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Sample records for smaller viral rebounds

  1. Plasma HIV Viral Rebound following Protocol-Indicated Cessation of ART Commenced in Primary and Chronic HIV Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamlyn, Elizabeth; Ewings, Fiona M; Porter, Kholoud

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The magnitude of HIV viral rebound following ART cessation has consequences for clinical outcome and onward transmission. We compared plasma viral load (pVL) rebound after stopping ART initiated in primary (PHI) and chronic HIV infection (CHI). DESIGN: Two populations with protocol...

  2. Effect of HIV Antibody VRC01 on Viral Rebound after Treatment Interruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Katharine J; Sneller, Michael C; Harrison, Linda J; Justement, J Shawn; Overton, Edgar T; Petrone, Mary E; Salantes, D Brenda; Seamon, Catherine A; Scheinfeld, Benjamin; Kwan, Richard W; Learn, Gerald H; Proschan, Michael A; Kreider, Edward F; Blazkova, Jana; Bardsley, Mark; Refsland, Eric W; Messer, Michael; Clarridge, Katherine E; Tustin, Nancy B; Madden, Patrick J; Oden, KaSaundra; O'Dell, Sijy J; Jarocki, Bernadette; Shiakolas, Andrea R; Tressler, Randall L; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Bailer, Robert T; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Capparelli, Edmund V; Lynch, Rebecca M; Graham, Barney S; Moir, Susan; Koup, Richard A; Mascola, John R; Hoxie, James A; Fauci, Anthony S; Tebas, Pablo; Chun, Tae-Wook

    2016-11-24

    The discovery of potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has made passive immunization a potential strategy for the prevention and treatment of HIV infection. We sought to determine whether passive administration of VRC01, a bNAb targeting the HIV CD4-binding site, can safely prevent or delay plasma viral rebound after the discontinuation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). We conducted two open-label trials (AIDS Clinical Trials Group [ACTG] A5340 and National Institutes of Health [NIH] 15-I-0140) of the safety, side-effect profile, pharmacokinetic properties, and antiviral activity of VRC01 in persons with HIV infection who were undergoing interruption of ART. A total of 24 participants were enrolled, and one serious alcohol-related adverse event occurred. Viral rebound occurred despite plasma VRC01 concentrations greater than 50 μg per milliliter. The median time to rebound was 4 weeks in the A5340 trial and 5.6 weeks in the NIH trial. Study participants were more likely than historical controls to have viral suppression at week 4 (38% vs. 13%, P=0.04 by a two-sided Fisher's exact test in the A5340 trial; and 80% vs. 13%, P<0.001 by a two-sided Fisher's exact test in the NIH trial) but the difference was not significant at week 8. Analyses of virus populations before ART as well as before and after ART interruption showed that VRC01 exerted pressure on rebounding virus, resulting in restriction of recrudescent viruses and selection for preexisting and emerging antibody neutralization-resistant virus. VRC01 slightly delayed plasma viral rebound in the trial participants, as compared with historical controls, but it did not maintain viral suppression by week 8. In the small number of participants enrolled in these trials, no safety concerns were identified with passive immunization with a single bNAb (VRC01). (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and others; ACTG A5340 and NIH 15-I

  3. HIV-1 antibody 3BNC117 suppresses viral rebound in humans during treatment interruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheid, Johannes F.; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Bar-On, Yotam; Kreider, Edward F.; Lu, Ching-Lan; Lorenzi, Julio C. C.; Feldmann, Anna; Braunschweig, Malte; Nogueira, Lilian; Oliveira, Thiago; Shimeliovich, Irina; Patel, Roshni; Burke, Leah; Cohen, Yehuda Z.; Hadrigan, Sonya; Settler, Allison; Witmer-Pack, Maggi; West, Anthony P.; Juelg, Boris; Keler, Tibor; Hawthorne, Thomas; Zingman, Barry; Gulick, Roy M.; Pfeifer, Nico; Learn, Gerald H.; Seaman, Michael S.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Klein, Florian; Schlesinger, Sarah J.; Walker, Bruce D.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Caskey, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Interruption of combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected individuals leads to rapid viral rebound. Here we report the results of a phase IIa open label clinical trial evaluating 3BNC117, a broad and potent neutralizing antibody (bNAb) against the CD4 binding site of HIV-1 Env1, in the setting of analytical treatment interruption in 13 HIV-1-infected individuals. Participants with 3BNC117-sensitive virus outgrowth cultures were enrolled. Two or four 30 mg kg−1 infusions of 3BNC117, separated by 3 or 2 weeks, respectively, are generally well tolerated. Infusions are associated with a delay in viral rebound for 5–9 weeks after two infusions, and up to 19 weeks after four infusions, or an average of 6.7 and 9.9 weeks respectively, compared with 2.6 weeks for historical controls (P < 0.00001). Rebound viruses arise predominantly from a single provirus. In most individuals, emerging viruses show increased resistance, indicating escape. However, 30% of participants remained suppressed until antibody concentrations waned below 20 μg ml−1, and the viruses emerging in all but one of these individuals showed no apparent resistance to 3BCN117, suggesting failure to escape over a period of 9–19 weeks. We conclude that administration of 3BNC117 exerts strong selective pressure on HIV-1 emerging from latent reservoirs during analytical treatment interruption in humans. PMID:27338952

  4. Plasma HIV viral rebound following protocol-indicated cessation of ART commenced in primary and chronic HIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Hamlyn

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The magnitude of HIV viral rebound following ART cessation has consequences for clinical outcome and onward transmission. We compared plasma viral load (pVL rebound after stopping ART initiated in primary (PHI and chronic HIV infection (CHI. DESIGN: Two populations with protocol-indicated ART cessation from SPARTAC (PHI, n = 182 and SMART (CHI, n = 1450 trials. METHODS: Time for pVL to reach pre-ART levels after stopping ART was assessed in PHI using survival analysis. Differences in pVL between PHI and CHI populations 4 weeks after stopping ART were examined using linear and logistic regression. Differences in pVL slopes up to 48 weeks were examined using linear mixed models and viral burden was estimated through a time-averaged area-under-pVL curve. CHI participants were categorised by nadir CD4 at ART stop. RESULTS: Of 171 PHI participants, 71 (41.5% rebounded to pre-ART pVL levels, at a median of 50 (95% CI 48-51 weeks after stopping ART. Four weeks after stopping treatment, although the proportion with pVL ≥ 400 copies/ml was similar (78% PHI versus 79% CHI, levels were 0.45 (95% CI 0.26-0.64 log(10 copies/ml lower for PHI versus CHI, and remained lower up to 48 weeks. Lower CD4 nadir in CHI was associated with higher pVL after ART stop. Rebound for CHI participants with CD4 nadir >500 cells/mm(3 was comparable to that experienced by PHI participants. CONCLUSIONS: Stopping ART initiated in PHI and CHI was associated with viral rebound to levels conferring increased transmission risk, although the level of rebound was significantly lower and sustained in PHI compared to CHI.

  5. Impact of CD4 and CD8 dynamics and viral rebounds on loss of virological control in HIV controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chereau, Fanny; Madec, Yoann; Sabin, Caroline; Obel, Niels; Ruiz-Mateos, Ezequiel; Chrysos, Georgios; Fidler, Sarah; Lehmann, Clara; Zangerle, Robert; Wittkop, Linda; Reiss, Peter; Hamouda, Osamah; Estrada Perez, Vicente; Leal, Manuel; Mocroft, Amanda; Garcia De Olalla, Patricia; Ammassari, Adriana; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Mussini, Cristina; Segura, Ferran; Castagna, Antonella; Cavassini, Matthias; Grabar, Sophie; Morlat, Philippe; De Wit, Stéphane; Lambotte, Olivier; Meyer, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    HIV controllers (HICs) spontaneously maintain HIV viral replication at low level without antiretroviral therapy (ART), a small number of whom will eventually lose this ability to control HIV viremia. The objective was to identify factors associated with loss of virological control. HICs were identified in COHERE on the basis of ≥5 consecutive viral loads (VL) ≤500 copies/mL over ≥1 year whilst ART-naive, with the last VL ≤500 copies/mL measured ≥5 years after HIV diagnosis. Loss of virological control was defined as 2 consecutive VL >2000 copies/mL. Duration of HIV control was described using cumulative incidence method, considering loss of virological control, ART initiation and death during virological control as competing outcomes. Factors associated with loss of virological control were identified using Cox models. CD4 and CD8 dynamics were described using mixed-effect linear models. We identified 1067 HICs; 86 lost virological control, 293 initiated ART, and 13 died during virological control. Six years after confirmation of HIC status, the probability of losing virological control, initiating ART and dying were 13%, 37%, and 2%. Current lower CD4/CD8 ratio and a history of transient viral rebounds were associated with an increased risk of losing virological control. CD4 declined and CD8 increased before loss of virological control, and before viral rebounds. Expansion of CD8 and decline of CD4 during HIV control may result from repeated low-level viremia. Our findings suggest that in addition to superinfection, other mechanisms, such as low grade viral replication, can lead to loss of virological control in HICs.

  6. Predictors of viral suppression and rebound among HIV-positive men who have sex with men in a large multi-site Canadian cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Zachary; Lachowsky, Nathan; Ding, Erin; Samji, Hasina; Hull, Mark; Cescon, Angela; Patterson, Sophie; Chia, Jason; Leslie, Alia; Raboud, Janet; Loutfy, Mona; Cooper, Curtis; Klein, Marina; Machouf, Nima; Tsoukas, Christos; Montaner, Julio; Hogg, Robert S

    2016-10-21

    Gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately affected by HIV in Canada. Combination antiretroviral therapy has been shown to dramatically decrease progression to AIDS, premature death and HIV transmission. However, there are no comprehensive data regarding combination antiretroviral therapy outcomes among this population. We sought to identify socio-demographic and clinical correlates of viral suppression and rebound. Our analysis included MSM participants in the Canadian Observational Cohort, a multi-site cohort of HIV-positive adults from Canada's three most populous provinces, aged ≥18 years who first initiated combination antiretroviral therapy between 2000 and 2011. We used accelerated failure time models to identify factors predicting time to suppression (2 measures 200 copies/mL ≥30 days apart). Of 2,858 participants, 2,448 (86 %) achieved viral suppression in a median time of 5 months (Q1-Q3: 3-7 months). Viral suppression was significantly associated with later calendar year of antiretroviral therapy initiation, no history of injection drug use, lower baseline viral load, being on an initial regimen consisting of non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors, and older age. Among those who suppressed, 295 (12 %) experienced viral rebound. This was associated with earlier calendar year of antiretroviral therapy initiation, injection drug use history, younger age, higher baseline CD4 cell count, and living in British Columbia. Further strategies are required to optimize combination antiretroviral therapy outcomes in men who have sex with men in Canada, specifically targeting younger MSM and those with a history of injection drug use.

  7. Predictors of viral suppression and rebound among HIV-positive men who have sex with men in a large multi-site Canadian cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Tanner

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM are disproportionately affected by HIV in Canada. Combination antiretroviral therapy has been shown to dramatically decrease progression to AIDS, premature death and HIV transmission. However, there are no comprehensive data regarding combination antiretroviral therapy outcomes among this population. We sought to identify socio-demographic and clinical correlates of viral suppression and rebound. Methods Our analysis included MSM participants in the Canadian Observational Cohort, a multi-site cohort of HIV-positive adults from Canada’s three most populous provinces, aged ≥18 years who first initiated combination antiretroviral therapy between 2000 and 2011. We used accelerated failure time models to identify factors predicting time to suppression (2 measures 200 copies/mL ≥30 days apart. Results Of 2,858 participants, 2,448 (86 % achieved viral suppression in a median time of 5 months (Q1–Q3: 3–7 months. Viral suppression was significantly associated with later calendar year of antiretroviral therapy initiation, no history of injection drug use, lower baseline viral load, being on an initial regimen consisting of non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors, and older age. Among those who suppressed, 295 (12 % experienced viral rebound. This was associated with earlier calendar year of antiretroviral therapy initiation, injection drug use history, younger age, higher baseline CD4 cell count, and living in British Columbia. Conclusions Further strategies are required to optimize combination antiretroviral therapy outcomes in men who have sex with men in Canada, specifically targeting younger MSM and those with a history of injection drug use.

  8. Therapeutic DNA vaccine induces broad T cell responses in the gut and sustained protection from viral rebound and AIDS in SIV-infected rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Heydenburg Fuller

    Full Text Available Immunotherapies that induce durable immune control of chronic HIV infection may eliminate the need for life-long dependence on drugs. We investigated a DNA vaccine formulated with a novel genetic adjuvant that stimulates immune responses in the blood and gut for the ability to improve therapy in rhesus macaques chronically infected with SIV. Using the SIV-macaque model for AIDS, we show that epidermal co-delivery of plasmids expressing SIV Gag, RT, Nef and Env, and the mucosal adjuvant, heat-labile E. coli enterotoxin (LT, during antiretroviral therapy (ART induced a substantial 2-4-log fold reduction in mean virus burden in both the gut and blood when compared to unvaccinated controls and provided durable protection from viral rebound and disease progression after the drug was discontinued. This effect was associated with significant increases in IFN-γ T cell responses in both the blood and gut and SIV-specific CD8+ T cells with dual TNF-α and cytolytic effector functions in the blood. Importantly, a broader specificity in the T cell response seen in the gut, but not the blood, significantly correlated with a reduction in virus production in mucosal tissues and a lower virus burden in plasma. We conclude that immunizing with vaccines that induce immune responses in mucosal gut tissue could reduce residual viral reservoirs during drug therapy and improve long-term treatment of HIV infection in humans.

  9. Impact of CD4 and CD8 dynamics and viral rebounds on loss of virological control in HIV controllers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chereau, Fanny; Madec, Yoann; Sabin, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: HIV controllers (HICs) spontaneously maintain HIV viral replication at low level without antiretroviral therapy (ART), a small number of whom will eventually lose this ability to control HIV viremia. The objective was to identify factors associated with loss of virological control. MET...

  10. Adiposity rebound is misclassified by BMI rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachta-Danielzik, S; Bosy-Westphal, A; Kehden, B; Gehrke, M I; Kromeyer-Hauschild, K; Grillenberger, M; Willhöft, C; Heymsfield, S B; Müller, M J

    2013-09-01

    Adiposity rebound (AR) is defined as the nadir or the inflexion point of body mass index (BMI) percentiles between the age of 3 and 7 years. An early rebound is seen as a risk of obesity and, thus, AR is considered as a suitable time period for prevention. As BMI does not reflect body composition, we aimed to examine the rebounds of fat mass index (FMI) and fat-free mass index (FFMI) together with BMI. Cross-sectional data of 19 264 children aged 3-11 years were pooled from three German studies (Kiel Obesity Prevention Study, the project 'Better diet. More exercise. KINDERLEICHT-REGIONS' and regular examinations of Jena children). Height and weight were measured. Fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) were obtained from bioelectrical impedance analysis and analysed using a population-specific algorithm. Percentiles of BMI, FMI and FFMI were constructed by the LMS method. Both BMI and FMI percentiles showed a rebound, whereas FFMI percentiles steadily increased with age. On P90, FMI rebound was about 1.6-1.8 years later compared with that of BMI, that is, at ages 4.2 years (BMI) and 5.8 years (FMI) in boys and at 4.2 years (BMI) and 6.0 years (FMI) in girls. At AR, the slope of the BMI-P90 was explained by increases in FFMI rather than FMI. By contrast, at FMI rebound, the slope of BMI was strongly related to FMI. BMI rebound does not equal the rebound of FM. At AR, the slope in BMI is determined by the increase in FFMI. AR should be defined as FMI rebound rather than BMI rebound.

  11. Reducing rebound effect through fossil subsidies reform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Jingzheng; Yang, Yingkui; Li, Hong

    2017-01-01

    by rebound effect. Energy subsidy as an economic regulation policy would significantly affect rebound effect. To explore how China's fossil subsidies reform would affect rebound effect, this study conducts a comprehensive evaluation based on a multi-sector computable general equilibrium (CGE) model. Rebound...... for electricity than for primary energies. Secondly, by removing fossil energy subsides, the rebound effect would be effectively mitigated, and removing all subsides would reduce the rebound effect most, however, it would bring significant negative impacts on the macro economy. Thirdly, an integrated policy...... with removal of fossil energy subsidies and increment of clean energy subsidies would be more effective, greatly reducing rebound effect and also bring benefits for both economy and environment. Our findings would be critical for China’s low-carbon policy making in the future....

  12. Is the adiposity rebound a rebound in adiposity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Michele Wen-Chien; Williams, Joanne; Carlin, John B; Wake, Melissa

    2011-06-01

    Early adiposity rebound ([AR], when body mass index [BMI] rises after reaching a nadir) strongly predicts later obesity. We investigated whether the upswing in BMI at AR is accompanied by an increase in body fat. Community-based cohort study. A total of 299 first-born children (49% male). Measurements. Six-monthly anthropometry and bioelectrical impedance, 4-6.5 years; lean and fat mass index (kg/m(2)) for direct comparison with BMI. Supplementary (0-2 years) weight and length measures (needed for growth curve modelling) were drawn from subjects' child health records. AR was estimated from individually modelled BMI curves from birth to 6.5 years. Two main analyses were performed: 1) cross-sectional comparisons of BMI, fat mass index (FMI), lean mass index (LMI) and percent body fat in children with early (5 years) rebound; and 2) investigation of linear trends in BMI, FMI, LMI and percent body fat before and after AR. Results. The 81 children (27%) experiencing early AR had higher BMI, FMI, LMI and percent fat at 6.5 years. Overall, FMI decreased steeply pre-AR, at -0.56 (0.02) kg/m(2) per year (mean [Standard Error]), then flattened post-AR to 0.07 (0.05) kg/m(2) per year. In contrast, LMI increased pre-AR (0.34 [0.01]) and steepened post-AR (0.47 [0.03] kg/m(2) per year). The 'adiposity rebound' is characterised by increasing lean mass index, coupled with cessation of the decline in fat mass index. Understanding what controls the dynamics of childhood body composition and mechanisms that delay AR could help prevent obesity.

  13. Early growth, menarche, and adiposity rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sheila; Dickson, Nigel

    2002-02-16

    Adiposity rebound is thought to arise earlier in children with a high body-mass index (BMI) at age 3 years. To test this hypothesis we followed up a birth cohort. Our results indicate that earlier rebound arose in children who were tall at age 3 years, but that timing was not associated with BMI at age 3 years in boys, and arose later in girls with higher BMIs at age 3. Adiposity rebound also arose earlier in children whose parents had high rather than low BMIs. Magnitude of BMI at rebound was associated with height and BMI at age 3, and with parental BMI. There was a correlation between age at rebound and age at menarche, which suggests that timing of rebound is an indicator of physical maturity rather than obesity.

  14. Sharing smaller pies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, T.

    1975-01-01

    Depletion of the earth's natural resources is rapidly forcing society to choose values and life styles that will enable survival and well-being for all. Fundamental changes in institutions can be accomplished by developing the self-discipline to limit population and demands. These new values must be adopted: stewardship for growth; austerity for excessive consumption; permanence for profit; responsibilities for rights; people for professions; quality for quantity; sufficiency for affluence; localization for centralization; equity for urbanization; work for leisure; and jobs for machines. People must develop both the capacity for self-sufficiency and the ability to develop interdependent relationships. By studying successful, but less consuming, countries, the U.S. can develop technologies that are fundamentally better and more responsive to scarcity. Evidence exists that smaller scales of operation are better. To accomplish this change, responsibility must be assumed by individuals, communities, governments, and all professional and industrial groups. (17 references) (DCK)

  15. Worlds Smaller than Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Computerized animations show the following: (1) an artist's conception of a Saturn-like extrasolar planet; (2) star and planet motion; and (3) young stellar disk and planet formation. Footage shows the outside of the Mauna Kea Observatories in Hawaii and Geoff Marcy and Paul Butler inside while they are processing information. Then a press conference,'Worlds Smaller than Saturn', is seen. Anne Kinney, Origins Science Director, NASA Headquarters, introduces Geoff Marcy, Paul Butler, Alan Boss, and Heidi Hammel. They discuss the discovery of the two new Saturn-sized extrasolar planets that are orbiting the stars HD46375 and 79 Seti, giving details on the search technique and size distribution. They then answer questions from the press.

  16. Rotational Rebound Attacks on Reduced Skein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khovratovich, Dmitry; Nikolic, Ivica; Rechberger, Christian

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we combine a recent rotational cryptanalysis with the rebound attack, which results in the best cryptanalysis of Skein, a candidate for the SHA-3 competition. The rebound attack approach was so far only applied to AES-like constructions. For the first time, we show that this approach...

  17. Determinants of Adiposity Rebound Timing in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Edward H; Marshall, Sarah A; Saldana, Santiago; Skelton, Joseph A; Suerken, Cynthia K; Arcury, Thomas A; Quandt, Sara A

    2017-05-01

    Adiposity rebound (AR) or BMI (body mass index) rebound refers to the increase in BMI following the minimum BMI in early childhood. Early AR (before age 5) is predictive of adult obesity. To determine how 4 domains - demographics, maternal BMI, food security, and behavioral characteristics - may affect timing of AR. A total of 248 children, ages 2.5-3.5 years, in Latino farmworker families in North Carolina were examined at baseline and every 3 months for 2 years. BMI was plotted serially for each child and the onset of BMI rebound was determined by visual inspection of the graphs. Given the ages of the children, all rebounds were detected before age 5 years and were deemed "early," whereas other children were classified as "nonrebounders." Classes were then compared in terms of the 4 domains with the use of bivariate analyses and linear mixed models. A total of 131 children demonstrated early rebound, 59 children were nonrebounders, and a further 35 had inconclusive data. Parents of early rebounders were less likely to have documentation permitting legal residence in the US. Mothers of early rebounders were on average 3 BMI units heavier. Sex, household food security, diet quality, caloric intake, and daily activity did not differ between classes. In multivariable analysis, female sex, limited maternal education, increased maternal BMI, and increased caloric intake were significant predictors of early rebound. High maternal BMI was the strongest predictor of early BMI rebound, but increased caloric intake also was significant. Limiting excess calories could delay premature AR and lower the risk of future obesity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Measuring the Rebound Effect with Micro Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Borger, Bruno; Mulalic, Ismir; Rouwendal, Jan

    2015-01-01

    . Specifically, our best estimate of the rebound effect is some 7.5%-10%. Fourth, the fuel price sensitivity of the demand for kilometres appears to be declining with household income, but we do not find a significant impact of income on the rebound effect. Finally, simulation results indicate that the small...... the ‘conventional’ formulation in which only fuel cost per kilometre matters. Second, the selection equation confirms that higher fuel prices induce households to switch car. Third, the results suggest the presence of a rebound effect that is on the lower end of the estimates available in the literature...... rebound effect and changes in car characteristics in response to higher fuel prices imply that -- compared to the reference scenario -- higher fuel prices lead to a substantial reduction in both the demand for kilometres and in demand for fuel....

  19. When suppressing one stereotype leads to rebound of another: on the procedural nature of stereotype rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geeraert, Nicolas

    2013-09-01

    A known consequence of stereotype suppression is post-suppressional rebound (PSR), an ironic activation of the suppressed stereotype. This is typically explained as an unintended by-product from a dual-process model of mental control. Relying on this model, stereotype rebound is believed to be conceptual. Alternative accounts predict PSR to be featural or procedural. According to the latter account, stereotype rebound would not be limited to the suppressed social category, but could occur for a target from any social category. The occurrence of procedural stereotype rebound was examined across five experiments. Suppression of one particular stereotype consistently led to rebound for social targets belonging to the same or a different stereotype in an essay-writing task (Experiments 1-3) and led to facilitation in recognition of stereotype-consistent words (Experiment 4). Finally, stereotype suppression was shown to impact on assessments of stereotype use but not on heuristic thinking (Experiment 5).

  20. Review: Can we comfortably deliver smaller and smaller babies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In medicine, it seems that technology and pharmacology are inspiring each other with the same synergism as computer hardware and software. As example of this, the survival of smaller and smaller babies has steadily been increasing over the past few decades. Very low birth weight (below 1500g) has had to be redefined ...

  1. Rebound from marital conflict and divorce prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottman, J M; Levenson, R W

    1999-01-01

    Marital interaction has primarily been examined in the context of conflict resolution. This study investigated the predictive ability of couples to rebound from marital conflict in a subsequent positive conversation. Results showed that there was a great deal of consistency in affect across both conversations. Also examined was the ability of affective interaction to predict divorce over a 4-year period, separately in each of the two conversations. It was possible to predict divorce using affective variables from each conversation, with 82.6% accuracy from the conflict conversation and with 92.7% accuracy from the positive rebound conversation.

  2. Measuring the rebound effect with micro data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Borger, B.; Mulalic, I.; Rouwendal, J.

    2016-01-01

    We provide estimates of the rebound effect for car transport in Denmark, using a rich data set with individual household data on car use, fuel efficiency, and car as well as household characteristics. A demand model is estimated in first differences; the availability of households in the sample that

  3. Rebound hyperbilirubinaemia in neonates admitted to Mofid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rebound hyperbilirubinaemia may occur after cessation of phototherapy, especially when the Coombs test is positive, in premature infants, and in those treated with phototherapy for ... 6-phosphate dehydrogenase de ciency, a history of neonatal exchange transfusion, and parental refusal. Phototherapy was delivered via a.

  4. Rebound hyperbilirubinaemia in neonates admitted to Mofid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rebound hyperbilirubinaemia may occur after cessation of phototherapy, especially when the Coombs test is positive, in premature infants, and in those treated with ... Exclusion criteria were neonatal infection, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deciency, a history of neonatal exchange transfusion, and parental refusal.

  5. Update on Postdialysis Rebound by a New Technology in Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testal, Alicia García; Marín, David Hervás; Maset, Rafael García; Maicas, Pilar Royo; Salvador, Inmaculada Soledad Rico; Díaz, Pau Olagüe; Najera, Jose Enrique Fernández; De Juan, Eduardo Torregrosa; Carrera, Caterina Benedito

    2017-10-01

    After dialysis ends, urea continued movement causes rebound postdialysis, with values at about 20%. New techniques have been incorporated into hemodialysis, but their relationship with rebound has not yet been studied. This study aimed to quantify urea rebound at 30-min postdialysis during sessions using polysulfone filters and high-flow versus online hemodiafiltration, and to define its correlation with body composition measured by bioimpedance by a cross-sectional study with 69 patients (December 2015 to January 2016). Mean urea rebound was 24.39, which was positively associated with recirculation, Kt/V or hypotension, and showed a negative relationship with online hemodiafiltration. It was not associated with different body composition compartments. To conclude, postdialysis urea rebound remained high with polysulfone dialyzers and low dialysis doses. Online hemodiafiltration could improve postdialysis urea rebound. Different body composition compartments were not related to rebound. © 2017 International Society for Apheresis, Japanese Society for Apheresis, and Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy.

  6. Rotational Rebound Attacks on Reduced Skein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khovratovich, Dmitry; Nikolić, Ivica; Rechberger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    number of rounds. We also use neutral bits and message modification methods from the practice of collision search in MD5 and SHA-1 hash functions. These methods push the rotational property through more rounds than previous analysis suggested, and eventually establish a distinguishing property......In this paper we combine two powerful methods of symmetric cryptanalysis: rotational cryptanalysis and the rebound attack. Rotational cryptanalysis was designed for the analysis of bit-oriented designs like ARX (Addition-Rotation-XOR) schemes. It has been applied to several hash functions and block...... ciphers, including the new standard SHA-3 (Keccak). The rebound attack is a start-from-the-middle approach for finding differential paths and conforming pairs in byte-oriented designs like Substitution-Permutation networks and AES. We apply our new compositional attack to the reduced version of the hash...

  7. Concrete density estimation by rebound hammer method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Mohamad Pauzi bin, E-mail: pauzi@nm.gov.my; Masenwat, Noor Azreen bin; Sani, Suhairy bin; Mohd, Shukri [NDT Group, Nuclear Malaysia, Bangi, Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Jefri, Muhamad Hafizie Bin; Abdullah, Mahadzir Bin [Material Technology Program, Faculty of Applied Sciences, UiTM, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Isa, Nasharuddin bin; Mahmud, Mohamad Haniza bin [Pusat Penyelidikan Mineral, Jabatan Mineral dan Geosains, Ipoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Concrete is the most common and cheap material for radiation shielding. Compressive strength is the main parameter checked for determining concrete quality. However, for shielding purposes density is the parameter that needs to be considered. X- and -gamma radiations are effectively absorbed by a material with high atomic number and high density such as concrete. The high strength normally implies to higher density in concrete but this is not always true. This paper explains and discusses the correlation between rebound hammer testing and density for concrete containing hematite aggregates. A comparison is also made with normal concrete i.e. concrete containing crushed granite.

  8. Smaller plates, less food waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg; Schmidt, Karsten; Skov, Laurits Rhoden

    was to investigate whether the size of the dishware would non-reflectively influence the amount of foods taken from an “ad-libitum” buffet and the resulting amount of waste. Sample consisted of Danish business leaders that took part in a congress in Copenhagen, Denmark. Two buffet tables were set up on two separate......With roughly one-third of food produced for human consumption lost or wasted globally (about 1.3 billion tons per year), the impact on the environment cannot be anymore neglected. Actions at all points in the production chain are now urgent, including reductions in food waste at home, by retailers....... All food waste was collected in designated trash bags (different colour in each floor) and weighted in bulk by students. Smaller plates appear to have decreased food waste by 26% compared to the standard sized plates at a single serving in a self-service eating setting. This pilot study supports...

  9. Chernobyl birds have smaller brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Pape Møller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animals living in areas contaminated by radioactive material from Chernobyl suffer from increased oxidative stress and low levels of antioxidants. Therefore, normal development of the nervous system is jeopardized as reflected by high frequencies of developmental errors, reduced brain size and impaired cognitive abilities in humans. Alternatively, associations between psychological effects and radiation have been attributed to post-traumatic stress in humans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Here we used an extensive sample of 550 birds belonging to 48 species to test the prediction that even in the absence of post-traumatic stress, there is a negative association between relative brain size and level of background radiation. We found a negative association between brain size as reflected by external head volume and level of background radiation, independent of structural body size and body mass. The observed reduction in brain size in relation to background radiation amounted to 5% across the range of almost a factor 5,000 in radiation level. Species differed significantly in reduction in brain size with increasing background radiation, and brain size was the only morphological character that showed a negative relationship with radiation. Brain size was significantly smaller in yearlings than in older individuals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Low dose radiation can have significant effects on normal brain development as reflected by brain size and therefore potentially cognitive ability. The fact that brain size was smaller in yearlings than in older individuals implies that there was significant directional selection on brain size with individuals with larger brains experiencing a viability advantage.

  10. A general equilibrium view of global rebound effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Taoyuan, E-mail: taoyuan.wei@cicero.uio.n [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research - Oslo (CICERO), University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1129 Blindern, 0318 Oslo (Norway)

    2010-05-15

    How do energy efficiency gains affect energy consumption? The effects are generally called 'rebound effects' in the literature. Previous studies have extensively focused on only part of the global economy to study rebound effects, e.g. energy consumption by households, one industry, or one country. However, since the global economy is highly connected among countries, these studies may lead to misleading conclusions if the rebound effects in the rest of the economy are significant. Recently Saunders (2008) analyzes the demand side by taking the global economy as a whole. Wei (2007) also provides a general analysis by using Cobb-Douglas production functions for the global economy. The present article expands Wei (2007) general analysis to explore the rebound effects from an economist's viewpoint by taking the global economy as a whole and applying general forms of production functions. The analysis provides new insights related to rebound effects: we highlight the role of energy supply as a determinant of rebound. We show that the substitution between energy resources and other productive resources is more relevant to long term rebound. We predict that long term rebound may be lower than short term rebound. And we also discover that super-conservation can happen in both the short term and the long term.

  11. A general equilibrium view of global rebound effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Taoyuan [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research - Oslo (CICERO), University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1129 Blindern, 0318 Oslo (Norway)

    2010-05-15

    How do energy efficiency gains affect energy consumption? The effects are generally called 'rebound effects' in the literature. Previous studies have extensively focused on only part of the global economy to study rebound effects, e.g. energy consumption by households, one industry, or one country. However, since the global economy is highly connected among countries, these studies may lead to misleading conclusions if the rebound effects in the rest of the economy are significant. Recently Saunders (2008) analyzes the demand side by taking the global economy as a whole. Wei (2007) also provides a general analysis by using Cobb-Douglas production functions for the global economy. The present article expands Wei (2007) general analysis to explore the rebound effects from an economist's viewpoint by taking the global economy as a whole and applying general forms of production functions. The analysis provides new insights related to rebound effects: we highlight the role of energy supply as a determinant of rebound. We show that the substitution between energy resources and other productive resources is more relevant to long term rebound. We predict that long term rebound may be lower than short term rebound. And we also discover that super-conservation can happen in both the short term and the long term. (author)

  12. Loss of immune homeostasis dictates SHIV rebound after stem-cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christopher W; Benne, Clarisse; Polacino, Patricia; Kaur, Jasbir; McAllister, Cristina E; Filali-Mouhim, Abdelali; Obenza, Willi; Pecor, Tiffany A; Huang, Meei-Li; Baldessari, Audrey; Murnane, Robert D; Woolfrey, Ann E; Jerome, Keith R; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Klatt, Nichole R; DeRosa, Stephen; Sékaly, Rafick P; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2017-02-23

    The conditioning regimen used as part of the Berlin patient's hematopoietic cell transplant likely contributed to his eradication of HIV infection. We studied the impact of conditioning in simian-human immunodeficiency virus-infected (SHIV-infected) macaques suppressed by combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). The conditioning regimen resulted in a dramatic, but incomplete depletion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and CD20(+) B cells, increased T cell activation and exhaustion, and a significant loss of SHIV-specific Abs. The disrupted T cell homeostasis and markers of microbial translocation positively correlated with an increased viral rebound after cART interruption. Quantitative viral outgrowth and Tat/rev-induced limiting dilution assays showed that the size of the latent SHIV reservoir did not correlate with viral rebound. These findings identify perturbations of the immune system as a mechanism for the failure of autologous transplantation to eradicate HIV. Thus, transplantation strategies may be improved by incorporating immune modulators to prevent disrupted homeostasis, and gene therapy to protect transplanted cells.

  13. Earlier BMI rebound and lower pre-rebound BMI as risk of obesity among Japanese preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, N; Isojima, T; Yokoya, S; Tanaka, T; Ono, A; Yokomichi, H; Yamagata, Z; Tanaka, S; Matsubara, H; Ishikuro, M; Kikuya, M; Chida, S; Hosoya, M; Kuriyama, S; Kure, S

    2017-10-03

    Longitudinal growth data of children were analyzed to clarify the relationship between the timing of body mass index (BMI) rebound and obesity risk in later ages. Of 54 558 children born between April 2004 and March 2005 and longitudinally measured in April and October every year in the preschool period, 15 255 children were analyzed wherein no longitudinal measurement is missing after 1 year of age. BMI rebound age was determined as the age with smallest BMI value across longitudinal individual data after 1 year of age. Rebound age was compared between overweight and non-overweight groups. The subjects were divided into groups based on the timing of rebound. The sex- and age-adjusted mean of the BMI, height and weight s.d. scores for age group, along with 6 months weight and height gain, were compared among groups using analysis of covariance. Among those who were overweight at 66-71 months of age, BMI rebound age obtained at approximately 3 years of age was compared with the non-overweight group, whose BMI rebound age was utmost 66 months or later (PBMI age group showed that earlier BMI rebound results in larger BMI (PBMI rebound earlier than 30 months of age, low BMI was observed (PBMI rebound among groups with rebound age earlier than 60 months of age (PBMI rebound timing with pre-rebound low BMI leads to greater childhood obesity risk; hence, early detection and prevention is necessary for such cases.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 24 October 2017; doi:10.1038/ijo.2017.242.

  14. A Comparative Analysis of the Rebound Hammer and Ultrasonic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work presents a study on the comparison between some non-destructive testing tech-niques (Rebound Hammer and Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity). Tests were performed to com-pare the accuracy between the rebound hammer and the ultrasonic pulse velocity methodin estimating the strength of concrete. Eighty samples ...

  15. Evaluating the rebound velocity of squash racquets | Sharp | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with statistical assessment using Statistica version 10. The results of the study indicated that there were differences in rebound velocities of different racquets if controlled for string tension. This research is an attempt to develop assessment methods into rebound characteristics of the lesser known racquet sport, squash.

  16. Measuring the Rebound Resilience of a Bouncing Ball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Ajay

    2012-01-01

    Some balls which are made of high-quality rubber (an elastomeric) material, such as tennis or squash balls, could be used for the determination of an important property of such materials called resilience. Since a bouncing ball involves a single impact we call this property "rebound resilience" and express it as the ratio of the rebound height to…

  17. a comparative analysis of the rebound hammer and ultrasonic pulse

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-03-01

    Mar 1, 2012 ... niques (Rebound Hammer and Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity). Tests were performed to com- pare the accuracy between the rebound hammer and the ultrasonic pulse velocity method in estimating the strength of concrete. Eighty samples (cubes of 150 × 150 × 150) were prepared using two mix designs of 1:2:4 ...

  18. Adiposity rebound in children: a simple indicator for predicting obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland-Cachera, M F; Deheeger, M; Bellisle, F; Sempé, M; Guilloud-Bataille, M; Patois, E

    1984-01-01

    To follow and predict the evolution of adiposity during growth, individual adiposity curves, assessed by the weight/height2 index, were drawn for 151 children from the age of 1 month to 16 yr. Adiposity increases during the 1st yr and then decreases. A renewed rise, termed here the adiposity rebound, occurs at about 6 yr. Individual weight/height2 curves may differ regarding their percentile range level and age at adiposity rebound. The present study shows a relationship between the age at adiposity rebound and final adiposity. An early rebound (before 5.5 yr) is followed by a significantly higher adiposity level than a later rebound (after 7 yr). This phenomenon is observed whatever the subject's adiposity at 1 yr. The present observations might be connected with the cellularity of adipose tissue.

  19. Genetically-barcoded SIV facilitates enumeration of rebound variants and estimation of reactivation rates in nonhuman primates following interruption of suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Fennessey

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available HIV and SIV infection dynamics are commonly investigated by measuring plasma viral loads. However, this total viral load value represents the sum of many individual infection events, which are difficult to independently track using conventional sequencing approaches. To overcome this challenge, we generated a genetically tagged virus stock (SIVmac239M with a 34-base genetic barcode inserted between the vpx and vpr accessory genes of the infectious molecular clone SIVmac239. Next-generation sequencing of the virus stock identified at least 9,336 individual barcodes, or clonotypes, with an average genetic distance of 7 bases between any two barcodes. In vitro infection of rhesus CD4+ T cells and in vivo infection of rhesus macaques revealed levels of viral replication of SIVmac239M comparable to parental SIVmac239. After intravenous inoculation of 2.2x105 infectious units of SIVmac239M, an average of 1,247 barcodes were identified during acute infection in 26 infected rhesus macaques. Of the barcodes identified in the stock, at least 85.6% actively replicated in at least one animal, and on average each barcode was found in 5 monkeys. Four infected animals were treated with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART for 82 days starting on day 6 post-infection (study 1. Plasma viremia was reduced from >106 to <15 vRNA copies/mL by the time treatment was interrupted. Virus rapidly rebounded following treatment interruption and between 87 and 136 distinct clonotypes were detected in plasma at peak rebound viremia. This study confirmed that SIVmac239M viremia could be successfully curtailed with cART, and that upon cART discontinuation, rebounding viral variants could be identified and quantified. An additional 6 animals infected with SIVmac239M were treated with cART beginning on day 4 post-infection for 305, 374, or 482 days (study 2. Upon treatment interruption, between 4 and 8 distinct viral clonotypes were detected in each animal at peak rebound

  20. Genetically-barcoded SIV facilitates enumeration of rebound variants and estimation of reactivation rates in nonhuman primates following interruption of suppressive antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkevych, Mykola; Reynaldi, Arnold; Reid, Carolyn; Newman, Laura; Lipkey, Leslie; Bosche, William J.; Ott, David E.; Estes, Jacob D.; Del Prete, Gregory Q.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Davenport, Miles P.; Keele, Brandon F.

    2017-01-01

    HIV and SIV infection dynamics are commonly investigated by measuring plasma viral loads. However, this total viral load value represents the sum of many individual infection events, which are difficult to independently track using conventional sequencing approaches. To overcome this challenge, we generated a genetically tagged virus stock (SIVmac239M) with a 34-base genetic barcode inserted between the vpx and vpr accessory genes of the infectious molecular clone SIVmac239. Next-generation sequencing of the virus stock identified at least 9,336 individual barcodes, or clonotypes, with an average genetic distance of 7 bases between any two barcodes. In vitro infection of rhesus CD4+ T cells and in vivo infection of rhesus macaques revealed levels of viral replication of SIVmac239M comparable to parental SIVmac239. After intravenous inoculation of 2.2x105 infectious units of SIVmac239M, an average of 1,247 barcodes were identified during acute infection in 26 infected rhesus macaques. Of the barcodes identified in the stock, at least 85.6% actively replicated in at least one animal, and on average each barcode was found in 5 monkeys. Four infected animals were treated with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for 82 days starting on day 6 post-infection (study 1). Plasma viremia was reduced from >106 to <15 vRNA copies/mL by the time treatment was interrupted. Virus rapidly rebounded following treatment interruption and between 87 and 136 distinct clonotypes were detected in plasma at peak rebound viremia. This study confirmed that SIVmac239M viremia could be successfully curtailed with cART, and that upon cART discontinuation, rebounding viral variants could be identified and quantified. An additional 6 animals infected with SIVmac239M were treated with cART beginning on day 4 post-infection for 305, 374, or 482 days (study 2). Upon treatment interruption, between 4 and 8 distinct viral clonotypes were detected in each animal at peak rebound viremia. The

  1. Exchange rate rebounds after foreign exchange market interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshikawa, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    This study examined the rebounds in the exchange rate after foreign exchange intervention. When intervention is strongly effective, the exchange rate rebounds at next day. The effect of intervention is reduced slightly by the rebound after the intervention. The exchange rate might have been 67.12-77.47 yen to a US dollar without yen-selling/dollar-purchasing intervention of 74,691,100 million yen implemented by the Japanese government since 1991, in comparison to the actual exchange rate was 103.19 yen to the US dollar at the end of March 2014.

  2. Early Adiposity Rebound and Premature Adrenarche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marakaki, Chrisanthi; Karapanou, Olga; Gryparis, Alexandros; Hochberg, Ze'ev; Chrousos, George; Papadimitriou, Anastasios

    2017-07-01

    To examine differences in the growth pattern and the age at adiposity rebound (AR) between children with premature adrenarche (PA) and their healthy peers (controls). In this cross-sectional study of 82 prepubertal children with PA and 63 controls, the main outcome measures were height and body mass index SDS progression, from birth to presentation at the clinic, baseline biochemical and hormonal evaluation, bone age determination, and age at AR. Children with PA were significantly taller and more adipose than controls from the first years of life. 33% of children with PA presented the growth pattern of constitutional advancement of growth (ie, early growth acceleration) vs 19% of controls (P = .045). Children with PA had an earlier AR compared with controls; mean age at AR in girls with PA was 3.73 (1.03) years vs 4.93 (1.36) years for control girls (P = .001) and in boys with PA was 3.45 (0.73) vs 5.10 (1.50) years in control boys (P = .048). Both obese and nonobese girls with PA were taller and had earlier age at AR compared with nonobese controls. Early AR and constitutional advancement of growth may be triggering factors for adrenal androgen production and PA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Design phase identification of high pile rebound soils : final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    An engineering problem has occurred when installing displacement piles in certain soils. During driving, piles are rebounding excessively during each hammer blow, causing delay and as a result may not achieve the required design capacities. Piles dri...

  4. Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home A-Z Health Topics Viral hepatitis Viral hepatitis > A-Z Health Topics Viral hepatitis (PDF, 90 ... liver. Source: National Cancer Institute Learn more about hepatitis Watch a video. Learn who is at risk ...

  5. Numerical study of droplet impact and rebound on superhydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xuan; Wu, Yanchen; Woerner, Martin; Frohnapfel, Bettina

    2017-11-01

    Droplet impact and rebound on superhydrophobic surface is an important process in many applications; among them are developing self-cleaning or anti-icing materials and limiting liquid film formation of Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) in exhaust gas pipe. In the latter field, rebound of DEF droplet from wall is desired as an effective mean for avoiding or reducing unwanted solid deposition. Our goal is to numerically study influence of surface wettability on DEF droplet impact and rebound behavior. A phase-field method is chosen, which was implemented in OpenFOAM by us and validated for wetting-related interfacial flow problems. In the present contribution we first numerically reproduce relevant experimental studies in literature, to validate the code for droplet impact and rebound problem. There we study droplet-surface contact time, maximum/instantaneous spreading factor and droplet shape evolution. Our numerical results show good agreement with experimental data. Next we investigate for DEF droplets the effects of diameter, impact velocity and surface wettability on rebound behavior and jumping height. Based on Weber number and equilibrium contact angle, two regimes are identified. We show that surface wettability is a deciding factor for achieving rebound event. This work is supported by Foundation ``Friedrich-und-Elisabeth Boysen Stiftung fuer Forschung und Innovation'' (BOY-127-TP1).

  6. Targeted photocoagulation of peripheral ischemia to treat rebound edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singer MA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Michael A Singer,1 Colin S Tan,2 Krishna R Surapaneni,3 Srinivas R Sadda4 1Medical Center Ophthalmology Associates, San Antonio, TX, USA; 2National Healthcare Group Eye Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore; 3University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA; 4Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA Introduction: Peripheral retinal ischemia not detectable by conventional fluorescein angiography has been proposed to be a driving force for rebound edema in retinal vein occlusions. In this report, we examine the treatment of peripheral retinal ischemia with targeted retinal photocoagulation (TRP to manage a patient’s rebound edema.Methods: To assess the extent of peripheral nonperfusion, an Optos 200Tx device was used. To target the treatment to peripheral ischemia areas, a Navilas Panretinal Laser was used.Results: A 64-year-old male with a central retinal vein occlusion and a visual acuity 20/300, and central macular thickness 318 µm presented with rubeosis. Angiography revealed extensive peripheral nonperfusion. Despite TRP to areas of irreversible ischemia, after 2 months, he continued show rubeosis and rebound edema. Additional TRP laser was repeatedly added more posteriorly to areas of reversible nonperfusion, resulting in eventual resolution of rubeosis and edema.Conclusion: In this study, we demonstrate the use of widefield imaging with targeted photocoagulation of peripheral ischemia to treat rebound edema, while preserving most peripheral vision. In order to treat rebound edema, extensive TRP, across reversible and nonreversible areas of ischemia, had to be performed – not just in areas of nonreversible peripheral ischemia. These areas need to be mapped during episodes of rebound edema, when ischemia is at its maximum. In this way, by doing the most TRP possible, the cycle of rebound edema can be broken. Keywords: macular edema, retinal vein occlusion 

  7. Butyrylcholinesterase gene transfer in obese mice prevents postdieting body weight rebound by suppressing ghrelin signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vicky Ping; Gao, Yang; Geng, Liyi; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate but treatment options remain limited. Despite initial success, weight loss by calorie restriction (CR) often fails because of rebound weight gain. Postdieting hyperphagia along with altered hypothalamic neuro-architecture appears to be one direct cause of this undesirable outcome. In response to calorie deficiency the circulating levels of the appetite-promoting hormone, acyl-ghrelin, rise sharply. We hypothesize that proper modulation of acyl-ghrelin and its receptor’s sensitivity will favorably impact energy intake and reprogram the body weight set point. Here we applied viral gene transfer of the acyl-ghrelin hydrolyzing enzyme, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Our results confirmed that BChE overexpression decreased circulating acyl-ghrelin levels, suppressed CR-provoked ghrelin signaling, and restored central ghrelin sensitivity. In addition to maintaining healthy body weights, BChE treated mice had modest postdieting food intake and showed normal glucose homeostasis. Spontaneous activity and energy expenditure did not differ significantly between treated and untreated mice after body weight rebound, suggesting that BChE gene transfer did not alter energy expenditure in the long term. These findings indicate that combining BChE treatment with CR could be an effective approach in treating human obesity and aiding lifelong weight management. PMID:28973869

  8. Viral encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Tulius T Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available While systemic viral infections are exceptionally common, symptomatic viral infections of the brain parenchyma itself are very rare, but a serious neurologic condition. It is estimated that viral encephalitis occurs at a rate of 1.4 cases per 100.000 inhabitants. Geography is a major determinant of encephalitis caused by vector-borne pathogens. A diagnosis of viral encephalitis could be a challenge to the clinician, since almost 70% of viral encephalitis cases are left without an etiologic agent identified. In this review, the most common viral encephalitis will be discussed, with focus on ecology, diagnosis, and clinical management.

  9. Patterns of growth associated with the timing of adiposity rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sheila M; Goulding, Ailsa

    2009-02-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of age of adiposity rebound (AR) on measures of fat mass between ages 7 and 11 years, maturity, and adiposity in 458 children from a birth cohort studied to age 26 years. Patterns of growth between ages 3 and 26 years and changes in fat mass index between 7 and 11 years in groups with early ( or =7.5 years for boys and > or =7 years for girls) are described. The mean z-scores for BMI, height, and weight increased between age 3 years and adolescence in the early-rebound group and decreased in the late-rebound group. The differences were maintained until adulthood for BMI and weight. Disproportionately high increases in fat mass index during growth (7-11 years), more advanced bone age in boys at age 7 years, and earlier menarche in girls were evident in the early-rebound group. The relative risks at 26 years of being overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m(2)) and obese (BMI > or =30 kg/m(2)) were 2.70 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.55, 4.66) and 5.91 (95% CI: 3.03, 11.55) respectively, using the average group as the reference. The corresponding relative risks for adult waist girths exceeding international cut points were 2.12 (95% CI: 1.09, 4.13) and 3.32 (95% CI: 1.46, 7.54). Thus, early rebound is associated with increased depositions of fat in middle childhood, and risks associated with early rebound persist at least until early adulthood.

  10. Rebound Attack on the Full LANE Compression Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matusiewicz, Krystian; Naya-Plasencia, Maria; Nikolic, Ivica

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we apply the rebound attack to the AES based SHA-3 candidate Lane. The hash function Lane uses a permutation based compression function, consisting of a linear message expansion and 6 parallel lanes. In the rebound attack on Lane, we apply several new techniques to construct a colli...... of freedom in the parallel AES states. This allows us to construct semi-free-start collisions for full Lane-256 with 2^96 compression function evaluations and 2^88 memory, and for full Lane-512 with 2^224 compression function evaluations and 2^128 memory....

  11. Viral marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Bláhová, Adéla

    2012-01-01

    The aim of my thesis is to provide a comprehensive overview of the viral marketing and to analyze selected viral campaigns. There is a description of advantages and disadvantages of this marketing tool. In the end I suggest for which companies viral marketing is an appropriate form of the promotion.

  12. Viral phylodynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik M Volz

    Full Text Available Viral phylodynamics is defined as the study of how epidemiological, immunological, and evolutionary processes act and potentially interact to shape viralphylogenies. Since the coining of the term in 2004, research on viral phylodynamics has focused on transmission dynamics in an effort to shed light on how these dynamics impact viral genetic variation. Transmission dynamics can be considered at the level of cells within an infected host, individual hosts within a population, or entire populations of hosts. Many viruses, especially RNA viruses, rapidly accumulate genetic variation because of short generation times and high mutation rates. Patterns of viral genetic variation are therefore heavily influenced by how quickly transmission occurs and by which entities transmit to one another. Patterns of viral genetic variation will also be affected by selection acting on viral phenotypes. Although viruses can differ with respect to many phenotypes, phylodynamic studies have to date tended to focus on a limited number of viral phenotypes. These include virulence phenotypes, phenotypes associated with viral transmissibility, cell or tissue tropism phenotypes, and antigenic phenotypes that can facilitate escape from host immunity. Due to the impact that transmission dynamics and selection can have on viral genetic variation, viral phylogenies can therefore be used to investigate important epidemiological, immunological, and evolutionary processes, such as epidemic spread[2], spatio-temporal dynamics including metapopulation dynamics[3], zoonotic transmission, tissue tropism[4], and antigenic drift[5]. The quantitative investigation of these processes through the consideration of viral phylogenies is the central aim of viral phylodynamics.

  13. Rebound and jet formation of a fluid-filled sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, Taylor W.; Klaus, Robert A.; Truscott, Tadd T.

    2012-12-01

    This study investigates the impact dynamics of hollow elastic spheres partially filled with fluid. Unlike an empty sphere, the internal fluid mitigates some of the rebound through an impulse driven exchange of energy wherein the fluid forms a jet inside the sphere. Surprisingly, this occurs on the second rebound or when the free surface is initially perturbed. Images gathered through experimentation show that the fluid reacts more quickly to the impact than the sphere, which decouples the two masses (fluid and sphere), imparts energy to the fluid, and removes rebound energy from the sphere. The experimental results are analyzed in terms of acceleration, momentum and an energy method suggesting an optimal fill volume in the neighborhood of 30%. While the characteristics of the fluid (i.e., density, viscosity, etc.) affect the fluid motion (i.e., type and size of jet formation), the rebound characteristics remain similar for a given fluid volume independent of fluid type. Implications of this work are a potential use of similar passive damping systems in sports technology and marine engineering.

  14. The Rebound Attack and Subspace Distinguishers: Application to Whirlpool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberger, Mario; Mendel, Florian; Schläffer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the rebound attack as a variant of differential cryptanalysis on hash functions and apply it to the hash function Whirlpool, standardized by ISO/IEC. We give attacks on reduced variants of the 10-round Whirlpool hash function and compression function. Our results are collisions for 5...

  15. Drop impact and rebound dynamics on an inclined superhydrophobic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeong, Yong Han; Burton, James; Loth, Eric; Bayer, Ilker S

    2014-10-14

    Due to its potential in water-repelling applications, the impact and rebound dynamics of a water drop impinging perpendicular to a horizontal superhydrophobic surface have undergone extensive study. However, drops tend to strike a surface at an angle in applications. In such cases, the physics governing the effects of oblique impact are not well studied or understood. Therefore, the objective of this study was to conduct an experiment to investigate the impact and rebound dynamics of a drop at various liquid viscosities, in an isothermal environment, and on a nanocomposite superhydrophobic surface at normal and oblique impact conditions (tilted at 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60°). This study considered drops falling from various heights to create normal impact Weber numbers ranging from 6 to 110. In addition, drop viscosity was varied by decreasing the temperature for water drops and by utilizing water-glycerol mixtures, which have similar surface tension to water but higher viscosities. Results revealed that oblique and normal drop impact behaved similarly (in terms of maximum drop spread as well as rebound dynamics) at low normal Weber numbers. However, at higher Weber numbers, normal and oblique impact results diverged in terms of maximum spread, which could be related to asymmetry and more complex outcomes. These asymmetry effects became more pronounced as the inclination angle increased, to the point where they dominated the drop impact and rebound characteristics when the surface was inclined at 60°. The drop rebound characteristics on inclined surfaces could be classified into eight different outcomes driven primarily by normal Weber number and drop Ohnesorge numbers. However, it was found that these outcomes were also a function of the receding contact angle, whereby reduced receding angles yielded tail-like structures. Nevertheless, the contact times of the drops with the coating were found to be generally independent of surface inclination.

  16. The Rebound Attack: Cryptanalysis of Reduced Whirlpool and Grøstl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendel, Florian; Rechberger, Christian; Schläffer, Martin

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we propose the rebound attack, a new tool for the cryptanalysis of hash functions. The idea of the rebound attack is to use the available degrees of freedom in a collision attack to efficiently bypass the low probability parts of a differential trail. The rebound attack consists...

  17. Investigation of binary drop rebound and coalescence in liquids using dual-field PIV technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungyong; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2009-08-01

    Experiments on binary drop collisions within an index-matched liquid were conducted for Weber numbers ( We) in the range of 1-50. Drop pairs of water/glycerin mixture were injected horizontally into silicone oil and, due to gravitational effects, travelled on downward trajectories before colliding. A dual-field high-speed PIV measurement system was employed to quantify drop trajectories and overall collision conditions while simultaneously examining detailed velocity fields at the collision interface. Sequences of velocity and vorticity fields were computed for both larger and smaller fields of view. In the We range examined, both rebounding and coalescing behavior occurred. Coalescence was found to result from a combination of vortical flow within drops and strong drop deformation characteristic of higher We. Flow through the centers of opposing ring vortices, strengthened by drop deformation, enhanced drainage of the thin film in the impact region, leading to film rupture and coalescence.

  18. Energy Rebound as a Potential Threat to a Low-Carbon Future: Findings from a New Exergy-Based National-Level Rebound Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E. Brockway

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available 150 years ago, Stanley Jevons introduced the concept of energy rebound: that anticipated energy efficiency savings may be “taken back” by behavioural responses. This is an important issue today because, if energy rebound is significant, this would hamper the effectiveness of energy efficiency policies aimed at reducing energy use and associated carbon emissions. However, empirical studies which estimate national energy rebound are rare and, perhaps as a result, rebound is largely ignored in energy-economy models and associated policy. A significant difficulty lies in the components of energy rebound assessed in empirical studies: most examine direct and indirect rebound in the static economy, excluding potentially significant rebound of the longer term structural response of the national economy. In response, we develop a novel exergy-based approach to estimate national energy rebound for the UK and US (1980–2010 and China (1981–2010. Exergy—as “available energy”—allows a consistent, thermodynamic-based metric for national-level energy efficiency. We find large energy rebound in China, suggesting that improvements in China’s energy efficiency may be associated with increased energy consumption (“backfire”. Conversely, we find much lower (partial energy rebound for the case of the UK and US. These findings support the hypothesis that producer-sided economies (such as China may exhibit large energy rebound, reducing the effectiveness of energy efficiency, unless other policy measures (e.g., carbon taxes are implemented. It also raises the prospect we need to deploy renewable energy sources faster than currently planned, if (due to rebound energy efficiency policies cannot deliver the scale of energy reduction envisaged to meet climate targets.

  19. Rebound intracranial hypertension: a complication of epidural blood patching for intracranial hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, P G; Amrhein, T J; Gray, L

    2014-06-01

    Rebound intracranial hypertension is a complication of epidural blood patching for treatment of intracranial hypotension characterized by increased intracranial pressure, resulting in potentially severe headache, nausea, and vomiting. Because the symptoms of rebound intracranial hypertension may bear some similarity to those of intracranial hypotension and literature reports of rebound intracranial hypertension are limited, it may be mistaken for refractory intracranial hypotension, leading to inappropriate management. This clinical report of 9 patients with confirmed rebound intracranial hypertension reviews the clinical characteristics of patients with this condition, emphasizing factors that can be helpful in discriminating rebound intracranial hypertension from refractory spontaneous intracranial hypotension, and discusses treatment. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  20. Early adiposity rebound: review of papers linking this to subsequent obesity in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachael W; Grant, Andrea M; Goulding, Ailsa; Williams, Sheila M

    2005-11-01

    Improving our understanding of factors driving fat gain in young children should increase our ability to manage the rising problem of obesity. Accordingly, studies associating timing of adiposity rebound with later obesity are reviewed. Investigations in many countries have confirmed that early adiposity rebound increases risk of high blood pressure and obesity in young adults. The magnitude of the effect can be substantial (>3 body mass index units at 18-21 years) for those undergoing early (7 years of age) rebound. Early rebound is also associated with impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes in adulthood. Because adiposity rebound is determined using serial measurements of body mass index, the actual changes in body composition occurring during this time are obscured. Recent data show that changing body mass index during adiposity rebound is due to higher than average deposition of weight rather than slowing of the rate of height gain. Moreover, this increased weight gain occurs because of rapid deposition of fat rather than lean tissue, with early rebounders gaining fat mass at almost three times the rate of late rebounders. Future work is needed to identify reasons for early adiposity rebound. Because high physical activity and low inactivity are associated with lower body fat during the period of adiposity rebound, studies should be undertaken to see whether stepping up activity can slow fat gain, delay the onset of adiposity rebound and lower adult obesity.

  1. Pemasaran ViralViral Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Situmorang, James Rianto

    2010-01-01

    Viral marketing is an extremely powerful and effective form of internet marketing. Itis a new form of word-of-mouth through internet. In viral marketing, someone passeson a marketing message to someone else and so on. Viral marketing proposes thatmessages can be rapidly disseminated from consumer to consumer leading to largescale market acceptance. The analogy of a virus is used to described the exponentialdiffusion of information in an electronic environment and should not be confusedwith th...

  2. Oblique impacts of water drops onto hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces: outcomes, timing, and rebound maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, C.; Villa, F.; Marengo, M.

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on water drop oblique impacts onto hydrophobic and superhydrophobic tilted surfaces, with the objective of understanding drop impact dynamics and the conditions for drop rebound on low wetting surfaces. Drop impact experiments were performed with millimetric water drops with Weber numbers in the range 25 definition of six different impact regimes: deposition, rivulet, sliding, rolling, partial rebound, and rebound. For superhydrophobic surfaces, surface tilting generally enhanced drop rebound and shedding from the surface, either by reducing drop rebound time up to 40 % or by allowing drop rebound even when impalement occurred in the vicinity of the impact region. On hydrophobic surfaces, rebound was never observed for tilt angles higher than 45°.

  3. Rebound Effects in the Context of Developing Country Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McNeil, Michael A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Leventis, Greg [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-08-30

    Energy efficiency-related “rebound effects” usually refer to the tendency of most consumers to increase their use of energy services in response to efficiency measures that have reduced their energy costs. This phenomenon is one reason why energy efficiency policies often result in lower energy savings than engineering-based estimates predict. Rebound effects have been the subject of intense debate in the field of energy efficiency policy for many years.1 In the past, the focus of this debate has been on the perceived loss of the expected energy savings and related benefits resulting from the rebound effects. However, more recently, there has been a growing recognition that policymakers need to consider the health, economic and other non-energy benefits that often result from the increase in energy services represented by user “rebound effects”. This is especially true in developing countries where basic energy service demands—such as lighting, heating, cooling, and refrigeration of food—are often not being met. As economic conditions improve and household incomes increase, demand for increased energy services (such as space conditioning and appliances) tends to rise rapidly. Improving energy efficiency reduces the amount of energy needed to produce one unit of energy service output (for example an hour of cooling at 21°C delivered for X vs Y kWh). Greater efficiency therefore often enables more rapid increased in energy services (and sometimes access), expanding the amount of services that can be provided by a fixed amount (or cost) of energy.

  4. Negative rebound in hippocampal neurogenesis following exercise cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Takeshi; Kamidozono, Yoshika; Ishiizumi, Atsushi; Amemiya, Seiichiro; Kita, Ichiro

    2017-03-01

    Physical exercise can improve brain function, but the effects of exercise cessation are largely unknown. This study examined the time-course profile of hippocampal neurogenesis following exercise cessation. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to either a control (Con) or an exercise cessation (ExC) group. Mice in the ExC group were reared in a cage with a running wheel for 8 wk and subsequently placed in a standard cage to cease the exercise. Exercise resulted in a significant increase in the density of doublecortin (DCX)-positive immature neurons in the dentate gyrus (at week 0). Following exercise cessation, the density of DCX-positive neurons gradually decreased and was significantly lower than that in the Con group at 5 and 8 wk after cessation, indicating that exercise cessation leads to a negative rebound in hippocampal neurogenesis. Immunohistochemistry analysis suggests that the negative rebound in neurogenesis is caused by diminished cell survival, not by suppression of cell proliferation and neural maturation. Neither elevated expression of ΔFosB, a transcription factor involved in neurogenesis regulation, nor increased plasma corticosterone, were involved in the negative neurogenesis rebound. Importantly, exercise cessation suppressed ambulatory activity, and a significant correlation between change in activity and DCX-positive neuron density suggested that the decrease in activity is involved in neurogenesis impairment. Forced treadmill running following exercise cessation failed to prevent the negative neurogenesis rebound. This study indicates that cessation of exercise or a decrease in physical activity is associated with an increased risk for impaired hippocampal function, which might increase vulnerability to stress-induced mood disorders. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Dopamine Rebound-Excitation Theory: Putting Brakes on PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason C Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available It is not uncommon for humans or animals to experience traumatic events in their lifetimes. However, the majority of individuals are resilient to long-term detrimental changes turning into anxiety and depression, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. What underlying neural mechanism accounts for individual variability in stress resilience? Hyperactivity in fear circuits, such as the amygdalar system, is well-known to be the major pathophysiological basis for PTSD, much like a stuck accelerator. Interestingly, increasing evidence demonstrates that dopamine (DA – traditionally known for its role in motivation, reward prediction, and addiction– is also crucial in regulating fear learning and anxiety. Yet how DA neurons control stress resilience is unclear, especially given that DA neurons have multiple subtypes with distinct temporal dynamics. Here, we propose the Rebound-Excitation Theory, which posits that DA neurons’ rebound-excitation at the termination of fearful experiences serves as an important brake by providing intrinsic safety-signals to fear-processing neural circuits in a spatially and temporally controlled manner. We discuss how DA neuron rebound-excitation may be regulated by genetics and experiences, and how such physiological properties may be used as a brain-activity biomarker to predict and confer individual resilience to stress and anxiety.

  6. Coping with Break-Ups: Rebound Relationships and Gender Socialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassie Shimek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When serious romantic relationships are terminated, partners are faced with convoluted and complex challenges of detachment from their previous partner, negative feelings about the overall situation, and the need to move forward in life. When faced with this relational upheaval, some individuals employ and find relief in superficial or noncommittal rebound relationships, which act as a means for coping with the loss of the previous relationship and the severed emotional attachment to an ex-partner, but which are under studied by empirical researchers. In a study of 201 participants, men were predicted and found to be more likely to enter rebound relationships in the aftermath of a relational termination based on lower levels of social support, more emotional attachment to an ex-partner, and displaying the ludus (or game playing love style. In addition to the measures of these variables, gender socialization and parental investment theory provide further support for the study’s claims. In sum, rebound relationships were employed by men as a distraction from their feelings of emotional attachment for their ex-partner, but also as a source of support and due to inherent ludic characteristics.

  7. Advancing Fusion by Innovations: Smaller, Quicker, Cheaper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryaznevich, Mikhail; Chuyanov, V. A.; Kingham, D.

    2015-01-01

    On the path to Fusion power, the construction of ITER is on-going, however there is not much progress in performance improvements of tokamaks in the last 15 years, Fig.1. One possible reason for this stagnation is the lack of innovations in physics and technology that could be implemented...... with this approach in which progress is expected mainly from the increase in the size of a Fusion device. Such innovations could be easier to test and use in much smaller (and so cheaper and quicker to build) compact Fusion devices. In this paper we propose a new path to Fusion energy based on a compact high field...

  8. Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us FAQs Ask a Question Toll Free Numbers Homeless Veterans Chat VA » Health Care » Viral Hepatitis » Veterans and ... Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning Service Members Rural Veterans Seniors & Aging Veterans ...

  9. Selective Loss of Smaller Spines in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Matthew L; Alhassan, Jamil; Newman, Jason T; Richard, Michelle; Gu, Hong; Kelly, Ryan M; Sampson, Alan R; Fish, Kenneth N; Penzes, Peter; Wills, Zachary P; Lewis, David A; Sweet, Robert A

    2017-06-01

    Decreased density of dendritic spines in adult schizophrenia subjects has been hypothesized to result from increased pruning of excess synapses in adolescence. In vivo imaging studies have confirmed that synaptic pruning is largely driven by the loss of large or mature synapses. Thus, increased pruning throughout adolescence would likely result in a deficit of large spines in adulthood. Here, the authors examined the density and volume of dendritic spines in deep layer 3 of the auditory cortex of 20 schizophrenia and 20 matched comparison subjects as well as aberrant voltage-gated calcium channel subunit protein expression linked to spine loss. Primary auditory cortex deep layer 3 spine density and volume was assessed in 20 pairs of schizophrenia and matched comparison subjects in an initial and replication cohort (12 and eight pairs) by immunohistochemistry-confocal microscopy. Targeted mass spectrometry was used to quantify postsynaptic density and voltage-gated calcium channel protein expression. The effect of increased voltage-gated calcium channel subunit protein expression on spine density and volume was assessed in primary rat neuronal culture. Only the smallest spines are lost in deep layer 3 of the primary auditory cortex in subjects with schizophrenia, while larger spines are retained. Levels of the tryptic peptide ALFDFLK, found in the schizophrenia risk gene CACNB4, are inversely correlated with the density of smaller, but not larger, spines in schizophrenia subjects. Consistent with this observation, CACNB4 overexpression resulted in a lower density of smaller spines in primary neuronal cultures. These findings require a rethinking of the overpruning hypothesis, demonstrate a link between small spine loss and a schizophrenia risk gene, and should spur more in-depth investigations of the mechanisms that govern new or small spine generation and stabilization under normal conditions as well as how this process is impaired in schizophrenia.

  10. Pilot Evaluation Study of the Life Skills Program REBOUND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Jungaberle

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the study is pilot evaluation of the life skills program REBOUND in a school context focusing on substance use, risk perception, and knowledge about psychoactive substances ( n IG + CG = 723 students in five schools and 46 classes, Mage = 14.8, range 14-18 for the total sample and in the subgroups gender, age, and school type. Main goal of the study is collecting evidence for program optimization. A controlled study was carried out with repeated measurement before and after the intervention (4-6 months. Multilevel analyses, ANCOVA, and logistic regression analyses were applied to measure the effects. Overall, significantly lower incidence rates of drunkenness (odds ratio [OR] = .55; p = .033, improved knowledge about psychoactive substances (p = .006, lower personal (p = .013 and general tobacco risk perception among users (p = .002, and lower general tobacco (p = .018 and cannabis (p = .000 risk perception in non-users were found in the total intervention group. In subgroups, significantly lower rates for the incidence of drunkenness can be shown for males (p = .008 and for younger participants (p = .004. Students at academic high school (German Gymnasium showed a decrease in 30-day prevalence for alcohol (p = .017 and cannabis (p = .014, and they improved in their knowledge about psychoactive substances (p = .000. In vocational high school classes (German Realschule, there was an increase in the relative alcohol risk perception of the students (p = .019. REBOUND contributes to a controlled use of alcohol and increases knowledge about psychoactive substances. REBOUND has various effects on the examined subgroups age, gender, and school type: Males, younger students, and students in academic high school benefitted more from the course regarding consumption-related criteria. We suggest a program optimization specific to school form and age, inclusion of a tobacco intervention, and the use of more gender-segregated interventions.

  11. Children grow and horses race: is the adiposity rebound a critical period for later obesity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cole TJ

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The adiposity rebound is the second rise in body mass index that occurs between 3 and 7 years. An early age at adiposity rebound is known to be a risk factor for later obesity. The aim here is to clarify the connection between the age at rebound and the corresponding pattern of body mass index change, in centile terms, so as to better understand its ability to predict later fatness. Discussion Longitudinal changes in body mass index during adiposity rebound, measured both in original (kg/m2 and standard deviation (SD score units, are studied in five hypothetical subjects. Two aspects of the body mass index curve, the body mass index centile and the rate of body mass index centile crossing, determine a child's age at rebound. A high centile and upward centile crossing are both associated separately with an early rebound, while a low centile and/or downward centile crossing correspond to a late rebound. Early adiposity rebound is a risk factor for later fatness because it identifies children whose body mass index centile is high and/or crossing upwards. Such children are likely to have a raised body mass index later in childhood and adulthood. This is an example of Peto's "horse racing effect". The association of centile crossing with later obesity is statistical not physiological, and it applies at all ages not just at rebound, so adiposity rebound cannot be considered a critical period for future obesity. Body mass index centile crossing is a more direct indicator of the underlying drive to fatness. Summary An early age at adiposity rebound predicts later fatness because it identifies children whose body mass index centile is high and/or crossing upwards. Such children are likely to have a raised body mass index later. Body mass index centile crossing is more direct than the timing of adiposity rebound for predicting later fatness.

  12. Children grow and horses race: is the adiposity rebound a critical period for later obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, T J

    2004-03-12

    The adiposity rebound is the second rise in body mass index that occurs between 3 and 7 years. An early age at adiposity rebound is known to be a risk factor for later obesity. The aim here is to clarify the connection between the age at rebound and the corresponding pattern of body mass index change, in centile terms, so as to better understand its ability to predict later fatness. Longitudinal changes in body mass index during adiposity rebound, measured both in original (kg/m2) and standard deviation (SD) score units, are studied in five hypothetical subjects. Two aspects of the body mass index curve, the body mass index centile and the rate of body mass index centile crossing, determine a child's age at rebound. A high centile and upward centile crossing are both associated separately with an early rebound, while a low centile and/or downward centile crossing correspond to a late rebound. Early adiposity rebound is a risk factor for later fatness because it identifies children whose body mass index centile is high and/or crossing upwards. Such children are likely to have a raised body mass index later in childhood and adulthood. This is an example of Peto's "horse racing effect". The association of centile crossing with later obesity is statistical not physiological, and it applies at all ages not just at rebound, so adiposity rebound cannot be considered a critical period for future obesity. Body mass index centile crossing is a more direct indicator of the underlying drive to fatness. An early age at adiposity rebound predicts later fatness because it identifies children whose body mass index centile is high and/or crossing upwards. Such children are likely to have a raised body mass index later. Body mass index centile crossing is more direct than the timing of adiposity rebound for predicting later fatness.

  13. Children grow and horses race: is the adiposity rebound a critical period for later obesity?

    OpenAIRE

    Cole TJ

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background The adiposity rebound is the second rise in body mass index that occurs between 3 and 7 years. An early age at adiposity rebound is known to be a risk factor for later obesity. The aim here is to clarify the connection between the age at rebound and the corresponding pattern of body mass index change, in centile terms, so as to better understand its ability to predict later fatness. Discussion Longitudinal changes in body mass index during adiposity rebound, measured both ...

  14. Enhanced neuroinvasion by smaller, soluble prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bett, Cyrus; Lawrence, Jessica; Kurt, Timothy D; Orru, Christina; Aguilar-Calvo, Patricia; Kincaid, Anthony E; Surewicz, Witold K; Caughey, Byron; Wu, Chengbiao; Sigurdson, Christina J

    2017-04-21

    Infectious prion aggregates can propagate from extraneural sites into the brain with remarkable efficiency, likely transported via peripheral nerves. Yet not all prions spread into the brain, and the physical properties of a prion that is capable of transit within neurons remain unclear. We hypothesized that small, diffusible aggregates spread into the CNS via peripheral nerves. Here we used a structurally diverse panel of prion strains to analyze how the prion conformation impacts transit into the brain. Two prion strains form fibrils visible ultrastructurally in the brain in situ, whereas three strains form diffuse, subfibrillar prion deposits and no visible fibrils. The subfibrillar strains had significantly higher levels of soluble prion aggregates than the fibrillar strains. Primary neurons internalized both the subfibrillar and fibril-forming prion strains by macropinocytosis, and both strain types were transported from the axon terminal to the cell body in vitro. However in mice, only the predominantly soluble, subfibrillar prions, and not the fibrillar prions, were efficiently transported from the tongue to the brain. Sonicating a fibrillar prion strain increased the solubility and enabled prions to spread into the brain in mice, as evident by a 40% increase in the attack rate, indicating that an increase in smaller particles enhances prion neuroinvasion. Our data suggest that the small, highly soluble prion particles have a higher capacity for transport via nerves. These findings help explain how prions that predominantly assemble into subfibrillar states can more effectively traverse into and out of the CNS, and suggest that promoting fibril assembly may slow the neuron-to-neuron spread of protein aggregates.

  15. Diagnosis and prediction of rebounds in financial markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wanfeng; Woodard, Ryan; Sornette, Didier

    2012-02-01

    We introduce the concept of “negative bubbles” as the mirror (but not necessarily exactly symmetric) image of standard financial bubbles, in which positive feedback mechanisms may lead to transient accelerating price falls. To model these negative bubbles, we adapt the Johansen-Ledoit-Sornette (JLS) model of rational expectation bubbles with a hazard rate describing the collective buying pressure of noise traders. The price fall occurring during a transient negative bubble can be interpreted as an effective random down payment that rational agents accept to pay in the hope of profiting from the expected occurrence of a possible rally. We validate the model by showing that it has significant predictive power in identifying the times of major market rebounds. This result is obtained by using a general pattern recognition method that combines the information obtained at multiple times from a dynamical calibration of the JLS model. Error diagrams, Bayesian inference and trading strategies suggest that one can extract genuine information and obtain real skill from the calibration of negative bubbles with the JLS model. We conclude that negative bubbles are in general predictably associated with large rebounds or rallies, which are the mirror images of the crashes terminating standard bubbles.

  16. Body mass index kinetics around adiposity rebound in Anorexia nervosa: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, Rémi; Neveu, Dorine; Carrier, Edouard; Ourrad, Nadia; Perroud, Alain; Nicolas, Alain

    2016-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with parameters involved in body mass index (BMI) regulation. Contrary to obesity, BMI kinetics around the adiposity rebound is not documented in AN. This study aimed at investigating which characteristics of BMI kinetics around the adiposity rebound are associated with AN. Multicentre case-control study with 101 inpatient women with AN onset after 10 years of age, and 101 healthy women, all free of overweight history and matched for age, level of education and fathers' socio-professional status. Age at adiposity rebound, pre- and post-adiposity rebound BMI velocities and accelerations (change in velocity over time) were estimated with linear mixed models using data recorded between 2 and 10 years of age. Patients had an earlier adiposity rebound (mean (standard deviation (SD)): 5.3 (1.3) vs 5.7 (1.1) years), a larger BMI at adiposity rebound (mean (SD): 15.3 [1] vs 14.9 (0.9) kg/m(2)) and 29% lower BMI acceleration after adiposity rebound than controls. After adjustment, only BMI at adiposity rebound and BMI acceleration after adiposity rebound were associated with a higher risk of AN (Odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 2.15 [1.41-3.46] for an increase of 1 kg/m(2) and 2.44 [1.56-4.02] for an increase of 0.1 kg/(m(2)*years(2)) respectively). These two factors were not correlated in patients (r = 0.007, p = 0.96). A flattened evolution of BMI after adiposity rebound and higher BMI at adiposity rebound were associated with AN. Further prospective study is needed to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Valuable Virality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akpinar, E.; Berger, Jonah

    2017-01-01

    Given recent interest in social media, many brands now create content that they hope consumers will view and share with peers. While some campaigns indeed go “viral,” their value to the brand is limited if they do not boost brand evaluation or increase purchase. Consequently, a key question is how

  18. Viral Gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help relieve the symptoms of viral gastroenteritis in adults: drinking plenty of liquids such as fruit juices, sports ... as the child is hungry giving infants breast milk or full strength ... solutions Older adults and adults with weak immune systems should also ...

  19. Viral pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragni, M V; Sherman, K E; Jordan, J A

    2010-07-01

    Despite continuous improvement in safety and purity of blood products for individuals with haemophilia, transmissible agents continue to affect individuals with haemophilia. This chapter addresses three viral pathogens with significant clinical impact: HIV, hepatitis C and parvovirus B19. Hepatitis C is the leading cause of chronic hepatitis and the major co-morbid complication of haemophilia treatment. Clinically, asymptomatic intermittent alanine aminotransferase elevation is typical, with biopsy evidence of advanced fibrosis currently in 25%. Current treatment is effective in up to 70%, and many new agents are in development. For those progressing to end-stage liver disease, liver transplantation outcomes are similar to those in non-haemophilia subjects, although pretransplant mortality is higher. HIV infection, the second leading co-morbid condition in haemophilia, is managed as a chronic infection with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). HAART also slows hepatitis C virus (HCV) progression in those with HIV/HCV co-infection. Viral inactivation and recombinant technologies have effectively prevented transfusion-transmitted viral pathogens in haemophilia. Human parvovirus B19 infection, typically associated with anaemia or, rarely severe aplastic crisis, is a non-lipid enveloped virus, for which standard inactivation techniques are ineffective. Thus, nucleic acid testing (NAT) to screen the blood supply for B19 DNA is currently under consideration by the Food and Drug Administration. To the extent, viral inactivation, recombinant, and NAT technologies are available worldwide, and the lifespan for those with haemophilia is approaching that of the normal population. The purpose of this chapter is to provide an update on three clinically significant transfusion-transmitted viral pathogens.

  20. The measurement of intraocular pressure over positive soft contact lenses by rebound tonometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Zeri

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: Rebound tonometry over positive hydrogel CLs leads to a certain degree of IOP underestimation. This result did not change for the two positive lenses used in the experiment, despite their large difference in power and therefore in lens thickness. Optometrists should bear this in mind when measuring IOP with the rebound tonometer over plus power contact lenses.

  1. Between green growth and degrowth: Decoupling, rebound effects and the politics for long-term sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen; Xue, Jin

    2016-01-01

    that the rebound effect is both a natural consequence of the growth dedicated society and a driver of further economic growth. Through rebound effects, labour productivity and eco-efficiency technologies in the growth society tend to contradict the goal of achieving environmental sustainability. To address...

  2. Interactive football training based on rebounders with hit position sensing and audio/light feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Møller; Grønbæk, Kaj; Rasmussen, Majken Kirkegård

    position sensing. The rebounders are equipped with loudspeakers and lights being used to call for the ball. Here we discuss one game “Pass ­and ­Turn”, which is meant to train speed in controlling a returned ball, reaction to a call for the ball and turning to hit rebounders to the left, right, behind...

  3. Rebound of a confined granular material: combination of a bouncing ball and a granular damper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Vázquez, F; Dorbolo, S

    2013-01-01

    A ball dropped over a solid surface bounces several times before a complete stop. The bouncing can be reduced by introducing a liquid into the ball; however, the first rebound remains largely unaffected by the fluid. Granular materials can also work as dampers. We investigated the rebound of a container partially filled with a given mass of grains mi. During the collision, the kinetic energy of the container is partially transferred to the grains, the rebound is damped, and the fast energy dissipation through inter-particle collisions and friction decreases the bouncing time dramatically. For grain-filled cylinders, a completely inelastic collision (zero rebound) is obtained when mi ≥ 1.5εomc, where εo and mc are the coefficient of restitution and mass of the empty container. For grain-filled spheres, the first rebound is almost undamped, but the second collision is completely inelastic if mi ≫ mc. These findings are potentially useful to design new granular damping systems.

  4. Avoiding Rebound through a Steady-State Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    The debate on the rebound effect as presented in most chapters in this book is based upon experience from the past more than visions of the future. The analyses are dominated by conventional economic theory, which implicitly assumes insatiable demand for energy services. Material consumption...... reductions in energy consumption are desirable, since most energy supply options involve environmental problems. While renewable energy sources are generally more environmentally benign than fossil fuels and nuclear, they nevertheless constitute a very direct intrusion on nature, as it is already apparent...... is considered to be limited primarily by productive capacity with little concern for ecological costs and limits. In such a development aiming at unlimited growth it would from a long term environmental perspective be close to irrelevant to reach for more efficient use of energy at the end-users, since it would...

  5. Rebound Thymic Hyperplasia after Chemotherapy in Children with Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ho; Hsiao, Chih-Chen; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Ko, Sheung-Fat; Huang, Shu-Hua; Huang, Shun-Chen; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming

    2017-04-01

    Development of mediastinal masses after completion of chemotherapy in pediatric patients with malignant lymphoma is worrisome and challenging to clinicians. We performed a retrospective review of 67 patients with lymphoma treated at our hospital from January 1, 2001 to June 1, 2013. Patients who received at least two chest computed tomography (CT) examinations after complete remission (CR) was achieved were further analyzed. Gallium-67 scans and positron emission tomography (PET) were recorded and compared between these patients. Sixty-two of 67 patients reached CR, of whom 31 (22 male, 9 female) were patients that received at least two chest CT examinations after CR. Rebound thymic hyperplasia (RTH) was diagnosed in 21/31 patients (67.7%), including 14/23 (60.9%) and seven out of eight (87.5%) with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's lymphoma, respectively. Ages ranged from 3 years to 18 years (median 10 years). Increased radioactivity uptake of the anterior mediastinum in gallium scans was found in nine out of 20 patients (45%) with thymic rebound. PET was performed in six out of 21 patients. Increased fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-avid uptake in the anterior mediastinum was observed in four of six patients (66.7%) by PET. One patient received thymectomy. No patients with RTH had lymphoma relapse within the median follow-up period (5 years). Relapse was statistically significantly different (p = 0.001) between patients with and without RTH. RTH developed in 67.7% of pediatric patients with lymphoma in CR after chemotherapy. The association of RTH development and lowered relapse rates has yet to be determined. Awareness of this phenomenon is important in the prevention of unnecessary surgical intervention or chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Small head circumference at birth and early age at adiposity rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, J G; Kajantie, E; Lampl, M; Osmond, C; Barker, D J P

    2014-01-01

    The adiposity rebound is the age in childhood when body mass index is at a minimum before increasing again. The age at rebound is highly variable. An early age is associated with increased obesity in later childhood and adult life. We have reported that an early rebound is predicted by low weight gain between birth and 1 year of age and resulting low body mass index at 1 year. Here, we examine whether age at adiposity rebound is determined by influences during infancy or is a consequence of foetal growth. Our hypothesis was that measurements of body size at birth are related to age at adiposity rebound. Longitudinal study of 2877 children born in Helsinki, Finland, during 1934-1944. Early age at adiposity rebound was associated with small head circumference and biparietal diameter at birth, but not with other measurements of body size at birth. The mean age at adiposity rebound rose from 5.8 years in babies with a head circumference of ≤33 cm to 6.2 in babies with a head circumference of >36 cm (P for trend = 0.007). The association between thinness in infancy and early rebound became apparent at 6 months of age. It was not associated with adverse living conditions. In a simultaneous regression, small head circumference at birth, high mother's body mass index and tall maternal stature each had statistically significant trends with early adiposity rebound (P = 0.002, early adiposity rebound was the result of inability to sustain a rapid intra-uterine growth trajectory initiated in association with large maternal body size. This was followed by catch-up growth in infancy, and we hypothesize that this depleted the infant's fat stores. © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. [Prospective association between early adiposity rebound and adolescent development in girls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y; Fang, J; Yang, R; Lai, Y P; Hu, J J; Duan, X N; Su, P Y; Wan, Y H; Tao, F B

    2017-09-06

    Objective: To determine possible relations between early adiposity rebound and adolescent development. Methods: Prospective children cohort from 2 kindergartens selected through clustering convenience sampling method in Anhui Province was established since Sep. 2010. Participants were classified as Cohort 1 (2010), Cohort 2 (2011) and Cohort 3 (2012) according to the recruiting year. Till Sep. 2015, a toal of 802 girls were included in this study, and received follow-up till primary school. During kindergarten period, physical examination was carried out every 3 months, 8 times in total. In primary school, physical examination was carried out annually; till Sep.2015, the cohort 1, 2, 3 took physical examination for 12, 11, 10 times, respectively. Information on household economic status and child physical activity was acquired through parents questionnaire survey, and breast development were assessed through visual inspection and palpation. Adiposity rebound was determined according to Rolland-Cachera's method for each girl. Differences between early adiposity rebound and normal adiposity rebound groups were compared by using t test and χ(2) test. Multivariate regression analysis was applied to explore the association between early adiposity rebound and breast development. Results: The average age of participants was (8.90±0.87) years old and the BMI was (17.48±2.70) kg/m(2). The average age at adiposity rebound was (6.16±0.90) years old and the BMI was (15.33±1.82) kg/m(2). Premature breast development was found significantly higher in girls in early adiposity rebound group (27.8%, 54/802) than it in normal adiposity rebound group (13.7%) (Padiposity rebound group was 2.41(95%CI: 1.41-4.12). Conclusion: Early adiposity rebound increases the risk of premature puberty in girls.

  8. Viral epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milavetz, Barry I; Balakrishnan, Lata

    2015-01-01

    DNA tumor viruses including members of the polyomavirus, adenovirus, papillomavirus, and herpes virus families are presently the subject of intense interest with respect to the role that epigenetics plays in control of the virus life cycle and the transformation of a normal cell to a cancer cell. To date, these studies have primarily focused on the role of histone modification, nucleosome location, and DNA methylation in regulating the biological consequences of infection. Using a wide variety of strategies and techniques ranging from simple ChIP to ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq to identify histone modifications, nuclease digestion to genome wide next generation sequencing to identify nucleosome location, and bisulfite treatment to MeDIP to identify DNA methylation sites, the epigenetic regulation of these viruses is slowly becoming better understood. While the viruses may differ in significant ways from each other and cellular chromatin, the role of epigenetics appears to be relatively similar. Within the viral genome nucleosomes are organized for the expression of appropriate genes with relevant histone modifications particularly histone acetylation. DNA methylation occurs as part of the typical gene silencing during latent infection by herpesviruses. In the simple tumor viruses like the polyomaviruses, adenoviruses, and papillomaviruses, transformation of the cell occurs via integration of the virus genome such that the virus's normal regulation is disrupted. This results in the unregulated expression of critical viral genes capable of redirecting cellular gene expression. The redirected cellular expression is a consequence of either indirect epigenetic regulation where cellular signaling or transcriptional dysregulation occurs or direct epigenetic regulation where epigenetic cofactors such as histone deacetylases are targeted. In the more complex herpersviruses transformation is a consequence of the expression of the viral latency proteins and RNAs which again can

  9. Viscous drops bounce faster: prompt tumbling-rebound from a sublimating slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Carlo; Jung, Stefan; Wetzel, Andreas; Heer, Emmanuel; Schoch, Philippe; Mazloomi, M. Ali; Chikatamarla, Shyam S.; Karlin, Ilya; Marengo, Marco; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2015-11-01

    We discovered a new drop rebound regime, characteristic of highly viscous liquids impacting onto tilted sublimating surfaces. By focusing on non-axisymmetric impact conditions at increasing viscosity, we demonstrate that low viscous drops show a ``slide, spread, recoil and rebound'' behavior, whereas viscous drops exhibit a ``prompt tumbling-rebound'' behavior. As such, viscous glycerol drops surprisingly rebound faster than three orders of magnitude less viscous water drops. This is made possible by a small conversion of translational to rotational kinetic energy, at non-axisymmetric impact conditions, as also confirmed by additional Lattice Boltzmann simulations: a rapid transition of the internal angular velocity prior to rebound to a constant value, as in a tumbling solid body, promotes a rapid rebound of more viscous drops, which are capable to rebound without recoiling. By studying drop impact dynamics, we explore the drop behavior in contactless and frictionless conditions, and identify the Ohnesorge number as the primary parameter to predict the transition between different impact regimes on tilted sublimating slopes, with tumbling observed for Ohnesorge numbers higher than unity.

  10. Weight and height growth rate and the timing of adiposity rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sheila M

    2005-06-01

    Adiposity rebound occurs when the ratio of the velocities of log(weight) to log(height) changes from 2. This study examined the timing of adiposity rebound in the context of the velocities of weight and height in early childhood because it is not known whether faster weight gain or slower gain in stature is the more important determinant. This was a longitudinal study of 406 boys and 397 girls born in Dunedin, New Zealand, in 1972 and 1973. Each child's height and weight were measured at 3 years of age and at least twice more as part of their two yearly assessments until 11 years of age. The mean age of adiposity rebound was 6.6+/-1.10 years (SD) for boys and 6.0+/-1.21 years for girls. After adjusting for sex, the correlations between the timing of rebound and z-scores for BMI, weight, and height at rebound were -0.35, -0.30, and -0.14, respectively. Correlations between the timing of rebound and estimated values of weight and height velocities at 3 years were -0.48 and -0.00. The correlations with BMI and waist girth at 26 years were -0.39 and -0.35. Children with an earlier adiposity rebound were heavier and had above average BMIs. Early rebound is the result of higher rates of weight gain, measured in percentage terms, rather than slower than average accrual of stature. This suggests that restraining weight gain could delay adiposity rebound and prevent obesity in early adulthood.

  11. Viral bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, Todd A; Plint, Amy C; Zorc, Joseph J

    2017-01-14

    Viral bronchiolitis is a common clinical syndrome affecting infants and young children. Concern about its associated morbidity and cost has led to a large body of research that has been summarised in systematic reviews and integrated into clinical practice guidelines in several countries. The evidence and guideline recommendations consistently support a clinical diagnosis with the limited role for diagnostic testing for children presenting with the typical clinical syndrome of viral upper respiratory infection progressing to the lower respiratory tract. Management is largely supportive, focusing on maintaining oxygenation and hydration of the patient. Evidence suggests no benefit from bronchodilator or corticosteroid use in infants with a first episode of bronchiolitis. Evidence for other treatments such as hypertonic saline is evolving but not clearly defined yet. For infants with severe disease, the insufficient available data suggest a role for high-flow nasal cannula and continuous positive airway pressure use in a monitored setting to prevent respiratory failure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. REM SLEEP REBOUND AS AN ADAPTIVE RESPONSE TO STRESSFUL SITUATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah eSuchecki

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Stress and sleep are related to each other in a bidirectional way. If on one hand poor or inadequate sleep exacerbates emotional, behavioral and stress-related responses, on the other hand acute stress induces sleep rebound, most likely as a form to cope with the adverse stimuli. Chronic stress, conversely, has been claimed to be one of the triggering factors of emotional-related sleep disorders, such as insomnia, depressive- and anxiety-disorders. These outcomes are dependent on individual psychobiological characteristics, which confer more complexity to the stress-sleep relationship. Its neurobiology has only recently begun to be explored, through animal models, which are also valuable for the development of potential therapeutic agents and preventive actions. This review seeks to present data on the effects of stress on sleep and the different approaches used to study this relationship as well as possible neurobiological underpinnings and mechanisms involved. The results of numerous studies in humans and animals indicate that increased sleep, especially the REM phase, following a stressful situation is an important adaptive behavior for recovery. However, this endogenous advantage appears to be impaired in human beings and rodent strains that exhibit high levels of anxiety and anxiety-like behavior.

  13. Adiposity rebound and the development of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Satomi; Ichikawa, Go; Kojima, Megumi; Shimura, Naoto; Sairenchi, Toshimi; Arisaka, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    The age of adiposity rebound (AR) is defined as the time at which BMI starts to rise after infancy and is thought to be a marker of later obesity. To determine whether this age is related to future occurrence of metabolic syndrome, we investigated the relationship of the timing of AR with metabolic consequences at 12 years of age. A total of 271 children (147 boys and 124 girls) born in 1995 and 1996 were enrolled in the study. Serial measurements of BMI were conducted at the ages of 4 and 8 months and 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 years, based on which age of AR was calculated. Plasma lipids and blood pressure were measured at 12 years of age. An earlier AR (<4 years of age) was associated with a higher BMI (≥ 20) and a lipoprotein phenotype representative of insulin resistance. This phenotype consists of elevated triglycerides, apolipoprotein B, and atherogenic index and decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in boys and elevated apolipoprotein B in girls at 12 years of age. The earlier AR was also related to elevated blood pressure in boys. This longitudinal population-based study indicates that children who exhibit AR at a younger age are predisposed to future development of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, monitoring of AR may be an effective method for the early identification of children at risk for metabolic syndrome.

  14. Premature adiposity rebound in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, J J; Kelly, A; Ness, P; Dorosty, A R; Wallace, W H; Gibson, B E; Emmett, P M

    2001-06-01

    The adiposity rebound (AR), when body mass index begins to increase after its nadir in childhood, is a critical period for the regulation of energy balance and adult obesity risk. The aim of the present study was to test whether children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) experience premature AR. This might, in part, explain their tendency to develop obesity. Timing of AR was assessed by visual inspection of body mass index plots in 68 patients treated for ALL in first remission. This sample comprised all eligible patients treated in Scotland between 1991 and 1998, age 30 months or less at the time of diagnosis. Timing of AR in patients was compared against a cohort of 889 healthy British children studied during the 1990s using the same method. AR occurred significantly earlier in the patients treated for ALL (chi(2) test, P < 0.001). The AR had occurred in 43% (29 of 68) of the patients and 4% (40 of 889) of the comparison group by age 37 months. At 49 months AR had occurred in 81% (55 of 68) of the patients and 21% (190 of 889) of the comparison group. Treatment of ALL is associated with a significantly advanced AR. This might, in part, explain the extremely high prevalence of obesity in long-term survivors. Clinical management should focus on minimizing excess weight gain during therapy to reduce long-term obesity risk.

  15. Factors associated with early adiposity rebound. ALSPAC Study Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorosty, A R; Emmett, P M; Cowin, S d; Reilly, J J

    2000-05-01

    The age at which body mass index (BMI) increases after its nadir in childhood, adiposity rebound (AR), is a critical period for the development of obesity. Children with early AR are at substantially increased risk of adult obesity. Few studies have examined the factors that influence the timing of the AR. The aims of this study were to test for influences on the timing of the AR, and to test the hypothesis that early AR is promoted by high-protein intake. Longitudinal cohort study of 889 children representative of the United Kingdom, followed from birth to 5 years. We tested for differences in dietary intake, parental BMI, socioeconomic status, and childhood BMI between 3 groups of children characterized by the following: very early AR (at or before 43 months), early AR (from 49 but before 61 months), and later AR (after 61 months). There was no evidence of associations between dietary protein intake, or any other dietary variable, and timing of the AR. Children with very early AR and early AR had parents with significantly higher BMI, and were significantly more likely to have at least 1 obese parent. This study does not support the hypothesis that early AR is promoted by high-protein intake. None of the dietary variables tested were significantly associated with timing of the AR, and timing of AR was not associated with socioeconomic status. Parental obesity was associated with an earlier AR.

  16. Timing of adiposity rebound: a step toward preventing obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonpleng, Wannaporn; Park, Chang Gi; Gallo, Agatha M

    2012-01-01

    Adiposity rebound (AR) is used as an indicator to predict obesity in adults. Previous studies about AR in the U.S. were based on local data; therefore, the generalizability of study results is limited. The purpose of this study was to identify the timing of AR for U.S. children using a national survey data set, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Combined data of NHANES 1999-2008 were used to estimate the national level of this critical period for U.S. children developing obesity. Data of 8813 children 2 to 10 years of age were analyzed. Mean body mass index was estimated using the survey sample analysis method. Visual inspection method was employed to examine the timing of AR. Gender and race/ethnicity differences in AR were identified at an early age. AR occurred earlier in girls and in Non-Hispanic African-American children than in Non-Hispanic Caucasian children. Differences in timing for AR by gender and race/ethnicity should be considered in planning early and timely intervention efforts to prevent childhood obesity.

  17. The Phoenix population: demographic crisis and rebound in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuveline, Patrick; Poch, Bunnak

    2007-05-01

    The study of mortality crises provides an unusual and valuable perspective on the relationship between mortality and fertility changes, a relationship that has puzzled demographers for decades. In this article, we combine nationally representative survey and demographic-surveillance system data to study fertility trends around the time of the Khmer Rouge (KR) regime, under which 25% of the Cambodian population died. We present the first quantitative evidence to date that attests to a one-third decline of fertility during this regime, followed by a substantial "baby boom" after the fall of the KR. Further analyses reveal that the fertility rebound was produced not only by a two-year marriage bubble but also by a surge in marital fertility that remained for nearly a decade above its precrisis level. Our results illustrate the potential influence of mortality on fertility, which may be more difficult to identify for more gradual mortality declines. To the extent that until recently, Cambodian fertility appears to fit natural fertility patterns, our findings also reinforce recent qualifications about the meaning of this core paradigm of demographic analysis.

  18. Tolerance and rebound with zafirlukast in patients with persistent asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johns David P

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential for tolerance to develop to zafirlukast, a cysteinyl leukotriene (CysLT receptor antagonist (LRA in persistent asthma, has not been specifically examined. Objective To look for any evidence of tolerance and potential for short-term clinical worsening on LRA withdrawal. Outcome measures included changes in; airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled methacholine (PD20FEV1, daily symptoms and peak expiratory flows (PEF, sputum and blood cell profiles, sputum CysLT and prostaglandin (PGE2 and exhaled nitric oxide (eNO levels. Methods A double blind, placebo-controlled study of zafirlukast, 20 mg twice daily over 12 weeks in 21 asthmatics taking β2-agonists only (Group I, and 24 subjects treated with ICS (Group II. Results In Group I, zafirlukast significantly improved morning PEF and FEV1compared to placebo (p 1 improved compared to placebo (p 2-agonist use and asthma severity scores (p 1 compared with placebo (p ≤ 0.05 and increased nocturnal awakenings in Group II (p 20FEV1, sputum CysLT concentrations or exhaled nitric oxide (eNO levels. However, blood neutrophils significantly increased in both groups following zafirlukast withdrawal compared to placebo (p = 0.007. Conclusion Tolerance appears to develop to zafirlukast and there is rebound clinical deterioration on drug withdrawal, accompanied by a blood neutrophilia.

  19. A Case Study on Stratified Settlement and Rebound Characteristics due to Dewatering in Shanghai Subway Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxiu Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Yishan Metro Station Project of Shanghai Metro Line number 9, a centrifugal model test was conducted to investigate the behavior of stratified settlement and rebound (SSR of Shanghai soft clay caused by dewatering in deep subway station pit. The soil model was composed of three layers, and the dewatering process was simulated by self-invention of decompressing devise. The results indicate that SSR occurs when the decompression was carried out, and only negative rebound was found in sandy clay, but both positive and negative rebound occurred in the silty clay, and the absolute value of rebound in sandy clay was larger than in silty clay, and the mechanism of SSR was discussed with mechanical sandwich model, and it was found that the load and cohesive force of different soils was the main source of different responses when decompressed.

  20. Muscle heating with Megapulse II shortwave diathermy and ReBound diathermy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Draper, David O; Hawkes, Amanda R; Johnson, A Wayne; Diede, Mike T; Rigby, Justin H

    2013-01-01

    .... To compare the effects of the ReBound diathermy with an established deep-heating diathermy, the Megapulse II pulsed shortwave diathermy, on tissue temperature in the human triceps surae muscle. Crossover study...

  1. Water Drops Dancing on Ice: How Sublimation Leads to Drop Rebound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, C.; Bernagozzi, I.; Jung, S.; Poulikakos, D.; Marengo, M.

    2013-07-01

    Drop rebound is a spectacular event that appears after impact on hydrophobic or superhydrophobic surfaces but can also be induced through the so-called Leidenfrost effect. Here we demonstrate that drop rebound can also originate from another physical phenomenon, the solid substrate sublimation. Through drop impact experiments on a superhydrophobic surfaces, a hot plate, and solid carbon dioxide (commonly known as dry ice), we compare drop rebound based on three different physical mechanisms, which apparently share nothing in common (superhydrophobicity, evaporation, and sublimation), but lead to the same rebound phenomenon in an extremely wide temperature range, from 300°C down to even below -79°C. The formation and unprecedented visualization of an air vortex ring around an impacting drop are also reported.

  2. Screening and Management of the Early Adiposity Rebound of Children in Montreuil?

    OpenAIRE

    Chougnet, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Infantile obesity is often accompanied by health problems both in childhood and adulthood. Efficient intervention program before obesity installation can be found in the literature. An early adiposity rebound is indeed the earliest mean to detect an obesity to come. QUESTION : How detecting and treating the early adiposity rebound of children in childhood living in Montreuil (Paris area - France) METHODOLOGY : Consensus search in a nominal group to establish a screening protocole for...

  3. Modification of General Research Corporation (GRC) Dynatup 8200 Drop Tower Rebounding Brake System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    ARL-TN-0770 ● AUG 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Modification of General Research Corporation ( GRC ) Dynatup 8200 Drop Tower...Research Laboratory Modification of General Research Corporation ( GRC ) Dynatup 8200 Drop Tower Rebounding Brake System by David Gray and...Research Corporation ( GRC ) Dynatup 8200 Drop Tower Rebounding Brake System 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  4. Early adiposity rebound in childhood and risk of Type 2 diabetes in adult life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, J G; Forsén, T; Tuomilehto, J; Osmond, C; Barker, D J P

    2003-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with a small body size at birth and a high BMI in adult life. The aim of our study was to assess the associations between Type 2 diabetes and birth size, infant growth and age at adiposity rebound. We carried out a longitudinal study of 8760 subjects born in Helsinki during 1934 to 1944. On average, they had 18 measurements of height and weight between birth and 12 years of age. In western countries BMI usually decreases after the age of 2 years and rises again at around 6 years--the so-called adiposity rebound. We defined age at adiposity rebound by the age of lowest BMI between one and 12 years. We identified people with Type 2 diabetes using a national register. A total of 290 individuals developed Type 2 diabetes in adult life. The cumulative incidence of Type 2 diabetes decreased progressively from 8.6% in persons whose adiposity rebound occurred before the age of 5 years to 1.8% in those in whom it occurred after 7 years ( padiposity rebound was preceded by low weight gain between birth and 1 year ( padiposity rebound.

  5. Biological therapies (immunomodulatory drugs), worsening of psoriasis and rebound effect: new evidence of similitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Marcus Zulian

    2016-11-01

    Employing the secondary action or adaptative reaction of the organism as therapeutic response, homeopathy uses the treatment by similitude (similia similibus curentur) administering to sick individuals the medicines that caused similar symptoms in healthy individuals. Such homeostatic or paradoxical reaction of the organism is scientifically explained through the rebound effect of drugs, which cause worsening of symptoms after withdrawal of several palliative treatments. Despite promoting an improvement in psoriasis at the beginning of the treatment, modern biological therapies provoke worsening of the psoriasis (rebound psoriasis) after discontinuation of drugs. Exploratory qualitative review of the literature on the occurrence of the rebound effect with the use of immunomodulatory drugs [T-cell modulating agents and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors drugs] in the treatment of psoriasis. Several researches indicate the rebound effect as the mechanism of worsening of psoriasis with the use of efalizumab causing the suspension of its marketing authorization in 2009, in view of some severe cases. Other studies also have demonstrated the occurrence of rebound psoriasis with the use of alefacept, etanercept and infliximab. As well as studied in other classes of drugs, the rebound effect of biologic agents supports the principle of similitude (primary action of the drugs followed by secondary action and opposite of the organism). Copyright © 2016 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Early adiposity rebound and obesity in children with congenital hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shou-Yen; Lin, Shio-Jean; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Chou, Yen-Yin

    2013-04-01

    Earlier adiposity rebound (AR) is correlated with obesity. Our goal is to examine rates of obesity and AR in congenital hypothyroidism (CHT) and analyze the risk factors of obesity. We retrospectively reviewed the cases with abnormal newborn screens of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) from 1990 to 2005 and enrolled permanent CHT patients who continued to receive treatment after the 3(rd) year of life. We determined subgroups of obesity/being overweight and normal body mass index (BMI) by the latest BMI at 6-7 years of age. BMI at each age and the age of AR were compared with the general population in Taiwan. The statistical correlation of obesity with the age and BMI at both AR and first peak, and thyroid function was calculated. A total of 90 cases of CHT were enrolled. The prevalence of obesity/being overweight was 32.2%. The age of AR was 4.94 ± 1.81 and 4.58 ± 1.86 years old in boys and girls, respectively. The age of AR in the girls with CHT was earlier than in girls in general, but no statistical significance was found in boys with CHT compared to the general population. Obesity was correlated with earlier age of AR, higher BMI at first peak and AR, and lower T4 after treatment, but not with the age of first peak of BMI, T4/TSH at diagnosis and AR, and TSH after treatment. Children with CHT have a higher risk of obesity due to earlier age of AR. We recommend that supervision and intervention on weight control should be provided to prevent the occurrence of obesity later. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Icare rebound tonometry in children with known and suspected glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemmons, Meghan S; Hsiao, Ya-Chuan; Dzau, Jacqueline; Asrani, Sanjay; Jones, Sarah; Freedman, Sharon F

    2011-04-01

    Accurate intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement, important in managing pediatric glaucoma, often presents challenges. The Icare rebound tonometer shows promise for screening healthy children and has been reported comparable with Goldmann applanation in adults with glaucoma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Icare tonometer against Goldmann applanation for clinic IOP measurement in pediatric glaucoma. This was a prospective study comparing Icare versus Goldmann tonometry in pediatric glaucoma. Children with known or suspected glaucoma were recruited from scheduled clinic visits. IOP was measured with the Icare tonometer by a clinician and subsequently measured with Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT) by a different single masked clinician. A total of 71 eyes of 71 children with known or suspected glaucoma were included. IOP by GAT ranged from 9 to 36 mm Hg. Icare readings ranged from 11 to 44 mm Hg. Mean difference between Icare and GAT was 2.3 ± SD 3.7 mm Hg, p IOPs were within ± 3 mm Hg of GAT in 63%. Icare IOPs were ≥GAT IOPs in 75%. The following factors were not associated with Icare IOPs greater than GAT: child's age, glaucoma diagnosis, strabismus, nystagmus, central corneal thickness, Icare instrument-reported reliability, number of glaucoma surgeries or medications, corneal abnormalities, and visual acuity. IOP by Icare tonometry was within 3 mm Hg of IOP by GAT in 63% and greater than GAT in 75%. This device may be reasonable to estimate IOP in selected children with known or suspected glaucoma whose IOP cannot otherwise be obtained in clinic; however, correlation of Icare IOPs with clinical findings must continue to be considered in each case. Copyright © 2011 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Timing of adiposity rebound and adiposity in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Adrienne R; Sherriff, Andrea; Ness, Andrew R; Reilly, John J

    2014-11-01

    To investigate associations between timing of adiposity rebound (AR; the period in childhood where BMI begins to increase from its nadir) and adiposity (BMI, fat mass) at age 15 years in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). The sample consisted of 546 children with AR derived in childhood and BMI and fat mass index (FMI; fat mass measured by dual-energy radiograph absorptiometry/height in m(2)) measured at 15 years. Multivariable linear regression models were based on standardized residuals of log BMI and log FMI to allow comparison of regression coefficients across outcomes. There were strong dose-response associations between timing of AR and both adiposity outcomes at 15 years independent of confounders. BMI was markedly higher in adolescence for those with very early AR (by 3.5 years; β = 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.33-1.07; P ≤ .001) and was also higher for those with early AR (between 3.5 and 5 years; β = 0.34; 95% CI: 0.08-0.59; P = .009) compared with those with later AR (>5 years) after full adjustment for a range of potential confounders. Similar magnitudes of association were found for FMI after full adjustment for confounders (compared with later AR: very early AR β = 0.74; 95% CI: 0.34-1.15; P ≤ .001; early AR β = 0.35; 95% CI: 0.07-0.63; P = .02). Early AR is strongly associated with increased BMI and FMI in adolescence. Preventive interventions should consider targeting modifiable factors in early childhood to delay timing of AR. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. THE PHOENIX POPULATION: DEMOGRAPHIC CRISIS AND REBOUND IN CAMBODIA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    HEUVELINE, PATRICK; POCH, BUNNAK

    2014-01-01

    The study of mortality crises provides an unusual and valuable perspective on the relationship between mortality and fertility changes, a relationship that has puzzled demographers for decades. In this article, we combine nationally representative survey and demographic-surveillance system data to study fertility trends around the time of the Khmer Rouge (KR) regime, under which 25% of the Cambodian population died. We present the first quantitative evidence to date that attests to a one-third decline of fertility during this regime, followed by a substantial “baby boom” after the fall of the KR. Further analyses reveal that the fertility rebound was produced not only by a two-year marriage bubble but also by a surge in marital fertility that remained for nearly a decade above its precrisis level. Our results illustrate the potential influence of mortality on fertility, which may be more difficult to identify for more gradual mortality declines. To the extent that until recently, Cambodian fertility appears to fit natural fertility patterns, our findings also reinforce meaning of this core paradigm of demographic analysis. In July 1978, a youth named Korb, bound hand and foot, arrived at a Pol Pot regime extermination camp. The local security chief, “Comrade Uncle An,” was handed the following note: Formerly this person was normal in character. Then, over about ten days, he went crazy. […] If many people come in, first he begins to whistle, and then he sings the following rhyme out loud: O! Khmers with black blood Now the eight-year Buddhist prophecy is being fulfilled. Vietnam is the elder brother Kampuchea is the younger. If we do not follow the Vietnamese as our elder brothers There will be nothing left of the Khmer this time but ashes.(Kiernan and Boua 1982:363) PMID:17583312

  10. Early adiposity rebound and the risk of adult obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, R C; Pepe, M S; Wright, J A; Seidel, K D; Dietz, W H

    1998-03-01

    At 5 to 6 years of age, body fatness normally declines to a minimum, a point called adiposity rebound (AR), before increasing again into adulthood. We determined whether a younger age at AR was associated with an increased risk of adult obesity and whether this risk was independent of fatness at AR and parent obesity. A retrospective cohort study using lifelong height and weight measurements recorded in outpatient medical records. Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound (GHC), a health maintenance organization based in Seattle, Washington. All 390 GHC members (and their parents) born at GHC between January 1, 1965, and January 1, 1971, who had at least one recorded adult height and weight measurement plus two visits with recorded height and weight measurements in each of three age intervals: 1.5 to 4, 4 to 8, and 8 to 16 years. We calculated the mean body mass index (BMI) of each subject during young adulthood (age 21 to 29 years) and the BMI of the parents when each subject was 1.5 years of age. Adult obesity was defined as a BMI >/=27.8 for males and >/=27. 3 for females. Curves were fit to each subject's BMI values between ages 1.5 and 16 years, and the age and BMI at AR were calculated from these curves. Subjects were divided into tertiles of age at AR (early, middle, and late), BMI at AR, and parent BMI (heavy, medium, and lean). The mean age at AR was 5.5 years, and 15% of the cohort was obese in young adulthood. Adult obesity rates were higher in those with early versus late AR (25% vs 5%), those who were heavy versus lean at AR (24% vs 4%), those with heavy versus lean mothers (25% vs 5%), and those with heavy versus lean fathers (21% vs 5%). After adjusting for parent BMI and BMI at AR, the odds ratio for adult obesity associated with early versus late AR was 6.0 (95% CI, 1.3-26.6). An early AR is associated with an increased risk of adult obesity independent of parent obesity and the BMI at AR. Future research should examine the biological and behavioral

  11. Ten Indicators of Vitality in Smaller Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, David

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a means of quickly ascertaining the relative health of smaller academic libraries by presenting a top ten list of vitality indicators. The list is based on an observational convenience sampling of thirty smaller academic libraries across the United States. The indicators making the list were those which appeared most often in…

  12. 13 CFR 107.710 - Requirement to finance smaller enterprises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirement to finance smaller enterprises. 107.710 Section 107.710 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL... Small Business for Sbic Financing § 107.710 Requirement to finance smaller enterprises. Your Portfolio...

  13. Do Methodological Choices in Environmental Modeling Bias Rebound Effects? A Case Study on Electric Cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font Vivanco, David; Tukker, Arnold; Kemp, René

    2016-10-18

    Improvements in resource efficiency often underperform because of rebound effects. Calculations of the size of rebound effects are subject to various types of bias, among which methodological choices have received particular attention. Modellers have primarily focused on choices related to changes in demand, however, choices related to modeling the environmental burdens from such changes have received less attention. In this study, we analyze choices in the environmental assessment methods (life cycle assessment (LCA) and hybrid LCA) and environmental input-output databases (E3IOT, Exiobase and WIOD) used as a source of bias. The analysis is done for a case study on battery electric and hydrogen cars in Europe. The results describe moderate rebound effects for both technologies in the short term. Additionally, long-run scenarios are calculated by simulating the total cost of ownership, which describe notable rebound effect sizes-from 26 to 59% and from 18 to 28%, respectively, depending on the methodological choices-with favorable economic conditions. Relevant sources of bias are found to be related to incomplete background systems, technology assumptions and sectorial aggregation. These findings highlight the importance of the method setup and of sensitivity analyses of choices related to environmental modeling in rebound effect assessments.

  14. Energy rebound and economic growth: A review of the main issues and research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madlener, R. [Institute for Future Energy Consumer Needs and Behavior (FCN), Faculty of Business and Economics/E.ON Energy Research Center, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Alcott, B. [Gretenweg 4, 8038 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2009-03-15

    Contrary to conventional wisdom, more efficient use of energy may actually through rebound effects lead to greater instead of less total consumption of energy - or at least to no diminution of energy consumption. If so, energy efficiency strategies may serve goals of raising economic growth and affluence, but as an environmental or energy policy strategy could backfire, leading to more resource use in absolute terms rather than less. This, in turn, could in the long run hamper economic growth, for instance if resource scarcity crowds out technical change. The hypothesis that rebound is greater than unity ('backfire') predicts the observed real-world correlation between rising energy consumption and rising efficiency of energy services, however difficult it may be to define a precise holistic metric for the latter. The opposing hypothesis, i.e. that rebound is less than unity and that energy efficiency increases therefore result in less energy consumption than before, requires on the other hand strong forces that do account for the empirically observed economic growth. This paper summarises some of the discussions around the rebound effect, puts it into perspective to economic growth, and provides some insights at the end that can guide future empirical research on the rebound topic. (author)

  15. REBOUND-ing Off Asteroids: An N-body Particle Model for Ejecta Dynamics on Small Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Jennifer; Sarid, Gal

    2017-10-01

    Here we describe our numerical approach to model the evolution of ejecta clouds. Modeling with an N-body particle method enables us to study the micro-dynamics while varying the particle size distribution. A hydrodynamic approach loses many of the fine particle-particle interactions included in the N-body particle approach (Artemieva 2008).We use REBOUND, an N-body integration package (Rein et al. 2012) developed to model various dynamical systems (planetary orbits, ring systems, etc.) with high resolution calculations at a lower performance cost than other N-body integrators (Rein & Tamayo 2017). It offers both symplectic (WHFast) and non-symplectic (IAS15) methods (Rein & Spiegel 2014, Rein & Tamayo 2015). We primarily use the IAS15 integrator due to its robustness and accuracy with short interaction distances and non-conservative forces. We implemented a wrapper (developed in Python) to handle changes in time step and integrator at different stages of ejecta particle evolution.To set up the system, each particle is given a velocity away from the target body’s surface at a given angle within a defined ejecta cone. We study the ejecta cloud evolution beginning immediately after an impact rather than the actual impact itself. This model considers effects such as varying particle size distribution, radiation pressure, perturbations from a binary component, particle-particle collisions and non-axisymmetric gravity of the target body. Restrictions on the boundaries of the target body’s surface define the physical shape and help count the number of particles that land on the target body. Later, we will build the central body from individual particles to allow for a wider variety of target body shapes and topographies.With our particle modeling approach, individual particle trajectories are tracked and predicted on short, medium and long timescales. Our approach will be applied to modeling of the ejecta cloud produced during the Double Asteroid Redirection Test

  16. [Viral superantigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Us, Dürdal

    2016-07-01

    , expression of endogenous SAgs leads to thymic deletion of responding T cells (bearing Vβ6-9+ TCR) due to self-tolerance induction during the fetal life, and protects the host against future exogenous MMTV infections. The SAg of rabies virus is the N protein found in nucleocapsid structure and stimulates Vβ8+TCR-bearing T cells. The SAg-induced polyclonal activation of T cells leads to turn-off the specific immune response, to enhance the immunopathogenesis and facilitates viral transmission from the initial site of infection (the muscle tissue) to the nerve endings. In case of EBV-associated SAg that activates Vβ13+TCR-bearing T cells, it was detected that the SAg activity was not encoded by EBV itself, but instead was due to the transactivation of HERV-K18 by EBV latent membrane proteins, whose env gene encodes the SAg (Sutkowski, et al. 2001). It has been denoted that EBV-induced SAg expression plays a role in the long-term persistence and latency of virus in memory B cells, in the development of autoimmune diseases and in the oncogenesis mechanisms. The proteins which are identified as SAgs of HIV are Nef and gp120. It is believed that, the massive activation of CD4+ T cells (selectively with Vβ-12+, Vβ-5.3+ and Vβ-18+ TCRs) in early stages of infection and clonal deletion, anergy and apoptosis of bystander T cells in the late stages may be due to SAg property of Nef protein, as well as the other mechanisms. However there are some studies indicating that Nef does not act as a SAg (Lapatschek, et al. 2001). HIV gp120 glycoprotein is a B-cell SAg that binds to VH3-expressing B cell receptors and causes polyclonal B cell activation. In addition, binding of gp120 to IgE on the surface of basophiles and mast cells causes activation of those cells, secretion of high level proinflammatory mediators leading to allergic reactions and tissue damage. In a recent study, the depletion (anergy or deletion) of T cell populations bearing Vβ12+, Vβ13+ and Vβ17+ TCR have been

  17. Investigation of the rebound number and compressive strength of concrete with quarry dust as fine aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinthaworn Suppachai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the consideration of relation between compressive strength and rebound number of concrete cooperating with quarry dust as fine aggregate (natural river sand was replaced by quarry dust at the rate of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% by weight of fine aggregate. The properties of the tested concrete samples are w/c = 0.6, maximum size of coarse aggregate is 20 mm., cement contents are between 308 and 348 kg/m3, slumps range from 0 to 100 mm., the 28-day compressive strength from 14 to 30 MPa. It was found that the rebound number results were affected by quarry dust especially the standard deviator of rebound number. The cube compressive strength at 28 days and the supplementary curve from the instruction manual were discussed. Moreover, the prediction equation is proposed to estimate the compressive strength of concrete cooperating with quarry dust as fine aggregate.

  18. Putting the brakes on prejudice rebound effects: An ironic effect of disparagement humor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Thomas E; Teeter, Sabrina R; Richardson, Kyle; Woodzicka, Julie A

    2017-01-01

    When people high in prejudice censor prejudice in one setting, they can experience a prejudice rebound effect-subsequently responding with more prejudice than otherwise. Disparagement humor fosters the release rather than suppression of prejudice. Thus, two experiments tested the hypothesis that exposure to disparagement humor attenuates rebound effects. Participants suppressed prejudice by writing fewer anti-gay thoughts about same-sex adoption (Experiment 1) or by reporting greater support for same-sex civil rights (Experiment 2) when expecting to share their responses with others (non-prejudice norm condition) but not if others first exchanged anti-gay jokes (prejudice norm condition). High-prejudice participants then exhibited prejudice rebound in the non-prejudice norm condition only. They rated a gay man more stereotypically (Experiment 1) and allocated greater budget cuts to a gay student organization (Experiment 2) in the non-prejudice norm condition.

  19. Rebound effect of modern drugs: serious adverse event unknown by health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Marcus Zulian

    2013-01-01

    Supported in the Hippocratic aphorism primum non nocere, the bioethical principle of non-maleficence pray that the medical act cause the least damage or injury to the health of the patient, leaving it to the doctor to assess the risks of a particular therapy through knowledge of possible adverse events of drugs. Among these, the rebound effect represents a common side effect to numerous classes of modern drugs, may cause serious and fatal disorders in patients. This review aims to clarify the health professionals on clinical and epidemiological aspects of rebound phenomenon. A qualitative, exploratory and bibliographic review was held in the PubMed database using the keywords 'rebound', 'withdrawal', 'paradoxical', 'acetylsalicylic acid', 'anti-inflammatory', 'bronchodilator', 'antidepressant', 'statin', 'proton pump inhibitor' and 'bisphosphonate'. The rebound effect occurs after discontinuation of numerous classes of drugs that act contrary to the disease disorders, exacerbating them at levels above those prior to treatment. Regardless of the disease, the drug and duration of treatment, the phenomenon manifests itself in a small proportion of susceptible individuals. However, it may cause serious and fatal adverse events should be considered a public health problem in view of the enormous consumption of drugs by population. Bringing together a growing and unquestionable body of evidence, the physician needs to have knowledge of the consequences of the rebound effect and how to minimize it, increasing safety in the management of modern drugs. On the other hand, this rebound can be used in a curative way, broadening the spectrum of the modern therapeutics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Empowering Technology and POETRY Supporting Scientific Inquiry: Investigating the Motion of a Rebounding Trolley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban-Woldron, Hildegard

    2012-03-01

    The recent implementation of technology in the classroom is probably one of the most challenging innovations that many teachers are having to confront today. Teachers have to develop a knowledge base that goes beyond technology proficiency, into learning about how technology, for example, can be used for various forms of representations of subject matters. This article aims to report on the investigation of the motion of a rebounding trolley, bringing together physics content, pedagogy, and technology to enhance student thinking and construction of knowledge. The activity, called "Rebounding Trolley," uses data logging and helps to emphasize the idea that velocity and acceleration can be in opposite directions.

  1. Measuring the rebound effect with micro data: A first difference approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Borger, Bruno; Mulalic, Ismir; Rouwendal, Jan

    2016-01-01

    that replaced their car during the period of observation combined with information on their driving behaviour before and after the car switch allows us to identify the rebound effect. Endogeneity is taken into account by using appropriate instruments. Results include the following. First, we reject...... rebound effect and changes in car characteristics in response to higher fuel prices imply that - compared to the reference scenario - higher fuel prices lead to a substantial reduction in both the demand for kilometres and in demand for fuel....

  2. Defining Space Mission Architects for the Smaller Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.

    1999-01-01

    The definition of the Space Mission Architect (SMA) must be clear in both technical and human terms if we expect to train and/or to find people needed to architect the numbers of smaller missions expected in the future.

  3. Inspection considerations for holes 0. 040 inch and smaller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    The accurate inspection of hole size and location for holes smaller than 0.040 inch necessitates several considerations beyond those normally encountered for larger holes. The technical aspects are described herein.

  4. Pheromone Chemistry of the Smaller European Elm Bark Beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Keith

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the aggregation pheromone of the smaller European elm bark beetle, Scolytus multistriatus (Marsham), with emphasis on information that could be used in the classroom as a practical application of organic chemistry. (Author/GA)

  5. Viral Skin Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Energy efficiency and rebound effects - Development, extent and containment; Energie-Effizienz und Reboundeffekte: Entstehung, Ausmass, Eindaemmung - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haan, P. de

    2009-07-15

    In this final report published for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE), the Institute for Environmental Decisions at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH in Zuerich examines so-called rebound effects. New, energy-efficient products that, in terms of energy-consumption, are cheaper to operate can lead to increased demand - the so-called rebound effect. The article deals with direct and indirect rebound effects and their origins as seen from the economical, socio-psychological and regulatory points of view. The results of empirical research on their magnitude are discussed and examples are quoted. Possible mental rebound effects are discussed, as are possible ways to inhibit such rebound effects.

  7. REBOUND: A Media-Based Life Skills and Risk Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröninger-Jungaberle, Henrik; Nagy, Ede; von Heyden, Maximilian; DuBois, Fletcher

    2015-01-01

    Background: REBOUND is a novel media-based life skills and risk education programme developed for 14- to 25-year olds in school, university or youth group settings. This paper outlines the programme's rationale, curriculum and implementation. It provides information of relevance to researchers, programme developers and policymakers. Methods/design…

  8. Equivalences in Biological and Economical Systems: Peloton Dynamics and the Rebound Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenchard, Hugh; Perc, Matjaz

    2016-01-01

    An interdisciplinary bridge is proposed between principles of collective behavior in biological systems, particularly bicycle pelotons, and the economic phenomenon called the rebound effect. Two main equivalencies are proposed between aspects of peloton dynamics and aspects of energy service efficiencies and the rebound effect. Firstly, a threshold whereby weaker cyclists, up to maximal capacities, sustain speeds of pacesetters by drafting; equivalent to a threshold whereby consumers will not exceed maximum allocated budgets for energy services, costs for which are externally determined. Secondly, a threshold of peloton dynamics whereby, below this threshold, weaker cyclists share costly non-drafting positions, whereas above this threshold cyclists cannot share these positions but can sustain pacesetter speeds. This is in turn equivalent to the threshold in the context of energy service efficiency, whereby consumers will increase spending to the limit indicated by the rebound magnitude but not to their maximum allocated budgets. These thresholds are a consequence of the model equations, and the latter threshold is explained by consumer apprehension that existing energy efficiencies could disappear or be negative, when consumers would be over budget. This partly explains long term rebound increase, whereby consumers increase consumption as confidence rises that cost savings due to energy service efficiency is stable.

  9. The measurement of intraocular pressure over positive soft contact lenses by rebound tonometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeri, Fabrizio; De Cusatis, Mario; Lupelli, Luigi; Swann, Peter Graham

    2016-01-01

    To investigate if the accuracy of intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements using rebound tonometry over disposable hydrogel (etafilcon A) contact lenses (CL) is affected by the positive power of the CLs. The experimental group comprised 26 subjects, (8 male, 18 female). IOP measurements were undertaken on the subjects' right eyes in random order using a Rebound Tonometer (ICare). The CLs had powers of +2.00D and +6.00D. Measurements were taken over each contact lens and also before and after the CLs had been worn. The IOP measure obtained with both CLs was significantly lower compared to the value without CLs (t test; p<0.001) but no significant difference was found between the two powers of CLs. Rebound tonometry over positive hydrogel CLs leads to a certain degree of IOP underestimation. This result did not change for the two positive lenses used in the experiment, despite their large difference in power and therefore in lens thickness. Optometrists should bear this in mind when measuring IOP with the rebound tonometer over plus power contact lenses. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Espana.. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of the ICare rebound tonometer as a home intraocular pressure monitoring device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asrani, Sanjay; Chatterjee, Ashmita; Wallace, David K; Santiago-Turla, Cecilia; Stinnett, Sandra

    2011-02-01

    (a) To investigate whether the ICare rebound tonometer can provide accurate measurements of intraocular pressure (IOP) in the hands of an inexperienced user compared with ICare measurements and Goldmann tonometry by a trained technician and (b) to assess the intrauser reproducibility of IOP measurements and the learning curve among patients using the ICare rebound tonometer. A trained technician used the ICare rebound tonometer to measure the IOP of the right eye of 100 glaucoma patients. The technician then instructed each patient on use of the ICare tonometer. Each patient then measured his/her own pressure using the ICare tonometer. Finally, a different technician, who was masked to both of the earlier readings, measured IOP by Goldmann applanation tonometry. Thirty patients repeated the ICare measurement 3 times (once every 5 min) 20 minutes after the initial IOP measurement. Of the 100 patients, 82 of patient ICare and the technician ICare readings were within 3 mm Hg of each other, and 75 of the patient ICare and Goldmann applanation tonometry measurements were within 3 mm Hg of each other. Intraclass correlations between self-administered ICare measurements 1 and 2, 1 and 3, and 2 and 3 were 0.69, 0.71 and 0.81, respectively. In this study, the ICare rebound tonometer was accurate and reliable in the hands of patients. Patients can easily learn to self-administer this test, possibly allowing for home monitoring of IOP.

  11. REBOUND: an open-source multi-purpose N-body code for collisional dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, H.; Liu, S.-F.

    2012-01-01

    REBOUND is a new multi-purpose N-body code which is freely available under an open-source license. It was designed for collisional dynamics such as planetary rings but can also solve the classical N-body problem. It is highly modular and can be customized easily to work on a wide variety of different problems in astrophysics and beyond. REBOUND comes with three symplectic integrators: leap-frog, the symplectic epicycle integrator (SEI) and a Wisdom-Holman mapping (WH). It supports open, periodic and shearing-sheet boundary conditions. REBOUND can use a Barnes-Hut tree to calculate both self-gravity and collisions. These modules are fully parallelized with MPI as well as OpenMP. The former makes use of a static domain decomposition and a distributed essential tree. Two new collision detection modules based on a plane-sweep algorithm are also implemented. The performance of the plane-sweep algorithm is superior to a tree code for simulations in which one dimension is much longer than the other two and in simulations which are quasi-two dimensional with less than one million particles. In this work, we discuss the different algorithms implemented in REBOUND, the philosophy behind the code's structure as well as implementation specific details of the different modules. We present results of accuracy and scaling tests which show that the code can run efficiently on both desktop machines and large computing clusters.

  12. Efficacy and rebound rates in propranolol-treated subglottic hemangioma: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Tyler; Faria, John; Pawar, Sachin; Siegel, Dawn; Chun, Robert H

    2017-11-01

    Propranolol has recently become the treatment of choice for management of subglottic and airway hemangiomas. This literature review aimed to determine the success rate of propranolol for managing these lesions as well as the rate of rebound growth following propranolol treatment cessation. Literature search involving MEDLINE and Scopus to identify English-language articles. Studies were identified using hemangioma, subglottic or airway, and propranolol for search terms. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they reported the treatment used, individual deidentified patient data, and contained patients without medical or surgical treatment prior to propranolol therapy RESULTS: Initial review included 107 abstracts. Twenty-four articles including case reports and case series met inclusion criteria and were included in the qualitative analysis. Forty-nine patients were included. Twenty-eight (57%) were treated with propranolol alone, and 20 (41%) were treated with a combination of propranolol and a corticosteroid. Thirty-seven (76%) of patients were treated with a dose of 2 mg/kg/d of propranolol. The initial treatment was successful in 43 (88%) of patients. Rebound growth occurred in four (9%) patients. Overall, six (12%) patients underwent surgical resection. Propranolol is efficacious for treating subglottic hemangiomas. Rebound growth does occur in a small subset of patients during the propranolol wean. Close observation for children during weaning of propranolol therapy for subglottic hemangioma is essential. Adjunctive management strategies need to be used in patients with rebound growth. Laryngoscope, 127:2665-2672, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. Rebound airway obstruction and responsiveness after cessation of terbutaline : Effects of budesonide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deJong, JW; vanderMark, TW; Koeter, GH; Postma, DS

    Regular monotherapy with inhaled Bz-agonists may lead to a temporary increase of airway obstruction and increase of airway responsiveness after cessation of treatment. We investigated whether antiinflammatory therapy may affect these rebound phenomena. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we

  14. Viral lysis of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lønborg, C.; Middelboe, M.; Brussaard, C.P.D.

    2013-01-01

    The viral mediated transformation of phytoplankton organic carbon to dissolved forms (“viral shunt”) has been suggested as a major source of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in marine systems. Despite the potential implications of viral activity on the global carbon fluxes, studies investigating

  15. Heating capacity of rebound shortwave diathermy and moist hot packs at superficial depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Amanda R; Draper, David O; Johnson, A Wayne; Diede, Mike T; Rigby, Justin H

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of a new continuous diathermy unit, ReBound, as a heating modality is unknown. To compare the effects of ReBound diathermy with silicate-gel moist hot packs on tissue temperature in the human triceps surae muscle. Crossover study. University research laboratory. A total of 12 healthy, college-aged volunteers (4 men, 8 women; age = 22.2 ± 2.25 years, calf subcutaneous fat thickness = 7.2 ± 1.9 mm). On 2 different days, 1 of 2 modalities (ReBound diathermy, silicate-gel moist hot pack) was applied to the triceps surae muscle of each participant for 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, the modality was removed, and temperature decay was recorded for 20 minutes. Medial triceps surae intramuscular tissue temperature at a depth of 1 cm was measured using an implantable thermocouple inserted horizontally into the muscle. Measurements were taken every 5 minutes during the 30-minute treatment and every minute during the 20-minute temperature decay, for a total of 50 minutes. Treatment was analyzed through a 2 × 7 mixed-model analysis of variance with repeated measures. Temperature decay was analyzed through a 2 × 21 mixed-model analysis of variance with repeated measures. During the 30-minute application, tissue temperatures at a depth of 1 cm increased more with the ReBound diathermy than with the moist hot pack (F6,66 = 7.14, P diathermy and moist hot packs increased tissue temperatures 3.69°C ± 1.50°C and 2.82°C ± 0.90°C, respectively, from baseline. Throughout the temperature decay, ReBound diathermy produced a greater rate of heat dissipation than the moist hot pack (F20,222 = 4.42, P diathermy increased tissue temperature to moderate levels, which were greater than the levels reached with moist hot packs.

  16. Viral Marketing Past Present Future

    OpenAIRE

    Nessipbekova, Zarina

    2010-01-01

    The work studies the viral marketing. These are past viral campaigns, viral campaigns today, and evaluates their actuality. The work tries to predict the development of viral marketing on the basis of the research done by the author.

  17. Trends and patterns in smaller companies: The Danish perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Madsen, Henning

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the empirical findings of a recent survey of Danish managers, with a special focus on managers in smaller companies. The survey, called the 'Danish Management Barometer', is part of a joint research programme between the Aarhus School of Business and the Danish Association...

  18. Entrepreneurship in Smaller Jurisdictions: Appraising a Glocal Elite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldacchino, Godfrey

    2008-01-01

    Entrepreneurship on smaller (often island) jurisdictions tends to suffer from the same import-orientation or "cargo cult" that affects many other issues: entrepreneurs are rarely locally bred but are most often "imported", recruited after long stints in other, larger countries, or else must be suffered to spend regular time…

  19. Does Studying Vocabulary in Smaller Sets Increase Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Tatsuya; Webb, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of part and whole learning on the acquisition of second language (L2, English) vocabulary. In whole learning, the materials to be learned are repeated in one large block, whereas, in part learning, the materials are divided into smaller blocks and repeated. Experiment 1 compared the effects of the following…

  20. The Underreported Use of Integrated Marketing Communication by Smaller Businesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ed

    This research suggests integrated marketing communication (IMC) is widely used by small business. In a survey of Midwest businesses, it was found that smaller business tend to integrate their marketing communication to the same extent as do larger businesses. Their advertising, P.R., and sales promotion are as likely to present a unified message,…

  1. Pride and Prejudice: The Choice for the Smaller Law School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitch, Edward

    1981-01-01

    The means required to establish a small, but quality, local law school are discussed. Facts about the Faculty of Law at the University of New Brunswick and arguments in favor of the enhancement in quality of the smaller law schools are presented. (MLW)

  2. Predicting BMI in young adults from childhood data using two approaches to modelling adiposity rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S; Davie, G; Lam, F

    1999-04-01

    To identify the age of adiposity rebound and the value of its associated BMI and examine their association with BMI at ages 18 and 21 y for males and females. A longitudinal study of a large cohort of people born in Dunedin, New Zealand between 1972-1973. Four hundred and seventy-four males and 448 females aged between birth and 21 y. BMI was derived from measurements of weight and height made when the participants were born and at intervals from age 3-21 y. When a random coefficients model was fitted to the data for those who had five or more measures of BMI between age 3 and age 18y, adiposity rebound occurred at 6.0 y of age for boys and 5.6y for girls. The values of BMI associated with these were 15.7 kg/m2 for boys and 15.5 kg/m2 for girls. The correlations between age at adiposity rebound and BMI at ages 18 and 21 y were between -0.72 and -0.65 for boys and -0.59 and -0.47 for girls. These were higher than those derived from fitting individual curves or from deriving the adiposity rebound from data collected up to age 11 y. The correlation between BMI at age 7y and BMI at ages 18 and 21 y were 0.70 and 0.61 for boys and 0.56 and 0.52 for girls. The correlations between measures of skeletal maturity at age 7y and adiposity rebound were statistically significant for boys but not for girls. BMI in early adulthood was associated with both age of adiposity rebound and BMI at that age. As the correlations between BMI at age 7 y and BMI at ages 18 and 21 y were similar in magnitude, BMI at age 7 y may be a more practical way of predicting BMI in early adulthood.

  3. Viral Entry into Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orsogna, Maria R.

    2010-09-01

    Successful viral infection of a healthy cell requires complex host-pathogen interactions. In this talk we focus on the dynamics specific to the HIV virus entering a eucaryotic cell. We model viral entry as a stochastic engagement of receptors and coreceptors on the cell surface. We also consider the transport of virus material to the cell nucleus by coupling microtubular motion to the concurrent biochemical transformations that render the viral material competent for nuclear entry. We discuss both mathematical and biological consequences of our model, such as the formulation of an effective integrodifferential boundary condition embodying a memory kernel and optimal timing in maximizing viral probabilities.

  4. Modified Schirmer tear test and rebound tonometry in blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário S.A. Falcão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to describe the modified Schirmer tear test (mSTT, intraocular pressure (IOP by rebound tonometry and palpebral fissure length (PFL in blue-fronted Amazon parrots (Amazona aestiva. Thirty-five healthy adult animals from a conservation breeding center in Brazil were used in this study. Modified Schirmer tear test, rebound tonometry and PFL measurements were performed in both eyes, with birds under physical restraint. Mean mSTT was 6.2±0.1mm/min and mean IOP was 6.4±0.1mmHg, while PFL was 10.1±0.1mm. A moderate correlation was seen between mSTT and PFL for OD (ρ=0.14 and OS (ρ=0.20. The results provide ophthalmic tests reference values for A. aestiva.

  5. Therapeutic use of the rebound effect of modern drugs: "New homeopathic medicines"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Zulian Teixeira

    Full Text Available Summary The homeopathic treatment is based on the principle of therapeutic similitude, employing medicines that cause certain disorders to treat similar manifestations, stimulating a reaction of the organism against its own ailments. The occurrence of this secondary reaction of the organism, opposite in nature to the primary action of the medicines, is evidenced in the study of the rebound (paradoxical effect of several classes of modern drugs. In this work, in addition to substantiate the principle of similitude before the experimental and clinical pharmacology, we suggest a proposal to employ hundreds of conventional drugs according to homeopathic method, applying the therapeutic similitude between the adverse events of medicines and the clinical manifestations of patients. Describing existing lines of research and a specific method for the therapeutic use of the rebound effect of modern drugs (http://www.newhomeopathicmedicines.com, we hope to minimize prejudices related to the homeopathy and contribute to a broadening of the healing art.

  6. The rebound effect of resource efficiency; Het reboundeffect bij resource efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oosterhuis, F.; Bouma, J. [Instituut voor Milieuvraagstukken IVM, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hanemaaijer, A. [Planbureau voor de Leefomgeving PBL, Den Haag (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    As a result of efficient use of natural resources production and use of goods and services can be made cheaper, which increases demand. However, that might partially offset savings in energy and other natural resources. This so-called 'rebound effect' can not be ignored. It is therefore worthwhile to keep that in formulating 'resource efficiency' policy [Dutch] Door efficienter om te gaan met natuurlijke hulpbronnen kunnen de productie en het gebruik van goederen en diensten goedkoper worden, waardoor de vraag ernaar toeneemt. Dat kan de besparingen op energie en andere natuurlijke hulpbronnen deels weer teniet doen. Dit 'rebound-effect' is niet verwaarloosbaar. Het is zinvol om hier bij beleid gericht op 'resource efficiency' rekening mee te houden.

  7. Evaluation of the Rebound Hernia Repair Device for Laparoscopic Hernia Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo; Sorcic, Laura; Ruth, George R.; Andrade, Rafael; Martin-del-Campo, Luis A.; Anderson,J. Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Background: The characteristics of the ideal type of mesh are still being debated. Mesh shrinkage and fixation have been associated with complications. Avoiding shrinkage and fixation would improve hernia recurrence rates and complications. To our knowledge, this is the first study of a device with a self-expanding frame for laparoscopic hernia repair. Methods: Six Rebound Hernia Repair Devices were placed laparoscopically in pigs. This device is a condensed polypropylene, super-thin, lightwe...

  8. Rebound syndrome after teriflunomide cessation in a patient with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamout, Bassem I; Said, Marianne; Hannoun, Salem; Zeineddine, Maya; Massouh, Joelle; Khoury, Samia J

    2017-09-15

    We report a case of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) with severe rebound syndrome 12weeks following discontinuation of teriflunomide therapy. The patient developed severe clinical relapses with significant increase in the number of brain and spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions. She responded well to intravenous and oral steroids and was later maintained on rituximab. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Correlations between corneal biomechanical properties measured with the ocular response analyzer and icare rebound tonometry

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge, Jorge; González-Méijome, José Manuel; Queirós, A; Fernandes, Paulo Rodrigues; Parafita, Manuel A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the biomechanical properties of the normal cornea, and correlate them with central and peripheral corneal thickness and age. Methods: Seventy-six right eyes of volunteers were measured with Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA), ICare rebound tonometry and an ultrasound pachymeter at corneal center and at 4 mm from corneal center in the nasal and temporal directions. Results: ICare readings were significantly correlated with central and peripheral corneal thickness an...

  10. Ankle brace attenuates the medial-lateral ground reaction force during basketball rebound jump

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Alex [UNESP; Goethel, Márcio Fagundes; Gáspari, Arthur Fernandes; Crozara, Luciano Fernandes; Gonçalves, Mauro [UNESP

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The jump landing is the leading cause for ankle injuries in basketball. It has been shown that the use of ankle brace is effective to prevent these injuries by increasing the mechanical stability of the ankle at the initial contact of the foot with the ground. Objective: To investigate the effects of ankle brace on the ground reaction force (GRF) during the simulation of a basketball rebound jump. Method: Eleven young male basketball players randomly carried out a si...

  11. Presenting a food in multiple smaller units increases expected satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham-Cooper, Rose E; Wilkinson, Laura L; Hardman, Charlotte A; Rogers, Peter J; Brunstrom, Jeffrey M

    2017-11-01

    Presentation of the same amount of a food in multiple smaller units ('segmentation') has been shown to reduce food intake and increase estimates of the amount of food consumed. However, this effect has been demonstrated for ad libitum food intake only. In the majority of cases, meals are not consumed ad libitum, but are pre-selected and consumed in their entirety, Expected satiety (ES; the anticipated capacity of a portion of food to relieve hunger between meals) is an excellent predictor of portion size selection. This study tested the hypothesis that segmentation increases ES. It was also hypothesised that perceived volume (PV) may account for the relationship between segmentation and ES. Sixty-eight participants made computer-based ES and PV judgments for equicaloric portions of three test foods (salted peanuts, spaghetti Bolognese, and chicken tikka masala), which were presented in either a single unit or as multiple smaller units (three or six units). Results revealed a consistent effect of segmentation on ES - foods presented in multiple smaller units were expected to deliver significantly greater satiety than when presented in a single unit (p < 0.005). Furthermore, results indicated that the effect of segmentation on ES was attributable to an increase in PV. ES plays an important role in determining the portion sizes that people select. Therefore, awareness of the effect of segmentation on ES may help to inform the design of foods that confer benefits for healthy weight maintenance. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Thucydides or Kissinger? : a critical review of smaller state diplomacy

    OpenAIRE

    Baldacchino, Godfrey

    2009-01-01

    In The Peloponnesian War, Thucydides (1972: 402) highlights the effects of the general, overall weakness of smaller states vis-à-vis larger, more powerful ones in a key passage, where the Athenians remind the Melians that: “… since you know as well as we do that, as the world goes, right is only in question between equals in power. Meanwhile, the strong do what they can and the weak suffer what they must.” Concerns about the vulnerability of small, weak, isolated states have...

  13. The remarkable environmental rebound effect of electric cars: a microeconomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font Vivanco, David; Freire-González, Jaume; Kemp, René; van der Voet, Ester

    2014-10-21

    This article presents a stepwise, refined, and practical analytical framework to model the microeconomic environmental rebound effect (ERE) stemming from cost differences of electric cars in terms of changes in multiple life cycle environmental indicators. The analytical framework is based on marginal consumption analysis and hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA). The article makes a novel contribution through a reinterpretation of the traditional rebound effect and methodological refinements. It also provides novel empirical results about the ERE for plug-in hybrid electric (PHE), full-battery electric (FBE), and hydrogen fuel cell (HFC) cars for Europe. The ERE is found to have a remarkable impact on product-level environmental scores. For the PHE car, the ERE causes a marginal increase in demand and environmental pressures due to a small decrease in the cost of using this technology. For FBE and HFC cars, the high capital costs cause a noteworthy decrease in environmental pressures for some indicators (negative rebound effect). The results corroborate the concern over the high influence of cost differences for environmental assessment, and they prompt sustainable consumption policies to consider markets and prices as tools rather than as an immutable background.

  14. Body mass index, adiposity rebound and early feeding in a longitudinal cohort (Raine Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, P; Hands, B; Parker, H; Bulsara, M; Beilin, L J; Kendall, G E; Oddy, W H

    2010-07-01

    This study examined the influence of type and duration of infant feeding on adiposity rebound and the tracking of body mass index (BMI) from birth to 14 years of age. A sample of 1330 individuals over eight follows-ups was drawn from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Trajectories of BMI from birth to adolescence using linear mixed model analysis investigated the influence of age at which breastfeeding was stopped and the age at which other milk was introduced (binomial 4-month cutoff point). A subsample of linear mixed model-predicted BMI was used to determine BMI and age at nadir for early infant feeding groups. Chi-square analysis between early feeding and weight status (normal weight, overweight and obese) groups found a significant difference between thee age at which breastfeeding was stopped (Padiposity rebound between early feeding groups were found (Padiposity rebound. The relationship between infant feeding and BMI remained up to the age of 14 years. Although confounding factors cannot be excluded, these findings support the importance of exclusive breastfeeding for longer than 4 months as a protective behaviour against the development of adolescent obesity.

  15. Rate of fat gain is faster in girls undergoing early adiposity rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachael W; Goulding, Ailsa; Lewis-Barned, Nick J; Williams, Sheila M

    2004-08-01

    To determine the changes in body composition (fat and lean mass) occurring in children during adiposity rebound (AR). Thirty-nine girls, 3 to 6 years of age at baseline, underwent yearly DXA scans for 2 years. An additional DXA scan was obtained 4 to 5 years after baseline. Age at AR was determined by modeling, and the velocity of change in height, weight, fat mass, and lean mass was estimated for each child using random coefficient models. Girls with an AR or =5 years were classified as late AR. Although body composition was similar at age 5, by age 9, girls with an early AR were significantly taller (3.5% more) and heavier (14.4%), with greater fat mass (50%) and percentage body fat (27%) than girls with a later AR. In addition, more girls were overweight according to BMI (18% vs. 6%) or percentage body fat (29% vs. 11%) at this time, despite no differences at baseline. Annual velocity of fat mass gain was over 2-fold higher in early compared with late rebounders (17.1% vs. 6.5%, p < 0.0001), with no difference in lean mass velocity (13.1% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.116). Differences in BMI during AR were caused specifically by alterations in body fat and not by alterations in lean mass or height. Children undergoing early AR gained fat at a faster rate than children who rebounded at a later age.

  16. Obesity and attenuated adiposity rebound in children with congenital hypothyroidism. Normalization of BMI values in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livadas, S; Magiakou, M-A; Mengreli, C; Girginoudis, P; Galani, C; Smyrnaki, P; Kanaka-Gantenbein, C; Xekouki, P; Chrousos, G P; Dacou-Voutetakis, C

    2007-07-01

    An earlier adiposity rebound, suggestive of adult obesity, has been reported in children with congenital hypothyroidism. We undertook this study to evaluate the effect of congenital hypothyroidism on: 1) the timing of adiposity rebound, 2) the long-term prognosis of BMI status, and 3) the factors potentially affecting adiposity in subjects with congenital hypothyroidism. We found that in children with congenital hypothyroidism the BMI values were higher during the first years of life compared to normal population, but subsequently normalized. After the initial rise of BMI, the decline (nadir) and subsequent rise (adiposity rebound), usually occurring in normal children at an age greater than 30 months, was less evident in our group of children with congenital hypothyroidism. The severity of hypothyroidism affected BMI values at 6 and 12, but not at 36 months of age. In conclusion, in children with congenital hypothyroidism, 1) the high BMI values in early childhood normalize in adolescence, and 2) the normally expected BMI fluctuations during the first years of life are attenuated. These findings constitute indirect evidence that thyroid function during fetal and neonatal life affects BMI status during the first years of life.

  17. REBOUND: Multi-purpose N-body code for collisional dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Hanno; Liu, Shang-Fei

    2011-10-01

    REBOUND is a multi-purpose N-body code which is freely available under an open-source license. It was designed for collisional dynamics such as planetary rings but can also solve the classical N-body problem. It is highly modular and can be customized easily to work on a wide variety of different problems in astrophysics and beyond. REBOUND comes with three symplectic integrators: leap-frog, the symplectic epicycle integrator (SEI) and a Wisdom-Holman mapping (WH). It supports open, periodic and shearing-sheet boundary conditions. REBOUND can use a Barnes-Hut tree to calculate both self-gravity and collisions. These modules are fully parallelized with MPI as well as OpenMP. The former makes use of a static domain decomposition and a distributed essential tree. Two new collision detection modules based on a plane-sweep algorithm are also implemented. The performance of the plane-sweep algorithm is superior to a tree code for simulations in which one dimension is much longer than the other two and in simulations which are quasi-two dimensional with less than one million particles.

  18. Muscle heating with Megapulse II shortwave diathermy and ReBound diathermy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, David O; Hawkes, Amanda R; Johnson, A Wayne; Diede, Mike T; Rigby, Justin H

    2013-01-01

    A new continuous diathermy called ReBound recently has been introduced. Its effectiveness as a heating modality is unknown. To compare the effects of the ReBound diathermy with an established deep-heating diathermy, the Megapulse II pulsed shortwave diathermy, on tissue temperature in the human triceps surae muscle. Crossover study. University research laboratory. Participants included 12 healthy, college-aged volunteers (4 men, 8 women; age = 22.2 ± 2.25 years, calf subcutaneous fat thickness = 7.2 ± 1.9 mm). Each modality treatment was applied to the triceps surae muscle group of each participant for 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, we removed the modality and recorded temperature decay for 20 minutes. We horizontally inserted an implantable thermocouple into the medial triceps surae muscle to measure intramuscular tissue temperature at 3 cm deep. We measured temperature every 5 minutes during the 30-minute treatment and each minute during the 20-minute temperature decay. Tissue temperature at a depth of 3 cm increased more with Megapulse II than with ReBound diathermy over the course of the treatment (F₆,₆₆ = 10.78, P diathermy did not produce as much intramuscular heating, leading to a slower heat dissipation rate than the Megapulse II (F₂₀,₂₂₀ = 28.84, P diathermy at increasing deep, intramuscular tissue temperature of the triceps surae muscle group.

  19. Lock-and-key mechanisms of cerebellar memory recall based on rebound currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetmore, Daniel Z; Mukamel, Eran A; Schnitzer, Mark J

    2008-10-01

    A basic question for theories of learning and memory is whether neuronal plasticity suffices to guide proper memory recall. Alternatively, information processing that is additional to readout of stored memories might occur during recall. We formulate a "lock-and-key" hypothesis regarding cerebellum-dependent motor memory in which successful learning shapes neural activity to match a temporal filter that prevents expression of stored but inappropriate motor responses. Thus, neuronal plasticity by itself is necessary but not sufficient to modify motor behavior. We explored this idea through computational studies of two cerebellar behaviors and examined whether deep cerebellar and vestibular nuclei neurons can filter signals from Purkinje cells that would otherwise drive inappropriate motor responses. In eyeblink conditioning, reflex acquisition requires the conditioned stimulus (CS) to precede the unconditioned stimulus (US) by >100 ms. In our biophysical models of cerebellar nuclei neurons this requirement arises through the phenomenon of postinhibitory rebound depolarization and matches longstanding behavioral data on conditioned reflex timing and reliability. Although CS-US intervals100 ms. This bound reflects the minimum time for deinactivation of rebound currents such as T-type Ca2+. In vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation, hyperpolarization-activated currents in vestibular nuclei neurons may underlie analogous dependence of adaptation magnitude on the timing of visual and vestibular stimuli. Thus, the proposed lock-and-key mechanisms link channel kinetics to recall performance and yield specific predictions of how perturbations to rebound depolarization affect motor expression.

  20. Bayesian Piecewise Linear Mixed Models With a Random Change Point: An Application to BMI Rebound in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilleman, Samuel L; Howe, Laura D; Wolfe, Rory; Tilling, Kate

    2017-11-01

    Body mass index (BMI) rebound refers to the beginning of the second rise in BMI during childhood. Accurate estimation of an individual's timing of BMI rebound is important because it is associated with health outcomes in later life. We estimated BMI trajectories for 6545 children from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. We used a novel Bayesian two-phase piecewise linear mixed model where the "change point" was an individual-level random effect corresponding to the individual-specific timing of BMI rebound. The model's individual-level random effects (intercept, prechange slope, postchange slope, change point) were multivariate normally distributed with an unstructured variance-covariance matrix, thereby, allowing for correlation between all random effects. Average age at BMI rebound (mean change point) was 6.5 (95% credible interval: 6.4 to 6.6) years. The standard deviation of the individual-specific timing of BMI rebound (random effects) was 2.0 years for females and 1.6 years for males. Correlation between the prechange slope and change point was 0.57, suggesting that faster rates of decline in BMI prior to rebound were associated with rebound occurring at an earlier age. Simulations showed that estimates from the model were less biased than those from models, assuming a common change point for all individuals or a nonlinear trajectory based on fractional polynomials. Our model flexibly estimated the individual-specific timing of BMI rebound, while retaining parameters that are meaningful and easy to interpret. It is applicable in any situation where one wishes to estimate a change-point process which varies between individuals.

  1. Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank

    2013-01-01

    This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.......This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus....

  2. Novel viral translation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Hilda H T; Jan, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Viral genomes are compact and encode a limited number of proteins. Because they do not encode components of the translational machinery, viruses exhibit an absolute dependence on the host ribosome and factors for viral messenger RNA (mRNA) translation. In order to recruit the host ribosome, viruses have evolved unique strategies to either outcompete cellular transcripts that are efficiently translated by the canonical translation pathway or to reroute translation factors and ribosomes to the viral genome. Furthermore, viruses must evade host antiviral responses and escape immune surveillance. This review focuses on some recent major findings that have revealed unconventional strategies that viruses utilize, which include usurping the host translational machinery, modulating canonical translation initiation factors to specifically enhance or repress overall translation for the purpose of viral production, and increasing viral coding capacity. The discovery of these diverse viral strategies has provided insights into additional translational control mechanisms and into the viral host interactions that ensure viral protein synthesis and replication. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Application of GRAM model for estimating groundwater rebound after mine closure: a case study at abandoned underground mines in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yosoon; Baek, Jieun; Kim, Dukmin

    2017-04-01

    Cessation of dewatering usually results in groundwater rebound after closing an underground mine because the mine voids and surrounding strata flood up to the levels of decant points such as shafts and drifts. The objective of this study was to develop a program for analyzing groundwater rebound in abandoned underground mines. Several numerical models have been developed to predict the timing, magnitude and location of discharges resulting from groundwater rebound. This study reviewed the numerical models such as MODFLOW, GRAM and MINEDW, and compares their scopes of assessment at different spatial and time scales. In addition, a GRAM(Groundwater Rebound in Abandoned Mine workings) model-based program, named GRAM for Windows, was developed using Visual Studio.NET 2012. The program, GRAM for Windows, is comprised of the graphic user interface and the simulation engine modules. Input and output files of the program were designed by considering the characteristics of GRAM model. Some case studies were performed to analyze groundwater rebound at abandoned underground mines in Korea. The comparisons of simulated and observed groundwater levels at the shaft of underground mine showed that the developed program can be used effectively to analyze and estimate the groundwater rebound in the abandoned underground mine.

  4. Immune and viral correlates of "secondary viral control" after treatment interruption in chronically HIV-1 infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Van Gulck

    Full Text Available Upon interruption of antiretroviral therapy, HIV-infected patients usually show viral load rebound to pre-treatment levels. Four patients, hereafter referred to as secondary controllers (SC, were identified who initiated therapy during chronic infection and, after stopping treatment, could control virus replication at undetectable levels for more than six months. In the present study we set out to unravel possible viral and immune parameters or mechanisms of this phenomenon by comparing secondary controllers with elite controllers and non-controllers, including patients under HAART. As candidate correlates of protection, virus growth kinetics, levels of intracellular viral markers, several aspects of HIV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell function and HIV neutralizing antibodies were investigated. As expected all intracellular viral markers were lower in aviremic as compared to viremic subjects, but in addition both elite and secondary controllers had lower levels of viral unspliced RNA in PBMC as compared to patients on HAART. Ex vivo cultivation of the virus from CD4+ T cells of SC consistently failed in one patient and showed delayed kinetics in the three others. Formal in vitro replication studies of these three viruses showed low to absent growth in two cases and a virus with normal fitness in the third case. T cell responses toward HIV peptides, evaluated in IFN-γ ELISPOT, revealed no significant differences in breadth, magnitude or avidity between SC and all other patient groups. Neither was there a difference in polyfunctionality of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, as evaluated with intracellular cytokine staining. However, secondary and elite controllers showed higher proliferative responses to Gag and Pol peptides. SC also showed the highest level of autologous neutralizing antibodies. These data suggest that higher T cell proliferative responses and lower replication kinetics might be instrumental in secondary viral control in the absence of

  5. Discovering hidden viral piracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eddo; Kliger, Yossef

    2005-12-01

    Viruses and developers of anti-inflammatory therapies share a common interest in proteins that manipulate the immune response. Large double-stranded DNA viruses acquire host proteins to evade host defense mechanisms. Hence, viral pirated proteins may have a therapeutic potential. Although dozens of viral piracy events have already been identified, we hypothesized that sequence divergence impedes the discovery of many others. We developed a method to assess the number of viral/human homologs and discovered that at least 917 highly diverged homologs are hidden in low-similarity alignment hits that are usually ignored. However, these low-similarity homologs are masked by many false alignment hits. We therefore applied a filtering method to increase the proportion of viral/human homologous proteins. The homologous proteins we found may facilitate functional annotation of viral and human proteins. Furthermore, some of these proteins play a key role in immune modulation and are therefore therapeutic protein candidates.

  6. Viral marketing on the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Štverák, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Thesis provides an overview of viral marketing. It describes the process by which you can be inspired to implement viral campaign. The thesis includes analysis of specific viral Web project. The aim of this thesis is to create a breakdown of the various components of viral marketing, to establish conditions that should be satisfied for the viral marketing to success, suggesting how to use viral marketing on social network Facebook and evaluate the various components of this service for the pr...

  7. Are LIGO's Black Holes Made From Smaller Black Holes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    The recent successes of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) has raised hopes that several long-standing questions in black-hole physics will soon be answerable. Besides revealing how the black-hole binary pairs are built, could detections with LIGO also reveal how the black holes themselves form?Isolation or HierarchyThe first detection of gravitational waves, GW150914, was surprising for a number of reasons. One unexpected result was the mass of the two black holes that LIGO saw merging: they were a whopping 29 and 36 solar masses.On the left of this schematic, two first-generation (direct-collapse) black holes form a merging binary. The right illustrates a second-generation hierarchical merger: each black hole in the final merging binary was formed by the merger of two smaller black holes. [Adapted fromGerosa et al., a simultaneously published paper that also explores the problem of hierarchical mergers and reaches similar conclusions]How do black holes of this size form? One possibility is that they form in isolation from the collapse of a single massive star. In an alternative model, they are created through the hierarchical merger of smaller black holes, gradually building up to the size we observed.A team of scientists led by Maya Fishbach (University of Chicago) suggests that we may soon be able to tell whether or not black holes observed by LIGO formed hierarchically. Fishbach and collaborators argue that hierarchical formation leaves a distinctive signature on the spins of the final black holes and that as soon as we have enough merger detections from LIGO, we can use spin measurements to statistically determine if LIGO black holes were formed hierarchically.Spins from Major MergersWhen two black holes merge, both their original spins and the angular momentum of the pair contribute to the spin of the final black hole that results. Fishbach and collaborators calculate the expected distribution of these final spins assuming that

  8. Automated Polarimetry with Smaller Aperture Telescopes: The ROVOR Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Moody

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available To better understand possible blazar jet mechanisms and morphologies, brighter prototypical objects are regularly monitored for variability in optical broad-band light. If the monitoring filters are polarized, the position angles and polarization percentages can be measured and their evolution monitored over time. However, building up a statistically significant time base of polarization parameters requires the arduous task of monitoring sources for months or years to catch and follow interesting events such as flares. Fortunately, monitoring an object is easily done using remotely operated or robotic telescopes. The Remote Observatory for Variable Object Research (ROVOR is a small-aperture telescope that has monitored blazars in broad-band Johnson filters since 2009. Calibration data using a set of four plane-polarized filters suggest that it is suitable for polarimetric monitoring as well. We have successfully collected data on CTA 102 and are encouraged at the prospects of monitoring it and other similar objects. Long-term monitoring campaigns are a scientifically and educationally-effective use of underutilized smaller-aperture telescopes.

  9. Rebound Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... swimming or cycling. To avoid injury, start slowly. Reduce stress. Get organized. Simplify your schedule. Plan ahead. Try to stay positive. Relax. Try yoga, meditation or relaxation exercises. Listen to music, read a book or take a hot bath. ...

  10. Viral pathogenesis in diagrams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tremblay, Michel; Berthiaume, Laurent; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    .... The 268 diagrams in Viral Pathogenesis in Diagrams were selected from over 800 diagrams of English and French virological literature, including one derived from a famous drawing by Leonardo da Vinci...

  11. Viral Gastroenteritis (Stomach Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu) Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  12. Viral hemorrhagic septicemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batts, William N.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) is one of the most important viral diseases of finfish worldwide. In the past, VHS was thought to affect mainly rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reared at freshwater facilities in Western Europe where it was known by various names including Egtved disease and infectious kidney swelling and liver degeneration (Wolf 1988). Today, VHS is known as an important source of mortality for cultured and wild fish in freshwater and marine environments in several regions of the northern hemisphere (Dixon 1999; Gagné et al. 2007; Kim and Faisal 2011; Lumsden et al. 2007; Marty et al. 1998, 2003; Meyers and Winton 1995; Skall et al. 2005b; Smail 1999; Takano et al. 2001). Viral hemorrhagic septicemia is caused by the fish rhabdovirus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a member of the genus Novirhabdovirus of the family Rhabdoviridae

  13. HIV Viral Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chains Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle ... used each time. Will exercise, nutrition, and other lifestyle modifications help decrease my HIV viral load? There ...

  14. Estimating concentration rebounds in pumping wells and their impact on aquifer remediation and risk analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Vila, X.; de Barros, F. P. J.; Fernández-Garcia, D.; Bolster, D.

    2012-04-01

    Capturing the effects of aquifer heterogeneity is key to evaluating risk in groundwater related problems. In this work we analyze the potential failure of remediation due to the rebound of concentrations driven by back diffusion. Withdrawing polluted water from a contaminated aquifer by pumping is one of the most common components of many remediation actions. Pumping proceeds until concentrations of contaminants in the extracted water falls below some pre-specified value. In several cases, it has been observed that a rebound in the concentration signal takes place at the well after remediation pumping stops. For this reason, a conservative approach may be needed and pumping may have to last much longer than back of the envelope calculations might suggest. It is well known and documented that spatial heterogeneity, ubiquitously found in the hydraulic properties of aquifers, leads to multiple mass transfer processes occurring at different time scales, both for conservative and reactive species. Heterogeneity thus plays a significant role in the interpretation of breakthrough curves and plays a driving role in controlling processes associated with concentration rebounds as described above. In this study we take a close look at this and lay the groundwork for a risk-based optimal operation methodology that is capable of estimating the time at which to end remediation pumping. Our model is built with aquifer parameters that characterize the role of a heterogeneous medium and the multiple scales of mass transfer as well as pumping rates and initial size of the polluted area. The results from this modeling framework will have a clear impact in economic terms on determining optimal and viable remediation strategies.

  15. Can Rebound Effects Explain Why Sustainable Mobility Has Not Been Achieved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Jakob Walnum

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the report “Our Common Future” launched sustainable development as a primary goal for society in 1987, both scientific and political discussions about the term’s definition and how to achieve sustainable development have ensued. The manifold negative environmental impacts of transportation are an important contributor to the so-far non-sustainable development in financially rich areas of the world. Thus, achieving sustainable mobility is crucial to achieving the wider challenge of sustainable development. In this article, we limit our sustainability focus to that of energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. We discuss whether rebound effects can reveal why sustainable mobility has not been reached. Rebound effects refer to behavioral or other systemic responses after the implementation of new technologies or other measures to reduce energy consumption. Three main strategies exist for achieving sustainable mobility: efficiency, substitution, and volume reduction. (1 The efficiency strategy is based on the idea that environmental problems caused by transport can be improved by developing new and more efficient technologies to replace old, inefficient, and polluting materials and methods; (2 The second strategy—substitution—argues for a change to less polluting means of transport; (3 The volume reduction strategy argue that efficiency and substitution are not sufficient, we must fundamentally change behavior and consumption patterns; people must travel less, and freight volumes must decrease. We found rebound effects associated with all three of the main strategies that will lead to offsetting expected savings in energy use and GHG emissions in the transport sector.

  16. Changes in fat mass and fat-free mass during the adiposity rebound: FLAME study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachael W; Williams, Sheila M; Carter, Philippa J; Goulding, Ailsa; Gerrard, David F; Taylor, Barry J

    2011-06-01

    To determine the changes in body composition from 3 to 7 years of age in children undergoing adiposity rebound (AR) at different ages. Body composition was measured bi-annually by bioelectrical impedance in 229 children from a birth cohort. Age at AR was calculated from changes in weight and height velocity over time. Early AR was defined as < 6.1 years (boys) and < 5.6 years (girls). Differences in fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) and the velocity of change in these measures were calculated between early and late rebounders. Physical activity (accelerometry), time in sedentary activity, birth factors, and parental weight were compared. Children with early and late AR did not differ in body composition at 3 years of age, except for greater FFM in boys (by 0.8 kg, P = 0.022). In both sexes, change in body mass index (BMI) was significantly higher in early compared with late AR, and was entirely due to differences in the rate of weight gain, rather than any discrepancy in height velocity. This weight differential is predominantly due to increased deposition of FM in girls and FFM in boys. However, in both sexes, children with early rebound have significantly greater increases in FM velocity from 5 years of age. Few differences in any environmental influences were observed. Variation in BMI associated with the timing of AR is due to differences in weight rather than height, and sex differences in the relative contribution of FM and FFM to this additional weight gain are apparent.

  17. Rebound of affective symptoms following acute cessation of deep brain stimulation in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, Pieter; Blankers, Matthijs; Figee, Martijn; Mantione, Mariska; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Schuurman, P Richard; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is regarded as an effective way to treat refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Little is known about the effects of DBS cessation following a longer period of stimulation. To determine the relapse and rebound effects of psychiatric symptoms, and their impact on Quality of Life (QoL) following acute cessation of DBS in OCD patients. We included 16 out of 32 patients who were treated with DBS between April 2005 and January 2011 at the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam. After treatment for at least one year, patients entered a 1-week phase in which DBS was switched off. We evaluated psychiatric symptoms and QoL at three time points: before DBS surgery (pre-DBS), following at least one year of DBS treatment (DBS-on) and following 1 week of DBS off (DBS-off). Psychiatric symptoms were assessed with the Yale-Brown obsessive-compulsive disorder scale (Y-BOCS), the Hamilton anxiety rating scale (HAM-A) and the Hamilton depression rating scale (HAM-D). QoL was assessed using the World Health Organization QOL scale (WHOQOL-Bref). Switching from DBS-on to DBS-off, Y-BOCS scores increased with 50%, HAM-A scores with 80% and HAM-D scores with 83%. In the DBS-off period, HAM-A and HAM-D scores exceeded pre-surgery levels with approximately 40%, suggesting a rebound phenomenon. Furthermore, a deterioration of physical and psychological QoL to levels comparable with pre-surgery was found during DBS-off. Acute DBS cessation causes a relapse of obsessions and compulsions and a rebound of anxiety and depression. Additionally, improvements on QoL disappear. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Treatment of viral encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Renan Barros

    2009-03-01

    Several viruses may cause central nervous system diseases with a broad range of clinical manifestations. The time course of the viral encephalitis can be acute, subacute, or chronic. Pathologically there are encephalitis with direct viral entry into the CNS in which brain parenchyma exhibits neuronal damaging and viral antigens and there are postinfectious autoimmune encephalitis associated with systemic viral infections with brain tissue presenting perivascular aggregation of immune cells and myelin damaging. Some virus affect previously healthy individuals while others produce encephalitis among imunocompromised ones. Factors such evolving lifestyles and ecological changes have had a considerable impact on the epidemiology of some viral encephalitis [e.g. West-Nile virus, and Japanese B virus]. Citomegalovirus and JC virus are examples of infections of the brain that have been seen more frequently because they occur in immunocompromised patients. In the other hand many scientific achievements in neuroimaging, molecular diagnosis, antiviral therapy, immunomodulatory treatments, and neurointensive care have allowed more precise and earlier diagnoses and more efficient treatments, resulting in improved outcomes. In this article, we will present the current drug options in the management of the main acute and chronic viral infection of the central nervous system of immunocompetent and immunocompromised adults, focusing on drugs mechanisms of action, efficacy, and side effects. The early diagnosis and correct management of such diseases can reduce mortality and neurological sequelae; however, even with recent treatment advances, potentially devastating outcomes are still possible.

  19. Mixed-mode synchronization between two inhibitory neurons with post-inhibitory rebound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagornov, Roman; Osipov, Grigory; Komarov, Maxim; Pikovsky, Arkady; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2016-07-01

    We study an array of activity rhythms generated by a half-center oscillator (HCO), represented by a pair of reciprocally coupled neurons with post-inhibitory rebounds (PIR). Such coupling-induced bursting possesses two time scales, one for fast spiking and another for slow quiescent periods, is shown to exhibit an array of synchronization properties. We discuss several HCO configurations constituted by two endogenous bursters, by tonic-spiking and quiescent neurons, as well as mixed-mode configurations composed of neurons of different type. We demonstrate that burst synchronization can be accompanied by complex, often chaotic, interactions of fast spikes within synchronized bursts.

  20. Postseismic Rebound in Fault Step-Overs Caused by Pore Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Gilles; Rosen, Paul; Rogez, Francois; Hudnut, Ken

    1996-01-01

    Near-field strain induced by large crustal earthquakes results in changes in pore fluid pressure that dissipate with time and produce surface deformation. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) interferometry revealed several centimeters of postseismic uplift in pull-apart structures and subsidence in a compressive jog along the Landers, California, 1992 earthquake surface rupture, with a relaxation time of 270 +/- 45 days. Such a postseismic rebound may be explained by the transition of the Poisson's ratio of the deformed volumes of rock from undrained to drained conditions as pore fluid flow allows pore pressure to return to hydrostatic equilibrium.

  1. More, smaller bacteria in response to ocean's warming?

    KAUST Repository

    Moran, Xose Anxelu G.

    2015-06-10

    Heterotrophic bacteria play a major role in organic matter cycling in the ocean. Although the high abundances and relatively fast growth rates of coastal surface bacterioplankton make them suitable sentinels of global change, past analyses have largely overlooked this functional group. Here, time series analysis of a decade of monthly observations in temperate Atlantic coastal waters revealed strong seasonal patterns in the abundance, size and biomass of the ubiquitous flow-cytometric groups of low (LNA) and high nucleic acid (HNA) content bacteria. Over this relatively short period, we also found that bacterioplankton cells were significantly smaller, a trend that is consistent with the hypothesized temperature-driven decrease in body size. Although decadal cell shrinking was observed for both groups, it was only LNA cells that were strongly coherent, with ecological theories linking temperature, abundance and individual size on both the seasonal and interannual scale. We explain this finding because, relative to their HNA counterparts, marine LNA bacteria are less diverse, dominated by members of the SAR11 clade. Temperature manipulation experiments in 2012 confirmed a direct effect of warming on bacterial size. Concurrent with rising temperatures in spring, significant decadal trends of increasing standing stocks (3% per year) accompanied by decreasing mean cell size (-1% per year) suggest a major shift in community structure, with a larger contribution of LNA bacteria to total biomass. The increasing prevalence of these typically oligotrophic taxa may severely impact marine foodwebs and carbon fluxes by an overall decrease in the efficiency of the biological pump. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Breastfeeding during the first 6 months of life, adiposity rebound and overweight/obesity at 8 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez-González, M D; Santana Del Pino, A; Henríquez-Sánchez, P; Peña-Quintana, L; Saavedra-Santana, P

    2016-01-01

    The question of whether breastfeeding protects the child from obesity is a still debated issue; however, the relationship between early adiposity rebound and higher risk of obesity is well known. This study was aimed at evaluating whether breastfeeding (without formula supplement) during the first 6 months of life delays the time of adiposity rebound and consequently reduces the rates of obesity at the age of 8. This retrospective cohort study included 1812 children born in Gran Canaria in 2004, with follow-up until they were 8 years of age. Anthropometrical data had been taken during routine visits to the doctor and were extracted from medical record databases. Only children with breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life (173 children) and children without breastfeeding (192 children) were included. Children with mixed feeding and children whose data were not available were excluded. No body mass index (BMI) differences were found between children with breastfeeding (17.7) or without breastfeeding (17.3) during the first 6 months of life. The percentages of children with normal weight, overweight and obesity were similar in both groups, as well as the age of adiposity rebound breastfeeding 3.61 years; formula 3.64 years). Early adiposity rebound was associated with increased BMI at the age of 8, both in male and female children. Breastfeeding during the first 6 months of life was not demonstrated to delay the age of the adiposity rebound, in our study.

  3. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness.......The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness....

  4. Evaluation of the Rebound Hernia Repair device for laparoscopic hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo; Sorcic, Laura; Ruth, George R; Andrade, Rafael; Martin-del-Campo, Luis A; Anderson, J Kyle

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of the ideal type of mesh are still being debated. Mesh shrinkage and fixation have been associated with complications. Avoiding shrinkage and fixation would improve hernia recurrence rates and complications. To our knowledge, this is the first study of a device with a self-expanding frame for laparoscopic hernia repair. Six Rebound Hernia Repair Devices were placed laparoscopically in pigs. This device is a condensed polypropylene, super-thin, lightweight, macroporous mesh with a self-expanding Nitinol frame. The devices were assessed for adhesions, shrinkage, and histological examination. Laboratory and radiologic evaluations were also performed. The handling properties of the devices facilitated their laparoscopic placement. They were easily identified with simple x-rays. The mesh was firmly integrated within the surrounding tissue. One device was associated with 3 small adhesions. The other 5 HRDs had no adhesions. We noted no shrinkage or folding. All devices preserved their original size and shape. At this evaluation stage, we found that the Rebound Hernia Repair Device may serve for laparoscopic hernia repair and has favorable handling properties. It prevents folding and shrinkage of the mesh. It may eliminate the need for fixation, thus preventing chronic pain. The Nitinol frame also allowed radiologic evaluation for gross movement. Further studies will be needed to evaluate its clinical application.

  5. Correlations between corneal biomechanical properties measured with the ocular response analyzer and ICare rebound tonometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Jorge Manuel Martins; González-Méijome, Jose M; Queirós, Antonio; Fernandes, Paulo; Parafita, Manuel A

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the biomechanical properties of the normal cornea, and correlate them with central and peripheral corneal thickness and age. Seventy-six right eyes of volunteers were measured with Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA), ICare rebound tonometry and an ultrasound pachymeter at corneal center and at 4 mm from corneal center in the nasal and temporal directions. ICare readings were significantly correlated with central and peripheral corneal thickness and corneal biomechanical properties. Corneal resistance factor was the biomechanical parameter with the higher correlation with ICare intraocular pressure (IOP) values. ICare tonometry at center and Goldmann equivalent IOP obtained with ORA were significantly higher for thicker than thinner corneas (Pcorneas and are positively correlated with biomechanical corneal parameters, namely corneal resistance factor. Although corneal thickness plays a significant role in rebound tonometry, elastic and viscous properties of the cornea seem to play a significant role in the interaction of the tonometer probe with the ocular surface. However, the mechanism behind this process is presently unknown.

  6. Severe Rebound-Associated Vertebral Fractures After Denosumab Discontinuation: 9 Clinical Cases Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Olivier; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Elena; Stoll, Delphine; Hans, Didier; Aubry-Rozier, Bérengère

    2017-02-01

    Denosumab inhibits bone resorption, increases bone mineral density, and reduces fracture risk. Denosumab was approved for the treatment of osteoporosis and the prevention of bone loss in some oncological situations. Denosumab discontinuation is associated with a severe bone turnover rebound (BTR) and a rapid loss of bone mineral density. The clinical consequences of the BTR observed after denosumab discontinuation are not known. We report 9 women who presented 50 rebound-associated vertebral fractures (RAVFs) after denosumab discontinuation. A broad biological and radiological assessment excluded other causes than osteoporosis. These 9 cases are unusual and disturbing for several reasons. First, all vertebral fractures (VFs) were spontaneous, and most patients had a high number of VFs (mean = 5.5) in a short period of time. Second, the fracture risk was low for most of these women. Third, their VFs occurred rapidly after last denosumab injection (9-16 months). Fourth, vertebroplasty was associated with a high number of new VFs. All the observed VFs seem to be related to denosumab discontinuation and unlikely to the underlying osteoporosis or osteopenia. We hypothesize that the severe BTR is involved in microdamage accumulation in trabecular bone and thus promotes VFs. Studies are urgently needed to determine 1) the pathophysiological processes involved, 2) the clinical profile of patients at risk for RAVFs, and 3) the management and/or treatment regimens after denosumab discontinuation. Health authorities, physicians, and patients must be aware of this RAVF risk. Denosumab injections must be scrupulously done every 6 months but not indefinitely.

  7. Predicting pubertal development by infantile and childhood height, BMI, and adiposity rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Alina; Shmoish, Michael; Hochberg, Ze'ev

    2015-10-01

    Despite substantial heritability in pubertal development, children differ in maturational tempo. (i) puberty and its duration are influenced by early changes in height and adiposity. (ii) Adiposity rebound (AR) is a marker for pubertal tempo. We utilized published prospective data from 659 girls and 706 boys of the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. We investigated the age of pubarche-thelarche-gonadarche-menarche as a function of early height, BMI, and AR. In girls, height standard deviation scores correlated negatively with thelarche and pubarche from 15 mo of age and with menarche from 54 mo. BMI correlated negatively with thelarche from 36 mo of age and menarche from 54 mo. In boys, age at gonadarche correlated negatively with height from 36 mo of age. An AR was detected in 47% of girls and 55% of boys, who became heavier and had earlier and faster puberty than those with no AR. The onset and tempo of puberty are influenced by a two-hit program. The first is exerted during the infancy-childhood transition (ICT; 6-12 mo) and includes height, as an early predictor of maturational tempo. The second hit occurs at the childhood-juvenility transition (5-7 y) and is based on adiposity and its rebound.

  8. Rebound mechanics of micrometre-scale, spherical particles in high-velocity impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Baran; Yang, Hankang; Gouldstone, Andrew; Müftü, Sinan

    2017-08-01

    The impact mechanics of micrometre-scale metal particles with flat metal surfaces is investigated for high-velocity impacts ranging from 50 m s-1 to more than 1 km s-1, where impact causes predominantly plastic deformation. A material model that includes high strain rate and temperature effects on the yield stress, heat generation due to plasticity, material damage due to excessive plastic strain and heat transfer is used in the numerical analysis. The coefficient of restitution e is predicted by the classical work using elastic-plastic deformation analysis with quasi-static impact mechanics to be proportional to Vi-1 / 4 and Vi-1 / 2 for the low and moderate impact velocities that span the ranges of 0-10 and 10-100 m s-1, respectively. In the elastic-plastic and fully plastic deformation regimes the particle rebound is attributed to the elastic spring-back that initiates at the particle-substrate interface. At higher impact velocities (0.1-1 km s-1) e is shown to be proportional to approximately Vi-1. In this deeply plastic deformation regime various deformation modes that depend on plastic flow of the material including the time lag between the rebound instances of the top and bottom points of particle and the lateral spreading of the particle are identified. In this deformation regime, the elastic spring-back initiates subsurface, in the substrate.

  9. Comparison of Rebound Tonometry, Perkins Applanation Tonometry and Ocular Response Analyser in Mucopolysaccharidosis Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Wasielica-Poslednik

    Full Text Available To investigate the feasibility and to compare three devices measuring intraocular pressure (IOP in mucopolysaccharidosis patients (MPS: iCare rebound tonometer (RT, Perkins applanation tonometer (PAT and ocular response analyzer (ORA.MPS patients who underwent at least two examinations out of: RT, PAT and ORA at the same visit were identified and retrospectively analyzed in this study.17 patients fulfilled the inclusion criterion. In all 17 patients IOP measurements were performed with RT (34 eyes and ORA (33 eyes, while PAT measurement was possible in only 12 (24 eyes patients. The RT, corneal-compensated intraocular pressure (IOPcc and Goldmann-correlated intraocular pressure (IOPg differed relevantly from IOP assessed with PAT. Corneal clouding in MPS patients correlated positively with PAT, RT and IOPg (r = 0.3, 0.5, and 0.5 respectively, but not with IOPcc (r = 0.07. The MPS-related corneal clouding correlated positively with biomechanical corneal parameters assessed with ORA: corneal hysteresis (r = 0.77 and corneal resistance factor (r = 0.77 either.RT and ORA measurements were tolerated better than applanation tonometry in MPS patients. IOP measurements assessed with RT and ORA differed relevantly from PAT. Corneal-compensated IOP assessed with ORA seems to be less affected by the MPS-related corneal clouding than applanation or rebound tonometry. RT and ORA measurements should be preferred for IOP assessment in patients with MPS.

  10. Rumination and Rebound from Failure as a Function of Gender and Time on Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald C. Whiteman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Rumination is a trait response to blocked goals that can have positive or negative outcomes for goal resolution depending on where attention is focused. Whereas “moody brooding” on affective states may be maladaptive, especially for females, “reflective pondering” on concrete strategies for problem solving may be more adaptive. In the context of a challenging general knowledge test, we examined how Brooding and Reflection rumination styles predicted students’ subjective and event-related responses (ERPs to negative feedback, as well as use of this feedback to rebound from failure on a later surprise retest. For females only, Brooding predicted unpleasant feelings after failure as the task progressed. It also predicted enhanced attention to errors through both bottom-up and top-down processes, as indexed by increased early (400–600 ms and later (600–1000 ms late positive potentials (LPP, respectively. Reflection, despite increasing females’ initial attention to negative feedback (i.e., early LPP, as well as both genders’ recurring negative thoughts, did not result in sustained top-down attention (i.e., late LPP or enhanced negative feelings toward errors. Reflection also facilitated rebound from failure in both genders, although Brooding did not hinder it. Implications of these gender and time-related rumination effects for learning in challenging academic situations are discussed.

  11. VIRAL DISEASES IN SEA FISH

    OpenAIRE

    Ivančica Strunjak-Perović; Mato Hacmanjek; Rozelinda Čož-Rakovac; Emin Teskeredžić

    1996-01-01

    Adequate knowledge on fish diseases caused by viruses is still lacking. Up until now, in fish which live their entire life cycle or part of it in the sea, some viral diseases have been determined (lymphoeytis, viral necrosis of crythrocytes, ciravosti cod syndrome, encephalitis, viral hemoragic septichemistry, viral hematopoetic necrosis, viral gusteraca necrosis, chum renviral infection, branchionephritis, rabdociral eel infection). Some of these diseases primarily occur in the freshwater ph...

  12. [Vasculitis and viral infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Aguilar, N E; Guido Bayardo, R; Vargas Camaño, M E; Compañ González, D; Miranda Feria, A J

    1997-01-01

    Viruses have been implicated in vasculitis. To determine activity of viral infection associated with vasculitis. 17 patients with vasculitis had been in immunological and antiviral antibodies evaluation. Twenty five healthy controls sex and age matched with hematic biometry (BH) and AA. All subjects were negative to HIV and HBV. Viral activity was demonstrated in eight patients; vascular purpura (5), Takayasu disease (1), polyarteritis nodosa (1), erythema nodosum (1). None subject of control group had IgM activity. Antibodies response of IgG in patients were of lesser intensity than in control group. 14 abnormalities in BH were found in patients and 4 in control group. Immune response in patients, measured by lymphocyte subpopulations and circulating immune complexes was abnormal. In conclusion 47% showed viral activity, but the dominant feature was abnormal immune response in 82%.

  13. Modeling Viral Capsid Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    I present a review of the theoretical and computational methodologies that have been used to model the assembly of viral capsids. I discuss the capabilities and limitations of approaches ranging from equilibrium continuum theories to molecular dynamics simulations, and I give an overview of some of the important conclusions about virus assembly that have resulted from these modeling efforts. Topics include the assembly of empty viral shells, assembly around single-stranded nucleic acids to form viral particles, and assembly around synthetic polymers or charged nanoparticles for nanotechnology or biomedical applications. I present some examples in which modeling efforts have promoted experimental breakthroughs, as well as directions in which the connection between modeling and experiment can be strengthened. PMID:25663722

  14. [Viral hepatitis in travellers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Cândida

    2007-01-01

    Considering the geographical asymmetric distribution of viral hepatitis A, B and E, having a much higher prevalence in the less developed world, travellers from developed countries are exposed to a considerable and often underestimated risk of hepatitis infection. In fact a significant percentage of viral hepatitis occurring in developed countries is travel related. This results from globalization and increased mobility from tourism, international work, humanitarian and religious missions or other travel related activities. Several studies published in Europe and North America shown that more than 50% of reported cases of hepatitis A are travel related. On the other hand frequent outbreaks of hepatitis A and E in specific geographic areas raise the risk of infection in these restricted zones and that should be clearly identified. Selected aspects related with the distribution of hepatitis A, B and E are reviewed, particularly the situation in Portugal according to the published studies, as well as relevant clinical manifestations and differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Basic prevention rules considering enteric transmitted hepatitis (hepatitis A and hepatitis E) and parenteral transmitted (hepatitis B) are reviewed as well as hepatitis A and B immunoprophylaxis. Common clinical situations and daily practice "pre travel" advice issues are discussed according to WHO/CDC recommendations and the Portuguese National Vaccination Program. Implications from near future availability of a hepatitis E vaccine, a currently in phase 2 trial, are highlighted. Potential indications for travellers to endemic countries like India, Nepal and some regions of China, where up to 30% of sporadic cases of acute viral hepatitis are caused by hepatitis E virus, are considered. Continued epidemiological surveillance for viral hepatitis is essential to recognize and control possible outbreaks, but also to identify new viral hepatitis agents that may emerge as important global health

  15. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Viral meningitis and encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuppeny, Misti

    2013-09-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges, whereas encephalitis is inflammation of the parenchymal brain tissue. The single distinguishing element between the 2 diagnoses is the altered state of consciousness, focal deficits, and seizures found in encephalitis. Consequently meningoencephalitis is a term used when both findings are present in the patient. Viral meningitis is not necessarily reported as it is often underdiagnosed, whereas encephalitis cases are on the increase in various areas of North America. Improved imaging and viral diagnostics, as well as enhanced neurocritical care management, have improved patient outcomes to date. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Rebound tonometry over an air-filled anterior chamber in the supine child after intraocular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ryan; Jiramongkolchai, Kim; Silverstein, Evan; Freedman, Sharon F

    2016-04-01

    Intracameral air is a critical component of multiple ophthalmic surgical procedures and is frequently used in pediatric intraocular surgery. Among other benefits, it helps to facilitate postoperative examination in uncooperative children by allowing quick confirmation of a formed anterior chamber. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness and accuracy of a position-independent rebound tonometer (Icare PRO) in measuring intraocular pressure (IOP) intraoperatively in pediatric eyes with intracameral air compared to a commonly used handheld applanation tonometer (Tono-Pen XL). In this prospective study of sequential children undergoing intraocular surgery, IOP was measured immediately following general anesthesia induction using both Icare PRO rebound tonometry and Tono-Pen XL tonometry, with instrument order randomized, in the supine child's eye(s). At completion of surgery after standard placement of intracameral air IOP was again measured using both instruments. A total of 42 eyes of 30 children were included. Surgeries included glaucoma (25), cataract-related (16), and both (1). Mean preoperative IOP by Tono-Pen XL was 23.52 ± 9.76 mm Hg; by Icare PRO, 20.94 ± 10.01 mm Hg (P = 0.0012). Mean IOP over intracameral air at surgery conclusion by Tono-Pen XL (n = 41) was 12.66 ± 4.90; by Icare PRO (n = 42), 12.96 ± 5.10 mm Hg (P = 0.46). One eye had postoperative IOP unrecordable by Tono-Pen XL but 7.9 mm Hg by Icare PRO. Bland-Altman analysis, which included only paired measurements, showed a preoperative mean difference in IOP (ΔIOPT-I) of 2.58 mm Hg (95% CI, -6.86 to 12.02); postoperative mean ΔIOPT-I of -0.42 mm Hg [95% CI, -7.57 to 6.73]. Position-independent rebound tonometry (Icare PRO) accurately measured IOP in supine children's eyes postoperatively in the presence of intracameral air. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. HIV and Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get some forms of viral hepatitis the same way you get HIV—through unprotected sexual contact and injection drug use. HAV, which causes a short-term but occasionally severe illness, is usually spread when the virus is ingested from contact with ...

  19. Immigration and viral hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Sharma (Suraj); M. Carballo (Manuel); J.J. Feld (Jordan J.); H.L.A. Janssen (Harry)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and

  20. VIRAL FEVER WITH THROMBOCYTOPENIA

    OpenAIRE

    Shilpa Anand Hakki

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is an alarming increase in the incidence of fever with thrombocytopenia especially during monsoon and peri-monsoon period. Infections with protozoa, bacteria and viruses can cause thrombocytopenia with or without disseminated intravascular coagulation. Commonly, dengue, malaria, scrub typhus and other rickettsial infections, meningococci, Leptospira and certain viral infections present as fever with thrombocytopenia. Occasionally, these patients can go on to devel...

  1. Vortex Reconnections and Rebounds in Trapped Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Serafini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Reconnections and interactions of filamentary coherent structures play a fundamental role in the dynamics of fluids, redistributing energy and helicity among the length scales and inducing fine-scale turbulent mixing. Unlike ordinary fluids, where vorticity is a continuous field, in quantum fluids vorticity is concentrated into discrete (quantized vortex lines turning vortex reconnections into isolated events, making it conceptually easier to study. Here, we report experimental and numerical observations of three-dimensional quantum vortex interactions in a cigar-shaped atomic Bose-Einstein condensate. In addition to standard reconnections, already numerically and experimentally observed in homogeneous systems away from boundaries, we show that double reconnections, rebounds, and ejections can also occur as a consequence of the nonhomogeneous, confined nature of the system.

  2. Visual analysis and Schmidt rebound hammer test of Taj-ul-Masajid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hussain

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Taj-ul-Masajid, literally, the crown among mosques is an embodiment of genius structural engineering located in the heart of Madhya Pradesh, Bhopal. A unique combination of the Mughal Architecture in complete stone masonry and modern day RCC work, it is a liaison between the past and the present of structural engineering. A wonder in its own right, the structure is often neglected by technicians and conservationalists alike, a satire on their ingenuity. Now, in a severely dilapidated condition, the structure is in pressing need of structural rehabilitation. The authors intend to perform in-situ Non-Destructive Testing & Evaluation (NDT&E of this structure and thereby suggest steps to better its present condition. As a first step, they’ve performed the visual analysis and Schmidt Rebound Hammer Test on the concrete portion of the structure which has been presented herein. The authors have also suggested a new approach for the verification of results obtained.

  3. Modulation of post‐movement beta rebound by contraction force and rate of force development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Adam; Mullinger, Karen J.; O'Neill, George C.; Barratt, Eleanor L.; Morris, Peter G.; Bauer, Markus; Folland, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Movement induced modulation of the beta rhythm is one of the most robust neural oscillatory phenomena in the brain. In the preparation and execution phases of movement, a loss in beta amplitude is observed [movement related beta decrease (MRBD)]. This is followed by a rebound above baseline on movement cessation [post movement beta rebound (PMBR)]. These effects have been measured widely, and recent work suggests that they may have significant importance. Specifically, they have potential to form the basis of biomarkers for disease, and have been used in neuroscience applications ranging from brain computer interfaces to markers of neural plasticity. However, despite the robust nature of both MRBD and PMBR, the phenomena themselves are poorly understood. In this study, we characterise MRBD and PMBR during a carefully controlled isometric wrist flexion paradigm, isolating two fundamental movement parameters; force output, and the rate of force development (RFD). Our results show that neither altered force output nor RFD has a significant effect on MRBD. In contrast, PMBR was altered by both parameters. Higher force output results in greater PMBR amplitude, and greater RFD results in a PMBR which is higher in amplitude and shorter in duration. These findings demonstrate that careful control of movement parameters can systematically change PMBR. Further, for temporally protracted movements, the PMBR can be over 7 s in duration. This means accurate control of movement and judicious selection of paradigm parameters are critical in future clinical and basic neuroscientific studies of sensorimotor beta oscillations. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2493–2511, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc PMID:27061243

  4. Metal-free oxidation of aromatic carbon-hydrogen bonds through a reverse-rebound mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Changxia; Liang, Yong; Hernandez, Taylor; Berriochoa, Adrian; Houk, Kendall N; Siegel, Dionicio

    2013-07-11

    Methods for carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bond oxidation have a fundamental role in synthetic organic chemistry, providing functionality that is required in the final target molecule or facilitating subsequent chemical transformations. Several approaches to oxidizing aliphatic C-H bonds have been described, drastically simplifying the synthesis of complex molecules. However, the selective oxidation of aromatic C-H bonds under mild conditions, especially in the context of substituted arenes with diverse functional groups, remains a challenge. The direct hydroxylation of arenes was initially achieved through the use of strong Brønsted or Lewis acids to mediate electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions with super-stoichiometric equivalents of oxidants, significantly limiting the scope of the reaction. Because the products of these reactions are more reactive than the starting materials, over-oxidation is frequently a competitive process. Transition-metal-catalysed C-H oxidation of arenes with or without directing groups has been developed, improving on the acid-mediated process; however, precious metals are required. Here we demonstrate that phthaloyl peroxide functions as a selective oxidant for the transformation of arenes to phenols under mild conditions. Although the reaction proceeds through a radical mechanism, aromatic C-H bonds are selectively oxidized in preference to activated Csp3-H bonds. Notably, a wide array of functional groups are compatible with this reaction, and this method is therefore well suited for late-stage transformations of advanced synthetic intermediates. Quantum mechanical calculations indicate that this transformation proceeds through a novel addition-abstraction mechanism, a kind of 'reverse-rebound' mechanism as distinct from the common oxygen-rebound mechanism observed for metal-oxo oxidants. These calculations also identify the origins of the experimentally observed aryl selectivity.

  5. Counterintuitive publicity and the rebound effect A publicidade contra-intuitiva e o efeito ricochete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Leite

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Counterintuitive publicity and the rebound effect — This paper shares with the reader some conceptual ideas of counterintuitive advertising, observing its possible effects on the reevaluation and deconstruction of beliefs and social stereotypes in the cognitive make-up of the viewer. The ironic rebound effect is singled out among the probable reflexes, according to the theory propounded by Daniel M. Wegner. This theory is applied taking as an example Fiat's commercial "The Driver", which was part of an advertising campaign in Brazil called "Review your concepts" to introduce its new Palio 2002 car model. The authors are currently engaged in a laboratory experiment to measure the above described theory in a consistent manner. O propósito deste artigo é compartilhar com o leitor algumas noções conceituais de publicidade contra-intuitiva e observar seus possíveis efeitos na reavaliação, desconstrução de crenças e estereótipos sociais, na estrutura cognitiva do indivíduo receptor. Destaca-se entre os reflexos provavelmente gerados o irônico efeito ricochete, segundo a teoria desenvolvida por Daniel M. Wegner. A aplicação para se discutir o cruzamento da narrativa contra-intuitiva e o efeito ricochete será, neste primeiro momento, pela exemplificação do filme Motorista, peça integrante da campanha publicitária da Fiat do Brasil "Reveja seus conceitos", para o lançamento do automóvel Palio 2002. Um experimento laboratorial está sendo desenvolvido pelos autores para se mensurar de maneira consistente a apresentação teórico-conceitual exposta.

  6. Paintball trauma and mechanisms of optic nerve injury: rotational avulsion and rebound evulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponsel, William E; Gray, Walt; Groth, Sylvia L; Stern, Amber R; Walker, James D

    2011-12-20

    Ballistic impact studies and supercomputer modeling were performed to elicit the mechanisms of optic nerve rupture that may accompany blunt ocular trauma. Paintball ocular impact responses were studied with abattoir-fresh porcine eyes. Physics-based numerical code CTH was used to produce robust geometric and constitutive models of the eye and orbit, providing a comparative 3-D finite volume model to help determine the mechanisms underlying empirical ballistic observations. Among 59 porcine eye specimens submitted to paintball impact in the 1- to 13-J range, 10 (17%) disengaged completely from the orbital mount. In each instance the paintball penetrated the orbit adjacent to the globe, producing rotation and eventual globe repulsion, dramatically evident on high-speed film images. Supercomputer modeling yielded similar globe-expulsive results when orbital constraints were in place, but not when these were removed. In these models, tangential (grazing) impact sheared the nerve flush with the globe via a strain rate effect within 260 μs, with minimal posterior displacement and just 5° of globe rotation. Midperipheral impact produced compressive globe distortion and posterior displacement, followed by rebound and tractional nerve avulsion 10 mm behind the lamina after 700 μs and 20° of globe rotation. Constitutive modeling studies suggest at least two trajectory-dependent mechanisms for optic nerve rupture with paintball impact on the eye. Tangential glancing blows produce strain-rate rotational avulsion, abscising the optic nerve with minimal internal globe disruption, whereas off-center direct impact produces slower rotational-rebound evulsion, traumatizing the globe and breaching the nerve posteriorly. The latter mechanism would be expected to arise more commonly and would most likely be clinically masked by accompanying intraocular injury.

  7. A Case Report: Red Skin Syndrome- as the Rebound Effect of Using a Long Term Potent Topical Corticosteroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristine D. Octaviani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available 31 years old male suffered from a rare skin disorder, diagnosed of red skin syndrome. Seven years ago, symptoms was begun with a light itching on skin area of body as well as face, and visited a general practitioner, diagnosed of light allergic rhinitis. He was prescribed oral corticosteroid, methyl prednisolone 4 mg b.i.d and very potent topical corticosteroid, clobetasol. The symptoms was significantly disappeared and being rebound after stopping the prescription. To maintain this rebound effect, for seven years in on-off unhealed conditions, he used topical cream corticosteroid, clobetasol, that fully masked this worst rebound condition. When application of the topical cream was stopped, rebound effect relapsed and even red skin syndrome became worse than before. After 20 months of being fully stopped from corticosteroid, the symptoms finally slowly reduced. He almost fully recovered and had a normal life until now December 2013. By this case, we can learn that this red skin syndrome, resulted from side effect of corticosteroid, will be stopped by fully stopping administering orally or topically, and this will take quite long time for skin to recover.

  8. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2007-01-01

    Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness.......Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness....

  9. Analysis of the subcellular targeting of the smaller replicase protein of Pelargonium flower break virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Turiño, Sandra; Hernández, Carmen

    2012-02-01

    Replication of all positive RNA viruses occurs in association with intracellular membranes. In many cases, the mechanism of membrane targeting is unknown and there appears to be no correlation between virus phylogeny and the membrane systems recruited for replication. Pelargonium flower break virus (PFBV, genus Carmovirus, family Tombusviridae) encodes two proteins, p27 and its read-through product p86 (the viral RNA dependent-RNA polymerase), that are essential for replication. Recent reports with other members of the family Tombusviridae have shown that the smaller replicase protein is targeted to specific intracellular membranes and it is assumed to determine the subcellular localization of the replication complex. Using in vivo expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in plant and yeast cells, we show here that PFBV p27 localizes in mitochondria. The same localization pattern was found for p86 that contains the p27 sequence at its N-terminus. Cellular fractionation of p27GFP-expressing cells confirmed the confocal microscopy observations and biochemical treatments suggested a tight association of the protein to membranes. Analysis of deletion mutants allowed identification of two regions required for targeting of p27 to mitochondria. These regions mapped toward the N- and C-terminus of the protein, respectively, and could function independently though with distinct efficiency. In an attempt to search for putative cellular factors involved in p27 localization, the subcellular distribution of the protein was checked in a selected series of knockout yeast strains and the outcome of this approach is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Viral Marketing and Academic Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Koktová, Silvie

    2010-01-01

    This bachelor thesis examines modern and constantly developing kind of internet marketing -- the so called viral marketing. It deals with its origin, principle, process, advantages and disadvantages, types of viral marketing and presumptions of creating successful viral campaign. The aim of the theoretical part is especially the understanding of viral marketing as one of the effective instruments of contemporary marketing. In this theoretical part the thesis also elaborates a marketing school...

  11. Dengue viral infections

    OpenAIRE

    Malavige, G; Fernando, S; Fernando, D; Seneviratne, S

    2004-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing...

  12. PROFILE OF VIRAL CONJUCTIVITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Kishan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Viral conjunctivitis is most commonly seen in the outpatient department. A variety of viruses which are responsible for conjunctival infection , of which Adenovirus is the most common. It is highly contagious during the first 2 weeks of infection. It can cause corneal involvement within 4 - 5 days after the onset of symptoms. Corneal lesions range from SPK (Superficial Punctat e Keratitis to epithelial defects. These corneal lesions may cause intense photophobia and impairment of vision. AIM : To find out the commonest etiological agent , to study the clinical features and complications related to it. METHODOLOGY : This study was carried out prospectively. 100 patients who came to outpatient department between October 2013 to October 2014 were enrolled in the study. All the age groups and both the genders were included. Patients underwent slit lamp examination and were diagnosed cl inically. 25 cases were submitted for Gram staining and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR study to know the type of virus and serotype . RESULT : 100 patients were diagnosed with viral conjunctivitis and were kept on follow up. 21percent of patients developed SPK. Adenovirus 8 was found to be more common than other viruses. CONCLUSION : The present study showed Adeno virus to be the most common etiological agent causing viral conjunctivitis and complications like subepithelial opacities and diminished vision

  13. Ultra-Sensitive HIV-1 Latency Viral Outgrowth Assays Using Humanized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Schmitt

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the current quest for a complete cure for HIV/AIDS, highly sensitive HIV-1 latency detection methods are critical to verify full viral eradication. Until now, the in vitro quantitative viral outgrowth assays (qVOA have been the gold standard for assessing latent HIV-1 viral burden. However, these assays have been inadequate in detecting the presence of ultralow levels of latent virus in a number of patients who were initially thought to have been cured, but eventually showed viral rebound. In this context, new approaches utilizing in vivo mouse-based VOAs are promising. In the murine VOA (mVOA, large numbers of CD4+ T cells or PBMC from aviremic subjects are xenografted into immunodeficient NSG mice, whereas in the humanized mouse-based VOA (hmVOA patient CD4+ T cell samples are injected into BLT or hu-hematopoetic stem cells (hu-HSC humanized mice. While latent virus could be recovered in both of these systems, the hmVOA provides higher sensitivity than the mVOA using a fewer number of input cells. In contrast to the mVOA, the hmVOA provides a broader spectrum of highly susceptible HIV-1 target cells and enables newly engrafted cells to home into preformed human lymphoid organs where they can infect cells in situ after viral activation. Hu-mice also allow for both xenograft- and allograft-driven cell expansions with less severe GvH providing a longer time frame for potential viral outgrowth from cells with a delayed latent viral activation. Based on these advantages, the hmVOA has great potential in playing an important role in HIV-1 latency and cure research.

  14. Longitudinal Evidence for Smaller Hippocampus Volume as a Vulnerability Factor for Perceived Stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lindgren, Lenita; Bergdahl, Jan; Nyberg, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal volume has been found to be smaller in individuals with stress-related disorders, but it remains unclear whether smaller volume is a consequence of stress or rather a vulnerability factor...

  15. A comparative evaluation of two different approaches to estimating age at adiposity rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroke, A; Hahn, S; Buyken, A E; Liese, A D

    2006-02-01

    To compare different approaches (visual estimation of individual BMI curves with polynomial models) to estimate age at adiposity rebound (AR), as different approaches might lead to different results. AR has been suggested as a critical period between intra-uterine life and early adulthood, and recent data showed that early age at AR is associated with higher body mass later in life. Longitudinal anthropometric data from the DOrtmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed (DONALD) Study were used to obtain individual BMI growth curves. We then compared the visual estimation approach to polynomial models in three different scenarios reflected by different data sets: an idealistic, an realistic, and a realistic scenario with imputed values. In all three scenarios, the visual estimation yielded significantly higher estimates than the polynomial models of 2nd or 3rd order. Cross-tabulations of groups of age at AR (early, medium, and late) showed that truly concordant classification was low, ranging only from 51 to 63%. A closer examination of the data indicated that the differences in estimates were mainly due to differences in the underlying definitions: the polynomial models select the nadir in the growth curve as the age at AR, whereas the visual estimation deviates from this concept in those cases where there is plateau in the growth curve. In the latter instance, the turning point of the growth curve before its increase is selected as the age at rebound. Estimating AR with the visual approach appears to best reflect the physiological basis of the AR, and is also preferable, because it resulted in the lowest number of children with missing estimates for age at AR. Only when the underlying criteria for the estimation of AR with the visual approach were modified, could concordant results between the two approaches be obtained. Considering the underlying physiological basis, it became clear that approaches which determine AR by simply identifying the

  16. Trimester-Specific Weight Gain and Midpregnancy Diastolic Blood Pressure Rebound During Normotensive Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qiong; Zhou, Xin; Duan, Dong-Mei; Lv, Li-Juan; Lin, Xiao-Hong; Ji, Wen-Jie; Cai, Wei; Zhang, Zhuoli; Li, Yu-Ming; Niu, Jian-Min

    2017-10-01

    The longitudinal exposure-response relationship between trimester-specific gestational weight gain (GWG) and blood pressure (BP) during pregnancy is not well understood. We retrospectively assessed 1112 uncomplicated, normotensive pregnant women whose body weight and BP were measured from 12+0 to 40+0 weeks of gestation from a hospital-based cohort. By using growth curve modeling, a J-shaped pattern dominated diastolic BP (DBP) changing dynamics, with a midpregnancy drop at 20+0 to 22+0 weeks followed by a rebound. Using group-based trajectory modeling, 3 distinctive trajectories of DBP were identified: high-J shaped (18.5%), moderate-J shaped (48.3%), and low-J shaped (33.1%), as well as 3 distinctive GWG trajectories: high increasing (14.7%), moderate increasing (48.6%) and low increasing (36.8%). A temporal coincidence between the maximal rate of GWG and DBP transition from its nadir to rebound was observed during 20+0 to 22+0 weeks. Moreover, women in the high-increasing GWG group had the highest probability of being in the high-J DBP group. The GWG rate during the late midsecond trimester (22+0 to 26+0 weeks) was consistently associated with an elevated DBP level: for every 200 g/wk increase, the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio was 1.27 (95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.43) for the trajectory shift to the high-J group and 1.20 (95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.35) for the occurrence of diastolic prehypertension after 37+0 weeks. Furthermore, adding a trimester-specific GWG rate (22+0 to 26+0 weeks) contributed to the incremental yield for the prediction of diastolic prehypertension after 37+0 weeks. Our results thus provide the timing and extent of gestational weight control relevant to the optimized BP level during pregnancy. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Preserving the Navy’s Forward Presence With a Smaller Fleet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Shipbuilding Budgets, 2015–2044 5 3. Inventory of Battle Force Ships and Fleet Composition in Selected Years Under Alternative Shipbuilding Budgets 6 4... Shipbuilding Budgets? 1 How Could the Navy Maintain Its Forward Presence Under Smaller Shipbuilding Budgets? 3 The Navy’s 2015 Shipbuilding Plan 4... Shipbuilding Under Smaller Budgets 4 What Would Smaller Shipbuilding Budgets Buy? 6 What Would Be the Policy Implications of Smaller Budgets? 7 What Would Be the

  18. Immigration and viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J.; Janssen, Harry

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly or...

  19. Understanding Image Virality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-08

    of images that is most similar to ours is the concurrently introduced viral meme generator of Wang et al., that combines NLP and Computer Vision (low...from what we might expect at a first glance. An analogous scenario researched in NLP is understanding the semantics of “That’s what she said!” jokes...and will require NLP and Computer Vision for understanding. 4.1. Intrinsic context We first examine whether humans and machines can pre- dict just by

  20. Rate on the rebound of films, strategic design and results; Tasa de rechazo de peliculas, diseno de estrategias y resultados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibelalde, E.; Fernandez, J.M.; Ramirez, R.; Canevaro, R.; Vano, E. [Catedra de Fisica Medica. Departamento de Radiologia. Universidad Complutense. Madrid (Spain)

    1998-12-31

    The present work pretends to identify the diagnostic tests of greatest rate on the rebound and to analyze their causes comparing them with the reference values obtained in the University Hospital `San Carlos` study in 1993. Equally is looking for contributing with criterions and strategies for the implantation of a responsible system of information caption. The control of the rate on rebound of radiographic plates is fundamental for the quality control programs feedback. The results emitted by this study confirm the utility to the advantage of this type of global indicators for the quality control programs and contribute reducing collective doses, since the improvement of medical diagnostic and diminishing the operation costs of the inputs utilized. It is emphasized the importance what had to introduce at the personnel which participate in the system to obtain fitted results. (Author)

  1. Issues in the clinical use of benzodiazepines: potency, withdrawal, and rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Guy

    2004-01-01

    Low and medium potency benzodiazepines were initially introduced for the treatment of insomnia and anxiety. Their therapeutic actions as anxiolytics, sedative hypnotics, anticonvulsants, and muscle relaxants (with their low toxicity) have led to their use as first-line treatments, and they have become one of the most prescribed classes of drugs. Novel therapeutic uses of benzodiazepines were discovered with the introduction of the high-potency benzodiazepines (e.g., alprazolam, clonazepam, and lorazepam). They were found to be effective in treating panic disorder and panic attacks with or without agoraphobia, as add-on therapy to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder and panic disorders, and as adjunctive therapy in treating patients with acute mania or acute agitation. High-potency benzodiazepines have replaced low and medium potency benzodiazepines in all benzodiazepine clinical indications due to their greater therapeutic effects and rapid onset of action. Differences in distribution, elimination half-life, and rate of absorption are important considerations when choosing a high-potency benzodiazepine. Typically, a benzodiazepine with long distribution and elimination half-lives is preferred. A maximum dose of 2 mg/day of any of the high-potency benzodiazepines when given for more than 1 week is recommended. Although as a class benzodiazepines act rapidly and are well tolerated, their use presents clinical issues such as dependence, rebound anxiety, memory impairment, and discontinuation syndrome.

  2. Evaluation of rebound tonometry in red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Cherlene; Mans, Christoph; McLellan, Gillian J; Bentley, Ellison; Sladky, Kurt K; Miller, Paul E

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate feasibility and accuracy of intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement by rebound tonometry in adult red-eared slider turtles and determine the effects of manual and chemical restraint on IOP. Seventeen adult red-eared slider turtles. Intraocular pressure was measured with TonoLab® and TonoVet® tonometers in conscious, unrestrained turtles. To evaluate the effects of manual restraint, turtles were restrained by digital pressure on the rostral head or proximal neck. The effect of two chemical restraint protocols (dexmedetomidine, ketamine, midazolam [DKM] and dexmedetomidine, ketamine [DK] subcutaneously) on IOP was evaluated. Triplicate TonoLab® and TonoVet® readings were compared with direct manometry in three ex vivo turtle eyes. TonoLab® correlated better with manometry at IOPs turtles was significantly lower (P turtles. Chemical and manual neck restraint affected IOP. Rostral head restraint had no significant effect on IOP and is, therefore, recommended as the appropriate restraint technique in red-eared slider turtles. TonoLab® measurements estimated actual IOP more accurately, within physiologic range, than measurements obtained using the TonoVet®. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  3. Reliability and sensitivity of the TonoLab rebound tonometer in awake Brown Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, John C; Jia, Lijun; Cepurna, William; Guo, Ying; Johnson, Elaine

    2009-06-01

    To compare the sensitivity of the TonoLab rebound tonometer with the Tono-Pen in awake Brown Norway rats and to compare their ability to predict optic nerve damage induced by experimental IOP elevation. TonoLab and Tono-Pen tonometers were calibrated in cannulated rat eyes connected to a pressure transducer. The TonoLab was used in awake animals housed in standard lighting to measure IOP during light and dark phases. Both instruments were used to monitor chronically elevated IOP produced by episcleral vein injection of hypertonic saline. Measured IOPs were correlated with quantified optic nerve damage in injected eyes. Although they were lower than transducer and Tono-Pen measurements at all levels, TonoLab readings showed an excellent linear fit with transducer readings from 20 to 80 mm Hg (R(2) = 0.99) in cannulated eyes. In awake animals housed in standard lighting, the TonoLab documented significantly higher pressures during the dark phase (27.9 +/- 1.7 mm Hg) than during the light phase (16.7 +/- 2.3 mm Hg). With elevated IOP, correlation between TonoLab and Tono-Pen readings (R(2) = 0.86, P awake Brown Norway rats, though instrument fluctuation may limit its ability to identify significant pressure elevations in eyes with minimal optic nerve damage.

  4. [Early adiposity rebound: prevalence and the effect on metabolic risk in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, H; Yan, S Q; Tao, F B

    2017-09-06

    The timing of the adiposity rebound (AR) gradually shifted to earlier ages throughout the world; early AR has a great effect on children's health, especially is possible associated with the development of metabolic disease for life, while the special mechanism isn't very clear. Metabolic diseases(MD) are common in adults, and the establishment of MD is the result of pathological chronic processes that can start in early life stages. If the metabolic risk factors and its predictive factors can be found in early childhood, it can bring forward the prevention and control of adult diseases. This paper is a review of the prevalence of early AR around the world, the factors that influence the timing of the AR, the significance of early detection and prevention of MD, the associations between timing of AR and metabolic risk in children and explored the possible mechanism. It aims to raise public awareness about the harm of early AR and provide new perspective to prevent and control of the metabolic syndrome.

  5. Association between timing of adiposity rebound and body weight gain during infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Satomi; Sairenchi, Toshimi; Shimura, Naoto; Arisaka, Osamu

    2015-02-01

    To investigate whether increments of weight gain in early infancy are related to the timing of adiposity rebound (AR). A total of 271 children (147 boys and 124 girls) in 1 community were enrolled in the study. Serial measurements of body mass index were carried out at the ages of 4, 8, and 12 months and 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 years, based on which the age of AR was determined. We also calculated body weight increments in 3 separate periods: birth to 4 months, 4-8 months, and 8-12 months. There was no significant relationship between weight gain in any period of infancy and the age of AR. Weight gain between birth and 4 months was positively correlated only with body mass index at 7 years of age. We could not find an association between body weight gain during infancy and the timing of AR. This suggests that infantile weight gain is not related to childhood obesity through AR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pulse therapy combined with oral corticosteroids in the management of severe rheumatic carditis and rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Renato P A; Torres, Rômulo F A; Torres, Rafael A; Torres, Rosângela S L A

    2017-10-25

    The aim of the present study was to describe the clinical course, laboratory tests, and the cardiac involvement in rheumatic carditis patients in functional class III and IV, submitted to pulse therapy combined with oral prednisone. A total of 120 patients with severe carditis due to acute rheumatic fever were treatment with three cycles of pulse therapy combined with oral corticosteroids. The patients were followed up from the hospital admission until the end of the treatment and returned after 30, 60, and 90 days to control. The patients were evaluated by clinical, laboratory, and transthoracic echocardiogram. In total, 23 (19.2%) patients at first attack of rheumatic fever and 97 (80.8%) with recurrent carditis were evaluated. Cardiac surgery was performed in 8 (6.6%) patients. The patients showed improved laboratory and radiological parameters (prheumatic carditis and the oral corticosteroid prevented rebound episodes. Prolonged hospital stay was required for the clinical stabilisation of patients and to avoid the interruption of medication.

  7. Cavitation structures formed during the rebound of a sphere from a wetted surface

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy

    2010-09-28

    We use high-speed imaging to observe the dynamics of cavitation, caused by the impact and subsequent rebound of a sphere from a solid surface covered with a thin layer of highly viscous liquid. We note marked qualitative differences between the cavitation structures with increase in viscosity, as well as between Newtonian and non-Newtonian liquids. The patterns observed are quite unexpected and intricate, appearing in concentric ring formations around the site of impact. In all cases, we identify a distinct radius from which the primary bubbles emanate. This radius is modelled with a modified form of Hertz contact theory. Within this radius, we show that some fine cavitation structure may exist or that it may be one large cavitation bubble. For the non-Newtonian fluids, we observe foam-like structures extending radially with diminishing bubble sizes with increase in radial position. Whereas for the Newtonian fluids, the opposite trend is observed with increasing bubble size for increasing radial position. Finally, we compare our experimental observations of cavitation to the maximum tension criterion proposed by Joseph (J Fluid Mech 366:367-378, 1998) showing that this provides the lower limit for the onset of cavitation in our experiments. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) associated with rice mills: fumigation efficacy and population rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckman, Karrie A; Campbell, James F; Subramanyam, Bhadriraju

    2013-02-01

    The red flourbeetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is the most important stored-product insect pest infesting rice (Oryza sativa L.) mills in the United States. Due to the phasing out of methyl bromide in accordance with the 1987 Montreal Protocol, the efficacy of alternative fumigants in controlling flour beetles in mill structures must be evaluated. Long-term trapping data sets (2-6 yr) of T. castaneum in and around seven rice mills were analyzed to assess the efficacy of sulfuryl fluoride fumigation (n = 25). Fumigation efficacy was evaluated as the percentage reduction in mean trap captures of adults and proportion of traps capturing at least one adult beetle. Beetle trap captures fluctuated seasonally, with increased captures during the warmer months, June-September, that dropped off during the cooler months, October-March. Fumigations resulted in a 66 +/- 6% (mean +/- SE) reduction in mean trap captures within mills and a 52 +/- 6% reduction in the proportion of traps capturing at least one adult beetle. Lengths of time for captures to reach prefumigation levels, or rebound rates, were variable, and adult capture levels inside were most influenced by seasonal temperature changes. Temperatures inside mills followed those outside the mill closely, and a significant positive relationship between outside temperatures and trap captures was observed. Inside and outside trap captures exhibited a significant, positive relationship, but fumigations consistently led to reductions in beetle captures outside of mills, highlighting the interconnectedness of populations located inside and outside mill structures.

  9. Update in tonometry. Phosphene and rebound tonometries, self-tonometry and technologies for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detry-Morel, M

    2007-01-01

    The Proview phosphene (eye-pressure) tonometer and the Rebound tonometer ICare are relatively new devices basically different from the Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT). Both technologies will be presented in this review with respect to their principle, their technique, their advantages and limits, as well as their accuracy, the IOP measurements agreement with GAT, and the influence of central corneal thickness on the reliability of these measurements. Because the current data base for the interpretation of glaucoma disease course and its management are still relatively small, the development of a continuous, accurate, reliable and harmless monitoring of IOP over 24 hours is strongly desirable in the future. Approaches for self-tonometry and devices such as smart contact lenses which can take the IOP from the corneal surface have been developed with this goal. The future will probably confirm whether telemetric IOP monitoring with an implantable active microsystem allows a reliable IOP monitoring or not. In any case, active implants will open new and important perspectives in the diagnosis and the treatment of glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

  10. Determination of Tear Production and Intraocular Pressure With Rebound Tonometry in Wild Humboldt Penguins ( Spheniscus humboldti ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Julie D; Adkesson, Michael J; Allender, Matthew C; Jankowski, Gwen; Langan, Jennifer; Cardeña, Marco; Cárdenas-Alayza, Susana

    2017-03-01

    Tear production and intraocular pressures (IOPs) were determined in 38 and 102 wild Humboldt penguins (Spheniscus humboldti), respectively, from the Punta San Juan Marine Protected Area in Ica, Peru. Tear production was measured by Schirmer tear test, and IOP was measured with a TonoVet rebound tonometer. Adult (n = 90) and chick (n = 12) penguins were sampled from 2 different beaches (north and south facing) during 2 sampling years (2010 and 2011). Results showed a mean ± SD (range) of 9 ± 4 (2-20) mm/min for tear production and 28 ± 9 (3-49) mm Hg for IOP. Tear production in penguins differed between beach and sex, whereas IOP differed between age, year, and beach. The IOPs were negatively correlated with packed cell volume. Tear production and IOP values had greater variation in this population than it has in other avian species. Previous investigations of IOP and tear production in Spheniscus species were conducted with birds housed under professional care in artificial marine and freshwater environments. This is the first study, to our knowledge, investigating tear production and IOP in wild penguins and establishes valuable reference intervals for this species.

  11. Accuracy and reproducibility of the TonoVet rebound tonometer in birds of prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Anne; Müller, Kerstin; Arndt, Gisela; Eule, Johanna Corinna

    2010-09-01

    To examine the accuracy and reproducibility of intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements obtained by the TonoVet rebound tonometer. Animals studied  Freshly enucleated healthy eyes of 44 free-ranging birds of prey out of the species Haliaeetus albicilla, Accipiter gentilis, Accipiter nisus, Buteo buteo, Falco tinnunculus, Strix aluco, Asio otus and Tyto alba euthanized because of unrelated health problems. IOP readings from the TonoVet were compared with a manometric device, with IOP being set from 5 to 100 mmHg in steps of 5 mmHg by adjusting the height of a NaCl solution reservoir connected to the eye. Reproducibility of the TonoVet readings was determined by repeated measurements. TonoVet and manometer values showed a strong linear correlation. In the Accipitridae, the TonoVet tended to increasingly overestimate IOP with increasing pressure, while in the other families, it increasingly underestimated it. In the Sparrowhawk, the values almost represent the ideal line. Reproducibility of TonoVet values decreases with increasing pressure in the clinically important range from 5 to 60 mmHg. IOP values measured with the TonoVet demonstrated species specific deviation from the manometric measurements. These differences should be considered when interpreting IOP values. Using the regression formulae presented, corrected IOP values could be calculated in a clinical setting.

  12. Diagnosis and prediction of tipping points in financial markets: Crashes and rebounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wanfeng; Woodard, Ryan; Sornette, Didier

    2010-08-01

    By combining (i) the economic theory of rational expectation bubbles, (ii) behavioral finance on imitation and herding of investors and traders and (iii) the mathematical and statistical physics of bifurcations and phase transitions, the log-periodic power law (LPPL) model has been developed as a flexible tool to detect bubbles. The LPPL model considers the faster-than-exponential (power law with finite-time singularity) increase in asset prices decorated by accelerating oscillations as the main diagnostic of bubbles. It embodies a positive feedback loop of higher return anticipations competing with negative feedback spirals of crash expectations. The power of the LPPL model is illustrated by two recent real-life predictions performed recently by our group: the peak of the Oil price bubble in early July 2008 and the burst of a bubble on the Shanghai stock market in early August 2009. We then present the concept of 'negative bubbles', which are the mirror images of positive bubbles. We argue that similar positive feedbacks are at work to fuel these accelerated downward price spirals. We adapt the LPPL model to these negative bubbles and implement a pattern recognition method to predict the end times of the negative bubbles, which are characterized by rebounds (the mirror images of crashes associated with the standard positive bubbles). The out-of-sample tests quantified by error diagrams demonstrate the high significance of the prediction performance.

  13. Faster Adaptation in Smaller Populations: Counterintuitive Evolution of HIV during Childhood Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayna Raghwani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of HIV-1 gene sequences sampled longitudinally from infected individuals can reveal the evolutionary dynamics that underlie associations between disease outcome and viral genetic diversity and divergence. Here we extend a statistical framework to estimate rates of viral molecular adaptation by considering sampling error when computing nucleotide site-frequencies. This is particularly beneficial when analyzing viral sequences from within-host viral infections if the number of sequences per time point is limited. To demonstrate the utility of this approach, we apply our method to a cohort of 24 patients infected with HIV-1 at birth. Our approach finds that viral adaptation arising from recurrent positive natural selection is associated with the rate of HIV-1 disease progression, in contrast to previous analyses of these data that found no significant association. Most surprisingly, we discover a strong negative correlation between viral population size and the rate of viral adaptation, the opposite of that predicted by standard molecular evolutionary theory. We argue that this observation is most likely due to the existence of a confounding third variable, namely variation in selective pressure among hosts. A conceptual non-linear model of virus adaptation that incorporates the two opposing effects of host immunity on the virus population can explain this counterintuitive result.

  14. Attachment styles and personal growth following romantic breakups: the mediating roles of distress, rumination, and tendency to rebound.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara C Marshall

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to examine the associations of attachment anxiety and avoidance with personal growth following relationship dissolution, and to test breakup distress, rumination, and tendency to rebound with new partners as mediators of these associations. Study 1 (N = 411 and Study 2 (N = 465 measured attachment style, breakup distress, and personal growth; Study 2 additionally measured ruminative reflection, brooding, and proclivity to rebound with new partners. Structural equation modelling revealed in both studies that anxiety was indirectly associated with greater personal growth through heightened breakup distress, whereas avoidance was indirectly associated with lower personal growth through inhibited breakup distress. Study 2 further showed that the positive association of breakup distress with personal growth was accounted for by enhanced reflection and brooding, and that anxious individuals' greater personal growth was also explained by their proclivity to rebound. These findings suggest that anxious individuals' hyperactivated breakup distress may act as a catalyst for personal growth by promoting the cognitive processing of breakup-related thoughts and emotions, whereas avoidant individuals' deactivated distress may inhibit personal growth by suppressing this cognitive work.

  15. The effect of hydrogel and silicone hydrogel contact lenses on the measurement of intraocular pressure with rebound tonometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeri, Fabrizio; Calcatelli, Paolo; Donini, Bernardo; Lupelli, Luigi; Zarrilli, Luciana; Swann, Peter G

    2011-12-01

    To assess the accuracy of intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements using rebound tonometry over disposable hydrogel (etafilcon A) and silicone hydrogel (senofilcon A) contact lenses (CLs) of different powers. The experimental group comprised 36 subjects (19 male, 17 female). IOP measurements were undertaken on the subject's right eyes in random order using a rebound tonometer (ICare). The CLs had powers of +2.00D, -2.00D and -6.00D. Six measurements were taken over each contact lens and also before and after the CLs had been worn. A good correlation was found between IOP measurements with and without CLs (all r≥0.80; phydrogel CLs were significant (psilicone hydrogel CLs were not significant. Rebound tonometry can be reliably performed over silicone hydrogel CLs. With hydrogel CLs, the measurements were lower than those without CLs. However, despite the fact that these differences were statistically significant, their clinical significance was minimal. 2011 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 9-Phenanthrol modulates postinhibitory rebound and afterhyperpolarizing potentials in an excitatory motor neuron of the medicinal leech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angstadt, James D; Giordano, Joshua R; Goncalves, Alexander J

    2017-08-01

    Postinhibitory rebound (PIR) responses in leech dorsal excitatory motor neurons (cell DE-3) are eliminated by Ca2+ channel blockers but also exhibit a strong dependence on extracellular Na+. These features could be explained by a voltage-gated Ca2+ current acting in concert with a Ca2+-activated nonspecific current (ICAN). In vertebrates, ICAN is associated with TRPM4 channels which are blocked selectively by 9-phenanthrol. Here, we show that 9-phenanthrol selectively inhibits a late phase of PIR and simultaneously enhances afterhyperpolarizing potentials (AHPs). Bath application of NNC 55-0396 or Cd2+ combined with ion substitution experiments indicate that a low-voltage-activated Ca2+ current plays a key role in generating PIR and that Ca2+ influx through low- or high-voltage-activated Ca2+ channels can trigger AHPs via activation of a Ca2+-dependent K+ current. We also demonstrate modulation of rebound responses by other ICAN blockers such as gadolinium and flufenamic acid, as well as the calmodulin antagonist W-7. We discuss how these results provide additional insights into the specific types of ionic currents underlying rebound responses of motor neuron DE-3 in the medicinal leech.

  17. Attachment Styles and Personal Growth following Romantic Breakups: The Mediating Roles of Distress, Rumination, and Tendency to Rebound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Tara C.; Bejanyan, Kathrine; Ferenczi, Nelli

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the associations of attachment anxiety and avoidance with personal growth following relationship dissolution, and to test breakup distress, rumination, and tendency to rebound with new partners as mediators of these associations. Study 1 (N = 411) and Study 2 (N = 465) measured attachment style, breakup distress, and personal growth; Study 2 additionally measured ruminative reflection, brooding, and proclivity to rebound with new partners. Structural equation modelling revealed in both studies that anxiety was indirectly associated with greater personal growth through heightened breakup distress, whereas avoidance was indirectly associated with lower personal growth through inhibited breakup distress. Study 2 further showed that the positive association of breakup distress with personal growth was accounted for by enhanced reflection and brooding, and that anxious individuals’ greater personal growth was also explained by their proclivity to rebound. These findings suggest that anxious individuals’ hyperactivated breakup distress may act as a catalyst for personal growth by promoting the cognitive processing of breakup-related thoughts and emotions, whereas avoidant individuals’ deactivated distress may inhibit personal growth by suppressing this cognitive work. PMID:24066169

  18. Postglacial Rebound Model ICE-6G_C (VM5a) Constrained by Geodetic and Geologic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, W. R.; Argus, D. F.; Drummond, R.

    2014-12-01

    We fit the revised global model of glacial isostatic adjustment ICE-6G_C (VM5a) to all available data, consisting of several hundred GPS uplift rates, a similar number of 14C dated relative sea level histories, and 62 geologic estimates of changes in Antarctic ice thickness. The mantle viscosity profile, VM5a is a simple multi-layer fit to prior model VM2 of Peltier (1996, Science). However, the revised deglaciation history, ICE-6G (VM5a), differs significantly from previous models in the Toronto series. (1) In North America, GPS observations of vertical uplift of Earth's surface from the Canadian Base Network require the thickness of the Laurentide ice sheet at Last Glacial Maximum to be significantly revised. At Last Glacial Maximum the new model ICE-6G_C in this region, relative to ICE-5G, roughly 50 percent thicker east of Hudson Bay (in and northern Quebec and Labrador region) and roughly 30 percent thinner west of Hudson Bay (in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and the Northwest Territories).the net change in mass, however, is small. We find that rates of gravity change determined by GRACE when corrected for the predictions of ICE-6G_C (VM5a) are significantly smaller than residuals determined on the basis of earlier models. (2) In Antarctica, we fit GPS uplift rates, geologic estimates of changes in ice thickness, and geologic constraints on the timing of ice loss. The resulting deglaciation history also differs significantly from prior models. The contribution of Antarctic ice loss to global sea level rise since Last Glacial Maximum in ICE-6G_C is 13.6 meters, less than in ICE-5G (17.5 m), but significantly larger than in both the W12A model of Whitehouse et al. [2012] (8 m) and the IJ05 R02 model of Ivins et al. [2013] (7.5 m). In ICE-6G_C rapid ice loss occurs in Antarctica from 11.5 to 8 thousands years ago, with a rapid onset at 11.5 ka thereby contributing significantly to Meltwater Pulse 1B. In ICE-6G_C (VM5a), viscous uplift of Antarctica is increasing

  19. A highly intensified ART regimen induces long-term viral suppression and restriction of the viral reservoir in a simian AIDS model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iart Luca Shytaj

    Full Text Available Stably suppressed viremia during ART is essential for establishing reliable simian models for HIV/AIDS. We tested the efficacy of a multidrug ART (highly intensified ART in a wide range of viremic conditions (10³-10⁷ viral RNA copies/mL in SIVmac251-infected rhesus macaques, and its impact on the viral reservoir. Eleven macaques in the pre-AIDS stage of the disease were treated with a multidrug combination (highly intensified ART consisting of two nucleosidic/nucleotidic reverse transcriptase inhibitors (emtricitabine and tenofovir, an integrase inhibitor (raltegravir, a protease inhibitor (ritonavir-boosted darunavir and the CCR5 blocker maraviroc. All animals stably displayed viral loads below the limit of detection of the assay (i.e. <40 RNA copies/mL after starting highly intensified ART. By increasing the sensitivity of the assay to 3 RNA copies/mL, viral load was still below the limit of detection in all subjects tested. Importantly, viral DNA resulted below the assay detection limit (<2 copies of DNA/5*10⁵ cells in PBMCs and rectal biopsies of all animals at the end of the follow-up, and in lymph node biopsies from the majority of the study subjects. Moreover, highly intensified ART decreased central/transitional memory, effector memory and activated (HLA-DR⁺ effector memory CD4⁺ T-cells in vivo, in line with the role of these subsets as the main cell subpopulations harbouring the virus. Finally, treatment with highly intensified ART at viral load rebound following suspension of a previous anti-reservoir therapy eventually improved the spontaneous containment of viral load following suspension of the second therapeutic cycle, thus leading to a persistent suppression of viremia in the absence of ART. In conclusion, we show, for the first time, complete suppression of viral load by highly intensified ART and a likely associated restriction of the viral reservoir in the macaque AIDS model, making it a useful platform for testing

  20. Rebound Deformity After Growth Modulation in Patients With Coronal Plane Angular Deformities About the Knee: Who Gets It and How Much?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveille, Lise A; Razi, Ozan; Johnston, Charles E

    2017-05-18

    With observed success and increased popularity of growth modulation techniques, there has been a trend toward use in progressively younger patients. Younger age at growth modulation increases the likelihood of complete deformity correction and need for implant removal before skeletal maturity introducing the risk of rebound deformity. The purpose of this study was to quantify magnitude and identify risk factors for rebound deformity after growth modulation. We performed a retrospective review of all patients undergoing growth modulation with a tension band plate for coronal plane deformity about the knee with subsequent implant removal. Exclusion criteria included completion epiphysiodesis or osteotomy at implant removal, ongoing growth modulation, and modulation, before implant removal, and at final follow-up. In total, 67 limbs in 45 patients met the inclusion criteria. Mean age at growth modulation was 9.8 years (range, 3.4 to 15.4 y) and mean age at implant removal was 11.4 years (range, 5.3 to 16.4 y). Mean change in HKA after implant removal was 6.9 degrees (range, 0 to 23 degrees). In total, 52% of patients had >5 degrees rebound and 30% had >10 degrees rebound in HKA after implant removal. Females below 10 years and males below 12 years at time of growth modulation had greater mean change in HKA after implant removal compared with older patients (8.4 vs. 4.7 degrees, P=0.012). Patients with initial deformity >20 degrees had an increased frequency of rebound >10 degrees compared with patients with less severe initial deformity (78% vs. 22%, P=0.002). Rebound deformity after growth modulation is common. Growth modulation at a young age and large initial deformity increases risk of rebound. However, rebound does not occur in all at risk patients, therefore, we recommend against routine overcorrection. Level IV-retrospective study.

  1. Equine viral arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosec Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Equine viral arteritis (EVA is a contagious disease of equids caused by equine artheritis virus (EAV, widespread in most countries in the world, where patients are diagnosed. The infection usually starts asymptomatic. Clinical signs indicate respiratory infection of different intensity and also abortions are present at different stages of gestation. Large prevalence of this disease in the world has become a growing economic problem. The disease is specific to a particular kind of animals, and it affects only equids (horses, donkeys, mules, mule and zebras. In countries where the infection has been confirmed, the percentage of positive animals differ. Likewise, there is difference in percentage among certain animal kinds. The highest percentage of positive animals has been found in totters and the lowest in cold-blooded.

  2. Viral gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancheño-Corvo, P; Martín-Duque, P

    2006-12-01

    Cancer is a multigenic disorder involving mutations of both tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes. A large body of preclinical data, however, has suggested that cancer growth can be arrested or reversed by treatment with gene transfer vectors that carry a single growth inhibitory or pro-apoptotic gene or a gene that can recruit immune responses against the tumor. Many of these gene transfer vectors are modified viruses. The ability for the delivery of therapeutic genes, made them desirable for engineering virus vector systems. The viral vectors recently in laboratory and clinical use are based on RNA and DNA viruses processing very different genomic structures and host ranges. Particular viruses have been selected as gene delivery vehicles because of their capacities to carry foreign genes and their ability to efficiently deliver these genes associated with efficient gene expression. These are the major reasons why viral vectors derived from retroviruses, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, herpesvirus and poxvirus are employed in more than 70% of clinical gene therapy trials worldwide. Because these vector systems have unique advantages and limitations, each has applications for which it is best suited. Retroviral vectors can permanently integrate into the genome of the infected cell, but require mitotic cell division for transduction. Adenoviral vectors can efficiently deliver genes to a wide variety of dividing and nondividing cell types, but immune elimination of infected cells often limits gene expression in vivo. Herpes simplex virus can deliver large amounts of exogenous DNA; however, cytotoxicity and maintenance of transgene expression remain as obstacles. AAV also infects many non-dividing and dividing cell types, but has a limited DNA capacity. This review discusses current and emerging virusbased genetic engineering strategies for the delivery of therapeutic molecules or several approaches for cancer treatment.

  3. Influence of a mini trampoline rebound exercise program on insulin resistance, lipid profile and central obesity in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuhu, Jibril M; Maharaj, Sonill S

    2017-03-01

    Exercises are important as an adjuvant for managing diabetes but due to fatigue and time constraints, individuals with diabetes may not engage in them. Jumping on a mini-trampoline referred to as rebound exercise is an aerobic activity used for exercise training benefits but only little research is available on its effects in diabetes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of mini-trampoline rebound exercise on insulin resistance and lipid profile in type 2 diabetics. Sixty non-insulin dependent type 2 diabetics (median age: 39.0 years, median body mass index: 25.2 kg/m2) recruited using convenience sampling were randomized to a rebound exercise group (n = 30) or a control group (n = 30). The control group read health magazines or watched television while the rebound exercise group jumped on a mini-trampoline at moderate intensity for 30 minutes three times per week for 12 weeks. Post-rebound exercise, significant improvements in insulin resistance and lipid profile were noted when compared to the control (ptrampoline rebound exercise is beneficial for individuals with type 2 diabetes and can serve as a useful exercise approach in the management of cardiovascular risk in diabetes.

  4. Early adiposity rebound: causes and consequences for obesity in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland-Cachera, M F; Deheeger, M; Maillot, M; Bellisle, F

    2006-12-01

    Childhood obesity is an important public health problem, with a rapidly increasing frequency worldwide. Identification of critical periods for the development of childhood and adolescent obesity could be very useful for targeting prevention measures. Weight status in early childhood is a poor predictor of adult adiposity status, and most obese adults were not obese as children. We first proposed to use the body mass index (BMI) charts to monitor individual BMI development. The adiposity rebound (AR) corresponds to the second rise in BMI curve that occurs between ages 5 and 7 years. It is not as direct a measure as BMI at any age, but because it involves the examination of several points during growth, and because it is identified at a time when adiposity level clearly change directions, this method provides information that can help us understand individual changes and the development of health risks. An early AR is associated with an increased risk of overweight. It is inversely associated with bone age, and reflects accelerated growth. The early AR recorded in most obese subjects and the striking difference in the mean age at AR between obese subjects (3 years) and non-obese subjects (6 years) suggest that factors have operated very early in life. The typical pattern associated with an early AR is a low BMI followed by increased BMI level after the rebound. This pattern is recorded in children of recent generations as compared to those of previous generations. This is owing to the trend of a steeper increase of height as compared to weight in the first years of life. This typical BMI pattern (low, followed by high body fatness level) is associated with metabolic diseases such as diabetes and coronary heart diseases. Low body fatness before the AR suggests that an energy deficit had occurred at an early stage of growth. It can be attributable to the high-protein, low-fat diet fed to infants at a time of high energy needs, the former triggering height velocity and

  5. Reduced Slow-Wave Rebound during Daytime Recovery Sleep in Middle-Aged Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafortune, Marjolaine; Gagnon, Jean-François; Latreille, Véronique; Vandewalle, Gilles; Martin, Nicolas; Filipini, Daniel; Doyon, Julien; Carrier, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Cortical synchronization during NREM sleep, characterized by electroencephalographic slow waves (SW 75 µV), is strongly related to the number of hours of wakefulness prior to sleep and to the quality of the waking experience. Whether a similar increase in wakefulness length leads to a comparable enhancement in NREM sleep cortical synchronization in young and older subjects is still a matter of debate in the literature. Here we evaluated the impact of 25-hours of wakefulness on SW during a daytime recovery sleep episode in 29 young (27y ±5), and 34 middle-aged (51y ±5) subjects. We also assessed whether age-related changes in NREM sleep cortical synchronization predicts the ability to maintain sleep during daytime recovery sleep. Compared to baseline sleep, sleep efficiency was lower during daytime recovery sleep in both age-groups but the effect was more prominent in the middle-aged than in the young subjects. In both age groups, SW density, amplitude, and slope increased whereas SW positive and negative phase duration decreased during daytime recovery sleep compared to baseline sleep, particularly in anterior brain areas. Importantly, compared to young subjects, middle-aged participants showed lower SW density rebound and SW positive phase duration enhancement after sleep deprivation during daytime recovery sleep. Furthermore, middle-aged subjects showed lower SW amplitude and slope enhancements after sleep deprivation than young subjects in frontal and prefrontal derivations only. None of the SW characteristics at baseline were associated with daytime recovery sleep efficiency. Our results support the notion that anterior brain areas elicit and may necessitate more intense recovery and that aging reduces enhancement of cortical synchronization after sleep loss, particularly in these areas. Age-related changes in the quality of wake experience may underlie age-related reduction in markers of cortical synchronization enhancement after sustained wakefulness. PMID

  6. Age at adiposity rebound: determinants and association with nutritional status and the metabolic syndrome at adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péneau, S; González-Carrascosa, R; Gusto, G; Goxe, D; Lantieri, O; Fezeu, L; Hercberg, S; Rolland-Cachera, M F

    2016-07-01

    Early-life growth characteristics and in particular age at adiposity rebound (AR), have been shown to impact nutritional status later in life but studies investigating the association with long-term health remain scarce. Our aims were to identify determinants of age at AR and its relationship with nutritional status and cardiometabolic risk factors at adulthood. A total of 1465 subjects aged 20-60 years participated in this retrospective cohort study. Height, weight, waist circumference, blood glucose, lipids and blood pressure were measured at adulthood. Childhood weight, height, gestational age, birth weight and early nutrition were collected retrospectively from health booklets and age at AR was assessed. Participants self-reported parental silhouettes. Associations were assessed using multiple linear and logistic regression. An earlier AR was associated with higher body mass index and waist circumference at adulthood in both men and women (P<0.0001). In addition, women with an earlier occurrence of AR had higher triglyceride (P=0.001), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (P=0.001), systolic (P=0.02) and diastolic blood pressure (P=0.04) at adulthood. Both men (odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI)): 0.82 (0.70-0.95)) and women (OR (95% CI): 0.84 (0.73-0.96) with an AR occurring earlier were more likely to develop a metabolic syndrome. Larger parental silhouette was associated with an earlier AR. This long-term study showed that age at AR was associated with nutritional status and metabolic syndrome at adulthood. These results highlight the importance of monitoring childhood growth so as to help identify children at risk of developing an adverse cardiometabolic profile in adulthood. AR determinants for use in overweight surveillance were identified.

  7. Early adiposity rebound is associated with metabolic risk in 7-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, L; Corvalán, C; Pereira, A; Kain, J; Garmendia, M L; Uauy, R

    2014-10-01

    Early adiposity rebound (AR <5 years) has been consistently associated with increased obesity risk, but its relationship with metabolic markers is less clear; in addition, the biologic mechanisms involved in these associations have not been established. The objective of this study was to assess the association between timing of AR and metabolic status at age 7 years, evaluating the potential role of adiposity, adipose functionality and skeletal maturation in this association. We estimated the age of AR from the body mass index (BMI) trajectories from 0 to 7 years in 910 children from the Growth and Obesity Chilean Cohort Study (GOCS). At 7 years, we measured waist circumference (WC) and blood glucose, insulin, triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels and constructed a metabolic risk score. We also measured percent fat mass (adiposity), plasma concentrations of leptin and adiponectin (adipose functionality) and bone age using wrist ultrasound (skeletal maturation). We found that 44% of the children had an AR <5 years. Earlier AR was associated with larger WC (β: 5.10 (95% confidence interval (CI): 4.29-5.91)), higher glucose (β: 1.02 (1.00-1.03)), insulin resistance (β Homeostatic Model Assessment: 1.06 (1.03-1.09)), triglycerides (β: 10.37 (4.01-6.73)) and adverse metabolic score (β: 0.30 (0.02-0.37)). Associations decreased significantly if adiposity was added to the models (i.e. β WC: 0.85 (0.33-1.38)) and, to a lesser extent, when adipokines (i.e. β WC: 0.73 (0.14-1.32)) and skeletal maturation (i.e. β WC: 0.65 (0.10-1.20)) were added. In GOCS children, AR at a younger age predicts higher metabolic risk at 7 years; these associations are mostly explained by increased adiposity, but adipose dysfunction and accelerated skeletal maturation also have a role.

  8. Children with congenital hypothyroidism are at risk of adult obesity due to early adiposity rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S C; Ng, S M; Didi, M

    2004-10-01

    There is some evidence that children with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) are heavier than their reference population. There are few data on adults with CH. The timing of adiposity rebound (AR) in childhood has been shown to have strong correlations with adult obesity. Our aims were to study the timing of AR and factors affecting AR in children with CH. The timing of AR was examined in a retrospective study of children with CH with growth data at least up to 5 years of age. The proportion of children with CH who reached AR by 37 months and by 49 months of age were compared with healthy children and children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) described in the literature. Correlation of timing of AR with body mass index (BMI) standard deviation score (SDS) at 10 years, initial severity of hypothyroidism and age at normalization of TSH were examined. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify independent factors associated with BMI > or = 20 (overweight) at 10 years of age. The study included 53 children (34 females and 19 males). AR had occurred by 37 months in 37.7% children with CH, in 42.7% children treated for ALL (CH vs. ALL, P = 0.58) and in 4.5% healthy British children (CH vs. normal, P or = 20 at 10 years of age (P = 0.04). Children with CH showed significantly earlier AR compared to normal British children. This showed significant negative correlation with BMI SDS at 10 years. AR in CH does not appear to be directly related to the initial severity of hypothyroidism or to treatment factors.

  9. Current crisis or artifact of surveillance: insights into rebound chlamydia rates from dynamic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background After initially falling in the face of intensified control efforts, reported rates of sexually transmitted chlamydia in many developed countries are rising. Recent hypotheses for this phenomenon have broadly focused on improved case finding or an increase in the prevalence. Because of many complex interactions behind the spread of infectious diseases, dynamic models of infection transmission are an effective means to guide learning, and assess quantitative conjectures of epidemiological processes. The objective of this paper is to bring a unique and robust perspective to observed chlamydial patterns through analyzing surveillance data with mathematical models of infection transmission. Methods This study integrated 25-year testing volume data from the Canadian province of Saskatchewan with one susceptible-infected-treated-susceptible and three susceptible-infected-treated-removed compartmental models. Calibration of model parameters to fit observed 25-year case notification data, after being combined with testing records, placed constraints on model behaviour and allowed for an approximation of chlamydia prevalence to be estimated. Model predictions were compared to observed case notification trends, and extensive sensitivity analyses were performed to confirm the robustness of model results. Results Model predictions accurately mirrored historic chlamydial trends including an observed rebound in the mid 1990s. For all models examined, the results repeatedly highlighted that increased testing volumes, rather than changes in the sensitivity and specificity of testing technologies, sexual behaviour, or truncated immunological responses brought about by treatment can, explain the increase in observed chlamydia case notifications. Conclusions Our results highlight the significant impact testing volume can have on observed incidence rates, and that simple explanations for these observed increases appear to have been dismissed in favor of changes to the

  10. Evaluation of a new rebound tonometer for self-measurement of intraocular pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabasia, Priya L; Lawrenson, John G; Murdoch, Ian E

    2016-08-01

    To compare the accuracy of self-obtained, partner-obtained and trainer-obtained measurements using the handheld Icare Home rebound tonometer with Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT), and to evaluate the acceptability to subjects of Icare Home measurement. 76 subjects were trained to use Icare Home for self-measurement using a standardised protocol. A prespecified checklist was used to assess the ability of a subject to perform self-tonometry. Accuracy of Icare Home self-measurement was compared with GAT using one eye per subject, randomly selected. Bland-Altman difference analysis was used to compare Icare Home and GAT intraocular pressure (IOP) estimates. Acceptability of self-tonometry was evaluated using a questionnaire. 56 subjects (74%, 95% CI 64 to 84) were able to correctly perform self-tonometry. Mean bias (95% limits of agreement) was 0.3 mm Hg (-4.6 to 5.2), 1.1 mm Hg (-3.2 to 5.3) and 1.2 mm Hg (-3.9 to 6.3) for self-assessment, partner-assessment and trainer-assessment, respectively, suggesting underestimation of IOP by Icare Home tonometry. Differences between GAT and Icare Home IOP were greater for central corneal thickness below 500 µm and above 600 µm than data points within this range. Acceptability questionnaire responses showed high agreement that the self-pressure device was easy to use (84%), the reading was quick to obtain (88%) and the measurement was comfortable (95%). Icare Home tonometry can be used for self-measurement by a majority of trained subjects. IOP measurements obtained using Icare Home tonometry by self-assessment and third party-assessment showed slight underestimation compared with GAT. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. A Comparison of Rebound to Indentation Tonometry in Supine Sedated Children with Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHarkan, Dora H; Al-Shamlan, Fatemah T; Edward, Deepak P; Khan, Arif O

    2016-01-01

    To compare intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements by rebound tonometry (Icare PRO; Icare Finland Oy, Helsinki, Finland) to measurements by indentation tonometry (Pneumotonometer Model 30 classic and Tono-Pen XL; Reichert, Buffalo, NY, USA) in supine sedated children with glaucoma. Prospective comparative observational study of Saudi Arabian children with glaucoma undergoing chloral hydrate sedation for ophthalmic examination (February 2012 - February 2013). Nonglaucomatous eyes were included as controls. Eyes with corneal scars or prior corneal transplant or lamellar surgery were excluded. Fifty-two eyes (26 OD, 26 OS) of 28 children were included. Thirty-six eyes had glaucoma (32 primary congenital glaucoma, two Sturge-Weber related, and two aphakia related). Sixteen eyes did not have glaucoma (six with pediatric cataract, five normal eyes, two strabismic eyes, two eyes with simple megalocornea, and one eye had peripheral corneal laceration repair. In the glaucoma group, the mean IOP was 17.55 ± 5.97 mmHg (range, 8-31.5 mmHg) with the Icare PRO and 20 ± 6.4 mmHg (range, 8-35.5 mmHg) with the Pneumotonometer from 20.47 ± 6.81 mmHg (range, 10-43 mmHg) with the Tono-Pen XL. The Icare PRO readings were significantly lower than each of the indentation tonometers. For the control group, there was no statistically significant difference in IOP measured by the Icare PRO and the indentation tonometers. In this population of supine sedated children with glaucoma, IOP measurements with the Icare PRO tend to be lower than readings from the Pneumotonometer and Tono-Pen XL.

  12. Subaqueous rock-avalanche deposits exposed by post-glacial isostatic rebound, Innfjorddalen, Western Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleier, Markus; Hermanns, Reginald L.; Gosse, John C.; Oppikofer, Thierry; Rohn, Joachim; Tønnesen, Jan F.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a detailed description of deposits and landforms of multiple rock avalanches in Western Norway, one of which fell onto water-saturated sediments in Innfjorddalen below the former water level. Deposits of the latter are now exposed on the valley floor due to post-glacial isostatic rebound. At least three rock avalanches from the same source at Gråfonnfjellet Mountain have occurred during late glacial and post-glacial time, and their deposits are distributed over an area of 1.44 km2 in the valley. These rock avalanches have volumes of 15.1 × 106 m3, 5.4 × 106 m3 and 0.3 × 106 m3 and yielded cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be ages of 14.3 ± 1.4 ka, 8.79 ± 0.94 ka and 1.028 ± 0.380 ka, respectively. The youngest event dates, within uncertainty limits to a historic rock avalanche in the year 1611-12 CE. The rock avalanches formed a stratified succession of deposits. The rock-avalanche deposits (1.38 m2) have lobate forms, have frontal rims and parallel ridges, extend across the valley floor and up the opposite slope, and form dams on the valley floor. Isolated hills comprised of rock boulders (0.61 km2), interpreted to be 'toma hills', are disconnected from the main rock-avalanche deposits by a 520-m-wide zone of deformed, valley-fill sediments. Trenches and a ground penetrating radar survey of these deposits indicate large-scale deformation or liquefaction. Numerical runout modeling of the rock avalanches with the code DAN3D supports the interpretation of their landforms and sources, and highlights their runout behavior.

  13. Reduced slow-wave rebound during daytime recovery sleep in middle-aged subjects.

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    Marjolaine Lafortune

    Full Text Available Cortical synchronization during NREM sleep, characterized by electroencephalographic slow waves (SW 75 µV, is strongly related to the number of hours of wakefulness prior to sleep and to the quality of the waking experience. Whether a similar increase in wakefulness length leads to a comparable enhancement in NREM sleep cortical synchronization in young and older subjects is still a matter of debate in the literature. Here we evaluated the impact of 25-hours of wakefulness on SW during a daytime recovery sleep episode in 29 young (27 y ± 5, and 34 middle-aged (51 y ± 5 subjects. We also assessed whether age-related changes in NREM sleep cortical synchronization predicts the ability to maintain sleep during daytime recovery sleep. Compared to baseline sleep, sleep efficiency was lower during daytime recovery sleep in both age-groups but the effect was more prominent in the middle-aged than in the young subjects. In both age groups, SW density, amplitude, and slope increased whereas SW positive and negative phase duration decreased during daytime recovery sleep compared to baseline sleep, particularly in anterior brain areas. Importantly, compared to young subjects, middle-aged participants showed lower SW density rebound and SW positive phase duration enhancement after sleep deprivation during daytime recovery sleep. Furthermore, middle-aged subjects showed lower SW amplitude and slope enhancements after sleep deprivation than young subjects in frontal and prefrontal derivations only. None of the SW characteristics at baseline were associated with daytime recovery sleep efficiency. Our results support the notion that anterior brain areas elicit and may necessitate more intense recovery and that aging reduces enhancement of cortical synchronization after sleep loss, particularly in these areas. Age-related changes in the quality of wake experience may underlie age-related reduction in markers of cortical synchronization enhancement after

  14. Current crisis or artifact of surveillance: insights into rebound chlamydia rates from dynamic modelling

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    Vickers David M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After initially falling in the face of intensified control efforts, reported rates of sexually transmitted chlamydia in many developed countries are rising. Recent hypotheses for this phenomenon have broadly focused on improved case finding or an increase in the prevalence. Because of many complex interactions behind the spread of infectious diseases, dynamic models of infection transmission are an effective means to guide learning, and assess quantitative conjectures of epidemiological processes. The objective of this paper is to bring a unique and robust perspective to observed chlamydial patterns through analyzing surveillance data with mathematical models of infection transmission. Methods This study integrated 25-year testing volume data from the Canadian province of Saskatchewan with one susceptible-infected-treated-susceptible and three susceptible-infected-treated-removed compartmental models. Calibration of model parameters to fit observed 25-year case notification data, after being combined with testing records, placed constraints on model behaviour and allowed for an approximation of chlamydia prevalence to be estimated. Model predictions were compared to observed case notification trends, and extensive sensitivity analyses were performed to confirm the robustness of model results. Results Model predictions accurately mirrored historic chlamydial trends including an observed rebound in the mid 1990s. For all models examined, the results repeatedly highlighted that increased testing volumes, rather than changes in the sensitivity and specificity of testing technologies, sexual behaviour, or truncated immunological responses brought about by treatment can, explain the increase in observed chlamydia case notifications. Conclusions Our results highlight the significant impact testing volume can have on observed incidence rates, and that simple explanations for these observed increases appear to have been dismissed in

  15. Effects of cocaine, methamphetamine and modafinil challenge on sleep rebound after paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C.S Martins

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep loss is both common and critically relevant to our society and might lead to the abuse of psychostimulants such as amphetamines, cocaine and modafinil. Since psychoactive substance abuse often occurs within a scenario of sleep deficit, the purpose of this investigation was to compare the sleep patterns of rats challenged with cocaine (7 mg/kg, ip, methamphetamine (7 mg/kg, ip, or modafinil (100 mg/kg, ip subsequent to paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD for 96 h. Our results show that, immediately after 96 h of PSD, rats (10 per group that were injected with a psychostimulant presented lower percentages of paradoxical sleep compared to those injected with saline (P < 0.01. Regarding slow wave sleep (SWS, rats injected with psychostimulants after PSD presented a late rebound (on the second night subsequent to the injection in the percentage of this phase of sleep when compared to PSD rats injected with saline (P < 0.05. In addition, the current study has produced evidence of the characteristic effect of each drug on sleep architecture. Home cage control rats injected with modafinil and methamphetamine showed a reduction in SWS compared with the saline group. Methamphetamine affected sleep patterns most, since it significantly reduced paradoxical sleep, SWS and sleep efficiency before and after PSD compared to control (P < 0.05. Cocaine was the psychostimulant causing the least changes in sleep pattern in relation to those observed after saline injection. Therefore, our results suggest that abuse of these psychostimulants in a PSD paradigm aggravates their impact on sleep patterns.

  16. Rebound tonometry versus Goldmann tonometry in school children: feasibility and agreement of intraocular pressure measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Leonardo Barranco Esporcatte

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: High intraocular pressure (IOP is an important risk factor for a variety of pediatric ophthalmic conditions. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility, length of examination, and corneal epithelial damage induced by rebound tonometry (RBT versus Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT in school children. Methods: Healthy children (n=57 participated in a randomized, transversal study with IOP measurement by GAT followed by RBT (study arm 1 or RBT followed by GAT (study arm 2. The number of attempts to acquire a reliable IOP measurement and the length of the examination were quantified. Corneal epithelial damage induced by tonometry was evaluated. Bland-Altman analysis was performed to establish the level of agreement between the two techniques. Results: The IOP was measured in all children with at least one of the devices. In both study arms, more children failed to be examined with GAT than with RBT (26% vs. 4%, and 16% vs. 6%, p<0.001, in study arm 1 and 2, respectively. The length of examination was shorter for RBT than for GAT (67.81 s ± 35.20 s vs. 126.70 s ± 56.60 s; p<0.0001; IOP measurements with RBT in both study arms were higher than those with GAT (15.20 ± 2.74 mmHg vs. 13.25 ± 2.47 mmHg, p=0.0247 and 16.76 ± 3.99 mmHg vs. 13.92 ± 2.08 mmHg, p=0.003, respectively. No difference was observed between RBT and GAT regarding the corneal epithelial damage caused by tonometry. Conclusion: IOP measurement is feasible in a greater number of children with RBT, and the examination was faster than that for GAT. Compared with GAT, RBT tended to overestimate the IOP. None of the methods induced marked corneal epithelial defects.

  17. Implications of smaller concentrations of stratospheric OH - A two-dimensional model study of ozone perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, R. C.; Borucki, W. J.; Woodward, H. T.; Capone, L. A.; Riegel, C. A.; Turco, R. P.; Poppoff, I. G.; Santhanam, K.

    1981-01-01

    There is growing observational evidence that stratospheric OH concentrations are smaller than models have been predicting. Using very recent HOx reaction rate coefficient measurements in a two-dimensional photochemical model, results which support these observations are obtained. As a consequence of smaller OH concentrations, we show that perturbations of stratospheric ozone by NOx (SST emissions and nitrogen fertilizers) may be larger than expected, while perturbations due to added water vapor and chlorine (SSTs and chlorofluoromethanes, respectively) may be smaller.

  18. VIRAL DISEASES IN SEA FISH

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    Ivančica Strunjak-Perović

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Adequate knowledge on fish diseases caused by viruses is still lacking. Up until now, in fish which live their entire life cycle or part of it in the sea, some viral diseases have been determined (lymphoeytis, viral necrosis of crythrocytes, ciravosti cod syndrome, encephalitis, viral hemoragic septichemistry, viral hematopoetic necrosis, viral gusteraca necrosis, chum renviral infection, branchionephritis, rabdociral eel infection. Some of these diseases primarily occur in the freshwater phase of host development, although recordings exist that the virus is carried on in surving samples which succeed in making it to the sea. As the number of sea fish species increases in controlled culture a increasing number of pathological cases are observed, which is caused by viruses. Therefore, in this area it is necessary to emphasize future investigations.

  19. Insulated Foamy Viral Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Diana L.; Collins, Casey P.; Hocum, Jonah D.; Leap, David J.; Rae, Dustin T.; Trobridge, Grant D.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral vector-mediated gene therapy is promising, but genotoxicity has limited its use in the clinic. Genotoxicity is highly dependent on the retroviral vector used, and foamy viral (FV) vectors appear relatively safe. However, internal promoters may still potentially activate nearby genes. We developed insulated FV vectors, using four previously described insulators: a version of the well-studied chicken hypersensitivity site 4 insulator (650cHS4), two synthetic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-based insulators, and an insulator based on the CCAAT box-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor I (7xCTF/NF1). We directly compared these insulators for enhancer-blocking activity, effect on FV vector titer, and fidelity of transfer to both proviral long terminal repeats. The synthetic CTCF-based insulators had the strongest insulating activity, but reduced titers significantly. The 7xCTF/NF1 insulator did not reduce titers but had weak insulating activity. The 650cHS4-insulated FV vector was identified as the overall most promising vector. Uninsulated and 650cHS4-insulated FV vectors were both significantly less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors. Integration sites were evaluated in cord blood CD34+ cells and the 650cHS4-insulated FV vector had fewer hotspots compared with an uninsulated FV vector. These data suggest that insulated FV vectors are promising for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. PMID:26715244

  20. Tight Junctions Go Viral!

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    Jesús M. Torres-Flores

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Tight junctions (TJs are highly specialized membrane domains involved in many important cellular processes such as the regulation of the passage of ions and macromolecules across the paracellular space and the establishment of cell polarity in epithelial cells. Over the past few years there has been increasing evidence that different components of the TJs can be hijacked by viruses in order to complete their infectious cycle. Viruses from at least nine different families of DNA and RNA viruses have been reported to use TJ proteins in their benefit. For example, TJ proteins such as JAM-A or some members of the claudin family of proteins are used by members of the Reoviridae family and hepatitis C virus as receptors or co-receptors during their entry into their host cells. Reovirus, in addition, takes advantage of the TJ protein Junction Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A to achieve its hematogenous dissemination. Some other viruses are capable of regulating the expression or the localization of TJ proteins to induce cell transformation or to improve the efficiency of their exit process. This review encompasses the importance of TJs for viral entry, replication, dissemination, and egress, and makes a clear statement of the importance of studying these proteins to gain a better understanding of the replication strategies used by viruses that infect epithelial and/or endothelial cells.

  1. Viral Response to Specifically Targeted Antiviral Therapy for Hepatitis C and the Implications for Treatment Success

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    Curtis L Cooper

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, hepatitis C virus (HCV antiviral therapy is characterized by long duration, a multitude of side effects, difficult administration and suboptimal success; clearly, alternatives are needed. Collectively, specifically targeted antiviral therapy for HCV (STAT-C molecules achieve rapid viral suppression and very high rapid virological response rates, and improve sustained virological response rates. The attrition rate of agents within this class has been high due to various toxicities. Regardless, several STAT-C molecules are poised to become the standard of care for HCV treatment in the foreseeable future. Optimism must be tempered with concerns related to the rapid development of drug resistance with resulting HCV rebound. Strategies including induction dosing with interferon and ribavirin, use of combination high-potency STAT-C molecules and an intensive emphasis on adherence to HCV antiviral therapy will be critical to the success of this promising advance in HCV therapy.

  2. Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is inflammation of the liver caused ...

  3. Note on the smaller mammals of the Hester Malan Nature Reserve ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Note on the smaller mammals of the Hester. Malan Nature Reserve, Springbok,. Namaqualand. R.C. Dieckmann. A survey of the smaller mammals of the Hester Malan. Nature Reserve resulted in a checklist as well as information on the habitat in which the mammals occurred. Of the 38 species listed, 31 were collected or.

  4. 75 FR 37779 - Office of Elementary and Secondary Education; Smaller Learning Communities Program; Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Elementary and Secondary Education; Smaller Learning Communities Program; Notice Inviting... year (FY) 2009 funds for the Smaller Learning Communities Program. There are errors in two of the dates...

  5. Acute escitalopram treatment inhibits REM sleep rebound and activation of MCH-expressing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus after long term selective REM sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kátai, Zita; Adori, Csaba; Kitka, Tamás; Vas, Szilvia; Kalmár, Lajos; Kostyalik, Diána; Tóthfalusi, László; Palkovits, Miklós; Bagdy, György

    2013-08-01

    Selective rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) deprivation using the platform-on-water ("flower pot") method causes sleep rebound with increased REMS, decreased REMS latency, and activation of the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) expressing neurons in the hypothalamus. MCH is implicated in the pathomechanism of depression regarding its influence on mood, feeding behavior, and REMS. We investigated the effects of the most selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram on sleep rebound following REMS deprivation and, in parallel, on the activation of MCH-containing neurons. Escitalopram or vehicle (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was administered to REMS-deprived (72 h) or home cage male Wistar rats. During the 3-h-long "rebound sleep", electroencephalography was recorded, followed by an MCH/Fos double immunohistochemistry. During REMS rebound, the time spent in REMS and the number of MCH/Fos double-labeled neurons in the lateral hypothalamus increased markedly, and REMS latency showed a significant decrease. All these effects of REMS deprivation were significantly attenuated by escitalopram treatment. Besides the REMS-suppressing effects, escitalopram caused an increase in amount of and decrease in latency of slow wave sleep during the rebound. These results show that despite the high REMS pressure caused by REMS deprivation procedure, escitalopram has the ability to suppress REMS rebound, as well as to diminish the activation of MCH-containing neurons, in parallel. Escitalopram caused a shift from REMS to slow wave sleep during the rebound. Furthermore, these data point to the potential connection between the serotonergic system and MCH in sleep regulation, which can be relevant in depression and in other mood disorders.

  6. Smaller Cigarette Pack as a Commitment to Smoke Less? Insights from Behavioral Economics.

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    Joachim Marti

    Full Text Available Cigarettes are commonly sold in packs of 20 units and therefore little is known about the potential impact of pack size on consumption. Using insights from behavioral economics, we suggest that cigarette packs smaller than the standard size may help some smokers cut back and/or quit, consistent with their long-term goals. Results from an online hypothetical purchase experiment conducted in a sample of US smokers reveal that over a third of smokers are willing to pay a price premium to purchase in smaller quantities. Further, a desire to quit smoking and high self-control is associated with preference for a smaller pack. While we provide some preliminary evidence that smaller packs may be beneficial to certain types of smokers, further research should be conducted to assess whether the smaller pack size should be considered in the arsenal of tobacco control policies to help current smokers quit (JEL: I18; I12; D12.

  7. Smaller Cigarette Pack as a Commitment to Smoke Less? Insights from Behavioral Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Joachim; Sindelar, Jody

    2015-01-01

    Cigarettes are commonly sold in packs of 20 units and therefore little is known about the potential impact of pack size on consumption. Using insights from behavioral economics, we suggest that cigarette packs smaller than the standard size may help some smokers cut back and/or quit, consistent with their long-term goals. Results from an online hypothetical purchase experiment conducted in a sample of US smokers reveal that over a third of smokers are willing to pay a price premium to purchase in smaller quantities. Further, a desire to quit smoking and high self-control is associated with preference for a smaller pack. While we provide some preliminary evidence that smaller packs may be beneficial to certain types of smokers, further research should be conducted to assess whether the smaller pack size should be considered in the arsenal of tobacco control policies to help current smokers quit (JEL: I18; I12; D12) PMID:26356844

  8. Dynamical rearrangement of super-Earths during disk dispersal. II. Assessment of the magnetospheric rebound model for planet formation scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Beibei; Ormel, Chris W.

    2017-10-01

    Context. The Kepler mission has provided a large sample to statistically analyze the orbital properties of the super-Earth planet population. We hypothesize that these planets formed early and consider the problem of matching planet formation theory to the current orbital configurations. Two scenarios - disk migration and in-situ formation - have been proposed to explain the origin of these planets. In the migration scenario, planets migrate inward to the inner disk due to planet-disk interaction, whereas in the in-situ scenario planets assemble locally. Therefore, planets formed by migration are expected to end up in resonances, whereas those formed in-situ are expected to stay in short period ratios and in non-resonant orbits. Both predictions are at odds with observations. Aims: We investigate whether a preferred formation scenario can be identified through a comparison between the magnetospheric rebound model and the Kepler data. Methods: We conduct N-body simulations of two-planet systems during the disk dispersal phase. Several distributions of model parameters are considered and we make a statistical comparison between the simulations and the Kepler observations. Results: Comparing the migration and the in-situ scenarios, we find that magnetospheric rebound tends to erase the difference in the orbital configuration that was initially presented. After disk dispersal, not all planets are in resonance in the migration scenario, whereas planets do not remain in compact configurations in the in-situ scenario. In both scenarios, the orbits of planets increase with the cavity expansion, and their period ratios have a wider distribution. Conclusions: From a statistical perspective, the magnetospheric rebound model reproduces several observed properties of Kepler planets, such as the fact that a significant number of planets are not in resonances and planet pairs can end up at large period ratios. The disparity in orbital configuration between the two formation

  9. The last North American ice sheet and mantle viscosity from glacial rebound analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambeck, Kurt; Purcell, Anthony; Zhao, Jason

    2017-04-01

    drainage of the palaeo-lakes to global sea level rise is small, earth's rotation axis. The full paper 'The North American Late Wisconsin ice sheet and mantle viscosity from glacial rebound analyses' is in press in J. Quaternary Science Reviews

  10. A Biomechanical Comparison Among Three Kinds of Rebound-Type Jumps in Female Collegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariai, Miki; Yoshida, Naruto; Imai, Atsushi; Ae, Kazumichi; Ogaki, Ryo; Suhara, Hirokazu; Shiraki, Hitoshi

    2017-08-01

    characteristics of the takeoff leg ROM and mechanical work were found between three kinds of rebound-type jump tests. These findings may help clinicians choose jump methods to assess lower extremity function and to design plyometric training programs in sports and clinical fields. 3b.

  11. Dynamical rearrangement of super-Earths during disk dispersal. I. Outline of the magnetospheric rebound model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Beibei; Ormel, Chris W.; Lin, Douglas N. C.

    2017-05-01

    disk dispersal can be retrieved. Conclusions: We highlight "magnetospheric" rebound as an important ingredient able to reconcile disk migration theory with observations. Even when planets are trapped into MMRs during the early gas-rich stage, subsequent cavity expansion induces substantial changes to their orbits that move them out of resonance.

  12. Neuroanatomy goes viral!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eNassi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The nervous system is complex not simply because of the enormous number of neurons it contains but by virtue of the specificity with which they are connected. Unraveling this specificity is the task of neuroanatomy. In this endeavor, neuroanatomists have traditionally exploited an impressive array of tools ranging from the Golgi method to electron microscopy. An ideal method for studying anatomy would label neurons that are interconnected, and, in addition, allow expression of foreign genes in these neurons. Fortuitously, nature has already partially developed such a method in the form of neurotropic viruses, which have evolved to deliver their genetic material between synaptically connected neurons while largely eluding glia and the immune system. While these characteristics make some of these viruses a threat to human health, simple modifications allow them to be used in controlled experimental settings, thus enabling neuroanatomists to trace multi-synaptic connections within and across brain regions. Wild-type neurotropic viruses, such as rabies and alpha-herpes virus, have already contributed greatly to our understanding of brain connectivity, and modern molecular techniques have enabled the construction of recombinant forms of these and other viruses. These newly engineered reagents are particularly useful, as they can target genetically defined populations of neurons, spread only one synapse to either inputs or outputs, and carry instructions by which the targeted neurons can be made to express exogenous proteins, such as calcium sensors or light-sensitive ion channels, that can be used to study neuronal function. In this review, we address these uniquely powerful features of the viruses already in the neuroanatomist's toolbox, as well as the aspects of their biology that currently limit their utility. Based on the latter, we consider strategies for improving viral tracing methods by reducing toxicity, improving control of transsynaptic

  13. Measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP) in chickens using a rebound tonometer: quantitative evaluation of variance due to position inaccuracies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashar, A; Guggenheim, J A; Erichsen, J T; Hocking, P M; Morgan, J E

    2007-10-01

    Intraocular pressure (IOP), an important risk factor for glaucoma, is a continuous trait determined by a complex set of genetic and environmental factors that are largely unknown. Genetic studies in laboratory animals may facilitate the identification of genes that affect IOP. We examined the use of the rebound tonometer for measuring IOP in non-anaesthetised birds, along with the device's robustness to alignment errors. Calibration curves were obtained by measuring the IOP of cannulated chicken eyes with the rebound tonometer over a range of pressures. To simulate different types of alignment errors that might be expected with measurement of IOP in alert chickens, for some calibrations the tonometer was positioned (1) at various distances from the cornea, (2) laterally displaced from the visual axis, or (3) angled away from the visual axis. In vivo measurements were taken on three-week-old alert chickens from a layer line, a broiler line, and a layer-broiler "advanced intercross line" (AIL) designed to facilitate QTL mapping. The rebound tonometer showed excellent linearity (R2=0.95-0.99) during calibration, as well as robustness to variation in the probe-to-cornea distance over the range 3-5mm and to lateral displacement over the range 0-2mm. However, the tonometer appeared less robust to off-axis misalignment over the range 0-20 degrees (PIOP measured in non-anaesthetised three-week-old AIL chickens was 17.51+/-0.13 mmHg (mean+/-S.E.; N=105 birds). IOP was significantly associated with corneal thickness (Pmeasurements were necessary in order to gauge IOP accurately in individual birds; a series of seven tonometry sessions over a 12-h period during the light phase of the light/dark cycle permitted IOP to be measured with a 95% CI of +/-0.7 mmHg. IOP did not differ significantly between the broiler and layer chicken lines which served as the progenitor lines for the AIL. In conclusion, the rebound tonometer permits rapid estimation of IOP in chickens and is well

  14. Viral marketing as epidemiological model

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, Helena Sofia

    2015-01-01

    In epidemiology, an epidemic is defined as the spread of an infectious disease to a large number of people in a given population within a short period of time. In the marketing context, a message is viral when it is broadly sent and received by the target market through person-to-person transmission. This specific marketing communication strategy is commonly referred as viral marketing. Due to this similarity between an epidemic and the viral marketing process and because the understanding of the critical factors to this communications strategy effectiveness remain largely unknown, the mathematical models in epidemiology are presented in this marketing specific field. In this paper, an epidemiological model SIR (Susceptible- Infected-Recovered) to study the effects of a viral marketing strategy is presented. It is made a comparison between the disease parameters and the marketing application, and simulations using the Matlab software are performed. Finally, some conclusions are given and their marketing impli...

  15. FastStats: Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Viral Hepatitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are for the U.S. Morbidity Number of new hepatitis A cases: 1,239 (2014) Number of new ...

  16. Aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, David N

    2008-08-01

    Meningitis and myelitis represent common and very infrequent viral infections of the central nervous system, respectively. The number of cases of viral meningitis that occurs annually exceeds the total number of meningitis cases caused by all other etiologies combined. Focal central nervous system infections, such as occur in the spinal cord with viral myelitis, are much less common and may be confused with noninfectious disorders that cause acute flaccid paralysis. This article reviews some of the important clinical features, epidemiology, diagnostic approaches, and management strategies for patients with aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis. Particular focus is placed on the diseases caused by enteroviruses, which as a group account for most aseptic meningitis cases and many focal infections of the spinal cord.

  17. Viral Evolution Core | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon F. Keele, Ph.D. PI/Senior Principal Investigator, Retroviral Evolution Section Head, Viral Evolution Core Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc. Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Frederick, MD 21702-1201 Tel: 301-846-173

  18. Viral hepatitis in minority America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Renard A; Vega, Kenneth J

    2005-02-01

    Viral hepatitis continues as an important public health concern in the United States. Available data indicate that acute and chronic viral hepatitis remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in this country despite the availability of immunization for hepatitis A and B and pharmacologic therapy for chronic hepatitis B and C. Minority populations within the United States are disproportionately affected by acute and chronic viral hepatitis. Many diseases, for example, Barrett's esophagus, affect ethnic groups differently. Viral hepatitis A, B, and C may demonstrate ethnic variation with regard to their epidemiology, natural history, clinicopatholgic findings, complications, and treatment outcomes. This report will review the literature regarding these areas in hepatitis A, B, and C among the African American, Hispanic American, and Native American populations of the United States.

  19. Microbiological diagnostics of viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    HASDEMİR, Ufuk

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is an infection that primarily affects the liverbut may also have systemic clinical manifestations. The vastmajority of viral hepatitis are caused by one of five hepatotropicviruses: hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV),hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D (delta) virus (HDV), andhepatitis E virus (HEV) (Table I) [1]. HBV, HCV, and HDValso cause chronic hepatitis, whereas HAV does not. HEVcauses acute hepatitis in normal hosts but can cause protractedand chronic he...

  20. Grid cell firing patterns may arise from feedback interaction between intrinsic rebound spiking and transverse travelling waves with multiple heading angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Hasselmo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a model using cellular resonance and rebound properties to model grid cells in medial entorhinal cortex. The model simulates the intrinsic resonance properties of single layer II stellate cells with different frequencies due to the hyperpolarization activated cation current (h current. The stellate cells generate rebound spikes after a delay interval that differs for neurons with different resonance frequency. Stellate cells drive inhibitory interneurons to cause rebound from inhibition in an alternating set of stellate cells that drive interneurons to activate the first set of cells. This allows maintenance of activity with cycle skipping of the spiking of cells that matches recent physiological data on theta cycle skipping. The rebound spiking interacts with subthreshold oscillatory input to stellate cells or interneurons regulated by medial septal input and defined relative to the spatial location coded by neurons. The timing of rebound determines whether the network maintains the activity for the same location or shifts to phases of activity representing a different location. Simulations show that spatial firing patterns similar to grid cells can be generated with a range of different resonance frequencies, indicating how grid cells could be generated with low frequencies present in bats and in mice with knockout of the HCN1 subunit of the h current.

  1. Why does Spain have smaller inequalities in mortality? An exploration of potential explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulhánová, Ivana; Bacigalupe, Amaia; Eikemo, Terje A; Borrell, Carme; Regidor, Enrique; Esnaola, Santiago; Mackenbach, Johan P

    2014-06-01

    While educational inequalities in mortality are substantial in most European countries, they are relatively small in Spain. A better understanding of the causes of these smaller inequalities in Spain may help to develop policies to reduce inequalities in mortality elsewhere. The aim of the present study was therefore to identify the specific causes of death and determinants contributing to these smaller inequalities. Data on mortality by education were obtained from longitudinal mortality studies in three Spanish populations (Barcelona, Madrid, the Basque Country), and six other Western European populations. Data on determinants by education were obtained from health interview surveys. The Spanish populations have considerably smaller absolute inequalities in mortality than other Western European populations. This is due mainly to smaller inequalities in mortality from cardiovascular disease (men) and cancer (women). Inequalities in mortality from most other causes are not smaller in Spain than elsewhere. Spain also has smaller inequalities in smoking and sedentary lifestyle and this is due to more smoking and physical inactivity in higher educated groups. Overall, the situation with regard to health inequalities does not appear to be more favourable in Spain than in other Western European populations. Smaller inequalities in mortality from cardiovascular disease and cancer in Spain are likely to be related to its later socio-economic modernization. Although these smaller inequalities in mortality seem to be a historical coincidence rather than the outcome of deliberate policies, the Spanish example does suggest that large inequalities in total mortality are not inevitable. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  2. Radical rebound mechanism in cytochrome P-450-catalyzed hydroxylation of the multifaceted radical clocks alpha- and beta-thujone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiang; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2004-09-17

    Alpha-thujone (1alpha) and beta-thujone (1beta) were used to investigate the mechanism of hydrocarbon hydroxylation by cytochromes P-450(cam) (CYP101) and P-450(BM3) (CYP102). The thujones are hydroxylated by these enzymes at various positions, but oxidation at C-4 gives rise to both rearranged and unrearranged hydroxylation products. Rearranged products result from the formation of a radical intermediate that can undergo either inversion of stereochemistry or ring opening of the adjacent cyclopropane ring. Both of these rearrangements, as well as a C-4 desaturation reaction, are observed. The ring opening clock gives oxygen rebound rates that range from 0.2 x 10(10) to 2.8 x 10(10) s(-1) for the different substrate and enzyme combinations. The C-4 inversion reaction provides independent confirmation of a radical intermediate. The phenol product expected if a C-4 cationic rather than radical intermediate is formed is not detected. The results are consistent with a two-state process and provide support for a radical rebound but not a hydroperoxide insertion mechanism for cytochrome P-450 hydroxylation.

  3. Long-term changes in body weight, BMI, and adiposity rebound among children and adolescents in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignerová, J; Humeníkova, L; Brabec, M; Riedlová, J; Bláha, P

    2007-12-01

    The Czech Republic has undergone rapid political, social, and economic transformation since the late 1980s. While obesity rates among children and adolescents in the Czech Republic have been previously relatively low, this has changed in recent years. Across the past 50 years, body weight, body mass index (BMI)-for-age, and adiposity rebound (AR) (the time when a child reaches the lowest BMI before their BMI gradually begins to increase until adulthood) occurs earlier. The most dramatic changes have been observed among school-aged children, where BMI values have increased at the 50th, 90th, and 97th percentiles. In contrast, adolescent girls appear to be thinner than in the past. The analyses of weight-for-height percentiles indicated that the 50th percentile of the body weight among boys and girls remained similar in nearly all age categories across the past 50 years. Although the growth pattern of children at the 50th percentile has not changed, the 10th and 90th percentiles have expanded. Our findings suggest that the secular trend of increased height, accelerated growth, and earlier maturation is responsible for Czech children experiencing adiposity rebound at earlier ages compared to the past.

  4. Mastering the technique of taking a rebound on opponent’s shield by basketball players of initial level of specialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukova L.M.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to prove the effectiveness of the use of training program aimed at improving the skill execution of tackling the ball at the opponent's shield attack in basketball specialized base preparation phase. Material: 30 sportsmen of 13-14 years old took part in the test. They were mostly from CYSS (Children and Youth Sports School. Results: low level of efficiency in the fight for the ball bounces in the attack was appeared to take place both in competitive activity in basketball and in performing the control exercises aimed to master the technique of tackling the ball. It was shown that the most important about the mastering of the technique of a rebound taking in the attack is motion. It was found that the use of simple technical actions as for the selection of the ball led to significant success in three control exercises approximately on 52.7% by improving the quality (accuracy, speed of performing the technique mentioned in the training program. Moreover the factor of effectiveness of the fight for a ball increased on 28.9% (P <0, 05 in competitive activity. Conclusions: to recommend the use of exercises which include four possibilities of moving after being blocked by the opponent: direct output, fainted moving with further escape, turn, one step back. This is needed in order to improve the technique of taking a rebound on the shield of the opponent and also to accelerate the formation of skills formation in competitive activity.

  5. [Neuropsychiatric sequelae of viral meningitis in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsgaard, Jesper; Hjerrild, Simon; Renvillard, Signe Groth; Leutscher, Peter Derek Christian

    2011-10-10

    Viral meningitis is considered to be a benign illness with only mild symptoms. In contrast to viral encephalitis and bacterial meningitis, the prognosis is usually good. However, retrospective studies have demonstrated that patients suffering from viral meningitis may experience cognitive impairment following the acute course of infection. Larger controlled studies are needed to elucidate the potential neuropsychiatric adverse outcome of viral meningitis.

  6. Virological Blips and Predictors of Post Treatment Viral Control After Stopping ART Started in Primary HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Sarah; Olson, Ashley D; Bucher, Heiner C; Fox, Julie; Thornhill, John; Morrison, Charles; Muga, Roberto; Phillips, Andrew; Frater, John; Porter, Kholoud

    2017-02-01

    Few individuals commencing antiretroviral therapy (ART) in primary HIV infection (PHI) maintain undetectable viremia after treatment cessation. Associated factors remain unclear given the importance of the phenomenon to cure research. Using CASCADE data of seroconverters starting ART in PHI (≤6 months from seroconversion), we estimated proportions experiencing viral blips (>400 copies followed by HIV-RNA/mL without alteration of regimen) while on ART. We used Cox models to examine the association between time from ART stop to loss of control (2 consecutive measurements >1000 copies per milliliter) and magnitude and frequency of blips while on ART, time from seroconversion to ART, time on ART, adjusting for mean number of HIV-RNA measurements/year while on ART, and other confounders. Seven hundred seventy-eight seroconverters started ART in PHI with ≥3 HIV-RNA measurements. Median interquartile range (IQR) ART duration was 16.2 (8.0-35.9) months, within which we observed 13% with ≥1 blip. Of 228 who stopped ART, 119 rebounded; time to loss of control was associated with longer interval between seroconversion and ART initiation [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.16 per month; 1.04, 1.28], and blips while on ART (HR = 1.71 per blip; 95% confidence interval = 0.94 to 3.10). Longer time on ART (HR = 0.84 per additional month; 0.76, 0.92) was associated with lower risk of losing control. Of 228 stopping ART, 22 (10%) maintained post treatment control (PTC), ie, HIV-RNA HIV viral blips on therapy are associated with subsequent viral rebound on stopping ART among individuals treated in PHI. Longer duration on ART is associated with a greater chance of PTC.

  7. [Pathology and viral metagenomics, a recent history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Pauline; Albina, Emmanuel; Eloit, Marc; Roumagnac, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    Human, animal and plant viral diseases have greatly benefited from recent metagenomics developments. Viral metagenomics is a culture-independent approach used to investigate the complete viral genetic populations of a sample. During the last decade, metagenomics concepts and techniques that were first used by ecologists progressively spread into the scientific field of viral pathology. The sample, which was first for ecologists a fraction of ecosystem, became for pathologists an organism that hosts millions of microbes and viruses. This new approach, providing without a priori high resolution qualitative and quantitative data on the viral diversity, is now revolutionizing the way pathologists decipher viral diseases. This review describes the very last improvements of the high throughput next generation sequencing methods and discusses the applications of viral metagenomics in viral pathology, including discovery of novel viruses, viral surveillance and diagnostic, large-scale molecular epidemiology, and viral evolution. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  8. The cholecystokinin CCK2 receptor antagonist, JNJ-26070109, inhibits gastric acid secretion and prevents omeprazole-induced acid rebound in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, TD; Lagaud, G; Wagaman, P; Freedman, JM; Yan, W; Andries, L; Rizzolio, MC; Morton, MF; Shankley, NP

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE JNJ-26070109 [(R)4-bromo-N-[1-(2,4-difluoro-phenyl)-ethyl]-2-(quinoxaline-5-sulfonylamino)-benzamide] is a novel antagonist at cholecystokinin CCK2 receptors with good pharmacokinetic properties and represents a novel mechanism for the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). The purpose of the present study was to determine whether chronic treatment with JNJ-26070109 could prevent, as well as treat, acid rebound in rats. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH A chronic fistula was surgically inserted into the stomach of rats to enable the measurement of acid secretion under basal, pentagastrin and histamine-stimulated conditions. JNJ-26070109 and omeprazole were administered separately and in combination. KEY RESULTS Sustained administration of omeprazole alone and in combination with JNJ-26070109 inhibited gastric acid secretion by >90%. However, 3 days after withdrawing treatment, there was a rebound hypersecretion by ∼1.5-fold in omeprazole-treated animals. No such acid rebound was observed with JNJ-26070109 alone or with co-administration of JNJ-26070109 and omeprazole. The anti-trophic effects of JNJ-26070109 in the gastric mucosal paralleled the effects on acid rebound. Administration of JNJ-26070109 for 3 days after cessation of omeprazole prevented the occurrence of acid rebound. Interestingly, chronic, but not acute, treatment with JNJ-26070109 also inhibited histamine-stimulated acid secretion. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Chronic administration of JNJ-26070109 effectively inhibited gastric acid secretion and suppressed proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-induced acid rebound in the rat. This work advances the field by demonstrating that modest doses of a competitive CCK2 receptor antagonist have significant and functionally important anti-trophic actions in the gastric mucosa. These properties make JNJ-26070109 a suitable candidate for clinical investigation for the treatment of GORD. PMID:22300007

  9. Viral O-GalNAc peptide epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olofsson, Sigvard; Blixt, Klas Ola; Bergström, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Viral envelope glycoproteins are major targets for antibodies that bind to and inactivate viral particles. The capacity of a viral vaccine to induce virus-neutralizing antibodies is often used as a marker for vaccine efficacy. Yet the number of known neutralization target epitopes is restricted...... variations at glycosylation sites. In conclusion, the viral O-glycosyl peptide epitopes may be of relevance for development of subunit vaccines and for improved serodiagnosis of viral diseases. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  10. Transforming a large-class lecture course to a smaller-group interactive course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persky, Adam M; Pollack, Gary M

    2010-11-10

    To transition a large pharmacokinetics course that was delivered using a traditional lecture format into a smaller-group course with a discussion format. An e-book and Web-based multimedia learning modules were utilized to facilitate students' independent learning which allowed the number of classes they were required to attend to be reduced from 3 to 1 per week. Students were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 weekly class sessions. The majority of lecture time was replaced with active-learning activities including discussion, problem solving, and case studies to encourage higher-order learning. Changes in course delivery were assessed over a 4-year period by comparing students' grades and satisfaction ratings on course evaluations. Although student satisfaction with the course did not improve significantly, students preferred the smaller-group setting to a large lecture-based class. The resources and activities designed to shift responsibility for learning to the students did not affect examination grades even though a larger portion of examination questions focused on higher orders of learning (eg, application) in the smaller-group format. Transitioning to a smaller-group discussion format is possible in a pharmacokinetics course by increasing student accountability for acquiring factual content outside of the classroom. Students favored the smaller-class format over a large lecture-based class.

  11. Measurement of smaller colon polyp in CT colonography images using morphological image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunath, K N; Siddalingaswamy, P C; Prabhu, G K

    2017-11-01

    Automated measurement of the size and shape of colon polyps is one of the challenges in Computed tomography colonography (CTC). The objective of this retrospective study was to improve the sensitivity and specificity of smaller polyp measurement in CTC using image processing techniques. A domain knowledge-based method has been implemented with hybrid method of colon segmentation, morphological image processing operators for detecting the colonic structures, and the decision-making system for delineating the smaller polyp-based on a priori knowledge. The method was applied on 45 CTC dataset. The key finding was that the smaller polyps were accurately measured. In addition to 6-9 mm range, polyps of even processing. It takes [Formula: see text] min for measuring the smaller polyp in a dataset of 500 CTC images. With this method, [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] were achieved. The domain-based approach with morphological image processing has given good results. The smaller polyps were measured accurately which helps in making right clinical decisions. Qualitatively and quantitatively the results were acceptable when compared to the ground truth at [Formula: see text].

  12. Viral diseases affecting the pleura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, Jennings; Huggins, Terrill; Kummerfeldt, Carlos; DiVietro, Matthew; Walters, Kenneth; Sahn, Steven

    2013-10-01

    Viruses affect the human body in multiple ways producing various disease states. The infections of the pulmonary parenchyma have been well described. However, there has been no current review of the literature pertaining to the pleura. To review the available literature pertaining to diseases of the pleura that are caused by viral infections. A Medline search was performed and available research and review articles relating to viral infections that resulted in pleural effusions, pleural masses, pleural thickening, and pleural nodularity were reviewed. There are numerous viruses that cause diseases of the pleura. Pleural effusions and lesions within the pleura are the most common presentation of the disease state. Polymerase chain reaction has the potential to further diagnose viral infections and expand our knowledge base in this field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute bacterial and viral meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartt, Russell

    2012-12-01

    Most cases of acute meningitis are infectious and result from a potentially wide range of bacterial and viral pathogens. The organized approach to the patient with suspected meningitis enables the prompt administration of antibiotics, possibly corticosteroids, and diagnostic testing with neuroimaging and spinal fluid analysis. Acute meningitis is infectious in most cases and caused by a potentially wide range of bacterial and viral pathogens. Shifts in the epidemiology of bacterial pathogens have been influenced by changes in vaccines and their implementation. Seasonal and environmental changes influence the likely viral and rickettsial pathogens. The organized approach to the patient with suspected meningitis enables the prompt administration of antibiotics, possibly corticosteroids, and diagnostic testing with neuroimaging and spinal fluid analysis. Pertinent testing and treatment can vary with the clinical presentation, season, and possible exposures. This article reviews the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of acute meningitis.

  14. Beyond viral suppression of HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V.; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly; Barton, Simon E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) adopted a new Global Health Sector Strategy on HIV for 2016-2021. It establishes 15 ambitious targets, including the '90-90-90' target calling on health systems to reduce under-diagnosis of HIV, treat a greater number of those diagnosed......, and ensure that those being treated achieve viral suppression. DISCUSSION: The WHO strategy calls for person-centered chronic care for people living with HIV (PLHIV), implicitly acknowledging that viral suppression is not the ultimate goal of treatment. However, it stops short of providing an explicit target...... for health-related quality of life. It thus fails to take into account the needs of PLHIV who have achieved viral suppression but still must contend with other intense challenges such as serious non-communicable diseases, depression, anxiety, financial stress, and experiences of or apprehension about HIV...

  15. Smaller volume, thickened formulas in the management of gastroesophageal reflux in thriving infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshoo, V; Ross, G; Brown, S; Edell, D

    2000-11-01

    The effect of smaller volume, thickened formulas on gastroesophageal reflux is not clear. The frequency of gastroesophageal reflux and duration of acid pH in the esophagus were determined in six thriving infants using extended esophageal pH monitoring. There was a significant reduction in frequency of emesis and gastroesophageal reflux but not the duration of acid pH in the esophagus with the use of infant formula thickened with rice cereal to provide a nutritionally appropriate intake in a smaller volume. Thickening of formula with rice cereal in a nutritionally balanced form and smaller volume may be an appropriate strategy for reducing frequency of emesis and gastroesophageal reflux in thriving infants.

  16. Kicking velocity and effect on match performance when using a smaller, lighter ball in women's football

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas B.; Krustrup, Peter; Bendiksen, Mads

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of a smaller, lighter ball on kicking speed and technical-tactical and physical match performance in high-level adult female footballers. In the laboratory test setting, the peak ball velocity was 6% higher with the new ball (NB) than the standard ball (SB...... in passing success rate (NB: 68±1% and SB: 68±1%, p>0.05). In conclusion, high-level adult female footballers had a higher kicking speed when using a smaller, lighter ball, but no differences were observed during match-play with the 2 ball types in respect of technical-tactical and physical match performance...

  17. Longitudinal Evidence for Smaller Hippocampus Volume as a Vulnerability Factor for Perceived Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Lindgren, Lenita; Bergdahl, Jan; Nyberg, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Published version. Source at http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhw154 Hippocampal volume has been found to be smaller in individuals with stress-related disorders, but it remains unclear whether smaller volume is a consequence of stress or rather a vulnerability factor. Here, we examined this issue by relating stress levels to hippocampal volumes in healthy participants examined every 5 years in a longitudinal population-based study. Based on scores of 25- to 60-year–old particip...

  18. Opportunities for smaller engineering companies despite globalization. Chancen kleiner Ingenieurbueros trotz Globalisierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorentzen, P. (IPL Ingenieurbuero Peter Lorentzen, Frankfurt am Main (Germany))

    1999-06-01

    The trend to size is escalating into gigantism. The biggest in the branch merge to become the oversized. In view of this situation, the question which arises is what are the survival chances of the smaller players Will they all drop out of the running The answer to this question does not only concern the future order books of smaller companies, but in conjunction therewith and predominately the social security of employees, type and scope of assignments as well as the competitive situation and the consequences of all these on remuneration. (orig.)

  19. AQUIFER TESTING AND REBOUND STUDY IN SUPPORT OF THE 100-H DEEP CHROMIUM INVESTIGATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMOOT JL

    2010-11-05

    evaluate the extent and persistence of hexavalent chromium in the deeper zones. Use data collected to refine the current conceptual model for the 100-H Area unconfined aquifer and the RUM in this area. (5) Evaluate the concentration 'rebound' in the unconfined aquifer of hexavalent chromium and the contaminants of concern during shutdown of the extraction wells. Measure co-contaminants at the beginning, middle, and end of each pumping test. The RUM is generally considered an aquitard in the 100-HR-3 OU; however, several water-bearing sand layers are present that are confined within the RUM. The current hydrogeologic model for the 100-H Area aquifer system portrays the RUM as an aquitard layer that underlies the unconfined aquifer, which may contain permeable zones, stringers, or layers. These permeable zones may provide pathways for chromium to migrate deeper into the RUM under certain hydrogeologic conditions. One condition may be the discharge of large volumes of cooling water that occurred near the former H Reactor, which caused a mound of groundwater to form 4.9 to 10.1 m (16 to 33 ft) above the natural water table. The cooling water reportedly contained 1 to 2 mglL of hexavalent chromium for corrosion prevention. Three alternate hypotheses for the introduction of hexavalent chromium into the RUM are as follows: (1) Local groundwater with higher concentrations of hexavalent chromium originating from reactor operations at H Reactor was driven by high heads from groundwater mounding in the unconfined aquifer into the RUM via permeable pathways in the upper surface of the RUM. (2) Local groundwater with hexavalent chromium was introduced from the unconfined aquifer via well boreholes, either during drilling or as a result of poor well construction, allowing hydraulic communication between the unconfined aquifer and the RUM. (3) Hexavalent chromium migrated across the Hom area within the more permeable zones of the RUM. The three wells used for the aquifer

  20. Postglacial Rebound and Current Ice Loss Estimates from Space Geodesy: The New ICE-6G (VM5a) Global Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, W. R.; Argus, D.; Drummond, R.; Moore, A. W.

    2012-12-01

    We compare, on a global basis, estimates of site velocity against predictions of the newly constructed postglacial rebound model ICE-6G (VM5a). This model is fit to observations of North American postglacial rebound thereby demonstrating that the ice sheet at last glacial maximum must have been, relative to ICE-5G,thinner in southern Manitoba, thinner near Yellowknife (northwest Territories), thicker in eastern and southern Quebec, and thicker along the British Columbia-Alberta border. The GPS based estimates of site velocity that we employ are more accurate than were previously available because they are based on GPS estimates of position as a function of time determined by incorporating satellite phase center variations [Desai et al. 2011]. These GPS estimates are constraining postglacial rebound in North America and Europe more tightly than ever before. In particular, given the high density of GPS sites in North America, and the fact that the velocity of the mass center (CM) of Earth is also more tightly constrained, the new model much more strongly constrains both the lateral extent of the proglacial forebulge and the rate at which this peripheral bulge (that was emplaced peripheral to the late Pleistocence Laurentia ice sheet) is presently collapsing. This fact proves to be important to the more accurate inference of the current rate of ice loss from both Greenland and Alaska based upon the time dependent gravity observations being provided by the GRACE satellite system. In West Antarctica we have also been able to significantly revise the previously prevalent ICE-5G deglaciation history so as to enable its predictions to be optimally consistent with GPS site velocities determined by connecting campaign WAGN measurements to those provided by observations from the permanent ANET sites. Ellsworth Land (south of the Antarctic peninsula), is observed to be rising at 6 ±3 mm/yr according to our latest analyses; the Ellsworth mountains themselves are observed to be

  1. Frequent hepatitis B virus rebound among HIV-hepatitis B virus-coinfected patients following antiretroviral therapy interruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dore, Gregory J; Soriano, Vicente; Rockstroh, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) interruption in HIV-hepatitis B virus (HBV)-coinfected patients was examined in the Strategic Management of AntiRetroviral Therapy (SMART) study. METHODS: Plasma HBV DNA was measured in all hepatitis B surface antigen-positive (HBV.......0002), nondetectable HBV DNA at baseline (P = 0.007), and black race (P = 0.03). Time to ART reinitiation was shorter (7.5, 15.6, and 17.8 months; P hepatitis C virus-positive and non-HBV/hepatitis...... C virus participants in the drug conservation arm. No hepatic decompensation events occurred among HBV-positive participants in either arm. CONCLUSION: HBV DNA rebound following ART interruption is common and may be associated with accelerated immune deficiency in HIV-HBV-coinfected patients....

  2. Rebound - Effects on the use of energy and environment by improvements in effectiveness; Effekter av effektivisering paa energibruk og miljoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grepperud, Sverre; Rasmussen, Ingeborg

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate possible long run effects on use of energy and CO2-emissions from improved energy efficiency in various production sectors and for some consumption goods. The results suggest that improved energy efficiency decrease energy consumption, but the initial reduction is modified over time due to Rebound effects which arises from changes in income and prices. Wide differences in changed energy use are observed across the sectors evaluated. The report also include an analysis of possible effects from installing new environmental technology or clean up technology at firm level. The consequences of such new technologies are found to depend on the type of technology implemented, but also on the type of environmental regulation a firm is subjected to. (author)

  3. Viral Infections and Febrile Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of febrile seizures (FS in a cohort of children, ages 3 months to 5 years, living in a Netherlands province was compared with the incidence of common viral infections reported to a national registry and the results reported from the Department of Medical Microbiology, Public Health Laboratory Friesland, Leeuwarden, The Netherlands.

  4. Viral Infection and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Li (Juan)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractMuch of liver pathology is related to infection with HBV and HCV and it is important to define factors associated with clinical behavior of disease following infection with these viruses. Thus in this thesis I first focus on the natural history of chronic viral diseases associated

  5. Viral hepatitis B- an overview

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994-08-08

    Aug 8, 1994 ... Hepatitis B e antigen. (HBeAg) is a soluble non-structural, enigmatic antigen which is often detected in the blood of patients infected with replicating HBV which results in massive viral load in the blood. Both HBe and HBc are derived from the same section of HBV DNA but the HBe transcript contains an.

  6. From world war to class war: the rebound of the rich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert G

    2006-07-01

    Incomes in Canada, as in many other countries, are becoming increasingly unequal. In North America this process has several notable features. First, after 40 years of stability, income has since 1980 been increasingly concentrated in the hands of the top 0.01% of earners. Second, this concentration correlates with an explosion in the relative earnings of corporate CEOs, a sort of "corporate kleptocracy." Third, the top earners have appropriated most of the productivity gains over this period. The resources and political influence of the super-rich underlie the growing prominence of the "elite" agenda: lower taxes, smaller government and privatization or shrinkage of social programs. The marketing of this agenda may explain much of the nonsense that contaminates health policy debates.

  7. Honors Programs at Smaller Colleges. 3rd Edition. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuman, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    This monograph focuses upon areas of special concern to those working with honors at smaller colleges and universities: mission, recruitment, facilities, administration, budget, and curriculum. In each area, the author makes some general suggestions about overall operating principles, note specific issues that can lead to difficulties, and suggest…

  8. Trends and patterns in contemporary management in smaller companies: The Danish perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Madsen, Henning

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports empirical findings from a recent survey of Danish managers with a special focus on managers from smaller companies. The survey has been initiated in Denmark and it is called the 'Danish Management Barometer'. The project is a joint research program between the Aarhus School...

  9. Smaller hippocampal volume as a vulnerability factor for the persistence of post-traumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rooij, S. J H; Kennis, M.; Sjouwerman, R.; Van Den Heuvel, M. P.; Kahn, R. S.; Geuze, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Smaller hippocampal volume has often been observed in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, there is no consensus whether this is a result of stress/trauma exposure, or constitutes a vulnerability factor for the development of PTSD. Second, it is unclear whether

  10. Chronic malnutrition favours smaller critical size for metamorphosis initiation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijendravarma, R K; Narasimha, S; Kawecki, T J

    2012-02-01

    Critical size at which metamorphosis is initiated represents an important checkpoint in insect development. Here, we use experimental evolution in Drosophila melanogaster to test the long-standing hypothesis that larval malnutrition should favour a smaller critical size. We report that six fly populations subject to 112 generations of laboratory natural selection on an extremely poor larval food evolved an 18% smaller critical size (compared to six unselected control populations). Thus, even though critical size is not plastic with respect to nutrition, smaller critical size can evolve as an adaptation to nutritional stress. We also demonstrate that this reduction in critical size (rather than differences in growth rate) mediates a trade-off in body weight that the selected populations experience on standard food, on which they show a 15-17% smaller adult body weight. This illustrates how developmental mechanisms that control life history may shape constraints and trade-offs in life history evolution. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2011 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  11. The role of interpretation in the internationalization of smaller brazilian firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Seifert (Ralf); J. Child (John); S.B. Rodrigues (Suzana)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAbstract This study considers how decision-makers in smaller firms interpret the means and conditions of internationalization, and how different modes of interpretation are likely to inform action choices in this process. Drawing on 58 qualitative interviews with the leaders of

  12. The role of interpretation in the internationalization of smaller brazilian firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Seifert; J. Child (John); S.B. Rodrigues (Suzana)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAbstract This study considers how decision-makers in smaller firms interpret the means and conditions of internationalization, and how different modes of interpretation are likely to inform action choices in this process. Drawing on 58 qualitative interviews with the leaders of Brazilian

  13. Just a bite: Considerably smaller snack portions satisfy delayed hunger and craving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleef, van E.; Shimizu, M.; Wansink, B.

    2013-01-01

    Could smaller snack portions be similarly effective in decreasing cravings or feelings of hunger as larger portions? To answer this, three common snack foods – chocolate, apple pie, potato chips – were given to 104 participants as either a small portion (x) or a substantially larger portion (5–10x).

  14. Program Patterns and Expenditures for Special Education in Smaller School Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmiller, Richard A.

    1982-01-01

    A survey of special education in 45 smaller school districts in Idaho gathered data on disabled and gifted students, district size, program costs per pupil, grade level, student hours in special education, and type of delivery system (including self-contained, resource room, work study, and homebound systems). (RW)

  15. Warming temperatures and smaller body sizes: synchronous changes in grwoth of North Sea fishes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baudron, A.; Needle, C.; Rijnsdorp, A.D.; Marshall, C.T.

    2014-01-01

    Decreasing body size has been proposed as a universal response to increasing temperatures. The physiology behind the response is well established for ectotherms inhabiting aquatic environments: as higher temperatures decrease the aerobic capacity, individuals with smaller body sizes have a reduced

  16. Response of smaller European elm bark beetles to pruning wounds on American elm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack H. Barger; William N. Cannon

    1987-01-01

    From 1982 to 1984, inflight smaller European elm bark beetles, Scolytus multistriatus, were captured on American elms, Ulmus americana, that were therapeutically pruned for Dutch elm disease control. Pruning wounds were treated with wound dressing or left untreated to determine effects of the treatments on beetle attraction....

  17. 13 CFR 120.215 - What interest rates apply to smaller loans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What interest rates apply to... BUSINESS LOANS Policies Specific to 7(a) Loans Maturities; Interest Rates; Loan and Guarantee Amounts § 120.215 What interest rates apply to smaller loans? For a loan over $25,000 but not exceeding $50,000, the...

  18. Smaller hippocampal volume as a vulnerability factor for the persistence of post-traumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, S J H; Kennis, M; Sjouwerman, R; van den Heuvel, M P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313905738; Kahn, R S; Geuze, E

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Smaller hippocampal volume has often been observed in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, there is no consensus whether this is a result of stress/trauma exposure, or constitutes a vulnerability factor for the development of PTSD. Second, it is unclear whether

  19. Note on the smaller mammals of the Hester Malan Nature Reserve ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of the smaller mammals of the Hester Malan Nature Reserve resulted in a checklist as well as information on the habitat in which the mammals occurred. Of the 38 species listed, 31 were collected or seen in the Reserve and seven on the neighbouring farms and surrounding district. 'n Opname is gemaak van die ...

  20. The relationship between birth weight, adiposity rebound and overweight at the age of 17 years (results of the Lithuanian longitudinal growth study, 1990 - 2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchomlinov, Andrej; Tutkuviene, Janina

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between overweight and obesity at the age of 17 years with a birth weight and time of an adiposity rebound. The results were based on data (N = 1535) collected from the personal health records of children born in 1990 in Vilnius city and region. The further growth of newborns with normal (3000 - 3999 g), suboptimal (2500 - 2999 g) and large (≥ 4000 g) birth weight was analyzed. Statistically significant results (p adiposity rebound (at the age of 5 years) in comparison with non-overweight children (their adiposity rebound had happened at the age of 6 - 7 years). However, the majority of children with an early adiposity rebound did not become overweight on the subsequent age period at once - it might happen later, already at the adolescence. Thus it is very important to carefully screen the growth of preschool children and start preventive measures against the overweight and obesity as early as possible.

  1. Mast cells in viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Witczak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available  There are some premises suggesting that mast cells are involved in the mechanisms of anti-virus defense and in viral disease pathomechanisms. Mast cells are particularly numerous at the portals of infections and thus may have immediate and easy contact with the external environment and invading pathogens. These cells express receptors responsible for recognition of virus-derived PAMP molecules, mainly Toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9, but also RIG-I-like and NOD-like molecules. Furthermore, mast cells generate various mediators, cytokines and chemokines which modulate the intensity of inflammation and regulate the course of innate and adaptive anti-viral immunity. Indirect evidence for the role of mast cells in viral infections is also provided by clinical observations and results of animal studies. Currently, more and more data indicate that mast cells can be infected by some viruses (dengue virus, adenoviruses, hantaviruses, cytomegaloviruses, reoviruses, HIV-1 virus. It is also demonstrated that mast cells can release pre formed mediators as well as synthesize de novo eicosanoids in response to stimulation by viruses. Several data indicate that virus-stimulated mast cells secrete cytokines and chemokines, including interferons as well as chemokines with a key role in NK and Tc lymphocyte influx. Moreover, some information indicates that mast cell stimulation via TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9 can affect their adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins and chemotaxis, and influence expression of some membrane molecules. Critical analysis of current data leads to the conclusion that it is not yet possible to make definitive statements about the role of mast cells in innate and acquired defense mechanisms developing in the course of viral infection and/or pathomechanisms of viral diseases.

  2. Autistic disorder and viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbey, Jane E; Sweeten, Thayne L; McMahon, William M; Fujinami, Robert S

    2005-02-01

    Autistic disorder (autism) is a behaviorally defined developmental disorder with a wide range of behaviors. Although the etiology of autism is unknown, data suggest that autism results from multiple etiologies with both genetic and environmental contributions, which may explain the spectrum of behaviors seen in this disorder. One proposed etiology for autism is viral infection very early in development. The mechanism, by which viral infection may lead to autism, be it through direct infection of the central nervous system (CNS), through infection elsewhere in the body acting as a trigger for disease in the CNS, through alteration of the immune response of the mother or offspring, or through a combination of these, is not yet known. Animal models in which early viral infection results in behavioral changes later in life include the influenza virus model in pregnant mice and the Borna disease virus model in newborn Lewis rats. Many studies over the years have presented evidence both for and against the association of autism with various viral infections. The best association to date has been made between congenital rubella and autism; however, members of the herpes virus family may also have a role in autism. Recently, controversy has arisen as to the involvement of measles virus and/or the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine in the development of autism. Biological assays lend support to the association between measles virus or MMR and autism whereas epidemiologic studies show no association between MMR and autism. Further research is needed to clarify both the mechanisms whereby viral infection early in development may lead to autism and the possible involvement of the MMR vaccine in the development of autism.

  3. PREVALENCE AND FACTORS AFFECTING REM AND SLOW WAVE SLEEP REBOUND ON CPAP TITRATION STUDY IN PATIENTS WITH OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA Prevalencia de los factores que afectan el sueño REM y el brote de ondas lentas en los estudios con CPAP en apnea obstructiva del sueño

    OpenAIRE

    Edgar Osuna S; Fouzia Siddiqui; Vanegas, Marco A.; Walters, Arthur S.; Sudhansu Chokroverty

    2008-01-01

    Background. In patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) treatment with CPAP results in an increase of REM sleep and slow wave sleep, but there is limited information about the prevalence of REM rebound in patients with OSAS and possible factors related to the rebound. Objective. REM rebound (RR) and slow wave sleep rebound (SWSR) has been described as a frequent phenomenon that occurs during CPAP titration, but the quantity that qualify for RR has not been mentioned in literature...

  4. Non-random patterns in viral diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthony, Simon J.; Islam, Ariful; Johnson, Christine

    2015-01-01

    It is currently unclear whether changes in viral communities will ever be predictable. Here we investigate whether viral communities in wildlife are inherently structured (inferring predictability) by looking at whether communities are assembled through deterministic (often predictable) or stocha...

  5. Faktor Risiko Non Viral Pada Karsinoma Nasofaring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukri Rahman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak           Latar belakang: Karsinoma nasofaring adalah tumor ganas epitel nasofaring yang sampai saat ini penyebabnya belum diketahui, infeksi virus Epstein Barr dilaporkan sebagai faktor dominan terjadinya karsinoma nasofaring tetapi faktor non viral juga berperan untuk timbulnya keganasan nasofaring. Tujuan: Untuk mengetahui faktor non viral  yang dapat meningkatkan kejadian karsinoma nasofaring sehingga dapat mencegah dan menghindari faktor-faktor non viral tersebut. Tinjauan Pustaka: Karsinoma nasofaring merupakan tumor ganas epitel nasofaring yang penyebabnya berhubungan dengan faktor viral dan non viral diantaranya asap rokok, ikan asin, formaldehid, genetik, asap kayu bakar , debu kayu, infeksi kronik telinga hidung tenggorok, alkohol dan obat tradisional. Kesimpulan: Pembuktian secara klinis dan ilmiah terhadap faktor non viral sebagai penyebab timbulnya karsinoma nasofaring masih belum dapat dijelaskan secara pasti. Faktor non viral merupakan salah satu faktor risiko yang dapat meningkatkan angka kejadian timbulnya keganasan nasofaring Kata kunci: karsinoma nasofaring, faktor risiko, non viral AbstractBackground: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a malignant epithelial nasopharyngeal tumor that until now the cause still unknown, Epstein barr virus infection had reported as predominant occurance of nasopharyngeal carcinoma but non viral factors may also contribute to the onset of the incidence of nasopharyngeal malignancy. Purpose: To find non viral factors that may increase the incidence of nasopharyngel carcinoma in order to prevent and avoid non-viral factors Literature: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a malignant tumor that causes nasopharyngeal epithelium associated with viral and non-viral factors such as cigarette smoke, salt fish, formaldehyde, genetic, wood smoke ,wood dust, ear nose throat chronic infections, alcohol, and traditional medicine. Conclusion: Clinically and scientifically proving the non-viral factors as

  6. Mechanisms of influenza viral membrane fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijleven, Jelle S; Boonstra, Sander; Onck, Patrick R; van der Giessen, Erik; van Oijen, Antoine M

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viral particles are enveloped by a lipid bilayer. A major step in infection is fusion of the viral and host cellular membranes, a process with large kinetic barriers. Influenza membrane fusion is catalyzed by hemagglutinin (HA), a class I viral fusion protein activated by low pH. The exact

  7. Viral commercials: the consumer as marketeer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, P.E.; Lucassen, P.; Kregting, G.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Research into the reasons why consumers pass along viral commercials: their motives, the content characteristics of viral commercials and the medium context in which viral commercials appear. Based on the uses and gratifications perspective this study has determined which motives of consumers,

  8. Virale commercials: De consument als marketeer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, P.E.; Lucassen, P.; Kregting, G.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Research into the reasons why consumers pass along viral commercials: their motives, the content characteristics of viral commercials and the medium context in which viral commercials appear. Based on the uses and gratifications perspective this study has determined which motives of consumers,

  9. Viral ecology of a shallow eutrophic lake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijdens, M.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis aims to give an insight into the ecology of the viral community in a shallow eutrophic lake. To achieve this, the population dynamics, diversity and control of the viral community in Lake Loosdrecht were studied, as well as the impact of the viral community on plankton mortality and

  10. Origin of the smaller conductances of Rh, Pb, and Co atomic junctions in hydrogen environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Chen, Mingyan; Ye, Xiang; Xie, Yi-qun; Ke, San-huang

    2015-02-01

    We study theoretically the structural and electronic origins of the smaller conductances (one conductance quantum, G0, and smaller) of Rh, Pb, and Co metal atomic junctions (MAJs) in a hydrogen environment, as were measured in recent experiments. For the Rh MAJs, the 1G0 conductance is attributed to a stable contact bridged by a single hydrogen molecule whose antibonding state provides a single transport channel. For the Pb and Co MAJs the 1G0 conductance is, however, ascribed to a linear atomic chain adsorbing two dissociated H atoms, which largely reduces the density of states at the Fermi energy with respect to the pure ones. On the other hand, the small conductances of 0.3G0 (Rh) and 0.2G0 (Co) are due to H-decorated atomic chains connected to electrodes by a H atom.

  11. Origin of the smaller conductances of Rh, Pb, and Co atomic junctions in hydrogen environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xue; Chen, Mingyan; Ye, Xiang; Xie, Yi-qun, E-mail: yqxie@shnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Shanghai Normal University, 100 Guilin Road, Shanghai 200232 (China); Ke, San-huang, E-mail: shke@tongji.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Advanced Microstructured Materials, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2015-02-14

    We study theoretically the structural and electronic origins of the smaller conductances (one conductance quantum, G{sub 0}, and smaller) of Rh, Pb, and Co metal atomic junctions (MAJs) in a hydrogen environment, as were measured in recent experiments. For the Rh MAJs, the 1G{sub 0} conductance is attributed to a stable contact bridged by a single hydrogen molecule whose antibonding state provides a single transport channel. For the Pb and Co MAJs the 1G{sub 0} conductance is, however, ascribed to a linear atomic chain adsorbing two dissociated H atoms, which largely reduces the density of states at the Fermi energy with respect to the pure ones. On the other hand, the small conductances of 0.3G{sub 0} (Rh) and 0.2G{sub 0} (Co) are due to H-decorated atomic chains connected to electrodes by a H atom.

  12. Smaller pupil size and better proofreading performance with positive than with negative polarity displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepenbrock, Cosima; Mayr, Susanne; Buchner, Axel

    2014-01-01

    The 'positive polarity advantage' describes the fact that reading performance is better for dark text on light background (positive polarity) than for light text on dark background (negative polarity). We investigated the underlying mechanism by assessing pupil size and proofreading performance when reading positive and negative polarity texts. In particular, we tested the display luminance hypothesis which postulates that the typically greater brightness of positive compared to negative polarity displays leads to smaller pupil sizes and, hence, a sharper retinal image and better perception of detail. Indeed, pupil sizes were smaller and proofreading performance was better with positive than with negative polarity displays. The results are compatible with the hypothesis that the positive polarity advantage is an effect of display luminance. Limitations of the study are being discussed.

  13. How food marketers can sell smaller portions: Consumer insights and product innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riis, J; Fisher, J O; Rowe, S

    2016-08-01

    Food portion size has been shown to be an important driver of energy intake. Despite the well acknowledged role of portion control in weight management, large portion sizes remain ubiquitous in the marketplace. Moving consumers towards consumption of smaller portion sizes will require changes in consumer behavior as well as changes in products available to consumers in a variety of settings. This special supplement presents cutting edge research aimed at understanding consumer behavior around portion size and innovations in product design that may promote the selection and consumption of smaller portion sizes. We identify further research that will be needed to translate basic behavioral findings into real world settings and to viable product development. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Participation of smaller size renewable generation in the electricity market trade in UK: Analyses and approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romanovsky, G.; Xydis, G.; Mutale, J.

    2011-01-01

    While there are presently different options for renewable and distributed generation (RES/DG) to participate in the UK electricity market, none of the market options is specifically tailored for such types of generation and in particular, the smaller (up to 5 MW) RES/DG. This is because the UK has...... a number of specific historical, technical and economic reasons that significantly influenced the ability of the smaller size RES/DG to participate in the electricity market and in provision of balancing services in accordance with the UK National Grid requirements. This paper discusses some perspectives...... and approaches aiming to help stand alone small size and clusters of RES and DG units to participate in the UK electricity market drawing on relevant experience from Denmark....

  15. Metal nanoplates: Smaller is weaker due to failure by elastic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Duc Tam; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Park, Harold S.; Kim, Sung Youb

    2017-11-01

    Under mechanical loading, crystalline solids deform elastically, and subsequently yield and fail via plastic deformation. Thus crystalline materials experience two mechanical regimes: elasticity and plasticity. Here, we provide numerical and theoretical evidence to show that metal nanoplates exhibit an intermediate mechanical regime that occurs between elasticity and plasticity, which we call the elastic instability regime. The elastic instability regime begins with a decrease in stress, during which the nanoplates fail via global, and not local, deformation mechanisms that are distinctly different from traditional dislocation-mediated plasticity. Because the nanoplates fail via elastic instability, the governing strength criterion is the ideal strength, rather than the yield strength, and as a result, we observe a unique "smaller is weaker" trend. We develop a simple surface-stress-based analytic model to predict the ideal strength of the metal nanoplates, which accurately reproduces the smaller is weaker behavior observed in the atomistic simulations.

  16. Desirable airfoil features for smaller-capacity straight-bladed VAWT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Mazharul; Ting, D.S.-K.; Fartaj, Amir

    2007-05-15

    In the small scale wind turbine market, the simple straight-bladed Darrieus type vertical axis wind turbine (SB-VAWT) is very attractive for its simple blade design. A detailed aerodynamic performance analysis was conducted on a smaller capacity fixed-pitch SB-VAWT. Brief analyses of the main aerodynamic challenges of this type of wind turbine were first discussed and subsequently the authors conducted further literature survey and computational analysis to shortlist aerodynamic characteristics of a desirable airfoil for a self-starting and better performing SB-VAWT. The required geometric features of the desirable airfoil to achieve the short listed characteristics were also discussed. It has been found out that conventionally used NACA symmetric airfoils are not suitable for smaller capacity SB-VAWT. Rather, it is advantageous to utilize a high-lift and low-drag asymmetric thick airfoil suitable for low speed operation typically encountered by SB-VAWT. (author)

  17. Is Smaller Better? A Comment on "Comparative Economic Impact Analyses" by Michael Mondello and Patrick Rishe

    OpenAIRE

    Victor Matheson

    2004-01-01

    In a recent article in Economic Development Quarterly, "Comparative Economic Impact Analyses: Differences Across Cities, Events, and Demographics" (November 2004), Michael Mondello and Patrick Rishe examined the economic impact of small, amateur sporting events on host economies. This response to their work suggests four reasons why ex ante economic impact estimates for smaller sporting events may come closer to matching ex post reality than those for "mega-events" including less crowding out...

  18. Media bias under direct and indirect government control: when is the bias smaller?

    OpenAIRE

    Abhra Roy

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical framework to compare media bias under direct and indirect government control. In this context, we show that direct control can lead to a smaller bias and higher welfare than indirect control. We further show that the size of the advertising market affects media bias only under direct control. Media bias, under indirect control, is not affected by the size of the advertising market.

  19. Plant Proteins Are Smaller Because They Are Encoded by Fewer Exons than Animal Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Sánchez, Obed; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; Delaye, Luis; Tiessen, Axel

    2016-12-01

    Protein size is an important biochemical feature since longer proteins can harbor more domains and therefore can display more biological functionalities than shorter proteins. We found remarkable differences in protein length, exon structure, and domain count among different phylogenetic lineages. While eukaryotic proteins have an average size of 472 amino acid residues (aa), average protein sizes in plant genomes are smaller than those of animals and fungi. Proteins unique to plants are ∼81aa shorter than plant proteins conserved among other eukaryotic lineages. The smaller average size of plant proteins could neither be explained by endosymbiosis nor subcellular compartmentation nor exon size, but rather due to exon number. Metazoan proteins are encoded on average by ∼10 exons of small size [∼176 nucleotides (nt)]. Streptophyta have on average only ∼5.7 exons of medium size (∼230nt). Multicellular species code for large proteins by increasing the exon number, while most unicellular organisms employ rather larger exons (>400nt). Among subcellular compartments, membrane proteins are the largest (∼520aa), whereas the smallest proteins correspond to the gene ontology group of ribosome (∼240aa). Plant genes are encoded by half the number of exons and also contain fewer domains than animal proteins on average. Interestingly, endosymbiotic proteins that migrated to the plant nucleus became larger than their cyanobacterial orthologs. We thus conclude that plants have proteins larger than bacteria but smaller than animals or fungi. Compared to the average of eukaryotic species, plants have ∼34% more but ∼20% smaller proteins. This suggests that photosynthetic organisms are unique and deserve therefore special attention with regard to the evolutionary forces acting on their genomes and proteomes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effect of Introducing a Smaller and Lighter Basketball on Female Basketball Players? Shot Accuracy

    OpenAIRE

    Podmenik, Nadja; Lesko?ek, Bojan; Er?ulj, Frane

    2012-01-01

    Our study examined whether the introduction of a smaller and lighter basketball (no. 6) affected the accuracy of female basketball players? shots at the basket. The International Basketball Federation (FIBA) introduced a size 6 ball in the 2004/2005 season to improve the efficiency and accuracy of technical elements, primarily shots at the basket. The sample for this study included 573 European female basketball players who were members of national teams that had qualified for the senior wome...

  1. Plant Proteins Are Smaller Because They Are Encoded by Fewer Exons than Animal Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obed Ramírez-Sánchez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein size is an important biochemical feature since longer proteins can harbor more domains and therefore can display more biological functionalities than shorter proteins. We found remarkable differences in protein length, exon structure, and domain count among different phylogenetic lineages. While eukaryotic proteins have an average size of 472 amino acid residues (aa, average protein sizes in plant genomes are smaller than those of animals and fungi. Proteins unique to plants are ∼81 aa shorter than plant proteins conserved among other eukaryotic lineages. The smaller average size of plant proteins could neither be explained by endosymbiosis nor subcellular compartmentation nor exon size, but rather due to exon number. Metazoan proteins are encoded on average by ∼10 exons of small size [∼176 nucleotides (nt]. Streptophyta have on average only ∼5.7 exons of medium size (∼230 nt. Multicellular species code for large proteins by increasing the exon number, while most unicellular organisms employ rather larger exons (>400 nt. Among subcellular compartments, membrane proteins are the largest (∼520 aa, whereas the smallest proteins correspond to the gene ontology group of ribosome (∼240 aa. Plant genes are encoded by half the number of exons and also contain fewer domains than animal proteins on average. Interestingly, endosymbiotic proteins that migrated to the plant nucleus became larger than their cyanobacterial orthologs. We thus conclude that plants have proteins larger than bacteria but smaller than animals or fungi. Compared to the average of eukaryotic species, plants have ∼34% more but ∼20% smaller proteins. This suggests that photosynthetic organisms are unique and deserve therefore special attention with regard to the evolutionary forces acting on their genomes and proteomes.

  2. High proportion of smaller ranged hummingbird species coincides with ecological specialization across the Americas.

    OpenAIRE

    Sonne, J; Martín González, AM; Maruyama, PK; Sandel, B.; Vizentin-Bugoni, J; Schleuning, M.; Abrahamczyk, S.; Alarcón, R.; Araujo, AC; Araújo, FP; Mendes de Azevedo, S; Baquero, AC; Cotton, PA; Ingversen, TT; Kohler, G.

    2016-01-01

    Ecological communities that experience stable climate conditions have been speculated to preserve more specialized interspecific associations and have higher proportions of smaller ranged species (SRS). Thus, areas with disproportionally large numbers of SRS are expected to coincide geographically with a high degree of community-level ecological specialization, but this suggestion remains poorly supported with empirical evidence. Here, we analysed data for hummingbird resource specialization,...

  3. Smaller calcite lattice deformation caused by occluded organic material in coccoliths than in mollusk shell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Simon; Sørensen, Henning Osholm; Hakim, Sepideh Sadat

    2015-01-01

    The growth and nucleation of biominerals are directed and affected by associated biological molecules. In this paper, we investigate the influence of occluded biomolecules on biogenic calcite from the coccolithophorid Pleurochrysis carterae and from chalk, a rock composed predominantly of fossil...... and the coccolithophorids. These differences were reflected in lattice deformation (macrostrain), structure (microstrain), and atomic disorder distributions (δorganic). The influence of the biological macromolecules on the inorganic phase was consistently smaller in the P. carterae compared to P. nobilis...

  4. Viral diseases and human evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leal Élcio de Souza

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of man with viral agents was possibly a key factor shaping human evolution, culture and civilization from its outset. Evidence of the effect of disease, since the early stages of human speciation, through pre-historical times to the present suggest that the types of viruses associated with man changed in time. As human populations progressed technologically, they grew in numbers and density. As a consequence different viruses found suitable conditions to thrive and establish long-lasting associations with man. Although not all viral agents cause disease and some may in fact be considered beneficial, the present situation of overpopulation, poverty and ecological inbalance may have devastating effets on human progress. Recently emerged diseases causing massive pandemics (eg., HIV-1 and HCV, dengue, etc. are becoming formidable challenges, which may have a direct impact on the fate of our species.

  5. Longitudinal Evidence for Smaller Hippocampus Volume as a Vulnerability Factor for Perceived Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Lenita; Bergdahl, Jan; Nyberg, Lars

    2016-08-01

    Hippocampal volume has been found to be smaller in individuals with stress-related disorders, but it remains unclear whether smaller volume is a consequence of stress or rather a vulnerability factor. Here, we examined this issue by relating stress levels to hippocampal volumes in healthy participants examined every 5 years in a longitudinal population-based study. Based on scores of 25- to 60-year-old participants on the perceived stress questionnaire, we defined moderately to high (n = 35) and low (n = 76) stress groups. The groups were re-examined after 5 years (at the 6th study wave). Historical data on subjective stress were available up to 10 years prior to Wave 5. At the first MRI session, the moderately to high stress group had a significantly smaller hippocampal volume, as measured by FreeSurfer (version 5.3), compared with the low-stress group. At follow-up, group differences in stress levels and hippocampal volume remained unchanged. In retrospective analyses of subjective stress, the observed group difference in stress was found to be stable. The long-term stability of group differences in perceived stress and hippocampal volume suggests that a small hippocampal volume may be a vulnerability factor for stress-related disorders. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Warming temperatures and smaller body sizes: synchronous changes in growth of North Sea fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudron, Alan R; Needle, Coby L; Rijnsdorp, Adriaan D; Marshall, C Tara

    2014-04-01

    Decreasing body size has been proposed as a universal response to increasing temperatures. The physiology behind the response is well established for ectotherms inhabiting aquatic environments: as higher temperatures decrease the aerobic capacity, individuals with smaller body sizes have a reduced risk of oxygen deprivation. However, empirical evidence of this response at the scale of communities and ecosystems is lacking for marine fish species. Here, we show that over a 40-year period six of eight commercial fish species in the North Sea examined underwent concomitant reductions in asymptotic body size with the synchronous component of the total variability coinciding with a 1-2 °C increase in water temperature. Smaller body sizes decreased the yield-per-recruit of these stocks by an average of 23%. Although it is not possible to ascribe these phenotypic changes unequivocally to temperature, four aspects support this interpretation: (i) the synchronous trend was detected across species varying in their life history and life style; (ii) the decrease coincided with the period of increasing temperature; (iii) the direction of the phenotypic change is consistent with physiological knowledge; and (iv) no cross-species synchrony was detected in other species-specific factors potentially impacting growth. Our findings support a recent model-derived prediction that fish size will shrink in response to climate-induced changes in temperature and oxygen. The smaller body sizes being projected for the future are already detectable in the North Sea. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. APLASTIC ANEMIA AND VIRAL HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cudillo

    2009-11-01

    Liver histology is characterized by T cell infiltrating the parenchyma as reported in acute hepatitis. Recently in HAA it has been demonstrated intrahepatic  and blood lymphocytes with  T cell repertoire similar to that of confirmed viral acute hepatitis. The expanded T cell clones return to a normal distribution after response to immunosuppressive treatment, suggesting the antigen or T cell clearance. Therapeutic options are the same as acquired aplastic anemia.

  8. Treatment of Acute Viral Bronchiolitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eber, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    Acute viral bronchiolitis represents the most common lower respiratory tract infection in infants and young children and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Respiratory syncytial virus is the most frequently identified virus, but many other viruses may also cause acute bronchiolitis. There is no common definition of acute viral bronchiolitis used internationally, and this may explain part of the confusion in the literature. Most children with bronchiolitis have a self limiting mild disease and can be safely managed at home with careful attention to feeding and respiratory status. Criteria for referral and admission vary between hospitals as do clinical practice in the management of acute viral bronchiolitis, and there is confusion and lack of evidence over the best treatment for this condition. Supportive care, including administration of oxygen and fluids, is the cornerstone of current treatment. The majority of infants and children with bronchiolitis do not require specific measures. Bronchodilators should not be routinely used in the management of acute viral bronchiolitis, but may be effective in some patients. Most of the commonly used management modalities have not been shown to have a clear beneficial effect on the course of the disease. For example, inhaled and systemic corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, immunoglobulins and monoclonal antibodies, antibiotics, antiviral therapy, and chest physiotherapy should not be used routinely in the management of bronchiolitis. The potential effect of hypertonic saline on the course of the acute disease is promising, but further studies are required. In critically ill children with bronchiolitis, today there is little justification for the use of surfactant and heliox. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure may be beneficial in children with severe bronchiolitis but a large trial is needed to determine its value. Finally, very little is known on the effect of the various

  9. Viral exanthems in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Sueli Coelho da Silva; Cestari, Tania; Allen, Samuel H; Ramos e-Silva, Marcia

    2007-01-01

    Viral exanthems are a common problem in tropical regions, particularly affecting children. Most exanthems are transient and harmless, but some are potentially very dangerous. Pregnant women and malnourished or immunocompromised infants carry the greatest risk of adverse outcome. In this article, parvovirus B19; dengue and yellow fever; West Nile, Barmah Forest, Marburg, and Ebola viruses, and human herpesviruses; asymmetric periflexural exanthema of childhood; measles; rubella; enteroviruses; Lassa fever; and South American hemorrhagic fevers will be discussed.

  10. Recycling Endosomes and Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Vale-Costa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many viruses exploit specific arms of the endomembrane system. The unique composition of each arm prompts the development of remarkably specific interactions between viruses and sub-organelles. This review focuses on the viral–host interactions occurring on the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC, and mediated by its regulatory Ras-related in brain (Rab GTPase Rab11. This protein regulates trafficking from the ERC and the trans-Golgi network to the plasma membrane. Such transport comprises intricate networks of proteins/lipids operating sequentially from the membrane of origin up to the cell surface. Rab11 is also emerging as a critical factor in an increasing number of infections by major animal viruses, including pathogens that provoke human disease. Understanding the interplay between the ERC and viruses is a milestone in human health. Rab11 has been associated with several steps of the viral lifecycles by unclear processes that use sophisticated diversified host machinery. For this reason, we first explore the state-of-the-art on processes regulating membrane composition and trafficking. Subsequently, this review outlines viral interactions with the ERC, highlighting current knowledge on viral-host binding partners. Finally, using examples from the few mechanistic studies available we emphasize how ERC functions are adjusted during infection to remodel cytoskeleton dynamics, innate immunity and membrane composition.

  11. Maternal immunization against viral disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, J; Glezen, W P; Piedra, P A

    1998-01-01

    The protective effect of maternal antibody against many viral diseases has been recognized. The use of maternal immunization has been considered as a means to augment this protection in the young infant against disease. Advantages of maternal immunization include the fact that young infants are most susceptible to infections but least responsive to vaccines, that pregnant women are accessible to medical care and respond well to vaccines, that IgG antibodies cross the placenta well during the third trimester, and that immunization of the pregnant woman has the potential to benefit both the mother and the infant. Disadvantages include the potential inhibition of an infant's response to active immunization or natural infection and liability issues with pharmaceutical companies and physicians. Immunization of pregnant women with viral vaccines for poliovirus, influenza viruses, and rubella has been described and maternal vaccination with these vaccines has been found to be safe for both the mother and the fetus. An open-label study of post-partum women immunized with the purified fusion protein of RSV (PFP-2, Wyeth-Lederle Pediatrics and Vaccines, Inc., Pearl River, NY) demonstrated that the vaccine was non-reactogenic and immunogenic; RSV-specific antibody was detected in breast milk. Immunization of pregnant women with purified protein or subunit vaccines could be considered against neonatal viral pathogens, such as respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza viruses, herpes group viruses, and human immunodeficiency virus. Further studies are needed to define the safety and efficacy of maternal immunization.

  12. Pediatric Asthma and Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, M Luz; Calvo Rey, Cristina; Del Rosal Rabes, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory viral infections, particularly respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus, are the most importance risk factors for the onset of wheezing in infants and small children. Bronchiolitis is the most common acute respiratory infection in children under 1year of age, and the most common cause of hospitalization in this age group. RSV accounts for approximately 70% of all these cases, followed by rhinovirus, adenovirus, metapneumovirus and bocavirus. The association between bronchiolitis caused by RSV and the development of recurrent wheezing and/or asthma was first described more than 40years ago, but it is still unclear whether bronchiolitis causes chronic respiratory symptoms, or if it is a marker for children with a genetic predisposition for developing asthma in the medium or long term. In any case, sufficient evidence is available to corroborate the existence of this association, which is particularly strong when the causative agent of bronchiolitis is rhinovirus. The pathogenic role of respiratory viruses as triggers for exacerbations in asthmatic patients has not been fully characterized. However, it is clear that respiratory viruses, and in particular rhinovirus, are the most common causes of exacerbation in children, and some type of respiratory virus has been identified in over 90% of children hospitalized for an episode of wheezing. Changes in the immune response to viral infections in genetically predisposed individuals are very likely to be the main factors involved in the association between viral infection and asthma. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Viral video: Live imaging of virus-host encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Kwangmin; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Cubillos-Ruiz, Andres; Chisholm, Sallie W.; Sullivan, Matthew B.; Stocker, Roman

    2014-11-01

    Viruses are non-motile infectious agents that rely on Brownian motion to encounter and subsequently adsorb to their hosts. Paradoxically, the viral adsorption rate is often reported to be larger than the theoretical limit imposed by the virus-host encounter rate, highlighting a major gap in the experimental quantification of virus-host interactions. Here we present the first direct quantification of the viral adsorption rate, obtained using live imaging of individual host cells and viruses for thousands of encounter events. The host-virus pair consisted of Prochlorococcus MED4, a 800 nm small non-motile bacterium that dominates photosynthesis in the oceans, and its virus PHM-2, a myovirus that has a 80 nm icosahedral capsid and a 200 nm long rigid tail. We simultaneously imaged hosts and viruses moving by Brownian motion using two-channel epifluorescent microscopy in a microfluidic device. This detailed quantification of viral transport yielded a 20-fold smaller adsorption efficiency than previously reported, indicating the need for a major revision in infection models for marine and likely other ecosystems.

  14. Viral Hepatitis: Information for Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    VIRAL HEPATITIS Information for Gay and Bisexual Men What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is an infection of the liver caused by ... United States, the most common types of viral hepatitis are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. ...

  15. Smaller = denser, and the brain knows it: natural statistics of object density shape weight expectations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan A K Peters

    Full Text Available If one nondescript object's volume is twice that of another, is it necessarily twice as heavy? As larger objects are typically heavier than smaller ones, one might assume humans use such heuristics in preparing to lift novel objects if other informative cues (e.g., material, previous lifts are unavailable. However, it is also known that humans are sensitive to statistical properties of our environments, and that such sensitivity can bias perception. Here we asked whether statistical regularities in properties of liftable, everyday objects would bias human observers' predictions about objects' weight relationships. We developed state-of-the-art computer vision techniques to precisely measure the volume of everyday objects, and also measured their weight. We discovered that for liftable man-made objects, "twice as large" doesn't mean "twice as heavy": Smaller objects are typically denser, following a power function of volume. Interestingly, this "smaller is denser" relationship does not hold for natural or unliftable objects, suggesting some ideal density range for objects designed to be lifted. We then asked human observers to predict weight relationships between novel objects without lifting them; crucially, these weight predictions quantitatively match typical weight relationships shown by similarly-sized objects in everyday environments. These results indicate that the human brain represents the statistics of everyday objects and that this representation can be quantitatively abstracted and applied to novel objects. Finally, that the brain possesses and can use precise knowledge of the nonlinear association between size and weight carries important implications for implementation of forward models of motor control in artificial systems.

  16. Less Daily Computer Use is Related to Smaller Hippocampal Volumes in Cognitively Intact Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbert, Lisa C; Dodge, Hiroko H; Lahna, David; Promjunyakul, Nutta-On; Austin, Daniel; Mattek, Nora; Erten-Lyons, Deniz; Kaye, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Computer use is becoming a common activity in the daily life of older individuals and declines over time in those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The relationship between daily computer use (DCU) and imaging markers of neurodegeneration is unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between average DCU and volumetric markers of neurodegeneration on brain MRI. Cognitively intact volunteers enrolled in the Intelligent Systems for Assessing Aging Change study underwent MRI. Total in-home computer use per day was calculated using mouse movement detection and averaged over a one-month period surrounding the MRI. Spearman's rank order correlation (univariate analysis) and linear regression models (multivariate analysis) examined hippocampal, gray matter (GM), white matter hyperintensity (WMH), and ventricular cerebral spinal fluid (vCSF) volumes in relation to DCU. A voxel-based morphometry analysis identified relationships between regional GM density and DCU. Twenty-seven cognitively intact participants used their computer for 51.3 minutes per day on average. Less DCU was associated with smaller hippocampal volumes (r = 0.48, p = 0.01), but not total GM, WMH, or vCSF volumes. After adjusting for age, education, and gender, less DCU remained associated with smaller hippocampal volume (p = 0.01). Voxel-wise analysis demonstrated that less daily computer use was associated with decreased GM density in the bilateral hippocampi and temporal lobes. Less daily computer use is associated with smaller brain volume in regions that are integral to memory function and known to be involved early with Alzheimer's pathology and conversion to dementia. Continuous monitoring of daily computer use may detect signs of preclinical neurodegeneration in older individuals at risk for dementia.

  17. Ultrafast acoustics in the middle UV range: coherent phonons at higher frequencies and in smaller objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrinhac, S; Devos, A; Le Louarn, A; Mante, P-A; Emery, P

    2010-10-15

    We show that the propagation of coherent acoustic phonons generated by femtosecond optical excitation can be clearly resolved using a probe laser in the middle UV (MUV) range. The MUV probe is easily produced from a high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser and a homemade frequency tripler. We present various experimental results that demonstrate efficient and high frequency detection of acoustic phonons. Thus, we show that the MUV range offers a unique way to reach higher frequencies and probe smaller objects in ultrafast acoustics.

  18. Further records of smaller mammals from the Kalahari Gemsbok National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.L. Rautenbach

    1975-07-01

    Full Text Available An earlier paper (Rautenbach 1971 summarized documented distributional data on the smaller mammals in the Kalahari Gemsbok National Park, Republic of South Africa. Since then continued field- work in this Park (e.g. Nel and Rautenbach in press has yielded more information on the distribution of some previously recorded species,whilst other species have been recorded for the first time. Collecting hasbeen concentrated on two localities in the vicinity of Twee Rivieren, two near Nossob Camp, as well as at Dankbaar in the north-central portion of the Park.

  19. Non-invasive Imaging of Sendai Virus Infection in Pharmacologically Immunocompromised Mice: NK and T Cells, but not Neutrophils, Promote Viral Clearance after Therapy with Cyclophosphamide and Dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Heba H; Vogel, Peter; Srinivasan, Ashok; Russell, Charles J

    2016-09-01

    In immunocompromised patients, parainfluenza virus (PIV) infections have an increased potential to spread to the lower respiratory tract (LRT), resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Understanding the immunologic defects that facilitate viral spread to the LRT will help in developing better management protocols. In this study, we immunosuppressed mice with dexamethasone and/or cyclophosphamide then monitored the spread of viral infection into the LRT by using a noninvasive bioluminescence imaging system and a reporter Sendai virus (murine PIV type 1). Our results show that immunosuppression led to delayed viral clearance and increased viral loads in the lungs. After cessation of cyclophosphamide treatment, viral clearance occurred before the generation of Sendai-specific antibody responses and coincided with rebounds in neutrophils, T lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells. Neutrophil suppression using anti-Ly6G antibody had no effect on infection clearance, NK-cell suppression using anti-NK antibody delayed clearance, and T-cell suppression using anti-CD3 antibody resulted in no clearance (chronic infection). Therapeutic use of hematopoietic growth factors G-CSF and GM-CSF had no effect on clearance of infection. In contrast, treatment with Sendai virus-specific polysera or a monoclonal antibody limited viral spread into the lungs and accelerated clearance. Overall, noninvasive bioluminescence was shown to be a useful tool to study respiratory viral progression, revealing roles for NK and T cells, but not neutrophils, in Sendai virus clearance after treatment with dexamethasone and cyclophosphamide. Virus-specific antibodies appear to have therapeutic potential.

  20. Encefalitis virales en la infancia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monserrat Téllez de Meneses

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available La encefalitis viral es una enfermedad grave que implica el compromiso inflamatorio del parénquima cerebral. Las infecciones virales del SNC ocurren con frecuencia como complicación de infecciones virales sistémicas. Más de 100 virus están implicados como agentes causales, entre los cuales el virus Herpes simplex tipo I, es el agente causal más frecuente de encefalitis no epidémica en todos los grupos poblacionales del mundo; es el responsable de los casos más graves en todas las edades. Muchos de los virus para los cuales existe vacunas también pueden causar encefalitis como: sarampión, paperas, polio, rabia, rubéola, varicela. El virus produce una inflamación del tejido cerebral, la cual puede evolucionar a una destrucción de neuronas, provocar hemorragia y daño cerebral, dando lugar a encefalitis graves, como la encefalitis necrotizante o hemorrágica, con mucho peor pronóstico, produciendo secuelas graves, incluso la muerte. El cuadro clínico, incluye la presencia de cefalea, fiebre y alteración de la conciencia, de rápida progresión. El pronóstico de las encefalitis víricas es variable, algunos casos son leves, con recuperación completa, sin embargo existen casos graves que pueden ocasionar secuelas importantes a nivel cerebral. Es fundamental realizar un diagnóstico lo antes posible, a través de pruebas de laboratorio (bioquímica, PCR, cultivos y de neuroimagen (TAC, RM y ante todo, la instauración de un tratamiento precoz para evitar la evolución del proceso y sus posibles complicaciones. El pronóstico empeora si se retrasa la instauración del tratamiento.

  1. Evaluation of Viral Meningoencephalitis Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handan Ilhan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate retrospectively adult cases of viral encephalitis. METHOD: Fifteen patients described viral encephalitis hospitalized between the years 2006-2011 follow-up and treatment at the infectious diseases clinic were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: Most of the patients (%60 had applied in the spring. Fever (87%, confusion (73%, neck stiffness (73%, headache (73%, nausea-vomiting (33%, loss of consciousness (33%, amnesia (33%, agitation (20%, convulsion (%20, focal neurological signs (13%, Brudzinski-sign (13% were most frequently encountered findings. Electroencephalography test was applied to 13 of 14 patients, and pathological findings compatible with encephalitis have been found. Radiological imaging methods such as CT and MRI were performed in 9 of the 14 patients, and findings consistent with encephalitis were reported. All of initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples were abnormal. The domination of the first examples was lymphocytes in 14 patients; only one patient had an increase in neutrophilic cells have been found. CSF protein level was high in nine patients, and low glucose level was detected in two patients. Herpes simplex virus polymerized chain reaction (PCR analyze was performed to fourteen patients CSF. Only two of them (14% were found positive. One of the patients sample selectively examined was found to be Parvovirus B19 (+, the other patient urine sample Jacobs-creutzfeld virus PCR was found to be positively. Empiric acyclovir therapy was given to all patients. Neuropsychiatric squeal developed at the one patient. CONCLUSION: The cases in the forefront of change in mental status viral meningoencephalitis should be considered and empirical treatment with acyclovir should be started. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(4.000: 447-452

  2. Toll-like receptor 4 deficiency: Smaller infarcts, but nogain in function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoeft Andreas

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgound It has been reported that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 deficiency reduces infarct size after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R. However, measurement of MI/R injury was limited and did not include cardiac function. In a chronic closed-chest model we assessed whether cardiac function is preserved in TLR4-deficient mice (C3H/HeJ following MI/R, and whether myocardial and systemic cytokine expression differed compared to wild type (WT. Results Infarct size (IS in C3H/HeJ assessed by TTC staining after 60 min ischemia and 24h reperfusion was significantly smaller than in WT. Despite a smaller infarct size, echocardiography showed no functional difference between C3H/HeJ and WT. Left-ventricular developed pressure measured with a left-ventricular catheter was lower in C3H/HeJ (63.0 ± 4.2 mmHg vs. 77.9 ± 1.7 mmHg in WT, p Conclusion These results demonstrate that, although a mutant TLR4 signaling cascade reduces myocardial IS and serum cytokine levels, it does not preserve myocardial function. The change in inflammatory response, secondary to a non-functional TLR-4 receptor, may contribute to the observed dichotomy between infarct size and function in the TLR-4 mutant mouse.

  3. Winged queens replaced by reproductives smaller than workers in Mystrium ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molet, Mathieu; Peeters, Christian; Fisher, Brian L.

    2007-04-01

    In ants, winged queens that are specialized for independent colony foundation can be replaced by wingless reproductives better adapted for colony fission. We studied this shift in reproductive strategy by comparing two Mystrium species from Madagascar using morphometry, allometry and dissections. Mystrium rogeri has a single dealate queen in each colony with a larger thorax than workers and similar mandibles that allow these queens to hunt during non-claustral foundation. In contrast, Mystrium ‘red’ lacks winged queens and half of the female adults belong to a wingless ‘intermorph’ caste smaller and allometrically distinct from the workers. Intermorphs have functional ovaries and spermatheca while those of workers are degenerate. Intermorphs care for brood and a few mate and reproduce making them an all-purpose caste that takes charge of both work and reproduction. However, their mandibles are reduced and inappropriate for hunting centipedes, unlike the workers’ mandibles. This together with their small thorax disallow them to perform independent colony foundation, and colonies reproduce by fission. M. rogeri workers have mandibles polymorphic in size and shape, which allow for all tasks from brood care to hunting. In M. ‘red’, colonial investment in reproduction has shifted from producing expensive winged queens to more numerous helpers. M. ‘red’ intermorphs are the first case of reproductives smaller than workers in ants and illustrate their potential to diversify their caste system for better colonial economy.

  4. Winged queens replaced by reproductives smaller than workers in Mystrium ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molet, Mathieu; Peeters, Christian; Fisher, Brian L

    2007-04-01

    In ants, winged queens that are specialized for independent colony foundation can be replaced by wingless reproductives better adapted for colony fission. We studied this shift in reproductive strategy by comparing two Mystrium species from Madagascar using morphometry, allometry and dissections. Mystrium rogeri has a single dealate queen in each colony with a larger thorax than workers and similar mandibles that allow these queens to hunt during non-claustral foundation. In contrast, Mystrium 'red' lacks winged queens and half of the female adults belong to a wingless 'intermorph' caste smaller and allometrically distinct from the workers. Intermorphs have functional ovaries and spermatheca while those of workers are degenerate. Intermorphs care for brood and a few mate and reproduce making them an all-purpose caste that takes charge of both work and reproduction. However, their mandibles are reduced and inappropriate for hunting centipedes, unlike the workers' mandibles. This together with their small thorax disallow them to perform independent colony foundation, and colonies reproduce by fission. M. rogeri workers have mandibles polymorphic in size and shape, which allow for all tasks from brood care to hunting. In M. 'red', colonial investment in reproduction has shifted from producing expensive winged queens to more numerous helpers. M. 'red' intermorphs are the first case of reproductives smaller than workers in ants and illustrate their potential to diversify their caste system for better colonial economy.

  5. Fluid Cognitive Ability is associated with Greater Exposure and Smaller Emotional Reactions to Daily Stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawski, Robert S.; Almeida, David M.; Lachman, Margie E.; Tun, Patricia A.; Rosnick, Christopher B.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether fluid cognitive ability predicts exposure and emotional reactivity to daily stressors. A national sample of adults from Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) study and the National Study of Daily Experiences (N = 1,202) with a mean age of 57 (SD = 12, 56% female) completed positive and negative mood reports, as well as a stressor diary on 8 consecutive evenings via telephone. Participants also completed a telephone-based battery of tests measuring fluid cognitive ability. Higher levels of fluid cognitive ability were associated with greater exposure to work- and home-related overload stressors. Possessing higher levels of fluid cognitive ability was associated with smaller stressor-related increases in negative mood, primarily for interpersonal tensions and network stressors, and smaller stressor-related decreases in positive mood for interpersonal tensions. Furthermore, fluid cognitive ability was unrelated to subjective severity ratings of the stressors reported. Discussion focuses on the role of fluid cognitive ability in daily stress processes. PMID:20545418

  6. Addressing the multiplication makes bigger and division makes smaller misconceptions via prediction and clickers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kien H.

    2011-12-01

    This article presents a lesson that uses prediction items, clickers and visuals via PowerPoint slides to help prospective middle-school teachers address two common misconceptions: multiplication makes bigger and division makes smaller (MMB-DMS). Classroom research was conducted to explore the viability of such a lesson. Results show that the lesson was effective in creating awareness that multiplication does not always make bigger and division does not always makes smaller, uncovering students' misconceptions, and providing opportunities for students to learn from mistakes. Students liked the activity for various reasons, such as getting to learn certain mathematical ideas, to think about the problems, to work in groups and to have fun. The lesson was implemented slightly differently in two classes. The class with an additional phase involving prediction and voting via clickers in the PowerPoint lesson showed a gain of 36 points (an effect size of 1.3 standard deviations, SDs) from the pre-test to the exit-test whereas, the comparison class showed a gain of 25 points (an effect size of 0.87 SDs). In terms of students' written responses with regards to addressing the MMB-DMS misconceptions, there was however not much difference between the two classes.

  7. Zebrafish prefer larger to smaller shoals: analysis of quantity estimation in a genetically tractable model organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, Diane; Gerlai, Robert

    2017-09-01

    Numerical abilities have been demonstrated in a variety of non-human vertebrates. However, underlying biological mechanisms have been difficult to study due to a paucity of experimental tools. Powerful genetic and neurobiological tools already exist for the zebrafish, but numerical abilities remain scarcely explored with this species. Here, we investigate the choice made by single experimental zebrafish between numerically different shoals of conspecifics presented concurrently on opposite sides of the experimental tank. We examined this choice using the AB strain and pet store zebrafish. We found zebrafish of both populations to generally prefer the numerically larger shoal to the smaller one. This preference was significant for contrasted ratios above or equalling 2:1 (i.e. 4 vs. 0, 4 vs. 1, 8 vs. 2, 6 vs. 2 and 6 vs. 3). Interestingly, zebrafish showed no significant preference when each of the two contrasted shoals had at least 4 members, e.g. in a contrast 8 versus 4. These results confirm that zebrafish possess the ability to distinguish larger numbers of items from smaller number of items, in a shoaling context, with a potential limit above 4. Our findings confirm the utility of the zebrafish for the exploration of both the behavioural and the biological mechanisms underlying numerical abilities in vertebrates.

  8. Suppressed expression of cystathionine β-synthase and smaller cerebellum in Wistar Kyoto rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Mao; Ikeda, Hiromi; Kawase, Takahiro; Iwamoto, Ayaka; Yasuo, Shinobu; Furuse, Mitsuiro

    2015-10-22

    We previously reported that Wistar Kyoto rats, an animal model of depression, have a characteristically abnormal serine metabolism in the brain, i.e., lower serine and cystathionine, which is a metabolite of serine, concentrations in the brain. To explore the mechanism underlying this abnormality, the expression of cystathionine β-synthase and serine racemase, which are the enzymes involved in the serine metabolism, was investigated in the cerebellum and hippocampus of Wistar and Wistar Kyoto rats. Wistar Kyoto rats exhibited a significantly lower mRNA expression of cystathionine β-synthase in the cerebellum in comparison with Wistar rats, while expression levels in the hippocampus did not differ between strains. Previous study indicated that the reduction of cystathionine β-synthase in the brain induced cerebellar aplasia in mice. Therefore, the cerebellar size was compared between Wistar rats and Wistar Kyoto rats. Wistar Kyoto rats displayed a lower ratio of cerebellum weight to whole-brain weight compared with Wistar rats of the same generation or similar body weight, suggesting that Wistar Kyoto rats exhibit smaller cerebellum. These results suggest that the lower mRNA expression of cystathionine β-synthase in the cerebellum and the smaller size of cerebellum may be related to the depression-like behavior in Wistar Kyoto rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Non-Viral Deoxyribonucleoside Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Louise Slot; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    to be valuable in studying the evolution of enzymes. Some of these newly discovered enzymes have been useful in numerous practical applications in medicine and biotechnology, and have contributed to our understanding of the structural basis of nucleoside and nucleoside analogue activation....... of great medical interest. However, during the last 20 years, research on dNKs has gone into non-mammalian organisms. In this review, we focus on non-viral dNKs, in particular their diversity and their practical applications. The diversity of this enzyme family in different organisms has proven...

  10. Electron Transfer Mechanism in the Oxidation of Aryl 1-Methyl-1-phenylethyl Sulfides Promoted by Nonheme Iron(IV)-Oxo Complexes: The Rate of the Oxygen Rebound Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Alessia; Del Giacco, Tiziana; Di Stefano, Stefano; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo; Lapi, Andrea; Mazzonna, Marco; Olivo, Giorgio

    2016-12-16

    The oxidation of aryl 1-methyl-1-phenylethyl sulfides promoted by the nonheme iron(IV)-oxo complexes [(N4Py)FeIV═O]2+ and [(Bn-TPEN)FeIV═O]2+ occurs by an electron transfer-oxygen rebound (ET-OT) mechanism leading to aryl 1-methyl-1-phenylethyl sulfoxides accompanied by products derived from Cα-S fragmentation of sulfide radical cations (2-phenyl-2-propanol and diaryl disulfides). For the first time, the rate constants for the oxygen rebound process (kOT), which are in the range of <0.8 × 104 to 3.5 × 104 s-1, were determined from the fragmentation rate constants of the radical cations (kf) and the S oxidation/fragmentation product ratios.

  11. Fatness, physical activity, and television viewing in children during the adiposity rebound period: the Iowa Bone Development Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, Kathleen F; Levy, Steven M; Burns, Trudy L; Torner, James C; Willing, Marcia C; Warren, John J

    2002-12-01

    Understanding the determinants of adiposity in young children may be particularly critical for preventing adult obesity since the age at which body fatness reaches a postinfancy low point (typically 4-6 years) is inversely associated with obesity later in life. METHODS; We examined cross-sectional associations among fatness, leanness, and physical activity in 467 children (range 4-6 years). Activity was measured using accelerometry and parental report of children's television (TV) viewing. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to quantify body composition. Minutes spent in vigorous activity and TV viewing were the variables most consistently and most highly associated with adiposity. Children in the lowest quartile for vigorous activity had on average (absolute) body fat percentages that were 4% greater than those children in the highest quartile for vigorous activity. Body fat percentages for children in the highest category for TV viewing were on average 3% greater than those children who watched the least amount of TV. Low levels of vigorous physical activity and high levels of TV viewing are associated with fatness in young children during the adiposity rebound period. This suggests that increasing children's active play may be important in preventing obesity later in life.

  12. Weight, height and body mass index nomograms; early adiposity rebound in a sample of children in tehran, iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mostafa; Navidi, Iman; Hesamifard, Bahare; Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Jafari, Nasim; Poorchaloo, Sakine Ranji; Ataei, Neamatollah

    2013-12-01

    Assessing growth is a useful tool for defining health and nutritional status of children. The objective of this study was to construct growth reference curves of Iranian infants and children (0-6 years old) and compare them with previous and international references. Weight, height or length of 2107 Iranian infants and children aged 0-6 years old were measured using a cross-sectional survey in Tehran in 2010. Standard smooth reference curves for Iranian population were constructed and compared to multinational World Health Organization 2006 reference standards as well as a previous study from two decades ago. Growth index references for Iranian girls are increased in compare to data from two decades ago and are approximately close to the international references. In boys; however, the increment was considerably large as it passed the international references. Not only the values for indexes was changed during two decades, but also the age at adiposity rebound came near the age of 3, which is an important risk factor for later obesity. During two decades, growth indexes of Iranian children raised noticeable. Risk factors for later obesity are now apparent and demand immediate policy formulations. In addition, reference curves presented in this paper can be used as a diagnostic tool for monitoring growth of Iranian children.

  13. Weight, height and body mass index nomograms; early adiposity rebound in a sample of children in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Hosseini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assessing growth is a useful tool for defining health and nutritional status of children. The objective of this study was to construct growth reference curves of Iranian infants and children (0-6 years old and compare them with previous and international references. Methods: Weight, height or length of 2107 Iranian infants and children aged 0-6 years old were measured using a cross-sectional survey in Tehran in 2010. Standard smooth reference curves for Iranian population were constructed and compared to multinational World Health Organization 2006 reference standards as well as a previous study from two decades ago. Results: Growth index references for Iranian girls are increased in compare to data from two decades ago and are approximately close to the international references. In boys; however, the increment was considerably large as it passed the international references. Not only the values for indexes was changed during two decades, but also the age at adiposity rebound came near the age of 3, which is an important risk factor for later obesity. Conclusions: During two decades, growth indexes of Iranian children raised noticeable. Risk factors for later obesity are now apparent and demand immediate policy formulations. In addition, reference curves presented in this paper can be used as a diagnostic tool for monitoring growth of Iranian children.

  14. Novel regulator of acylated ghrelin, CF801, reduces weight gain, rebound feeding after a fast, and adiposity in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K Wellman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ghrelin is a 28 amino-acid hormonal peptide that is intimately related to the regulation of food intake and body weight. Once secreted, ghrelin binds to the growth hormone secretagogue receptor-1a (GHSR-1a, the only known receptor for ghrelin and is capable of activating a number of signaling cascades ultimately resulting in an increase in food intake and adiposity. Because ghrelin has been linked to overeating and the development of obesity, a number of pharmacological interventions have been generated in order to interfere with either the activation of ghrelin or interrupting ghrelin signaling as a means to reducing appetite and decrease weight gain. Here we present a novel peptide, CF801, capable of reducing circulating acylated ghrelin levels and subsequent body weight gain and adiposity. To this end, we show that IP administration of CF801 is sufficient to reduce circulating plasma acylated ghrelin levels. Acutely, intraperitoneal injections of CF801 resulted in decreased rebound feeding after an overnight fast. When delivered chronically decreased weight gain and adiposity without affecting caloric intake. CF801, however, did cause a change in diet preference, decreasing preference for a high fat diet and increasing preference for regular chow diet. Given the complexity of ghrelin receptor function, we propose that CF801 along with other compounds that regulate ghrelin secretion may prove to be a beneficial tool in the study of the ghrelin system, and potential targets for ghrelin based obesity treatments without altering the function of ghrelin receptors.

  15. Novel Regulator of Acylated Ghrelin, CF801, Reduces Weight Gain, Rebound Feeding after a Fast, and Adiposity in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Martin K; Patterson, Zachary R; MacKay, Harry; Darling, Joseph E; Mani, Bharath K; Zigman, Jeffrey M; Hougland, James L; Abizaid, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin is a 28 amino acid hormonal peptide that is intimately related to the regulation of food intake and body weight. Once secreted, ghrelin binds to the growth hormone secretagogue receptor-1a, the only known receptor for ghrelin and is capable of activating a number of signaling cascades, ultimately resulting in an increase in food intake and adiposity. Because ghrelin has been linked to overeating and the development of obesity, a number of pharmacological interventions have been generated in order to interfere with either the activation of ghrelin or interrupting ghrelin signaling as a means to reducing appetite and decrease weight gain. Here, we present a novel peptide, CF801, capable of reducing circulating acylated ghrelin levels and subsequent body weight gain and adiposity. To this end, we show that IP administration of CF801 is sufficient to reduce circulating plasma acylated ghrelin levels. Acutely, intraperitoneal injections of CF801 resulted in decreased rebound feeding after an overnight fast. When delivered chronically, they decreased weight gain and adiposity without affecting caloric intake. CF801, however, did cause a change in diet preference, decreasing preference for a high-fat diet and increasing preference for regular chow diet. Given the complexity of ghrelin receptor function, we propose that CF801, along with other compounds that regulate ghrelin secretion, may prove to be a beneficial tool in the study of the ghrelin system, and potential targets for ghrelin-based obesity treatments without altering the function of ghrelin receptors.

  16. Viral organization of human proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Wuchty

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Although maps of intracellular interactions are increasingly well characterized, little is known about large-scale maps of host-pathogen protein interactions. The investigation of host-pathogen interactions can reveal features of pathogenesis and provide a foundation for the development of drugs and disease prevention strategies. A compilation of experimentally verified interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins and a set of HIV-dependency factors (HDF allowed insights into the topology and intricate interplay between viral and host proteins on a large scale. We found that targeted and HDF proteins appear predominantly in rich-clubs, groups of human proteins that are strongly intertwined among each other. These assemblies of proteins may serve as an infection gateway, allowing the virus to take control of the human host by reaching protein pathways and diversified cellular functions in a pronounced and focused way. Particular transcription factors and protein kinases facilitate indirect interactions between HDFs and viral proteins. Discerning the entanglement of directly targeted and indirectly interacting proteins may uncover molecular and functional sites that can provide novel perspectives on the progression of HIV infection and highlight new avenues to fight this virus.

  17. Sequencing Needs for Viral Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, S N; Lam, M; Mulakken, N J; Torres, C L; Smith, J R; Slezak, T

    2004-01-26

    We built a system to guide decisions regarding the amount of genomic sequencing required to develop diagnostic DNA signatures, which are short sequences that are sufficient to uniquely identify a viral species. We used our existing DNA diagnostic signature prediction pipeline, which selects regions of a target species genome that are conserved among strains of the target (for reliability, to prevent false negatives) and unique relative to other species (for specificity, to avoid false positives). We performed simulations, based on existing sequence data, to assess the number of genome sequences of a target species and of close phylogenetic relatives (''near neighbors'') that are required to predict diagnostic signature regions that are conserved among strains of the target species and unique relative to other bacterial and viral species. For DNA viruses such as variola (smallpox), three target genomes provide sufficient guidance for selecting species-wide signatures. Three near neighbor genomes are critical for species specificity. In contrast, most RNA viruses require four target genomes and no near neighbor genomes, since lack of conservation among strains is more limiting than uniqueness. SARS and Ebola Zaire are exceptional, as additional target genomes currently do not improve predictions, but near neighbor sequences are urgently needed. Our results also indicate that double stranded DNA viruses are more conserved among strains than are RNA viruses, since in most cases there was at least one conserved signature candidate for the DNA viruses and zero conserved signature candidates for the RNA viruses.

  18. T Cell Exhaustion During Persistent Viral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Shannon M.; Wherry, E. John; Zajac, Allan J.

    2015-01-01

    Although robust and highly effective anti-viral T cells contribute to the clearance of many acute infections, viral persistence is associated with the development of functionally inferior, exhausted, T cell responses. Exhaustion develops in a step-wise and progressive manner, ranges in severity, and can culminate in the deletion of the anti-viral T cells. This disarming of the response is consequential as it compromises viral control and potentially serves to dampen immune-mediated damage. Exhausted T cells are unable to elaborate typical anti-viral effector functions. They are characterized by the sustained upregulation of inhibitory receptors and display a gene expression profile that distinguishes them from prototypic effector and memory T cell populations. In this review we discuss the properties of exhausted T cells; the virological and immunological conditions that favor their development; the cellular and molecular signals that sustain the exhausted state; and strategies for preventing and reversing exhaustion to favor viral control. PMID:25620767

  19. Viral Infection in Renal Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana Cukuranovic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are among the most common causes of opportunistic infection after transplantation. The risk for viral infection is a function of the specific virus encountered, the intensity of immune suppression used to prevent graft rejection, and other host factors governing susceptibility. Although cytomegalovirus is the most common opportunistic pathogen seen in transplant recipients, numerous other viruses have also affected outcomes. In some cases, preventive measures such as pretransplant screening, prophylactic antiviral therapy, or posttransplant viral monitoring may limit the impact of these infections. Recent advances in laboratory monitoring and antiviral therapy have improved outcomes. Studies of viral latency, reactivation, and the cellular effects of viral infection will provide clues for future strategies in prevention and treatment of viral infections. This paper will summarize the major viral infections seen following transplant and discuss strategies for prevention and management of these potential pathogens.

  20. Opportunities and barriers for smaller portions in food service: lessons from marketing and behavioral economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riis, J

    2014-07-01

    This paper uses the frameworks and evidence from marketing and behavioral economics to highlight the opportunities and barriers for portion control in food service environments. Applying Kahneman's 'thinking fast and slow' concepts, it describes 10 strategies that can be effective in 'tricking' the consumer's fast cognitive system to make better decisions and in triggering the slow cognitive system to help prevent the fast system from making bad decisions. These strategies include shrinking defaults, elongating packages, increasing the visibility of small portions, offering more mixed virtue options, adding more small sizes, offering 'right-sized' standard portions, using meaningful size labels, adopting linear pricing, using temporal landmarks to push smaller portions and facilitating pre-commitment. For each of these strategies, I discuss the specific cost and revenue barriers that a food service operator would face if the strategy were adopted.

  1. TouchGrid: Touchpad pointing by recursively mapping taps to smaller display regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Hornbæk, Kasper

    2005-01-01

    Touchpad devices are widely used but lacking in pointing efficiency. The TouchGrid, an instance of what we term cell cursors, replaces moving the cursor through dragging the finger on a touchpad with tapping in different regions of the touchpad. The touchpad regions are recursively mapped...... to smaller display regions and thereby enable high-precision pointing without requiring high tapping precision. In an experiment, six subjects used the TouchGrid and a standard touchpad across different numbers of targets, distances to targets, and target widths. Whereas standard touchpad operation follows...... Fitts’ law, target selection time with the TouchGrid is a linear function of the required number of taps. The TouchGrid was significantly faster for small targets and for tasks requiring one tap, and marginally faster for two-tap tasks. Error rates tended to be higher with the TouchGrid than...

  2. An atlas of the smaller maps in orientable and nonorientable surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, David

    2000-01-01

    Maps are beguilingly simple structures with deep and ubiquitous properties. They arise in an essential way in many areas of mathematics and mathematical physics, but require considerable time and computational effort to generate. Few collected drawings are available for reference, and little has been written, in book form, about their enumerative aspects. An Atlas of the Smaller Maps in Orientable and Nonorientable Surfaces is the first book to provide complete collections of maps along with their vertex and face partitions, number of rootings, and an index number for cross referencing. It provides an explanation of axiomatization and encoding, and serves as an introduction to maps as a combinatorial structure. The Atlas lists the maps first by genus and number of edges, and gives the embeddings of all graphs with at most five edges in orientable surfaces, thus presenting the genus distribution for each graph. Exemplifying the use of the Atlas, the authors explore two substantial conjectures with origins in ...

  3. Micrometeoroid Impacts on the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Smaller Particle Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, D. K.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J.C.; Opiela, J.; Kearsley, A. T.; Grime, G.; Webb, R.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V.; Colaux, J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The radiator shield on the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) was subject to optical inspection following return from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2009. The survey revealed over 600 impact features of > 300 micrometers diameter, from exposure in space for 16 years. Subsequently, an international collaborative programme of analysis was organized to determine the origin of hypervelocity particles responsible for the damage. Here we describe examples of the numerous smaller micrometeoroid (MM) impact features (< 700 micrometers diameter) which excavated zinc orthotitanate (ZOT) paint from the radiator surface, but did not incorporate material from underlying Al alloy; larger impacts are described by [3]. We discuss recognition and interpretation of impactor remains, and MM compositions found on WFPC2.

  4. The Problem with Big Data: Operating on Smaller Datasets to Bridge the Implementation Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Richard P; Mushtaq, Faisal; White, Alan D; Mata-Cervantes, Gabriel; Pike, Tom; Coker, Dalton; Murdoch, Stuart; Hiles, Tim; Smith, Clare; Berridge, David; Hinchliffe, Suzanne; Hall, Geoff; Smye, Stephen; Wilkie, Richard M; Lodge, J Peter A; Mon-Williams, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Big datasets have the potential to revolutionize public health. However, there is a mismatch between the political and scientific optimism surrounding big data and the public's perception of its benefit. We suggest a systematic and concerted emphasis on developing models derived from smaller datasets to illustrate to the public how big data can produce tangible benefits in the long term. In order to highlight the immediate value of a small data approach, we produced a proof-of-concept model predicting hospital length of stay. The results demonstrate that existing small datasets can be used to create models that generate a reasonable prediction, facilitating health-care delivery. We propose that greater attention (and funding) needs to be directed toward the utilization of existing information resources in parallel with current efforts to create and exploit "big data."

  5. Do open access biomedical journals benefit smaller countries? The Slovenian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Nana

    2011-06-01

    Scientists from smaller countries have problems gaining visibility for their research. Does open access publishing provide a solution? Slovenia is a small country with around 5000 medical doctors, 1300 dentists and 1000 pharmacists. A search of Slovenia's Bibliographic database was carried out to identity all biomedical journals and those which are open access. Slovenia has 18 medical open access journals, but none has an impact factor and only 10 are indexed by Slovenian and international bibliographic databases. The visibility and quality of medical papers is poor. The solution might be to reduce the number of journals and encourage Slovenian scientists to publish their best articles in them. © 2011 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2011 Health Libraries Group.

  6. Smaller-loss planar SPP transmission line than conventional microstrip in microwave frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Jun Feng; Tang, Wenxuan; Fan, Yifeng; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-03-17

    Transmission line is a basic component in all passive devices, integrated circuits, and systems. Microstrip is the most popular transmission line in the microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies, and has been widely used in current electronic devices, circuits, and systems. One of the important issues to be solved in such applications is the relatively large transmission loss of microstrip. Here, we propose a method to reduce the loss of microwave transmission line based on the designable wavenumber of spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Using this characteristic, we analyze and experimentally demonstrate the low-loss feature of the SPP transmission line through the perturbation method and S-parameter measurements, respectively. Both simulation and experimental results show that the SPP transmission line has much smaller transmission loss than traditional microstrip with the same size in the microwave frequencies. Hence, the spoof SPP transmission line may make a big step forward in the low-loss circuits and systems.

  7. A step toward production of smaller diameter single wall carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lemos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-wall carbon nanotubes were produced with, either, a bimetallic or a mixture of three catalysts. Raman scattering and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were used as characterization tools. The mixture LiNi0.5Co0.5O2 leaded to a sample relatively free from impurities with long bundles, each containing a few tubes. A narrow distribution of diameters for the sample produced with this mixture was evidenced by Raman scattering experiences. The mean tube diameter was found to be smaller than those measured for the nanotubes obtained with the bimetallic catalysts, Fe/Ni and Ni/Co. Possible chiralities were calculated for the semiconductor nanotubes formed. Assignments of the Raman radial breathing mode frequencies to the calculated structures are presented.

  8. The Problem with Big Data: Operating on Smaller Datasets to Bridge the Implementation Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Richard P.; Mushtaq, Faisal; White, Alan D.; Mata-Cervantes, Gabriel; Pike, Tom; Coker, Dalton; Murdoch, Stuart; Hiles, Tim; Smith, Clare; Berridge, David; Hinchliffe, Suzanne; Hall, Geoff; Smye, Stephen; Wilkie, Richard M.; Lodge, J. Peter A.; Mon-Williams, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Big datasets have the potential to revolutionize public health. However, there is a mismatch between the political and scientific optimism surrounding big data and the public’s perception of its benefit. We suggest a systematic and concerted emphasis on developing models derived from smaller datasets to illustrate to the public how big data can produce tangible benefits in the long term. In order to highlight the immediate value of a small data approach, we produced a proof-of-concept model predicting hospital length of stay. The results demonstrate that existing small datasets can be used to create models that generate a reasonable prediction, facilitating health-care delivery. We propose that greater attention (and funding) needs to be directed toward the utilization of existing information resources in parallel with current efforts to create and exploit “big data.” PMID:27990415

  9. Virion-targeted viral inactivation: new therapy against viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okui, N; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, N; Sakuma, R; Ishikawa, T; Kitamura, T

    2001-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is resistant to all current therapy. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative or additive to current, unsatisfactory AIDS therapy. To develop an antiviral molecule targeting viral integrase (HIV IN), we generated a single-chain antibody, termed scAb, which interacted with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IN and inhibited virus replication at the integration step when expressed intracellularly. To reduce infectivity from within the virus particles, we made expression plasmids (pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-CA, and pC-scAbE-WXXF), which expressed the anti-HIV IN scAb fused to the N-terminus of HIV-1-associated accessory protein R (Vpr), capsid protein (CA), and specific binding motif to Vpr (WXXF), respectively. All fusion proteins were tagged with a nine-amino acid peptide derived from influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) at the C terminus. The fusion molecules, termed scAbE-Vpr, scAbE-CA, and scAbE-WXXF, interacted specifically with HIV IN immobilized on a nitrocellulose membrane. Immunoblot analysis showed that scAbE-Vpr, scAbE-CA, and scAbE-WXXF were incorporated into the virions produced by cotransfection of 293T cells with HIV-1 infectious clone DNA (pLAI) and pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-WXXF. A multinuclear activation galactosidase indicator (MAGI) assay revealed that the virions released from 293T cells cotransfected with pLAI and pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-WXXF had as little 1000-fold of the infectivity of the control wild-type virions, which were produced from the 293T cells transfected with pLAI alone. Furthermore, the virions produced from the 293T cells cotransfected with pLAI and an scAb expression vector (pC-scAb) showed only 1% of the infectivity of the control HIV-1 in a MAGI assay, although scAb was not incorporated into the virions. In either instance, the total quantity of the progeny virions released from the transfected 293T cells and the patterns of the virion proteins were hardly affected by the presence of

  10. Smaller Brain Volume is Associated with Poorer Instrumental ADL Performance in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alosco, Michael L.; Brickman, Adam M.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Narkhede, Atul; Griffith, Erica Y; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel; Gunstad, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure patients require assistance with instrumental activities of daily living in part due to the high rates of cognitive impairment in this population. Structural brain insult (e.g., reduced gray matter volume) is theorized to underlie cognitive dysfunction in heart failure, although no study has examined the association among gray matter, cognition, and instrumental activities of daily living in heart failure. Objectives To investigate the associations among gray matter volume, cognitive function, and functional ability in heart failure. Methods 81 heart failure patients completed a cognitive test battery and the Lawton-Brody self-report questionnaire to assess instrumental activities of daily living. Participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging to quantify total gray matter and subcortical gray matter volume. Results Impairments in instrumental activities of daily living were common in this sample of HF patients. Regression analyses controlling for demographic and medical confounders showed smaller total gray matter volume predicted decreased scores on the instrumental activities of daily living composite, with specific associations noted for medication management and independence in driving. Interaction analyses showed that reduced total gray matter volume interacted with worse attention/executive function and memory to negatively impact instrumental activities of daily living. Conclusions Smaller gray matter volume is associated with greater impairment in instrumental activities of daily living in persons with heart failure, possibly via cognitive dysfunction. Prospective studies are needed to clarify the utility of clinical correlates of gray matter volume (e.g., cognitive dysfunction) in identifying heart failure patients at risk for functional decline and determine whether interventions that target improved brain and cognitive function can preserve functional independence in this high risk population. PMID:25419946

  11. Retrograde intrarenal surgery and micro-percutaneous nephrolithotomy for renal lithiasis smaller than 2 CM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, M; Amón, J H; Mainez, J A; de la Cruz, B; Rodríguez, V; Alonso, D; Martínez-Sagarra, J M

    2017-10-01

    Microperc is the upgraded form of percutaneous nephrolithotomy miniaturization. The aim of this study is to compare prospectively microperc and retrograde intrarenal surgery for the treatment of renal stones smaller than 2 cm. A comparative prospective study of both techniques was carried out between January 2014 and June 2015. Thirty-five patients were divided in two groups: Group A, 17 patients treated by retrograde intrarenal surgery and Group B, 18 patients treated by microperc. Stone clearance was assessed using CT scan 3 months after surgery. Both groups were statistically comparable as demographic variables and stone size was similar (16.76 mm Group A vs 15.72 mm Group B). Success rate, hospital stay and JJ stenting were similar for both groups. There was no statistically significant difference regarding post-operatory complications: 17.64% Group A vs 5.56% Group B (p=0,062), all of them Clavien I and II. Surgical time was statistically different (63.82 min Group A vs 103.24 min Group B) as well as hemoglobin drop (0.62 g/dl Group A and 1.89 g/dl Group B). Microperc is an effective and safe procedure for the treatment of renal lithiasis smaller than 2 cm, which makes it a good alternative to retrograde intrarenal surgery for this stone size. However, more prospective studies that include a larger cohort are necessary to confirm our results. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Smaller prostate gland size and older age predict Gleason score upgrading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Boris; Dahl, Douglas M; Olumi, Aria F; Young, Robert H; McDougal, W Scott; Wu, Chin-Lee

    2013-10-01

    Gleason score is important for prostate cancer (CaP) risk stratification and prognostication but has a significant rate of upgrading. We examined the effect of prostate size and age on upgrading of Gleason 6 CaP. A retrospective review was performed of patients with Gleason 6 CaP who underwent radical prostatectomy from 2001 through 2010. Preoperative clinical and pathologic variables were assessed to determine association with risk of upgrading at prostatectomy. A total of 1,836 patients were identified with Gleason 6 on prostate biopsy. Upgrading was observed in 543 (29.6%) patients with a final Gleason score of 3+4 in 463 (25.2%), 4+3 in 49 (2.7%), and 8-10 in 31 (1.7%). On univariate logistic regression, age, prostate weight, and PSA were significant predictors of Gleason score upgrading and remained significant on multiple logistic regression. Prostate weight was inversely related to risk of upgrading. To further explore this effect, we performed multiple logistic regression to examine risk of Gleason 6, 7, or 8-10 disease in 2,493 patients with Gleason 6-10 at prostatectomy. After controlling for age and PSA, there was a progressively increased risk of Gleason 6, 7, and 8-10 disease with decreasing prostate weight. Older age, higher PSA, and smaller prostate gland size are associated with increased risk of Gleason score upgrading. The inverse relationship of prostate weight to risk of Gleason upgrading may be related to increased high-grade disease in smaller glands. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Visualizing viral transport and host infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Kwangmin; Guasto, Jeffrey; Cubillos-Ruiz, Andres; Sullivan, Matthew; Stocker, Roman; MIT Team

    2013-11-01

    A virus is a non-motile infectious agent that can only replicate inside a living host. They consist of a virus-host encounter/adsorption dynamics and subsequently the effectiveness of various tail morphologies for viral infection. Viral transport and the role of viral morphology in host-virus interactions are critical to our understanding of both ecosystem dynamics and human health, as well as to the evolution of virus morphology.

  14. Viral Advertising on Facebook in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Phuong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to explore which factors affect the effectiveness of viral advertising on Facebook in Vietnam. The quantitative research method is applied in this research and the sample is Vietnamese Facebook users. After the data analysis stage using SPSS, it became clear that weak ties, perceptual affinity and emotions have an impact on the effectiveness of viral advertising. The results provide a pratical implication of how to make an Ad which can go viral on Facebook. Moreo...

  15. Viral Advertising: Branding Effects from Consumers’ Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yueqing

    2012-01-01

    Viral advertising is popular for its high viral transmission results online. Its increased impacts on the social media users have been noticed by the author. At the same time, viewers’ negative attitudes toward traditional advertisements become obvious which can be regarded as the phenomenon of advertisement avoidance. It arouses author’s interests to know how the viral advertising reduces the viewers’ negative emotions and its performances in branding online. This paper is going to look into...

  16. [Workshop on Molecular Epidemiology of Viral Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, B; Cabrera, L; Arias, C F

    1997-01-01

    A workshop on viral epidemiology was held on September 29, 1995 at the Medical School of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico. The aim of this workshop was to promote interaction among scientists working in viral epidemiology. Eighteen scientists from ten institutions presented their experiences and work. General aspects of the epidemiology of meaningful viral diseases in the country were discussed, and lectures presented on the rota, polio, respiratory syncytial, dengue, papiloma, rabies, VIH and hepatitis viruses.

  17. Marked Variability in the Extent of Protein Disorder within and between Viral Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushker, Ravindra; Mooney, Catherine; Davey, Norman E.; Jacqué, Jean-Marc; Shields, Denis C.

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered regions in eukaryotic proteomes contain key signaling and regulatory modules and mediate interactions with many proteins. Many viral proteomes encode disordered proteins and modulate host factors through the use of short linear motifs (SLiMs) embedded within disordered regions. However, the degree of viral protein disorder across different viruses is not well understood, so we set out to establish the constraints acting on viruses, in terms of their use of disordered protein regions. We surveyed predicted disorder across 2,278 available viral genomes in 41 families, and correlated the extent of disorder with genome size and other factors. Protein disorder varies strikingly between viral families (from 2.9% to 23.1% of residues), and also within families. However, this substantial variation did not follow the established trend among their hosts, with increasing disorder seen across eubacterial, archaebacterial, protists, and multicellular eukaryotes. For example, among large mammalian viruses, poxviruses and herpesviruses showed markedly differing disorder (5.6% and 17.9%, respectively). Viral families with smaller genome sizes have more disorder within each of five main viral types (ssDNA, dsDNA, ssRNA+, dsRNA, retroviruses), except for negative single-stranded RNA viruses, where disorder increased with genome size. However, surveying over all viruses, which compares tiny and enormous viruses over a much bigger range of genome sizes, there is no strong association of genome size with protein disorder. We conclude that there is extensive variation in the disorder content of viral proteomes. While a proportion of this may relate to base composition, to extent of gene overlap, and to genome size within viral types, there remain important additional family and virus-specific effects. Differing disorder strategies are likely to impact on how different viruses modulate host factors, and on how rapidly viruses can evolve novel instances of SLi

  18. Marked variability in the extent of protein disorder within and between viral families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Pushker

    Full Text Available Intrinsically disordered regions in eukaryotic proteomes contain key signaling and regulatory modules and mediate interactions with many proteins. Many viral proteomes encode disordered proteins and modulate host factors through the use of short linear motifs (SLiMs embedded within disordered regions. However, the degree of viral protein disorder across different viruses is not well understood, so we set out to establish the constraints acting on viruses, in terms of their use of disordered protein regions. We surveyed predicted disorder across 2,278 available viral genomes in 41 families, and correlated the extent of disorder with genome size and other factors. Protein disorder varies strikingly between viral families (from 2.9% to 23.1% of residues, and also within families. However, this substantial variation did not follow the established trend among their hosts, with increasing disorder seen across eubacterial, archaebacterial, protists, and multicellular eukaryotes. For example, among large mammalian viruses, poxviruses and herpesviruses showed markedly differing disorder (5.6% and 17.9%, respectively. Viral families with smaller genome sizes have more disorder within each of five main viral types (ssDNA, dsDNA, ssRNA+, dsRNA, retroviruses, except for negative single-stranded RNA viruses, where disorder increased with genome size. However, surveying over all viruses, which compares tiny and enormous viruses over a much bigger range of genome sizes, there is no strong association of genome size with protein disorder. We conclude that there is extensive variation in the disorder content of viral proteomes. While a proportion of this may relate to base composition, to extent of gene overlap, and to genome size within viral types, there remain important additional family and virus-specific effects. Differing disorder strategies are likely to impact on how different viruses modulate host factors, and on how rapidly viruses can evolve novel

  19. Viral Subversion of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Le Sage

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear pore complex (NPC acts as a selective barrier between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and is responsible for mediating communication by regulating the transport of RNA and proteins. Numerous viral pathogens have evolved different mechanisms to hijack the NPC in order to regulate trafficking of viral proteins, genomes and even capsids into and out of the nucleus thus promoting virus replication. The present review examines the different strategies and the specific nucleoporins utilized during viral infections as a means of promoting their life cycle and inhibiting host viral defenses.

  20. Viral diseases of northern ungulates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Frölich

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes viral diseases reported in northern ungulates and those that are a potential threat to these species. The following diseases are discussed: bovine viral diarrhoea/mucosal disease (BVD/MD, alphaherpesvirus infections, malignant catarrhal fever (MCF, poxvirus infections, parainfluenza type 3 virus infection, Alvsborg disease, foot-and-mouth disease, epizootic haemorrhage disease of deer and bluetongue disease, rabies, respiratory syncytial virus infection, adenovirus infection, hog-cholera, Aujeszky's disease and equine herpesvirus infections. There are no significant differences in antibody prevalence to BVDV among deer in habitats with high, intermediate and low density of cattle. In addition, sequence analysis from the BVDV isolated from roe deer (Capreolus capreolus showed that this strain was unique within BVDV group I. Distinct BVDV strains might circulate in free-ranging roe deer populations in Germany and virus transmission may be independent of domestic livestock. Similar results have been obtained in a serological survey of alpha-herpesviruses in deer in Germany. Malignant catarrhal fever was studied in fallow deer (Cervus dama in Germany: the seroprevalence and positive PCR results detected in sheep originating from the same area as the antibody-positive deer might indicate that sheep are the main reservoir animals. Contagious ecthyma (CE is a common disease in domestic sheep and goats caused by the orf virus. CE has been diagnosed in Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis, mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus, Dall sheep (Ovis dalli, chamois (Rupkapra rupi-capra, muskox {Ovibos moschatus and reindeer (Rangifer tarandus. Most parainfluenza type 3 virus infections are mild or clinically undetectable. Serological surveys in wildlife have been successfully conducted in many species. In 1985, a new disease was identified in Swedish moose (Alces alces, designated as Alvsborg disease. This wasting syndrome probably

  1. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Luis P.

    2011-01-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  2. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis P. Villarreal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  3. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  4. Viral Innovation, Sustainability, and Excellence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgeman, Rick; Eskildsen, Jacob Kjær

    for these models include Biophysical/Environmental, Business/Economic, and Societal dimensions with the BEST model adding a Technological dimension that refers predominantly to infrastructure, that is, to the built-environment. Integration across these sustainability dimensions is challenging, but can......Enterprises strive to be economically sustainable. In doing so, they either contribute to or detract from environmental and social sustainability. Sustainability is hence multi-dimensional with formulations that include the familiar triple-bottom-line and BEST models. Any assessment regimen...... what is henceforth called “viral innovation”. Evidence of growing global emphasis on environmental and social sustainability is provided by the United Nations Global Compact (http://www.unglobalcompact.org/), the Pearl Initiative in the Middle East (http...

  5. Rapid rebound of soil respiration following partial stand disturbance by tree girdling in a temperate deciduous forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy-Varon, Jennifer H; Schuster, William S F; Griffin, Kevin L

    2014-04-01

    Forests serve an essential role in climate change mitigation by removing CO2 from the atmosphere. Within a forest, disturbance events can greatly impact C cycling and subsequently influence the exchange of CO2 between forests and the atmosphere. This connection makes understanding the forest C cycle response to disturbance imperative for climate change research. The goal of this study was to examine the temporal response of soil respiration after differing levels of stand disturbance for 3 years at the Black Rock Forest (southeastern NY, USA; oaks comprise 67% of the stand). Tree girdling was used to mimic pathogen attack and create the following treatments: control, girdling all non-oaks (NOG), girdling half of the oak trees (O50), and girdling all the oaks (OG). Soil respiratory rates on OG plots declined for 2 years following girdling before attaining a full rebound of belowground activity in the third year. Soil respiration on NOG and O50 were statistically similar to the control for the duration of the study although a trend for a stronger decline in respiration on O50 relative to NOG occurred in the first 2 years. Respiratory responses among the various treatments were not proportional to the degree of disturbance and varied over time. The short-lived respiratory response on O50 and OG suggests that belowground activity is resilient to disturbance; however, sources of the recovered respiratory flux on these plots are likely different than they were pre-treatment. The differential taxon response between oaks and non-oaks suggests that after a defoliation or girdling event, the temporal response of the soil respiratory flux may be related to the C allocation pattern of the affected plant group.

  6. Age at adiposity rebound is associated with fat mass in young adult males-the GOOD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Claes; Lorentzon, Mattias; Norjavaara, Ensio; Kindblom, Jenny M

    2012-01-01

    Age at adiposity rebound (AR) is associated with obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in adults. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of age at AR in adult fat mass, fat distribution and pubertal timing for a Swedish cohort. This is a retrospective cohort study. Detailed growth charts were retrieved for the men participating in the population-based GOOD (Gothenburg Osteoporosis and Obesity Determinants) study (n=573). Body composition was analysed using dual X-ray absorptiometry and computed tomography at 18-20 years of age. Age and BMI at AR were calculated using pediatric growth charts and AR was defined as the lowest BMI between 3 and 9 years of age. Subjects were divided into early (age at AR below 5.4 years of age), middle (age at AR 5.4 to 6.8 years of age) and late (age at AR after 6.8 years of age) age at AR tertiles. Subjects in the early age at AR tertile had higher young adult BMI (+8%), whole body fat mass (+34%) and amount of subcutaneous adipose tissue (+61%) than the subjects in the middle and late tertiles (p<0.01). The early age at AR tertile had an increased risk of obesity (Odds Ratio 4.1 [95% CI 1.2-13.9]) compared with the middle and late tertiles. In addition, the early age at AR tertile had Peak Height Velocity (PHV) 7 months earlier than the late tertile. Early age at AR was associated with young adult obesity as a consequence of a high amount of subcutaneous adipose tissue in men. In addition we made the novel observation that early age at AR was associated with an early puberty in men.

  7. Age at Adiposity Rebound Is Associated with Fat Mass in Young Adult Males—The GOOD Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Claes; Lorentzon, Mattias; Norjavaara, Ensio; Kindblom, Jenny M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Age at adiposity rebound (AR) is associated with obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in adults. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of age at AR in adult fat mass, fat distribution and pubertal timing for a Swedish cohort. Patients and Methods This is a retrospective cohort study. Detailed growth charts were retrieved for the men participating in the population-based GOOD (Gothenburg Osteoporosis and Obesity Determinants) study (n = 573). Body composition was analysed using dual X-ray absorptiometry and computed tomography at 18–20 years of age. Age and BMI at AR were calculated using pediatric growth charts and AR was defined as the lowest BMI between 3 and 9 years of age. Results Subjects were divided into early (age at AR below 5.4 years of age), middle (age at AR 5.4 to 6.8 years of age) and late (age at AR after 6.8 years of age) age at AR tertiles. Subjects in the early age at AR tertile had higher young adult BMI (+8%), whole body fat mass (+34%) and amount of subcutaneous adipose tissue (+61%) than the subjects in the middle and late tertiles (p<0.01). The early age at AR tertile had an increased risk of obesity (Odds Ratio 4.1 [95% CI 1.2–13.9]) compared with the middle and late tertiles. In addition, the early age at AR tertile had Peak Height Velocity (PHV) 7 months earlier than the late tertile. Conclusions Early age at AR was associated with young adult obesity as a consequence of a high amount of subcutaneous adipose tissue in men. In addition we made the novel observation that early age at AR was associated with an early puberty in men. PMID:23166661

  8. Effectiveness of the ICare rebound tonometer in patients with overestimated intraocular pressure due to tight orbit syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, You Kyung; Lee, Y K; Lee, Ji Young; Lee, J Y; Moon, Jung Il; Moon, J I; Park, Myoung Hee; Park, M H

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the ICare rebound tonometer in patients with overestimated intraocular pressure (IOP) due to tight orbit syndrome and to identify factors affecting the development of tight orbit syndrome in glaucoma patients. We investigated 84 eyes in 84 glaucoma patients, of which 14 eyes were classified in the tight orbit syndrome group and 70 eyes in the control group. IOP was measured using the ICare tonometer and the Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT). The demographic data, medical histories, ocular histories, and detailed ocular drug histories of the two groups were compared to identify factors contributing to the development of tight orbit syndrome. In the tight orbit syndrome group, the ICare tonometer significantly underestimated the IOP by approximately 8.6 mmHg compared with the GAT. In the control group, the IOP readings of the GAT and the ICare tonometer did not differ significantly. Bland-Altman analysis showed that the mean difference between measurements taken using the GAT and those taken using the ICare tonometer was 2.5 ± 6.3 mmHg. The difference between the GAT and ICare tonometer measurements was greater in the tight orbit syndrome group (8.6 ± 5.3 mmHg) than in the control group (1.3 ± 2.7 mmHg). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that only the use of prostaglandin analogs (PGAs) was associated with the development of tight orbit syndrome. The ICare tonometer is a suitable alternative device for use in patients with tight orbit syndrome in whom the IOP may be overestimated with the GAT. The prolonged use of PGAs is significantly associated with the development of tight orbit syndrome.

  9. The effects of pre-pregnancy BMI and maternal factors on the timing of adiposity rebound in offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Jeannette; Corvalán, Camila; Galleguillos, Bárbara; Kain, Juliana; González, Laura; Uauy, Ricardo; Garmendia, María Luisa; Mericq, Verónica

    2016-06-01

    To assess the effect of pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain (GWG), and other maternal factors on the timing of adiposity rebound (AR). In this study, 594 mothers (mothers who do not have diabetes and not underweight) from the longitudinal Growth and Obesity Chilean Cohort Study self-reported their weights at the beginning and end of their pregnancies, and their heights were measured. Pre-pregnancy BMI was categorized as normal weight, overweight, or obesity, and GWG was assessed according to Institute of Medicine guidelines. For children, weight and height measurements from 0 to 3 years were retrieved from records, and they were measured from age 4 to 7 years. BMI curves from 0 to 7 years were used to estimate the age at AR, which was categorized as early (7 years). The associations between pre-pregnancy BMI and GWG and early AR were tested using logistic regression models. In total, 33% of the mothers had excess pre-pregnancy weight, 31.2% exceeded Institute of Medicine recommendations, and 45% of children had early AR. The pre-pregnancy BMI and parity were associated with earlier AR (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.02-1.11; OR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.74-0.99, respectively), but GWG was unrelated. These results suggest that preventive strategies for promoting normal pre-pregnancy BMI, especially in women's first pregnancies, could delay the timing of AR, with protective metabolic effects on offspring. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  10. Age at adiposity rebound is associated with fat mass in young adult males-the GOOD study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claes Ohlsson

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Age at adiposity rebound (AR is associated with obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in adults. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of age at AR in adult fat mass, fat distribution and pubertal timing for a Swedish cohort. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study. Detailed growth charts were retrieved for the men participating in the population-based GOOD (Gothenburg Osteoporosis and Obesity Determinants study (n=573. Body composition was analysed using dual X-ray absorptiometry and computed tomography at 18-20 years of age. Age and BMI at AR were calculated using pediatric growth charts and AR was defined as the lowest BMI between 3 and 9 years of age. RESULTS: Subjects were divided into early (age at AR below 5.4 years of age, middle (age at AR 5.4 to 6.8 years of age and late (age at AR after 6.8 years of age age at AR tertiles. Subjects in the early age at AR tertile had higher young adult BMI (+8%, whole body fat mass (+34% and amount of subcutaneous adipose tissue (+61% than the subjects in the middle and late tertiles (p<0.01. The early age at AR tertile had an increased risk of obesity (Odds Ratio 4.1 [95% CI 1.2-13.9] compared with the middle and late tertiles. In addition, the early age at AR tertile had Peak Height Velocity (PHV 7 months earlier than the late tertile. CONCLUSIONS: Early age at AR was associated with young adult obesity as a consequence of a high amount of subcutaneous adipose tissue in men. In addition we made the novel observation that early age at AR was associated with an early puberty in men.

  11. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy differentially affects smaller axons in the optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadun, A A; Win, P H; Ross-Cisneros, F N; Walker, S O; Carelli, V

    2000-01-01

    losses of the papillomacular bundle. The present study extends these findings to demonstrate a relative preservation of the M-cells in the optic nerve as reflected by the nerve fiber spectral profile. This selective loss of smaller fibers and their corresponding smaller retinal ganglion cells may, in addition to explaining the clinical features in LHON, provide valuable insights as to the exact pathophysiologic mechanisms by which mitochondrial impairment may induce apoptosis in vulnerable neurons. Images FIGURE 1A FIGURE 1B FIGURE 2A FIGURE 2B FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 4 C FIGURE 4 D FIGURE 4 E FIGURE 4 F PMID:11190025

  12. High- compared to low-arched athletes exhibit smaller knee abduction moments in walking and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Douglas W; Andrews, Samantha; Stickley, Cris; Williams, D S Blaise

    2016-12-01

    High- (HA) and low-arched athletes (LA) experience distinct injury patterns. These injuries are the result of the interaction of structure and biomechanics. A suggested mechanism of patellofemoral pain pertains to frontal plane knee moments which may be exaggerated in LA athletes. We hypothesize that LA athletes will exhibit greater peak knee abduction moments than high-arched athletes. Twenty healthy female recreational athletes (10HA and 10LA) performed five over-ground barefoot walking and five barefoot running trials at a self-selected velocity while three-dimensional kinematics and ground reaction forces were recorded. Peak knee abduction moments and time-to-peak knee abduction moments were calculated using Visual 3D. High-arched athletes had smaller peak knee abduction moments compared to low-arched athletes during walking (KAM1: p=0.019; KAM2: p=0.015) and running (p=0.010). No differences were observed in time-to-peak knee abduction moment during walking (KAM1: p=0.360; KAM2: p=0.085) or running (p=0.359). These findings demonstrate that foot type is associated with altered frontal plane knee kinetics which may contribute to patellofemoral pain. Future research should address the efficacy of clinical interventions including orthotics and rehabilitation programs in these athletes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Effect of Introducing a Smaller and Lighter Basketball on Female Basketball Players’ Shot Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podmenik, Nadja; Leskošek, Bojan; Erčulj, Frane

    2012-01-01

    Our study examined whether the introduction of a smaller and lighter basketball (no. 6) affected the accuracy of female basketball players’ shots at the basket. The International Basketball Federation (FIBA) introduced a size 6 ball in the 2004/2005 season to improve the efficiency and accuracy of technical elements, primarily shots at the basket. The sample for this study included 573 European female basketball players who were members of national teams that had qualified for the senior women’s European championships in 2001, 2003, 2005 and 2007. A size 7 (larger and heavier) basketball was used by 286 players in 1,870 matches, and a size 6 basketball was used by 287 players in 1,966 matches. The players were categorised into three playing positions: guards, forwards and centres. The results revealed that statistically significant changes by year occurred only in terms of the percentage of successful free throws. With the size 6 basketball, this percentage decreased. Statistically significant differences between the playing positions were observed in terms of the percentage of field goals worth three points (between guards and forwards) and two points (between guards and centres). The results show that the introduction of the size 6 basketball did not lead to improvement in shooting accuracy (the opposite was found for free throws), although the number of three-point shots increased. PMID:23486286

  14. Effective Dispersal of Caribbean Reef Fish is Smaller than Current Spacing Among Marine Protected Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, Diana M; Schizas, Nikolaos V; Appeldoorn, Richard S; Prada, Carlos

    2017-07-05

    The oceans are deteriorating at a fast pace. Conservation measures, such as Marine Protected Areas, are being implemented to relieve areas from local stressors and allow populations to restore to natural levels. Successful networks of MPAs operate if the space among MPAs is smaller than the dispersal capacity of the species under protection. We studied connectivity patterns across populations in a series of MPAs in the common yellowhead Jawfish, Opistognathus aurifrons. Using the power of genome-wide variation, we estimated that the maximum effective dispersal is 8.3 km. We found that MPAs exchange migrants likely via intermediate unprotected habitats through stepping stone dispersal. At scales >50 km such connectivity is decreased, particularly across the Mona Passage. The MPA network studied would be unable to maintain connectivity of these small benthic fishes if habitat in between them is extirpated. Our study highlights the power of SNPs to derive effective dispersal distance and the ability of SNPs to make inferences from single individuals. Given that overall reef fish diversity is driven by species with life histories similar to that of the yellowhead jawfish, managers face a challenge to develop strategies that allow connectivity and avoid isolation of populations and their possible extinction.

  15. Independent practice associations and physician-hospital organizations can improve care management for smaller practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Wu, Frances M; Ryan, Andrew M; Copeland, Kennon; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Ramsay, Patricia P; Shortell, Stephen M

    2013-08-01

    Pay-for-performance, public reporting, and accountable care organization programs place pressures on physicians to use health information technology and organized care management processes to improve the care they provide. But physician practices that are not large may lack the resources and size to implement such processes. We used data from a unique national survey of 1,164 practices with fewer than twenty physicians to provide the first information available on the extent to which independent practice associations (IPAs) and physician-hospital organizations (PHOs) might make it possible for these smaller practices to share resources to improve care. Nearly a quarter of the practices participated in an IPA or a PHO that accounted for a significant proportion of their patients. On average, practices participating in these organizations provided nearly three times as many care management processes for patients with chronic conditions as nonparticipating practices did (10.4 versus 3.8). Half of these processes were provided only by IPAs or PHOs. These organizations may provide a way for small and medium-size practices to systematically improve care and participate in accountable care organizations.

  16. High proportion of smaller ranged hummingbird species coincides with ecological specialization across the Americas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín González, Ana M.; Maruyama, Pietro K.; Sandel, Brody; Vizentin-Bugoni, Jeferson; Schleuning, Matthias; Abrahamczyk, Stefan; Alarcón, Ruben; Araujo, Andréa C.; Araújo, Francielle P.; Mendes de Azevedo, Severino; Baquero, Andrea C.; Cotton, Peter A.; Ingversen, Tanja Toftemark; Kohler, Glauco; Lara, Carlos; Guedes Las-Casas, Flor Maria; Machado, Adriana O.; Machado, Caio Graco; Maglianesi, María Alejandra; Moura, Alan Cerqueira; Nogués-Bravo, David; Oliveira, Genilda M.; Oliveira, Paulo E.; Ornelas, Juan Francisco; Rodrigues, Licléia da Cruz; Rosero-Lasprilla, Liliana; Rui, Ana Maria; Sazima, Marlies; Timmermann, Allan; Varassin, Isabela Galarda; Wang, Zhiheng; Watts, Stella; Fjeldså, Jon; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Rahbek, Carsten; Dalsgaard, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Ecological communities that experience stable climate conditions have been speculated to preserve more specialized interspecific associations and have higher proportions of smaller ranged species (SRS). Thus, areas with disproportionally large numbers of SRS are expected to coincide geographically with a high degree of community-level ecological specialization, but this suggestion remains poorly supported with empirical evidence. Here, we analysed data for hummingbird resource specialization, range size, contemporary climate, and Late Quaternary climate stability for 46 hummingbird–plant mutualistic networks distributed across the Americas, representing 130 hummingbird species (ca 40% of all hummingbird species). We demonstrate a positive relationship between the proportion of SRS of hummingbirds and community-level specialization, i.e. the division of the floral niche among coexisting hummingbird species. This relationship remained strong even when accounting for climate, furthermore, the effect of SRS on specialization was far stronger than the effect of specialization on SRS, suggesting that climate largely influences specialization through species' range-size dynamics. Irrespective of the exact mechanism involved, our results indicate that communities consisting of higher proportions of SRS may be vulnerable to disturbance not only because of their small geographical ranges, but also because of their high degree of specialization. PMID:26842573

  17. The effect of introducing a smaller and lighter basketball on female basketball players' shot accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podmenik, Nadja; Leskošek, Bojan; Erčulj, Frane

    2012-03-01

    Our study examined whether the introduction of a smaller and lighter basketball (no. 6) affected the accuracy of female basketball players' shots at the basket. The International Basketball Federation (FIBA) introduced a size 6 ball in the 2004/2005 season to improve the efficiency and accuracy of technical elements, primarily shots at the basket. The sample for this study included 573 European female basketball players who were members of national teams that had qualified for the senior women's European championships in 2001, 2003, 2005 and 2007. A size 7 (larger and heavier) basketball was used by 286 players in 1,870 matches, and a size 6 basketball was used by 287 players in 1,966 matches. The players were categorised into three playing positions: guards, forwards and centres. The results revealed that statistically significant changes by year occurred only in terms of the percentage of successful free throws. With the size 6 basketball, this percentage decreased. Statistically significant differences between the playing positions were observed in terms of the percentage of field goals worth three points (between guards and forwards) and two points (between guards and centres). The results show that the introduction of the size 6 basketball did not lead to improvement in shooting accuracy (the opposite was found for free throws), although the number of three-point shots increased.

  18. High proportion of smaller ranged hummingbird species coincides with ecological specialization across the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonne, Jesper; Martín González, Ana M; Maruyama, Pietro K; Sandel, Brody; Vizentin-Bugoni, Jeferson; Schleuning, Matthias; Abrahamczyk, Stefan; Alarcón, Ruben; Araujo, Andréa C; Araújo, Francielle P; Mendes de Azevedo, Severino; Baquero, Andrea C; Cotton, Peter A; Ingversen, Tanja Toftemark; Kohler, Glauco; Lara, Carlos; Guedes Las-Casas, Flor Maria; Machado, Adriana O; Machado, Caio Graco; Maglianesi, María Alejandra; Moura, Alan Cerqueira; Nogués-Bravo, David; Oliveira, Genilda M; Oliveira, Paulo E; Ornelas, Juan Francisco; Rodrigues, Licléia da Cruz; Rosero-Lasprilla, Liliana; Rui, Ana Maria; Sazima, Marlies; Timmermann, Allan; Varassin, Isabela Galarda; Wang, Zhiheng; Watts, Stella; Fjeldså, Jon; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Rahbek, Carsten; Dalsgaard, Bo

    2016-02-10

    Ecological communities that experience stable climate conditions have been speculated to preserve more specialized interspecific associations and have higher proportions of smaller ranged species (SRS). Thus, areas with disproportionally large numbers of SRS are expected to coincide geographically with a high degree of community-level ecological specialization, but this suggestion remains poorly supported with empirical evidence. Here, we analysed data for hummingbird resource specialization, range size, contemporary climate, and Late Quaternary climate stability for 46 hummingbird-plant mutualistic networks distributed across the Americas, representing 130 hummingbird species (ca 40% of all hummingbird species). We demonstrate a positive relationship between the proportion of SRS of hummingbirds and community-level specialization, i.e. the division of the floral niche among coexisting hummingbird species. This relationship remained strong even when accounting for climate, furthermore, the effect of SRS on specialization was far stronger than the effect of specialization on SRS, suggesting that climate largely influences specialization through species' range-size dynamics. Irrespective of the exact mechanism involved, our results indicate that communities consisting of higher proportions of SRS may be vulnerable to disturbance not only because of their small geographical ranges, but also because of their high degree of specialization. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. (Npro) protein of bovine viral d

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is an economically important pathogen of cattle and sheep, and causes significant respiratory and reproductive disease worldwide. Bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1 (BVDV-1), BVDV-2 along with the border disease virus (BDV) and classical swine fever virus (CSFV) belong to the genus ...

  20. Influence of dendritic cells on viral pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Giulia; Matteucci, Donatella

    2009-07-01

    Although most viral infections cause minor, if any, symptoms, a certain number result in serious illness. Viral disease symptoms result both from direct viral replication within host cells and from indirect immunopathological consequences. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key determinants of viral disease outcome; they activate immune responses during viral infection and direct T cells toward distinct T helper type responses. Certain viruses are able to skew cytokine secretion by DCs inducing and/or downregulating the immune system with the aim of facilitating and prolonging release of progeny. Thus, the interaction of DCs with viruses most often results in the absence of disease or complete recovery when natural functions of DCs prevail, but may lead to chronic illness or death when these functions are outmanoeuvred by viruses in the exploitation of DCs.

  1. Influence of dendritic cells on viral pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Freer

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Although most viral infections cause minor, if any, symptoms, a certain number result in serious illness. Viral disease symptoms result both from direct viral replication within host cells and from indirect immunopathological consequences. Dendritic cells (DCs are key determinants of viral disease outcome; they activate immune responses during viral infection and direct T cells toward distinct T helper type responses. Certain viruses are able to skew cytokine secretion by DCs inducing and/or downregulating the immune system with the aim of facilitating and prolonging release of progeny. Thus, the interaction of DCs with viruses most often results in the absence of disease or complete recovery when natural functions of DCs prevail, but may lead to chronic illness or death when these functions are outmanoeuvred by viruses in the exploitation of DCs.

  2. Origins and challenges of viral dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R; Wang, David

    2017-07-15

    The accurate classification of viral dark matter - metagenomic sequences that originate from viruses but do not align to any reference virus sequences - is one of the major obstacles in comprehensively defining the virome. Depending on the sample, viral dark matter can make up from anywhere between 40 and 90% of sequences. This review focuses on the specific nature of dark matter as it relates to viral sequences. We identify three factors that contribute to the existence of viral dark matter: the divergence and length of virus sequences, the limitations of alignment based classification, and limited representation of viruses in reference sequence databases. We then discuss current methods that have been developed to at least partially circumvent these limitations and thereby reduce the extent of viral dark matter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Itchy fish and viral dermatopathies: sampling, diagnosis, and management of common viral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, E P Scott

    2013-09-01

    Viral dermatopathies of fish bear clinical signs similar to those of dermatopathies from other causes. This article offers an overview to approaching dermatologic presentations in fish, with an emphasis on sampling, diagnosis, and management of viral dermatopathies, building on previous publications. It is vital to recognize clinical signs associated with viral dermatopathies because there are currently no treatments available. Avoidance and prevention is the key to controlling viral diseases in fish. Optimizing husbandry practices and providing appropriate quarantine procedures can help prevent viral disease outbreaks in collection and aquaculture stocks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Filovirus Entry: A Novelty in the Viral Fusion World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Maury

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ebolavirus (EBOV and Marburgvirus (MARV that compose the filovirus family of negative strand RNA viruses infect a broad range of mammalian cells. Recent studies indicate that cellular entry of this family of viruses requires a series of cellular protein interactions and molecular mechanisms, some of which are unique to filoviruses and others are commonly used by all viral glycoproteins. Details of this entry pathway are highlighted here. Virus entry into cells is initiated by the interaction of the viral glycoprotein1 subunit (GP1 with both adherence factors and one or more receptors on the surface of host cells. On epithelial cells, we recently demonstrated that TIM-1 serves as a receptor for this family of viruses, but the cell surface receptors in other cell types remain unidentified. Upon receptor binding, the virus is internalized into endosomes primarily via macropinocytosis, but perhaps by other mechanisms as well. Within the acidified endosome, the heavily glycosylated GP1 is cleaved to a smaller form by the low pH-dependent cellular proteases Cathepsin L and B, exposing residues in the receptor binding site (RBS. Details of the molecular events following cathepsin-dependent trimming of GP1 are currently incomplete; however, the processed GP1 specifically interacts with endosomal/lysosomal membranes that contain the Niemann Pick C1 (NPC1 protein and expression of NPC1 is required for productive infection, suggesting that GP/NPC1 interactions may be an important late step in the entry process. Additional events such as further GP1 processing and/or reducing events may also be required to generate a fusion-ready form of the glycoprotein. Once this has been achieved, sequences in the filovirus GP2 subunit mediate viral/cellular membrane fusion via mechanisms similar to those previously described for other enveloped viruses. This multi-step entry pathway highlights the complex and highly orchestrated path of internalization and fusion that

  5. Birds and Roads: Reduced Transit for Smaller Species over Roads within an Urban Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. Johnson

    2017-05-01

    important role in determining species presence and crossing likelihood. Dense vegetation is known to benefit smaller species due to the provision of foraging resources and shelter from larger, more aggressive species.

  6. Amotivation is associated with smaller ventral striatum volumes in older patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Fervaha, Gagan; Iwata, Yusuke; Plitman, Eric; Chung, Jun Ku; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Mar, Wanna; Gerretsen, Philip; Kim, Julia; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Mulsant, Benoit; Pollock, Bruce; Mamo, David; Remington, Gary; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2017-11-07

    Motivational deficits are prevalent in patients with schizophrenia, persist despite antipsychotic treatment, and predict long-term outcomes. Evidence suggests that patients with greater amotivation have smaller ventral striatum (VS) volumes. We wished to replicate this finding in a sample of older, chronically medicated patients with schizophrenia. Using structural imaging and positron emission tomography, we examined whether amotivation uniquely predicted VS volumes beyond the effects of striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor (D2/3 R) blockade by antipsychotics. Data from 41 older schizophrenia patients (mean age: 60.2 ± 6.7; 11 female) were reanalysed from previously published imaging data. We constructed multivariate linear stepwise regression models with VS volumes as the dependent variable and various sociodemographic and clinical variables as the initial predictors: age, gender, total brain volume, and antipsychotic striatal D2/3 R occupancy. Amotivation was included as a subsequent step to determine any unique relationships with VS volumes beyond the contribution of the covariates. In a reduced sample (n = 36), general cognition was also included as a covariate. Amotivation uniquely explained 8% and 6% of the variance in right and left VS volumes, respectively (right: β = -.38, t = -2.48, P = .01; left: β = -.31, t = -2.17, P = .03). Considering cognition, amotivation levels uniquely explained 9% of the variance in right VS volumes (β = -.43, t = -0.26, P = .03). We replicate and extend the finding of reduced VS volumes with greater amotivation. We demonstrate this relationship uniquely beyond the potential contributions of striatal D2/3 R blockade by antipsychotics. Elucidating the structural correlates of amotivation in schizophrenia may help develop treatments for this presently irremediable deficit. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Depressed suicide attempters have smaller hippocampus than depressed patients without suicide attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Romain; Chupin, Marie; Cury, Claire; Vandendrie, Christophe; Gressier, Florence; Hardy, Patrick; Falissard, Bruno; Colliot, Olivier; Ducreux, Denis; Corruble, Emmanuelle

    2015-02-01

    Despite known relationship between hippocampal volumes and major depressive episodes (MDE) and the increased suicidality in MDE, the links between hippocampal volumes and suicidality remain unclear in major depressive disorders (MDD). If the hippocampus could be a biomarker of suicide attempts in depression, it could be useful for prevention matters. This study assessed the association between hippocampal volumes and suicide attempts in MDD. Hippocampal volumes assessed with automatic segmentation were compared in 63 patients with MDD, with (n = 24) or without (n = 39) suicide attempts. Acute (one month) suicide attempts were studied. Although not different in terms of socio-demographic, MDD and MDE clinical features, suicide attempters had lower total hippocampus volumes than non-attempters (4.61 (± 1.15) cm(3) vs 5.22 (± 0.99) cm(3); w = 625.5; p = 0.03), especially for acute suicide attempts (4.19 (± 0.81) cm(3) vs 5.22 (± 0.99) cm(3); w = 334; p = 0.005), even after adjustment on brain volumes, sex, age, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) scores and MDD duration. A ROC analysis showed that a total hippocampal volume threshold of 5.00 cm(3) had a 98.2% negative predictive value for acute suicide attempts. Depressed suicide attempters have smaller hippocampus than depressed patients without suicide attempts, independently from socio-demographics and MDD characteristics. This difference is related to acute suicide attempts but neither to past suicide attempts nor to duration since the first suicide attempt, suggesting that hippocampal volume could be a suicidal state marker in MDE. Further studies are required to better understand this association. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Changes in anti-viral effectiveness of interferon after dose reduction in chronic hepatitis c patients: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levi-Drummer Rachel S

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High dose interferon induction treatment of hepatitis C viral infection blocks viral production over 95%. Since dose reduction is often performed due to clinical considerations, the effect of dose reduction on hepatitis C virus kinetics was studied. Methods A new model that allowed longitudinal changes in the parameters of viral dynamics was used in a group of genotype-1 patients (N = 15 with dose reduction from 10 to 3 million units of interferon daily in combination with ribavirin, in comparison to a control group (N = 9 with no dose reduction. Results Dose reduction gave rise to a complex viral kinetic pattern, which could be only explained by a decrease in interferon effectiveness in blocking virion production. The benefit of the rapid initial viral decline following the high induction dose is lost after dose reduction. In addition, in some patients also the second phase viral decline slope, which is highly predictive of success of treatment, was impaired by the dose reduction resulting in smaller percentage of viral clearance in the dose reduction group. Conclusions These findings, while explaining the failure of many induction schedules, suggest that for genotype-1 patients induction therapy should be continued till HCVRNA negativity in serum in order to increase the sustained response rate for chronic hepatitis C.

  9. The moving minimum audible angle is smaller during self motion than during source motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Owen eBrimijoin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We are rarely perfectly still: our heads rotate in three axes and move in three dimensions, constantly varying the spectral and binaural cues at the ear drums. In spite of this motion, static sound sources in the world are typically perceived as stable objects. This argues that the auditory system – in a manner not unlike the vestibulo-ocular reflex – works to compensate for self motion and stabilize our sensory representation of the world. We tested a prediction arising from this postulate: that self motion should be processed more accurately than source motion.We used an infrared motion tracking system to measure head angle, and real-time interpolation of head related impulse responses to create head-stabilized signals that appeared to remain fixed in space as the head turned. After being presented with pairs of simultaneous signals consisting of a man and a woman speaking a snippet of speech, normal and hearing impaired listeners were asked to report whether the female voice was to the left or the right of the male voice. In this way we measured the moving minimum audible angle (MMAA. This measurement was made while listeners were asked to turn their heads back and forth between ± 15° and the signals were stabilized in space. After this self-motion condition we measured MMAA in a second source-motion condition when listeners remained still and the virtual locations of the signals were moved using the trajectories from the first condition.For both normal and hearing impaired listeners, we found that the MMAA for signals moving relative to the head was ~1-2° smaller when the movement was the result of self motion than when it was the result of source motion, even though the motion with respect to the head was identical. These results as well as the results of past experiments suggest that spatial processing involves an ongoing and highly accurate comparison of spatial acoustic cues with self-motion cues.

  10. Lumbar spinal canal MRI diameter is smaller in herniated disc cauda equina syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korse, Nina S; Kruit, Mark C; Peul, Wilco C; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A

    2017-01-01

    Correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical features in cauda equina syndrome (CES) is unknown; nor is known whether there are differences in MRI spinal canal size between lumbar herniated disc patients with CES versus lumbar herniated discs patients without CES, operated for sciatica. The aims of this study are 1) evaluating the association of MRI features with clinical presentation and outcome of CES and 2) comparing lumbar spinal canal diameters of lumbar herniated disc patients with CES versus lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated because of sciatica. MRIs of CES patients were assessed for the following features: level of disc lesion, type (uni- or bilateral) and severity of caudal compression. Pre- and postoperative clinical features (micturition dysfunction, defecation dysfunction, altered sensation of the saddle area) were retrieved from the medical files. In addition, anteroposterior (AP) lumbar spinal canal diameters of CES patients were measured at MRI. AP diameters of lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica, were measured for comparison. 48 CES patients were included. At MRI, bilateral compression was seen in 82%; complete caudal compression in 29%. MRI features were not associated with clinical presentation nor outcome. AP diameter was measured for 26 CES patients and for 31 lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica. Comparison displayed a significant smaller AP diameter of the lumbar spinal canal in CES patients (largest p = 0.002). Compared to average diameters in literature, diameters of CES patients were significantly more often below average than that of the sciatica patients (largest p = 0.021). This is the first study demonstrating differences in lumbar spinal canal size between lumbar herniated disc patients with CES and lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica. This finding might imply that lumbar herniated disc patients with a

  11. Lumbar spinal canal MRI diameter is smaller in herniated disc cauda equina syndrome patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina S Korse

    Full Text Available Correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and clinical features in cauda equina syndrome (CES is unknown; nor is known whether there are differences in MRI spinal canal size between lumbar herniated disc patients with CES versus lumbar herniated discs patients without CES, operated for sciatica. The aims of this study are 1 evaluating the association of MRI features with clinical presentation and outcome of CES and 2 comparing lumbar spinal canal diameters of lumbar herniated disc patients with CES versus lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated because of sciatica.MRIs of CES patients were assessed for the following features: level of disc lesion, type (uni- or bilateral and severity of caudal compression. Pre- and postoperative clinical features (micturition dysfunction, defecation dysfunction, altered sensation of the saddle area were retrieved from the medical files. In addition, anteroposterior (AP lumbar spinal canal diameters of CES patients were measured at MRI. AP diameters of lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica, were measured for comparison.48 CES patients were included. At MRI, bilateral compression was seen in 82%; complete caudal compression in 29%. MRI features were not associated with clinical presentation nor outcome. AP diameter was measured for 26 CES patients and for 31 lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica. Comparison displayed a significant smaller AP diameter of the lumbar spinal canal in CES patients (largest p = 0.002. Compared to average diameters in literature, diameters of CES patients were significantly more often below average than that of the sciatica patients (largest p = 0.021.This is the first study demonstrating differences in lumbar spinal canal size between lumbar herniated disc patients with CES and lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica. This finding might imply that lumbar herniated disc patients with

  12. Assembly of viral genomes from metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia L Smits

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Viral infections remain a serious global health issue. Metagenomic approaches are increasingly used in the detection of novel viral pathogens but also to generate complete genomes of uncultivated viruses. In silico identification of complete viral genomes from sequence data would allow rapid phylogenetic characterization of these new viruses. Often, however, complete viral genomes are not recovered, but rather several distinct contigs derived from a single entity, some of which have no sequence homology to any known proteins. De novo assembly of single viruses from a metagenome is challenging, not only because of the lack of a reference genome, but also because of intrapopulation variation and uneven or insufficient coverage. Here we explored different assembly algorithms, remote homology searches, genome-specific sequence motifs, k-mer frequency ranking, and coverage profile binning to detect and obtain viral target genomes from metagenomes. All methods were tested on 454-generated sequencing datasets containing three recently described RNA viruses with a relatively large genome which were divergent to previously known viruses from the viral families Rhabdoviridae and Coronaviridae. Depending on specific characteristics of the target virus and the metagenomic community, different assembly and in silico gap closure strategies were successful in obtaining near complete viral genomes.

  13. Randomised trial of the effect of a gastrin/CCK2 receptor antagonist on esomeprazole-induced hypergastrinaemia: evidence against rebound hyperacidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Malcolm; van den Berg, Frans; Mitchell, Toni; Darwin, Kate; Warrington, Steve

    2017-02-01

    Hypergastrinaemia induced by proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy may cause ECL-cell and parietal-cell hyperplasia and rebound hyperacidity and dyspepsia after PPI withdrawal. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of different dosage-regimens of netazepide, a gastrin/CCK2 receptor antagonist, on PPI-induced hypergastrinaemia and elevated chromogranin A (CgA). Six groups of eight healthy subjects participated in a randomised, double-blind study of esomeprazole 40 mg daily for 28 days, in combination with netazepide 1, 5 or 25 mg or placebo, daily, during the last 14 days of esomeprazole or during 14 days after treatment withdrawal. Fasting serum gastrin and plasma CgA were measured during treatment and after withdrawal, as biomarkers of acid suppression and ECL-cell activity, respectively. Dyspepsia was monitored throughout the study. Esomeprazole increased gastrin and CgA. Netazepide increased gastrin, but not CgA, and inhibited dose dependently the CgA response to esomeprazole. Gastrin and CgA returned to baseline within 2-3 days of esomeprazole withdrawal; netazepide did not shorten that time. There was no rebound dyspepsia after esomeprazole withdrawal. Esomeprazole and netazepide each increase gastrin, consistent with a secondary effect of gastric acid suppression, but by different mechanisms. Esomeprazole-induced hypergastrinaemia stimulates ECL cells and thereby increases CgA. Netazepide-induced hypergastrinaemia does not increase CgA, because netazepide blocks gastrin/CCK2 receptors on ECL cells. Co-administration of netazepide 5 mg abolishes the effect of esomeprazole-induced hypergastrinaemia on ECL cells. The quick return to baseline of gastrin and CgA and absence of dyspepsia after esomeprazole withdrawal do not support the concept of rebound hyperacidity.

  14. A 14-day regimen of esomeprazole 20 mg/day for frequent heartburn: durability of effects, symptomatic rebound, and treatment satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peura, David; Le Moigne, Anne; Pollack, Charles; Nagy, Peter; Lind, Tore

    2016-08-01

    Esomeprazole 20 mg once daily has been shown to be effective for treating frequent heartburn over 14 days in subjects who are likely to self-treat with over-the-counter medications. These analyses were conducted to assess durability of effects and symptomatic rebound after cessation of treatment, treatment satisfaction, and rescue antacid use with esomeprazole 20 mg once daily for 14 days. Adults with frequent heartburn (≥ two days/week in the past four weeks) were randomly assigned to 14 days of double-blind treatment with esomeprazole 20 mg or placebo in two identical multicenter studies. All subjects entered a 1-week single-blind placebo follow-up period after treatment. The results of the primary efficacy endpoints were reported previously. The percentage of heartburn-free days during the 1-week follow-up, use of rescue antacids, and treatment satisfaction, measured with the Global Assessment Questions instrument, are described. The percentage of heartburn-free days was maintained during the 1-week follow-up period; the proportion was 43% among esomeprazole subjects in these studies, suggesting no evidence of symptomatic rebound. Rescue antacid use generally decreased compared with the run-in period in the 14-day treatment and 1-week follow-up periods. Significantly more subjects taking esomeprazole were "very satisfied" or "satisfied" with treatment versus placebo (Study 1: 78% vs. 63%, respectively, P = 0.0038; Study 2: 81% vs. 60%, respectively, P = 0.0002). Subjects who are likely to self-treat their frequent heartburn with over-the-counter medications reported satisfaction with esomeprazole 20 mg. Esomeprazole's treatment effect was maintained for ≥ one week after treatment ended, with no sign of symptomatic rebound. These trials were registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01370525; NCT01370538.

  15. Potential selection effects when estimating associations between the infancy peak or adiposity rebound and later body mass index in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börnhorst, C; Siani, A; Tornaritis, M; Molnár, D; Lissner, L; Regber, S; Reisch, L; De Decker, A; Moreno, L A; Ahrens, W; Pigeot, I

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to evaluate a potential selection effect caused by exclusion of children with non-identifiable infancy peak (IP) and adiposity rebound (AR) when estimating associations between age and body mass index (BMI) at IP and AR and later weight status. In 4744 children with at least 4 repeated measurements of height and weight in the age interval from 0 to 8 years (37 998 measurements) participating in the IDEFICS (Identification and Prevention of Dietary- and Lifestyle-Induced Health Effects in Children and Infants)/I.Family cohort study, fractional polynomial multilevel models were used to derive individual BMI trajectories. Based on these trajectories, age and BMI at IP and AR, BMI values and growth velocities at selected ages as well as the area under the BMI curve were estimated. The BMI growth measures were standardized and related to later BMI z-scores (mean age at outcome assessment: 9.2 years). Age and BMI at IP and AR were not identifiable in 5.4% and 7.8% of the children, respectively. These groups of children showed a significantly higher BMI growth during infancy and childhood. In the remaining sample, BMI at IP correlated almost perfectly (r⩾0.99) with BMI at ages 0.5, 1 and 1.5 years, whereas BMI at AR correlated perfectly with BMI at ages 4-6 years (r⩾0.98). In the total study group, BMI values in infancy and childhood were positively associated with later BMI z-scores where associations increased with age. Associations between BMI velocities and later BMI z-scores were largest at ages 5 and 6 years. Results differed for children with non-identifiable IP and AR, demonstrating a selection effect. IP and AR may not be estimable in children with higher-than-average BMI growth. Excluding these children from analyses may result in a selection bias that distorts effect estimates. BMI values at ages 1 and 5 years might be more appropriate to use as predictors for later weight status instead.

  16. Aberrant development of post-movement beta rebound in adolescents and young adults with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei A. Vakhtin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dependent on maternal (e.g. genetic, age and exposure (frequency, quantity, and timing variables, the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing fetus are known to vary widely, producing a broad range of morphological anomalies and neurocognitive deficits in offspring, referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD. Maternal drinking during pregnancy remains a leading risk factor for the development of intellectual disabilities in the US. While few functional findings exist today that shed light on the mechanisms responsible for the observed impairments in individuals with FASD, animal models consistently report deleterious effects of early alcohol exposure on GABA-ergic inhibitory pathways. The post-motor beta rebound (PMBR, a transient increase of 15–30 Hz beta power in the motor cortex that follows the termination of movement, has been implicated as a neural signature of GABA-ergic inhibitory activity. Further, PMBR has been shown to be a reliable predictor of age in adolescents. The present study sought to investigate any differences in the development of PMBR between FASD and control groups. Beta event-related de-synchronization (ERD and movement-related gamma synchronization (MRGS, although not clearly linked to brain maturation, were also examined. Twenty-two participants with FASD and 22 age and sex-matched controls (12–22 years old underwent magnetoencephalography scans while performing an auditory oddball task, which required a button press in response to select target stimuli. The data surrounding the button presses were localized to the participants' motor cortices, and the time courses from the locations of the maximally evoked PMBR were subjected to wavelet analyses. The subsequent analysis of PMBR, ERD, and MRGS revealed a significant interaction between group and age in their effects on PMBR. While age had a significant effect on PMBR in the controls, no simple effects of age were detected in the FASD

  17. Aberrant development of post-movement beta rebound in adolescents and young adults with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakhtin, Andrei A; Kodituwakku, Piyadasa W; Garcia, Christopher M; Tesche, Claudia D

    2015-01-01

    Dependent on maternal (e.g. genetic, age) and exposure (frequency, quantity, and timing) variables, the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing fetus are known to vary widely, producing a broad range of morphological anomalies and neurocognitive deficits in offspring, referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Maternal drinking during pregnancy remains a leading risk factor for the development of intellectual disabilities in the US. While few functional findings exist today that shed light on the mechanisms responsible for the observed impairments in individuals with FASD, animal models consistently report deleterious effects of early alcohol exposure on GABA-ergic inhibitory pathways. The post-motor beta rebound (PMBR), a transient increase of 15-30 Hz beta power in the motor cortex that follows the termination of movement, has been implicated as a neural signature of GABA-ergic inhibitory activity. Further, PMBR has been shown to be a reliable predictor of age in adolescents. The present study sought to investigate any differences in the development of PMBR between FASD and control groups. Beta event-related de-synchronization (ERD) and movement-related gamma synchronization (MRGS), although not clearly linked to brain maturation, were also examined. Twenty-two participants with FASD and 22 age and sex-matched controls (12-22 years old) underwent magnetoencephalography scans while performing an auditory oddball task, which required a button press in response to select target stimuli. The data surrounding the button presses were localized to the participants' motor cortices, and the time courses from the locations of the maximally evoked PMBR were subjected to wavelet analyses. The subsequent analysis of PMBR, ERD, and MRGS revealed a significant interaction between group and age in their effects on PMBR. While age had a significant effect on PMBR in the controls, no simple effects of age were detected in the FASD group. The FASD group

  18. A theoretical study into a trans-dioxo Mn(V) porphyrin complex that does not follow the oxygen rebound mechanism in C-H bond activation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung-Bin; Nam, Wonwoo

    2016-01-18

    Previous experimental results revealed that the C-H bond activation reaction by a synthetic trans-dioxo Mn(V) porphyrin complex, [(TF4TMAP)OMn(V)O](3+), does not occur via the well-known oxygen rebound mechanism, which has been well demonstrated in Fe(IV)O porphyrin π-cation radical reactions. In the present study, theoretical calculations offer an explanation through the energetics involved in the C-H bond activation reaction, where a multi-spin state scenario cannot be excluded.

  19. Vaccines in the Prevention of Viral Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Clementine S; Jha, Akhilesh; Openshaw, Peter J M

    2017-03-01

    Pneumonia is of great global public health importance. Viral infections play both direct and indirect parts in its cause across the globe. Influenza is a leading cause of viral pneumonia in both children and adults, and respiratory syncytial virus is increasingly recognized as causing disease at both extremes of age. Vaccination offers the best prospect for prevention but current influenza vaccines do not provide universal and durable protection, and require yearly reformulation. In the future, it is hoped that influenza vaccines will give better and universal protection, and that new vaccines can be found for other causes of viral pneumonia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluating viral marketing: isolating the key criteria in insurance industry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maria Gooyandeh Hagh

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical investigation to determine the key criteria that viral marketing practitioners believe should be implemented to measure about the success of viral marketing campaigns...

  1. EXPERIMENTAL LIPOSOMAL VIRAL VACCINE SAFETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanova OA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. With the transport links development there is rather important issue respiratory viral infections spread, especially influenza. The only method controlling influenza is vaccination. Search and development effective and safe vaccines is important. Material and methods. In base SO "Mechnikov Institute Microbiology and Immunology National Ukrainian Academy Medical Sciences" in the scientific theme "Developing new approaches to creating viral vaccines and study specific activity depending of type and degree component`s modification" was created several experimental influenza vaccine with subsequent component`s modification for selecting the most optimal pattern of safety and immunogenicity. In assessing the influenza vaccine safety is using a few criteria, including, reactivity, as measured by the frequency of local and systemic adverse (negative effects, which due to its introduction, and for lipid content drugs, ability to influence oxidation processes. At present study phase was determined: a systemic reaction and local reaction of delayed-type hypersensitivity (foot pad swelling assay;b lipids and proteins peroxidation processes after administration officinal and experimental vaccines (content protein’s carbonyl groups, lipid’s hydroperoxides, activity of glutathione-peroxidase.Study objects were trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine, "Vaxigrip" (Sanofi Pasteur, S.A., France, "Inflexal V" (Biotech Ltd. Berne, Switzerland and experimental vaccine samples. Highest immunogenicity vaccines had undergone improvements and modifications using adjuvant systems and acylation influenza proteins. Liposomes 2 – the experimental influenza vaccine with a liposome negative charge and antigenic composition like split vaccines "Vaksihryp". Liposomes 2.1 - the adjuvantexperimental influenza vaccine with modifications liposomal components (etoniy and chlorophyllipt molecules embedded in liposomal membrane. Liposomes 2.2 - the adjuvant

  2. Harvey, Mark S. (2003: Catalogue of the smaller arachnid orders of the world: Amblypygi, Uropygi, Schizomida, Palpigradi, Ricinulei and Solifugae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blick, Theo

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available book review: Harvey Mark S. (2003: Catalogue of the smaller arachnid orders of the world: Amblypygi, Uropygi, Schizomida, Palpigradi, Ricinulei and Solifugae. Includes checklists for Europe of: Amblypygi, Uropygi, Schizomida, Palpigradi, Solifugae.

  3. Viral fitness: definitions, measurement, and current insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargo, Andrew R.; Kurath, Gael

    2012-01-01

    Viral fitness is an active area of research, with recent work involving an expanded number of human, non-human vertebrate, invertebrate, plant, and bacterial viruses. Many publications deal with RNA viruses associated with major disease emergence events, such as HIV-1, influenza virus, and Dengue virus. Study topics include drug resistance, immune escape, viral emergence, host jumps, mutation effects, quasispecies diversity, and mathematical models of viral fitness. Important recent trends include increasing use of in vivo systems to assess vertebrate virus fitness, and a broadening of research beyond replicative fitness to also investigate transmission fitness and epidemiologic fitness. This is essential for a more integrated understanding of overall viral fitness, with implications for disease management in the future.

  4. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) - 2014.In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals 1,000 cases but...

  5. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  6. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) C

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) C - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  7. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  8. CHOLESTASIS IN ACUTE AND CHRONIC VIRAL HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Uchaikin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We observed 43 patients with cholestasis (21 — with acute viral hepatitis A and B and 22 — with chronic viral hepatitis B and C. Etiological diagnosis was based on the identification of specific markers of the spectrum. These 43 patients in addition to basic therapy ursodeoxycholic acid as a drug Ursosan of company «PRO.MED.CS Praha a.s.» (CzechRepublic. The control group consisted of 17 patients with acute viral hepatitis. Clinical signs are jaundice and itching of the skin, abdominal pain, significant hepatomegaly. Serum bilirubin level rises due to the conjugated fraction, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase. When ultrasound revealed dilated bile ducts in the liver parenchyma, reactive edema of the gallbladder wall, signs gipomotornoy dyskinesia. Appointment ursosan in acute and chronic viral hepatitis occurring with cholestasis leads to the clinical and biochemical effects, and has a beneficial effect on the state of the liver and gall bladder.

  9. Characterization of the viral O-glycopeptidome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cló, Emiliano; Kracun, Stjepan K; Nudelman, Aaron S

    2012-01-01

    also lead to aberrant glycosylation that may elicit immunity. Our knowledge of immunity to aberrant viral glycans and glycoproteins is limited, potentially due to technical limitations in identifying immunogenic glycans and glycopeptide epitopes. This work describes three different complementary...

  10. [Pediatrics. New treatment options for viral bronchiolitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, I; Hafen, G

    2013-01-16

    The combination of nebulized epinephrine and high dose dexamethasone, or nebulized hypertonic saline, are promising new therapeutic strategies for viral bronchiolitis in the young infant. However, further research is needed before a general recommendation can be given.

  11. Drug Use and Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Viral) HIV/AIDS Mental Health Military Opioid Overdose Reversal with Naloxone (Narcan, Evzio) Pain Prevention Recovery Substance ... as sharing drug-use equipment and having unprotected sex, which can lead to these infections. Getting treatment. ...

  12. transfusion transmissible viral infections among potential blood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    Key words: Transfusion Transmissible Infections, HIV, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, Blood Donors,. University College Hospital (UCH), ELISA. INTRODUCTION. The most common diseases transmitted in blood transfusions are viral infections. Transfusion- transmissible infectious agents such as human immunodeficiency virus ...

  13. Viruses, anti-viral therapy, and viral vaccines in children with immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elalfy, Mohsen S; Nugent, Diane

    2016-04-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) might be preceded by silent or overt viral infections. Similarly, anti-viral drugs and viral vaccines could also trigger ITP and might play a central role in its pathogenesis. The seasonal nature of childhood ITP suggests that viral infections might initiate immune responses that increase the predisposition and occurrence of ITP. Active cytomegalovirus or Epstein-Barr virus should be considered in differential diagnosis when thrombocytopenia is associated with lymphadenopathy, especially with splenomegaly. This review will focus on the specific association of ITP in association with viral disease and vaccinations, and will discuss the effectiveness of current therapies in light of our current understanding of viral-associated ITP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Liver hemosiderosis study in chronic viral hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocariu, Camelia; Trifan, Anca; Mihailovici, Maria Sultana; Danciu, M; Stanciu, C

    2008-01-01

    In chronic viral hepatitis the histopathological exam can reveal the presence of liver iron deposits in 10 to 73% of patients. Iron deposits are usually found in Kupffer cells, in endothelial cells and portal macrophages, and extremely rarely in hepatocytes. To evaluate the incidence of hepatic hemosiderosis in chronic viral hepatitis. 549 morphopathological features of liver biopsy specimens performed in the Gastroenterology and Hepatology Institute IaSi, between January 1 2003 and December 31 2007 have been analyzed. Semiquantitative assessment of the degree of hepatic iron overload was performed and the localization of haemosiderin deposits: at the level of hepatocytes, the reticuloendothelial system or mixedly. The same anatomopathologist examined the blades and interpreted the results. The medium age of patients who underwent liver biopsy was 45.08 years +/- 10.045. Positive iron staining was found in 22.8% of cases, more frequently in males (31%), and in 91.82% of cases iron deposits were grade 1-2. The association of alcoholic etiology did not influence the incidence of hemosiderosis: 23% in patients with hepatitis and no ethanol exposure vs 25% in cases of strictly viral etiology. Deposits of haemosiderin were more frequent in viral hepatitis B (38.6%) than in viral hepatitis C (26.9%). In 34% of cases stainable iron was found only in reticuloendothelial system and in 46% of cases both in Kupffer cells and hepatocytes. Almost a quarter of chronic viral hepatitis cases are associated with liver deposits of haemosiderin, with features of secondary iron overload (deposits localized in the mesenchymal areas or mixedly). There is a higher risk of hemosiderosis in men, especially for those between 30 and 50. Liver iron overload levels in chronic viral hepatitis are, in most cases, low or medium, and the association with an alcoholic etiology does not influence the incidence of hemosiderosis in chronic viral hepatitis.

  15. Institute of Medicine's Report on Viral Hepatitis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-05-18

    In this podcast, Dr. John Ward, Director of CDC’s Division of Viral Hepatitis, discusses the 2010 report, Hepatitis and Liver Cancer: A National Strategy for Prevention and Control of Hepatitis B and C, from the Institute of Medicine.  Created: 5/18/2010 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 5/18/2010.

  16. Viral Oncolytic Therapeutics for Neoplastic Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0387 TITLE: Viral Oncolytic Therapeutics for Neoplastic Meningitis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mikhail Papisov, PhD...SUBTITLE Viral Oncolytic Therapeutics for Neoplastic Meningitis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0387 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR...for neoplastic meningitis ( meningeal metastasis of breast cancer). The proposed therapy will be based on direct (intrathecal) administration of

  17. Bacterial and Viral Fish Diseases in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Öztürk, Rafet Çagrı; Altınok, İlhan

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the state of knowledge about the major bacterial and viral pathogens of fish found in Turkey. It also considers diseases prevention and treatment. In this study, peer reviewed scientific articles, theses and dissertations, symposium proceedings, government records as well as recent books, which published between 1976 and 2013 were used as a source to compile dispersed literature. Bacterial and viral disease problems were investigated during this period in Turkey. Total ...

  18. Rapid and highly fieldable viral diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKnight, Timothy E.

    2016-12-20

    The present invention relates to a rapid, highly fieldable, nearly reagentless diagnostic to identify active RNA viral replication in a live, infected cells, and more particularly in leukocytes and tissue samples (including biopsies and nasal swabs) using an array of a plurality of vertically-aligned nanostructures that impale the cells and introduce a DNA reporter construct that is expressed and amplified in the presence of active viral replication.

  19. Viral Metagenomics: MetaView Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C; Smith, J

    2007-10-22

    The purpose of this report is to design and develop a tool for analysis of raw sequence read data from viral metagenomics experiments. The tool should compare read sequences of known viral nucleic acid sequence data and enable a user to attempt to determine, with some degree of confidence, what virus groups may be present in the sample. This project was conducted in two phases. In phase 1 we surveyed the literature and examined existing metagenomics tools to educate ourselves and to more precisely define the problem of analyzing raw read data from viral metagenomic experiments. In phase 2 we devised an approach and built a prototype code and database. This code takes viral metagenomic read data in fasta format as input and accesses all complete viral genomes from Kpath for sequence comparison. The system executes at the UNIX command line, producing output that is stored in an Oracle relational database. We provide here a description of the approach we came up with for handling un-assembled, short read data sets from viral metagenomics experiments. We include a discussion of the current MetaView code capabilities and additional functionality that we believe should be added, should additional funding be acquired to continue the work.

  20. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morinet, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.morinet@sls.aphp.fr [Centre des Innovations Thérapeutiques en Oncologie et Hématologie (CITOH), CHU Saint-Louis, Paris (France); Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité Paris, Paris (France); Casetti, Luana [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); Laboratoire d' Hématologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, Boulogne (France); Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin en Yvelynes, Versailles (France); Pillet, Sylvie [Laboratoire de Bactériologie-Virologie-Hygiène, CHU de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne (France); Université de Lyon et Université de Saint-Etienne, Jean Monnet, GIMAP EA3064, F-42023 Saint-Etienne, Lyon (France)

    2013-09-15

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition. - Highlights: • Oxygen tension level regulates viral replication in vitro and possibly in vivo. • Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α) is the principal factor involved in Oxygen tension level. • HIF-1α upregulates gene expression for example of HIV, JC and Kaposi sarcoma viruses. • In addition to classical chemotherapy inhibition of HIF-1α may constitute a new track to treat human viral infections.

  1. Bioinformatics tools for analysing viral genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, R J; Gu, Q; Hughes, J; Maabar, M; Modha, S; Vattipally, S B; Wilkie, G S; Davison, A J

    2016-04-01

    The field of viral genomics and bioinformatics is experiencing a strong resurgence due to high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technology, which enables the rapid and cost-effective sequencing and subsequent assembly of large numbers of viral genomes. In addition, the unprecedented power of HTS technologies has enabled the analysis of intra-host viral diversity and quasispecies dynamics in relation to important biological questions on viral transmission, vaccine resistance and host jumping. HTS also enables the rapid identification of both known and potentially new viruses from field and clinical samples, thus adding new tools to the fields of viral discovery and metagenomics. Bioinformatics has been central to the rise of HTS applications because new algorithms and software tools are continually needed to process and analyse the large, complex datasets generated in this rapidly evolving area. In this paper, the authors give a brief overview of the main bioinformatics tools available for viral genomic research, with a particular emphasis on HTS technologies and their main applications. They summarise the major steps in various HTS analyses, starting with quality control of raw reads and encompassing activities ranging from consensus and de novo genome assembly to variant calling and metagenomics, as well as RNA sequencing.

  2. Generating viral metagenomes from the coral holobiont

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Dawn Weynberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Reef-building corals comprise multipartite symbioses where the cnidarian animal is host to an array of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and the viruses that infect them. These viruses are critical elements of the coral holobiont, serving not only as agents of mortality, but also as potential vectors for lateral gene flow, and as elements encoding a variety of auxiliary metabolic functions. Consequently, understanding the functioning and health of the coral holobiont requires detailed knowledge of the associated viral assemblage and its function. Currently, the most tractable way of uncovering viral diversity and function is through metagenomic approaches, which is inherently difficult in corals because of the complex holobiont community, an extracellular mucus layer that all corals secrete, and the variety of sizes and structures of nucleic acids found in viruses. Here we present the first protocol for isolating, purifying and amplifying viral nucleic acids from corals based on mechanical disruption of cells. This method produces at least 50% higher yields of viral nucleic acids, has very low levels of cellular sequence contamination and captures wider viral diversity than previously used chemical-based extraction methods. We demonstrate that our mechanical-based method profiles a greater diversity of DNA and RNA genomes, including virus groups such as Retro-transcribing and ssRNA viruses, which are absent from metagenomes generated via chemical-based methods. In addition, we briefly present (and make publically available the first paired DNA and RNA viral metagenomes from the coral Acropora tenuis.

  3. Application of space geodetic techniques for the determination of intraplate deformations and movements in relation with the postglacial rebound of Fennoscandia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherneck, H.G.; Johansson, J.M.; Elgered, G. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Onsala Space Observatory

    1996-04-01

    This report introduces into space geodetic measurements of relative positions over distances ranging from tens to thousands of kilometers. Such measurements can routinely be carried out with repeatabilities on the order of a few millimeters. The techniques presented are Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), employing observations of radio-astronomical objects in the distant universe, and ranging measurements to satellites of the GPS, the Global Positioning System. These techniques have helped to trace plate tectonic motions. More recently, deformations within continents have been detected. We present the SWEPOS system of permanently operating GPS stations as one of the major geoscience investments starting in 1993. BIFROST (Baseline Interference for Fennoscandian Rebound Observations, Sea level, and Tectonics) is a project within SWEPOS with main purpose to detect crustal movements in Fennoscandia. First results are presented, indicating movements which generally support the notion of a dominating displacement pattern due to the postglacial rebound of Fennoscandia. However deviations exist. densification is indicated in those areas which are notable for an increased seismicity. 148 refs.

  4. Age at adiposity rebound and body mass index trajectory from early childhood to adolescence; differences by breastfeeding and maternal immigration background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besharat Pour, M; Bergström, A; Bottai, M; Magnusson, J; Kull, I; Moradi, T

    2017-02-01

    This paper aims to assess association between breastfeeding and maternal immigration background and body mass index development trajectories from age 2 to 16 years. A cohort of children born in Stockholm during 1994 to 1996 was followed from age 2 to 16 years with repeated measurement of height and weight at eight time points (n = 2278). Children were categorized into groups by breastfeeding status during the first 6 months of life and maternal immigration background. Body mass index (BMI) trajectories and age at adiposity rebound were estimated using mixed-effects linear models. Body mass index trajectories were different by breastfeeding and maternal immigration status (P-value immigrant mothers followed a lower BMI trajectory. Ages at adiposity rebound were earlier for higher BMI trajectories regardless of maternal immigration background. Differences in BMI trajectories between offspring of immigrant and of Swedish mothers suggest a lack of beneficial association between breastfeeding and long-term BMI development among children of immigrant mothers. Given the relation between long-term BMI development and risk of overweight/obesity, these differences challenge the notion that exclusive breastfeeding is always beneficial for children's BMI development and subsequent risk of overweight/obesity. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  5. Viral infection and host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, W A; De Clercq, E

    1974-12-27

    Double-stranded RNA, made as an intermediary substance in the replication of most, if not all, viruses, may play a much more important role in the pathogenesis and the recovery from virus infections than has hitherto been suspected. Apparently, dsRNA is used by both the challenge virus and the host cell in an attempt to gain "molecular control." Double-stranded RNA exerts a set of effects, which may be well balanced, not only at the level of the individual cell but also at the complex assemblage of these cells termed the organism (Fig. 1). In the cell, interferon synthesis is triggered, although interferon mRNA translation may not occur if dsRNA shuts off protein synthesis too quickly. In the whole organism, the disease severity will depend on how certain toxic reactions evoked by infection (such as cell necrosis and fever) are counterbalanced by an increase in the host defense mechanisms (for example, immune responsiveness and interferon production). Many aspects of the response, relating to either progress of, or recovery from, the disease, can be explained on the basis of a dsRNA. In addition to drawing attention to the biodynamic role of dsRNA, our hypothesis suggests specific experimental vectors designed to enhance our information on the molecular basis of the morbid process which occurs with viral infection. Finally, we suggest that, although the dsRNA molecule may be viewed as a rather simple unit structure, the opportunity for further diversity in the biological activity of a given dsRNA molecule always exists. Namely, each deviation from a perfectly double-helical arrangement introduces the possibility for emphasizing one biological reactivity at the expense of another. This latter structure-activity property may partially account for the extreme apparent diversity, commonly encountered, in the presentations of virologic illness. Appendix note added in proof. Subsequent to submission of this text, we have found that the potent mitogen effect of dsRNA for

  6. Molecular piracy: the viral link to carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaitz, C M; Hicks, M J

    1998-11-01

    The vast majority of the human experience with viral infections is associated with acute symptoms, such as malaise, fever, chills, rhinitis and diarrhea. With this acute or lytic phase, the immune system mounts a response and eliminates the viral agent while acquiring antibodies to that specific viral subtype. With latent or chronic infections, the viral agent becomes incorporated into the human genome. Viral agents capable of integration into the host's genetic material are particularly dangerous and may commandeer the host's ability to regulate normal cell growth and proliferation. The oncogenic viruses may immortalize the host cell, and facilitate malignant transformation. Cell growth and proliferation may be enhanced by viral interference with tumor suppressor gene function (p53 and pRb). Viruses may act as vectors for mutated proto-oncogenes (oncogenes). Overexpression of these oncogenes in viral-infected cells interferes with normal cell function and allows unregulated cell growth and proliferation, which may lead to malignant transformation and tumour formation. Development of oral neoplasms, both benign and malignant, has been linked to several viruses. Epstein-Barr virus is associated with oral hairy leukoplakia, lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoepithelial carcinoma, B-cell lymphomas, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Human herpesvirus-8 has been implicated in all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphomas, multiple myeloma, angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy, and Castleman's disease. Human herpesvirus-6 has been detected in lymphoproliferative disease, lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. The role of human papillomavirus in benign (squamous papilloma, focal epithelial hyperplasia, condyloma acuminatum, verruca vulgaris), premalignant (oral epithelial dysplasia), and malignant (squamous cell carcinoma) neoplasms within the oral cavity is well recognized. Herpes simplex virus may participate as a cofactor in oral squamous

  7. Lactoferrin for prevention of common viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Oda, Hirotsugu; Yamauchi, Koji; Abe, Fumiaki

    2014-11-01

    Although lactoferrin has many biological functions, the host-protective effects against pathogenic microorganisms including bacteria, fungi, and viruses are regarded as one of the most important. Here, we review research on the protective role of lactoferrin administration against common viral infections. Many studies have shown the in vitro antiviral activity of lactoferrin against viral pathogens that cause common infections such as the common cold, influenza, gastroenteritis, summer cold, and herpes, where lactoferrin inhibits mainly viral attachment to the target cells. Recently, studies indicating the in vivo protective effects of lactoferrin by oral administration against common viral infections have been increasing. For instance, norovirus is an extremely important emerging human pathogen that causes a majority of gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide that may be a target candidate for lactoferrin. Lactoferrin consumption reduced the incidence of noroviral gastroenteritis in children and a similar effect was observed in a wide range of ages in a preliminary survey. A recent in vitro study reported that lactoferrin inhibits both cellular attachment of the murine norovirus, a virus closely-related to the human norovirus, and viral replication in the cells by inducing antiviral cytokines interferon (IFN)-α/β. Lactoferrin administration also enhances NK cell activity and Th1 cytokine responses, which lead to protection against viral infections. In conclusion, lactoferrin consumption may protect the host from viral infections through inhibiting the attachment of a virus to the cells, replication of the virus in the cells, and enhancement of systemic immune functions. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. APLASTIC ANEMIA AND VIRAL HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cudillo

    2009-11-01

    target organ of the immune  response is the liver as suggested by the time interval between hepatitis and the onset of bone marrow failure.

    Liver histology is characterized by T cell infiltrating the parenchyma as reported in acute hepatitis.

    Recently in HAA it has been demonstrated intrahepatic  and blood lymphocytes with  T cell repertoire similar to that of confirmed viral acute hepatitis. The expanded T cell clones return to a normal distribution after response to immunosuppressive treatment, suggesting the antigen or T cell clearance. Therapeutic options are the same as acquired aplastic anemia.

  9. Hepatic sarcoidosis complicating treatment-naive viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Aravinthan, Aloysious; Gelson, William; Limbu, Anita; Brais, Rebecca; Richardson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic sarcoidosis is usually asymptomatic but rarely leads to adverse liver-related outcome. Co-existence of viral hepatitis and hepatic sarcoidosis is a rare, but recognised phenomenon. Obtaining a balance between immune suppression and anti-viral therapy may be problematic. Immunosuppression in the presence of viral hepatitis can lead to rapid deterioration of liver disease. Similarly, anti-viral therapy may exacerbate granulomatous hepatitis. Here we present two cases of viral hepatitis ...

  10. Viral Hepatitis and Liver Cancer on the Island of Guam

    OpenAIRE

    Haddock, RL; Paulino, YC; Bordallo, R

    2013-01-01

    Patient records from the Guam Cancer Registry were compared with patients listed in a health department viral hepatitis case registry. The number of liver cancer and viral hepatitis cases were compared by ethnicity. Hepatitis C was the form of viral hepatitis most common among liver cancer cases on Guam (63.3% of viral hepatitis-associated liver cancer cases). Since viral hepatitis is an important cause of liver cancer, studies such as the present one may provide the information necessary to ...

  11. Molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Haddad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses have made their mark on the cancer world as a potential therapeutic option, with the possible advantages of reduced side effects and strengthened treatment efficacy due to higher tumor selectivity. Results have been so promising, that oncolytic viral treatments have now been approved for clinical trials in several countries. However, clinical studies may benefit from the ability to noninvasively and serially identify sites of viral targeting via molecular imaging in order to provide safety, efficacy, and toxicity information. Furthermore, molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy may provide a more sensitive and specific diagnostic technique to detect tumor origin and, more importantly, presence of metastases. Several strategies have been investigated for molecular imaging of viral replication broadly categorized into optical and deep tissue imaging, utilizing several reporter genes encoding for fluorescence proteins, conditional enzymes, and membrane protein and transporters. Various imaging methods facilitate molecular imaging, including computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, gamma-scintigraphy, and photoacoustic imaging. In addition, several molecular probes are used for medical imaging, which act as targeting moieties or signaling agents. This review will explore the preclinical and clinical use of in vivo molecular imaging of replication-competent oncolytic viral therapy.

  12. View and review on viral oncology research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parolin Cristina

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To date, almost one and a half million cases of cancer are diagnosed every year in the US and nearly 560,000 Americans are expected to die of cancer in the current year, more than 1,500 people a day (data from the American Cancer Society at http://www.cancer.org/. According to the World Health Organization (WHO, roughly 20% of all cancers worldwide results from chronic infections; in particular, up to 15% of human cancers is characterized by a viral aetiology with higher incidence in Developing Countries. The link between viruses and cancer was one of the pivotal discoveries in cancer research during the past Century. Indeed, the infectious nature of specific tumors has important implications in terms of their prevention, diagnosis, and therapy. In the 21st Century, the research on viral oncology field continues to be vigorous, with new significant and original studies on viral oncogenesis and translational research from basic virology to treatment of cancer. This review will cover different viral oncology aspects, starting from the history of viral oncology and moving to the peculiar features of oncogenic RNA and DNA viruses, with a special focus on human pathogens.

  13. Pediatric Viral Exanthema: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Jafar Saffar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Context Many diseases caused by viral agents are associated with fever and cutaneous manifestations. Viral exanthema is a widespread nonspecific skin rash, commonly characterized by generalized eruption of erythematous macules and papular lesions. Although these rashes are mostly benign and self-limited, some may be serious and life-threatening. Differentiation between severe and benign types is clinically important and life-saving. Evidence Acquisition In this narrative review, electronic databases, including Google Scholar, Science Direct, PubMed (including Medline, Web of Science, Scientific Information Database, and Scopus, were searched. We conducted a narrative review of papers published on pediatric viral exanthema during 2000 - 2016. The used keywords included “viral exanthema”, “fever”, and “skin rash”. Articles on skin rash, caused by drug reactions or nonviral exanthema, were excluded. Results Different viral agents can cause different types of skin reactions. Cutaneous manifestations and skin rashes can be categorized, based on the form of the rash (macular, papular, vesicular, blistery, petechial, and purpuric or the general term, which denotes illnesses such as measles-like morbilliform rash, rubella or rubelliform rash, and scarlatiniform rash, a scarlet-fever like infection. Conclusions Based on the findings, a systematic approach relying on accurate history-taking and analysis of epidemiological cues and rash characteristics is of great significance.

  14. Viral vector-based influenza vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Rory D.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antigenic drift of seasonal influenza viruses and the occasional introduction of influenza viruses of novel subtypes into the human population complicate the timely production of effective vaccines that antigenically match the virus strains that cause epidemic or pandemic outbreaks. The development of game-changing vaccines that induce broadly protective immunity against a wide variety of influenza viruses is an unmet need, in which recombinant viral vectors may provide. Use of viral vectors allows the delivery of any influenza virus antigen, or derivative thereof, to the immune system, resulting in the optimal induction of virus-specific B- and T-cell responses against this antigen of choice. This systematic review discusses results obtained with vectored influenza virus vaccines and advantages and disadvantages of the currently available viral vectors. PMID:27455345

  15. Shedding new light on viral photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puxty, Richard J; Millard, Andrew D; Evans, David J; Scanlan, David J

    2015-10-01

    Viruses infecting the environmentally important marine cyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus encode 'auxiliary metabolic genes' (AMGs) involved in the light and dark reactions of photosynthesis. Here, we discuss progress on the inventory of such AMGs in the ever-increasing number of viral genome sequences as well as in metagenomic datasets. We contextualise these gene acquisitions with reference to a hypothesised fitness gain to the phage. We also report new evidence with regard to the sequence and predicted structural properties of viral petE genes encoding the soluble electron carrier plastocyanin. Viral copies of PetE exhibit extensive modifications to the N-terminal signal peptide and possess several novel residues in a region responsible for interaction with redox partners. We also highlight potential knowledge gaps in this field and discuss future opportunities to discover novel phage-host interactions involved in the photosynthetic process.

  16. V-GAP: Viral genome assembly pipeline

    KAUST Repository

    Nakamura, Yoji

    2015-10-22

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have allowed the rapid determination of the complete genomes of many organisms. Although shotgun sequences from large genome organisms are still difficult to reconstruct perfect contigs each of which represents a full chromosome, those from small genomes have been assembled successfully into a very small number of contigs. In this study, we show that shotgun reads from phage genomes can be reconstructed into a single contig by controlling the number of read sequences used in de novo assembly. We have developed a pipeline to assemble small viral genomes with good reliability using a resampling method from shotgun data. This pipeline, named V-GAP (Viral Genome Assembly Pipeline), will contribute to the rapid genome typing of viruses, which are highly divergent, and thus will meet the increasing need for viral genome comparisons in metagenomic studies.

  17. [Promotion of Porphyromonas gingivalis to viral disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiantian, Meng; Xin, Li

    2016-08-01

    Chronic periodontitis is one of the most common oral diseases in humans, the main recognized pathogenic bac-terium of which is the Porphyromonas gingivalis. Various types of viruses have been detected in periodontal disease in situ, and the joint action of viral and bacterial pathogens infection mechanism are complicated. Porphyromonas gingivalis has the characteristics resulting from the interaction with a variety of bacterium viruses, which may be the reason for chronic perio-dontitis being a protracted disease associated with a variety of systemic diseases. In this paper, we reviewed the relationship between Porphyromonas gingivalis and viral diseases to provide a new idea for the treatment of patients with periodontal disease and viral infections.

  18. Cochrane Corner: Corticosteroids for viral myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Daniel; Lopes, Luís R; Vaz-Carneiro, António; Costa, João

    2015-01-01

    The causes of myocarditis are diverse, but a viral etiology is the most common. In this systematic review by the Cochrane Collaboration, the authors assessed the efficacy of corticosteroid therapy in patients with viral myocarditis. Eight randomized controlled trials with 719 patients (two trials in pediatric populations) were included for analysis. Pooled results did not show significant differences in mortality with the use of corticosteroids. Patients on corticosteroid therapy had significantly higher post-treatment left ventricular ejection fraction values compared to control. These results are limited by the significant heterogeneity associated with clinical trials. The best available evidence does not support the routine use of corticosteroids in patients with viral myocarditis. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Hepatitis viral load correlates to glutathione levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Several recent scientific articles have found a direct correlation between Glutathione levels and viral activity for hepatitis B and C. When viral load increases, Glutathione decreases. Researchers from Germany report that adding NAC (N-acetyl cysteine) to HBV producing cells lines can reduce hepatitis viral load 50 fold. Glutathione is used by the liver to help break down toxins. Patients who have chronic infection for more than 90 days should ask their physicians to check their Glutathione levels. A test kit is available from ImmunoSciences Labs; contact information is included. An amino acid, L-Glutamine, can be used with Alpha Lipoic Acid and NAC to increase Glutathione levels. Chlorophyll also offers benefits to people with hepatitis and other infections. Instructions on how to use a special retention enema containing chlorophyll, water, and apple cider vinegar are provided.

  20. IFITM proteins restrict viral membrane hemifusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM protein family represents a new class of cellular restriction factors that block early stages of viral replication; the underlying mechanism is currently not known. Here we provide evidence that IFITM proteins restrict membrane fusion induced by representatives of all three classes of viral membrane fusion proteins. IFITM1 profoundly suppressed syncytia formation and cell-cell fusion induced by almost all viral fusion proteins examined; IFITM2 and IFITM3 also strongly inhibited their fusion, with efficiency somewhat dependent on cell types. Furthermore, treatment of cells with IFN also markedly inhibited viral membrane fusion and entry. By using the Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus envelope and influenza A virus hemagglutinin as models for study, we showed that IFITM-mediated restriction on membrane fusion is not at the steps of receptor- and/or low pH-mediated triggering; instead, the creation of hemifusion was essentially blocked by IFITMs. Chlorpromazine (CPZ, a chemical known to promote the transition from hemifusion to full fusion, was unable to rescue the IFITM-mediated restriction on fusion. In contrast, oleic acid (OA, a lipid analog that generates negative spontaneous curvature and thereby promotes hemifusion, virtually overcame the restriction. To explore the possible effect of IFITM proteins on membrane molecular order and fluidity, we performed fluorescence labeling with Laurdan, in conjunction with two-photon laser scanning and fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM. We observed that the generalized polarizations (GPs and fluorescence lifetimes of cell membranes expressing IFITM proteins were greatly enhanced, indicating higher molecularly ordered and less fluidized membranes. Collectively, our data demonstrated that IFITM proteins suppress viral membrane fusion before the creation of hemifusion, and suggested that they may do so by reducing membrane fluidity and conferring a positive

  1. The fecal viral flora of wild rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung G Phan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequent interactions of rodents with humans make them a common source of zoonotic infections. To obtain an initial unbiased measure of the viral diversity in the enteric tract of wild rodents we sequenced partially purified, randomly amplified viral RNA and DNA in the feces of 105 wild rodents (mouse, vole, and rat collected in California and Virginia. We identified in decreasing frequency sequences related to the mammalian viruses families Circoviridae, Picobirnaviridae, Picornaviridae, Astroviridae, Parvoviridae, Papillomaviridae, Adenoviridae, and Coronaviridae. Seventeen small circular DNA genomes containing one or two replicase genes distantly related to the Circoviridae representing several potentially new viral families were characterized. In the Picornaviridae family two new candidate genera as well as a close genetic relative of the human pathogen Aichi virus were characterized. Fragments of the first mouse sapelovirus and picobirnaviruses were identified and the first murine astrovirus genome was characterized. A mouse papillomavirus genome and fragments of a novel adenovirus and adenovirus-associated virus were also sequenced. The next largest fraction of the rodent fecal virome was related to insect viruses of the Densoviridae, Iridoviridae, Polydnaviridae, Dicistroviriade, Bromoviridae, and Virgaviridae families followed by plant virus-related sequences in the Nanoviridae, Geminiviridae, Phycodnaviridae, Secoviridae, Partitiviridae, Tymoviridae, Alphaflexiviridae, and Tombusviridae families reflecting the largely insect and plant rodent diet. Phylogenetic analyses of full and partial viral genomes therefore revealed many previously unreported viral species, genera, and families. The close genetic similarities noted between some rodent and human viruses might reflect past zoonoses. This study increases our understanding of the viral diversity in wild rodents and highlights the large number of still uncharacterized viruses in

  2. Acute Viral Hepatitis in Pediatric Age Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhamshu KC

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Our clinical experience showed that there has been no decrease in pediatric cases of acute viral hepatitis in Kathmandu. The objective of the study was to analyze the etiology, clinical features, laboratory parameters, sonological findings and other to determine the probable prognostic factors of Acute Viral Hepatitis in pediatric population. Methods: Consecutive patients of suspected Acute Viral Hepatitis, below the age of 15 years, attending the liver clinic between January 2006 and December2010were studied. After clinical examination they were subjected to blood tests and ultrasound examination of abdomen. The patients were divided in 3 age groups; 0–5, 5–10 and 5–15 years. Clinical features, laboratory parameters, ultrasound findings were compared in three age groups. Results: Etiology of Acute Viral Hepatitis was Hepatitis A virus 266 (85%, Hepatitis E virus in 24 (8%, Hepatitis B virus in 15 (5%. In 7(2% patients etiology was unknown. Three patients went to acute liver failure but improved with conservative treatment. There was no statistical difference in most of the parameters studied in different age groups. Ascites was more common in 5-10 years age group. Patients with secondary bacterial infection, ultrasound evidence of prominent biliary tree and ascites were associated with increased duration of illness. Patients with history of herbal medications had prolonged cholestasis. Conclusions: Hepatitis A is most common cause of Acute Viral Hepatitis in pediatric population. Improper use of herbal medications, secondary bacterial infection and faulty dietary intake was associated with prolonged illness. Patients with prominent biliary radicals should be treated with antibiotics even with normal blood counts for earlier recovery. Keywords: Acute viral hepatitis; hepatitis A; hepatitis E; herbal medications.

  3. Examining Behavioral, Relational, and Cognitive Engagement in Smaller Learning Communities: A Case Study of Reform in One Suburban District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Heather A.; Chang, Mei-Lin; Andrzejewski, Carey E.; Poirier, Ryan R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine the impact of Smaller Learning Community reform on students' behavioral, relational, and cognitive engagement in a suburban school district experiencing urbanization. We describe a project in which we evaluated the engagement of a cohort of 8th grade students as they transitioned to high school (n = 605).…

  4. Examining the Rule of Thumb of Not Using Multilevel Modeling: The "Design Effect Smaller than Two" Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Mark H. C.; Kwok, Oi-man

    2015-01-01

    Educational researchers commonly use the rule of thumb of "design effect smaller than 2" as the justification of not accounting for the multilevel or clustered structure in their data. The rule, however, has not yet been systematically studied in previous research. In the present study, we generated data from three different models…

  5. Viral pneumonias: Typical and atypical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westhoff-Bleck, M.; Bleck, J.S.; Schirg, E.

    1987-10-01

    The clinical and radiological features of viral pneumonias are summarized and discussed. Although viral infections of the lung belong to atypical pneumonias they demonstrate not always the radiographic pattern of an interstitial pneumonia. Characteristic radiographic findings are quite rare. In most cases the microbial etiology cannot be predicted from chest radiographs. The appearance varies depending on the virulence of the organism and the resistence of the host. In this regard knowledge of epidemiological data as well as patients condition and underlying disease is of utmost importance. Differentiation between community- and hospital-acquired infection may be very helpful.

  6. Viral diseases in honey bee queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, Roy Mathew

    Honey bees are important insects for human welfare, due to pollination as well as honey production. Viral diseases strongly impact honey bee health, especially since the spread of varroa mites. This dissertation deals with the interactions between honey bees, viruses and varroa mites. A new tool...... was developed to diagnose three viruses in honey bees. Quantitative PCR was used to investigate the distribution of two popular viruses in five different tissues of 86 honey bee queens. Seasonal variation of viral infection in honey bee workers and varroa mites were determined by sampling 23 colonies under...

  7. Structure of viral hepatitis in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Sorokman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many current studies are devoted to the study of hepatitis caused by viral infections, which are qualified as TORCH-infection. In infants TORCH-induced lesions prevail in the structure of viral hepatitis, the largest proportion is hepatitis of cytomegalovirus etiology. The purpose was to study the structure of viral hepatitis in infants. Materials and methods. The study included sixty-two children (mean age 1.8 ± 0.9 years born in 2007–2016 treated in Chernivtsi Regional Children’s Clinical Hospital. The comparison group consisted of 36 healthy children of the same age. The pathogens of viral hepatitis B, C, TORCH infections were verified by enzyme immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction. The results of the research were analyzed using computer package Statistica StatSoft Inc. and Excel XP for Windows for a personal computer. Results. The results of the analysis of the liver diseases structure in 62 young children, according to hospital statistics, determined that the overwhelming majority (38 children; 61.3 % had viral hepatitis (VH, the other 24 (38.7 % patients were divided by the etiological structure of liver damage as follows: 8 (12.9 % patients had prolonged conjunctive jaundice, 7 (11.3 % patients had congenital metabolic disorders, 9 (14.5 % patients had congenital hepatobiliary abnomalities. 16.6 % of young children had hepatitis B and C viruses. In 5.8 % of cases VH was caused by viruses of the TORCH group of infections. Conclusions. In the structure of hepatobiliary diseases in infants, viral hepatitis (68.4 % is on the first ranked place. Among the viral hepatitis in children in the first year of life, CMV-hepatitis (68.4 % is most common, in children over 1 year old chronic hepatitis B and C. Severe obstetrical anamnesis, violations of pregnancy, placental infection are rather significant in the group of children with viral hepatitis. The main clinical signs of CMV-hepatitis are prolonged jaundice, cholestasis

  8. Latent Viral Marketing, Concepts and Control Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Sela, Alon; Goldenberg, Dmitri; Ben-Gal, Irad; Shmueli, Erez

    2017-01-01

    Numerus works that study the spread of information in social networks include a spreading mechanism in which a set of nodes is initially infected (i.e. seeded), followed by a viral process, which spontaneously spread the message through the nodes of the network. These models are used to describe the spread of rumors as well as the spread of new products and services. In reality however, it is quite rare that a product or service spreads through a social networks solely by viral forces. It is ...

  9. Full Viral Suppression, Low-Level Viremia, and Quantifiable Plasma HIV-RNA at the End of Pregnancy in HIV-Infected Women on Antiretroviral Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroncelli, Silvia; Pirillo, Maria F; Tamburrini, Enrica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Pinnetti, Carmela; Degli Antoni, Anna; Galluzzo, Clementina M; Stentarelli, Chiara; Amici, Roberta; Floridia, Marco

    2015-07-01

    There is limited information on full viral suppression and low-level HIV-RNA viremia in HIV-infected women at the end of pregnancy. We investigated HIV-RNA levels close to delivery in women on antiretroviral treatment in order to define rates of complete suppression, low-level viremia, and quantifiable HIV-RNA, exploring as potential determinants some clinical and viroimmunological variables. Plasma samples from a national study in Italy, collected between 2003 and 2012, were used. According to plasma HIV-RNA levels, three groups were defined: full suppression (target not detected), low-level viremia (target detected but HIV-RNA (≥37 copies/ml). Multivariable logistic regression was used to define determinants of full viral suppression and of quantifiable HIV-RNA. Among 107 women evaluated at a median gestational age of 35 weeks, 90 (84.1%) had HIV-RNA HIV-RNA was 109 copies/ml (IQR 46-251), with only one case showing resistance (mutation M184V; rate: 9.1%). In multivariable analyses, women with higher baseline HIV-RNA levels and with hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection were significantly more likely to have quantifiable HIV-RNA in late pregnancy. Full viral suppression was significantly more likely with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimens and significantly less likely with higher HIV-RNA in early pregnancy. No cases of HIV transmission occurred. In conclusion, HIV-infected pregnant women showed a high rate of viral suppression and a low resistance rate before delivery. In most cases no target HIV-RNA was detected in plasma, suggesting a low risk of subsequent virological rebound and development of resistance. Women with high levels of HIV-RNA in early pregnancy and those who have concomitant HCV infection should be considered at higher risk of having quantifiable HIV-RNA at the end of pregnancy.

  10. Perceived impact of smaller compared with larger-sized bottles of sugar-sweetened beverages on consumption: A qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantzari, Eleni; Hollands, Gareth J; Pechey, Rachel; Jebb, Susan; Marteau, Theresa M

    2017-08-31

    Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption increases obesity risk and is linked to adverse health consequences. Large packages increase food consumption, but most evidence comes from studies comparing larger with standard packages, resulting in uncertainty regarding the impact of smaller packages. There is also little research on beverages. This qualitative study explores the experiences of consuming cola from smaller compared with larger bottles, to inform intervention strategies. Sixteen households in Cambridge, England, participating in a feasibility study assessing the impact of bottle size on in-home SSB consumption, received a set amount of cola each week for four weeks in one of four bottle sizes: 1500 ml, 1000 ml, 500 ml, or 250 ml, in random order. At the study end, household representatives were interviewed about their experiences of using each bottle, including perceptions of i) consumption level; ii) consumption-related behaviours; and iii) factors affecting consumption. Interviews were semi-structured and data analysed using the Framework approach. The present analysis focuses specifically on experiences relating to use of the smaller bottles. The smallest bottles were described as increasing drinking occasion frequency and encouraging consumption of numerous bottles in succession. Factors described as facilitating their consumption were: i) convenience and portability; ii) greater numbers of bottles available, which hindered consumption monitoring and control; iii) perceived insufficient quantity per bottle; and iv) positive attitudes. In a minority of cases the smallest bottles were perceived to have reduced consumption, but this was related to practical issues with the bottles that resulted in dislike. The perception of greater consumption and qualitative reports of drinking habits associated with the smallest bottles raise the possibility that the 'portion size effect' has a lower threshold, beyond which smaller portions and packages may

  11. The effect of signal leakage and glacial isostatic rebound on GRACE-derived ice mass changes in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Louise Sandberg; Jarosch, Alexander H.; Adalgeirsdottir, Gudfinna

    2017-01-01

    Monthly gravity field models from the GRACE satellite mission are widely used to determine ice mass changes of large ice sheets as well as smaller glaciers and ice caps. Here, we investigate in detail the ice mass changes of the Icelandic ice caps as derived from GRACE data. The small size...... of the Icelandic ice caps, their location close to other rapidly changing ice covered areas and the low viscosity of the mantle below Iceland make this especially challenging. The mass balance of the ice caps is well constrained by field mass balance measurements, making this area ideal for such investigations. We...... find that the ice mass changes of the Icelandic ice caps derived from GRACE gravity field models are influenced by both the large gravity change signal resulting from ice mass loss in southeast Greenland and the mass redistribution within the Earth mantle due to glacial isostatic adjustment since...

  12. MEASURING INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE IN WHITE'S TREE FROGS (LITORIA CAERULEA) BY REBOUND TONOMETRY: COMPARING DEVICE, TIME OF DAY, AND MANUAL VERSUS CHEMICAL RESTRAINT METHODS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Jennifer C; Krisp, Ashley; Sladky, Kurt; Miller, Paul E; Mans, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Ocular diseases reported in frogs include uveitis and glaucoma, which are associated with changes in intraocular pressure (IOP). The objectives of this study were to characterize the normal IOP for White's tree frogs ( Litoria caerulea ) using two types of rebound tonometers, and to assess whether time of day or method of restraint affected IOP. Eighteen conscious, unrestrained, ophthalmologically normal frogs were used to measure IOP using TonoVet® and TonoLab® tonometers, at three time points during the day. In a subset of 12 frogs, IOP was measured while under manual restraint using the TonoVet. Anesthesia was induced in 9 frogs using two different concentrations of MS-222 (0.5 g/L and 2 g/L) in order to evaluate for changes in IOP with the TonoVet. Mean (± SD) IOP values for the TonoLab (16.8 ± 3.9 mm Hg) were significantly higher than TonoVet values (14.7 ± 1.6 mm Hg; P IOP values did not significantly change with time of day. TonoLab values were significantly lower in the evening (1600-1800; 14.5 ± 3.1 mm Hg), compared with morning and midday measurements (0800-1000 and 1200-1400; 18.0 ± 3.8 mm Hg; P IOP (13.4 ± 1.5 mm Hg) compared with unrestrained frogs (15.3 ± 1.2 mm Hg; P IOP. Intraocular pressure can be measured with both types of rebound tonometers in White's tree frogs, but time of day and manual restraint can affect IOP values.

  13. Smaller than a gnat

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "CERN in Geneva is the largest research center for particle physics in the world; the Institute is a Mecca for scientists. Particle are projected into each other in gigantic ring accelerators to gain information from their reactions about the force and relations inside the elements. These experiments require high vacuum - Oerlikon Leybold Vacuum recently competed in a Eyropean call for bids for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and won the contract." (1,5 page)

  14. Sharing Smaller Pies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Tom

    This paper details the unfavorable predicament of the United States as a consequence of using much of its own non-renewable material and energy resources. As a consequence, the United States will soon be subject to the political and economic conditions imposed upon it by other nations. The United States must begin to implement adjustments to the…

  15. Making Microbiology Even Smaller!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Linda Mull; Motz, Vicki Abrams

    2013-01-01

    We outline protocols for producing slant-minis (SLINIs) and mini-deeps (MEEPs) and examples of their use in simple microbiology experiments suitable for high school students. The principal benefits of these protocols are decreased cost associated with significantly reduced media use; easier, less expensive disposal of waste; and increased safety…

  16. Comparing viral metagenomics methods using a highly multiplexed human viral pathogens reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linlin; Deng, Xutao; Mee, Edward T; Collot-Teixeira, Sophie; Anderson, Rob; Schepelmann, Silke; Minor, Philip D; Delwart, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Unbiased metagenomic sequencing holds significant potential as a diagnostic tool for the simultaneous detection of any previously genetically described viral nucleic acids in clinical samples. Viral genome sequences can also inform on likely phenotypes including drug susceptibility or neutralization serotypes. In this study, different variables of the laboratory methods often used to generate viral metagenomics libraries were compared for their abilities to detect multiple viruses and generate full genome coverage. A biological reagent consisting of 25 different human RNA and DNA viral pathogens was used to estimate the effect of filtration and nuclease digestion, DNA/RNA extraction methods, pre-amplification and the use of different library preparation kits on the detection of viral nucleic acids. Filtration and nuclease treatment led to slight decreases in the percentage of viral sequence reads and number of viruses detected. For nucleic acid extractions silica spin columns improved viral sequence recovery relative to magnetic beads and Trizol extraction. Pre-amplification using random RT-PCR while generating more viral sequence reads resulted in detection of fewer viruses, more overlapping sequences, and lower genome coverage. The ScriptSeq library preparation method retrieved more viruses and a greater fraction of their genomes than the TruSeq and Nextera methods. Viral metagenomics sequencing was able to simultaneously detect up to 22 different viruses in the biological reagent analyzed including all those detected by qPCR. Further optimization will be required for the detection of viruses in biologically more complex samples such as tissues, blood, or feces. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Good Friends, Bad News - Affect and Virality in Twitter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Arvidsson, Adam; Nielsen, Finn Årup

    2011-01-01

    The link between affect, defined as the capacity for sentimental arousal on the part of a message, and virality, defined as the probability that it be sent along, is of significant theoretical and practical importance, e.g. for viral marketing. The basic measure of virality in Twitter is the prob......The link between affect, defined as the capacity for sentimental arousal on the part of a message, and virality, defined as the probability that it be sent along, is of significant theoretical and practical importance, e.g. for viral marketing. The basic measure of virality in Twitter...

  18. Recombinant viruses as vaccines against viral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P.D. Souza

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine approaches to infectious diseases are widely applied and appreciated. Amongst them, vectors based on recombinant viruses have shown great promise and play an important role in the development of new vaccines. Many viruses have been investigated for their ability to express proteins from foreign pathogens and induce specific immunological responses against these antigens in vivo. Generally, gene-based vaccines can stimulate potent humoral and cellular immune responses and viral vectors might be an effective strategy for both the delivery of antigen-encoding genes and the facilitation and enhancement of antigen presentation. In order to be utilized as a vaccine carrier, the ideal viral vector should be safe and enable efficient presentation of required pathogen-specific antigens to the immune system. It should also exhibit low intrinsic immunogenicity to allow for its re-administration in order to boost relevant specific immune responses. Furthermore, the vector system must meet criteria that enable its production on a large-scale basis. Several viral vaccine vectors have thus emerged to date, all of them having relative advantages and limits depending on the proposed application, and thus far none of them have proven to be ideal vaccine carriers. In this review we describe the potential, as well as some of the foreseeable obstacles associated with viral vaccine vectors and their use in preventive medicine.

  19. Why do Individuals Differ in Viral Susceptibility?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, van L.; Pijlman, G.P.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2017-01-01

    Viral susceptibility and disease progression is determined by host genetic variation that underlies individual differences. Genetic polymorphisms that affect the phenotype upon infection have been well-studied for only a few viruses, such as HIV-1 and Hepatitis C virus. However, even for

  20. Meta-analyses on viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise L; Gluud, Christian

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes the meta-analyses of interventions for viral hepatitis A, B, and C. Some of the interventions assessed are described in small trials with unclear bias control. Other interventions are supported by large, high-quality trials. Although attempts have been made to adjust...