.

  17. Software Architecture Design for Spatially-Indexed Media in Smart Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SCHIPOR, O.-A.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We introduce in this work a new software architecture design, based on well-established web communication protocols and scripting languages, for implementing spatially-indexed media in smart environments. We based our approach on specific design guidelines. Our concept of spatially-indexed media enables users to readily instantiate mappings between digital content and specific regions of the physical space. We present an implementation of the architecture using a motion capture system, a large visualization display, and several smart devices. We also present an experimental evaluation of our new software architecture by reporting response times function of changes in the complexity of physical-digital environment.

  18. Classrooms with Growing Room. Playing Smart: Enrichment in the Home. Lessons without Limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanevsky, Lannie

    Three papers by the same author address: (1) educational methods for gifted children in the regular classroom; (2) principles of enriching the gifted child's development in the home; and (3) modifying lessons to optimally challenge gifted students. The first paper is titled, "Classrooms with Growing Room." It stresses the need for gifted children…

  19. On the Design of Smart Homes: A Framework for Activity Recognition in Home Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicirelli, Franco; Fortino, Giancarlo; Giordano, Andrea; Guerrieri, Antonio; Spezzano, Giandomenico; Vinci, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    A smart home is a home environment enriched with sensing, actuation, communication and computation capabilities which permits to adapt it to inhabitants preferences and requirements. Establishing a proper strategy of actuation on the home environment can require complex computational tasks on the sensed data. This is the case of activity recognition, which consists in retrieving high-level knowledge about what occurs in the home environment and about the behaviour of the inhabitants. The inherent complexity of this application domain asks for tools able to properly support the design and implementation phases. This paper proposes a framework for the design and implementation of smart home applications focused on activity recognition in home environments. The framework mainly relies on the Cloud-assisted Agent-based Smart home Environment (CASE) architecture offering basic abstraction entities which easily allow to design and implement Smart Home applications. CASE is a three layered architecture which exploits the distributed multi-agent paradigm and the cloud technology for offering analytics services. Details about how to implement activity recognition onto the CASE architecture are supplied focusing on the low-level technological issues as well as the algorithms and the methodologies useful for the activity recognition. The effectiveness of the framework is shown through a case study consisting of a daily activity recognition of a person in a home environment.

  20. Applying a Wearable Voice-Activated Computer to Instructional Applications in Clean Room Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Corey A.; Lupisella, Mark L.

    2004-01-01

    The use of wearable computing technology in restrictive environments related to space applications offers promise in a number of domains. The clean room environment is one such domain in which hands-free, heads-up, wearable computing is particularly attractive for education and training because of the nature of clean room work We have developed and tested a Wearable Voice-Activated Computing (WEVAC) system based on clean room applications. Results of this initial proof-of-concept work indicate that there is a strong potential for WEVAC to enhance clean room activities.

  1. Context-Aware Mobile Sensors for Sensing Discrete Events in Smart Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awais Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, several advancements in the field of smart environment gained importance, so the experts can analyze ideas for smart building based on embedded systems to minimize the expense and energy conservation. Therefore, propelling the concept of smart home toward smart building, several challenges of power, communication, and sensors’ connectivity can be seen. Such challenges distort the interconnectivity between different technologies, such as Bluetooth and ZigBee, making it possible to provide the continuous connectivity among different objects such as sensors, actuators, home appliances, and cell phones. Therefore, this paper presents the concept of smart building based on embedded systems that enhance low power mobile sensors for sensing discrete events in embedded systems. The proposed scheme comprises system architecture that welcomes all the mobile sensors to communicate with each other using a single platform service. The proposed system enhances the concept of smart building in three stages (i.e., visualization, data analysis, and application. For low power mobile sensors, we propose a communication model, which provides a common medium for communication. Finally, the results show that the proposed system architecture efficiently processes, analyzes, and integrates different datasets efficiently and triggers actions to provide safety measurements for the elderly, patients, and others.

  2. Anomaly detection using temporal data mining in a smart home environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakkula, V; Cook, D J

    2008-01-01

    To many people, home is a sanctuary. With the maturing of smart home technologies, many people with cognitive and physical disabilities can lead independent lives in their own homes for extended periods of time. In this paper, we investigate the design of machine learning algorithms that support this goal. We hypothesize that machine learning algorithms can be designed to automatically learn models of resident behavior in a smart home, and that the results can be used to perform automated health monitoring and to detect anomalies. Specifically, our algorithms draw upon the temporal nature of sensor data collected in a smart home to build a model of expected activities and to detect unexpected, and possibly health-critical, events in the home. We validate our algorithms using synthetic data and real activity data collected from volunteers in an automated smart environment. The results from our experiments support our hypothesis that a model can be learned from observed smart home data and used to report anomalies, as they occur, in a smart home.

  3. Smart sensors enable smart air conditioning control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chin-Chi; Lee, Dasheng

    2014-06-24

    In this study, mobile phones, wearable devices, temperature and human motion detectors are integrated as smart sensors for enabling smart air conditioning control. Smart sensors obtain feedback, especially occupants' information, from mobile phones and wearable devices placed on human body. The information can be used to adjust air conditioners in advance according to humans' intentions, in so-called intention causing control. Experimental results show that the indoor temperature can be controlled accurately with errors of less than ±0.1 °C. Rapid cool down can be achieved within 2 min to the optimized indoor capacity after occupants enter a room. It's also noted that within two-hour operation the total compressor output of the smart air conditioner is 48.4% less than that of the one using On-Off control. The smart air conditioner with wearable devices could detect the human temperature and activity during sleep to determine the sleeping state and adjusting the sleeping function flexibly. The sleeping function optimized by the smart air conditioner with wearable devices could reduce the energy consumption up to 46.9% and keep the human health. The presented smart air conditioner could provide a comfortable environment and achieve the goals of energy conservation and environmental protection.

  4. Smart Sensors Enable Smart Air Conditioning Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Chi Cheng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, mobile phones, wearable devices, temperature and human motion detectors are integrated as smart sensors for enabling smart air conditioning control. Smart sensors obtain feedback, especially occupants’ information, from mobile phones and wearable devices placed on human body. The information can be used to adjust air conditioners in advance according to humans’ intentions, in so-called intention causing control. Experimental results show that the indoor temperature can be controlled accurately with errors of less than ±0.1 °C. Rapid cool down can be achieved within 2 min to the optimized indoor capacity after occupants enter a room. It’s also noted that within two-hour operation the total compressor output of the smart air conditioner is 48.4% less than that of the one using On-Off control. The smart air conditioner with wearable devices could detect the human temperature and activity during sleep to determine the sleeping state and adjusting the sleeping function flexibly. The sleeping function optimized by the smart air conditioner with wearable devices could reduce the energy consumption up to 46.9% and keep the human health. The presented smart air conditioner could provide a comfortable environment and achieve the goals of energy conservation and environmental protection.

  5. WanderCouch: A Smart TV Approach Towards Experiencing Music Festivals Live from the Living Room

    OpenAIRE

    WIJNANTS, Maarten; Rovelo Ruiz, Gustavo; Quax, Peter; Lamotte, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Attending music festivals is a popular pastime. However, there will unfortunately always be a share of fans who, for a wide variety of reasons, are unable to visit a festival of their choice in person. This article reports on the expectations users have about being able to immersively experience music festivals from the comfort of their living room. Out of these expectations, we distill an approach for remote festival engagement that is centered around the concept of blending respectively pro...

  6. Using Cellular Automata for Parking Recommendations in Smart Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horng, Gwo-Jiun

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we propose an innovative adaptive recommendation mechanism for smart parking. The cognitive RF module will transmit the vehicle location information and the parking space requirements to the parking congestion computing center (PCCC) when the driver must find a parking space. Moreover, for the parking spaces, we use a cellular automata (CA) model mechanism that can adjust to full and not full parking lot situations. Here, the PCCC can compute the nearest parking lot, the parking lot status and the current or opposite driving direction with the vehicle location information. By considering the driving direction, we can determine when the vehicles must turn around and thus reduce road congestion and speed up finding a parking space. The recommendation will be sent to the drivers through a wireless communication cognitive radio (CR) model after the computation and analysis by the PCCC. The current study evaluates the performance of this approach by conducting computer simulations. The simulation results show the strengths of the proposed smart parking mechanism in terms of avoiding increased congestion and decreasing the time to find a parking space. PMID:25153671

  7. Rooms with Gender: Physical Environment and Play Culture in Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Børve, Hege Eggen; Børve, Elin

    2017-01-01

    This article focuses on the impact of the physical environment and construction of play culture in kindergartens. Based on a case study, we explore employees' perception of indoor physical environment and children's play. The findings revealed that gender is interwoven in the physical environments and materials. Children's play practices are…

  8. A Review of Wireless and PLC Propagation Channel Characteristics for Smart Grid Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabih Güzelgöz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless, power line communication (PLC, fiber optic, Ethernet, and so forth are among the communication technologies on which smart grid communication infrastructure is envisioned to be built. Among these, wireless and PLC-based solutions are attractive considering the cost of initial deployment. Wireless communication deployment in smart grid covers a variety of environments such as indoor, outdoor, and electric-power-system facilities. Similar diversity is expected in PLC deployment as well covering low voltage (LV, medium voltage (MV, and high voltage (HV segments of the grid. In spite of being attractive, wireless and PLC channels are very harsh posing great challenges to performance of communication systems. In proposing solutions to smart grid communication needs, two approaches are likely to be followed. One is based on the use of existing wireless and PLC technologies with some modifications, and the other relies upon developing novel communication protocols particularly addressing the smart grid needs. Both of these approaches require an in-depth knowledge of communication channel characteristics. The aim of this study is to reveal the wireless and PLC channel characteristics of smart grid environments in terms of several parameters such as path loss and attenuation, time dispersion, time selectivity, amplitude statistics, and noise characteristics.

  9. Lightweight UDP Pervasive Protocol in Smart Home Environment Based on Labview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Wijaya; Hannats Hanafi Ichsan, Mochammad; Rizqika Akbar, Sabriansyah; Arwani, Issa

    2017-04-01

    TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) technology in a reliable environment was not a problem, but not in an environment where the entire Smart Home network connected locally. Currently employing pervasive protocols using TCP technology, when data transmission is sent, it would be slower because they have to perform handshaking process in advance and could not broadcast the data. On smart home environment, it does not need large size and complex data transmission between monitoring site and monitoring center required in Smart home strain monitoring system. UDP (User Datagram Protocol) technology is quick and simple on data transmission process. UDP can broadcast messages because the UDP did not require handshaking and with more efficient memory usage. LabVIEW is a programming language software for processing and visualization of data in the field of data acquisition. This paper proposes to examine Pervasive UDP protocol implementations in smart home environment based on LabVIEW. UDP coded in LabVIEW and experiments were performed on a PC and can work properly.

  10. Context dependent memory in two learning environments: the tutorial room and the operating theatre

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coveney, Andrew P; Switzer, Timothy; Corrigan, Mark A; Redmond, Henry P

    2013-01-01

    .... Using a free recall experimental model, fourteen medical student participants were administered audio lists of 30 words in two separate learning environments, a tutorial room and an operating theatre...

  11. Semantic and Virtual Reality-Enhanced Configuration of Domestic Environments: The Smart Home Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Spoladore

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the Smart Home Simulator, one of the main outcomes of the D4All project. This application takes into account the variety of issues involved in the development of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL solutions, such as the peculiarity of each end-users, appliances, and technologies with their deployment and data-sharing issues. The Smart Home Simulator—a mixed reality application able to support the configuration and customization of domestic environments in AAL systems—leverages on integration capabilities of Semantic Web technologies and the possibility to model relevant knowledge (about both the dwellers and the domestic environment into formal models. It also exploits Virtual Reality technologies as an efficient means to simplify the configuration of customized AAL environments. The application and the underlying framework will be validated through two different use cases, each one foreseeing the customized configuration of a domestic environment for specific segments of users.

  12. Crowdsensing in Smart Cities: Overview, Platforms, and Environment Sensing Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvear, Oscar; Calafate, Carlos T; Cano, Juan-Carlos; Manzoni, Pietro

    2018-02-04

    Evidence shows that Smart Cities are starting to materialise in our lives through the gradual introduction of the Internet of Things (IoT) paradigm. In this scope, crowdsensing emerges as a powerful solution to address environmental monitoring, allowing to control air pollution levels in crowded urban areas in a distributed, collaborative, inexpensive and accurate manner. However, even though technology is already available, such environmental sensing devices have not yet reached consumers. In this paper, we present an analysis of candidate technologies for crowdsensing architectures, along with the requirements for empowering users with air monitoring capabilities. Specifically, we start by providing an overview of the most relevant IoT architectures and protocols. Then, we present the general design of an off-the-shelf mobile environmental sensor able to cope with air quality monitoring requirements; we explore different hardware options to develop the desired sensing unit using readily available devices, discussing the main technical issues associated with each option, thereby opening new opportunities in terms of environmental monitoring programs.

  13. A room acoustical computer model for industrial environments - the model and its verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Lynge; Foged, Hans Torben

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an extension to the traditional room acoustic modelling methods allowing computer modelling of huge machinery in industrial spaces. The program in question is Odeon 3.0 Industrial and Odeon 3.0 Combined which allows the modelling of point sources, surface sources and line...... of an omnidirectional sound source and a microphone. This allows the comparison of simulated results with the ones measured in real rooms. However when simulating the acoustic environment in industrial rooms, the sound sources are often far from being point like, as they can be distributed over a large space...... in the room and may indeed contribute surfaces to the room. Examples of such sources could be ventilation tubes or the surfaces of two turbines as presented in this paper....

  14. SVM to detect the presence of visitors in a smart home environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Johanna; Larimer, Nicole; Kaye, Jeffrey A; Pavel, Misha; Hayes, Tamara L

    2012-01-01

    With the rising age of the population, there is increased need to help elderly maintain their independence. Smart homes, employing passive sensor networks and pervasive computing techniques, enable the unobtrusive assessment of activities and behaviors of the elderly which can be useful for health state assessment and intervention. Due to the multiple health benefits associated with socializing, accurately tracking whether an individual has visitors to their home is one of the more important aspects of elders' behaviors that could be assessed with smart home technology. With this goal, we have developed a preliminary SVM model to identify periods where untagged visitors are present in the home. Using the dwell time, number of sensor firings, and number of transitions between major living spaces (living room, dining room, kitchen and bathroom) as features in the model, and self report from two subjects as ground truth, we were able to accurately detect the presence of visitors in the home with a sensitivity and specificity of 0.90 and 0.89 for subject 1, and of 0.67 and 0.78 for subject 2, respectively. These preliminary data demonstrate the feasibility of detecting visitors with in-home sensor data, but highlight the need for more advanced modeling techniques so the model performs well for all subjects and all types of visitors.

  15. Building Environment Analysis based on Temperature and Humidity for Smart Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jaeseok; Won, Kwang-Ho

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) control strategy as part of the smart energy system that can balance occupant comfort against building energy consumption using ubiquitous sensing and machine learning technology. We have developed ZigBee-based wireless sensor nodes and collected realistic temperature and humidity data during one month from a laboratory environment. With the collected data, we have established a building environment model using machine learning algorithms, which can be used to assess occupant comfort level. We expect the proposed HVAC control strategy will be able to provide occupants with a consistently comfortable working or home environment. PMID:23202004

  16. Building Environment Analysis Based on Temperature and Humidity for Smart Energy Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Ho Won

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a new HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning control strategy as part of the smart energy system that can balance occupant comfort against building energy consumption using ubiquitous sensing and machine learning technology. We have developed ZigBee-based wireless sensor nodes and collected realistic temperature and humidity data during one month from a laboratory environment. With the collected data, we have established a building environment model using machine learning algorithms, which can be used to assess occupant comfort level. We expect the proposed HVAC control strategy will be able to provide occupants with a consistently comfortable working or home environment.

  17. Multimodal identification and localization of users in a smart environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A. Salah (Albert Ali); R. Morros; J. Luque; C. Segura; J. Hernando; O. Ambekar (Onkar); B.A.M. Schouten (Ben); E.J. Pauwels (Eric)

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractDetecting the location and identity of users is a first step in creating context-aware applications for technologically-endowed environments. We propose a system that makes use of motion detection, person tracking, face identification, feature-based identification, audio-based

  18. Measurement Combination for Acoustic Source Localization in a Room Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertilä Pasi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of time delay estimation (TDE is well understood and therefore attractive to apply in acoustic source localization (ASL. A time delay between microphones maps into a hyperbola. Furthermore, the likelihoods for different time delays are mapped into a set of weighted nonoverlapping hyperbolae in the spatial domain. Combining TDE functions from several microphone pairs results in a spatial likelihood function (SLF which is a combination of sets of weighted hyperbolae. Traditionally, the maximum SLF point is considered as the source location but is corrupted by reverberation and noise. Particle filters utilize past source information to improve localization performance in such environments. However, uncertainty exists on how to combine the TDE functions. Results from simulated dialogues in various conditions favor TDE combination using intersection-based methods over union. The real-data dialogue results agree with the simulations, showing a 45% RMSE reduction when choosing the intersection over union of TDE functions.

  19. Measurement Combination for Acoustic Source Localization in a Room Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasi Pertilä

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of time delay estimation (TDE is well understood and therefore attractive to apply in acoustic source localization (ASL. A time delay between microphones maps into a hyperbola. Furthermore, the likelihoods for different time delays are mapped into a set of weighted nonoverlapping hyperbolae in the spatial domain. Combining TDE functions from several microphone pairs results in a spatial likelihood function (SLF which is a combination of sets of weighted hyperbolae. Traditionally, the maximum SLF point is considered as the source location but is corrupted by reverberation and noise. Particle filters utilize past source information to improve localization performance in such environments. However, uncertainty exists on how to combine the TDE functions. Results from simulated dialogues in various conditions favor TDE combination using intersection-based methods over union. The real-data dialogue results agree with the simulations, showing a 45% RMSE reduction when choosing the intersection over union of TDE functions.

  20. PUCK: An Automated Prompting System for Smart Environments: Towards achieving automated prompting; Challenges involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Barnan; Cook, Diane J; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Seelye, Adriana M

    2012-10-01

    The growth in popularity of smart environments has been quite steep in the last decade and so has the demand for smart health assistance systems. A smart home-based prompting system can enhance these technologies to deliver in-home interventions to users for timely reminders or brief instructions describing the way a task should be done for successful completion. This technology is in high demand given the desire of people who have physical or cognitive limitations to live independently in their homes. In this paper, with the introduction of the "PUCK" prompting system, we take an approach to automate prompting-based interventions without any predefined rule sets or user feedback. Unlike other approaches, we use simple off-the-shelf sensors and learn the timing for prompts based on real data that is collected with volunteer participants in our smart home test bed. The data mining approaches taken to solve this problem come with the challenge of an imbalanced class distribution that occurs naturally in the data. We propose a variant of an existing sampling technique, SMOTE, to deal with the class imbalance problem. To validate the approach, a comparative analysis with Cost Sensitive Learning is performed.

  1. Energy-efficient privacy protection for smart home environments using behavioral semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Homin; Basaran, Can; Park, Taejoon; Son, Sang Hyuk

    2014-09-02

    Research on smart environments saturated with ubiquitous computing devices is rapidly advancing while raising serious privacy issues. According to recent studies, privacy concerns significantly hinder widespread adoption of smart home technologies. Previous work has shown that it is possible to infer the activities of daily living within environments equipped with wireless sensors by monitoring radio fingerprints and traffic patterns. Since data encryption cannot prevent privacy invasions exploiting transmission pattern analysis and statistical inference, various methods based on fake data generation for concealing traffic patterns have been studied. In this paper, we describe an energy-efficient, light-weight, low-latency algorithm for creating dummy activities that are semantically similar to the observed phenomena. By using these cloaking activities, the amount of  fake data transmissions can be flexibly controlled to support a trade-off between energy efficiency and privacy protection. According to the experiments using real data collected from a smart home environment, our proposed method can extend the lifetime of the network by more than 2× compared to the previous methods in the literature. Furthermore, the activity cloaking method supports low latency transmission of real data while also significantly reducing the accuracy of the wireless snooping attacks.

  2. A systematic review of built environment factors related to physical activity and obesity risk: implications for smart growth urban planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, C P; Andalib, M; Dunton, G F; Wolch, J; Pentz, M A

    2011-05-01

    Smart growth is an approach to urban planning that provides a framework for making community development decisions. Despite its growing use, it is not known whether smart growth can impact physical activity. This review utilizes existing built environment research on factors that have been used in smart growth planning to determine whether they are associated with physical activity or body mass. Searching the MEDLINE, Psycinfo and Web-of-Knowledge databases, 204 articles were identified for descriptive review, and 44 for a more in-depth review of studies that evaluated four or more smart growth planning principles. Five smart growth factors (diverse housing types, mixed land use, housing density, compact development patterns and levels of open space) were associated with increased levels of physical activity, primarily walking. Associations with other forms of physical activity were less common. Results varied by gender and method of environmental assessment. Body mass was largely unaffected. This review suggests that several features of the built environment associated with smart growth planning may promote important forms of physical activity. Future smart growth community planning could focus more directly on health, and future research should explore whether combinations or a critical mass of smart growth features is associated with better population health outcomes. © 2011 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2011 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  3. The interactive optical fiber fabrics for smart interior environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Z. Q.; Dong, A. H.; Du, Z. Y.; Tan, J.

    2017-10-01

    Comparing to conventional textiles, interactive photonic textiles can emit light, present different colors, change the surface pattern and can interact with users. They are particularly suitable for decorative purpose. Home furniture is one possible application [1]. With attractive illumination and color effect, the photonic textiles can also be used in hotels, exhibition halls, restaurants and many other circumstances to enhance the interior environment. However, the functionality of the interactive photonic textile for interior purpose is still underdeveloped, since there are still sever challenges about how to improve the usability and functionality of the interactive textile. This project aims to study how to improve the interactive function of photonic textiles, which can enhance the well-being of the end-user. In the end, a color-changeable interactive cushion which can detect the main primary particulate matter (PM) 2.5 was developed.

  4. IoT Architecture for a Sustainable Tourism Application in a Smart City Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Nitti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years, the Smart Cities concept has become one of the main driving forces for the urban transition towards a low carbon environment, sustainable economy, and mobility. Tourism, as one of the fastest growing industries, is also an important generator of carbon emissions; therefore, the recently emerging sustainable tourism concept is envisioned as an important part of the Smart Cities paradigm. Within this context, the Internet-of-Things (IoT concept is the key technological point for the development of smart urban environments through the use of aggregated data, integrated in a single decisional platform. This paper performs the first analysis on the feasibility of the use of an IoT approach and proposes a specific architecture for a sustainable tourism application. The architecture is tailored for the optimisation of the movement of cruise ship tourists in the city of Cagliari (Italy, by taking into consideration factors such as transport information and queue waiting times. A first set of simulations is performed using 67-point of interest, real transportation data, and an optimisation algorithm.

  5. Nursing in a technological environment: nursing care in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Rosalind; FitzGerald, Mary

    2006-02-01

    Operating room nurses continue to draw criticism regarding the appropriateness of a nursing presence in the operating room. The technological focus of the theatre and the ways in which nurses in the theatre have shaped and reshaped their practice in response to technological change have caused people within and outside the nursing profession to question whether operating room nursing is a technological rather than nursing undertaking. This paper reports findings from an ethnographic study that was conducted in an Australian operating department. The study examined the contribution of nurses to the work of the operating room through intensive observation and ethnographic interviews. This paper uses selected findings from the study to explore the ways in which nurses in theatre interpret their role in terms of caring in a technological environment.

  6. Cognitive IoT incorporating intelligence in building smart environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Dishari; Sumathy, S.

    2017-11-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is an invention of this century which also can be called as Internet which makes life more logical and electronic. According to research in the industrial field about which aspect in IoT contributes more for GDP is the concept which can be applied in various aspects of our life to make life logical and easier. We are very much aware of the increasing population and the pollution that is caused by the vehicles and many other sources such as harmful gas producers. So, this work focuses in determining the level of pollution in a specific area and predict how much more greenery has to be increased in that area. With its widespread application, this paper proposes an idea with a social cause in order to exhibit the concern towards the environment and mankind. This proposal will benefit farmers and others in polluted cities. The language to be used is Embedded C programming and Arduino IDE open source platform with both hardware and software interaction. The display will involve an android app called Blynk App.

  7. Neural-Network-Based Smart Sensor Framework Operating in a Harsh Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhari Narendra S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an artificial neural-network- (NN- based smart interface framework for sensors operating in harsh environments. The NN-based sensor can automatically compensate for the nonlinear response characteristics and its nonlinear dependency on the environmental parameters, with high accuracy. To show the potential of the proposed NN-based framework, we provide results of a smart capacitive pressure sensor (CPS operating in a wide temperature range of 0 to . Through simulated experiments, we have shown that the NN-based CPS model is capable of providing pressure readout with a maximum full-scale (FS error of only over this temperature range. A novel scheme for estimating the ambient temperature from the sensor characteristics itself is proposed. For this purpose, a second NN is utilized to estimate the ambient temperature accurately from the knowledge of the offset capacitance of the CPS. A microcontroller-unit- (MCU- based implementation scheme is also provided.

  8. Ubiquitous Green Computing Techniques for High Demand Applications in Smart Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M. Moya

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitous sensor network deployments, such as the ones found in Smart cities and Ambient intelligence applications, require constantly increasing high computational demands in order to process data and offer services to users. The nature of these applications imply the usage of data centers. Research has paid much attention to the energy consumption of the sensor nodes in WSNs infrastructures. However, supercomputing facilities are the ones presenting a higher economic and environmental impact due to their very high power consumption. The latter problem, however, has been disregarded in the field of smart environment services. This paper proposes an energy-minimization workload assignment technique, based on heterogeneity and application-awareness, that redistributes low-demand computational tasks from high-performance facilities to idle nodes with low and medium resources in the WSN infrastructure. These non-optimal allocation policies reduce the energy consumed by the whole infrastructure and the total execution time.

  9. An Efficient Recommendation Filter Model on Smart Home Big Data Analytics for Enhanced Living Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Xie, Xiaoyun; Shu, Wanneng; Xiong, Naixue

    2016-10-15

    With the rapid growth of wireless sensor applications, the user interfaces and configurations of smart homes have become so complicated and inflexible that users usually have to spend a great amount of time studying them and adapting to their expected operation. In order to improve user experience, a weighted hybrid recommender system based on a Kalman Filter model is proposed to predict what users might want to do next, especially when users are located in a smart home with an enhanced living environment. Specifically, a weight hybridization method was introduced, which combines contextual collaborative filter and the contextual content-based recommendations. This method inherits the advantages of the optimum regression and the stability features of the proposed adaptive Kalman Filter model, and it can predict and revise the weight of each system component dynamically. Experimental results show that the hybrid recommender system can optimize the distribution of weights of each component, and achieve more reasonable recall and precision rates.

  10. Big data and Internet of Things a roadmap for smart environments

    CERN Document Server

    Dobre, Ciprian

    2014-01-01

    This book presents current progress on challenges related to Big Data management by focusing on the particular challenges associated with context-aware data-intensive applications and services. The book is a state-of-the-art reference discussing progress made, as well as prompting future directions on the theories, practices, standards and strategies that are related to the emerging computational technologies and their association with supporting the Internet of Things advanced functioning for organizational settings including both business and e-science. Apart from inter-operable and inter-cooperative aspects, the book deals with a notable opportunity namely, the current trend in which a collectively shared and generated content is emerged from Internet end-users. Specifically, the book presents advances on managing and exploiting the vast size of data generated from within the smart environment (i.e. smart cities) towards an integrated, collective intelligence approach. The book also presents methods and pr...

  11. An Efficient Recommendation Filter Model on Smart Home Big Data Analytics for Enhanced Living Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid growth of wireless sensor applications, the user interfaces and configurations of smart homes have become so complicated and inflexible that users usually have to spend a great amount of time studying them and adapting to their expected operation. In order to improve user experience, a weighted hybrid recommender system based on a Kalman Filter model is proposed to predict what users might want to do next, especially when users are located in a smart home with an enhanced living environment. Specifically, a weight hybridization method was introduced, which combines contextual collaborative filter and the contextual content-based recommendations. This method inherits the advantages of the optimum regression and the stability features of the proposed adaptive Kalman Filter model, and it can predict and revise the weight of each system component dynamically. Experimental results show that the hybrid recommender system can optimize the distribution of weights of each component, and achieve more reasonable recall and precision rates.

  12. Context dependent memory in two learning environments: the tutorial room and the operating theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coveney, Andrew P; Switzer, Timothy; Corrigan, Mark A; Redmond, Henry P

    2013-09-01

    Psychologists have previously demonstrated that information recall is context dependent. However, how this influences the way we deliver medical education is unclear. This study aimed to determine if changing the recall context from the learning context affects the ability of medical students to recall information. Using a free recall experimental model, fourteen medical student participants were administered audio lists of 30 words in two separate learning environments, a tutorial room and an operating theatre. They were then asked to recall the words in both environments. While in the operating theatre participants wore appropriate surgical clothing and assembled around an operating table. While in the tutorial room, participants dressed casually and were seated around a table. Students experienced the same duration (15 minutes) and disruption in both environments. The mean recall score from the 28 tests performed in the same environment was 12.96 +/- 3.93 (mean, SD). The mean recall score from the 28 tests performed in an alternative environment to the learning episode was 13.5 +/- 5.31(mean, SD), indicating that changing the recall environment from the learning environment does not cause any statistical difference (p=0.58). The average recall score of participants who learned and recalled in the tutorial room was 13.0 +/- 3.84 (mean, SD). The average recall score of participants who learnt and recalled in the operating theatre was 12.92 +/- 4.18 (mean, SD), representing no significant difference between the two environments for learning (p=0.4792). The results support the continued use of tutorial rooms and operating theatres as appropriate environments in which to teach medical students, with no significant difference in information recall seen either due to a same context effect or specific context effect.

  13. Evaluating the auralization of a small room in a virtual sound environment using objective room acoustic measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrens, Axel; Marschall, Marton; Dau, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    of the room. The auralizations were generated using the loudspeaker-based room auralization toolbox (LoRA; Favrot and Buchholz, 2010) and reproduced in a 64-channel loudspeaker array, set up in an anechoic chamber. Differences between the objective measures evaluated in the real and the virtual room were...

  14. Evaluating the auralization of a small room in a virtual sound environment using objective room acoustic measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrens, Axel; Marschall, Marton; Dau, Torsten

    ) & reverberation time (T20, T30); - clarity (C7, C50, C80); - interaural cross-correlation (IACC); - speech transmission index (STI); - direct-to-reverberant ratio (DRR). Impulse responses (IRs) were measured in an IEC listening room. The room was then modeled in the room acoustics software ODEON, and the same...

  15. Designing EvoRoom: An Immersive Simulation Environment for Collective Inquiry in Secondary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Michelle Mei Yee

    This dissertation investigates the design of complex inquiry for co-located students to work as a knowledge community within a mixed-reality learning environment. It presents the design of an immersive simulation called EvoRoom and corresponding collective inquiry activities that allow students to explore concepts around topics of evolution and biodiversity in a Grade 11 Biology course. EvoRoom is a room-sized simulation of a rainforest, modeled after Borneo in Southeast Asia, where several projected displays are stitched together to form a large, animated simulation on each opposing wall of the room. This serves to create an immersive environment in which students work collaboratively as individuals, in small groups and a collective community to investigate science topics using the simulations as an evidentiary base. Researchers and a secondary science teacher co-designed a multi-week curriculum that prepared students with preliminary ideas and expertise, then provided them with guided activities within EvoRoom, supported by tablet-based software as well as larger visualizations of their collective progress. Designs encompassed the broader curriculum, as well as all EvoRoom materials (e.g., projected displays, student tablet interfaces, collective visualizations) and activity sequences. This thesis describes a series of three designs that were developed and enacted iteratively over two and a half years, presenting key features that enhanced students' experiences within the immersive environment, their interactions with peers, and their inquiry outcomes. Primary research questions are concerned with the nature of effective design for such activities and environments, and the kinds of interactions that are seen at the individual, collaborative and whole-class levels. The findings fall under one of three themes: 1) the physicality of the room, 2) the pedagogical script for student observation and reflection and collaboration, and 3) ways of including collective

  16. [Design of an anesthesia and micro-environment information management system in mobile operating room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianwen; Liu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Wenchang; Wu, Qingfu; Tan, Shulin

    2013-08-01

    We have designed a mobile operating room information management system. The system is composed of a client and a server. A client, consisting of a PC, medical equipments, PLC and sensors, provides the acquisition and processing of anesthesia and micro-environment data. A server is a powerful computer that stores the data of the system. The client gathers the medical device data by using the C/S mode, and analyzes the obtained HL7 messages through the class library call. The client collects the micro-environment information with PLC, and finishes the data reading with the OPC technology. Experiment results showed that the designed system could manage the patient anesthesia and micro-environment information well, and improve the efficiency of the doctors' works and the digital level of the mobile operating room.

  17. Optimum Operating Room Environment for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Sara; Luo, James N; Gilbert, Jack; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C

    Surgical site infections (SSI), whether they be incisional or deep, can entail major morbidity and death to patients and additional cost to the healthcare system. A significant amount of effort has gone into optimizing the surgical patient and the operating room environment to reduce SSI. Relevant guidelines and literature were reviewed. The modern practice of surgical antisepsis involves the employment of strict sterile techniques inside the operating room. Extensive guidelines are available regarding the proper operating room antisepsis as well as pre-operative preparation. The use of pre-operative antimicrobial prophylaxis has become increasingly prevalent, which also presents the challenge of opportunistic and nosocomial infections. Ongoing investigative efforts have brought about a greater appreciation of the surgical patient's endogenous microflora, use of non-bactericidal small molecules, and pre-operative microbial screening. Systematic protocols exist for optimizing the surgical sterility of the operating room to prevent SSIs. Ongoing research efforts aim to improve the precision of peri-operative antisepsis measures and personalize these measures to tailor the patient's unique microbial environment.

  18. A Distributed Reasoning Engine Ecosystem for Semantic Context-Management in Smart Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego López-de-Ipiña

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available To be able to react adequately a smart environment must be aware of the context and its changes. Modeling the context allows applications to better understand it and to adapt to its changes. In order to do this an appropriate formal representation method is needed. Ontologies have proven themselves to be one of the best tools to do it. Semantic inference provides a powerful framework to reason over the context data. But there are some problems with this approach. The inference over semantic context information can be cumbersome when working with a large amount of data. This situation has become more common in modern smart environments where there are a lot sensors and devices available. In order to tackle this problem we have developed a mechanism to distribute the context reasoning problem into smaller parts in order to reduce the inference time. In this paper we describe a distributed peer-to-peer agent architecture of context consumers and context providers. We explain how this inference sharing process works, partitioning the context information according to the interests of the agents, location and a certainty factor. We also discuss the system architecture, analyzing the negotiation process between the agents. Finally we compare the distributed reasoning with the centralized one, analyzing in which situations is more suitable each approach.

  19. IoT Privacy and Security Challenges for Smart Home Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huichen Lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Often the Internet of Things (IoT is considered as a single problem domain, with proposed solutions intended to be applied across a wide range of applications. However, the privacy and security needs of critical engineering infrastructure or sensitive commercial operations are very different to the needs of a domestic Smart Home environment. Additionally, the financial and human resources available to implement security and privacy vary greatly between application domains. In domestic environments, human issues may be as important as technical issues. After surveying existing solutions for enhancing IoT security, the paper identifies key future requirements for trusted Smart Home systems. A gateway architecture is selected as the most appropriate for resource-constrained devices, and for high system availability. Two key technologies to assist system auto-management are identified. Firstly, support for system auto-configuration will enhance system security. Secondly, the automatic update of system software and firmware is needed to maintain ongoing secure system operation.

  20. MudGet: Reproduction of the desired lighting environment using a smart-LED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Hwi Kim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available With the emergence of smart LEDs, lighting based interior design is becoming popular. However, most of the smart LED-based lighting systems rely on expert-human intervention to create a desired atmosphere. For convenience, commercial lighting systems offer a number of options but their usability is fairly restricted. Therefore, an intuitive interface is required for novice users to generate the desired lighting environment. In this paper, we have developed a software, named MudGet, which automatically extracts the light mood from a digital image and controls the LED lamps to reproduce a desired lighting effect according to the extracted light mood. In our method, the light mood is regarded as a set of the representative colors of the digital image. The representative colors are extracted by utilizing K-means clustering algorithm. The dimming parameters are set for which each of the LED lamps create the lighting environment with the mood extracted by the software. To evaluate the feasibility of mood reproduction qualitatively, the degree of similarity between the light mood in the digital image and the reproduced result using LEDs is evaluated by a user study under a miniaturized experimental set. We observe that users can easily produce a desired atmosphere through the proposed MudGet software.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of microbial contamination in the operating room environment: Is there a risk for infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmiston, Charles E; Seabrook, Gary R; Cambria, Robert A; Brown, Kellie R; Lewis, Brian D; Sommers, Jay R; Krepel, Candace J; Wilson, Patti J; Sinski, Sharon; Towne, Jonathan B

    2005-10-01

    Modern operating rooms are considered to be aseptic environments. The use of surgical mask, frequent air exchanges, and architectural barriers are used to reduce airborne microbial populations. Breaks in surgical technique, host contamination, or hematogenous seeding are suggested as causal factors in these infections. This study implicates contamination of the operating room air as an additional etiology of infection. To investigate the potential sources of perioperative contamination, an innovative in situ air-sampling analysis was conducted during an 18-month period involving 70 separate vascular surgical procedures. Air-sample cultures were obtained from multiple points within the operating room, ranging from 0.5 to 4 m from the surgical wound. Selected microbial clonality was determined by pulse-field gel electrophoresis. In a separate series of studies microbial nasopharyngeal shedding was evaluated under controlled environmental conditions in the presence and absence of a surgical mask. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were recovered from 86% of air samples, 51% from within 0.5 m of the surgical wound, whereas Staphylococcus aureus was recovered from 64% of air samples, 39% within 0.5 m from the wound. Anterior nares swabs were obtained from 11 members of the vascular team, clonality was observed between 8 strains of S epidermidis, and 2 strains of S aureus were recovered from selected team members and air-samples collected throughout the operating room environment. Miscellaneous Gram-negative isolates were recovered less frequently (operating room, including areas adjacent to the operative field. Nasopharyngeal shedding from person participating in the operation was identified as the source of many of these airborne contaminants. Failure of the traditional surgical mask to prevent microbial shedding is likely associated with an increased risk of perioperative contamination of biomedical implants, especially in procedures lasting longer than 90 minutes.

  2. Smart city planning from a bottom-up approach: local communities' intervention for a smarter urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alverti, Maroula; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos; Kyriakidis, Phaedon; Serraos, Konstantinos

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the concept of "smart" cities from the perspective of inclusive community participation and Geographical Information Systems (GIS).The concept of a smart city is critically analyzed, focusing on the power/knowledge implications of a "bottom-up" approach in planning and how GIS could encourage community participation in smart urban planning. The paper commences with a literature review of what it means for cities to be "smart". It draws supporting definitions and critical insights into smart cities with respect to the built environment and the human factor. The second part of the paper, analyzes the "bottom-up" approach in urban planning, focusing on community participation reviewing forms and expressions through good practices from European cities. The third part of the paper includes a debate on how smart urban cities policies and community participation interact and influence each other. Finally, the paper closes with a discussion of the insights that were found and offers recommendations on how this debate could be addressed by Information and Communication Technologies and GIS in particular.

  3. Wearing ID Badges in the Operating Room Environment: Is Reconsideration Warranted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Matthew H; Heilmann, Kris P; Callaghan, John J

    2017-07-01

    Surgical site infection and nosocomial infections in general have appropriately undergone increased scrutiny over the last decade. Numerous studies have documented pathogenic bacterial contamination of personal items such as cell phones, pagers, ties, and pens in the hospital setting. It is our understanding that Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations requires all personnel to wear an identification badge at all times, which includes the operating room environment. Badges, lanyards, and pagers from operating room personnel were swabbed and cultured using the same protocol used for surgical specimens in the operating rooms. Personnel included orthopedic attendings (14), orthopedic residents (20), nurses (19), and anesthesia personnel (11). A total of 64 badges were sampled, with no methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) or methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) cultured on any of the badges. Two of 64 had enterococcus (3%), and 1 of those was vancomycin resistant. Pagers had similar results, with only 1/42 growing MSSA or enterococcus (2.4%), and no MRSA. Lanyards showed higher rates of contamination. There were 11% with MSSA or MRSA out of 27 sampled. Highest contamination rates were with orthopedic staff and resident lanyards, with 3/22 (13.6%) growing MSSA or MRSA. No lanyards grew enterococcus. When comparing rates of MSSA and/or MRSA between groups, lanyards had a statistically significant higher rate (P operating room personnel should probably not use lanyards to display their ID badges. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Methodology for analyzing environmental quality indicators in a dynamic operating room environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Thomas; Markel, Troy A; Jones, Howard W; Wagner, Jennifer; Greeley, Damon; Clarke, James H; Abkowitz, Mark; Ostojic, John

    2017-04-01

    Sufficient quantities of quality air and controlled, unidirectional flow are important elements in providing a safe building environment for operating rooms. To make dynamic assessments of an operating room environment, a validated method of testing the multiple factors influencing the air quality in health care settings needed to be constructed. These include the following: temperature, humidity, particle load, number of microbial contaminants, pressurization, air velocity, and air distribution. The team developed the name environmental quality indicators (EQIs) to describe the overall air quality based on the actual measurements of these properties taken during the mock surgical procedures. These indicators were measured at 3 different hospitals during mock surgical procedures to simulate actual operating room conditions. EQIs included microbial assessments at the operating table and the back instrument table and real-time analysis of particle counts at 9 different defined locations in the operating suites. Air velocities were measured at the face of the supply diffusers, at the sterile field, at the back table, and at a return grille. The testing protocol provided consistent and comparable measurements of air quality indicators between institutions. At 20 air changes per hour (ACH), and an average temperature of 66.3°F, the median of the microbial contaminants for the 3 operating room sites ranged from 3-22 colony forming units (CFU)/m3 at the sterile field and 5-27 CFU/m3 at the back table. At 20 ACH, the median levels of the 0.5-µm particles at the 3 sites were 85,079, 85,325, and 912,232 in particles per cubic meter, with a predictable increase in particle load in the non-high-efficiency particulate air-filtered operating room site. Using a comparison with cleanroom standards, the microbial and particle counts in all 3 operating rooms were equivalent to International Organization for Standardization classifications 7 and 8 during the mock surgical

  5. Vibration, buckling and smart control of microtubules using piezoelectric nanoshells under electric voltage in thermal environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farajpour, A., E-mail: ariobarzan.oderj@gmail.com; Rastgoo, A.; Mohammadi, M.

    2017-03-15

    Piezoelectric nanomaterials such as zinc oxide (ZnO) are of low toxicity and have many biomedical applications including optical imaging, drug delivery, biosensing and harvesting biomechanical energy using hybrid nanogenerators. In this paper, the vibration, buckling and smart control of microtubules (MTs) embedded in an elastic medium in thermal environment using a piezoelectric nanoshell (PNS) are investigated. The MT and PNS are considered to be coupled by a filament network. The PNS is subjected to thermal loads and an external electric voltage which operates to control the mechanical behavior of the MT. Using the nonlocal continuum mechanics, the governing differential equations are derived. An exact solution is presented for simply supported boundary conditions. The differential quadrature method is also used to solve the governing equations for other boundary conditions. A detailed parametric study is conducted to investigate the effects of the elastic constants of surrounding medium and internal filament matrix, scale coefficient, electric voltage, the radius-to-thickness ratio of PNSs and temperature change on the smart control of MTs. It is found that the applied electric voltage can be used as an effective controlling parameter for the vibration and buckling of MTs.

  6. a Novel Approach to Camera Calibration Method for Smart Phones Under Road Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bijun; Zhou, Jian; Ye, Maosheng; Guo, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Monocular vision-based lane departure warning system has been increasingly used in advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS). By the use of the lane mark detection and identification, we proposed an automatic and efficient camera calibration method for smart phones. At first, we can detect the lane marker feature in a perspective space and calculate edges of lane markers in image sequences. Second, because of the width of lane marker and road lane is fixed under the standard structural road environment, we can automatically build a transformation matrix between perspective space and 3D space and get a local map in vehicle coordinate system. In order to verify the validity of this method, we installed a smart phone in the `Tuzhi' self-driving car of Wuhan University and recorded more than 100km image data on the road in Wuhan. According to the result, we can calculate the positions of lane markers which are accurate enough for the self-driving car to run smoothly on the road.

  7. Vibration, buckling and smart control of microtubules using piezoelectric nanoshells under electric voltage in thermal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajpour, A.; Rastgoo, A.; Mohammadi, M.

    2017-03-01

    Piezoelectric nanomaterials such as zinc oxide (ZnO) are of low toxicity and have many biomedical applications including optical imaging, drug delivery, biosensing and harvesting biomechanical energy using hybrid nanogenerators. In this paper, the vibration, buckling and smart control of microtubules (MTs) embedded in an elastic medium in thermal environment using a piezoelectric nanoshell (PNS) are investigated. The MT and PNS are considered to be coupled by a filament network. The PNS is subjected to thermal loads and an external electric voltage which operates to control the mechanical behavior of the MT. Using the nonlocal continuum mechanics, the governing differential equations are derived. An exact solution is presented for simply supported boundary conditions. The differential quadrature method is also used to solve the governing equations for other boundary conditions. A detailed parametric study is conducted to investigate the effects of the elastic constants of surrounding medium and internal filament matrix, scale coefficient, electric voltage, the radius-to-thickness ratio of PNSs and temperature change on the smart control of MTs. It is found that the applied electric voltage can be used as an effective controlling parameter for the vibration and buckling of MTs.

  8. IoT-Based User-Driven Service Modeling Environment for a Smart Space Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoan-Suk Choi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The existing Internet environment has been extended to the Internet of Things (IoT as an emerging new paradigm. The IoT connects various physical entities. These entities have communication capability and deploy the observed information to various service areas such as building management, energy-saving systems, surveillance services, and smart homes. These services are designed and developed by professional service providers. Moreover, users’ needs have become more complicated and personalized with the spread of user-participation services such as social media and blogging. Therefore, some active users want to create their own services to satisfy their needs, but the existing IoT service-creation environment is difficult for the non-technical user because it requires a programming capability to create a service. To solve this problem, we propose the IoT-based user-driven service modeling environment to provide an easy way to create IoT services. Also, the proposed environment deploys the defined service to another user. Through the personalization and customization of the defined service, the value and dissemination of the service is increased. This environment also provides the ontology-based context-information processing that produces and describes the context information for the IoT-based user-driven service.

  9. IoT-based user-driven service modeling environment for a smart space management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hoan-Suk; Rhee, Woo-Seop

    2014-11-20

    The existing Internet environment has been extended to the Internet of Things (IoT) as an emerging new paradigm. The IoT connects various physical entities. These entities have communication capability and deploy the observed information to various service areas such as building management, energy-saving systems, surveillance services, and smart homes. These services are designed and developed by professional service providers. Moreover, users' needs have become more complicated and personalized with the spread of user-participation services such as social media and blogging. Therefore, some active users want to create their own services to satisfy their needs, but the existing IoT service-creation environment is difficult for the non-technical user because it requires a programming capability to create a service. To solve this problem, we propose the IoT-based user-driven service modeling environment to provide an easy way to create IoT services. Also, the proposed environment deploys the defined service to another user. Through the personalization and customization of the defined service, the value and dissemination of the service is increased. This environment also provides the ontology-based context-information processing that produces and describes the context information for the IoT-based user-driven service.

  10. Transmission of Clostridium difficile spores in isolation room environments and through hospital beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, Maria; Eriksson, Mats; Andersson, Josefin; Norén, Torbjörn

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the dissemination of Clostridium difficile (CD) spores in a hospital setting where the potassium monopersulfate-based disinfectant Virkon™ was used for cleaning. In the initial part of the study, we sampled 16 areas of frequent patient contact in 10 patient rooms where a patient with CD infection (CDI) had been accommodated. In the second part of the study, we obtained samples from 10 patient beds after discharge of CDI patients, both before and after the beds were cleaned. In the first part, CDspores were isolated in only 30% of the rooms. In the second part, which focused on transmission to hospital beds, C. difficile was found in four of 10 beds either before or after cleaning. In conclusion, in both parts of the study, we demonstrated a moderate spread of CD spores to the environment despite routine cleaning procedures involving Virkon™. © 2014 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Smart mobility in smart cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baucells, Aleta N.

    2016-07-01

    Cities are currently undergoing a transformation into the Smart concept, like Smartphones or SmartTV. Many initiatives are being developed in the framework of the Smart Cities projects, however, there is a lack of consistent indicators and methodologies to assess, finance, prioritize and implement this kind of projects. Smart Cities projects are classified according to six axes: Government, Mobility, Environment, Economy, People and Living. (Giffinger, 2007). The main objective of this research is to develop an evaluation model in relation to the mobility concept as one of the six axes of the Smart City classification and apply it to the Spanish cities. The evaluation was carried out in the 62 cities that made up in September 2015 the Spanish Network of Smart Cities (RECI- Red Española de Ciudades Inteligentes). This research is part of a larger project about Smart Cities’ evaluation (+CITIES), the project evaluates RECI’s cities in all the axes. The analysis was carried out taking into account sociodemographic indicators such as the size of the city or the municipal budget per inhabitant. The mobility’s evaluation in those cities has been focused in: sustainability mobility urban plans and measures to reduce the number of vehicles. The 62 cities from the RECI have been evaluated according to their degree of progress in several Smart Cities’ initiatives related to smart mobility. The applied methodology has been specifically made for this project. The grading scale has different ranks depending on the deployment level of smart cities’ initiatives. (Author)

  12. Smart environment as a service: three factor cloud based user authentication for telecare medical information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Zeeshan; Abdullah, Abdul Hanan; Khan, Muhammad Khurram; Alghamdi, Abdullah S

    2014-01-01

    The Telecare Medical Information System (TMIS) provides a set of different medical services to the patient and medical practitioner. The patients and medical practitioners can easily connect to the services remotely from their own premises. There are several studies carried out to enhance and authenticate smartcard-based remote user authentication protocols for TMIS system. In this article, we propose a set of enhanced and authentic Three Factor (3FA) remote user authentication protocols utilizing a smartphone capability over a dynamic Cloud Computing (CC) environment. A user can access the TMIS services presented in the form of CC services using his smart device e.g. smartphone. Our framework transforms a smartphone to act as a unique and only identity required to access the TMIS system remotely. Methods, Protocols and Authentication techniques are proposed followed by security analysis and a performance analysis with the two recent authentication protocols proposed for the healthcare TMIS system.

  13. Towards a conceptual framework of OSH risk management in smart working environments based on smart PPE, ambient intelligence and the Internet of Things technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgórski, Daniel; Majchrzycka, Katarzyna; Dąbrowska, Anna; Gralewicz, Grzegorz; Okrasa, Małgorzata

    2017-03-01

    Recent developments in domains of ambient intelligence (AmI), Internet of Things, cyber-physical systems (CPS), ubiquitous/pervasive computing, etc., have led to numerous attempts to apply ICT solutions in the occupational safety and health (OSH) area. A literature review reveals a wide range of examples of smart materials, smart personal protective equipment and other AmI applications that have been developed to improve workers' safety and health. Because the use of these solutions modifies work methods, increases complexity of production processes and introduces high dynamism into thus created smart working environments (SWE), a new conceptual framework for dynamic OSH management in SWE is called for. A proposed framework is based on a new paradigm of OSH risk management consisting of real-time risk assessment and the capacity to monitor the risk level of each worker individually. A rationale for context-based reasoning in SWE and a respective model of the SWE-dedicated CPS are also proposed.

  14. Using a Virtual Room Platform To Build a Multimedia Distance Learning Environment For The Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Ginsberg

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Education and training are expected to change dramatically due to the combined impact of the Internet and multimedia technologies. A challenge for internet-based education systems is to allow educators and trainers to work from known models, while simultaneously letting them experiment with innovations without requiring frequent retooling. Work in distance learning, while of interest in its own right, is important to our general research program as a test bed for our ideas. The basic research program is to provide a general foundation, or set of "primitive" classes, for building remote collaboration environments, and then to build toolkits using these classes, and other more specific classes, that will address the particular requirements of various collaboration environments. Our basic premise is that the virtual room concept together with other fundamental concepts provides such a foundation. In this paper we discuss our virtual room platform and a distance-learning environment called PERSYST. PERSYST has been used in several distance-learning trials; we close this paper with a discussion of the trials and what we have learned from them.

  15. Thermal environment in a simulated double office room with convective and radiant cooling systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustakallio, Panu; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Rezgals, Lauris

    2017-01-01

    The thermal environment in a double office room obtained with chilled beam (CB), chilled beam with radiant panel (CBR), chilled ceiling with ceiling installed mixing ventilation (CCMV) and overhead mixing total volume ventilation (MTVV) under summer (cooling) condition was compared. Design (peak......) and usual (average) heat load from solar radiation, office equipment, lighting and occupants was simulated, respectively at 62 W/m2 and 38 W/m2 under four different workstation layouts. Air temperature, globe (operative) temperature, radiant asymmetry, air velocity and turbulent intensity were measured...

  16. Report: EPA’s Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory Should Improve Its Computer Room Security Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #12-P-0847, September 21, 2012.Our review of the security posture and in-place environmental controls of EPA’s Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory computer room disclosed an array of security and environmental control deficiencies.

  17. The methodological aspect of the landscape and ecological forming of a comfortable environment for the Smart City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova Nina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is directed to the development of a model for the “smart city” including an interior space with the developed system of information technologies to provide comfortability in the area of living environment and the natural external envelope forming a hurdle from negative natural and climatic phenomena. Some new landscape solutions are given that increase the potential of energy saving technologies in the city when later transforming it into the Smart city. The history of building the green belt around Stalingrad-Volgograd is analyzed, directions of the ecological type of their impact on the urban living quality are settled. New landscape solutions are presented increasing the potential of energy saving technologies of the city. The research embrace the theoretical principles of forming the landscape building objects in the concept of the Smart city. The article justifies the need for enlarging the landscape building techniques in terms of enhancing the energy efficiency of buildings as well as forming the territorial platform to transform the city into the “Smart city” region. The developed methodology of the landscape object building enables to apply the obtained proposals in the Russian and world construction under similar natural conditions when developing the city into the Smart city sphere.

  18. Isolation and characterization of bacteria capable of tolerating the extreme conditions of clean room environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Duc, Myron T; Dekas, Anne; Osman, Shariff; Moissl, Christine; Newcombe, David; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2007-04-01

    In assessing the bacterial populations present in spacecraft assembly, spacecraft test, and launch preparation facilities, extremophilic bacteria (requiring severe conditions for growth) and extremotolerant bacteria (tolerant to extreme conditions) were isolated. Several cultivation approaches were employed to select for and identify bacteria that not only survive the nutrient-limiting conditions of clean room environments but can also withstand even more inhospitable environmental stresses. Due to their proximity to spacefaring objects, these bacteria pose a considerable risk for forward contamination of extraterrestrial sites. Samples collected from four geographically distinct National Aeronautics and Space Administration clean rooms were challenged with UV-C irradiation, 5% hydrogen peroxide, heat shock, pH extremes (pH 3.0 and 11.0), temperature extremes (4 degrees C to 65 degrees C), and hypersalinity (25% NaCl) prior to and/or during cultivation as a means of selecting for extremotolerant bacteria. Culture-independent approaches were employed to measure viable microbial (ATP-based) and total bacterial (quantitative PCR-based) burdens. Intracellular ATP concentrations suggested a viable microbial presence ranging from below detection limits to 10(6) cells/m(2). However, only 0.1 to 55% of these viable cells were able to grow on defined culture medium. Isolated members of the Bacillaceae family were more physiologically diverse than those reported in previous studies, including thermophiles (Geobacillus), obligate anaerobes (Paenibacillus), and halotolerant, alkalophilic species (Oceanobacillus and Exiguobacterium). Non-spore-forming microbes (alpha- and beta-proteobacteria and actinobacteria) exhibiting tolerance to the selected stresses were also encountered. The multiassay cultivation approach employed herein enhances the current understanding of the physiological diversity of bacteria housed in these clean rooms and leads us to ponder the origin and means

  19. Regulation through code as a safeguard for implementing smart contracts in no-trust environments

    OpenAIRE

    EENMAA-DIMITRIEVA, Helen; SCHMIDT-KESSEN, Maria Jose

    2017-01-01

    Smart contracts, self-executing agreements based on blockchain technology, are a hotly debated topic in the tech community, among policy makers, industry stakeholders and in academia. They offer the prospect of cheaper, faster and better transactions. The hype around smart contracts is also viewed with caution. We contribute to the existing academic literature by addressing some of the concerns about the legal nature, anonymity and reliability of smart contracts. Several contract law scholars...

  20. A liquid metal reaction environment for the room-temperature synthesis of atomically thin metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavabeti, Ali; Ou, Jian Zhen; Carey, Benjamin J.; Syed, Nitu; Orrell-Trigg, Rebecca; Mayes, Edwin L. H.; Xu, Chenglong; Kavehei, Omid; O’Mullane, Anthony P.; Kaner, Richard B.; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh; Daeneke, Torben

    2017-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) oxides have a wide variety of applications in electronics and other technologies. However, many oxides are not easy to synthesize as 2D materials through conventional methods. We used nontoxic eutectic gallium-based alloys as a reaction solvent and co-alloyed desired metals into the melt. On the basis of thermodynamic considerations, we predicted the composition of the self-limiting interfacial oxide. We isolated the surface oxide as a 2D layer, either on substrates or in suspension. This enabled us to produce extremely thin subnanometer layers of HfO2, Al2O3, and Gd2O3. The liquid metal–based reaction route can be used to create 2D materials that were previously inaccessible with preexisting methods. The work introduces room-temperature liquid metals as a reaction environment for the synthesis of oxide nanomaterials with low dimensionality.

  1. FAST ASSESSMENT OF RF POWER ABSORPTION IN INDOOR ENVIRONMENTS BY ROOM ELECTROMAGNETICS THEORY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamba, Aliou; Joseph, Wout; Boursianis, Achilles; Samaras, Theodoros; Vermeeren, Günter; Thielens, Arno; Martens, Luc

    2016-12-01

    A fast method to assess radiofrequency (RF) radiation absorption in humans present in realistic indoor environments is proposed. The only required inputs are the room characteristics and the weight and position of the human with respect to the electromagnetic source. The method is compared and validated with full finite-difference time-domain simulations. Various realistic scenarios are investigated, in which one to six human phantoms are present. Whole-body power absorption ranges from 23.5 to 85.9 µW kg(-1) with a median deviation of ∼3.1 dB (51 %). While this difference may appear large, it is outbalanced by a calculation time of less than a second for the proposed method compared with ∼17.5 h for a single full-wave electromagnetic simulation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. The NICU Environment: Infusing Single-Family Room Benefits into the Open-Bay Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Jenna L; Jnah, Amy; Newberry, Desi

    2017-03-01

    Two distinct architectural designs are found in today's NICUs-the open-bay (OPBY) and the single-family room (SFR) designs. When neonatology was recognized as a medical subspecialty in the 1970s, the OPBY design was the only platform offered to neonates and families. The OPBY design facilitated communication between staff, collegiality, and interprofessional collaboration among members of the neonatal team. Over time, pitfalls to the design were recognized, including increased transmission of sound and light. As a result, the SFR design emerged offering a family-centered, customizable environment. Through recognition and adoption of best practices, the neurodevelopmental benefits to SFRs can be infused within the OPBY unit. This article aims to identify best practices to infuse the benefits of SFR design (such as low light, low sound, and less overstimulation) into the OPBY NICU to reduce negative stimulation and optimize developmental outcomes for vulnerable neonates.

  3. Measuring Situation Awareness of Operating Team in Different Main Control Room Environments of Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Woo Lee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Environments in nuclear power plants (NPPs are changing as the design of instrumentation and control systems for NPPs is rapidly moving toward fully digital instrumentation and control, and modern computer techniques are gradually introduced into main control rooms (MCRs. Within the context of these environmental changes, the level of performance of operators in a digital MCR is a major concern. Situation awareness (SA, which is used within human factors research to explain to what extent operators of safety-critical systems know what is transpiring in the system and the environment, is considered a prerequisite factor to guarantee the safe operation of NPPs. However, the safe operation of NPPs can be guaranteed through a team effort. In this regard, the operating team's SA in a conventional and digital MCR should be measured in order to assess whether the new design features implemented in a digital MCR affect this parameter. This paper explains the team SA measurement method used in this study and the results of applying this measurement method to operating teams in different MCR environments. The paper also discusses several empirical lessons learned from the results.

  4. Energy-Efficient Through-Life Smart Design, Manufacturing and Operation of Ships in an Industry 4.0 Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Hock Ang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Energy efficiency is an important factor in the marine industry to help reduce manufacturing and operational costs as well as the impact on the environment. In the face of global competition and cost-effectiveness, ship builders and operators today require a major overhaul in the entire ship design, manufacturing and operation process to achieve these goals. This paper highlights smart design, manufacturing and operation as the way forward in an industry 4.0 (i4 era from designing for better energy efficiency to more intelligent ships and smart operation through-life. The paper (i draws parallels between ship design, manufacturing and operation processes, (ii identifies key challenges facing such a temporal (lifecycle as opposed to spatial (mass products, (iii proposes a closed-loop ship lifecycle framework and (iv outlines potential future directions in smart design, manufacturing and operation of ships in an industry 4.0 value chain so as to achieve more energy-efficient vessels. Through computational intelligence and cyber-physical integration, we envision that industry 4.0 can revolutionise ship design, manufacturing and operations in a smart product through-life process in the near future.

  5. SMARTE: RESTORING THE ENVIRONMENT, REVITALIZING COMMUNITIES - NOV. 13, 2006 - TECHNOLOGY SHOWCASE THEATRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    SMARTe (Sustainable Management Approaches and Revitalization Tools -electronic) is a web-based decision support tool being developed by the Office of Research and Development (ORD) in partnership with the Office of Brownfields Cleanup and...

  6. Enhanced ID-Based Authentication Scheme Using OTP in Smart Grid AMI Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Sang-Soo Yeo; Dae-il Park; Young-Ae Jung

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the vulnerabilities analyses of KL scheme which is an ID-based authentication scheme for AMI network attached SCADA in smart grid and proposes a security-enhanced authentication scheme which satisfies forward secrecy as well as security requirements introduced in KL scheme and also other existing schemes. The proposed scheme uses MDMS which is the supervising system located in an electrical company as a time-synchronizing server in order to synchronize smart devices at hom...

  7. From Smart Guesser to Smart Navigator: Changes in Collection Development for Research Libraries in a Network Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the impact that network technology, electronic publishing, and Internet communication are having on collection development policies in research libraries. Highlights include changes in the research library environment, including financial difficulties; scholarly communication; workstations for material selection; and materials in…

  8. Extending MAM5 Meta-Model and JaCalIV E Framework to Integrate Smart Devices from Real Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J A Rincon

    Full Text Available This paper presents the extension of a meta-model (MAM5 and a framework based on the model (JaCalIVE for developing intelligent virtual environments. The goal of this extension is to develop augmented mirror worlds that represent a real and virtual world coupled, so that the virtual world not only reflects the real one, but also complements it. A new component called a smart resource artifact, that enables modelling and developing devices to access the real physical world, and a human in the loop agent to place a human in the system have been included in the meta-model and framework. The proposed extension of MAM5 has been tested by simulating a light control system where agents can access both virtual and real sensor/actuators through the smart resources developed. The results show that the use of real environment interactive elements (smart resource artifacts in agent-based simulations allows to minimize the error between simulated and real system.

  9. Cyber-physical security of Wide-Area Monitoring, Protection and Control in a smart grid environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Aditya; Hahn, Adam; Govindarasu, Manimaran

    2014-07-01

    Smart grid initiatives will produce a grid that is increasingly dependent on its cyber infrastructure in order to support the numerous power applications necessary to provide improved grid monitoring and control capabilities. However, recent findings documented in government reports and other literature, indicate the growing threat of cyber-based attacks in numbers and sophistication targeting the nation's electric grid and other critical infrastructures. Specifically, this paper discusses cyber-physical security of Wide-Area Monitoring, Protection and Control (WAMPAC) from a coordinated cyber attack perspective and introduces a game-theoretic approach to address the issue. Finally, the paper briefly describes how cyber-physical testbeds can be used to evaluate the security research and perform realistic attack-defense studies for smart grid type environments.

  10. Numerical Modelling of Thermal Environment in a Displacement-Ventilated Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torsten V.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    It is the purpose of this paper to investigate the ability of a k-E turbulence model to predict air flow and comfort conditions in a displacement-ventilated room.......It is the purpose of this paper to investigate the ability of a k-E turbulence model to predict air flow and comfort conditions in a displacement-ventilated room....

  11. Distributed smart device for monitoring, control and management of electric loads in domotic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Ricardo; Badesa, Francisco J; García-Aracil, Nicolas; Perez-Vidal, Carlos; Sabater, Jose María

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a microdevice for monitoring, control and management of electric loads at home. The key idea is to compact the electronic design as much as possible in order to install it inside a Schuko socket. Moreover, the electronic Schuko socket (electronic microdevice + Schuko socket) has the feature of communicating with a central unit and with other microdevices over the existing powerlines. Using the existing power lines, the proposed device can be installed in new buildings or in old ones. The main use of this device is to monitor, control and manage electric loads to save energy and prevent accidents produced by different kind of devices (e.g., iron) used in domestic tasks. The developed smart device is based on a single phase multifunction energy meter manufactured by Analog Devices (ADE7753) to measure the consumption of electrical energy and then to transmit it using a serial interface. To provide current measurement information to the ADE7753, an ultra flat SMD open loop integrated circuit current transducer based on the Hall effect principle manufactured by Lem (FHS-40P/SP600) has been used. Moreover, each smart device has a PL-3120 smart transceiver manufactured by LonWorks to execute the user's program, to communicate with the ADE7753 via serial interface and to transmit information to the central unit via powerline communication. Experimental results show the exactitude of the measurements made using the developed smart device.

  12. Thermal Behaviour of Low Voltage Cables in Smart Grid - Related Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.F. Höning (Nicolas); E. de Jong (Erik); G. Bloemhof; J.A. La Poutré (Han); Ö. Usta

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractLow voltage cables in distribution grids will operate under harmful conditions more often in the near future, due to the integration of renewable energy sources and the addition of powerful consumption appliances. It is crucial to evaluate smart solutions that can prolong cable

  13. Pure random search for ambient sensor distribution optimisation in a smart home environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P; Nugent, Chris D; Wang, Hui; Chen, Liming

    2011-01-01

    Smart homes are living spaces facilitated with technology to allow individuals to remain in their own homes for longer, rather than be institutionalised. Sensors are the fundamental physical layer with any smart home, as the data they generate is used to inform decision support systems, facilitating appropriate actuator actions. Positioning of sensors is therefore a fundamental characteristic of a smart home. Contemporary smart home sensor distribution is aligned to either a) a total coverage approach; b) a human assessment approach. These methods for sensor arrangement are not data driven strategies, are unempirical and frequently irrational. This Study hypothesised that sensor deployment directed by an optimisation method that utilises inhabitants' spatial frequency data as the search space, would produce more optimal sensor distributions vs. the current method of sensor deployment by engineers. Seven human engineers were tasked to create sensor distributions based on perceived utility for 9 deployment scenarios. A Pure Random Search (PRS) algorithm was then tasked to create matched sensor distributions. The PRS method produced superior distributions in 98.4% of test cases (n=64) against human engineer instructed deployments when the engineers had no access to the spatial frequency data, and in 92.0% of test cases (n=64) when engineers had full access to these data. These results thus confirmed the hypothesis.

  14. Distributed Smart Device for Monitoring, Control and Management of Electric Loads in Domotic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Perez-Vidal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a microdevice for monitoring, control and management of electric loads at home. The key idea is to compact the electronic design as much as possible in order to install it inside a Schuko socket. Moreover, the electronic Schuko socket (electronic microdevice + Schuko socket has the feature of communicating with a central unit and with other microdevices over the existing powerlines. Using the existing power lines, the proposed device can be installed in new buildings or in old ones. The main use of this device is to monitor, control and manage electric loads to save energy and prevent accidents produced by different kind of devices (e.g., iron used in domestic tasks. The developed smart device is based on a single phase multifunction energy meter manufactured by Analog Devices (ADE7753 to measure the consumption of electrical energy and thento transmit it using a serial interface. To provide current measurement information to the ADE7753, an ultra flat SMD open loop integrated circuit current transducer based on the Hall effect principle manufactured by Lem (FHS-40P/SP600 has been used. Moreover, each smart device has a PL-3120 smart transceiver manufactured by LonWorks to execute the user’s program, to communicate with the ADE7753 via serial interface and to transmit information to the central unit via powerline communication. Experimental results show the exactitude of the measurements made using the developed smart device.

  15. Smart Location Database - Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Smart Location Database (SLD) summarizes over 80 demographic, built environment, transit service, and destination accessibility attributes for every census block...

  16. Smart Location Database - Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Smart Location Database (SLD) summarizes over 80 demographic, built environment, transit service, and destination accessibility attributes for every census block...

  17. Noise disturbance in open-plan study environments: a field study on noise sources, student tasks and room acoustic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braat-Eggen, P Ella; van Heijst, Anne; Hornikx, Maarten; Kohlrausch, Armin

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to gain more insight in the assessment of noise in open-plan study environments and to reveal correlations between noise disturbance experienced by students and the noise sources they perceive, the tasks they perform and the acoustic parameters of the open-plan study environment they work in. Data were collected in five open-plan study environments at universities in the Netherlands. A questionnaire was used to investigate student tasks, perceived sound sources and their perceived disturbance, and sound measurements were performed to determine the room acoustic parameters. This study shows that 38% of the surveyed students are disturbed by background noise in an open-plan study environment. Students are mostly disturbed by speech when performing complex cognitive tasks like studying for an exam, reading and writing. Significant but weak correlations were found between the room acoustic parameters and noise disturbance of students. Practitioner Summary: A field study was conducted to gain more insight in the assessment of noise in open-plan study environments at universities in the Netherlands. More than one third of the students was disturbed by noise. An interaction effect was found for task type, source type and room acoustic parameters.

  18. Employing a RGB-D Sensor for Real-Time Tracking of Humans across Multiple Re-Entries in a Smart Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Han (Jungong ); E.J. Pauwels (Eric); P.M. de Zeeuw (Paul); P.H.N. de With

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe term smart environment refers to physical spaces equipped with sensors feeding into adaptive algorithms that enable the environment to become sensitive and responsive to the presence and needs of its occupants. People with special needs, such as the elderly or disabled

  19. Hacking the hospital environment: young adults designing youth-friendly hospital rooms together with young people with cancer experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisen, Kirsten A; Boisen, Anne; Thomsen, Stine Legarth; Matthiesen, Simon Meggers; Hjerming, Maiken; Hertz, Pernille Grarup

    2015-12-09

    There is a need for youth-friendly hospital environments as the ward environment may affect both patient satisfaction and health outcomes. To involve young people in designing youth-friendly ward environment. We arranged a design competition lasting 42 h (Hackathon). Students in architecture, design, engineering, communication and anthropology participated (27 young adults) - forming eight groups. Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with current or former cancer experience participated as sparring partners. We provided workspace and food during the weekend. The groups presented their products to a jury and relevant stakeholders. The groups created eight unique design concepts. The young designers were extremely flexible listening to ideas and experiences from the young patients, which led to common features including individual and flexible design, privacy in two-bed wardrooms and social contact with other hospitalized AYA. The winning project included an integrated concept for both wardrooms and the AYA day room, including logos and names for the rooms and an 'energy wall' in the day room. A hackathon event was an effective mode of youth participation. The design concepts and ideas were in line with current evidence regarding pleasing hospital environment and youth-friendly inpatient facilities and may be applicable to other young patients.

  20. Differential responses of individuals with late-stage dementia to two novel environments: a multimedia room and an interior garden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Seiko; Kamal, Naveed; Puzio, Helene; Kobylarz, Fred; Herrup, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the responses of individuals with advanced dementia to two novel sensory environments in a nursing home facility. The first was a multisensory Snoezelen room; the second was a temporary Japanese garden. Subjects viewed each environment twice a week for 15 minutes during the study. Stress was measured using heart rate and informant-based behavioral changes. By these criteria, the garden-viewing group showed positive behavioral changes while the responses of the subjects in the Snoezelen group were more negative. The response of the subjects' pulse rate was most dramatic. During the 15 minutes in the garden, the average rate (all subjects/all visits) was significantly less than in their residential room. In the Snoezelen room, we detected little or no change. The impact of the garden could also be seen in the negative behavioral signs elicited upon returning the subjects to the garden room after the installation had been replaced with plants and furniture arranged with no formal design. We propose that exposure to a small interior Japanese garden could be an effective intervention for individuals suffering from late stage Alzheimer's disease.

  1. The integration and evaluation of an intelligent PV setup in a smart house environment

    OpenAIRE

    Sridharan, Vignesh

    2012-01-01

    With the implementation of self-consumption electricity tariff in Germany and the increasing prospects of it being implemented in many other countries, the number of PV installations on individual rooftops has increased. With the increase in such individual power plants on dwellings, there arises a need for robust energy measurement principles, which require more sophisticated metering infrastructure involving smart meters with bidirectional communication protocols. In order to...

  2. Distributed Generation Units as Ancillary Services Providers in a Pre Smart Grid Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donadel, Clainer Bravin; Fardin, Jussara Farias; Encarnação, Lucas Frizera

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, ancillary services in electrical distribution networks (e. g. voltage support and reactive power control), usually provided by capacitor banks, start to be performed by distributed generation units (DGs). In this way, several papers have been studying the use of DGs as reactive power providers, and the power electronic/market regulation involved in this new scenario. However, the authors commonly consider a full implementation of Smart Grid philosophy, i. e., there are appropriate communications between DGs and distribution network operator (DNO)'s control centers, but it is not a close reality in many developing countries, due to high costs involved in their implementation. Therefore, this paper proposes a new method in order to use DGs as ancillary services providers in a short and medium-term (called in the literature Pre Smart Grid), in which there are not effective communications between DGs and control centers of DNOs. The proposed method uses a non-uniform DGs distribution, obtained from local atlas of wind, solar, hydraulic and biomass power. The methodology presented accurate results when compared with a PSO-based method, widely used to solve optimization problems, but needs a complete Smart Grid philosophy implementation to work.

  3. An Adaptive Privacy Protection Method for Smart Home Environments Using Supervised Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingsha He

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, smart home technologies have started to be widely used, bringing a great deal of convenience to people’s daily lives. At the same time, privacy issues have become particularly prominent. Traditional encryption methods can no longer meet the needs of privacy protection in smart home applications, since attacks can be launched even without the need for access to the cipher. Rather, attacks can be successfully realized through analyzing the frequency of radio signals, as well as the timestamp series, so that the daily activities of the residents in the smart home can be learnt. Such types of attacks can achieve a very high success rate, making them a great threat to users’ privacy. In this paper, we propose an adaptive method based on sample data analysis and supervised learning (SDASL, to hide the patterns of daily routines of residents that would adapt to dynamically changing network loads. Compared to some existing solutions, our proposed method exhibits advantages such as low energy consumption, low latency, strong adaptability, and effective privacy protection.

  4. Smart Placemaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind, Simon

    2017-01-01

    As an ambiguous umbrella term, Smart City predominantly annotates the usage of technologies and data in creating solutions to grand challenges that contemporary societies face (i.e. climate change, congestion, pollution, aging populations). Visions and realisations of Smart City revolve around...... overly focused on optimisation, security and economic growth, and not on creating living environments foremost for the people that inhabit them (Greenfield 2013, Townsend 2014, Sassen 2012, Foth 2014, Koolhaas 2015). In this paper we review two empirical cases and explore how ICT, media technologies...... and data materialise in ‘smart placemaking’. In the Utzon Center in Aalborg (DK), the first case illustrates how Minecraft, LEGO and VR is used to create urban utopias and facilitate new spatial experiences, ownership and interaction. The second case, in Copenhagen (DK), addresses TREE.0, an installation...

  5. Customer baseline load models for residential sector in a smart-grid environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sharifi

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a new method is presented for the calculation of CBL for customers in residential sector in the context of a smart grid, considering the impact of weather changes. The results clearly show the high impact of changes in weather conditions on the calculation of CBL, and also show the extent of effect of buildings’ improved insulation on this parameter. It is also indicated that implementing DR programs can increase the willingness of customers in residential sector to improve the insulations of their buildings.

  6. Analysis of commode grab bar usage for the monitoring of older adults in the smart home environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcelus, Amaya; Holtzman, Megan; Goubran, Rafik; Sveistrup, Heidi; Guitard, Paulette; Knoefel, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of falls inside the home is a common yet potentially hazardous issue for adults as they age. Even with the installation of physical aids such as grab bars, weight transfers on and off a toilet or bathtub can become increasingly difficult as a person's level of physical mobility and sense of balance deteriorate. Detecting this deterioration becomes an important goal in fall prevention within a smart home. This paper develops an unobtrusive method of analyzing the usage of toilet grab bars using pressure sensors embedded into the arm rests of a commode. Clinical parameters are successfully extracted automatically from a series of stand-to-sit (StSi) and sit-to-stand (SiSt) transfers performed by a trial group of young and older adults. A preliminary comparison of the parameters indicates differences between the two groups, and aligns well with published characteristics obtained using accelerometers worn on the body. The unobtrusive nature of this method provides a useful tool to be incorporated into a system of continuous monitoring of older adults within the smart home environment.

  7. An Open Architecture to Support Social and Health Services in a Smart TV Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Carlos Rivas; Anido-Rifon, Luis E; Fernandez-Iglesias, Manuel J

    2017-03-01

    To design, implement, and test a solution to provide social and health services for the elderly at home based on smart TV technologies and access to all services. The architecture proposed is based on an open software platform and standard personal computing hardware. This provides great flexibility to develop new applications over the underlying infrastructure or to integrate new devices, for instance to monitor a broad range of vital signs in those cases where home monitoring is required. An actual system as a proof-of-concept was designed, implemented, and deployed. Applications range from social network clients to vital signs monitoring; from interactive TV contests to conventional online care applications such as medication reminders or telemedicine. In both cases, the results have been very positive, confirming the initial perception of the TV as a convenient, easy-to-use technology to provide social and health care. The TV set is a much more familiar computing interface for most senior users, and as a consequence, smart TVs become a most convenient solution for the design and implementation of applications and services targeted to this user group. This proposal has been tested in real setting with 62 senior people at their homes. Users included both individuals with experience using computers and others reluctant to them.

  8. SmartContent—Self-Protected Context-Aware Active Documents for Mobile Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Luca De Angelis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices make it possible to create, store, access, share or publish personal content on the Internet, anywhere and at anytime. This leads to situations of potential intentional or unintentional misuse of content as well as privacy issues. Recent techniques involving the use of contextual information focus on access of documents stored in clouds, or authentication for secured Web sites. These techniques or more traditional solutions, such as steganography or Digital Rights Management, do not empower the user itself, or data controller in professional settings, with a fine-grained control of the access to or manipulations actions on documents stored on mobile devices, e.g., copying, sharing, etc. In this paper, we propose SmartContent, a novel approach for content protection and privacy. Documents are active and context-aware documents that sense and analyse their current context, e.g., location, noise, neighbouring devices, social network, expiration time, etc. Based on user provided policies, they grant, deny or limit access and manipulation actions, or destroy themselves if necessary. We present the generic model of SmartContent, a concrete architecture and an implementation of a proof-of-concept specifically designed for mobile devices. We deployed it on tablets and showed that a picture dynamically reveals or conceals itself based on sensed context or on changing policies. The implementation leverages the SAPERE middleware specifically developed for context-aware systems.

  9. Smart space technology innovations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Mu-Yen

    2013-01-01

    Recently, ad hoc and wireless communication technologies have made available the device, service and information rich environment for users. Smart Space and ubiquitous computing extend the ""Living Lab"" vision of everyday objects and provide context-awareness services to users in smart living environments. This ebook investigates smart space technology and its innovations around the Living Labs. The final goal is to build context-awareness smart space and location-based service applications that integrate information from independent systems which autonomously and securely support human activ

  10. Contextual Intelligent Load Management Considering Real Time Pricing in a Smart Grid Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, Luis; Fernandes, Filipe; Faria, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The use of demand response programs enables the adequate use of resources of small and medium players, bringing high benefits to the smart grid, and increasing its efficiency. One of the difficulties to proceed with this paradigm is the lack of intelligence in the management of small and medium...... size players. In order to make demand response programs a feasible solution, it is essential that small and medium players have an efficient energy management and a fair optimization mechanism to decrease the consumption without heavy loss of comfort, making it acceptable for the users. This paper...... addresses the application of real-time pricing in a house that uses an intelligent optimization module involving artificial neural networks....

  11. Analyzing Activity Behavior and Movement in a Naturalistic Environment Using Smart Home Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Diane J; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Dawadi, Prafulla

    2015-11-01

    One of the many services that intelligent systems can provide is the ability to analyze the impact of different medical conditions on daily behavior. In this study, we use smart home and wearable sensors to collect data, while ( n = 84) older adults perform complex activities of daily living. We analyze the data using machine learning techniques and reveal that differences between healthy older adults and adults with Parkinson disease not only exist in their activity patterns, but that these differences can be automatically recognized. Our machine learning classifiers reach an accuracy of 0.97 with an area under the ROC curve value of 0.97 in distinguishing these groups. Our permutation-based testing confirms that the sensor-based differences between these groups are statistically significant.

  12. Wireless smart meters and public acceptance: the environment, limited choices, and precautionary politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, David J; Coley, Jonathan S

    2014-08-01

    Wireless smart meters (WSMs) promise numerous environmental benefits, but they have been installed without full consideration of public acceptance issues. Although societal-implications research and regulatory policy have focused on privacy, security, and accuracy issues, our research indicates that health concerns have played an important role in the public policy debates that have emerged in California. Regulatory bodies do not recognize non-thermal health effects for non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation, but both homeowners and counter-experts have contested the official assurances that WSMs pose no health risks. Similarities and differences with the existing social science literature on mobile phone masts are discussed, as are the broader political implications of framing an alternative policy based on an opt-out choice. The research suggests conditions under which health-oriented precautionary politics can be particularly effective, namely, if there is a mandatory technology, a network of counter-experts, and a broader context of democratic contestation.

  13. Improved scores for observed teamwork in the clinical environment following a multidisciplinary operating room simulation intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Jennifer M; Cumin, David; Civil, Ian D; Torrie, Jane; Garden, Alexander; MacCormick, Andrew D; Gurusinghe, Nishanthi; Boyd, Matthew J; Frampton, Christopher; Cokorilo, Martina; Tranvik, Magnus; Carlsson, Lisa; Lee, Tracey; Ng, Wai Leap; Crossan, Michael; Merry, Alan F

    2016-08-05

    We ran a Multidisciplinary Operating Room Simulation (MORSim) course for 20 complete general surgical teams from two large metropolitan hospitals. Our goal was to improve teamwork and communication in the operating room (OR). We hypothesised that scores for teamwork and communication in the OR would improve back in the workplace following MORSim. We used an extended Behavioural Marker Risk Index (BMRI) to measure teamwork and communication, because a relationship has previously been documented between BMRI scores and surgical patient outcomes. Trained observers scored general surgical teams in the OR at the two study hospitals before and after MORSim, using the BMRI. Analysis of BMRI scores for the 224 general surgical cases before and 213 cases after MORSim showed BMRI scores improved by more than 20% (0.41 v 0.32, pteamwork score would translate into a clinically important reduction in complications and mortality in surgical patients. We demonstrated an improvement in scores for teamwork and communication in general surgical ORs following our intervention. These results support the use of simulation-based multidisciplinary team training for OR staff to promote better teamwork and communication, and potentially improve outcomes for general surgical patients.

  14. A Smart Home Center Platform Solution Based on Smart Mirror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Xibo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the popularization of the concept of smart home, people have raised requirements on the experience of smart living. A smart home platform center solution is put forward in order to solve the intelligent interoperability and information integration of smart home, which enable people to have a more intelligent and convenient life experience. This platform center is achieved through the Smart Mirror. The Smart Mirror refers to a smart furniture, on the basis of the traditional concept of mirror, combining Raspberry Pi, the application of one-way mirror imaging principle, the touch-enabled design, voice and video interaction. Smart Mirror can provide a series of intelligent experience for the residents, such as controlling all the intelligent furniture through Smart Mirror; accessing and displaying the weather, time, news and other life information; monitoring the home environment; remote interconnection operation.

  15. Experimental Performance Evaluation of Multihop IEEE 802.15.4/4g/4e Smart Utility Networks in Outdoor Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Sean Sum

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental performance evaluation results of the IEEE 802.15.4/4g/4e Smart Utility Networks (SUN in applications suited for outdoor environment. SUN is an advanced wireless communications network designed for reliable, low data rate, and low energy consumption networks for command-and-control applications like utility service, sensor network, and so on. IEEE 802.15.4g/4e is the international standard for SUN supported by multiple utility providers and product vendors. In this paper, a comprehensive field test was conducted by employing the implementation we have developed to evaluate the performance of the SUN devices based on IEEE 802.15.4/4g/4e standard. The output power of the implementation is 250 mW for extended range, reducible to 20 mW for short-range scalability and battery preservation. Results showed that in an outdoor line-of-sight environment, the achievable one-hop range of a 50 kbps SUN device was 450 m. Next, in a non-line-of-sight environment involving typical residential concrete building, the communications could be established penetrating obstructions to reach above the 11th storey, reaching the performance degradation limits at the 20th storey. Next, the network of the SUN system was proven to be capable of supporting a typical multihop tree network in a dense populated building, meeting the required performance by the standard.

  16. Light on! Real world evaluation of a P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI) for environment control in a smart home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabalona, Roberta; Grossi, Ferdinando; Tessadri, Adam; Castiglioni, Paolo; Caracciolo, Antonio; de Munari, Ilaria

    2012-01-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems aim to enable interaction with other people and the environment without muscular activation by the exploitation of changes in brain signals due to the execution of cognitive tasks. In this context, the visual P300 potential appears suited to control smart homes through BCI spellers. The aim of this work is to evaluate whether the widely used character-speller is more sustainable than an icon-based one, designed to operate smart home environment or to communicate moods and needs. Nine subjects with neurodegenerative diseases and no BCI experience used both speller types in a real smart home environment. User experience during BCI tasks was evaluated recording concurrent physiological signals. Usability was assessed for each speller type immediately after use. Classification accuracy was lower for the icon-speller, which was also more attention demanding. However, in subjective evaluations, the effect of a real feedback partially counterbalanced the difficulty in BCI use. Since inclusive BCIs require to consider interface sustainability, we evaluated different ergonomic aspects of the interaction of disabled users with a character-speller (goal: word spelling) and an icon-speller (goal: operating a real smart home). We found the first one as more sustainable in terms of accuracy and cognitive effort.

  17. Predicting the perceived reverberation in different room acoustic environments using a binaural auditory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osses Vecchi, Alejandro; Kohlrausch, Armin; Lachenmayr, Winfried; Mommertz, Eckard

    2017-04-01

    In this paper a binaural auditory model was used to compute reverberance estimates in four simulated halls. For three of the halls different absorption conditions were evaluated. The model estimates (pRev) were obtained using music excerpts of an orchestra consisting of 23 instrument sections and then compared with the room acoustic parameters of reverberation time (T30) and early decay time (EDT) at mid frequencies. Although the results showed that pRev has a higher correlation with EDT rather than with T30, this relationship depends on the properties of the instruments. The simulations show that pRev depends on the presentation level and that for instruments with similar critical-band spectrum, pRev follows a similar trend across acoustic conditions. A computational framework and sound stimuli are provided to encourage the search of experimental evidence of the aspects addressed in this study.

  18. Multi-sensor architecture for human-centered smart environments, A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A.M. Ben Schouten; Dr. Johan Tangelder; Stefan Bonchev

    2005-01-01

    In a multi-sensory environment, supported with embedded computer technology, the system can capture and interpret what the users are doing and assist or collaborate with the users in real-time. Such an environment should be aware of users intentions, tasks and feelings, and allow people to interact

  19. Sound Spectrum Influences Auditory Distance Perception of Sound Sources Located in a Room Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Spiousas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies on the effect of spectral content on auditory distance perception (ADP focused on the physically measurable cues occurring either in the near field (low-pass filtering due to head diffraction or when the sound travels distances >15 m (high-frequency energy losses due to air absorption. Here, we study how the spectrum of a sound arriving from a source located in a reverberant room at intermediate distances (1–6 m influences the perception of the distance to the source. First, we conducted an ADP experiment using pure tones (the simplest possible spectrum of frequencies 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz. Then, we performed a second ADP experiment with stimuli consisting of continuous broadband and bandpass-filtered (with center frequencies of 0.5, 1.5, and 4 kHz and bandwidths of 1/12, 1/3, and 1.5 octave pink-noise clips. Our results showed an effect of the stimulus frequency on the perceived distance both for pure tones and filtered noise bands: ADP was less accurate for stimuli containing energy only in the low-frequency range. Analysis of the frequency response of the room showed that the low accuracy observed for low-frequency stimuli can be explained by the presence of sparse modal resonances in the low-frequency region of the spectrum, which induced a non-monotonic relationship between binaural intensity and source distance. The results obtained in the second experiment suggest that ADP can also be affected by stimulus bandwidth but in a less straightforward way (i.e., depending on the center frequency, increasing stimulus bandwidth could have different effects. Finally, the analysis of the acoustical cues suggests that listeners judged source distance using mainly changes in the overall intensity of the auditory stimulus with distance rather than the direct-to-reverberant energy ratio, even for low-frequency noise bands (which typically induce high amount of reverberation. The results obtained in this study show that, depending on

  20. Fast or Smart? How the Use of Scrum Can Influence the Temporal Environment in a Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheller, Vibeke Kristine; Hvid, Helge Søndergaard; Pries-Heje, Jan

    2015-01-01

    A recent survey shows that 40% of all projects use, or have used, agile methods. The most commonly used agile method is Scrum, one reason being that Scrum provides mechanisms for building a healthy temporal environment for the project participants. Through a case study carried out in a Danish...... municipality we demkonstrate how the tgemporal environment in a project is influenced - enhanced as well as challenged - by the use of Scrum....

  1. Adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay for monitoring contamination of the working environment of anaesthetists and cleanliness of the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukada, Tomoko; Tsuchiya, Yuri; Iwakiri, Hiroko; Ozaki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Anaesthetists possibly contribute to the spread of infections during anaesthesia. The adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence assay is an easy-to-perform, on-the-spot assay that provides objective data; therefore, using the LuciPac®Pen and the Lumitester PD-20®System, we assessed contamination of the working environment of anaesthetists before and after surgery as well as their hands at the time of each procedure during induction and extubation. Similarly, cleanliness of the operating room was evaluated using this assay to determine whether it is useful to assess the effectiveness of the routine cleaning protocols followed after surgery. ATP concentrations in the working environment of anaesthetists and their hands increased during surgery. In addition, ATP concentrations within the working environment decreased after routine cleaning with ethanol or accelerated hydrogen peroxide; however, there were no differences in the number of sites with ATP concentrations >500 relative light units before and after cleaning. This method is useful to evaluate contamination of the working environment of anaesthetists; nevertheless, it is prudent to evaluate the effectiveness of routine cleaning protocols because ATP bioluminescence assays are influenced by the use of various disinfectants at varying concentrations.

  2. Warm-up in a virtual reality environment improves performance in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calatayud, Dan; Arora, Sonal; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Kruglikova, Irina; Schulze, Svend; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Grantcharov, Teodor

    2010-06-01

    To assess the impact of warm-up on laparoscopic performance in the operating room (OR). Implementation of simulation-based training into clinical practice remains limited despite evidence to show that the improvement in skills is transferred to the OR. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a short virtual reality warm-up training program on laparoscopic performance in the OP. Sixteen Laparoscopic Cholecystectomies were performed by 8 surgeons in the OR. Participants were randomized to a group which received a preprocedure warm-up using a virtual reality simulator and no warm-up group. After the initial laparoscopic cholecystectomy all surgeons served as their own controls by performing another procedure with or without preoperative warm-up. All OR procedures were videotaped and assessed by 2 independent observers using the generic OSATS global rating scale (from 7 to 35). There was significantly better surgical performance on the laparoscopic Cholecystectomy following preoperative warm-up, median 28.5 (range = 18.5-32.0) versus median 19.25 (range = 15-31.5), P = 0.042. The results demonstrated excellent reliability of the assessment tool used (Cronbach's alpha = 0.92). This study showed a significant beneficial impact of warm-up on laparoscopic performance in the OP. The suggested program is short, easy to perform, and therefore realistic to implement in the daily life in a busy surgical department. This will potentially improve the procedural outcome and contribute to improved patient safety and better utilization of OR resources.

  3. Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement on Austenitic Stainless Steels from Room Temperature to Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) on austenitic stainless steels SUS304, 304L, and 316L in the high pressure hydrogen gas was evaluated from ambient temperature to 20 K using a very simple mechanical properties testing procedure. In the method, the high- pressure hydrogen environment is produced just inside the hole in the specimen and the specimen is cooled in a cooled-alcohol dewar and a cryostat with a GM refrigerator. The effect of HEE was observed in tensile properties, especially at lower temperatures, and fatigue properties at higher stress level but almost no effect around the stress level of yield strength where almost no strain-induced martensite was produced. So, no effect of HEE on austenitic stainless steels unless the amount of the ferrite phase is small.

  4. Automated Demand Response Approaches to Household Energy Management in a Smart Grid Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adika, Christopher Otieno

    demand response schemes that can be deployed by electricity providers to manage customer loads. This study also addresses the problem of manual demand response by proposing smart systems that will autonomously execute the DR programs without the direct involvement of the customers.

  5. Semantic Brokering of Multimedia Contents for Smart Delivery of Ubiquitous Services in Pervasive Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Amato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available With the proliferation of modern mobile devices having the capability to interact each other and with the environment in a transparent manner, there is an increase in the development of those applications that are specifically designed for pervasive and ubiquitous environments. Those applications are able to provide a service of interest for the user that depends on context information, such as the user's position, his preferences, the capability of the device and its available resources. Services have to respond in a rational way in manydifferent situations choosing the actions with the best expected result by the user, so making environment not only more connected and efficient, but smarter. Here we present a semantic framework that provides the technology for the development of intelligent, context aware service.

  6. SBMAC: Smart Blocking MAC Mechanism for Variable UW-ASN (Underwater Acoustic Sensor Network Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Hyun Park

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, several MAC scheduling methods applicable to an underwater environment are proposed. Besides, a new marine communication system model was proposed to improve the reliability of the proposed SBMAC method. The scheme minimizes transmission of control frames except for data transmission and various transmission methods and ACK methods can be used together. Simulation models are set indices and analysis of the underwater environment is established to conduct reliable simulations. Consequently, the performance improvement of the proposed method is verified with respect to delay time, data transmission rate, memory utilization, energy efficiency, etc.

  7. A Distributed Control System Prototyping Environment to Support Control Room Modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lew, Roger Thomas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Boring, Ronald Laurids [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ulrich, Thomas Anthony [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Operators of critical processes, such as nuclear power production, must contend with highly complex systems, procedures, and regulations. Developing human-machine interfaces (HMIs) that better support operators is a high priority for ensuring the safe and reliable operation of critical processes. Human factors engineering (HFE) provides a rich and mature set of tools for evaluating the performance of HMIs, however the set of tools for developing and designing HMIs is still in its infancy. Here we propose a rapid prototyping approach for integrating proposed HMIs into their native environments before a design is finalized. This approach allows researchers and developers to test design ideas and eliminate design flaws prior to fully developing the new system. We illustrate this approach with four prototype designs developed using Microsoft’s Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF). One example is integrated into a microworld environment to test the functionality of the design and identify the optimal level of automation for a new system in a nuclear power plant. The other three examples are integrated into a full-scale, glasstop digital simulator of a nuclear power plant. One example demonstrates the capabilities of next generation control concepts; another aims to expand the current state of the art; lastly, an HMI prototype was developed as a test platform for a new control system currently in development at U.S. nuclear power plants. WPF possesses several characteristics that make it well suited to HMI design. It provides a tremendous amount of flexibility, agility, robustness, and extensibility. Distributed control system (DCS) specific environments tend to focus on the safety and reliability requirements for real-world interfaces and consequently have less emphasis on providing functionality to support novel interaction paradigms. Because of WPF’s large user-base, Microsoft can provide an extremely mature tool. Within process control applications,WPF is

  8. Fast or Smart? How the Use of Scrum Can Influence the Temporal Environment in a Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheller, Vibeke Kristine; Hvid, Helge Søndergaard; Pries-Heje, Jan

    2015-01-01

    A recent survey shows that 40% of all projects use, or have used, agile methods. The most commonly used agile method is Scrum, one reason being that Scrum provides mechanisms for building a healthy temporal environment for the project participants. Through a case study carried out in a Danish mun...

  9. Smart with Natural Gas in the built environment; Slim met Gas in de gebouwde omgeving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensing, H.; Oude Elberink, L.; Holwerda, B. [et al.] (ed.)

    2011-12-15

    This magazine addresses the future of the energy system, the role of natural gas in the energy transition process and innovative (gas) technology for the built environment [Dutch] In dit magazine komen de toekomst van de energievoorziening, de rol van aardgas in het energietransitieproces en innovatieve (gas)technologie voor de gebouwde omgeving aan bod.

  10. Smart Environments for Collaborative Design, Implementation, and Interpretation of Scientific Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vet, P.E.; Kulyk, Olga Anatoliyivna; Wassink, I.; Fikkert, F.W.; Rauwerda, Han; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; van der Veer, Gerrit C.; Breit, Timo; Huang, Thomas S.; Nijholt, Antinus; Pantic, Maja; Pentland, Alex

    2007-01-01

    Ambient intelligence promises to enable humans to smoothly interact with their environment, mediated by computer technology. In the literature on ambient intelligence, empirical scientists are not often mentioned. Yet they form an interesting target group for this technology. In this position paper,

  11. Location-Enhanced Activity Recognition in Indoor Environments Using Off the Shelf Smart Watch Technology and BLE Beacons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippoupolitis, Avgoustinos; Oliff, William; Takand, Babak; Loukas, George

    2017-05-27

    Activity recognition in indoor spaces benefits context awareness and improves the efficiency of applications related to personalised health monitoring, building energy management, security and safety. The majority of activity recognition frameworks, however, employ a network of specialised building sensors or a network of body-worn sensors. As this approach suffers with respect to practicality, we propose the use of commercial off-the-shelf devices. In this work, we design and evaluate an activity recognition system composed of a smart watch, which is enhanced with location information coming from Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) beacons. We evaluate the performance of this approach for a variety of activities performed in an indoor laboratory environment, using four supervised machine learning algorithms. Our experimental results indicate that our location-enhanced activity recognition system is able to reach a classification accuracy ranging from 92% to 100%, while without location information classification accuracy it can drop to as low as 50% in some cases, depending on the window size chosen for data segmentation.

  12. Location-Enhanced Activity Recognition in Indoor Environments Using Off the Shelf Smart Watch Technology and BLE Beacons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avgoustinos Filippoupolitis

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Activity recognition in indoor spaces benefits context awareness and improves the efficiency of applications related to personalised health monitoring, building energy management, security and safety. The majority of activity recognition frameworks, however, employ a network of specialised building sensors or a network of body-worn sensors. As this approach suffers with respect to practicality, we propose the use of commercial off-the-shelf devices. In this work, we design and evaluate an activity recognition system composed of a smart watch, which is enhanced with location information coming from Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE beacons. We evaluate the performance of this approach for a variety of activities performed in an indoor laboratory environment, using four supervised machine learning algorithms. Our experimental results indicate that our location-enhanced activity recognition system is able to reach a classification accuracy ranging from 92% to 100%, while without location information classification accuracy it can drop to as low as 50% in some cases, depending on the window size chosen for data segmentation.

  13. A depth video sensor-based life-logging human activity recognition system for elderly care in smart indoor environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal, Ahmad; Kamal, Shaharyar; Kim, Daijin

    2014-07-02

    Recent advancements in depth video sensors technologies have made human activity recognition (HAR) realizable for elderly monitoring applications. Although conventional HAR utilizes RGB video sensors, HAR could be greatly improved with depth video sensors which produce depth or distance information. In this paper, a depth-based life logging HAR system is designed to recognize the daily activities of elderly people and turn these environments into an intelligent living space. Initially, a depth imaging sensor is used to capture depth silhouettes. Based on these silhouettes, human skeletons with joint information are produced which are further used for activity recognition and generating their life logs. The life-logging system is divided into two processes. Firstly, the training system includes data collection using a depth camera, feature extraction and training for each activity via Hidden Markov Models. Secondly, after training, the recognition engine starts to recognize the learned activities and produces life logs. The system was evaluated using life logging features against principal component and independent component features and achieved satisfactory recognition rates against the conventional approaches. Experiments conducted on the smart indoor activity datasets and the MSRDailyActivity3D dataset show promising results. The proposed system is directly applicable to any elderly monitoring system, such as monitoring healthcare problems for elderly people, or examining the indoor activities of people at home, office or hospital.

  14. A Harmonized Perspective on Transportation Management in Smart Cities: The Novel IoT-Driven Environment for Road Traffic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Masek

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The unprecedented growth of today’s cities together with increased population mobility are fueling the avalanche in the numbers of vehicles on the roads. This development led to the new challenges for the traffic management, including the mitigation of road congestion, accidents, and air pollution. Over the last decade, researchers have been focusing their efforts on leveraging the recent advances in sensing, communications, and dynamic adaptive technologies to prepare the deployed road traffic management systems (TMS for resolving these important challenges in future smart cities. However, the existing solutions may still be insufficient to construct a reliable and secure TMS that is capable of handling the anticipated influx of the population and vehicles in urban areas. Along these lines, this work systematically outlines a perspective on a novel modular environment for traffic modeling, which allows to recreate the examined road networks in their full resemblance. Our developed solution is targeted to incorporate the progress in the Internet of Things (IoT technologies, where low-power, embedded devices integrate as part of a next-generation TMS. To mimic the real traffic conditions, we recreated and evaluated a practical traffic scenario built after a complex road intersection within a large European city.

  15. A Harmonized Perspective on Transportation Management in Smart Cities: The Novel IoT-Driven Environment for Road Traffic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masek, Pavel; Masek, Jan; Frantik, Petr; Fujdiak, Radek; Ometov, Aleksandr; Hosek, Jiri; Andreev, Sergey; Mlynek, Petr; Misurec, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    The unprecedented growth of today’s cities together with increased population mobility are fueling the avalanche in the numbers of vehicles on the roads. This development led to the new challenges for the traffic management, including the mitigation of road congestion, accidents, and air pollution. Over the last decade, researchers have been focusing their efforts on leveraging the recent advances in sensing, communications, and dynamic adaptive technologies to prepare the deployed road traffic management systems (TMS) for resolving these important challenges in future smart cities. However, the existing solutions may still be insufficient to construct a reliable and secure TMS that is capable of handling the anticipated influx of the population and vehicles in urban areas. Along these lines, this work systematically outlines a perspective on a novel modular environment for traffic modeling, which allows to recreate the examined road networks in their full resemblance. Our developed solution is targeted to incorporate the progress in the Internet of Things (IoT) technologies, where low-power, embedded devices integrate as part of a next-generation TMS. To mimic the real traffic conditions, we recreated and evaluated a practical traffic scenario built after a complex road intersection within a large European city. PMID:27834796

  16. A Harmonized Perspective on Transportation Management in Smart Cities: The Novel IoT-Driven Environment for Road Traffic Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masek, Pavel; Masek, Jan; Frantik, Petr; Fujdiak, Radek; Ometov, Aleksandr; Hosek, Jiri; Andreev, Sergey; Mlynek, Petr; Misurec, Jiri

    2016-11-08

    The unprecedented growth of today's cities together with increased population mobility are fueling the avalanche in the numbers of vehicles on the roads. This development led to the new challenges for the traffic management, including the mitigation of road congestion, accidents, and air pollution. Over the last decade, researchers have been focusing their efforts on leveraging the recent advances in sensing, communications, and dynamic adaptive technologies to prepare the deployed road traffic management systems (TMS) for resolving these important challenges in future smart cities. However, the existing solutions may still be insufficient to construct a reliable and secure TMS that is capable of handling the anticipated influx of the population and vehicles in urban areas. Along these lines, this work systematically outlines a perspective on a novel modular environment for traffic modeling, which allows to recreate the examined road networks in their full resemblance. Our developed solution is targeted to incorporate the progress in the Internet of Things (IoT) technologies, where low-power, embedded devices integrate as part of a next-generation TMS. To mimic the real traffic conditions, we recreated and evaluated a practical traffic scenario built after a complex road intersection within a large European city.

  17. Smart Location Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Smart Location Database, Access to Jobs and Workers via Transit, and National Walkability Index tools can help assess indicators related to the built environment, transit accessibility, and walkability.

  18. Smart Book Charts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnapongse, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    Smart book charts for TPSM: Heatshield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET), Conformal Ablative TPS (CA-TPS), 3D Woven Multifunctional Ablative TPS (3D MAT), and Adaptable, Deployable, Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT).

  19. Investigating the thermal environment effects on geometrically nonlinear vibration of smart functionally graded plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Rastgoo, Abbas; Bahrami, Mansoor Nikkhah [University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    An analytical solution for a sandwich circular FGM plate coupled with piezoelectric layers under one-dimensional heat conduction is presented. All materials of the device may be of any functional gradients in the direction of thickness. The solution exactly satisfies all the equilibrium conditions and continuity conditions for the stress, displacement and electric displacement as well as electric potential on the interfaces between adjacency layers. A nonlinear static problem is solved first to determine the initial stress state and pre-vibration deformations of the FG plate that is subjected to in-plane forces and applied actuator voltage in thermal environment in the case of simply supported boundary conditions. By adding an incremental dynamic state to the pre-vibration state, the differential equations that govern the nonlinear vibration behavior of pre-stressed piezoelectric coupled FGM plates are derived. The role of thermal environment as well as control effects on nonlinear static deflections and natural frequencies imposed by the piezoelectric actuators using high input voltages are investigated. Numerical examples are provided and simulation results are discussed. Numerical results for FGM plates with a mixture of metal and ceramic are presented in dimensionless forms. The good agreement between the results of this paper and those of the finite element (FE) analyses validated the presented approach. In a parametric study the emphasis is placed on investigating the effect of varying the applied actuator voltage and thermal environment as well as gradient index of FG plate on the dynamics and control characteristics of the structure

  20. Intelligent Temporal Data Driven World Actuation in Ambient Environments Case Study: Anomaly Recognition and Assistance Provision in Smart Home

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract — A possible resident of smart home is an old person or an Alzheimer patient that should be assisted continuously for the rest of his life; however,...

  1. Study of Smart Campus Development Using Internet of Things Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widya Sari, Marti; Wahyu Ciptadi, Prahenusa; Hafid Hardyanto, R.

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the development of smart campus using Internet of Things (IoT) technology. Through smart campus, it is possible that a campus is connected via online by the outside entity, so that the teaching approach based on technology can be conducted in real time. This research was conducted in smart education, smart parking and smart room. Observation and literature studies were applied as the research method with the related theme for the sake of system design of smart campus. The result of this research is the design of smart campus system that includes smart education development, smart parking and smart room with the sake of Universitas PGRI Yogyakarta as the case study.

  2. Smart Grid Information Security (IS) Functional Requirement

    OpenAIRE

    Ling, Amy Poh Ai; Masao, Mukaidono

    2011-01-01

    It is important to implement safe smart grid environment to enhance people's lives and livelihoods. This paper provides information on smart grid IS functional requirement by illustrating some discussion points to the sixteen identified requirements. This paper introduces the smart grid potential hazards that can be referred as a triggering factor to improve the system and security of the entire grid. The background of smart information infrastructure and the needs for smart grid IS is descri...

  3. A Wearable Wireless Sensor Network for Indoor Smart Environment Monitoring in Safety Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Antolín

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the implementation of a wearable wireless sensor network aimed at monitoring harmful gases in industrial environments. The proposed solution is based on a customized wearable sensor node using a low-power low-rate wireless personal area network (LR-WPAN communications protocol, which as a first approach measures CO2 concentration, and employs different low power strategies for appropriate energy handling which is essential to achieving long battery life. These wearables nodes are connected to a deployed static network and a web-based application allows data storage, remote control and monitoring of the complete network. Therefore, a complete and versatile remote web application with a locally implemented decision-making system is accomplished, which allows early detection of hazardous situations for exposed workers.

  4. Probing a Proactive Home: Challenges in Researching and Designing Everyday Smart Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Mäyrä

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the results of a 3-year interdisciplinary study, this article presents an approach in which proactive information technology was introduced into homes, and discusses the derived design principles from a human-centered perspective. The application of proactive computing in homes will face particularly sensitive conditions, as familiar and reliable household elements remain strongly preferred. Since there is considerable resistance towards the increase of information technology in homes, both the calm system behaviors and the degree of variety in aesthetic designs will play major roles in the acceptance of proactive technology. If proactive technology will be an embedded part of a home’s structures and furniture, it needs to blend with the normal, cozy standards of a real living environment and aim to enhance the homeyness or the key social and aesthetic qualities of homes.

  5. Promoting autonomy in a smart home environment with a smarter interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, C P; McCullagh, P J; Galway, L; Lightbody, G

    2015-01-01

    In the not too distant future, the median population age will tend towards 65; an age at which the need for dependency increases. Most older people want to remain autonomous and self-sufficient for as long as possible. As environments become smarter home automation solutions can be provided to support this aspiration. The technology discussed within this paper focuses on providing a home automation system that can be controlled by most users regardless of mobility restrictions, and hence it may be applicable to older people. It comprises a hybrid Brain-Computer Interface, home automation user interface and actuators. In the first instance, our system is controlled with conventional computer input, which is then replaced with eye tracking and finally a BCI and eye tracking collaboration. The systems have been assessed in terms of information throughput; benefits and limitations are evaluated.

  6. A Wearable Wireless Sensor Network for Indoor Smart Environment Monitoring in Safety Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolín, Diego; Medrano, Nicolás; Calvo, Belén; Pérez, Francisco

    2017-02-14

    This paper presents the implementation of a wearable wireless sensor network aimed at monitoring harmful gases in industrial environments. The proposed solution is based on a customized wearable sensor node using a low-power low-rate wireless personal area network (LR-WPAN) communications protocol, which as a first approach measures CO₂ concentration, and employs different low power strategies for appropriate energy handling which is essential to achieving long battery life. These wearables nodes are connected to a deployed static network and a web-based application allows data storage, remote control and monitoring of the complete network. Therefore, a complete and versatile remote web application with a locally implemented decision-making system is accomplished, which allows early detection of hazardous situations for exposed workers.

  7. Electricity Markets, Smart Grids and Smart Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcey, Jonathan M.

    A smart grid is an electricity network that accommodates two-way power flows, and utilizes two-way communications and increased measurement, in order to provide more information to customers and aid in the development of a more efficient electricity market. The current electrical network is outdated and has many shortcomings relating to power flows, inefficient electricity markets, generation/supply balance, a lack of information for the consumer and insufficient consumer interaction with electricity markets. Many of these challenges can be addressed with a smart grid, but there remain significant barriers to the implementation of a smart grid. This paper proposes a novel method for the development of a smart grid utilizing a bottom up approach (starting with smart buildings/campuses) with the goal of providing the framework and infrastructure necessary for a smart grid instead of the more traditional approach (installing many smart meters and hoping a smart grid emerges). This novel approach involves combining deterministic and statistical methods in order to accurately estimate building electricity use down to the device level. It provides model users with a cheaper alternative to energy audits and extensive sensor networks (the current methods of quantifying electrical use at this level) which increases their ability to modify energy consumption and respond to price signals The results of this method are promising, but they are still preliminary. As a result, there is still room for improvement. On days when there were no missing or inaccurate data, this approach has R2 of about 0.84, sometimes as high as 0.94 when compared to measured results. However, there were many days where missing data brought overall accuracy down significantly. In addition, the development and implementation of the calibration process is still underway and some functional additions must be made in order to maximize accuracy. The calibration process must be completed before a reliable

  8. A novel neural network-based technique for smart gas sensors operating in a dynamic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baha, Hakim; Dibi, Zohir

    2009-01-01

    Thanks to their high sensitivity and low-cost, metal oxide gas sensors (MOX) are widely used in gas detection, although they present well-known problems (lack of selectivity and environmental effects…). We present in this paper a novel neural network- based technique to remedy these problems. The idea is to create intelligent models; the first one, called corrector, can automatically linearize a sensor's response characteristics and eliminate its dependency on the environmental parameters. The corrector's responses are processed with the second intelligent model which has the role of discriminating exactly the detected gas (nature and concentration). The gas sensors used are industrial resistive kind (TGS8xx, by Figaro Engineering). The MATLAB environment is used during the design phase and optimization. The sensor models, the corrector, and the selective model were implemented and tested in the PSPICE simulator. The sensor model accurately expresses the nonlinear character of the response and the dependence on temperature and relative humidity in addition to their gas nature dependency. The corrector linearizes and compensates the sensor's responses. The method discriminates qualitatively and quantitatively between seven gases. The advantage of the method is that it uses a small representative database so we can easily implement the model in an electrical simulator. This method can be extended to other sensors.

  9. A Novel Neural Network-Based Technique for Smart Gas Sensors Operating in a Dynamic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohir Dibi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to their high sensitivity and low-cost, metal oxide gas sensors (MOX are widely used in gas detection, although they present well-known problems (lack of selectivity and environmental effects…. We present in this paper a novel neural network- based technique to remedy these problems. The idea is to create intelligent models; the first one, called corrector, can automatically linearize a sensor’s response characteristics and eliminate its dependency on the environmental parameters. The corrector’s responses are processed with the second intelligent model which has the role of discriminating exactly the detected gas (nature and concentration. The gas sensors used are industrial resistive kind (TGS8xx, by Figaro Engineering. The MATLAB environment is used during the design phase and optimization. The sensor models, the corrector, and the selective model were implemented and tested in the PSPICE simulator. The sensor model accurately expresses the nonlinear character of the response and the dependence on temperature and relative humidity in addition to their gas nature dependency. The corrector linearizes and compensates the sensor’s responses. The method discriminates qualitatively and quantitatively between seven gases. The advantage of the method is that it uses a small representative database so we can easily implement the model in an electrical simulator. This method can be extended to other sensors.

  10. Smart way; Smart way

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    A smart way, in which communication/information processing/control technologies are melted, is to realize a road traffic system which is safe/comfortable. This is planned as a common base supporting a lot of services such as the vehicle traffic information communication system, automatic toll collecting system and operation assisting road system. Vehicles running on the smart way exchange information with roads for increasing safety and relaxing regulation. Further, the way is expected as the social infrastructure of the 21st century which has a lot of possibilities such as acquisition of travel information and video/music information and cashless purchases at shops on the way. (translated by NEDO)

  11. Smart learning services based on smart cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Svetlana; Song, Su-Mi; Yoon, Yong-Ik

    2011-01-01

    Context-aware technologies can make e-learning services smarter and more efficient since context-aware services are based on the user's behavior. To add those technologies into existing e-learning services, a service architecture model is needed to transform the existing e-learning environment, which is situation-aware, into the environment that understands context as well. The context-awareness in e-learning may include the awareness of user profile and terminal context. In this paper, we propose a new notion of service that provides context-awareness to smart learning content in a cloud computing environment. We suggest the elastic four smarts (E4S)--smart pull, smart prospect, smart content, and smart push--concept to the cloud services so smart learning services are possible. The E4S focuses on meeting the users' needs by collecting and analyzing users' behavior, prospecting future services, building corresponding contents, and delivering the contents through cloud computing environment. Users' behavior can be collected through mobile devices such as smart phones that have built-in sensors. As results, the proposed smart e-learning model in cloud computing environment provides personalized and customized learning services to its users.

  12. Numerical Modeling of Indoor Environment with a Ceiling Fan and an Upper-Room Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shengwei; Srebric, Jelena; Rudnick, Stephen N; Vincent, Richard L; Nardell, Edward A

    2014-02-01

    This study proposes a numerical modeling method for the indoor environment with ceiling fans and upper-room ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UR-UVGI) fixtures. The numerical modeling deployed steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) with a rotating reference frame to simulate the rotation of fan blades. CFD was validated with experimental data of velocity field and fraction of microorganism remaining at the exhaust diffuser. The fraction of microorganism remaining represented the ratio of the concentration of airborne microorganisms measured with UVGI turned on to the one measured with UVGI turned off. According to the validation results, the CFD model correctly reproduced the air movement induced by the rotation of ceiling fan. When the ambient ventilation rate was 2 ACH (air changes per hour) or 6 ACH, the CFD model accurately predicted the average vertical speeds in the section 2.44 m above the floor with the errors less than 10%, regardless of the ceiling fan's rotational direction or speed. In addition, the simulation results showed that the fraction of microorganism remaining increased with the ambient air exchange rate when the fan blew air downward with a rotational speed as high as 235 rpm, which corresponded with the experimental results. Furthermore, the simulation results accurately predicted the fraction of microorganism remaining when the ambient air exchange rate was 2 ACH. We conclude that this novel numerical model can reproduce the effects of ceiling fans and UR-UVGI fixtures on indoor environment, and should aid in the investigation of the impact of ceiling fans on UR-UVGI disinfection efficacy.

  13. Multi-Sensory Rooms: Comparing Effects of the Snoezelen and the Stimulus Preference Environment on the Behavior of Adults with Profound Mental Retardation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, Leonardo; Strauss, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined whether Snoezelen and Stimulus Preference environments have differential effects on disruptive and pro-social behaviors in adults with profound mental retardation and autism. In N = 27 adults these target behaviors were recorded for a total of 20 sessions using both multi-sensory rooms. Three comparison groups were…

  14. European and Italian experience of Smart Cities: A model for the smart planning of city built

    OpenAIRE

    Starlight Vattano

    2013-01-01

    The construction of the city through smart measures is now a frontier reached from many cities in the world. The built environment requires smart planning able to relate urban realities that are relegated to a marginal change. But how does the smart cities can create a relationship between sustainable cities of the future and their heritage? The article highlights the way of smart urban transformation of reality European and Italian proposing critical comparisons from which to infer smart par...

  15. The Changing World of the DSO in a Smart Energy System Environment : Key Issues and Policy Recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marhold, Anna; Lavrijssen, Saskia; Trias Lopez, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Technological developments – summarised by the term ‘Smart Energy System’ – as well as changes on the supply and demand side of the electricity market (such as the growth of distributed generation and the deployment of charging stations for electric vehicles), are fundamentally changing and

  16. A QoS Scheme for a Congestion Core Network Based on Dissimilar QoS Structures in Smart-Phone Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Ryong; Na, Wonshik; Kang, Jang-Mook

    2010-01-01

    This study suggests an approach to effective transmission of multimedia content in a rapidly changing Internet environment including smart-phones. Guaranteeing QoS in networks is currently an important research topic. When transmitting Assured Forwarding (AF) packets in a Multi-DiffServ network environment, network A may assign priority in an order AF1, AF2, AF3 and AF4; on the other hand, network B may reverse the order to a priority AF4, AF3, AF2 and AF1. In this case, the AF1 packets that received the best quality of service in network A will receive the lowest in network B, which may result in dropping of packets in network B and vice versa. This study suggests a way to guarantee QoS between hosts by minimizing the loss of AF packet class when one network transmits AF class packets to another network with differing principles. It is expected that QoS guarantees and their experimental value may be utilized as principles which can be applied to various mobile-web environments based on smart-phones. PMID:22163453

  17. A QoS Scheme for a Congestion Core Network Based on Dissimilar QoS Structures in Smart-Phone Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Mook Kang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This study suggests an approach to effective transmission of multimedia content in a rapidly changing Internet environment including smart-phones. Guaranteeing QoS in networks is currently an important research topic. When transmitting Assured Forwarding (AF packets in a Multi-DiffServ network environment, network A may assign priority in an order AF1, AF2, AF3 and AF4; on the other hand, network B may reverse the order to a priority AF4, AF3, AF2 and AF1. In this case, the AF1 packets that received the best quality of service in network A will receive the lowest in network B, which may result in dropping of packets in network B and vice versa. This study suggests a way to guarantee QoS between hosts by minimizing the loss of AF packet class when one network transmits AF class packets to another network with differing principles. It is expected that QoS guarantees and their experimental value may be utilized as principles which can be applied to various mobile-web environments based on smart-phones.

  18. Smart meters in smart manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Rubio, Irene; Florence Sandoval, Antonio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Elena; Andina de la Fuente, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The extent of change in business process and smart manufacturing usage should be taken into account in every energy efficiency project in industries. A significant part of smart metering success depends upon making the business processes more systematic. Smart manufacturing in the dramatically intensified and pervasive application of networked information-based technologies through the manufacturing and supply chain enterprise. There is no doubt that the deployment os smart meters involves ...

  19. PLCs used in smart home control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, C.; Deaconu, S. I.; Latinovic, T.; Berdie, A.; Pop-Vadean, A.; Horgos, M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the realization of a smart home automation using Siemens PLCs. The smart home interface is realized using the HMI Weintek eMT3070a touchscreen, which shows the window for controlling and monitoring the lighting, room temperature, irrigation systems, swimming pool, etc. By using PLCs, the smart home can be controlled via Ethernet and it can be programmed to the needs of tenants.

  20. Home, Smart Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ellen Kathrine; Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj; Mullins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The article places focus on how smart technologies integrated in a one family- home and particular the window offer unique challenges and opportunities for designing buildings with the best possible environments for people and nature. Toward an interdisciplinary approach, we address the interaction...... between daylight defined in technical terms and daylight defined in aesthetic, architectural terms. Through field-tests of a Danish carbon-neutral home and an analysis of five key design parameters, we explore the contradictions and potentials in smart buildings, using the smart window as example of how...... to the energy design is central. The study illuminates an approach of the design of smart houses as living organisms by connecting technology with the needs of the occupants with the power and beauty of daylight....

  1. Study on the living environment of semi-underground room with attached green house; Fusetsu onshitsu no aru hanchikashitsu no kyojusei ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T.; Tsukayama, N. [Ochanomizu University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    In response to demand for the expansion of living space, the living environment of semi-underground room has been investigated. An attached green house (passive solar house) is adjacent to the semi-underground room. This is reinforced concrete construction, having flat type solar collector on its roof and lighting window in its north side. It does not have artificial air conditioners. Based on the measurements of daylight factor, artificial lighting is not required at the window in the daytime, but it is desirable to use daylight and artificial lighting together at the center. The performance of sound insulation depends on the high performance soundproof sash level. There is less daily temperature variation due to its large heat capacity, and less yearly temperature variation than the outside. By shielding the solar radiation, the insolation in the green house in summer can be restricted in the same as in winter. The insolation can be easily received in winter due to its large vertical intensity of solar radiation. The green house in the south side is useful for improving the living environment of semi-underground room. The temperature rise in the semi-underground room can be restricted by opening window in summer. It is desirable for the comfortable living to use artificial cooling to reduce the daytime temperature by 3 to 4{degree}C. In winter, it is comfortable to heat by 4 to 5{degree}C. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Increases in heart rate and serum cortisol concentrations in healthy dogs are positively correlated with an indoor waiting-room environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, Roberta; Proverbio, Daniela; Spada, Eva

    2014-03-01

    Few studies have investigated the effect of veterinary clinical procedures on the welfare of dogs, with specific emphasis on the veterinary practice environment. Clinicopathologic variables have also not been assessed in these potentially stressful situations. Similar to human clinical studies, the veterinary clinical waiting room could present a significant stress factor for dogs. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of waiting-room environment on serum cortisol and glucose alterations as well as heart rate in privately owned healthy dogs. The clinical trial included 24 healthy dogs that were divided into 2 groups: the clinical waiting-room group (A) and the control group (B) that waited outside in a garden. During the entire experiment, 18 dogs (9 dogs per group) were monitored with a human heart rate monitor fastened around the chest. After 20 minutes of waiting, blood samples were collected from all of the dogs (24 dogs) to determine serum cortisol concentration. Serum cortisol concentration and mean, maximum, and minimum heart rate were significantly higher in group A compared with group B, but there was no statistical difference in serum glucose concentrations between the 2 study groups. Results of this study suggest that the waiting room is a potentially stressful situation for dogs in clinical veterinary practice, when compared with a garden, based on the assessment of adrenal cortex function and heart rate evaluation. © 2014 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology and European Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  3. [Evaluation of work environment in the flax textile industry. V. Air microflora in the flax spinning and flax weaving rooms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gościcki, J; Włodarczyk, L; Bielichowska, G

    1980-01-01

    Microbiological air pollution in spinning and weaving rooms was determined by aspiration impinger using an aeroscop (Chirana, Czechoslovakia). The air samples were taken on Petri dishes with Bacto-broth-agar (Difco) or Bacto-blood-agar (Difco). After incubation at 37 degrees C for 24 h the number of bacterial or mould colonies and bacterial cells per 1 m3 of the air was calculated. The number of bacterial cells in flax spinning rooms ranged from 10.5 X 10(3) to 12,5 X 10(4), while in flax weaving rooms--from 2,4 X 10(3) to 10(4) per 1 m3 of air. In the examined samples of the air the bacterial pollution was found to dominate (45,1--95%). Gram-positive sporing bacteria were most frequently recognized. In the air of weaving rooms some moulds: Mucor sp., Circinella sp., Hormodendrum sp., Vetricillum sp., Aspergillus sp. and Penicillum sp. were also found (16.8--54%). It was observed that the microbiological air pollution in spinning and weaving rooms of flax industry was greater than in cotton industry. A wet technology of flax spinning promotes microbiological pollution in the air of this kind of workposts. A high level of mould cells in the air at workposts enhances the risk of workers' exposure to mycotoxins.

  4. Antifungal activity of benzalkonium chloride, dettol , and chlorhexidine on opportunistic isolated fungi from the environment and operating rooms in private clinics of Tehran in 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Nowrozi; Ali Kazemi; Fatemeh MotallebiKhah; Farshad Ghooshchi; Adel Khodaee Sharabiani

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim: Due to increasing of fungal infections and isolation of fungal agents from different surgery sites and Intensive Care Units, the administration of effective disinfectants is essential. The present study was done to evaluate antifungal activity of various disinfectants on fungi isolated from the environment and surgery rooms in private clinics in Tehran between 2011 and 2012. Materials and Methods: This cross- sectional study was done during 2011- 2012 in Tehran. The fu...

  5. Assessment of an innovative antimicrobial surface disinfectant in the operating room environment using adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Brian D; Spencer, Maureen; Rossi, Peter J; Lee, Cheong J; Brown, Kellie R; Malinowski, Michael; Seabrook, Gary R; Edmiston, Charles E

    2015-03-01

    Terminal cleaning in the operating room is a critical step in preventing the transmission of health care-associated pathogens. The persistent disinfectant activity of a novel isopropyl alcohol/organofunctional silane solution (ISO) was evaluated in 4 operating rooms after terminal cleaning. Adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence documented a significant difference (P contamination on IOS-treated surfaces compared with controls. Further studies are warranted to validate the persistent disinfectant activity of ISO within selective health care settings. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Smart textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Langenhove, Lieva; Hertleer, Carla; Catrysse, Michael; Puers, Robert; Van Egmond, Harko; Matthijs, Dirk

    2004-01-01

    After technical textiles and functional textiles, also smart textiles came into force a few years ago. The term 'smart textiles' covers a broad range. The application possibilities are only limited by our imagination and creativity. In this presentation, it is further explored what smart textiles precisely mean. In a second part, an analysis is made of the possibilities, the state of affairs and the needs for further research.

  7. European and Italian experience of Smart Cities: A model for the smart planning of city built

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starlight Vattano

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The construction of the city through smart measures is now a frontier reached from many cities in the world. The built environment requires smart planning able to relate urban realities that are relegated to a marginal change. But how does the smart cities can create a relationship between sustainable cities of the future and their heritage? The article highlights the way of smart urban transformation of reality European and Italian proposing critical comparisons from which to infer smart parameters most used and easy to apply for the sustainable construction of these smart cities focusing on the urban sources of intelligent retrieval for quality their historical and cultural heritage.

  8. A demand response modeling for residential consumers in smart grid environment using game theory based energy scheduling algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sofana Reka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, demand response modeling scheme is proposed for residential consumers using game theory algorithm as Generalized Tit for Tat (GTFT Dominant Game based Energy Scheduler. The methodology is established as a work flow domain model between the utility and the user considering the smart grid framework. It exhibits an algorithm which schedules load usage by creating several possible tariffs for consumers such that demand is never raised. This can be done both individually and among multiple users of a community. The uniqueness behind the demand response proposed is that, the tariff is calculated for all hours and the load during the peak hours which can be rescheduled is shifted based on the Peak Average Ratio. To enable the vitality of the work simulation results of a general case of three domestic consumers are modeled extended to a comparative performance and evaluation with other algorithms and inference is analyzed.

  9. Managing Emergency Situations in the Smart City: The Smart Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Asensio

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In a city there are numerous items, many of them unnoticed but essential; this is the case of the signals. Signals are considered objects with reduced technological interest, but in this paper we prove that making them smart and integrating in the IoT (Internet of Things could be a relevant contribution to the Smart City. This paper presents the concept of Smart Signal, as a device conscious of its context, with communication skills, able to offer the best message to the user, and as a ubiquitous element that contributes with information to the city. We present the design considerations and a real implementation and validation of the system in one of the most challenging environments that may exist in a city: a tunnel. The main advantages of the Smart Signal are the improvement of the actual functionality of the signal providing new interaction capabilities with users and a new sensory mechanism of the Smart City.

  10. Smart Cities for Smart Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias; Jensen, Martin Lynge; Wøldike, Niels Peter

    This position paper presents the concept of smart cities for smart children before highlighting three concrete projects we are currently running in order to investigate different aspects of the underlying concept like social-relational interaction and situated and experiential learning....

  11. Smart Factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilberg, Arne; Radziwon, Agnieszka; Grube Hansen, David

    2017-01-01

    A large part of Danish Industry is based on Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs), which account for –99% of the companies in Denmark and about two third of the job positions (source: statistikbanken.dk) . That is why, it is so important also to focus research and development at SMEs, and to ...... the opportunity to join and collaborate in a bigger forum to become more powerful in a competitive and global environment.......A large part of Danish Industry is based on Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs), which account for –99% of the companies in Denmark and about two third of the job positions (source: statistikbanken.dk) . That is why, it is so important also to focus research and development at SMEs......, and to target their challenges and ensure sustainable growth and business in these enterprises. Therefore the focus of the Smart Factory project was to support the growth and sustainable development of the small and medium sized manufacturing industry in Denmark. The project focused on SMEs and how to improve...

  12. Smart textiles: Challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherenack, Kunigunde; van Pieterson, Liesbeth

    2012-11-01

    Smart textiles research represents a new model for generating creative and novel solutions for integrating electronics into unusual environments and will result in new discoveries that push the boundaries of science forward. A key driver for smart textiles research is the fact that both textile and electronics fabrication processes are capable of functionalizing large-area surfaces at very high speeds. In this article we review the history of smart textiles development, introducing the main trends and technological challenges faced in this field. Then, we identify key challenges that are the focus of ongoing research. We then proceed to discuss fundamentals of smart textiles: textile fabrication methods and textile interconnect lines, textile sensor, and output device components and integration of commercial components into textile architectures. Next we discuss representative smart textile systems and finally provide our outlook over the field and a prediction for the future.

  13. Hypoxia Room

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypoxia Room is a 8x8x8 ft. clear vinyl plastic and aluminum frame construction enclosure located within USAREIM laboratory 028. The Hypoxia Room (manufactured...

  14. Knowledge Building Conceptualisation within Smart Constructivist Learning Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badie, Farshad

    2017-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the meeting of Constructivism (as a learning theory) and Smart Learning and, thus, theorises Smart Constructivist Learning. The main field of research is Smart Learning Environments. Relying on the phenomena of ‘meaning construction’ and ‘meaningful understanding production......’ in the framework of smart constructivism, we will focus on analysing Smart Constructivist Knowledge Building. Accordingly, we analysed Learning-and-Constructing-Together as a smart constructivist model. The outcomes of this chapter could support the developments of smart learning strategies....

  15. Smart Distribution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazhou Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The increasing importance of system reliability and resilience is changing the way distribution systems are planned and operated. To achieve a distribution system self-healing against power outages, emerging technologies and devices, such as remote-controlled switches (RCSs and smart meters, are being deployed. The higher level of automation is transforming traditional distribution systems into the smart distribution systems (SDSs of the future. The availability of data and remote control capability in SDSs provides distribution operators with an opportunity to optimize system operation and control. In this paper, the development of SDSs and resulting benefits of enhanced system capabilities are discussed. A comprehensive survey is conducted on the state-of-the-art applications of RCSs and smart meters in SDSs. Specifically, a new method, called Temporal Causal Diagram (TCD, is used to incorporate outage notifications from smart meters for enhanced outage management. To fully utilize the fast operation of RCSs, the spanning tree search algorithm is used to develop service restoration strategies. Optimal placement of RCSs and the resulting enhancement of system reliability are discussed. Distribution system resilience with respect to extreme events is presented. Test cases are used to demonstrate the benefit of SDSs. Active management of distributed generators (DGs is introduced. Future research in a smart distribution environment is proposed.

  16. An efficient biometric and password-based remote user authentication using smart card for Telecare Medical Information Systems in multi-server environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, Tanmoy; Giri, Debasis

    2014-12-01

    The medical organizations have introduced Telecare Medical Information System (TMIS) to provide a reliable facility by which a patient who is unable to go to a doctor in critical or urgent period, can communicate to a doctor through a medical server via internet from home. An authentication mechanism is needed in TMIS to hide the secret information of both parties, namely a server and a patient. Recent research includes patient's biometric information as well as password to design a remote user authentication scheme that enhances the security level. In a single server environment, one server is responsible for providing services to all the authorized remote patients. However, the problem arises if a patient wishes to access several branch servers, he/she needs to register to the branch servers individually. In 2014, Chuang and Chen proposed an remote user authentication scheme for multi-server environment. In this paper, we have shown that in their scheme, an non-register adversary can successfully logged-in into the system as a valid patient. To resist the weaknesses, we have proposed an authentication scheme for TMIS in multi-server environment where the patients can register to a root telecare server called registration center (RC) in one time to get services from all the telecare branch servers through their registered smart card. Security analysis and comparison shows that our proposed scheme provides better security with low computational and communication cost.

  17. Smart biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Narain, Ravin; Idota, Naokazu; Kim, Young-Jin; Hoffman, John M; Uto, Koichiro; Aoyagi, Takao

    2014-01-01

    This book surveys smart biomaterials, exploring the properties, mechanics and characterization of hydrogels, particles, assemblies, surfaces, fibers and conjugates. Reviews applications such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, bioseparation and more.

  18. Human Body Exergy Balance: Numerical Analysis of an Indoor Thermal Environment of a Passive Wooden Room in Summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Isawa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To obtain a basic understanding of the resultant changes in the human body exergy balance (input, consumption, storage, and output accompanying outdoor air temperature fluctuations, a “human body system and a built environmental system” coupled with numerical analysis was conducted. The built environmental system assumed a wooden room equipped with passive cooling strategies, such as thermal insulation and solar shading devices. It was found that in the daytime, the cool radiation exergy emitted by surrounding surfaces, such as walls increased the rate of human body exergy consumption, whereas the warm radiant exergy emitted by the surrounding surfaces at night decreased the rate of human body exergy consumption. The results suggested that the rates and proportions of the different components in the exergy balance equation (exergy input, consumption, storage, and output vary according to the outdoor temperature and humidity conditions.

  19. Smart Card

    OpenAIRE

    Floarea NASTASE

    2006-01-01

    Reforms in electronic business have presented new opportunities to use smart card technology as an enabling tool. The network-centric applications, where resources are located throughout the Internet and access to them is possible from any location, require authenticated access and secured transactions. Smart cards represent an ideal solution: they offers an additional layer of electronic security and information assurance for user authentication, confidentiality, non-repudiation, information...

  20. Exploring the Environment/Energy Pareto Optimal Front of an Office Room Using Computational Fluid Dynamics-Based Interactive Optimization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangji Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the development of a high-resolution and control-friendly optimization framework in enclosed environments that helps improve thermal comfort, indoor air quality (IAQ, and energy costs of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC system simultaneously. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD-based optimization method which couples algorithms implemented in Matlab with CFD simulation is proposed. The key part of this method is a data interactive mechanism which efficiently passes parameters between CFD simulations and optimization functions. A two-person office room is modeled for the numerical optimization. The multi-objective evolutionary algorithm—non-dominated-and-crowding Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGA-II—is realized to explore the environment/energy Pareto front of the enclosed space. Performance analysis will demonstrate the effectiveness of the presented optimization method.

  1. ecoSmart landscapes: a versatile SaaS platform for green infrastructure applications in urban environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greg McPherson; Qingfu Xiao; Joe Purohit; Mark Dietenberger; Charles (C.R.) Boardman; Jim Simpson; Paula Peper

    2014-01-01

    The urban environment offers significant opportunities to improve sustainability and optimize water resources. Historically, research and software applications have been focused on the built environment (buildings). Cost-effective, practical tools that can assess the impact of different landscape configurations and their interactions with buildings have not been widely...

  2. Development of a Conductivity Sensor for Monitoring Groundwater Resources to Optimize Water Management in Smart City Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Lorena; Sendra, Sandra; Lloret, Jaime; Bosch, Ignacio

    2015-08-26

    The main aim of smart cities is to achieve the sustainable use of resources. In order to make the correct use of resources, an accurate monitoring and management is needed. In some places, like underground aquifers, access for monitoring can be difficult, therefore the use of sensors can be a good solution. Groundwater is very important as a water resource. Just in the USA, aquifers represent the water source for 50% of the population. However, aquifers are endangered due to the contamination. One of the most important parameters to monitor in groundwater is the salinity, as high salinity levels indicate groundwater salinization. In this paper, we present a specific sensor for monitoring groundwater salinization. The sensor is able to measure the electric conductivity of water, which is directly related to the water salinization. The sensor, which is composed of two copper coils, measures the magnetic field alterations due to the presence of electric charges in the water. Different salinities of the water generate different alterations. Our sensor has undergone several tests in order to obtain a conductivity sensor with enough accuracy. First, several prototypes are tested and are compared with the purpose of choosing the best combination of coils. After the best prototype was selected, it was calibrated using up to 30 different samples. Our conductivity sensor presents an operational range from 0.585 mS/cm to 73.8 mS/cm, which is wide enough to cover the typical range of water salinities. With this work, we have demonstrated that it is feasible to measure water conductivity using solenoid coils and that this is a low cost application for groundwater monitoring.

  3. Research Advance in Smart Metamaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Xiang-Long; Zhou, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterials, man-made materials, enable us to design our own "atoms", and thereby to create materials with unprecedented effective properties that have not yet been found in nature. Smart metamaterial is one of those that is an intelligent perceptive to the changes from external environments and simultaneously having the capability to respond to thermal and mechanical stimuli. This paper can provide a review on these smart metamaterials in perspective of science, engineering and industrial ...

  4. A novel smart card and dynamic ID based remote user authentication scheme for multi-server environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Xiong; Ma, Jian; Wang, Wendong; Xiong, Yongping; Zhang, Junsong

    2013-01-01

    .... Furthermore, in order to protect the users from being tracked when they login to the remote server, researchers have proposed some dynamic ID based remote user authentication schemes for multi-server environments...

  5. Room Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  6. Smart use of storage potentials of electric vehicles for renewable energy generation in the built environment: A design scenario

    OpenAIRE

    Van Timmeren, A.; Bauer, T.C.; Silvester, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, results are reported of a technology assessment of use of electrical vehicles for energy storage (of renewable sources), their integration in the built environment and attached required power and charging systems for the Netherlands. This was done as part of the DIEMIGO project on integration of electrical mobility in the built environment. Around the world several concepts for EV charging and EV/Building interfaces have been developed, or are under development. In general howe...

  7. Smart sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Carlo

    2006-08-01

    The term "Smart Sensors" refer to sensors which contain both sensing and signal processing capabilities with objectives ranging from simple viewing to sophisticated remote sensing, surveillance, search/track, weapon guidance, robotics, perceptronics and intelligence applications. In a broad sense, they include any sensor systems covering the whole electromagnetic spectrum: this paper deals specifically with a new class of smart sensors in infrared spectral bands whose developments started some years ago, when it was recognized that the rapid advances of "very large scale integration" (VLSI) processor technology and mosaic infrared detector array technology could be combined to develop new generations of infrared smart sensor systems with much improved performance. So, sophisticated signal processing operations have been developed for these new systems by integrating microcomputers and other VLSI signal processors within or next to the sensor arrays on the same focal plane avoiding complex computing located far away from the sensors. Recently this approach is achieving higher goals by a new and revolutionary sensors concept which introduce inside the sensor some of the basic function of living eyes, such as dynamic stare, dishomogenity compensation, spatial and temporal filtering. New objectives and requirements of these new focal plane processors are presented for this type of new infrared smart sensor systems. This paper is concerned with the processing techniques for only the front end of the focal plane processing, namely, the enhancement of target-to-noise ratio by background clutter suppression and the improvement in target detection by "smart" and pattern correlation threshold.

  8. Scalable Open Source Smart Grid Simulator (SGSim)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebeid, Emad Samuel Malki; Jacobsen, Rune Hylsberg; Quaglia, Davide

    2017-01-01

    The future smart power grid will consist of an unlimited number of smart devices that communicate with control units to maintain the grid’s sustainability, efficiency, and balancing. In order to build and verify such controllers over a large grid, a scalable simulation environment is needed....... This paper presents an open source smart grid simulator (SGSim). The simulator is based on open source SystemC Network Simulation Library (SCNSL) and aims to model scalable smart grid applications. SGSim has been tested under different smart grid scenarios that contain hundreds of thousands of households...... and appliances. By using SGSim, different smart grid control strategies and protocols can be tested, validated and evaluated in a scalable environment....

  9. Changes in type of foodservice and dining room environment preferentially benefit institutionalized seniors with low body mass indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Jyotika; Winter, Aaron; Young, Karen W H; Greenwood, Carol E

    2007-05-01

    To compare energy intakes in seniors with cognitive impairment residing in long-term care and receiving meals by bulk (cafeteria style with waitress service) vs traditional tray delivery systems and determine subject characteristics that identify responsiveness to type of foodservice provided. DESIGN AND SUBJECTS/SETTING: Usual energy intakes were compared in subjects residing in cognitive impairment units in either the old (tray delivery, n=23) or new (bulk delivery, n=26) nursing home at Baycrest, a teaching facility associated with University of Toronto Medical School. Changes to foodservice and physical environment (from institutional to more home-like environment). Twenty-one consecutive day investigator-weighed energy and macronutrient intakes and behavioral function (London Psychogeriatric Rating Scale). Analysis of variance determined mean differences in intake and regression analyses identified predictors of sensitivity to type of food delivery systems. Higher 24-hour total (P<0.001) and dinner (P<0.001) energy intakes in subjects receiving bulk compared to tray delivery were predominantly associated with greater carbohydrate intakes (P<0.001). Higher energy, carbohydrate, and protein, but not fat intakes, with bulk delivery were more apparent in individuals with lower body mass indexes (BMIs) (food delivery by BMI interaction, all P values <0.05). High-risk, cognitively impaired individuals with low BMI benefited the most from the changed foodservice and physical environment, whereas individuals with higher BMIs did not show substantive changes in intake. Bulk foodservice and a home-like dining environment optimize energy intake in individuals at high risk for malnutrition, particularly those with low BMIs and cognitive impairment.

  10. Simple, heart-smart substitutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronary artery disease - heart smart substitutions; Atherosclerosis - heart smart substitutions; Cholesterol - heart smart substitutions; Coronary heart disease - heart smart substitutions; Healthy diet - heart ...

  11. Smart Money

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avital, Michel; Hedman, Jonas; Albinsson, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Legal tender in the form of coins and banknotes is expected to be replaced at one point in the future by digital legal tender. This transformation is an opportunity for central banks to rethink the idea of money and overhaul the prevailing payment systems. Digital legal tender is expected to reduce...... transaction costs by providing seamless real-time payments. In addition, digital legal tender that is based on blockchain technology can provide a foundation for customizable “smart money” which can be used to manage the appropriation of money and its use. In essence, the smart money is a customizable value...... exchange instrument that relies on computer protocols to facilitate, verify, and enforce certain conditions for its appropriation as payment, e.g. who may use the money, where, and for what. If we believe that digital legal tender will become ubiquitous, then the emergence and diffusion of smart money...

  12. Green Technology for Smart Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, M.

    2017-08-01

    In view of the enormous social and environmental changes at the global level, more and more cities worldwide have directed their development strategies towards smart policies aimed at sustainable mobility, energy upgrading of the building stock, increase of energy production from renewable sources, improvement of waste management and implementation of ICT infrastructures. The goal is to turn into Smart Cities, able to improve the quality of life of their inhabitants by offering a lasting opportunity for cultural, economic and social growth within a healthy, safe, stimulating and dynamic environment. After an overview of the role of cities in climate changes and environmental pollution worldwide, the article provides an up to date definition of Smart City and of its main expected features, focussing on technology innovation, smart governance and main financing and support programs. An analysis of the most interesting initiatives at the international level pursued by cities investigating the three main areas of Green Buildings, Smart grid-Smart lighting, and Smart mobility is given, with the objective to offer a broad reference for the identification of development sustainable plans and programs at the urban level within the current legislative framework.

  13. Constructing a User-Friendly and Smart Ubiquitous Personalized Learning Environment by Using a Context-Aware Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ching-Bang

    2017-01-01

    Although m-learning applications have been widely researched, few studies have investigated applying adaptive learning content to various learning environments and efficient input interfaces. This study combined a context-aware mechanism, which can be used to provide suitable learning information anytime and anyplace by using GPS technology, with…

  14. An Improvement of Robust Biometrics-Based Authentication and Key Agreement Scheme for Multi-Server Environments Using Smart Cards.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongho Moon

    Full Text Available In multi-server environments, user authentication is a very important issue because it provides the authorization that enables users to access their data and services; furthermore, remote user authentication schemes for multi-server environments have solved the problem that has arisen from user's management of different identities and passwords. For this reason, numerous user authentication schemes that are designed for multi-server environments have been proposed over recent years. In 2015, Lu et al. improved upon Mishra et al.'s scheme, claiming that their remote user authentication scheme is more secure and practical; however, we found that Lu et al.'s scheme is still insecure and incorrect. In this paper, we demonstrate that Lu et al.'s scheme is vulnerable to outsider attack and user impersonation attack, and we propose a new biometrics-based scheme for authentication and key agreement that can be used in multi-server environments; then, we show that our proposed scheme is more secure and supports the required security properties.

  15. Smart use of storage potentials of electric vehicles for renewable energy generation in the built environment : A design scenario

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Timmeren, A.; Bauer, T.C.; Silvester, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, results are reported of a technology assessment of use of electrical vehicles for energy storage (of renewable sources), their integration in the built environment and attached required power and charging systems for the Netherlands. This was done as part of the DIEMIGO project on

  16. An Improvement of Robust Biometrics-Based Authentication and Key Agreement Scheme for Multi-Server Environments Using Smart Cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jongho; Choi, Younsung; Jung, Jaewook; Won, Dongho

    2015-01-01

    In multi-server environments, user authentication is a very important issue because it provides the authorization that enables users to access their data and services; furthermore, remote user authentication schemes for multi-server environments have solved the problem that has arisen from user's management of different identities and passwords. For this reason, numerous user authentication schemes that are designed for multi-server environments have been proposed over recent years. In 2015, Lu et al. improved upon Mishra et al.'s scheme, claiming that their remote user authentication scheme is more secure and practical; however, we found that Lu et al.'s scheme is still insecure and incorrect. In this paper, we demonstrate that Lu et al.'s scheme is vulnerable to outsider attack and user impersonation attack, and we propose a new biometrics-based scheme for authentication and key agreement that can be used in multi-server environments; then, we show that our proposed scheme is more secure and supports the required security properties.

  17. Air Force Smart Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-19

    bases and missions toward an enterprise solution for incorporating smart technologies in the future (defined in the Information Environment Mission... technology might enrich and protect our nation, businesses, and lives. As a human-centric design center, we seek out unique ways to connect Air Force...warfighters with current and future technology in meaningful ways. We look to transfer, license, and share promising prototypes, solutions, and knowledge

  18. Smart City

    OpenAIRE

    Perko, Matevž

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this graduation thesis, is to present the term »the idea of smart city« and to define, why a city is labeled as smart city. I explained the different areas in which new ideas for the advancement of cities are developed and explained, how new technologies and ideas are implemented in different areas of the city. Described are two approaches to the modernization of the city. I also showed different inovations and technologies, that have helped the cities become smarter and so tha...

  19. Smart Card

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floarea NASTASE

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reforms in electronic business have presented new opportunities to use smart card technology as an enabling tool. The network-centric applications, where resources are located throughout the Internet and access to them is possible from any location, require authenticated access and secured transactions. Smart cards represent an ideal solution: they offers an additional layer of electronic security and information assurance for user authentication, confidentiality, non-repudiation, information integrity, physical access control to facilities, and logical access control to an computer systems.

  20. Smart Beta or Smart Alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kenneth Lillelund; Steenstrup, Søren Resen

    2016-01-01

    Smart beta has become the flavor of the decade in the investment world with its low fees, easy access to rewarded risk premiums, and appearance of providing good investment results relative to both traditional passive benchmarks and actively managed funds. Although we consider it well documented...... that smart beta investing probably will do better than passive market capitalization investing over time, we believe many are coming to a conclusion too quickly regarding active managers. Institutional investors are able to guide managers through benchmarks and risk frameworks toward the same well......-documented smart beta risk premiums and still motivate active managers to avoid value traps, too highly priced small caps, defensives, etc. By constructing the equity portfolios of active managers that resemble the most widely used risk premiums, we show that the returns and risk-adjusted returns measures...

  1. Smart Grid Control and Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciontea, Catalin-Iosif; Pedersen, Rasmus; Kristensen, Thomas le Fevre

    2015-01-01

    ) and the quality of the power may become costly. In this light, Smart Grids may provide an answer towards a more active and efficient electrical network. The EU project SmartC2Net aims to enable smart grid operations over imperfect, heterogeneous general purpose networks, which poses a significant challenge...... to the reliability due to the stochastic behavior found in such networks. Therefore, key concepts are presented in this paper targeting the support of proper smart grid control in these network environments and its Real-Time Hardware-In-the Loop (HIL) verification. An overview on the required Information......The expected growth in distributed generation will significantly affect the operation and control of today's distribution grids. Being confronted with fast fluctuating power from distributed generations, the assurance of a reliable service (grid stability, avoidance of energy losses...

  2. Smart Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Rhea, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    What makes a classroom "smart"? Presentation technologies such as projectors, document cameras, and LCD panels clearly fit the bill, but when considering other technologies for teaching, learning, and developing content, the possibilities become limited only by the boundaries of an institution's innovation. This article presents 32 best practices…

  3. Smart Service Portfolios: Do the Cities Follow Standards?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anthopoulos, Leonidas; Janssen, M.F.W.H.A.; Weerakkody, Vishanth

    2016-01-01

    Smart services concern the core element of a smart city, since they support the realization of urban "intelligence" in terms of people, economy, governance, environment, mobility and leaving. Smart services aim to enhance quality of life within a city and in this respect to improve "livability". The

  4. Smart home for urban Chinese elderly living

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, J. (Jingwen)

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this thesis is to design a new smart home for urban Chinese elderly people in home living environment. This new smart home design has to be integrated all the ICT solutions which based on a literature review was proposed and also with a functional back-end system for data collection, analysis and storage. The literature review p...

  5. Smart Signs Show You the Way

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijding, M.E.M.; Meratnia, Nirvana; Benz, H.P.; Matysiak Szóstek, A.

    Smart Signs are a new type of electronic door and way signs based on small computers which can be seamlessly incorporated in the environment. Smart Signs provide personalized context-aware guidance and messaging designed to support wayfinding activities in large indoor spaces and their surroundings.

  6. Vehicular applications of smart material systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Donald J.; Weddle, Craig; Naganathan, Ganapathy; Buckley, Stephen J.

    1998-06-01

    The results of an initial investigation in the use of smart material system for automobiles are presented. For this work, a smart material system is defined as a network of embedded electromechanical devices that are able to sense and affect their environment and autonomously adapt to changes in operating conditions. The development of smart material system for production vehicles has the potential for compact, lightweight subsystems that reduce vehicle weight and improve vehicle performance. This paper presents an overview of current technology and how it contrasts with the development of highly integrated smart material systems. Automotive design requirements are examined to highlight practical constraints associated with integrating smart material technology into automobiles. Representative examples of a embedded sensor-actuator system for camless engines and a smart automotive seat are presented to illustrate the design concepts.

  7. Triple-layer smart grid business model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Zheng; Lundgaard, Morten; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard

    2016-01-01

    ), and identifies the parameters for the smart grid solutions to the emerging markets. This study develops a triple-layer business model including the organizational (Niche), environmental (Intermediate), and global (Dominators) factors. The result uncovers an interface of market factors and stakeholders......Viewing the smart grid with the theory of business models may open opportunities in understanding and capturing values in new markets. This study tries to discover and map the smart grid ecosystem-based business model framework with two different environments (sub-Saharan Africa and Denmark...... in a generic smart grid constellation. The findings contribute the transferability potential of the smart grid solutions between countries, and indicate the potential to export and import smart grid solutions based on the business modeling....

  8. Smart grids, smart network companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arends, M.; Hendriks, P.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of intelligent technology to turn electricity networks into smart grids is an important vehicle to meet the many challenges modern society poses. However, technology alone will not make energy supply more intelligent and may for the medium and long range even involve risks of

  9. Smart material interfaces: "another step to a material future"

    OpenAIRE

    Kretzer, Manuel; Minuto, A.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2013-01-01

    Smart Materials have physical properties that can be changed or controlled by external stimuli such as electric or magnetic fields, temperature or stress. Shape, size and color are among the properties that can be changed. Smart Material Interfaces are physical interfaces that utilize these Smart Materials to sense the environment and display responses by changing their physical properties. This workshop aims at stimulating research and development in interfaces that make novel use of Smart M...

  10. Testing of the voice communication in smart home care

    OpenAIRE

    Vaňuš, Jan; Smolon, Marek; Martinek, Radek; Koziorek, Jiří; Žídek, Jan; Bilík, Petr

    2015-01-01

    This article is aimed to describe the method of testing the implementation of voice control over operating and technical functions of Smart Home Come. Custom control over operating and technical functions was implemented into a model of Smart Home that was equipped with KNX technology. A sociological survey focused on the needs of seniors has been carried out to justify the implementation of voice control into Smart Home Care. In the real environment of Smart Home Care, there are usually unwa...

  11. Smart Service Portfolios: Do the Cities Follow Standards?

    OpenAIRE

    Anthopoulos, Leonidas; Janssen, M.F.W.H.A.; Weerakkody, Vishanth

    2016-01-01

    Smart services concern the core element of a smart city, since they support the realization of urban "intelligence" in terms of people, economy, governance, environment, mobility and leaving. Smart services aim to enhance quality of life within a city and in this respect to improve "livability". The types and purposes of smart services cannot be easily pre-defined, since they are the outcome of innovation, which cannot be pre-defined either, but instead it is the product of citizens' and busi...

  12. Learning situation models in a smart home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brdiczka, Oliver; Crowley, James L; Reignier, Patrick

    2009-02-01

    This paper addresses the problem of learning situation models for providing context-aware services. Context for modeling human behavior in a smart environment is represented by a situation model describing environment, users, and their activities. A framework for acquiring and evolving different layers of a situation model in a smart environment is proposed. Different learning methods are presented as part of this framework: role detection per entity, unsupervised extraction of situations from multimodal data, supervised learning of situation representations, and evolution of a predefined situation model with feedback. The situation model serves as frame and support for the different methods, permitting to stay in an intuitive declarative framework. The proposed methods have been integrated into a whole system for smart home environment. The implementation is detailed, and two evaluations are conducted in the smart home environment. The obtained results validate the proposed approach.

  13. Smart Markets for Water Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffensperger, John

    2017-04-01

    Commercial water users often want to trade water, but their trades can hurt other users and the environment. So government has to check every transaction. This checking process is slow and expensive. That's why "free market" water trading doesn't work, especially with trading between a single buyer and a single seller. This talk will describe a water trading mechanism designed to solve these problems. The trading mechanism is called a "smart market". A smart market allows simultaneous many-to-many trades. It can reduce the transaction costs of water trading, while improving environmental outcomes. The smart market depends on a combination of recent technologies: hydrology simulation, computer power, and the Internet. Our smart market design uses standard hydrological models, user bids from a web page, and computer optimization to maximize the economic value of water while meeting all environmental constraints. Before the smart market can be implemented, however, users and the water agency must meet six critical prerequisites. These prerequisites may be viewed as simply good water management that should be done anyway. I will describe these prerequisites, and I will briefly discuss common arguments against water markets. This talk will be an abstract of a forthcoming book, "Smart Markets for Water Resources: A Manual for Implementation," by John F. Raffensperger and Mark W. Milke, from Springer Publishing.

  14. Smart card technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, R.A.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes smart card techonology and applications, including the use of smart cards as smart badges. The paper illustrates that smart cards are designed with security features, which makes them suitable for security applications. But smart cards also provide multiple functions, so they can support additional applications. The goal of this paper is to inform about the technology, and to inspire thought about possible applications that would benefit if a smart badge were implemented.

  15. Smart antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Godara, Lal Chand

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Antenna GainPhased Array AntennaPower Pattern Beam Steering Degree of Freedom Optimal AntennaAdaptive AntennaSmart AntennaSummary NARROWBAND PROCESSINGSignal Model Conventional BeamformerNull Steering BeamformerOptimal BeamformerOptimization Using Reference SignalBeam Space Processing Effect of ErrorsNotation and AbbreviationsReferencesADAPTIVE PROCESSINGSample Matrix Inversion AlgorithmUnconstrained Least Mean Squares AlgorithmNormalized Least Mean Squares AlgorithmConstrained

  16. Smart Growth and Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Describes the relationship between smart growth and transportation, focusing smart and sustainable street design, transit-oriented development, parking management, sustainable transportation planning, and related resources.

  17. Single room occupancy (SRO) hotels as mental health risk environments among impoverished women: the intersection of policy, drug use, trauma, and urban space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Kelly R; Lopez, Andrea M; Comfort, Megan; Shumway, Martha; Cohen, Jennifer; Riley, Elise D

    2014-05-01

    Due to the significantly high levels of comorbid substance use and mental health diagnosis among urban poor populations, examining the intersection of drug policy and place requires a consideration of the role of housing in drug user mental health. In San Francisco, geographic boundedness and progressive health and housing polices have coalesced to make single room occupancy hotels (SROs) a key urban built environment used to house poor populations with co-occurring drug use and mental health issues. Unstably housed women who use illicit drugs have high rates of lifetime and current trauma, which manifests in disproportionately high rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, and depression when compared to stably housed women. We report data from a qualitative interview study (n=30) and four years of ethnography conducted with housing policy makers and unstably housed women who use drugs and live in SROs. Women in the study lived in a range of SRO built environments, from publicly funded, newly built SROs to privately owned, dilapidated buildings, which presented a rich opportunity for ethnographic comparison. Applying Rhodes et al.'s framework of socio-structural vulnerability, we explore how SROs can operate as "mental health risk environments" in which macro-structural factors (housing policies shaping the built environment) interact with meso-level factors (social relations within SROs) and micro-level, behavioral coping strategies to impact women's mental health. The degree to which SRO built environments were "trauma-sensitive" at the macro level significantly influenced women's mental health at meso- and micro-levels. Women who were living in SROs which exacerbated fear and anxiety attempted, with limited success, to deploy strategies on the meso- and micro-level to manage their mental health symptoms. Study findings underscore the importance of housing polices which consider substance use in the context of current and cumulative trauma

  18. Smart tools for Java Card

    OpenAIRE

    Attali, I; Caromel, D.; Courbis, C.; Henrio, L.; H. Nilsson

    2000-01-01

    This article describes a java Card progamming environment which to a large extent is generated from formal specifications of the syntax and semantics of Java card, the JCRE (Java Card Runtime Environment), and the Java Card APIs. The resulting environment consists of a set of tightly integrated and somewhat smart tools, such as a Java specific structure editor and a simulator which allows an application to be tested before being downloaded to a card. Furthermore, the simulator analyses the ap...

  19. Digital Operating Room assistant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geudon, A.C.P.

    2016-01-01

    The Operating Room (OR) is a complex environment, where a large variety of patients and diseases can be treated and many unexpected events occur (such as emergency surgeries and unexpected progress of procedures). In practice, OR assistants support OR processes as well as they can, in order to

  20. Rooms with a View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourihan, Peter; Berry, Millard, III

    2006-01-01

    When well-designed and integrated into a campus living or learning space, an atrium can function as the heart and spirit of a building, connecting interior rooms and public spaces with the outside environment. However, schools and universities should seek technological and HVAC solutions that maximize energy efficiency. This article discusses how…

  1. A Solution for Street Lighting in Smart Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Popa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Smart Cities is a domain of great interest in the modern society. The aim of a smart urban environment is to increase citizens’ comfort and quality of life with minimum resources and power consumption and without affecting the natural environment. Street lighting is one of the main interests in such a smart environment. This thesis focuses on implementing a lighting control system that makes street lighting to be an autonomous and efficient part of the urban environment. The performance of the proposed system is analyzed using an OMNET++ network simulation. The results lead to the conclusion that the smart control system improves some drawbacks of a classic street lighting system.

  2. Meetings and meeting modeling in smart surroundings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Nijholt, Antinus; Nishida, T.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we survey our research on smart meeting rooms and its relevance for augmented reality meeting support and virtual reality generation of meetings in real-time or off-line. Intelligent real-time and off-line generation requires understanding of what is going on during a meeting. The

  3. Environment of care: Is it time to reassess microbial contamination of the operating room air as a risk factor for surgical site infection in total joint arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Javad; Barnes, Sue; Shohat, Noam; Edmiston, Charles E

    2017-11-01

    In the modern operating room (OR), traditional surgical mask, frequent air exchanges, and architectural barriers are viewed as effective in reducing airborne microbial populations. Intraoperative sampling of airborne particulates is rarely performed in the OR because of technical difficulties associated with sampling methodologies and a common belief that airborne contamination is infrequently associated with surgical site infections (SSIs). Recent studies suggest that viable airborne particulates are readily disseminated throughout the OR, placing patients at risk for postoperative SSI. In 2017, virtually all surgical disciplines are engaged in the implantation of selective biomedical devices, and these implants have been documented to be at high risk for intraoperative contamination. Approximately 1.2 million arthroplasties are performed annually in the United States, and that number is expected to increase to 3.8 million by the year 2030. The incidence of periprosthetic joint infection is perceived to be low (air quality standards on their manufacturing processes, there is currently no U.S. standard for acceptable air quality within the OR environment. This review documents the contribution of air contamination to the etiology of periprosthetic joint infection, and evidence for selective innovative strategies to reduce the risk of intraoperative microbial aerosols. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Recovery Room

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Before 1950's, patients were usually cared for in an ill-defined postoperative unit or on the hospital ward. Patients were frequently transferred from the operating room directly to the ward where they were placed close to the nursing station. In 1947 the. Anesthesia Study Commission of the Philadelphia. Country Medical ...

  5. Recovery Room

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical Journal of Zambia, Volume 36 Number 3 (2009). 132. Department of Anaesthesia, University Teaching Hospital ... nursing shortage, stimulated widespread development of recovery rooms. This article summarizes .... Singapore Med J.1997; 38(5): 200-204. 11. Feeley TW, Macario A. Chapter 71: The postanesthesia ...

  6. Co-evolution of smart energy products and services: A novel approach towards smart grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Angele; Respinis, de Moreno; Loon, van Jorien; Stekelenburg, Anton; Bliek, Frits; Schram, Wouter; Sark, van Wilfried; Esteri, Tara; Uebermasser, Stefan; Lehfuss, Felix; Gultekin, Esin; Mierlo, Van Barbara; Markocic, Elena; Hassewend, Brigitte; Robledo, Carla; Papaioannou, Ioulia; Wijk, van Ad; Lagler, Mike; Schmautzer, Ernst; Hohn, Thomas; Fickert, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present our project on interdisciplinary evaluations of existing smart grid environments regarding (1) the technical performance of smart energy products and services, (2) end users perceptions, (3) stakeholder processes and (4) market aspects. Our evaluations are based on data and

  7. Co-Evolution of Smart Energy Products and Services : a Novel Approach towards Smart Grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Angelina H.M.E.; De Respinis, Moreno; van Loon, J.; Stekelenburg, A.; Bliek, F.; Schram, Wouter; van Sark, Wilfried; Esteri, Tara; Uebermasser, Stefan; Lehfuss, Frits; Gultekin, Esin; van Mierlo, Barbara; Markočič, Elena; Hassewend, Brigitte; Robledo, Carla; Papaioannou, Ioulia; van Wijk, Ad; Lagler, Mike; Schmautzer, Ernst; Höhn, Thomas; Fickert, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present our project on interdisciplinary evaluations of existing smart grid environments regarding (1) the technical performance of smart energy products and services, (2) end users perceptions, (3) stakeholder processes and (4) market aspects. Our evaluations are based on data and

  8. Building smart cities analytics, ICT, and design thinking

    CERN Document Server

    Stimmel, Carol L

    2015-01-01

    The term "smart city" defines the new urban environment, one that is designed for performance through information and communication technologies. Given that the majority of people across the world will live in urban environments within the next few decades, it's not surprising that massive effort and investment is being placed into efforts to develop strategies and plans for achieving "smart" urban growth. Building Smart Cities: Analytics, ICT, and Design Thinking explains the technology and a methodology known as design thinking for building smart cities. Information and communications technologies form the backbone of smart cities. A comprehensive and robust data analytics program enables the right choices to be made in building these cities. Design thinking helps to create smart cities that are both livable and able to evolve. This book examines all of these components in the context of smart city development and shows how to use them in an integrated manner. Using the principles of design thinking to refr...

  9. Future's Learning Environments in Health Education: The Effects of Smart Classrooms on the Academic Achievements of the Students at Health College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevindik, Tuncay

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of smart classrooms on the academic achievement of the nursing students. The sample of the research included 66 Health College students in Elazig. The sampling group was randomly chosen from second year students of Nursing and Midwife Education. The research was carried out with experimental…

  10. IBM SmartCloud essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Schouten, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    A practical, user-friendly guide that provides an introduction to cloud computing using IBM SmartCloud, along with a thorough understanding of resource management in a cloud environment.This book is great for anyone who wants to get a grasp of what cloud computing is and what IBM SmartCloud has to offer. If you are an IT specialist, IT architect, system administrator, or a developer who wants to thoroughly understand the cloud computing resource model, this book is ideal for you. No prior knowledge of cloud computing is expected.

  11. Smart energy and smart energy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Østergaard, Poul Alberg; Connolly, David

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the terms “Smart Energy” and “Smart Energy Systems” have been used to express an approach that reaches broader than the term “Smart grid”. Where Smart Grids focus primarily on the electricity sector, Smart Energy Systems take an integrated holistic focus on the inclusion of more...... sectors (electricity, heating, cooling, industry, buildings and transportation) and allows for the identification of more achievable and affordable solutions to the transformation into future renewable and sustainable energy solutions. This paper first makes a review of the scientific literature within...... the field. Thereafter it discusses the term Smart Energy Systems with regard to the issues of definition, identification of solu- tions, modelling, and integration of storage. The conclusion is that the Smart Energy System concept represents a scientific shift in paradigms away from single-sector thinking...

  12. Being smart about writing SMART objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerke, May Britt; Renger, Ralph

    2017-04-01

    This article challenges the conventional wisdom in mainstream evaluation regarding the process for developing specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and time-bound (SMART) objectives. The article notes several advantages of mainstreaming the SMART method including program capacity building and being able to independently monitor progress toward process and outcome objectives. It is argued the one size fits all approach for writing SMART objectives is misleading. The context in which the evaluation is conducted is a key deciding factor in how and when the SMART criteria should be applied. Without an appreciation of the evaluation context, mainstream users may be developing objectives that are far from smart. A case example is presented demonstrating a situation where a stepwise, rather than simultaneous application of the SMART criteria was necessary. Learning from this case, recommendations are forwarded for adjusting how SMART criteria should be presented in mainstream evaluation manuals/guides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Innovative testing and measurement solutions for smart grid

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Qi; Yi, Jianbo; Zhen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Focuses on sensor applications and smart meters in the newly developing interconnected smart grid Focuses on sensor applications and smart meters in the newly developing interconnected smart grid Presents the most updated technological developments in the measurement and testing of power systems within the smart grid environment Reflects the modernization of electric utility power systems with the extensive use of computer, sensor, and data communications technologies, providing benefits to energy consumers and utility companies alike The leading author heads a group of researchers focusing on

  14. Smart Regulation for Smart Grids

    OpenAIRE

    Meeus, Leonardo; Saguan, Marcelo; Glachant, Jean-Michel; Belmans, Ronnie

    2010-01-01

    QM-AI-10-001-EN-C (print)/QM-AI-10-001-EN-N (online) The European Union set ambitious objectives for the year 2020 in terms of increase of renewable generation, energy savings and reduction of GHG emissions. These objectives lead Europe towards a complete decarbonisation of the electricity system. There is a key role to be played by grids in facilitating the required transformation and this implies they need to become “smart”. In practical terms, making grids smart means deepening the ener...

  15. Smarter energy from smart metering to the smart grid

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Hongjian; Poor, H Vincent; Carpanini, Laurence; Fornié, Miguel Angel Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    This book presents cutting-edge perspectives and research results in smart energy spanning multiple disciplines across four main topics: smart metering, smart grid modeling, control and optimisation, and smart grid communications and networking.

  16. Smart Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jim; Edgar, Thomas; Graybill, Robert; Korambath, Prakashan; Schott, Brian; Swink, Denise; Wang, Jianwu; Wetzel, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Historic manufacturing enterprises based on vertically optimized companies, practices, market share, and competitiveness are giving way to enterprises that are responsive across an entire value chain to demand dynamic markets and customized product value adds; increased expectations for environmental sustainability, reduced energy usage, and zero incidents; and faster technology and product adoption. Agile innovation and manufacturing combined with radically increased productivity become engines for competitiveness and reinvestment, not simply for decreased cost. A focus on agility, productivity, energy, and environmental sustainability produces opportunities that are far beyond reducing market volatility. Agility directly impacts innovation, time-to-market, and faster, broader exploration of the trade space. These changes, the forces driving them, and new network-based information technologies offering unprecedented insights and analysis are motivating the advent of smart manufacturing and new information technology infrastructure for manufacturing.

  17. Smart Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    GWS takes plans for a new home and subjects them to intensive computerized analysis that does 10,000 calculations relative to expected heat loss and heat gain, then provides specifications designed specifically for each structure as to heating, cooling, ventilation and insulation. As construction progresses, GWS inspects the work of the electrical, plumbing and insulation contractors and installs its own Smart House Radiant Barrier. On completion of the home, GWS technicians use a machine that creates a vacuum in the house and enables computer calculation of the air exchanged, a measure of energy efficiency. Key factor is the radiant barrier, borrowed from the Apollo program. This is an adaptation of a highly effective aluminized heat shield as a radiation barrier holding in or keeping out heat, cold air and water vapor.

  18. Smart Grid: Smart Customer Policy Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    In September 2010, the International Energy Agency (IEA) held a workshop on the regulatory, market and consumer policies necessary to ensure that smart grids are deployed with adequate consideration of their risks and benefits to all stakeholders. This was one of several workshops that brought together energy providers, network operators, technology developers, regulators, customers and government policy makers to discuss smart grid technology and policy. The Smart Grid - Smart Customer Policies workshop allowed stakeholders to: gain a perspective on key issues and barriers facing early deployment of smart grids; hear expert opinion on regulatory, consumer and market challenges to smart grids; discuss smart grid-smart customer policy priorities; and build consensus on the technology and policy ingredients needed for customer-friendly smart grid deployments. Drawing on workshop discussions, the following paper lays out a logical framework to maximise the benefits and minimise the risks that smart grids pose for customers. The paper also describes key policy research questions that will guide future IEA research on this topic.

  19. Smart Learning Adoption in Employees and HRD Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junghwan; Zo, Hangjung; Lee, Hwansoo

    2014-01-01

    The innovation of online technologies and the rapid diffusion of smart devices are changing workplace learning environment. Smart learning, as emerging learning paradigm, enables employees' learning to take place anywhere and anytime. Workplace learning studies, however, have focused on traditional e-learning environment, and they have failed…

  20. Smartness and Italian Cities. A Cluster Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Boscacci

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Smart cities have been recently recognized as the most pleasing and attractive places to live in; due to this, both scholars and policy-makers pay close attention to this topic. Specifically, urban “smartness” has been identified by plenty of characteristics that can be grouped into six dimensions (Giffinger et al. 2007: smart Economy (competitiveness, smart People (social and human capital, smart Governance (participation, smart Mobility (both ICTs and transport, smart Environment (natural resources, and smart Living (quality of life. According to this analytical framework, in the present paper the relation between urban attractiveness and the “smart” characteristics has been investigated in the 103 Italian NUTS3 province capitals in the year 2011. To this aim, a descriptive statistics has been followed by a regression analysis (OLS, where the dependent variable measuring the urban attractiveness has been proxied by housing market prices. Besides, a Cluster Analysis (CA has been developed in order to find differences and commonalities among the province capitals.The OLS results indicate that living, people and economy are the key drivers for achieving a better urban attractiveness. Environment, instead, keeps on playing a minor role. Besides, the CA groups the province capitals a

  1. Smart grid security

    CERN Document Server

    Goel, Sanjay; Papakonstantinou, Vagelis; Kloza, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    This book on smart grid security is meant for a broad audience from managers to technical experts. It highlights security challenges that are faced in the smart grid as we widely deploy it across the landscape. It starts with a brief overview of the smart grid and then discusses some of the reported attacks on the grid. It covers network threats, cyber physical threats, smart metering threats, as well as privacy issues in the smart grid. Along with the threats the book discusses the means to improve smart grid security and the standards that are emerging in the field. The second part of the b

  2. Data Security in Smart Cities: Challenges and Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela POPESCUL

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide an extensive overview of security-related problems in the context of smart cities, seen as huge data consumers and producers. Trends as hyper connectivity, messy complexity, loss of boundary and industrialized hacking transform smart cities in complex environments in which the already-existing security analysis are not useful anymore. Specific data-security requirements and solutions are approached in a four-layer framework, with elements considered to be critical to the operation of a smart city: smart things, smart spaces, smart systems and smart citizens. As urban management should pay close attention to security and privacy protection, network protocols, identity management, standardization, trusted architecture etc., the paper will serve them as a start point for better decisions in security design and management.

  3. Smart Sensors Enable Smart Air Conditioning Control

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Chin-Chi; Lee, Dasheng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, mobile phones, wearable devices, temperature and human motion detectors are integrated as smart sensors for enabling smart air conditioning control. Smart sensors obtain feedback, especially occupants’ information, from mobile phones and wearable devices placed on human body. The information can be used to adjust air conditioners in advance according to humans’ intentions, in so-called intention causing control. Experimental results show that the indoor temperature can be contr...

  4. Smart materials in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, J F; Yan, Z; Al Naimi, O T; Mahmoud, G; Rolland, S L

    2011-06-01

    Most dental materials are designed to have a relatively 'neutral' existence in the mouth. It is considered that if they are 'passive' and do not react with the oral environment they will be more stable and have a greater durability. At the same time, it is hoped that our materials will be well accepted and will cause neither harm nor injury. This is an entirely negative approach to material tolerance and biocompatibility and hides the possibility that some positive gains can be achieved by using materials which behave in a more dynamic fashion in the environment in which they are placed. An example of materials which have potential for 'dynamic' behaviour exists with structures which are partly water-based or have phases or zones with significant water content and for which the water within the material can react to changes in the ambient conditions. Such materials may even be said to have the potential for 'smart' behaviour, i.e. they can react to changes in the environment to bring about advantageous changes in properties, either within the material itself or in the material-tooth complex. The controlled movement of water or aqueous media through the material may cause changes in dimensions, may be the carrier for various dissolved species, and may influence the potential for the formation of biofilms at the surface. Some of these issues may be closely interrelated. Clearly, materials which do not have the capacity for water transport or storage do not have the potential for this sort of behaviour. Some materials which are normally resistant to the healthy oral environment can undergo controlled degradation at low pH in order to release ions which may prove beneficial or protective. It is doubtful whether such behaviour should be classified as 'smart' because the material cannot readily return to its original condition when the stimulus is removed. Other materials, such as certain alloys, having no means of transporting water through their structure, can display

  5. Binaural room simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, H.; Blauert, Jens; Pompetzki, W.

    1991-01-01

    In every-day listening the auditory event perceived by a listener is determined not only by the sound signal that a sound emits but also by a variety of environmental parameters. These parameters are the position, orientation and directional characteristics of the sound source, the listener's position and orientation, the geometrical and acoustical properties of surfaces which affect the sound field and the sound propagation properties of the surrounding fluid. A complete set of these parameters can be called an Acoustic Environment. If the auditory event perceived by a listener is manipulated in such a way that the listener is shifted acoustically into a different acoustic environment without moving himself physically, a Virtual Acoustic Environment has been created. Here, we deal with a special technique to set up nearly arbitrary Virtual Acoustic Environments, the Binaural Room Simulation. The purpose of the Binaural Room Simulation is to compute the binaural impulse response related to a virtual acoustic environment taking into account all parameters mentioned above. One possible way to describe a Virtual Acoustic Environment is the concept of the virtual sound sources. Each of the virtual sources emits a certain signal which is correlated but not necessarily identical with the signal emitted by the direct sound source. If source and receiver are non moving, the acoustic environment becomes a linear time-invariant system. Then, the Binaural Impulse Response from the source to a listener' s eardrums contains all relevant auditory information related to the Virtual Acoustic Environment. Listening into the simulated environment can easily be achieved by convolving the Binaural Impulse Response with dry signals and representing the results via headphones.

  6. The next step: intelligent digital assistance for clinical operating rooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miehle Juliana

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available With the emergence of new technologies, the surgical working environment becomes increasingly complex and comprises many medical devices that have to be taken cared of. However, the goal is to reduce the workload of the surgical team to allow them to fully focus on the actual surgical procedure. Therefore, new strategies are needed to keep the working environment manageable. Existing research projects in the field of intelligent medical environments mostly concentrate on workflow modeling or single smart features rather than building up a complete intelligent environment. In this article, we present the concept of intelligent digital assistance for clinical operating rooms (IDACO, providing the surgeon assistance in many different situations before and during an ongoing procedure using natural spoken language. The speech interface enables the surgeon to concentrate on the surgery and control the technical environment at the same time, without taking care of how to interact with the system. Furthermore, the system observes the context of the surgery and controls several devices autonomously at the appropriate time during the procedure.

  7. Smart hydrogel functional materials

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Liang-Yin; Ju, Xiao-Jie

    2014-01-01

    This book systematically introduces smart hydrogel functional materials with the configurations ranging from hydrogels to microgels. It serves as an excellent reference for designing and fabricating artificial smart hydrogel functional materials.

  8. Smart storage technologies applied to fresh foods: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyu; Zhang, Min; Gao, Zhongxue; Adhikari, Benu

    2017-06-30

    Fresh foods are perishable, seasonal and regional in nature and their storage, transportation, and preservation of freshness are quite challenging. Smart storage technologies can online detection and monitor the changes of quality parameters and storage environment of fresh foods during storage, so that operators can make timely adjustments to reduce the loss. This article reviews the smart storage technologies from two aspects: online detection technologies and smartly monitoring technologies for fresh foods. Online detection technologies include electronic nose, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), hyperspectral imaging and computer vision. Smartly monitoring technologies mainly include some intelligent indicators for monitoring the change of storage environment. Smart storage technologies applied to fresh foods need to be highly efficient and nondestructive and need to be competitively priced. In this work, we have critically reviewed the principles, applications, and development trends of smart storage technologies.

  9. Smart Hand For Manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Paolo

    1987-10-01

    Sensor based, computer controlled end effectors for mechanical arms are receiving more and more attention in the robotics industry, because commonly available grippers are only adequate for simple pick and place tasks. This paper describes the current status of the research at JPL on a smart hand for a Puma 560 robot arm. The hand is a self contained, autonomous system, capable of executing high level commands from a supervisory computer. The mechanism consists of parallel fingers, powered by a DC motor, and controlled by a microprocessor embedded in the hand housing. Special sensors are integrated in the hand for measuring the grasp force of the fingers, and for measuring forces and torques applied between the arm and the surrounding environment. Fingers can be exercised under position, velocity and force control modes. The single-chip microcomputer in the hand executes the tasks of communication, data acquisition and sensor based motor control, with a sample cycle of 2 ms and a transmission rate of 9600 baud. The smart hand described in this paper represents a new development in the area of end effector design because of its multi-functionality and autonomy. It will also be a versatile test bed for experimenting with advanced control schemes for dexterous manipulation.

  10. A smart rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressel, Phil

    2014-12-01

    This project was to design and build a protective weapon for a group of associations that believed in aliens and UFO's. They collected enough contributions from societies and individuals to be able to sponsor and totally fund the design, fabrication and testing of this equipment. The location of this facility is classified. It also eventually was redesigned by the Quartus Engineering Company for use at a major amusement park as a "shoot at targets facility." The challenge of this project was to design a "smart rock," namely an infrared bullet (the size of a gallon can of paint) that could be shot from the ground to intercept a UFO or any incoming suspicious item heading towards the earth. Some of the challenges to design this weapon were to feed cryogenic helium at 5 degrees Kelvin from an inair environment through a unique rotary coupling and air-vacuum seal while spinning the bullet at 1500 rpm and maintain its dynamic stability (wobble) about its spin axis to less than 10 micro-radians (2 arc seconds) while it operated in a vacuum. Precision optics monitored the dynamic motion of the "smart rock."

  11. Smart energy management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Aniruddha; Singh, Jugdutt

    2010-04-01

    Peak and average energy usage in domestic and industrial environments is growing rapidly and absence of detailed energy consumption metrics is making systematic reduction of energy usage very difficult. Smart energy management system aims at providing a cost-effective solution for managing soaring energy consumption and its impact on green house gas emissions and climate change. The solution is based on seamless integration of existing wired and wireless communication technologies combined with smart context-aware software which offers a complete solution for automation of energy measurement and device control. The persuasive software presents users with easy-to-assimilate visual cues identifying problem areas and time periods and encourages a behavioural change to conserve energy. The system allows analysis of real-time/statistical consumption data with the ability to drill down into detailed analysis of power consumption, CO2 emissions and cost. The system generates intelligent projections and suggests potential methods (e.g. reducing standby, tuning heating/cooling temperature, etc.) of reducing energy consumption. The user interface is accessible using web enabled devices such as PDAs, PCs, etc. or using SMS, email, and instant messaging. Successful real-world trial of the system has demonstrated the potential to save 20 to 30% energy consumption on an average. Low cost of deployment and the ability to easily manage consumption from various web enabled devices offers gives this system a high penetration and impact capability offering a sustainable solution to act on climate change today.

  12. Smart Grids. Innovators talking; Smart Grids. Innovators aan het woord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-02-15

    Qualitative studies have been conducted of the results of completed projects focused on energy innovation, spread over the seven themes of the top sector Energy: Energy saving in industry, Energy conservation in the built environment, Gas, Bio-energy, Smart grids, Offshore Wind, Solar PV. This provides insight into the follow-up activities and lessons of some EOS (Energy Research Subsidy) completed projects with the aim to inspire, connect and strengthen the TKIs (Topconsortia for Knowledge and Innovation) and individual companies and researchers working on energy innovation. This report concerns the research on Smart Grids [Dutch] Er is een kwalitatief onderzoek uitgevoerd naar de resultaten van afgeronde projecten gericht op energie-innovatie, verdeeld over de zeven thema's van de topsector Energie: Energiebesparing in de industrie; Energiebesparing in de gebouwde omgeving; Gas; Bio-energie; Smart grids; Wind op zee; Zon-pv. Daarmee wordt inzicht gegeven in de vervolgactiviteiten en lessen van een aantal afgesloten EOS-projecten (Energie Onderzoek Subsidie) met het oog op het inspireren, verbinden en versterken van de TKI's (Topconsortia voor Kennis en Innovatie) en individuele bedrijven en onderzoekers die werken aan energie-innovatie. Dit rapport betreft het onderzoek naar Smart Grids.

  13. Smart City project

    KAUST Repository

    Al Harbi, Ayman

    2018-01-24

    A \\'smart city\\' is an urban region that is highly advanced in terms of overall infrastructure, sustainable real estate, communications and market viability. It is a city where information technology is the principal infrastructure and the basis for providing essential services to residents. Yanbu Industrial City- Smart City Project - First large scale smart city in The kingdom.

  14. Attack Classification Schema for Smart City WSNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Garcia-Font

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Urban areas around the world are populating their streets with wireless sensor networks (WSNs in order to feed incipient smart city IT systems with metropolitan data. In the future smart cities, WSN technology will have a massive presence in the streets, and the operation of municipal services will be based to a great extent on data gathered with this technology. However, from an information security point of view, WSNs can have failures and can be the target of many different types of attacks. Therefore, this raises concerns about the reliability of this technology in a smart city context. Traditionally, security measures in WSNs have been proposed to protect specific protocols in an environment with total control of a single network. This approach is not valid for smart cities, as multiple external providers deploy a plethora of WSNs with different security requirements. Hence, a new security perspective needs to be adopted to protect WSNs in smart cities. Considering security issues related to the deployment of WSNs as a main data source in smart cities, in this article, we propose an intrusion detection framework and an attack classification schema to assist smart city administrators to delimit the most plausible attacks and to point out the components and providers affected by incidents. We demonstrate the use of the classification schema providing a proof of concept based on a simulated selective forwarding attack affecting a parking and a sound WSN.

  15. Attack Classification Schema for Smart City WSNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Font, Victor; Garrigues, Carles; Rifà-Pous, Helena

    2017-04-05

    Urban areas around the world are populating their streets with wireless sensor networks (WSNs) in order to feed incipient smart city IT systems with metropolitan data. In the future smart cities, WSN technology will have a massive presence in the streets, and the operation of municipal services will be based to a great extent on data gathered with this technology. However, from an information security point of view, WSNs can have failures and can be the target of many different types of attacks. Therefore, this raises concerns about the reliability of this technology in a smart city context. Traditionally, security measures in WSNs have been proposed to protect specific protocols in an environment with total control of a single network. This approach is not valid for smart cities, as multiple external providers deploy a plethora of WSNs with different security requirements. Hence, a new security perspective needs to be adopted to protect WSNs in smart cities. Considering security issues related to the deployment of WSNs as a main data source in smart cities, in this article, we propose an intrusion detection framework and an attack classification schema to assist smart city administrators to delimit the most plausible attacks and to point out the components and providers affected by incidents. We demonstrate the use of the classification schema providing a proof of concept based on a simulated selective forwarding attack affecting a parking and a sound WSN.

  16. Perceptions of seniors with heart failure regarding autonomous zero-effort monitoring of physiological parameters in the smart-home environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Sherry L; Taherzadeh, Golnoush; Jae Chang, Isaac Sung; Boger, Jennifer; Arcelus, Amaya; Mak, Susanna; Chessex, Caroline; Mihailidis, Alex

    Technological advances are leading to the ability to autonomously monitor patient's health status in their own homes, to enable aging-in-place. To understand the perceptions of seniors with heart failure (HF) regarding smart-home systems to monitor their physiological parameters. In this qualitative study, HF outpatients were invited to a smart-home lab, where they completed a sequence of activities, during which the capacity of 5 autonomous sensing modalities was compared to gold standard measures. Afterwards, a semi-structured interview was undertaken. These were transcribed and analyzed using an interpretive-descriptive approach. Five themes emerged from the 26 interviews: (1) perceptions of technology, (2) perceived benefits of autonomous health monitoring, (3) disadvantages of autonomous monitoring, (4) lack of perceived need for continuous health monitoring, and (5) preferences for autonomous monitoring. Patient perception towards autonomous monitoring devices was positive, lending credence to zero-effort technology as a viable and promising approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis Matrix for Smart Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo E. Branchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current digital revolution has ignited the evolution of communications grids and the development of new schemes for productive systems. Traditional technologic scenarios have been challenged, and Smart Cities have become the basis for urban competitiveness. The citizen is the one who has the power to set new scenarios, and that is why a definition of the way people interact with their cities is needed, as is commented in the first part of the article. At the same time, a lack of clarity has been detected in the way of describing what Smart Cities are, and the second part will try to set the basis for that. For all before, the information and communication technologies that manage and transform 21st century cities must be reviewed, analyzing their impact on new social behaviors that shape the spaces and means of communication, as is posed in the experimental section, setting the basis for an analysis matrix to score the different elements that affect a Smart City environment. So, as the better way to evaluate what a Smart City is, there is a need for a tool to score the different technologies on the basis of their usefulness and consequences, considering the impact of each application. For all of that, the final section describes the main objective of this article in practical scenarios, considering how the technologies are used by citizens, who must be the main concern of all urban development.

  18. Smart Energy Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, D.; Lund, H.; Mathiesen, B. V.

    2016-01-01

    is presented in terms of energy (primary energy supply), environment (carbon dioxide emissions), and economy (total annual socio-economic cost). The steps are ordered in terms of their scientific and political certainty as follows: Decommissioning nuclear power, implementing a large amount of heat savings......This study presents one scenario for a 100% renewable energy system in Europe by the year 2050. The transition from a business-as-usual situation in 2050, to a 100% renewable energy Europe is analysed in a series of steps. Each step reflects one major technological change. For each step, the impact......, converting the private car fleet to electricity, providing heat in rural areas with heat pumps, providing heat in urban areas with district heating, converting fuel in heavy-duty vehicles to a renewable electrofuel, and replacing natural gas with methane. The results indicate that by using the Smart Energy...

  19. OpenSHS: Open Smart Home Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshammari, Nasser; Alshammari, Talal; Sedky, Mohamed; Champion, Justin; Bauer, Carolin

    2017-01-01

    This paper develops a new hybrid, open-source, cross-platform 3D smart home simulator, OpenSHS, for dataset generation. OpenSHS offers an opportunity for researchers in the field of the Internet of Things (IoT) and machine learning to test and evaluate their models. Following a hybrid approach, OpenSHS combines advantages from both interactive and model-based approaches. This approach reduces the time and efforts required to generate simulated smart home datasets. We have designed a replication algorithm for extending and expanding a dataset. A small sample dataset produced, by OpenSHS, can be extended without affecting the logical order of the events. The replication provides a solution for generating large representative smart home datasets. We have built an extensible library of smart devices that facilitates the simulation of current and future smart home environments. Our tool divides the dataset generation process into three distinct phases: first design: the researcher designs the initial virtual environment by building the home, importing smart devices and creating contexts; second, simulation: the participant simulates his/her context-specific events; and third, aggregation: the researcher applies the replication algorithm to generate the final dataset. We conducted a study to assess the ease of use of our tool on the System Usability Scale (SUS). PMID:28468330

  20. OpenSHS: Open Smart Home Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshammari, Nasser; Alshammari, Talal; Sedky, Mohamed; Champion, Justin; Bauer, Carolin

    2017-05-02

    This paper develops a new hybrid, open-source, cross-platform 3D smart home simulator, OpenSHS, for dataset generation. OpenSHS offers an opportunity for researchers in the field of the Internet of Things (IoT) and machine learning to test and evaluate their models. Following a hybrid approach, OpenSHS combines advantages from both interactive and model-based approaches. This approach reduces the time and efforts required to generate simulated smart home datasets. We have designed a replication algorithm for extending and expanding a dataset. A small sample dataset produced, by OpenSHS, can be extended without affecting the logical order of the events. The replication provides a solution for generating large representative smart home datasets. We have built an extensible library of smart devices that facilitates the simulation of current and future smart home environments. Our tool divides the dataset generation process into three distinct phases: first design: the researcher designs the initial virtual environment by building the home, importing smart devices and creating contexts; second, simulation: the participant simulates his/her context-specific events; and third, aggregation: the researcher applies the replication algorithm to generate the final dataset. We conducted a study to assess the ease of use of our tool on the System Usability Scale (SUS).

  1. OpenSHS: Open Smart Home Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Alshammari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a new hybrid, open-source, cross-platform 3D smart home simulator, OpenSHS, for dataset generation. OpenSHS offers an opportunity for researchers in the field of the Internet of Things (IoT and machine learning to test and evaluate their models. Following a hybrid approach, OpenSHS combines advantages from both interactive and model-based approaches. This approach reduces the time and efforts required to generate simulated smart home datasets. We have designed a replication algorithm for extending and expanding a dataset. A small sample dataset produced, by OpenSHS, can be extended without affecting the logical order of the events. The replication provides a solution for generating large representative smart home datasets. We have built an extensible library of smart devices that facilitates the simulation of current and future smart home environments. Our tool divides the dataset generation process into three distinct phases: first design: the researcher designs the initial virtual environment by building the home, importing smart devices and creating contexts; second, simulation: the participant simulates his/her context-specific events; and third, aggregation: the researcher applies the replication algorithm to generate the final dataset. We conducted a study to assess the ease of use of our tool on the System Usability Scale (SUS.

  2. Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentini, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The term environment refers to the internal and external context in which organizations operate. For some scholars, environment is defined as an arrangement of political, economic, social and cultural factors existing in a given context that have an impact on organizational processes and structures....... For others, environment is a generic term describing a large variety of stakeholders and how these interact and act upon organizations. Organizations and their environment are mutually interdependent and organizational communications are highly affected by the environment. This entry examines the origin...... and development of organization-environment interdependence, the nature of the concept of environment and its relevance for communication scholarships and activities....

  3. SmartShadow models and methods for pervasive computing

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhaohui

    2013-01-01

    SmartShadow: Models and Methods for Pervasive Computing offers a new perspective on pervasive computing with SmartShadow, which is designed to model a user as a personality ""shadow"" and to model pervasive computing environments as user-centric dynamic virtual personal spaces. Just like human beings' shadows in the physical world, it follows people wherever they go, providing them with pervasive services. The model, methods, and software infrastructure for SmartShadow are presented and an application for smart cars is also introduced.  The book can serve as a valuable reference work for resea

  4. Secure and Privacy Enhanced Gait Authentication on Smart Phone

    OpenAIRE

    Thang Hoang; Deokjai Choi

    2014-01-01

    Smart environments established by the development of mobile technology have brought vast benefits to human being. However, authentication mechanisms on portable smart devices, particularly conventional biometric based approaches, still remain security and privacy concerns. These traditional systems are mostly based on pattern recognition and machine learning algorithms, wherein original biometric templates or extracted features are stored under unconcealed form for performing matching with a ...

  5. SMART CITY SERVICES DRIVEN BY IOT: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Mijac

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The central role in development of information society is taken by smart cities and their novel services through the use of modern technology and smart solutions. The key enabler and driver of smart cities is Internet of Things (IoT. In this paper, we have conducted a systematic literature review in order to investigate proposed smart city services driven by IoT. We have formulated the review protocol to define the research question/s, search strategy, selection criteria, study quality assessment, and data extraction strategy. We have defined the following main research question: What are the reported applications of Internet of Things in the development of smart city services? The papers were categorized by the smart city services they proposed or described. We have recognized the following categories: traffic and transport; environment monitoring; accessibility & healthcare; waste management; public lighting; energy management; city infrastructure; and other.

  6. Trends and Potentials of the Smart Grid Infrastructure: From ICT Sub-System to SDN-Enabled Smart Grid Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaebeom Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Context and situational awareness are key features and trends of the smart grid and enable adaptable, flexible and extendable smart grid services. However, the traditional hardware-dependent communication infrastructure is not designed to identify the flow and context of data, and it focuses only on packet forwarding using a pre-defined network configuration profile. Thus, the current network infrastructure may not dynamically adapt the various business models and services of the smart grid system. To solve this problem, software-defined networking (SDN is being considered in the smart grid, but the design, architecture and system model need to be optimized for the smart grid environment. In this paper, we investigate the state-of-the-art smart grid information subsystem, communication infrastructure and its emerging trends and potentials, called an SDN-enabled smart grid. We present an abstract business model, candidate SDN applications and common architecture of the SDN-enabled smart grid. Further, we compare recent studies into the SDN-enabled smart grid depending on its service functionalities, and we describe further challenges of the SDN-enabled smart grid network infrastructure.

  7. Privacy-Preserving Aggregation and Authentication of Multi-Source Smart Meters in a Smart Grid System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyoung Koo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The smart grid is a promising electrical grid paradigm for enhancing flexibility and reliability in power transmission through two-way communications among grid entities. In the smart grid system, the privacy of usage information measured by individual smart meters has gained significant attention, owing to the possibility of personal information inference. Moreover, efficient and reliable power provisioning can be seriously impeded through illicit manipulations of aggregated data under the influence of malicious adversaries. Due to such potential risks, it becomes an important requirement for the smart grid to preserve privacy of metering data by secure aggregation and to authenticate the aggregated result in an efficient manner within large scale environments. From this perspective, this paper investigates the current status of security and privacy in smart grid systems and representative state-of-the-art studies in secure aggregation and authentication of metering data for future directions of a smart grid.

  8. Impact of Operating Room Environment on Postoperative Central Nervous System Infection in a Resource-Limited Neurosurgical Center in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambaram, Swathi; Vasudevan, Madabushi Chakravarthy; Nair, Mani Nathan; Joyce, Cara; Germanwala, Anand V

    2017-11-21

    Postoperative central nervous system infections (PCNSIs) are serious complications following neurosurgical intervention. We previously investigated the incidence and causative pathogens of PCNSIs at a resource-limited, neurosurgical center in south Asia. This follow-up study was conducted to analyze differences in PCNSIs at the same institution following only one apparent change: the operating room air filtration system. This was a retrospective study of all neurosurgical cases performed between December 1, 2013, and March 31, 2016 at our center. Providers, patient demographic data, case types, perioperative care, rate of PCNSI, and rates of other complications were reviewed. These results were then compared with the findings of our previous study of neurosurgical cases between June 1, 2012, and June 30, 2013. All 623 neurosurgical operative cases over the study period were reviewed. Four patients (0.6%) had a PCNSI, and no patients had a positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture. In the previous study, among 363 cases, 71 patients (19.6%) had a PCNSI and 7 (1.9%) had a positive CSF culture (all Gram-negative organisms). The differences in both parameters are statistically significant (P system inside the neurosurgical operating rooms; this environmental change occurred during the 5 months between the 2 studies. This study demonstrates the impact of environmental factors in reducing infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Editorial: Smart cities of the future: Creating tomorrow’s education toward effective skills and career development today

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fanny Klett; Minhong Wang

    2014-01-01

    ... education that is striving to shape the new generation of the Smart Citizens. Smart Cities are improving the interconnection between citizens and with governments paying regard to shaping a new environment for the education...

  10. Organic smart pixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodabalapur, A.; Bao, Z.; Makhija, A.; Laquindanum, J. G.; Raju, V. R.; Feng, Y.; Katz, H. E.; Rogers, J.

    1998-07-01

    The fabrication and characteristics of organic smart pixels are described. The smart pixel reported in this letter consists of a single organic thin-film field effect transistor (FET) monolithically integrated with an organic light-emitting diode. The FET active material is a regioregular polythiophene. The maximum optical power emitted by the smart pixel is about 300 nW/cm2 corresponding to a luminance of ˜2300 cd/m2.

  11. Learn about Smart Sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    about the Smart Sectors program including: Meaningful Collaboration with Regulated Sectors; Sensible Policies to Improve Environmental Outcomes; Better EPA Practices and Streamlined Operations; Historical Context

  12. Synergisms between smart metering and smart grid; Synergien zwischen Smart Metering und Smart Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, Peter [IDS GmbH, Ettlingen (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    With the implementation of a smart metering solution, it is not only possible to acquire consumption data for billing but also to acquire relevant data of the distribution grid for grid operation. There is still a wide gap between the actual condition and the target condition. Synergies result from the use of a common infrastructure which takes account both of the requirements of smart metering and of grid operation. An open architecture also enables the future integration of further applications of the fields of smart grid and smart home. (orig.)

  13. SmartCampusAAU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rene; Thomsen, Bent; Thomsen, Lone Leth

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes SmartCampusAAU - an open, extendable platform that supports the easy creation of indoor location based systems. SmartCampusAAU offers an app and backend that can be used to enable indoor positioning and navigation in any building. The SmartCampusAAU app is available on all ma...... major mobile platforms (Android, iPhone and Windows Phone) and supports both device- and infrastructure-based positioning. SmartCampusAAU also offers a publicly available OData backend that allows researchers to share radio map and location tracking data....

  14. Smart Electronic Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Wei; Chen, Peining; He, Sisi; Sun, Xuemei; Peng, Huisheng

    2016-05-17

    This Review describes the state-of-the-art of wearable electronics (smart textiles). The unique and promising advantages of smart electronic textiles are highlighted by comparing them with the conventional planar counterparts. The main kinds of smart electronic textiles based on different functionalities, namely the generation, storage, and utilization of electricity, are then discussed with an emphasis on the use of functional materials. The remaining challenges are summarized together with important new directions to provide some useful clues for the future development of smart electronic textiles. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Smart sensing surveillance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Charles; Chu, Kai-Dee; O'Looney, James; Blake, Michael; Rutar, Colleen

    2010-04-01

    An effective public safety sensor system for heavily-populated applications requires sophisticated and geographically-distributed infrastructures, centralized supervision, and deployment of large-scale security and surveillance networks. Artificial intelligence in sensor systems is a critical design to raise awareness levels, improve the performance of the system and adapt to a changing scenario and environment. In this paper, a highly-distributed, fault-tolerant, and energy-efficient Smart Sensing Surveillance System (S4) is presented to efficiently provide a 24/7 and all weather security operation in crowded environments or restricted areas. Technically, the S4 consists of a number of distributed sensor nodes integrated with specific passive sensors to rapidly collect, process, and disseminate heterogeneous sensor data from near omni-directions. These distributed sensor nodes can cooperatively work to send immediate security information when new objects appear. When the new objects are detected, the S4 will smartly select the available node with a Pan- Tilt- Zoom- (PTZ) Electro-Optics EO/IR camera to track the objects and capture associated imagery. The S4 provides applicable advanced on-board digital image processing capabilities to detect and track the specific objects. The imaging detection operations include unattended object detection, human feature and behavior detection, and configurable alert triggers, etc. Other imaging processes can be updated to meet specific requirements and operations. In the S4, all the sensor nodes are connected with a robust, reconfigurable, LPI/LPD (Low Probability of Intercept/ Low Probability of Detect) wireless mesh network using Ultra-wide band (UWB) RF technology. This UWB RF technology can provide an ad-hoc, secure mesh network and capability to relay network information, communicate and pass situational awareness and messages. The Service Oriented Architecture of S4 enables remote applications to interact with the S4

  16. Residence as a Diagnostic and Therapeutic Area - A Smart Home Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Corinna; Voss, Thorsten; Haux, Reinhold

    2017-01-01

    The "research apartment Halberstadtstraße" (HSS) in Braunschweig, Germany, is the attempt to realize a personal living environment as a room for diagnostics and therapy with the support of health-enabling and ambient assistive technologies (HEAAT). As a research tool, the HSS will enable the efficient implementation of new HEAAT and help in evaluating these under controlled real-life conditions. This new research tool will therefore be the missing link between artificial laboratory and complete real-life conditions. For a defined period, selected subjects can live in the HSS and experience the benefit of such a "Smart Home". The academic support in a real-life controlled living-environment enables continuous monitoring of behavior patterns and habits of healthy and ill persons, evaluation of new HEAAT, and conduction of requirements analysis and acceptance studies.

  17. International Electronical Committee (IEC 61850 Mapping with Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP in Smart Grids Based European Telecommunications Standard Institute Machine-to-Machine (M2M Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Jae Shin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available As power systems develop rapidly into smarter and more flexible configurations, so too must the communication technologies that support them. Machine-to-machine (M2M communication in power systems enables information collection by combining sensors and communication protocols. In doing so, M2M technology supports communication between machines to improve power quality and protection coordination. When functioning in a “smart grid” environment, M2M has been labelled by the European Telecommunications Standard Institute (ETSI. International Electronical Committee (IEC 61850 as the most important standard in power network systems. As evidence, this communication platform has been used for device data collection/control in substation automation systems and distribution automation systems. If the IEC 61850 information model were to be combined with a set of contemporary web protocols, the potential benefits would be enormous. Therefore, a constrained application protocol (CoAP has been adopted to create an ETSI M2M communication architecture. CoAP is compared with other protocols (MQTT, SOAP to demonstrate the validity of using it. This M2M communication technology is applied in an IEC61850, and use the OPNET Modeler 17.1 to demonstrate intercompatibility of CoAP Gateway. The proposed IEC 61850 and CoAP mapping scheme reduces the mapping time and improves throughput. CoAP is useful in the ETSI M2M environment where device capability is able to be limited.

  18. Developing and Implementing "Waupaca Eating Smart": A Restaurant and Supermarket Intervention to Promote Healthy Eating Through Changes in the Food Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escaron, Anne L; Martinez-Donate, Ana P; Riggall, Ann Josie; Meinen, Amy; Hall, Beverly; Nieto, F Javier; Nitzke, Susan

    2016-03-01

    Restaurants and food stores are suitable settings for healthy eating interventions. A community-academic partnership developed and implemented "Waupaca Eating Smart" (WES), a healthy eating program in restaurants and supermarkets of a rural, Midwest community. Previous interventions targeted either restaurants or small food stores nearly all in urban areas. Intervention design and implementation is rarely documented, making replication difficult for interested researchers and communities. In this article, we report the activities we undertook to develop and implement WES. Working with a local nutrition and activity coalition, we used evidence-based strategies guided by the social ecological model and social marketing principles to inform the content of WES. Formative assessment included a review of the literature, statewide key informant interviews and focus groups with restaurant and food store operators and patrons, a local community survey, and interviews with prospective WES businesses. WES was implemented in seven restaurants and two supermarkets and evaluated for feasibility and acceptance using surveys and direct observation of WES implementation. Prior to this intervention, only one of seven restaurants had three or more meals that met WES nutrition criteria. By the end of the program, 38 meals were labeled and promoted to restaurant customers, and the team had staffed four side salad taste tests for supermarket customers. Four and 10 months after intervention launch, the majority of the program's strategies were observed in participating outlets, suggesting that these program's strategies are feasible and can be sustained. Operators reported strong satisfaction overall. A combined restaurant- and supermarket-based healthy eating intervention is feasible and positively valued in rural communities. Further research is needed to better understand how to foster sustainability of these interventions and their impact on customer food choices. © 2015 Society for

  19. Smart Tirana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Lerario

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Albania represents an interesting case of a newly emerging destination in the international tourist market, with intensive pressures coming from seasonal visit flows and the related impacts on the environment. The Albanian Culture Marketing Strategy, while correctly focusing on heritage for the de-seasoning of visits in congested areas and for awareness-raising about the country’s cultural identity among tourists and residents, presents some limitations in the definition of application patterns and concrete solutions. In particular, the active contribution of potential users, of ICTs and, in particular, the potentialities of widespread tools such as mobile apps seem to be overlooked. In this article, the current scenario of the Albanian tourism sector, with particular emphasis on the cultural segment, is presented through a detailed analysis of relevant program documents in order to outline strengths and weaknesses of the underlying approach. Then, the potential contribution of mobile apps to the sustainable development of destinations are analyzed and the market of available technologies is presented through a taxonomy of a consistent number of representative cases. Finally, the SOS-Tirana app is presented and its adequateness to the context is discussed.

  20. Innovative P1451-Enabled Smart Power IVHM Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has expressed a requirement for advanced Smart Sensors to support new systems for harsh environments. Power systems are an integral component of virtually any...

  1. Playing the Smart Card.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuzack, Christine A.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced magnetic strip cards and "smart cards" offer varied service options to college students. Enhanced magnetic strip cards serve as cash cards and provide access to services. Smart cards, which resemble credit cards but contain a microchip, can be used as phone cards, bus passes, library cards, admission tickets, point-of-sale debit…

  2. Smart Icon Cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Icons are frequently used in the music classroom to depict concepts in a developmentally appropriate way for students. SmartBoards provide music educators yet another way to share these manipulatives with students. This article provides a step-by-step tutorial to create Smart Icon Cards using the folk song "Lucy Locket."

  3. Chromogenic smart materials

    OpenAIRE

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2004-01-01

    Smart materials cover a wide and developing range of technologies. A particular type of smart material, known as chromogenics, can be used for large area glazing in buildings, automobiles, planes, and for certain types of electronic display. These technologies consist of electrically-driven media including electrochromism, suspended particle electrophoresis, polymer dispersed liquid crystals, electrically heated thermotropics, and gaschromics.

  4. SMART Boards Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Rebecca M.; Shaw, Edward L.

    2011-01-01

    SMART Board is a technology that combines the functionality of a whiteboard, computer, and projector into a single system. The interactive nature of the SMART Board offers many practical uses for providing an introduction to or review of material, while the large work area invites collaboration through social interaction and communication. As a…

  5. Cluster - Smart Specialization Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florina Popa

    2016-01-01

    The paper refers to the relationship that is created in the regional economic space, between thecluster phenomenon and that of the strategy of smart specialization; in the process oftransformation of the regional economy, the smart specialization strategies take over clusters’policies and clusters integrate activities specific to areas of technological knowledge.

  6. Smart Clothing Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    As sensors and computers become smaller and smaller, it becomes possible to add intelligence or smartness to common items. This is already seen in smart appliances, cars that diagnose their own maintenance problems, and military hardware that is something straight out of a science fiction book. In this article, the author looks at a design…

  7. Making Smart Food Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Healthy Aging Making Smart Food Choices Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents Everyday ... NIH www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Making Smart Food Choices To maintain a healthy weight, balance the calories ...

  8. Less Smart More City

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rocco Papa; Carmela Gargiulo; Mario Cristiano; Immacolata Di Francesco; Andrea Tulisi

    2015-01-01

    ...: everything is smart, even cities. But when you pair the term smart to a complex organism such as the city the significance of the two together is open to a variety of interpretations, as shown by the vast and varied landscape...

  9. Smart Fabrics Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Cory; Potter, Elliott; Potter, Elliott; McCabe, Mary; Baggerman, Clint

    2010-01-01

    Advances in Smart Fabrics technology are enabling an exciting array of new applications for NASA exploration missions, the biomedical community, and consumer electronics. This report summarizes the findings of a brief investigation into the state of the art and potential applications of smart fabrics to address challenges in human spaceflight.

  10. Planning in Smart Grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, M.G.C.

    2012-01-01

    The electricity supply chain is changing, due to increasing awareness for sustainability and an improved energy efficiency. The traditional infrastructure where demand is supplied by centralized generation is subject to a transition towards a Smart Grid. In this Smart Grid, sustainable generation

  11. Smart Grid Security A Smart Meter-Centric Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigo, Roberto; Yuksel, Ender; Ramli, Carroline Dewi Puspa Kencana

    2012-01-01

    , leading to what is known as the Smart Grid. The development of this Cyber-Physical System introduces new security issues, thus calling for efforts in studying possible attacks and devising suitable countermeasures. In this paper, we review a generic model for the Smart Grid, and present possible attacks...... and countermeasures focusing on a key component of the Smart Grid: the Smart Meter....

  12. Reducing inpatient falls in a 100% single room elderly care environment: evaluation of the impact of a systematic nurse training programme on falls risk assessment (FRA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Inderpal; Okeke, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Inpatient falls (IF) are the most commonly reported safety incidents. The high rate of inpatient falls was reported in a newly built hospital, within Aneurin Bevan University Health Board, Wales (UK). The aim of the project is to reduce the incidence of IF and associated adverse clinical outcomes in a hospital with 100% single rooms. The key mechanism for improvement was education and training of nursing staff around falls risk factors. A Plan-Do-Study-Act methodology was used and a geriatrician-led, systematic nurse training programme on the understanding and correct use of existing multifactorial falls risk assessment (FRA) tool was implemented in April 2013. Pre-training baseline data revealed inadequate falls assessment and low completion rates of the FRA tool. Subsequent, post-training data showed improvement in compliance with all aspects of FRA. Concurrent with nurse training, the actual falls incidence/1000 patient-bed-days fell significantly from the baseline of 18.19±3.46 (Nov 2011-March 2013) to 13.36±2.89 (pMarch 2014) and remained low (mean falls 12.81±2.85) until November 2015. Improved clinical outcomes have been observed in terms of a reduction of length of stay and new care home placements, making total annualised savings of £642,055.

  13. STIS: smart travel planning across multiple modes of transportation

    OpenAIRE

    Brennan, Shane; Meier, Rene

    2007-01-01

    peer-reviewed Travellers require information on individual transport systems when planning a journey. Many transport-rich urban environments contain numerous underlying transport infrastructures, offering a traveller various ways to complete the journey. This paper presents the Smart Traveller Information Service, a system designed to offer travellers an easy to use and efficient means of planning journeys in an otherwise complex multi-modal transport environment. The Smart Traveller Infor...

  14. Making a Smart Campus in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelyaman, Eltayab Salih

    2008-01-01

    Prince Sultan University (PSU) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, has conceptualized what it means to be a smart campus after surveying similar notions worldwide. A "smart" campus requires smart teachers, smart technology, and smart pedagogical centers. It deploys smart teachers and gives them smart tools and ongoing support to do their jobs…

  15. Investigation of local structural environments and room-temperature ferromagnetism in (Fe,Cu)-codoped In2O3 diluted magnetic oxide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yukai; Xing, Yaya; Pan, Fei; Wu, Zhonghua; Liu, Jiwen

    2016-05-11

    The local structural, optical, magnetic and transport properties of (In0.95-xFexCu0.05)2O3 (0.06 ≤ x ≤ 0.20) films deposited by RF-magnetron sputtering have been systemically studied by different experimental techniques. Detailed structural analyses using XRD, XPS, EXAFS and full multiple-scattering ab initio theoretical calculations of Fe K-edge XANES show that the (In0.95-xFexCu0.05)2O3 films have the same cubic bixbyite structure as pure In2O3. The doped Fe ions exist at both +2 and +3 oxidation states, substituting for the In(3+) sites in the In2O3 lattice and forming a FeIn + 2VO complex with the O vacancy in the first coordination shell of Fe. However, the co-doped Cu atoms are not incorporated into the In2O3 lattice and form the Cu metal clusters due to high ionization energy. UV-Vis measurements show that the optical band gap Eg decreases monotonically with the increase of Fe concentration, implying an increasing s-pd exchange interaction in the films. All the films display intrinsic room-temperature (RT) ferromagnetism and the saturated magnetization (Ms) increases monotonically with Fe doping. The temperature dependence of the resistivity data suggests the conduction mechanism of Mott variable-range hopping (VRH) at low temperature, confirming that the carriers are localized. It can be concluded that the observed RT ferromagnetism in the films originates from the overlapping of polarons mediated by oxygen vacancies based on the bound magnetic polaron (BMP) model. The variation of the localization effect of carriers with Fe doping can obviously adjust the magnetic exchange interaction in the (In0.95-xFexCu0.05)2O3 films.

  16. GRID INDEPENDENT FUEL CELL OPERATED SMART HOME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Mohammad S. Alam

    2003-12-07

    A fuel cell power plant, which utilizes a smart energy management and control (SEMaC) system, supplying the power need of laboratory based ''home'' has been purchased and installed. The ''home'' consists of two rooms, each approximately 250 sq. ft. Every appliance and power outlet is under the control of a host computer, running the SEMaC software package. It is possible to override the computer, in the event that an appliance or power outage is required. Detailed analysis and simulation of the fuel cell operated smart home has been performed. Two journal papers has been accepted for publication and another journal paper is under review. Three theses have been completed and three additional theses are in progress.

  17. Development of a Proxy-Free Objective Assessment Tool of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living in Mild Cognitive Impairment Using Smart Home Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jekel, Katrin; Damian, Marinella; Storf, Holger; Hausner, Lucrezia; Frölich, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of activities of daily living (ADL) is essential for dementia diagnostics. Even in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), subtle deficits in instrumental ADL (IADL) may occur and signal a higher risk of conversion to dementia. Thus, sensitive and reliable ADL assessment tools are important. Smart homes equipped with sensor technology and video cameras may provide a proxy-free assessment tool for the detection of IADL deficits. The aim of this paper is to investigate the potential of a smart home environment for the assessment of IADL in MCI. The smart home consisted of a two-room flat equipped with activity sensors and video cameras. Participants with either MCI or healthy controls (HC) had to solve a standardized set of six tasks, e.g., meal preparation, telephone use, and finding objects in the flat. MCI participants needed more time (1384 versus 938 seconds, p smart home technologies offer the chance for an objective and ecologically valid assessment of IADL. It can be analyzed not only whether a task is successfully completed but also how it is completed. Future studies should concentrate on the development of automated detection of IADL deficits.

  18. Redefining smart city concept with resilience approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafah, Y.; Winarso, H.

    2017-06-01

    The smart city concept originally aimed at dealing with various urban problems, in particular, those related to the urban environment and infrastructure, such as modeling transport flow in a city. As it developed, the concept is now widely used to accelerate the process of urban management by using IT technology and by the availability of big data. However, the smart city discourses are still debated. There is a number of critical literature on the discourses; some are more concerned with the use and development of information communication technology (ICT). ICT and modern technology are considered the key aspect of the smart city concept. Meanwhile, others emphasize the importance of the people who operate the technology. Very few, if any, literature emphasizes the importance of resilience in the smart city discourse. The city as a complex system should have the ability to be resilient, especially when technology fails either due to technical/man-made or natural disasters. This paper aims to redefine the smart city concept in urban planning through a literature study in the context of planning using a resilience approach. This paper describes and defines what the smart city concept is, what it means, as well as explains the relation and linkage of the importance of using resilience approach in defining the smart city. Factors of resilience will lead to a soft infrastructure approach, such as enhancement in many aspects, e.g. community capacity, social and human capital, knowledge inclusion, participation, social innovation, and social equity. Discussion and analysis are conducted through a deep literature study using systematic literature review methodology.

  19. Simulation of Smart Home Activity Datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synnott, Jonathan; Nugent, Chris; Jeffers, Paul

    2015-06-16

    A globally ageing population is resulting in an increased prevalence of chronic conditions which affect older adults. Such conditions require long-term care and management to maximize quality of life, placing an increasing strain on healthcare resources. Intelligent environments such as smart homes facilitate long-term monitoring of activities in the home through the use of sensor technology. Access to sensor datasets is necessary for the development of novel activity monitoring and recognition approaches. Access to such datasets is limited due to issues such as sensor cost, availability and deployment time. The use of simulated environments and sensors may address these issues and facilitate the generation of comprehensive datasets. This paper provides a review of existing approaches for the generation of simulated smart home activity datasets, including model-based approaches and interactive approaches which implement virtual sensors, environments and avatars. The paper also provides recommendation for future work in intelligent environment simulation.

  20. WSN- and IOT-Based Smart Homes and Their Extension to Smart Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Ghayvat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Our research approach is to design and develop reliable, efficient, flexible, economical, real-time and realistic wellness sensor networks for smart home systems. The heterogeneous sensor and actuator nodes based on wireless networking technologies are deployed into the home environment. These nodes generate real-time data related to the object usage and movement inside the home, to forecast the wellness of an individual. Here, wellness stands for how efficiently someone stays fit in the home environment and performs his or her daily routine in order to live a long and healthy life. We initiate the research with the development of the smart home approach and implement it in different home conditions (different houses to monitor the activity of an inhabitant for wellness detection. Additionally, our research extends the smart home system to smart buildings and models the design issues related to the smart building environment; these design issues are linked with system performance and reliability. This research paper also discusses and illustrates the possible mitigation to handle the ISM band interference and attenuation losses without compromising optimum system performance.

  1. WSN- and IOT-Based Smart Homes and Their Extension to Smart Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghayvat, Hemant; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas; Gui, Xiang; Suryadevara, Nagender

    2015-01-01

    Our research approach is to design and develop reliable, efficient, flexible, economical, real-time and realistic wellness sensor networks for smart home systems. The heterogeneous sensor and actuator nodes based on wireless networking technologies are deployed into the home environment. These nodes generate real-time data related to the object usage and movement inside the home, to forecast the wellness of an individual. Here, wellness stands for how efficiently someone stays fit in the home environment and performs his or her daily routine in order to live a long and healthy life. We initiate the research with the development of the smart home approach and implement it in different home conditions (different houses) to monitor the activity of an inhabitant for wellness detection. Additionally, our research extends the smart home system to smart buildings and models the design issues related to the smart building environment; these design issues are linked with system performance and reliability. This research paper also discusses and illustrates the possible mitigation to handle the ISM band interference and attenuation losses without compromising optimum system performance. PMID:25946630

  2. WSN- and IOT-Based Smart Homes and Their Extension to Smart Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghayvat, Hemant; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas; Gui, Xiang; Suryadevara, Nagender

    2015-05-04

    Our research approach is to design and develop reliable, efficient, flexible, economical, real-time and realistic wellness sensor networks for smart home systems. The heterogeneous sensor and actuator nodes based on wireless networking technologies are deployed into the home environment. These nodes generate real-time data related to the object usage and movement inside the home, to forecast the wellness of an individual. Here, wellness stands for how efficiently someone stays fit in the home environment and performs his or her daily routine in order to live a long and healthy life. We initiate the research with the development of the smart home approach and implement it in different home conditions (different houses) to monitor the activity of an inhabitant for wellness detection. Additionally, our research extends the smart home system to smart buildings and models the design issues related to the smart building environment; these design issues are linked with system performance and reliability. This research paper also discusses and illustrates the possible mitigation to handle the ISM band interference and attenuation losses without compromising optimum system performance.

  3. SMART GRIDS LABORATORIES INVENTORY 2015

    OpenAIRE

    PONCELA BLANCO MARTA; PRETTICO GIUSEPPE; ANDREADOU NIKOLETA; OLARIAGA-GUARDIOLA Miguel; Fulli, Gianluca; COVRIG CATALIN-FELIX

    2015-01-01

    A smart electricity grid opens the door to a myriad of new applications aimed at enhancing security of supply, sustainability and market competitiveness. Gathering detailed information about smart grid laboratories activities represents a primary need. In order to obtain a better picture of the ongoing Smart Grid developments, after the successful smart grid project survey initiated in 2011, we recently launched a focused on-line survey addressed to organisations owning or running Smart Grid ...

  4. Intelligent Agents Meet Semantic Web in a Smart Meeting Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    computing service. Services usually register themselves with one or more Service Managers. The functions of a Service Manager are to provide a Yellow... Service Manager re- quires the list of role definition to be enclosed in a signed digital certificate. Upon receiving a digital certificate from the...service, if it can be verified, the Service Manager adds the enclosed access permission information to its knowl- edge base. To access a registered

  5. A Context Broker for Building Smart Meeting Rooms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Harry; Finin, Tim; Joshi, Anupam

    2004-01-01

    .... CoBrA exploits the Web Ontology Language OWL for supporting knowledge sharing and data fusion, uses logic inferences for resolving and detecting inconsistent context knowledge, and provides users...

  6. A Review of Smart House Analysis Methods for Assisting Older People Living Alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veralia Gabriela Sanchez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Smart Houses are a prominent field of research referring to environments adapted to assist people in their everyday life. Older people and people with disabilities would benefit the most from the use of Smart Houses because they provide the opportunity for them to stay in their home for as long as possible. In this review, the developments achieved in the field of Smart Houses for the last 16 years are described. The concept of Smart Houses, the most used analysis methods, and current challenges in Smart Houses are presented. A brief introduction of the analysis methods is given, and their implementation is also reported.

  7. Dynamic Access Control Model for Security Client Services in Smart Grid

    OpenAIRE

    Sang-Soo Yeo; Si-Jung Kim; Do-Eun Cho

    2014-01-01

    In the next-generation intelligent power grid, known as the smart grid, various objects can access systems in several network environments, and, accordingly, access control security becomes critical. Thus, to provide users with secure services in the smart grid, a new access control security model is needed. This paper proposes a dynamic access model for secure user services in the smart grid environment. The proposed model analyzes the user's various access contexts and chooses an appropriat...

  8. SmartNursing - a mobile application to improve communication in home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyborg, Mads; Bashir, Khurram; Maknickaite, Asta

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents SmartNursing system and discusses how increasing capabilities of smartphone could benefit employees in working environment. A SmartNursing system is developed for home nurses working environment to fulfil their needs. The solution helps to improve communication among nurses, p......, provide customized information and increase work efficiency. Developed system consists of mobile application, web based server and database. This article discusses the solution SmartNursing from design to implementation....

  9. Thundercloud: Domain specific information security training for the smart grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stites, Joseph

    In this paper, we describe a cloud-based virtual smart grid test bed: ThunderCloud, which is intended to be used for domain-specific security training applicable to the smart grid environment. The test bed consists of virtual machines connected using a virtual internal network. ThunderCloud is remotely accessible, allowing students to undergo educational exercises online. We also describe a series of practical exercises that we have developed for providing the domain-specific training using ThunderCloud. The training exercises and attacks are designed to be realistic and to reflect known vulnerabilities and attacks reported in the smart grid environment. We were able to use ThunderCloud to offer practical domain-specific security training for smart grid environment to computer science students at little or no cost to the department and no risk to any real networks or systems.

  10. Scenarios for active learning in smart territories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizia Moggio

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This work is intended to foster a “quantum leap” in the reflection on learning in smart cities/territories. We try to move from a vision according to which education is identified with “infrastructures and services” needed to sustain the smart city “organism” (due also to the social capital that it may produce toward a “new” vision that recovers the founding role of the educative processes, through which the relationships between persons and inhabited territories are continuously reshaped. According to that we present: a a strategic and methodological approach focused on museal field and narrative as key elements of future "learning from smart cities"; b a model of an advanced integrated technological environment (mobile, web, internet of things designed to support such an approach. The need for a different approach to the monitoring of complex learning experiences is also underlined.

  11. Cognitive Radio for Smart Grid with Security Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Shuaib

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate how Cognitive Radio as a means of communication can be utilized to serve a smart grid deployment end to end, from a home area network to power generation. We show how Cognitive Radio can be mapped to integrate the possible different communication networks within a smart grid large scale deployment. In addition, various applications in smart grid are defined and discussed showing how Cognitive Radio can be used to fulfill their communication requirements. Moreover, information security issues pertained to the use of Cognitive Radio in a smart grid environment at different levels and layers are discussed and mitigation techniques are suggested. Finally, the well-known Role-Based Access Control (RBAC is integrated with the Cognitive Radio part of a smart grid communication network to protect against unauthorized access to customer’s data and to the network at large.

  12. Profitability of smart grid solutions applied in power grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katić Nenad A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a Smart Grid solution has been developing for years, as complete solution for a power utility, consisting of different advanced technologies aimed at improving of the efficiency of operation. The trend of implementing various smart systems continues, e.g. Energy Management Systems, Grid Automation Systems, Advanced Metering Infrastructure, Smart power equipment, Distributed Energy Resources, Demand Response systems, etc. Futhermore, emerging technologies, such as energy storages, electrical vehicles or distributed generators, become integrated in distribution networks and systems. Nowadays, the idea of a Smart Grid solution becomes more realistic by full integration of all advanced operation technologies (OT within IT environment, providing the complete digitalization of an Utility (IT/OT integration. The overview of smart grid solutions, estimation of investments, operation costs and possible benefits are presented in this article, with discusison about profitability of such systems.

  13. Challenging 'smart' in smart city strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Knudsen, Jacob

    Smart city strategies concern the improvement of economic and political efficiency and the enabling of social, cultural and urban development (Hollands 2008) and covers a variety of fields from improving infrastructures, social and cultural development, resilience strategies (e.g. green energy...

  14. Smart sensors and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kyung, Chong-Min; Yasuura, Hiroto; Liu, Yongpan

    2015-01-01

     This book describes for readers technology used for effective sensing of our physical world and intelligent processing techniques for sensed information, which are essential to the success of Internet of Things (IoTs).  The authors provide a multidisciplinary view of sensor technology from MEMS, biological, chemical, and electrical domains and showcase smart sensor systems in real applications including smart home, transportation, medical, environmental, agricultural, etc.  Unlike earlier books on sensors, this book will provide a “global” view on smart sensors covering abstraction levels from device, circuit, systems, and algorithms.  .

  15. Introduction to smart antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Balanis, Constantine A

    2007-01-01

    As the growing demand for mobile communications is constantly increasing, the need for better coverage, improved capacity, and higher transmission quality rises. Thus, a more efficient use of the radio spectrum is required. Smart antenna systems are capable of efficiently utilizing the radio spectrum and is a promise for an effective solution to the present wireless systems' problems while achieving reliable and robust high-speed high-data-rate transmission. The purpose of this book is to provide the reader a broad view of the system aspects of smart antennas. In fact, smart antenna systems co

  16. Smart security proven practices

    CERN Document Server

    Quilter, J David

    2014-01-01

    Smart Security: Understanding and Contributing to the Business is a video presentation. Length: 68 minutes. In Smart Security: Understanding and Contributing to the Business, presenter J. David Quilter demonstrates the benefits of how a fully integrated security program increases business profits and delivers smart security practices at the same time. The presentation does away with the misconception that security is only an expense. In fact, a well-integrated security program can protect business interests, thereby enhancing productivity and net income. Quilter covers cost analysis and secu

  17. Nanomaterials for benign indoor environments: Electrochromics for 'smart windows', sensors for air quality, and photo-catalysts for air cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granqvist, C.G. [Department of Engineering Sciences, The AAngstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Azens, A. [ChromoGenics Sweden AB, Maerstagatan 4, SE-75323 Uppsala (Sweden); Heszler, P. [Research Group of Laser Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Kish, L.B. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Texas A& amp; M University, College Station, TX 77843-3128 (United States); OEsterlund, L. [Department of Environment and Protection, FOI NBC Defence, SE-90182 Umeaa (Sweden)

    2007-02-15

    Nanomaterials can be used in a number of technologies in order to accomplish benign indoor environments. This paper takes a unified view on this problem from a solar-energy-based perspective and specifically considers electrochromics for achieving good day-lighting jointly with energy efficiency, sensors aimed at air quality assessment, and photocatalysis for air cleaning. Recent results, mainly from the authors' laboratories, are reported for all of these areas. (author)

  18. Experiences with integral microelectronics on smart structures for space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Ted; Casteel, Scott; Navarro, Sergio A.; Kraml, Bob

    1995-05-01

    One feature of a smart structure implies that some computational and signal processing capability can be performed at a local level, perhaps integral to the controlled structure. This requires electronics with a minimal mechanical influence regarding structural stiffening, heat dissipation, weight, and electrical interface connectivity. The Advanced Controls Technology Experiment II (ACTEX II) space-flight experiments implemented such a local control electronics scheme by utilizing composite smart members with integral processing electronics. These microelectronics, tested to MIL-STD-883B levels, were fabricated with conventional thick film on ceramic multichip module techniques. Kovar housings and aluminum-kapton multilayer insulation was used to protect against harsh space radiation and thermal environments. Development and acceptance testing showed the electronics design was extremely robust, operating in vacuum and at temperature range with minimal gain variations occurring just above room temperatures. Four electronics modules, used for the flight hardware configuration, were connected by a RS-485 2 Mbit per second serial data bus. The data bus was controlled by Actel field programmable gate arrays arranged in a single master, four slave configuration. An Intel 80C196KD microprocessor was chosen as the digital compensator in each controller. It was used to apply a series of selectable biquad filters, implemented via Delta Transforms. Instability in any compensator was expected to appear as large amplitude oscillations in the deployed structure. Thus, over-vibration detection circuitry with automatic output isolation was incorporated into the design. This was not used however, since during experiment integration and test, intentionally induced compensator instabilities resulted in benign mechanical oscillation symptoms. Not too surprisingly, it was determined that instabilities were most detectable by large temperature increases in the electronics, typically

  19. Perceptual effects in auralization of virtual rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiner, Mendel; Larsson, Pontus; Vastfjall, Daniel; Torres, Rendell R.

    2002-05-01

    By using various types of binaural simulation (or ``auralization'') of physical environments, it is now possible to study basic perceptual issues relevant to room acoustics, as well to simulate the acoustic conditions found in concert halls and other auditoria. Binaural simulation of physical spaces in general is also important to virtual reality systems. This presentation will begin with an overview of the issues encountered in the auralization of room and other environments. We will then discuss the influence of various approximations in room modeling, in particular, edge- and surface scattering, on the perceived room response. Finally, we will discuss cross-modal effects, such as the influence of visual cues on the perception of auditory cues, and the influence of cross-modal effects on the judgement of ``perceived presence'' and the rating of room acoustic quality.

  20. Test Your Sodium Smarts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You may be surprised to learn how much sodium is in many foods. Sodium, including sodium chloride ... foods with little or no salt. Test your sodium smarts by answering these 10 questions about which ...

  1. Technology Roadmaps: Smart Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The development of Technology Roadmaps: Smart Grids -- which the IEA defines as an electricity network that uses digital and other advanced technologies to monitor and manage the transport of electricity from all generation sources to meet the varying electricity demands of end users -- is essential if the global community is to achieve shared goals for energy security, economic development and climate change mitigation. Unfortunately, existing misunderstandings of exactly what smart grids are and the physical and institutional complexity of electricity systems make it difficult to implement smart grids on the scale that is needed. This roadmap sets out specific steps needed over the coming years to achieve milestones that will allow smart grids to deliver a clean energy future.

  2. Smart grid in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Simon; Ma, Zheng; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard

    2015-01-01

    China is planning to transform its traditional power grid in favour of a smart grid, since it allows a more economically efficient and a more environmentally friendly transmission and distribution of electricity. Thus, a nationwide smart grid is likely to save tremendous amounts of resources...... and costs. This paper elaborates on the key stakeholders, crucial polices and general challenges in the context of the Chinese smart grid development. The paper finds that the Chinese energy market is a state monopoly and foreign companies can only become key stakeholders in the role of suppliers or service...... providers. It can be concluded that the Chinese smart grid development has still to overcome technological and political issues, such as overlapping authority structures, not installed or immature key technologies, the absence of standards and governmental market protectionism....

  3. Becoming a smart student

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundqvist, Ulla

    problem for students, teachers and educational scholars, because they create social inequities in schools. This study explores how smart student roles evolve over the course of fourth -, fifth -, and sixth form classes in a Danish primary school. Theoretically, the study draws from the frameworks...... smart student roles evolve into favoured roles, and become contested by other students. While focusing on “smartness”, this study also describes how a student come to inhabit disapproved identities, such as “disruptive” and “passive” student, relative to a classmate come to been seen by the teachers...... of the smart student in their classrooms and schools, and how the enactment and contestation of the smart student role may either encourage or constrain possibilities for student participation. This study points out that educational scholarship can gain a better understanding of children’s educational...

  4. The Smart Factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radziwon, Agnieszka; Bilberg, Arne; Bogers, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays we live in a world, which a decade ago would only be described in the science fiction literature. More and more things become smart and both scientists and engineers strive for developing not only new and innovative devices, but also homes, factories, or even cities. Despite of continuous...... development, many of those concepts are still being just a vision of the future, which still needs a lot of effort to become true. This paper reviews the usage of adjective smart in respect to technology and with a special emphasis on the smart factory concept placement among contemporary studies. Due...... to a lack of a consensus of common understanding of this term, a unified definition is proposed. The conceptualization will not only refer to various smart factory visions reported in the literature, but also link the crucial characteristics of this emerging manufacturing concept to usual manufacturing...

  5. The burden of smartness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundqvist, Ulla

    research accentuates the inequity that occurs when those students who do not fit the “smart” category are marginalized, the inequities that emerge when teachers prefer the smart student have not received much scholarly attention. Drawing on linguistic ethnographic fieldwork in a primary school......Schools are sociohistorically situated battlefields about what it means to be a "smart student", and about which students come to be viewed as smart. Struggles around smartness are a problem for educational scholars and teachers because they can foster social inequity in classrooms. While much...... in Copenhagen, Denmark, and using the theoretical frameworks of social identification and participation, this paper explores how one student, over the course of two years and two months, comes to inhabit the “smart” role, and must then cope with being favoured by the teachers and ostracised by peers. Dual...

  6. Controlling smart grid adaptivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toersche, Hermen; Nykamp, Stefan; Molderink, Albert; Hurink, Johann L.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2012-01-01

    Methods are discussed for planning oriented smart grid control to cope with scenarios with limited predictability, supporting an increasing penetration of stochastic renewable resources. The performance of these methods is evaluated with simulations using measured wind generation and consumption

  7. The Smart Energy System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurowetzki, Roman; Dyrelund, Anders; Hummelmose, Lars

    on the synergies which are obtained through integration of the district heating and district cooling, gas, and electricity grid into a single smart energy system. Besides documenting the technology and innovation strengths that Danish companies possess particularly relating to wind, district heating, CHP......Copenhagen Cleantech Cluster has launched a new report, which provides an overview of Danish competencies relating to smart energy systems. The report, which is based on a questionnaire answered by almost 200 companies working with smart energy as well as a number of expert interviews, focuses...... production, large scale solar heat, fuel cells, heat storage, waste incineration, among others, the report draws a picture of Denmark as a research and development hub for smart energy system solutions....

  8. The Effect of Various Hot Environments on Physiological Responses and Information Processing Performance Following Firefighting Activities in a Smoke-Diving Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasoul Hemmatjo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fire service workers often implement multiple duties in the emergency conditions, with such duties being mostly conducted in various ambient temperatures. Methods: The aim of the current study was to assess the firefighters' physiological responses, information processing, and working memory prior to and following simulated firefighting activities in three different hot environments. Seventeen healthy male firefighters performed simulated firefighting tasks in three separate conditions, namely (1 low heat (LH; 29–31°C, 55–60% relative humidity, (2 moderate heat (MH; 32–34°C, 55–60% relative humidity, and (3 severe heat (SH; 35–37°C, 55–60% relative humidity. It took about 45–50 minutes for each firefighter to finish all defined firefighting activities and the paced auditory serial addition test (PASAT. Results: At the end of all the three experimental conditions, heart rate (HR and tympanic temperature (TT increased, while PASAT scores as a measure of information processing performance decreased relative to baseline. HR and TT were significantly higher at the end of the experiment in the SH (159.41±4.25 beats/min; 38.22±0.10°C compared with the MH (156.59±3.77 beats/min; 38.20±0.10°C and LH (154.24±4.67 beats/min; 38.17±0.10°C conditions (p0.05. Nonetheless, there was a measurable difference in PASAT scores between LH and SH (p<0.05. Conclusion: These consequences demonstrate that ambient temperature is effective in raising the physiological responses following firefighting activities. It is therefore argued that further increase of ambient temperature can impact firefighters' information processing and working memory during firefighting activity. Keywords: firefighting, hot environment, information processing, physiological responses, working memory

  9. SmartCityWare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Nader; Al-Jaroodi, Jameela; Jawhar, Imad

    2017-01-01

    Smart cities are becoming a reality. Various aspects of modern cities are being automated and integrated with information and communication technologies to achieve higher functionality, optimized resources utilization, and management, and improved quality of life for the residents. Smart cities...... rely heavily on utilizing various software, hardware, and communication technologies to improve the operations in areas, such as healthcare, transportation, energy, education, logistics, and many others, while reducing costs and resources consumption. One of the promising technologies to support...

  10. EEsof - Philips Smart Library

    OpenAIRE

    Parrish, Peter T.; Peroomal, Manivannan; LeBlanc, Remy; Gatti, Giuliano

    1992-01-01

    In this poster paper we present a new MMIC design library - the EEof-Philips SMART (Simulateable Microwave ARTwork) Library - based on a novel design approach that incorporates a file-based parameter list. The SMART Library permits the capture of a MMIC schematic, and can simultaneously display the detailed physical layout and circuit simulation. The library elements consist of schematic symbols, parametrized layout macros and C-language simulation models. The library works in conjunction wit...

  11. The Smart Wind Turbine

    OpenAIRE

    Halimi, Wissam; Salzmann, Christophe; Gillet, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Remote experimentation is at the core of Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics education supported by e-learning. The development and integration of remote labo- ratories in online learning activities is hindered by the inherited supporting infrastructure’s architecture and implementation. In this paper we present a remote experiment (The Smart Wind Tur- bine) built following the Smart Device Paradigm and integrated in an Inquiry Learning Space: the rich open educational resource def...

  12. A physical model of a smart home using the Internet of Things

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Coetzee, L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A smart environment consists of three elements: automation facilities, a network, and intelligent control. This paper describes a project in which a physical model of a smart environment was created, connected to the Internet, and controlled by a...

  13. Patterns of work injuries: cases admitted to emergency room treatment compared to cases reported to the Danish Working Environment Authority during 2003-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, Flemming; Nielsen, Kent Jacob; Rasmussen, Kurt; Lauritsen, Jens M

    2014-02-01

    To compare work injuries treated in an emergency department (ED) and injuries reported to the Danish Working Environment Authority (DWEA). Work injuries of the ED, Odense University Hospital, and injuries from the geographical catchment area reported to the DWEA between 2003 and 2010 were included. The injuries included in both datasets were identified by merging the ED file and the DWEA file using the civil registry number and injury date information as key. Approximately 50 000 work injuries occurred in the catchment area of the ED. The intersection between the two injury registration systems was 16%. A major discordance concerned the type of injuries, as some injuries were seen frequently in the ED but not reported to the DWEA to any significant extent, for example 'eye injuries' and 'superficial lacerations or wounds'. On the other hand, some injuries are rarely seen in the ED, but often reported to the DWEA, for example 'low back pain'. Additionally, younger workers visit the ED more often than older workers, and injuries in the high risk sectors have the lowest reporting proportion. Neither the ED nor DWEA injury files alone give a complete picture of work injuries. But merged, they represent a significant number of injuries, taking into account differences in data sources, for example concerning uneven distribution of age, sex, type of injury and type of industry. Obviously, not all serious work related ED injuries resulting in lost work time are reported to the DWEA.

  14. Increase in voice level and speaker comfort in lecture rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas; Gade, Anders Christian; Bellester, Gaspar Payá

    2009-01-01

    Teachers often suffer from health problems related to their voice. These problems are related to their working environment, including the acoustics of the lecture rooms. However, there is a lack of studies linking the room acoustic parameters to the voice produced by the speaker. In this pilot...... study, the main goals are to investigate whether objectively measurable parameters of the rooms can be related to an increase in the voice sound power produced by speakers and to the speakers’ subjective judgments about the rooms. In six different rooms with different sizes, reverberation times...... that in different rooms significant changes in the sound power produced by the speaker can be found. It is also found that these changes mainly have to do with the size of the room and to the gain produced by the room. To describe this quality, a new room acoustic quantity called “room gain” is proposed....

  15. On the way to the smart education in the cloud: The experience of using a virtual learning environment and webinars in educational and career guidance process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapshinsky, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    The article is devoted to the consideration of issues of functionality and application of educational portal as virtual learning environments and webinars as SaaS services. Examples of their use in educational and vocational guidance processes are presented. The prospects of transition from portal VLE to SaaS and cloud services are marked. Portal www.valinfo.ru with original learning management system has been used in the educational process since 2003 in the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI and in the Peoples' Friendship University of Russia. Supported courses: Computer Science, Computer Workshop, Networks, Information Technology, The Introduction to Nano-Engineer, Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials etc. For webinars as SaaS services, used the "virtual classroom," kindly provided by WebSoft Company.

  16. Using a smart wheelchair as a gaming device for floor-projected games: a mixed-reality environment for training powered-wheelchair driving skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secoli, R; Zondervan, D; Reinkensmeyer, D

    2012-01-01

    For children with a severe disability, such as can arise from cerebral palsy, becoming independent in mobility is a critical goal. Currently, however, driver's training for powered wheelchair use is labor intensive, requiring hand-over-hand assistance from a skilled therapist to keep the trainee safe. This paper describes the design of a mixed reality environment for semi-autonomous training of wheelchair driving skills. In this system, the wheelchair is used as the gaming input device, and users train driving skills by maneuvering through floor-projected games created with a multi-projector system and a multi-camera tracking system. A force feedback joystick assists in steering and enhances safety.

  17. Towards Efficient Energy Management: Defining HEMS and Smart Grid Objectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossello Busquet, Ana; Soler, José

    2011-01-01

    to distribute and produce electricity more efficiently. This paper presents the high level goals and requirements of HEMS and the Smart Grid. Additionally, it provides an overview on how Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) is involved in the Smart Grid and how they help to achieve the emerging...... in home environments, researches have been designing Home Energy Management Systems (HEMS). Efficiently managing and distributing electricity in the grid will also help to reduce the increase of energy consumption in the future. The power grid is evolving into the Smart Grid, which is being developed...

  18. The role of smart grids in integrating renewable energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali MEKKAOUI

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a novel model of smart grid connected photovoltaic / wind turbine hybrid system is developed. A Smart Grid has been presented in MATLAB/SIMULINK environment to see the approach for analysis of power exchange. Analysis of this last, gives the exact idea to know the range of maximum permissible loads that can be connected to their relevant bus bars. This paper presents the variation of Active Power with varying load angle in context with small signal analysis. The Smart Grid, regarded as the future generation power grid, uses two-way flow of electricity and information to create a widely distributed automated energy delivery network.

  19. Smart Cities as Cyber-Physical Social Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos G. Cassandras

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The emerging prototype for a Smart City is one of an urban environment with a new generation of innovative services for transportation, energy distribution, healthcare, environmental monitoring, business, commerce, emergency response, and social activities. Enabling the technology for such a setting requires a viewpoint of Smart Cities as cyber-physical systems (CPSs that include new software platforms and strict requirements for mobility, security, safety, privacy, and the processing of massive amounts of information. This paper identifies some key defining characteristics of a Smart City, discusses some lessons learned from viewing them as CPSs, and outlines some fundamental research issues that remain largely open.

  20. Activity Learning as a Foundation for Security Monitoring in Smart Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessamyn Dahmen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Smart environment technology has matured to the point where it is regularly used in everyday homes as well as research labs. With this maturation of the technology, we can consider using smart homes as a practical mechanism for improving home security. In this paper, we introduce an activity-aware approach to security monitoring and threat detection in smart homes. We describe our approach using the CASAS smart home framework and activity learning algorithms. By monitoring for activity-based anomalies we can detect possible threats and take appropriate action. We evaluate our proposed method using data collected in CASAS smart homes and demonstrate the partnership between activity-aware smart homes and biometric devices in the context of the CASAS on-campus smart apartment testbed.

  1. Research on data collection key technology of smart electric energy meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangqun; Huang, Rui; Shen, Liman; Chen, Hao; Xiong, Dezhi; Xiao, Xiangqi; Mouhailiu; Renheng, Xu

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, smart electric energy meters are demand at 70 million to 90 million with the strong smart grid construction every year in China. However, there are some issues in smart electric energy meters data collection such as the interference of environment, low collection efficiency and inability to work when the power is off. In order to solve these issues above, it uses the RFID communication technology to collect the numbers and electric energy information of smart electric energy meters on the basis of the existing smart electric energy meters, and the related data collection communication experiments were made. The experimental result shows that the electric information and other data batch collection of RFID smart electric energy meters are realized in power and power off. It improves the efficiency and the overall success rate is 99.2% within 2 meters. It provides a new method for smart electric energy meters data collection.

  2. Activity Learning as a Foundation for Security Monitoring in Smart Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Jessamyn; Thomas, Brian L.; Cook, Diane J.; Wang, Xiaobo

    2017-01-01

    Smart environment technology has matured to the point where it is regularly used in everyday homes as well as research labs. With this maturation of the technology, we can consider using smart homes as a practical mechanism for improving home security. In this paper, we introduce an activity-aware approach to security monitoring and threat detection in smart homes. We describe our approach using the CASAS smart home framework and activity learning algorithms. By monitoring for activity-based anomalies we can detect possible threats and take appropriate action. We evaluate our proposed method using data collected in CASAS smart homes and demonstrate the partnership between activity-aware smart homes and biometric devices in the context of the CASAS on-campus smart apartment testbed. PMID:28362342

  3. Activity Learning as a Foundation for Security Monitoring in Smart Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Jessamyn; Thomas, Brian L; Cook, Diane J; Wang, Xiaobo

    2017-03-31

    Smart environment technology has matured to the point where it is regularly used in everyday homes as well as research labs. With this maturation of the technology, we can consider using smart homes as a practical mechanism for improving home security. In this paper, we introduce an activity-aware approach to security monitoring and threat detection in smart homes. We describe our approach using the CASAS smart home framework and activity learning algorithms. By monitoring for activity-based anomalies we can detect possible threats and take appropriate action. We evaluate our proposed method using data collected in CASAS smart homes and demonstrate the partnership between activity-aware smart homes and biometric devices in the context of the CASAS on-campus smart apartment testbed.

  4. Smart Grid Integration Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troxell, Wade [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2011-12-22

    The initial federal funding for the Colorado State University Smart Grid Integration Laboratory is through a Congressionally Directed Project (CDP), DE-OE0000070 Smart Grid Integration Laboratory. The original program requested in three one-year increments for staff acquisition, curriculum development, and instrumentation all which will benefit the Laboratory. This report focuses on the initial phase of staff acquisition which was directed and administered by DOE NETL/ West Virginia under Project Officer Tom George. Using this CDP funding, we have developed the leadership and intellectual capacity for the SGIC. This was accomplished by investing (hiring) a core team of Smart Grid Systems engineering faculty focused on education, research, and innovation of a secure and smart grid infrastructure. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory will be housed with the separately funded Integrid Laboratory as part of CSU's overall Smart Grid Integration Center (SGIC). The period of performance of this grant was 10/1/2009 to 9/30/2011 which included one no cost extension due to time delays in faculty hiring. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory's focus is to build foundations to help graduate and undergraduates acquire systems engineering knowledge; conduct innovative research; and team externally with grid smart organizations. Using the results of the separately funded Smart Grid Workforce Education Workshop (May 2009) sponsored by the City of Fort Collins, Northern Colorado Clean Energy Cluster, Colorado State University Continuing Education, Spirae, and Siemens has been used to guide the hiring of faculty, program curriculum and education plan. This project develops faculty leaders with the intellectual capacity to inspire its students to become leaders that substantially contribute to the development and maintenance of Smart Grid infrastructure through topics such as: (1) Distributed energy systems modeling and control; (2) Energy and power conversion; (3

  5. A Study of the Relationship between Weather Variables and Electric Power Demand inside a Smart Grid/Smart World Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Chinarro

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the main challenges of today’s society is the need to fulfill at the same time the two sides of the dichotomy between the growing energy demand and the need to look after the environment. Smart Grids are one of the answers: intelligent energy grids which retrieve data about the environment through extensive sensor networks and react accordingly to optimize resource consumption. In order to do this, the Smart Grids need to understand the existing relationship between energy demand and a set of relevant climatic variables. All smart “systems” (buildings, cities, homes, consumers, etc. have the potential to employ their intelligence for self-adaptation to climate conditions. After introducing the Smart World, a global framework for the collaboration of these smart systems, this paper presents the relationship found at experimental level between a range of relevant weather variables and electric power demand patterns, presenting a case study using an agent-based system, and emphasizing the need to consider this relationship in certain Smart World (and specifically Smart Grid and microgrid applications.

  6. A Study of the Relationship between Weather Variables and Electric Power Demand inside a Smart Grid/Smart World Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Luis; Baladrón, Carlos; Aguiar, Javier M.; Calavia, Lorena; Carro, Belén; Sánchez-Esguevillas, Antonio; Cook, Diane J.; Chinarro, David; Gómez, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    One of the main challenges of today's society is the need to fulfill at the same time the two sides of the dichotomy between the growing energy demand and the need to look after the environment. Smart Grids are one of the answers: intelligent energy grids which retrieve data about the environment through extensive sensor networks and react accordingly to optimize resource consumption. In order to do this, the Smart Grids need to understand the existing relationship between energy demand and a set of relevant climatic variables. All smart “systems” (buildings, cities, homes, consumers, etc.) have the potential to employ their intelligence for self-adaptation to climate conditions. After introducing the Smart World, a global framework for the collaboration of these smart systems, this paper presents the relationship found at experimental level between a range of relevant weather variables and electric power demand patterns, presenting a case study using an agent-based system, and emphasizing the need to consider this relationship in certain Smart World (and specifically Smart Grid and microgrid) applications.

  7. From Smart Metering to Smart Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukuča, Peter; Chrapčiak, Igor

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with evaluation of measurements in electrical distribution systems aimed at better use of data provided by Smart Metering systems. The influence of individual components of apparent power on the power loss is calculated and results of measurements under real conditions are presented. The significance of difference between the traditional and the complex evaluation of the electricity consumption efficiency by means of different definitions of the power factor is illustrated.

  8. SMART SUSTAINABLE ISLANDS VS SMART SUSTAINABLE CITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Pantazis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper has several aims: a the presentation of a critical analysis of the terms “smart sustainable cities” and “smart sustainable islands” b the presentation of a number of principles towards to the development methodological framework of concepts and actions, in a form of a manual and actions guide, for the smartification and sustainability of islands. This kind of master plan is divided in thematic sectors (key factors which concern the insular municipalities c the creation of an island’s smartification and sustainability index d the first steps towards the creation of a portal for the presentation of our smartification actions manual, together with relative resources, smart applications examples, and, in the near future the first results of our index application in a number of Greek islands and e the presentation of some proposals of possible actions towards their sustainable development and smartification for the municipalities - islands of Paros and Antiparos in Greece, as case studies.

  9. Smart-1 Project Development Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racca, G. D.; Foing, B. H.; SMART-1 Project Team

    SMART-1 is the first of the Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology of the ESA Horizons 2000 Science Plan. The main mission objective of SMART-1 is to demonstrate key technologies for Bepi-Colombo and other scientific deep-space missions. One of the key technologies is the solar electric propulsion used as primary propulsion. The electric propulsion will be using 1400W to transfer the 350 kg space- craft from an Ariane-5 standard GTO to an elliptic Moon polar orbit, 10000x300 km. The total mission time is 24 months including a maximum of 18 months transfer time. The spacecraft development entered the detailed design and implementation phase in October 1999, under the responsibility of the Swedish Space Corporation as prime contractor, and the flight acceptance is targeted for the end of 2002. Apart from the in-orbit demonstration of electric propulsion as primary propulsion, SMART-1 is im- plementing many other enabling technologies for deep-space missions. In addition, the spacecraft avionics design is tailored to the low cost philosophy by enabling flexi- ble integration of Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) equipment. The scientific instru- ments support the characterisation of the electric propulsion thrust environment during the long transfer phase and detailed imaging and spectroscopy of the lunar surface in visible, infrared and X-ray during the Moon orbiting phase. The paper summarises the baseline mission and spacecraft design. The main part of the paper highlights the spacecraft design status and the assembly, integration and verification activities.

  10. Less Smart More City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocco Papa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Smart is an expression used in recent years in science, and it refers to someone or something that shows a lively intelligence, with a quick learning curve and a fast response to external stimuli. The present scenario is dominated by the accelerated technological development that involves every aspect of life, enhancing the everyday tools through the use of information and digital processing: everything is smart, even cities. But when you pair the term smart to a complex organism such as the city the significance of the two together is open to a variety of interpretations, as shown by the vast and varied landscape of definitions that have occurred in recent years. Our contribution presents the results of research aimed at analyzing and interpreting this fragmented scene mainly, but not exclusively, through lexical analysis, applied to a textual corpus of 156 definitions of smart city. In particular, the study identified the main groups of stakeholders that have taken part in the debate, and investigated the differences and convergences that can be detected: Academic, Institutional, and Business worlds. It is undeniable that the term smart has been a veritable media vehicle that, on the one hand brought to the center of the discussion the issue of the city, of increasing strategic importance for the major challenges that humanity is going to face,  and on the other has been a fertile ground on which to pour the interests of different groups and individuals. In a nutshell we can say that from the analysis the different approaches that each group has used and supported emerge clearly and another, alarming, consideration occurs: of the smart part of “Smart City” we clearly grasp the tools useful to the each group of stakeholders, and of the city part, as a collective aspiration, there is often little or nothing.

  11. Scheduling Optimization of Smart Homes Based on Demand Response

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jiawei; Lauri, Fabrice; Koukam, Abderrafiaa; Hilaire, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Part 4: Smart Environments, Agents, and Robots; International audience; Demand response can potentially lead to economic and environmental advantages, but non-coordinated scheduling and operation of controllable devices in a set of smart homes will make peak rebounds at periods with lower electricity prices happen, which may damage the power grid, cause unforeseen disasters, and reduce the global profit. In this work, we advocate the use of a metaheuristic algorithm based on Cooperative Parti...

  12. The roles of households in the smart grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    2013-01-01

    The smart grid is often mentioned as one of the key examples of IT playing a positive role for the environment, because it is regarded as a precondition for a low carbon transition of the energy system. Households are expected to play a variety of roles in relation to the development of the smart...... grid. The changes are complex and involve a number of concerns and challenges for policy-making....

  13. Prior listening in rooms improves speech intelligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandewie, Eugene; Zahorik, Pavel

    2010-07-01

    Although results from previous studies have demonstrated that the acoustic effects of a single reflection are perceptually suppressed after repeated exposure to a particular configuration of source and reflection, the extent to which this dynamic echo suppression might generalize to speech understanding in room environments with multiple reflections and reverberation is largely unknown. Here speech intelligibility was measured using the coordinate response measure corpus both with and without prior listening exposure to a reverberant room environment, which was simulated using virtual auditory space techniques. Prior room listening exposure was manipulated by presenting either a two-sentence carrier phrase that preceded the target speech, or no carrier phrase within the room environment. Results from 14 listeners indicate that with prior room exposure, masked speech reception thresholds were on average 2.7 dB lower than thresholds without exposure, an improvement in intelligibility of over 18 percentage points on average. This effect, which is shown to be absent in anechoic space and greatly reduced under monaural listening conditions, demonstrates that prior binaural exposure to reverberant rooms can improve speech intelligibility, perhaps due to a process of perceptual adaptation to the acoustics of the listening room.

  14. 40 CFR 1601.12 - Public reading room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public reading room. 1601.12 Section... DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Administration § 1601.12 Public reading room. (a) The CSB maintains a public reading room that contains the records that the FOIA requires to be made...

  15. The Future of Smart Cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickes, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the evolution of smart cards from digital signatures and other innovations into the realm of magnetic-stripe cards to expand their applications. Examples of magnetic-strip smart card usage are examined. (GR)

  16. Market Acceptance of Smart Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report finds that smart growth developments enjoy market acceptance because of stability in prices over time. Housing resales in smart growth developments often have greater appreciation than their conventional suburban counterparts.

  17. Smart learning objects for smart education in computer science theory, methodology and robot-based implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Stuikys, Vytautas

    2015-01-01

    This monograph presents the challenges, vision and context to design smart learning objects (SLOs) through Computer Science (CS) education modelling and feature model transformations. It presents the latest research on the meta-programming-based generative learning objects (the latter with advanced features are treated as SLOs) and the use of educational robots in teaching CS topics. The introduced methodology includes the overall processes to develop SLO and smart educational environment (SEE) and integrates both into the real education setting to provide teaching in CS using constructivist a

  18. Smart city – future city? smart city 20 as a livable city and future market

    CERN Document Server

    Etezadzadeh, Chirine

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a livable smart city presented in this book highlights the relevance of the functionality and integrated resilience of viable cities of the future. It critically examines the progressive digitalization that is taking place and identifies the revolutionized energy sector as the basis of urban life. The concept is based on people and their natural environment, resulting in a broader definition of sustainability and an expanded product theory. Smart City 2.0 offers its residents many opportunities and is an attractive future market for innovative products and services. However, it presents numerous challenges for stakeholders and product developers.

  19. How IoT, AAI Can Contribute to Smart Home and Smart Cities Services - the Role of Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skouby, Knud Erik; Lynggaard, Per; Windekilde, Iwona Maria

    comprises a collection of smart homes equipped with IoT’s and an AAI system. The presented concept includes novel services for citizens and it seems to move the state-of-the-art for innovative smart city services into the next era, i.e. a new ecosystem. Furthermore we will investigate the relationship...... of social programs and healthcare, environment, energy and water, government, administration and public safety services....

  20. Securing smart grid technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitanya Krishna, E.; Kosaleswara Reddy, T.; Reddy, M. YogaTeja; Reddy G. M., Sreerama; Madhusudhan, E.; AlMuhteb, Sulaiman

    2013-03-01

    In the developing countries electrical energy is very important for its all-round improvement by saving thousands of dollars and investing them in other sector for development. For Growing needs of power existing hierarchical, centrally controlled grid of the 20th Century is not sufficient. To produce and utilize effective power supply for industries or people we should have Smarter Electrical grids that address the challenges of the existing power grid. The Smart grid can be considered as a modern electric power grid infrastructure for enhanced efficiency and reliability through automated control, high-power converters, modern communications infrastructure along with modern IT services, sensing and metering technologies, and modern energy management techniques based on the optimization of demand, energy and network availability and so on. The main objective of this paper is to provide a contemporary look at the current state of the art in smart grid communications as well as critical issues on smart grid technologies primarily in terms of information and communication technology (ICT) issues like security, efficiency to communications layer field. In this paper we propose new model for security in Smart Grid Technology that contains Security Module(SM) along with DEM which will enhance security in Grid. It is expected that this paper will provide a better understanding of the technologies, potential advantages and research challenges of the smart grid and provoke interest among the research community to further explore this promising research area.

  1. NSTAR Smart Grid Pilot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabari, Anil [NSTAR Electric, Manchester, NH (United States); Fadipe, Oloruntomi [NSTAR Electric, Manchester, NH (United States)

    2014-03-31

    NSTAR Electric & Gas Corporation (“the Company”, or “NSTAR”) developed and implemented a Smart Grid pilot program beginning in 2010 to demonstrate the viability of leveraging existing automated meter reading (“AMR”) deployments to provide much of the Smart Grid functionality of advanced metering infrastructure (“AMI”), but without the large capital investment that AMI rollouts typically entail. In particular, a central objective of the Smart Energy Pilot was to enable residential dynamic pricing (time-of-use “TOU” and critical peak rates and rebates) and two-way direct load control (“DLC”) by continually capturing AMR meter data transmissions and communicating through customer-sited broadband connections in conjunction with a standardsbased home area network (“HAN”). The pilot was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (“DOE”) through the Smart Grid Demonstration program. NSTAR was very pleased to not only receive the funding support from DOE, but the guidance and support of the DOE throughout the pilot. NSTAR is also pleased to report to the DOE that it was able to execute and deliver a successful pilot on time and on budget. NSTAR looks for future opportunities to work with the DOE and others in future smart grid projects.

  2. Smart Radiation Therapy Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Boateng, Francis; Kumar, Rajiv; Irvine, Darrell J; Formenti, Silvia; Ngoma, Twalib; Herskind, Carsten; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Hildenbrand, Georg Lars; Hausmann, Michael; Wenz, Frederik; Hesser, Juergen

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a crucial component of cancer care, used in the treatment of over 50% of cancer patients. Patients undergoing image guided RT or brachytherapy routinely have inert RT biomaterials implanted into their tumors. The single function of these RT biomaterials is to ensure geometric accuracy during treatment. Recent studies have proposed that the inert biomaterials could be upgraded to "smart" RT biomaterials, designed to do more than 1 function. Such smart biomaterials include next-generation fiducial markers, brachytherapy spacers, and balloon applicators, designed to respond to stimuli and perform additional desirable functions like controlled delivery of therapy-enhancing payloads directly into the tumor subvolume while minimizing normal tissue toxicities. More broadly, smart RT biomaterials may include functionalized nanoparticles that can be activated to boost RT efficacy. This work reviews the rationale for smart RT biomaterials, the state of the art in this emerging cross-disciplinary research area, challenges and opportunities for further research and development, and a purview of potential clinical applications. Applications covered include using smart RT biomaterials for boosting cancer therapy with minimal side effects, combining RT with immunotherapy or chemotherapy, reducing treatment time or health care costs, and other incipient applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An Analysis of Security and Privacy Issues in Smart Grid Software Architectures on Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmhan, Yogesh; Kumbhare, Alok; Cao, Baohua; Prasanna, Viktor K.

    2011-07-09

    Power utilities globally are increasingly upgrading to Smart Grids that use bi-directional communication with the consumer to enable an information-driven approach to distributed energy management. Clouds offer features well suited for Smart Grid software platforms and applications, such as elastic resources and shared services. However, the security and privacy concerns inherent in an information rich Smart Grid environment are further exacerbated by their deployment on Clouds. Here, we present an analysis of security and privacy issues in a Smart Grids software architecture operating on different Cloud environments, in the form of a taxonomy. We use the Los Angeles Smart Grid Project that is underway in the largest U.S. municipal utility to drive this analysis that will benefit both Cloud practitioners targeting Smart Grid applications, and Cloud researchers investigating security and privacy.

  4. Becoming 'ward smart' medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Beth; Wallace, Deirdre; Mangera, Zaheer; Gill, Deborah

    2017-10-01

    A small number of medical students elect to work as health care assistants (HCAs) during or prior to their undergraduate training. There is a significant body of evidence in the literature regarding the impact of HCA experience on student nurses; however, little research has examined the effects of such experience on medical students. All fourth-year medical students with self-declared experience as HCAs from a single UK medical school were invited to participate in focus groups to explore their experiences and perceptions. Ten students from the year group took part. Participants felt that their experience as HCAs enhanced their learning in the workplace through becoming 'ward smart', helping them to become socialised into the world of health care, providing early meaningful and humanised patient interaction, and increasing their understanding of multidisciplinary team (MDT) members' roles. Little research has examined the effects of [HCA] experience on medical students DISCUSSION: Becoming 'ward smart' and developing a sense of belonging are central to maximising learning in, from and through work on the ward. Experience as a HCA provides a range of learning and social opportunities for medical students, and legitimises their participation within clinical communities. HCA experience also seems to benefit in the 'hard to reach' dimensions of medical training: empathy; humanisation of patient care; professional socialisation; and providing a sense of belonging within health care environments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  5. Poster Abstract: A Practical Model for Human-Smart Appliances Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürst, Jonathan; Fruergaard, Andreas; Johannesen, Marco Høvinghof

    2016-01-01

    for human-smart appliance interaction. We present a prototype implementation with an off-the-shelf smart lighting and heating system in a shared office space. Our approach minimizes the need for location metadata. It relies on a human-feedback loop (both sensor based and manual) to identify the optimal......Buildings are increasingly equipped with smart appliances that allow a fine grained adaption to personal comfort requirements. Such comfort adaption should be based on a human-feedback loop and not on a centralized comfort model. We argue that this feedback-loop should be achieved through local...... interaction with smart appliances. Two issues stand out: (1) How to impose logical locality when interacting with a smart appliance? (2) How to mediate conflicts between several persons in a room, or between building-wide policies and user preferences? We approach both problems by defining a general model...

  6. How to be smart and energy efficient: a general discussion on thermochromic windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Linshuang; Ye, Hong

    2014-09-19

    A window is a unique element in a building because of its simultaneous properties of being "opaque" to inclement weather yet transparent to the observer. However, these unique features make the window an element that can reduce the energy efficiency of buildings. A thermochromic window is a type of smart window whose solar radiation properties vary with temperature. It is thought that the solar radiation gain of a room can be intelligently regulated through the use of thermochromic windows, resulting in lower energy consumption than with standard windows. Materials scientists have made many efforts to improve the performance of thermochromic materials. Despite these efforts, fundamental problems continue to confront us. How should a "smart" window behave? Is a "smart" window really the best candidate for energy-efficient applications? What is the relationship between smartness and energy performance? To answer these questions, a general discussion of smartness and energy performance is provided.

  7. Our Urban Living Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortshøj, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Our Urban Living Room is an exhibition and a book, created by Cobe. The theme is based on Cobe’s ten years of practice, grounded in social livability and urban democracy, and our aim to create buildings and spaces that invite Copenhageners to use and define them; as an extended living room, where...... the boundaries between private and public space become fluid. Based on specific Cobe projects, Our Urban Living Room tells stories about the architectural development of Copenhagen, while exploring the progression of the Danish Capital - from an industrial city into an urban living room, known as one...

  8. Health Physics counting room

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1970-01-01

    The Health Physics counting room, where the quantity of induced radioactivity in materials is determined. This information is used to evaluate possible radiation hazards from the material investigated.

  9. Smart metering design and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Weranga, K S K; Chandima, D P

    2013-01-01

    Taking into account the present day trends and the requirements, this Brief focuses on smart metering of electricity for next generation energy efficiency and conservation. The contents include discussions on the smart metering concepts and existing technologies and systems as well as design and implementation of smart metering schemes together with detailed examples.

  10. The Science of Smart Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boohan, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Over the last few decades, smart materials have become increasingly important in the design of products. Essentially, a smart material is one that has been designed to respond to a stimulus, such as a change in temperature or magnetic field, in a particular and useful way. This article looks at a range of smart materials that are relatively…

  11. Smart TV and data protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Breda, B.; van Eijk, N.; Irion, K.; McGonagle, T.; van Voorst, S.

    2016-01-01

    What is smart TV? How does smart TV compare with other forms of audiovisual media? What regulatory frameworks govern smart TV? What guidance can be found in selected country-specific case studies? What are the dangers associated with the collection, storage and processing of private user information

  12. Speaker comfort and increase of voice level in lecture rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas; Gade, Anders Christian; Bellester, G P

    2008-01-01

    Teachers often suffer health problems or tension related to their voice. These problems may be related to there working environment, including room acoustics of the lecture rooms which forces them to stress their voices. The present paper describes a first effort in finding relationships between...... the objectively measurable parameters of the rooms and the objective voice power produced by speakers. In rooms with different sizes, reverberation time and other physical attributes, the sound power levels produced by six speakers where measured while giving a short lecture. Relevant room acoustic parameters...... that these changes were mainly related to the size of the room and to the gain or support produced by the room. To describe this quality, a new room acoustic quantity called 'room gain' is proposed....

  13. Realisering af Smart City/Smart House i Nordjylland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Peter; Saghaug, Kristin Margrethe

    2008-01-01

    beskriver tankerne, visionerne og perspektiverne i forhold til at realisere Smart House-konceptet i Region Nordjylland. Smart House-tankerne er baseret på at bygge smarte huse og smarte byggekomponenter til fremtidens brugere, hvor den nyeste teknologi indenfor byggematerialer kombineres med nye værdier....... Formålet med Smart House Nordjylland er at flytte byggeindustriens og forskernes fokus fra en indbyrdes konkurrence lokalt til et udviklende innovationssamarbejde, som sigter mod det globale marked. På denne måde kan regionen skabe et udstillingsvindue indenfor fremtidens byggeri gennem en interaktion...

  14. SMART POWER TURBINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nirm V. Nirmalan

    2003-11-01

    Gas turbines are the choice technology for high-performance power generation and are employed in both simple and combined cycle configurations around the world. The Smart Power Turbine (SPT) program has developed new technologies that are needed to further extend the performance and economic attractiveness of gas turbines for power generation. Today's power generation gas turbines control firing temperatures indirectly, by measuring the exhaust gas temperature and then mathematically calculating the peak combustor temperatures. But temperatures in the turbine hot gas path vary a great deal, making it difficult to control firing temperatures precisely enough to achieve optimal performance. Similarly, there is no current way to assess deterioration of turbine hot-gas-path components without shutting down the turbine. Consequently, maintenance and component replacements are often scheduled according to conservative design practices based on historical fleet-averaged data. Since fuel heating values vary with the prevalent natural gas fuel, the inability to measure heating value directly, with sufficient accuracy and timeliness, can lead to maintenance and operational decisions that are less than optimal. GE Global Research Center, under this Smart Power Turbine program, has developed a suite of novel sensors that would measure combustor flame temperature, online fuel lower heating value (LHV), and hot-gas-path component life directly. The feasibility of using the ratio of the integrated intensities of portions of the OH emission band to determine the specific average temperature of a premixed methane or natural-gas-fueled combustion flame was demonstrated. The temperature determined is the temperature of the plasma included in the field of view of the sensor. Two sensor types were investigated: the first used a low-resolution fiber optic spectrometer; the second was a SiC dual photodiode chip. Both methods worked. Sensitivity to flame temperature changes was

  15. Perancangan Sistem Kendali Otomatis pada Smart Home menggunakan Modul Arduino Uno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Kurnianto

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency, effectiveness and electrical energy saving have become topics of research that attracts many researchers today. Model of technology has been widely proposed to improve effectiveness and energy saving for the livelihood of the peoples. One of example is a model of a Smart Home technology. Smart Home models proposed in this research is controlled centrally by an Arduino Uno microcontroller. Microcontroller detect output from the two magnetic sensors installed in the entrance. Microcontroller response to the two outputs of magnetic sensors in the form of control of room lighting. fan, mosquito repellent and LCD. The system will work automatically when someone inside the house. Room lights will turn on automatically, the fan will work in accordance with the room temperature conditions and mosquito repellent device will work automatically. The test results show that the proposed model of a Smart Home can work well according design with a success rate of 100%.

  16. Urban sprawl, smart growth, and deliberative democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, David B

    2010-10-01

    Urban sprawl is an increasingly common feature of the built environment in the United States and other industrialized nations. Although there is considerable evidence that urban sprawl has adverse affects on public health and the environment, policy frameworks designed to combat sprawl-such as smart growth-have proven to be controversial, making implementation difficult. Smart growth has generated considerable controversy because stakeholders affected by urban planning policies have conflicting interests and divergent moral and political viewpoints. In some of these situations, deliberative democracy-an approach to resolving controversial public-policy questions that emphasizes open, deliberative debate among the affected parties as an alternative to voting-would be a fair and effective way to resolve urban-planning issues.

  17. Becoming a Smart Student

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundqvist, Ulla

    for students, teachers and educational scholars, because they create social inequities in schools.This studye xplores how smart student roles evolve over the course of fourth -, fifth -, and sixth form classes in a Danish primary school. Theoretically, the study draws from the frameworks of “social...... student in their classrooms and schools, and how the enactment and contestation of the smart student role may either encourage or constrain possibilities for student participation.This study points out that educational scholarship can gain a better understanding of children’s educational socialization...... identification” and “participation framework”. Methodologically, the study is based on three years of linguistic ethnographic fieldwork in a public primary school in Copenhagen and with students and their families. This study documents -in broad ethnographic scope and interactional detail -how smart student...

  18. Smart SDHW systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the project is to develop smart solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems. A smart SDHW is a system in which the domestic water can bee heated both by solar collectors and by an auxiliary energy supply system. The auxiliary energy supply system heats up the hot-water tank from the top...... and the water volume heated by the auxiliary energy supply system is fitted to the hot water consumption and consumption pattern. In periods with a large hot-water demand the volume is large, in periods with a small hot-water demand the volume is small. Different system designs have been tested over longer...... periods in a laboratory. Numeric models of the systems have been developed. The models are verified with measured temperatures and energy quantities. In order to verify the good test results in the laboratory two of the smart SDHW systems have been installed in practice. Measurements will bee carried out...

  19. Demand side management scheme in smart grid with cloud computing approach using stochastic dynamic programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sofana Reka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a cloud computing framework in smart grid environment by creating small integrated energy hub supporting real time computing for handling huge storage of data. A stochastic programming approach model is developed with cloud computing scheme for effective demand side management (DSM in smart grid. Simulation results are obtained using GUI interface and Gurobi optimizer in Matlab in order to reduce the electricity demand by creating energy networks in a smart hub approach.

  20. HomeRules: A Tangible End-User Programming Interface for Smart Homes

    OpenAIRE

    De Russis, Luigi; Corno, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    A considerable amount of research has been carried out towards enabling average users to customize their smart homes through trigger-action ("if... then...") programming. However, inhabitants of such smart environments keep having problems understanding, administering, troubleshooting, and deriving benefits from the technologies employed in their homes. By synthesizing a broad body of research on end-user programming in smart homes with observations of commercial products and our own experien...

  1. Smart Cities and a Stochastic Frontier Analysis: A Comparison among European Cities

    OpenAIRE

    Mundula, Luigi; Auci, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    The level of interest in smart cities is growing, and the recent literature on this topic (Holland, 2008; Caragliu et al., 2009, Nijkamp et al., 2011 and Lombardi et al., 2012) identifies a number of factors that characterise a city as smart, such as economic development, environment, human capital, culture and leisure, and e-governance. Thus, the smartness concept is strictly linked to urban efficiency in a multifaceted way. A seminal research for European policy conducted by Giffinger et al...

  2. Smart materials: development of new sensory experiences through stimuli responsive materials

    OpenAIRE

    Esther, Lefebvre; Piselli, Agnese; Faucheu, Jenny; Delafosse, David; Del Curto, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Smart materials are materials that change properties according to stimuli, adapting to their environment. This makes them particularly interesting, to increase the performance of a product, and to enable new functionalities and new ways to interact with users. Some smart materials can affect the perception we have of objects. Existing smart materials have an action mostly on the visual and the tactile aspects. The most popular variations are based on colour changing ma...

  3. ALMANAC: Internet of things for smart cities

    OpenAIRE

    Bonino, Dario; Delgado Alizo, Maria Teresa; Alapetite, Alexandre; Gilbert, Thomas; Axling, Mathias; Udsen, Helene; Carvajal Soto, José Ángel; Spirito, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Smart cities advocate future environments where sensor pervasiveness, data delivery and exchange, and information mash-up enable better support of every aspect of (social) life in human settlements. As this vision matures, evolves and is shaped against several application scenarios, and adoption perspectives, a common need for scalable, pervasive, flexible and replicable infrastructures emerges. Such a need is currently fostering new design efforts to grant performance, reuse and interoperabi...

  4. SMART product innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer-Petersen, Claus L.; Ahmed-Kristensen, Saeema; Li, Xuemeng

    2016-01-01

    Among the inspirations for the SMART process is “design to customer value,” where products are modified based on a thorough understanding of customers that allows product developers to eliminate features that do not affect customer satisfaction while including only the elements and functionality...... that customers really appreciate. The SMART process includes methods to understand product value for the customer and the user; analyse the cost of components and processes; combine customer value and cost reduction potentials into feasible, high-value concepts; and generate prototypes that can be tested...

  5. Using acoustic information to perceive room size: effects of blindness, room reverberation time, and stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarik, Andrew J; Pardhan, Shahina; Cirstea, Silvia; Moore, Brian C J

    2013-01-01

    Blind participants greatly rely on sound for spatial information regarding the surrounding environment. It is not yet established whether lack of vision to calibrate audition in far space affects blind participants' internal spatial representation of acoustic room size. Furthermore, blind participants may rely more on farthest distance estimates to sound sources compared with sighted participants when perceiving room size. Here we show that judgments of apparent room size and sound distance are correlated, more so for blind than for sighted participants. Sighted participants judged a reverberant virtual room to be larger for speech than for music or noise stimuli, whereas blind participants did not. The results suggest that blindness affects the use of room reverberation for distance and room-size judgments.

  6. Customer-Driven Smart and Sustainable Interactions in Conventions: The Case of Nestlé’s Smart Button Adoption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arum Park

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Services based on Internet of Things (IoT technologies have emerged in various business environments. To enhance service quality at conventions and maximize the experience of attendees, this study developed a customer-driven smart and sustainable service, applying a smart button as an IoT technology. An application of the IoT technology-based smart button was adopted by comparing advantages and disadvantages of technologies. We also identified the need for customer-driven smart and sustainable service by analyzing cases. Then, we designed, constructed and evaluated the service with the action research framework, which includes phases such as diagnosis, action planning, action taking, evaluation, and specify learning. In the first phase, various challenges and problems of the smart convention were diagnosed through interviews with organizers. In the action planning phase, service models were designed to solve the problems. In the action taking phase, which IoT technology would be the most appropriate was discussed and it was applied to the convention space. In the evaluation phase, we derived the role of IoT technology for smart conventions and summarized the results of the smart convention service. Finally, we presented implications for a business.

  7. Virtual Seminar Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren Otto; Fosgerau, Anders; Hansen, Peter Søren Kirk

    1999-01-01

    The initial design considerations and research goals for an ATM network based virtual seminar room with 5 sites are presented.......The initial design considerations and research goals for an ATM network based virtual seminar room with 5 sites are presented....

  8. Operating room manager game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans, Elias W.; Nieberg, T.

    2007-01-01

    The operating room (OR) department of a hospital forms the heart of the organization, where the single largest cost is incurred. This document presents and reports on the “Operating Room Manager Game,” developed to give insight into managing a large hospital's OR department at various levels of

  9. Designing Smart Knowledge Building Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambar Murillo Montes de Oca

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge building communities (KBCs are environments where learning is continually occurring as a social process, and the collective knowledge base is gradually being expanded upon. Knowledge accessible to all members is produced in collaborative discourse, along with the development and the use of conceptual artifacts. This theoretical contribution discusses the possibilities to foster and design KBCs in a “smart” manner so that they can be connected to formal learning. Firstly, the paper identifies the characteristics of “smartness” for the context of KBCs: participants (individuals and groups, collaboration and convergence, as well as technology that may provide enabling and monitoring tools. Secondly, tools are suggested to foster and monitor the development and the use of collaborative discourse and conceptual artifacts. Thirdly, recommendations for the design of smart KBCs are provided. Finally, a research agenda is proposed based on the previous discussions.

  10. Cloud Computing and Smart Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina POPEANGĂ

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing concern about energy consumption is leading to infrastructure that supports real-time, two-way communication between utilities and consumers, and allows software systems at both ends to control and manage power use. To manage communications to millions of endpoints in a secure, scalable and highly-available environment and to achieve these twin goals of ‘energy conservation’ and ‘demand response’, utilities must extend the same communication network management processes and tools used in the data center to the field.This paper proposes that cloud computing technology, because of its low cost, flexible and redundant architecture and fast response time, has the functionality needed to provide the security, interoperability and performance required for large-scale smart grid applications.

  11. Power Admission Control with Predictive Thermal Management in Smart Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Jianguo; Costanzo, Giuseppe Tommaso; Zhu, Guchuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a control scheme for thermal management in smart buildings based on predictive power admission control. This approach combines model predictive control with budget-schedulability analysis in order to reduce peak power consumption as well as ensure thermal comfort. First...... appliances. The performance of the proposed control scheme is assessed by simulation based on the thermal dynamics of a real eight-room office building located at Danish Technical University....

  12. 2nd September 2010 - Japanese Senior Vice-Minister of the Environment I. Tajima signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the ATLAS control room with physicists T. Kondo and H. Fukuda, Members of the ATLAS Collaboration and KEK.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    2nd September 2010 - Japanese Senior Vice-Minister of the Environment I. Tajima signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the ATLAS control room with physicists T. Kondo and H. Fukuda, Members of the ATLAS Collaboration and KEK.

  13. Smart Circuit Breaker Communication Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian Mihai MACHIDON

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of the Internet of Things has fostered the development of smart technologies in fields such as power transmission and distribution systems (as is the Smart Grid and also in regard to home automation (the Smart Home concept. This paper addresses the network communication infrastructure for a Smart Circuit Breaker system, a novel application at the edge of the two afore-mentioned systems (Smart Grid and Smart Home. Such a communication interface has high requirements from functionality, performance and security point of views, given the large amount of distributed connected elements and the real-time information transmission and system management. The paper describes the design and implementation of the data server, Web interface and the embedded networking capabilities of the smart circuit breakers, underlining the protocols and communication technologies used.

  14. Implementing a High-Assurance Smart-Card OS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karger, Paul A.; Toll, David C.; Palmer, Elaine R.; McIntosh, Suzanne K.; Weber, Samuel; Edwards, Jonathan W.

    Building a high-assurance, secure operating system for memory constrained systems, such as smart cards, introduces many challenges. The increasing power of smart cards has made their use feasible in applications such as electronic passports, military and public sector identification cards, and cell-phone based financial and entertainment applications. Such applications require a secure environment, which can only be provided with sufficient hardware and a secure operating system. We argue that smart cards pose additional security challenges when compared to traditional computer platforms. We discuss our design for a secure smart card operating system, named Caernarvon, and show that it addresses these challenges, which include secure application download, protection of cryptographic functions from malicious applications, resolution of covert channels, and assurance of both security and data integrity in the face of arbitrary power losses.

  15. Smart grid as a service: a discussion on design issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Hung-Lin; Tsai, Chen-Chou; Hsiung, Pao-Ann; Chou, I-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Smart grid allows the integration of distributed renewable energy resources into the conventional electricity distribution power grid such that the goals of reduction in power cost and in environment pollution can be met through an intelligent and efficient matching between power generators and power loads. Currently, this rapidly developing infrastructure is not as "smart" as it should be because of the lack of a flexible, scalable, and adaptive structure. As a solution, this work proposes smart grid as a service (SGaaS), which not only allows a smart grid to be composed out of basic services, but also allows power users to choose between different services based on their own requirements. The two important issues of service-level agreements and composition of services are also addressed in this work. Finally, we give the details of how SGaaS can be implemented using a FIPA-compliant JADE multiagent system.

  16. A smart grid simulation testbed using Matlab/Simulink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallapuram, Sriharsha; Moulema, Paul; Yu, Wei

    2014-06-01

    The smart grid is the integration of computing and communication technologies into a power grid with a goal of enabling real time control, and a reliable, secure, and efficient energy system [1]. With the increased interest of the research community and stakeholders towards the smart grid, a number of solutions and algorithms have been developed and proposed to address issues related to smart grid operations and functions. Those technologies and solutions need to be tested and validated before implementation using software simulators. In this paper, we developed a general smart grid simulation model in the MATLAB/Simulink environment, which integrates renewable energy resources, energy storage technology, load monitoring and control capability. To demonstrate and validate the effectiveness of our simulation model, we created simulation scenarios and performed simulations using a real-world data set provided by the Pecan Street Research Institute.

  17. Smart Manufacturing for the Oil Refining and Petrochemical Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong Yuan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Smart manufacturing will transform the oil refining and petrochemical sector into a connected, information-driven environment. Using real-time and high-value support systems, smart manufacturing enables a coordinated and performance-oriented manufacturing enterprise that responds quickly to customer demands and minimizes energy and material usage, while radically improving sustainability, productivity, innovation, and economic competitiveness. In this paper, several examples of the application of so-called “smart manufacturing” for the petrochemical sector are demonstrated, such as the fault detection of a catalytic cracking unit driven by big data, advanced optimization for the planning and scheduling of oil refinery sites, and more. Key scientific factors and challenges for the further smart manufacturing of chemical and petrochemical processes are identified.

  18. Smart Structures and Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    vehicles in crashes. A smart configuration would be that in which normal loads are taken care of in normal conditions, and suitable actuation systems are activated to tackle abnormal loads. Even for normal loads, corrosion ... electrical energy to stiffen or strengthen itself while alerting the user that the ladder is overloaded.

  19. Decentral Smart Grid Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Benjamin; Matthiae, Moritz; Timme, Marc; Witthaut, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Stable operation of complex flow and transportation networks requires balanced supply and demand. For the operation of electric power grids—due to their increasing fraction of renewable energy sources—a pressing challenge is to fit the fluctuations in decentralized supply to the distributed and temporally varying demands. To achieve this goal, common smart grid concepts suggest to collect consumer demand data, centrally evaluate them given current supply and send price information back to customers for them to decide about usage. Besides restrictions regarding cyber security, privacy protection and large required investments, it remains unclear how such central smart grid options guarantee overall stability. Here we propose a Decentral Smart Grid Control, where the price is directly linked to the local grid frequency at each customer. The grid frequency provides all necessary information about the current power balance such that it is sufficient to match supply and demand without the need for a centralized IT infrastructure. We analyze the performance and the dynamical stability of the power grid with such a control system. Our results suggest that the proposed Decentral Smart Grid Control is feasible independent of effective measurement delays, if frequencies are averaged over sufficiently large time intervals.

  20. Creating a Smart Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domermuth, David

    2005-01-01

    This article provides a description of an affordable, smart classroom built for the Technology Department at Appalachian State university. The system consists of three basic components: a home theater combo, a tablet PC, and a digital projector, costing a total of $7,300, or $8,800 if a podium, screen, and projector mount are purchased. The…

  1. Smart(er) Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This is an answer and an elaboration to Carsten Sørensens’ “The Curse of the Smart Machine?”. My answer disagrees with the postulate of a mainframe focus within the IS field. Instead I suggest that it is a struggle between old and new science. The answer then agrees with the notion that we need n...

  2. Unlocking the smart grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokach, Joshua Z.

    2010-10-15

    The country has progressed in a relatively short time from rotary dial phones to computers, cell phones, and iPads. With proper planning and orderly policy implementation, the same will happen with the Smart Grid. Here are some suggestions on how to proceed. (author)

  3. EU Smart City Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Gargiulo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years European Commission has developed a set of documents for Members States tracing, directly or indirectly, recommendations for the transformation of the European city. The paper wants to outline which future EU draws for the city, through an integrated and contextual reading of addresses and strategies contained in the last documents, a future often suggested as Smart City. Although the three main documents (Cohesion Policy 2014-2020 of European Community, Digital Agenda for Europe and European Urban Agenda face the issue of the future development of European cities from different points of view, which are respectively cohesion social, ICT and urban dimension, each of them pays particular attention to urban and territorial dimension, identified by the name of Smart City. In other words, the paper aims at drawing the scenario of evolution of Smart Cities that can be delineated through the contextual reading of the three documents. To this end, the paper is divided into three parts: the first part briefly describes the general contents of the three European economic plan tools; the second part illustrates the scenarios for the future of the European city contained in each document; the third part seeks to trace the evolution of the Smart Cities issue developed by the set of the three instruments, in order to provide the framework of European Community for the near future of our cities. 

  4. Smart Efficient Lightweight Facade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martjanova, I.; Miraliyari, M.; Kakolyri, T.

    2014-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0533 Innovation & Sustainability. The purpose of the manual is to describe and demonstrate innovative materials for an efficient, lightweight and smartly working facade. We explain their current state and their technological progress so the

  5. Smart Sustainable Cities

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    documents, e.g. policy areas, represented countries, etc.;. 3. Qualitative Analysis to analyze the policy documents based upon 13 Smart City attributes derived from the project's terms of reference and further study, the same as for the research literature review: 1). Innovations, 2) Technologies, 3) Drivers, 4) Challenges, ...

  6. Designing smart markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Bichler (Martin); A. Gupta (Alok); W. Ketter (Wolfgang)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractElectronic markets have been a core topic of information systems (IS) research for last three decades. We focus on a more recent phenomenon: smart markets. This phenomenon is starting to draw considerable interdisciplinary attention from the researchers in computer science, operations

  7. Den Smarte Metalfabrik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilberg, Arne; Grube Hansen, David

    Projektet ”Den Smarte Fabrik” (SMAF) er blevet gennemført fra 2013 til 2016 med støtte af Industriens Fond. Det overordnede formål med projektet er at skabe innovation, ny forretning og styrket vækst gennem samarbejde mellem små og mellemstore virksomheder (SMV’er), og gennem en fleksibel og...

  8. Modelling Chinese Smart Grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuksel, Ender; Nielson, Hanne Riis; Nielson, Flemming

    In this document, we consider a specific Chinese Smart Grid implementation and try to address the verification problem for certain quantitative properties including performance and battery consumption. We employ stochastic model checking approach and present our modelling and analysis study using...

  9. Towards Smart City Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias; Stan, Catalin; Wøldike, Niels Peter

    2015-01-01

    , the concept of smart city learning is exploited to situate learning about geometric shapes in concrete buildings and thus make them more accessible for younger children. In close collaboration with a local school a game for 3rd graders was developed and tested on a field trip and in class. A mixed measures...

  10. ABC's of Being Smart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Determining what giftedness is all about means focusing on many aspects of the individual. In this paper, the author focuses on letter D of the ABC's of being smart. She starts with specifics about giftedness (details), and then moves on to some ways of thinking (dispositions).

  11. The computer disappears, the environment becomes smart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van h. (Henk)

    2011-01-01

    Contribution to exhibition Qua Art - Qua Science. The artist Joost Verhagen represents spaces in an original way by using colours, texture and forms. He invokes thoughts and feelings with his works of art. The concept of ambient intelligence also deals with space, but especially with spaces that are

  12. Encyclopedia of Smart Materials, 2 Volume Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Mel

    2002-03-01

    Smart materials--materials and structures that can impart information about their environment to an observer or monitoring device--are revolutionizing fields as diverse as engineering, optics, and medical technology. Advances in smart materials are impacting disciplines across the scientific and technological landscape. Now, practictioners and researchers have an authoritative source to go to for answers about this emerging new area. Encyclopedia of Smart Materials provides A-to-Z coverage of the entire field of intelligent materials. Discussions of theory, fabrication, processing, applications, and uses of these unique materials are presented here in a collection of concise entries from the world's foremost experts in the field--including scientists, educators and engineers. This encyclopedia is as broad in scope as the technology itself, addressing daily, commercial applications as well as sophisticated units designed to operate in space, underwater, underground, and within the human body. Extensively cross-referenced and generously supplemented with bibliographies and indexes, this book's treatment also broaches the specialized properties and coatings that are required for the use of materials in extreme conditions. Illustrated with photographs, tables, line drawings, and equations, Encyclopedia of Smart Materials is the premier reference for material scientists, chemists, chemical engineers, process engineers, consultants, patent attorneys and students in these areas. An essential resource on the shelves of laboratories, government facilities, and academic libraries. Editor-in-Chief, Mel Schwartz has over forty years of experience with metals, ceramics, and composites, with special expertise in brazing. The holder of five patents, he has authored thirteen books and more than one hundred technical papers and articles. Reach the information you need rapidly and easily with the ONLINE edition of the Encyclopedia of Smart Materials. The online edition delivers all

  13. The Virtual Dressing Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Michael Boelstoft; Gao, Yi; Petersson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design and evaluation of a usability and user experience test of a virtual dressing room. First, we motivate and introduce our recent developed prototype of a virtual dressing room. Next, we present the research and test design grounded in related usability and user...... experience studies. We give a description of the experimental setup and the execution of the designed usability and user experience test. To this end, we report interesting results and discuss the results with respect to user-centered design and development of a virtual dressing room....

  14. RILIS laser room HD

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Footage of the RILIS laser room at ISOLDE. The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is a chemically selective ion source which relies on resonant excitation of atomic transitions using tunable laser radiation. This video shows you the laser table with the different lenses and optics as well as an overview of the RILIS laser setup. It also shows laser light with different colors and operation by the RILIS laser experts. The last part of the video shows you the laser path from the RILIS laser room into the ISOLDE GPS separator room where it enters the GPS separator magnet.

  15. RILIS laser room

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Footage of the RILIS laser room at ISOLDE. The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is a chemically selective ion source which relies on resonant excitation of atomic transitions using tunable laser radiation. This video shows you the laser table with the different lenses and optics as well as an overview of the RILIS laser setup. It also shows laser light with different colors and operation by the RILIS laser experts. The last part of the video shows you the laser path from the RILIS laser room into the ISOLDE GPS separator room where it enters the GPS separator magnet.

  16. Room for caring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Connie; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Birkelund, Regner

    2015-01-01

    rooms such as a view of nature or natural light entering the room are often neglected in caring for these patients. Method A phenomenological-hermeneutic study design was applied and data was collected through multiple qualitative interviews combined with observations at a teaching hospital in Denmark......) Experiencing inner peace and an escape from negative thoughts, (ii) Experiencing a positive mood and hope and (iii) Experiencing good memories. Conclusion Our findings highlight aesthetic sensory impressions in the form of nature sights and natural light in the patient room as a powerful source of well...

  17. Definition of an Ontology Matching Algorithm for Context Integration in Smart Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-Cerdeira, Lorena; Rodríguez-Martínez, Francisco J; Gómez-Rodríguez, Alma

    2014-12-08

    In this paper we describe a novel proposal in the field of smart cities: using an ontology matching algorithm to guarantee the automatic information exchange between the agents and the smart city. A smart city is composed by different types of agents that behave as producers and/or consumers of the information in the smart city. In our proposal, the data from the context is obtained by sensor and device agents while users interact with the smart city by means of user or system agents. The knowledge of each agent, as well as the smart city's knowledge, is semantically represented using different ontologies. To have an open city, that is fully accessible to any agent and therefore to provide enhanced services to the users, there is the need to ensure a seamless communication between agents and the city, regardless of their inner knowledge representations, i.e., ontologies. To meet this goal we use ontology matching techniques, specifically we have defined a new ontology matching algorithm called OntoPhil to be deployed within a smart city, which has never been done before. OntoPhil was tested on the benchmarks provided by the well known evaluation initiative, Ontology Alignment Evaluation Initiative, and also compared to other matching algorithms, although these algorithms were not specifically designed for smart cities. Additionally, specific tests involving a smart city's ontology and different types of agents were conducted to validate the usefulness of OntoPhil in the smart city environment.

  18. Definition of an Ontology Matching Algorithm for Context Integration in Smart Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Otero-Cerdeira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a novel proposal in the field of smart cities: using an ontology matching algorithm to guarantee the automatic information exchange between the agents and the smart city. A smart city is composed by different types of agents that behave as producers and/or consumers of the information in the smart city. In our proposal, the data from the context is obtained by sensor and device agents while users interact with the smart city by means of user or system agents. The knowledge of each agent, as well as the smart city’s knowledge, is semantically represented using different ontologies. To have an open city, that is fully accessible to any agent and therefore to provide enhanced services to the users, there is the need to ensure a seamless communication between agents and the city, regardless of their inner knowledge representations, i.e., ontologies. To meet this goal we use ontology matching techniques, specifically we have defined a new ontology matching algorithm called OntoPhil to be deployed within a smart city, which has never been done before. OntoPhil was tested on the benchmarks provided by the well known evaluation initiative, Ontology Alignment Evaluation Initiative, and also compared to other matching algorithms, although these algorithms were not specifically designed for smart cities. Additionally, specific tests involving a smart city’s ontology and different types of agents were conducted to validate the usefulness of OntoPhil in the smart city environment.

  19. Predicting Acoustics in Class Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Lynge; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    Typical class rooms have fairly simple geometries, even so room acoustics in this type of room is difficult to predict using today's room acoustic computer modeling software. The reasons why acoustics of class rooms are harder to predict than acoustics of complicated concert halls might...

  20. From climate-smart agriculture to climate-smart landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    Scherr Sara J; Shames Seth; Friedman Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background For agricultural systems to achieve climate-smart objectives, including improved food security and rural livelihoods as well as climate change adaptation and mitigation, they often need to be take a landscape approach; they must become ‘climate-smart landscapes’. Climate-smart landscapes operate on the principles of integrated landscape management, while explicitly incorporating adaptation and mitigation into their management objectives. Results An assessment of climate ch...

  1. Analysis and design of energy monitoring platform for smart city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-xia

    2016-09-01

    The development and utilization of energy has greatly promoted the development and progress of human society. It is the basic material foundation for human survival. City running is bound to consume energy inevitably, but it also brings a lot of waste discharge. In order to speed up the process of smart city, improve the efficiency of energy saving and emission reduction work, maintain the green and livable environment, a comprehensive management platform of energy monitoring for government departments is constructed based on cloud computing technology and 3-tier architecture in this paper. It is assumed that the system will provide scientific guidance for the environment management and decision making in smart city.

  2. Smart Operations in Distributed Energy Resources System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Li; Jie, Shu; Zhang-XianYong; Qing, Zhou

    Smart grid capabilities are being proposed to help solve the challenges concerning system operations due to that the trade-offs between energy and environmental needs will be constantly negotiated while a reliable supply of electricity needs even greater assurance in case of that threats of disruption have risen. This paper mainly explores models for distributed energy resources system (DG, storage, and load),and also reviews the evolving nature of electricity markets to deal with this complexity and a change of emphasis on signals from these markets to affect power system control. Smart grid capabilities will also impact reliable operations, while cyber security issues must be solved as a culture change that influences all system design, implementation, and maintenance. Lastly, the paper explores significant questions for further research and the need for a simulation environment that supports such investigation and informs deployments to mitigate operational issues as they arise.

  3. Smart Cities and the Ageing Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skouby, Knud Erik; Kivimäki, Anri; Haukiputo, Lotta

    Due to a growing number of elderly people, it is a necessity to create the cities that are aware of the special needs of all their citizens including the needs of aging populations. This paper shows that by combining smart homes with smart cities, we are able to provide an ICT infrastructure...... a better sustainable and cost efficient environment. Modern ICT communication infrastructure fuels sustainable economic development and a high quality of life together with a wise management of natural resources. So, it is necessary to create the cities that are aware of the specific needs of aging...... future trend is the sensor-based surveillance technologies and that the elderly citizen will gain benefits of avatar-based 3D visualization system, exploiting wearable sensors and human activity simulations resulted both positive and negative impressions of the concept utilizing activity recognition...

  4. The smart - development and technology; Der smart - Entwicklung und Technik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goppelt, G.

    1999-06-01

    The smart is the first representative of a radically new vehicle concept, with minimum space requirements and trend-setting in terms of ecology, safety, and individualism. The new design is not rooted in any tradition. The contribution describes the development process and constructional features of the smart. [Deutsch] Der smart ist der erste Vertreter eines voellig neuen Fahrzeugkonzepts. Bei kleinstem Raumbedarf soll er neue Massstaebe bei Oekologie, Sicherheit und Individualitaet setzen. Entstanden ist eine konsequente Neukonstruktion, die sich von bisherigen Traditionen loest. In diesem Beitrag sind der Entwicklungsprozess sowie die Konstruktionsmerkmale des smart beschrieben. (orig.)

  5. Smart City and Smart Tourism: A Case of Dubai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sajid Khan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, the advent of new technology has brought about the emergence of smart cities aiming to provide their stakeholders with technology-based solutions that are effective and efficient. Insofar as the objective of smart cities is to improve outcomes that are connected to people, systems and processes of businesses, government and other public- and private-sector entities, its main goal is to improve the quality of life of all residents. Accordingly, smart tourism has emerged over the past few years as a subset of the smart city concept, aiming to provide tourists with solutions that address specific travel related needs. Dubai is an emerging tourism destination that has implemented smart city and smart tourism platforms to engage various stakeholders. The objective of this study is to identify best practices related to Dubai’s smart city and smart tourism. In so doing, Dubai’s mission and vision along with key dimensions and pillars are identified in relation to the advancements in the literature while highlighting key resources and challenges. A Smart Tourism Dynamic Responsive System (STDRS framework is proposed while suggesting how Dubai may able to enhance users’ involvement and their overall experience.

  6. Operating Room Telephone Microbial Flora

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Jason; Shinn, Antoinette M; Bivens, Ava

    2005-01-01

    ...) could be found on telephones in the Operating Room (OR). A total of 26 cultures were taken from telephones within 14 operating rooms and two sub-sterile rooms at a large, teaching, medical center...

  7. Operating Environment of the Future

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanson, Matthew

    1997-01-01

    ...), the Smart Surgical System (SSS), and the Intelligent Virtual Patient Environment (IVPE). The project is one of several targeting reduction in mortality and morbidity of the wounded soldier through improved far-forward combat casualty care...

  8. Smart Energi i Hjemmet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Michael

    Med denne rapport foreligger en evaluering af det såkaldte SEIH-projekt: Smart Energi i Hjemmet. Projektet er gennemført i samarbejde med 191 husejere i Middelfart Kommune med formål at afsøge mulighederne for at opnå energibesparelser i enfamiliehuse ved at bruge automatik til at sænke temperatu......Med denne rapport foreligger en evaluering af det såkaldte SEIH-projekt: Smart Energi i Hjemmet. Projektet er gennemført i samarbejde med 191 husejere i Middelfart Kommune med formål at afsøge mulighederne for at opnå energibesparelser i enfamiliehuse ved at bruge automatik til at sænke...

  9. Engineering the smart factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Robert; Vera, Daniel; Ahmad, Bilal

    2016-10-01

    The fourth industrial revolution promises to create what has been called the smart factory. The vision is that within such modular structured smart factories, cyber-physical systems monitor physical processes, create a virtual copy of the physical world and make decentralised decisions. This paper provides a view of this initiative from an automation systems perspective. In this context it considers how future automation systems might be effectively configured and supported through their lifecycles and how integration, application modelling, visualisation and reuse of such systems might be best achieved. The paper briefly describes limitations in current engineering methods, and new emerging approaches including the cyber physical systems (CPS) engineering tools being developed by the automation systems group (ASG) at Warwick Manufacturing Group, University of Warwick, UK.

  10. Smart Energy Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, David; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Lund, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    The European Union has some of the most ambitious targets to decarbonise its energy system in the coming decades. To do so, it is likely that many countries will depend on intermittent renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power. There is still a lot of uncertainty in relation...... in excess of 80% are possible in the electricity sector. Hence, this approach is one potential solution that will enable the European energy system to significantly reduce its carbon emissions. In this study, the Smart Energy System approach is applied to Europe, which achieves two key objectives: firstly...... to the integration of these resources, since the current energy system is not designed to handle intermittency on the supply side. The Smart Energy System concept is one approach which can accommodate very large penetrations of these intermittent resources, with some analysis demonstrating how penetration levels...

  11. Smart parking barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Abdulrazaq M.

    2016-05-06

    Various methods and systems are provided for smart parking barriers. In one example, among others, a smart parking barrier system includes a movable parking barrier located at one end of a parking space, a barrier drive configured to control positioning of the movable parking barrier, and a parking controller configured to initiate movement of the parking barrier, via the barrier drive. The movable parking barrier can be positioned between a first position that restricts access to the parking space and a second position that allows access to the parking space. The parking controller can initiate movement of the movable parking barrier in response to a positive identification of an individual allowed to use the parking space. The parking controller can identify the individual through, e.g., a RFID tag, a mobile device (e.g., a remote control, smartphone, tablet, etc.), an access card, biometric information, or other appropriate identifier.

  12. Smart Grid Architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dondossola, Giovanna; Terruggia, Roberta; Bessler, Sandford

    2014-01-01

    grids requiring the development of new Information and Communication Technology (ICT) solutions with various degrees of adaptation of the monitoring, communication and control technologies. The costs of ICT based solutions need however to be taken into account, hence it is desirable to work...... with existing communication networks. The objective of the European FP7 project SmartC2Net in this regard is to enable robust smart grid control utilizing heterogeneous third party communication infrastructures.......The scope of this paper is to address the evolution of distribution grid architectures following the widespread introduction of renewable energy sources. The increasing connection of distributed resources has a strong impact on the topology and the control functionality of the current distribution...

  13. Communication technologies in smart grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladinović Nikola

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of communication technologies in Smart Grid lies in integration of large number of devices into one telecommunication system. This paper provides an overview of the technologies currently in use in electric power grid, that are not necessarily in compliance with the Smart Grid concept. Considering that the Smart Grid is open to the flow of information in all directions, it is necessary to provide reliability, protection and security of information.

  14. Smart Cities Will Need Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandru WOINAROSCHY

    2016-01-01

    A smart city is a sustainable and efficient urban centre that provides a high quality of life to its inhabitants through optimal management of its resources. Chemical industry has a key role to play in the sustainable evolution of the smart cities. Additionally, chemistry is at the heart of all modern industries, including electronics, information technology, biotechnology and nano-technology. Chemistry can make the smart cities project more sustainable, more energy efficient and more cos...

  15. Communication technologies in smart grid

    OpenAIRE

    Miladinović Nikola; Polužanski Vladimir; Milosavljević Srđan

    2013-01-01

    The role of communication technologies in Smart Grid lies in integration of large number of devices into one telecommunication system. This paper provides an overview of the technologies currently in use in electric power grid, that are not necessarily in compliance with the Smart Grid concept. Considering that the Smart Grid is open to the flow of information in all directions, it is necessary to provide reliability, protection and security of information.

  16. Advanced smart tungsten alloys for a future fusion power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litnovsky, A.; Wegener, T.; Klein, F.; Linsmeier, Ch; Rasinski, M.; Kreter, A.; Tan, X.; Schmitz, J.; Mao, Y.; Coenen, J. W.; Bram, M.; Gonzalez-Julian, J.

    2017-06-01

    The severe particle, radiation and neutron environment in a future fusion power plant requires the development of advanced plasma-facing materials. At the same time, the highest level of safety needs to be ensured. The so-called loss-of-coolant accident combined with air ingress in the vacuum vessel represents a severe safety challenge. In the absence of a coolant the temperature of the tungsten first wall may reach 1200 °C. At such a temperature, the neutron-activated radioactive tungsten forms volatile oxide which can be mobilized into atmosphere. Smart tungsten alloys are being developed to address this safety issue. Smart alloys should combine an acceptable plasma performance with the suppressed oxidation during an accident. New thin film tungsten-chromium-yttrium smart alloys feature an impressive 105 fold suppression of oxidation compared to that of pure tungsten at temperatures of up to 1000 °C. Oxidation behavior at temperatures up to 1200 °C, and reactivity of alloys in humid atmosphere along with a manufacturing of reactor-relevant bulk samples, impose an additional challenge in smart alloy development. First exposures of smart alloys in steady-state deuterium plasma were made. Smart tungsten-chroimium-titanium alloys demonstrated a sputtering resistance which is similar to that of pure tungsten. Expected preferential sputtering of alloying elements by plasma ions was confirmed experimentally. The subsequent isothermal oxidation of exposed samples did not reveal any influence of plasma exposure on the passivation of alloys.

  17. Proxy Smart Card Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Cattaneo, Giuseppe; Faruolo, Pompeo; Palazzo, Vincenzo; Visconti, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    International audience; The established legal value of digital signatures and the growing availability of identity-based digital services are progressively extending the use of smart cards to all citizens, opening new challenging scenarios. Among them, motivated by concrete applications, secure and practical delegation of digital signatures is becoming more and more critical. Unfortunately, secure delegation systems proposed so far (e.g., proxy signatures) include various drawbacks for any pr...

  18. Smart Data Web Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin STRIMBEI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the new world where the Internet business resembles with a large and distributed sea of links, using Cloud architectural model, the web-service interoperability and SOA model one could deploy an arguably new class/generation of apps/services that could leverage the marriage of these originally distinct computing models to be real smart, as autonomous, dynamic and agile, but open to integrate and adapt.

  19. Smart materials and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, Robert S.; Heyman, Joseph S.

    1993-01-01

    Embedded optical fibers allow not only the cure-monitoring and in-service lifetime measurements of composite materials, but the NDE of material damage and degradation with aging. The capabilities of such damage-detection systems have been extended to allow the quantitative determination of 2D strain in materials by several different methods, including the interferometric and the numerical. It remains to be seen, what effect the embedded fibers have on the strength of the 'smart' materials created through their incorporation.

  20. Sensors in Smart Phone

    OpenAIRE

    Pei, Chunmei; Guo, Huiling; Yang, Xiuqing; Wang, Yangqiu; Zhang, Xiaojing; Ye, Hairong

    2010-01-01

    International audience; The technological innovation in electronics makes nowadays mobile phone more than a simple communication tool: it becomes a portable electronic device with integrated functions, such as listening to music, watching movies, taking photos, etc. To achieve these, many kinds of advanced sensor are used. In this paper, several applications of sensor in smart phone are introduced including Image Sensor, Fingerprint Identification Sensor, Photo-electric Sensor, Acceleration S...