WorldWideScience

Sample records for small temperature benefits

  1. Fringe Benefits Provision by Rural Small Businesses

    OpenAIRE

    Jayachandran N. Variyam; David S. Kraybill

    1998-01-01

    We examine the relationship between employer size and the provision of fringe benefits in a large sample of rural businesses. A clear employer size-benefits relationship exists only in the case of health insurance, while other benefits are not strongly linked to employer size. The negative relationship between employer size and health insurance is weaker, though still existent, in businesses whose employees have relatively high skill levels. Single, independent establishments and sole proprie...

  2. Small private irrigation: Enhancing benefits and managing trade-offs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giordano, M.; Fraiture, de C.M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Millions of smallholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia benefit from readily available and affordable irrigation technologies. The rapid uptake of small private irrigation in South Asia had a proven positive effect on poverty alleviation. In sub-Saharan Africa similar trends are

  3. HACCP in Small Companies:Benefit or Burden?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EuniceTaylor

    2001-01-01

    This paper acknowledges the importance of small companies across the food chain and indntifies the slow uptake of HACCP in these companies as an area of concern for the production of safe food,This set the scene for an analysis of the barriers to HACCP implementation which include availability of appropriate training in HACCP methodology,access to technical expertise and the general resource problems of time and money ,The burden that this places on the small business,particularly in terms of documentation,validation and verification,are then discussed,The paper concludes with a summary of the burdens and benefits that this sector faces as it moves towards compliance with food safety legislation.

  4. Targeting small airways in asthma: Improvement in clinical benefit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aim:  Disease control is not achieved in a substantial proportion of patients with asthma. Recent advances in aerosol formulations and delivery devices may offer more effective therapy. This review will focus on the importance and potential clinical benefit of targeting the lung...... half the daily dose with no increased risk of systemic effects. Clinical studies of adults with asthma have shown a greater effect of ultrafine ICS, compared with non-ultrafine ICS, on quality of life, small airway patency, and markers of pulmonary and systemic inflammation, but no difference...... with regard to conventional clinical indices of lung function and asthma control. Conclusions:  Asthma patients treated with ultrafine ICS, compared with non-ultrafine ICS, have at least similar chance of achieving asthma control at a lower daily dose. Further clinical studies are needed to explore whether...

  5. Targeting small airways in asthma: Improvement in clinical benefit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aim: Disease control is not achieved in a substantial proportion of patients with asthma. Recent advances in aerosol formulations and delivery devices may offer more effective therapy. This review will focus on the importance and potential clinical benefit of targeting the lung...... half the daily dose with no increased risk of systemic effects. Clinical studies of adults with asthma have shown a greater effect of ultrafine ICS, compared with non-ultrafine ICS, on quality of life, small airway patency, and markers of pulmonary and systemic inflammation, but no difference...... with regard to conventional clinical indices of lung function and asthma control. Conclusions: Asthma patients treated with ultrafine ICS, compared with non-ultrafine ICS, have at least similar chance of achieving asthma control at a lower daily dose. Further clinical studies are needed to explore whether...

  6. Small employers and self-insured health benefits: too small to succeed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Tracy; Christianson, Jon B; Ginsburg, Paul B

    2012-07-01

    Over the past decade, large employers increasingly have bypassed traditional health insurance for their workers, opting instead to assume the financial risk of enrollees' medical care through self-insurance. Because self-insurance arrangements may offer advantages--such as lower costs, exemption from most state insurance regulation and greater flexibility in benefit design--they are especially attractive to large firms with enough employees to spread risk adequately to avoid the financial fallout from potentially catastrophic medical costs of some employees. Recently, with rising health care costs and changing market dynamics, more small firms--100 or fewer workers--are interested in self-insuring health benefits, according to a new qualitative study from the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Self-insured firms typically use a third-party administrator (TPA) to process medical claims and provide access to provider networks. Firms also often purchase stop-loss insurance to cover medical costs exceeding a predefined amount. Increasingly competitive markets for TPA services and stop-loss insurance are making self-insurance attractive to more employers. The 2010 national health reform law imposes new requirements and taxes on health insurance that may spur more small firms to consider self-insurance. In turn, if more small firms opt to self-insure, certain health reform goals, such as strengthening consumer protections and making the small-group health insurance market more viable, may be undermined. Specifically, adverse selection--attracting sicker-than-average people--is a potential issue for the insurance exchanges created by reform.

  7. Ambient temperature influences the neural benefits of exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Mark E; Chung, Chasity; Comer, Ashley; Nelson, Katharine; Tran, Jamie; Werries, Nadja; Barton, Emily A; Spinetta, Michael; Leasure, J Leigh

    2016-02-15

    Many of the neural benefits of exercise require weeks to manifest. It would be useful to accelerate onset of exercise-driven plastic changes, such as increased hippocampal neurogenesis. Exercise represents a significant challenge to the brain because it produces heat, but brain temperature does not rise during exercise in the cold. This study tested the hypothesis that exercise in cold ambient temperature would stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis more than exercise in room or hot conditions. Adult female rats had exercise access 2h per day for 5 days at either room (20 °C), cold (4.5 °C) or hot (37.5 °C) temperature. To label dividing hippocampal precursor cells, animals received daily injections of BrdU. Brains were immunohistochemically processed for dividing cells (Ki67+), surviving cells (BrdU+) and new neurons (doublecortin, DCX) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Animals exercising at room temperature ran significantly farther than animals exercising in cold or hot conditions (room 1490 ± 400 m; cold 440 ± 102 m; hot 291 ± 56 m). We therefore analyzed the number of Ki67+, BrdU+ and DCX+ cells normalized for shortest distance run. Contrary to our hypothesis, exercise in either cold or hot conditions generated significantly more Ki67+, BrdU+ and DCX+ cells compared to exercise at room temperature. Thus, a limited amount of running in either cold or hot ambient conditions generates more new cells than a much greater distance run at room temperature. Taken together, our results suggest a simple means by which to augment exercise effects, yet minimize exercise time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A university in a small city: Discovering which sectors benefit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Dyason

    2017-11-01

    Contribution or value-add: This approach provided exceptional value in identifying the sectors that benefit and provide important trend analyses that will be combined with input–output models to improve the accuracy of measuring university impact assessment on a local level.

  9. Benefits of carbon markets to small and medium enterprises (SMEs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Harvested wooden handicrafts products have the ability to lock carbon for long time and mitigate climate change. These products are currently eligible for availing benefits from voluntary carbon markets. The market size and opportunities for carbon credits are likely to increase substantially for these products during the ...

  10. How can Small Countries in South Asia benefit from Biotechnology ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant will help small developing countries in South Asia develop ... and Development) countries and emerging economies like India and China. The second concerns a plan to implement agro-biotechnology businesses based on tissue ... in India, including heat stress, water management, and climate-related migration.

  11. Thermocouple design for measuring temperatures of small insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.A. Hanson; R.C. Venette

    2013-01-01

    Contact thermocouples often are used to measure surface body temperature changes of insects during cold exposure. However, small temperature changes of minute insects can be difficult to detect, particularly during the measurement of supercooling points. We developed two thermocouple designs, which use 0.51 mm diameter or 0.127 mm diameter copper-constantan wires, to...

  12. Measurements of temperature profiles at the exit of small rockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, M; Harshbarger, F C

    1966-02-01

    The sodium line reversal technique was used to determine the reversal temperature profile across the exit of small rockets. Measurements were made on one 73-kg thrust rocket, and two 23-kg thrust rockets with different injectors. The large rocket showed little variation of reversal temperature across the plume. However, the 23-kg rockets both showed a large decrease of reversal temperature from the axis to the edge of the plume. In addition, the sodium line reversal technique of temperature measurement was compared with an infrared technique developed in these laboratories.

  13. Increasing Water Temperature Triggers Dominance of Small Freshwater Plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasconi, Serena; Gall, Andrea; Winter, Katharina; Kainz, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Climate change scenarios predict that lake water temperatures will increase up to 4°C and rainfall events will become more intense and frequent by the end of this century. Concurrently, supply of humic substances from terrestrial runoff is expected to increase, resulting in darker watercolor ("brownification") of aquatic ecosystems. Using a multi-seasonal, low trophic state mesocosm experiment, we investigated how higher water temperature and brownification affect plankton community composition, phenology, and functioning. We tested the hypothesis that higher water temperature (+3°C) and brownification will, a) cause plankton community composition to shift toward small sized phytoplankton and cyanobacteria, and, b) extend the length of the growing season entailing higher phytoplankton production later in the season. We demonstrate that the 3°C increase of water temperature favored the growth of heterotrophic bacteria and small sized autotrophic picophytoplankton cells with significantly higher primary production during warmer fall periods. However, 3X darker water (effect of brownification) caused no significant changes in the plankton community composition or functioning relative to control conditions. Our findings reveal that increased temperature change plankton community structure by favoring smaller sized species proliferation (autotrophic phytoplankton and small size cladocerans), and increase primary productivity and community turnover. Finally, results of this multi-seasonal experiment suggest that warming by 3°C in aquatic ecosystems of low trophic state may cause planktonic food web functioning to become more dominated by fast growing, r-trait species (i.e., small sizes and rapid development).

  14. Increasing Water Temperature Triggers Dominance of Small Freshwater Plankton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Rasconi

    Full Text Available Climate change scenarios predict that lake water temperatures will increase up to 4°C and rainfall events will become more intense and frequent by the end of this century. Concurrently, supply of humic substances from terrestrial runoff is expected to increase, resulting in darker watercolor ("brownification" of aquatic ecosystems. Using a multi-seasonal, low trophic state mesocosm experiment, we investigated how higher water temperature and brownification affect plankton community composition, phenology, and functioning. We tested the hypothesis that higher water temperature (+3°C and brownification will, a cause plankton community composition to shift toward small sized phytoplankton and cyanobacteria, and, b extend the length of the growing season entailing higher phytoplankton production later in the season. We demonstrate that the 3°C increase of water temperature favored the growth of heterotrophic bacteria and small sized autotrophic picophytoplankton cells with significantly higher primary production during warmer fall periods. However, 3X darker water (effect of brownification caused no significant changes in the plankton community composition or functioning relative to control conditions. Our findings reveal that increased temperature change plankton community structure by favoring smaller sized species proliferation (autotrophic phytoplankton and small size cladocerans, and increase primary productivity and community turnover. Finally, results of this multi-seasonal experiment suggest that warming by 3°C in aquatic ecosystems of low trophic state may cause planktonic food web functioning to become more dominated by fast growing, r-trait species (i.e., small sizes and rapid development.

  15. Design and Modelling of Small Scale Low Temperature Power Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wronski, Jorrit

    he work presented in this report contributes to the state of the art within design and modelling of small scale low temperature power cycles. The study is divided into three main parts: (i) fluid property evaluation, (ii) expansion device investigations and (iii) heat exchanger performance......-oriented Modelica code and was included in the thermo Cycle framework for small scale ORC systems. Special attention was paid to the valve system and a control method for variable expansion ratios was introduced based on a cogeneration scenario. Admission control based on evaporator and condenser conditions...

  16. Two-phase exchangers with small temperature differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moracchioli, R.; Marie, G.; Lallee, J. de.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility in using heat available at low temperature level is shown (industrial wastes, solar energy, geothermal energy, heat power from seas). Special emphasis is put on the importance of heat exchangers that commonly should be evaporators and condensors working with small temperature differences (20 to 100 deg C). The expansion of the so-called ''new'' energies or recovery processes will depend on the physical performance of exchangers (Rankine two-phase cycles) and cost of the elementary exchange interfaces and assembling technics [fr

  17. Household vulnerability and small ruminant benefits in transitional zone of Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duku, S.; Zijpp, van der A.J.; Udo, H.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated household vulnerability and small ruminant benefits in the transitional zone of Ghana. The dimensions of vulnerability considered were the sex and socio-economic status of the household head, and household morbidity and mortality. Data was collected from 11 key informants,

  18. 26 CFR 1.927(e)-2T - Temporary regulations; effect of boycott participation on FSC and small FSC benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... small FSC benefits. (a) International boycott factor. If the FSC (or small FSC) or any member of the FSC...) exempt foreign trade income multiplied by the international boycott factor determined under section 999... participation on FSC and small FSC benefits. 1.927(e)-2T Section 1.927(e)-2T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE...

  19. Baseline Concept Description of a Small Modular High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gougar, Hans D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a description of generic small modular high temperature reactors (herein denoted as an smHTR), summarize their distinguishing attributes, and lay out the research and development (R&D) required for commercialization. The generic concepts rely heavily on the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor designs developed in the 1980s which were never built but for which pre-licensing or certification activities were conducted. The concept matured more recently under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, specifically in the areas of fuel and material qualification, methods development, and licensing. As all vendor-specific designs proposed under NGNP were all both ‘small’ or medium-sized and ‘modular’ by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Department of Energy (DOE) standards, the technical attributes, challenges, and R&D needs identified, addressed, and documented under NGNP are valid and appropriate in the context of Small Modular Reactor (SMR) applications. Although the term High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is commonly used to denote graphite-moderated, thermal spectrum reactors with coolant temperatures in excess of 650oC at the core outlet, in this report the historical term High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) will be used to distinguish the gas-cooled technology described herein from its liquid salt-cooled cousin. Moreover, in this report it is to be understood that the outlet temperature of the helium in an HTGR has an upper limit of 950 degrees C which corresponds to the temperature to which certain alloys are currently being qualified under DOE’s ARC program. Although similar to the HTGR in just about every respect, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may have an outlet temperature in excess of 950 degrees C and is therefore farther from commercialization because of the challenges posed to materials exposed to these temperatures. The VHTR is the focus of R&D under the

  20. Baseline Concept Description of a Small Modular High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Gougar

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a description of generic small modular high temperature reactors (herein denoted as an smHTR), summarize their distinguishing attributes, and lay out the research and development (R&D) required for commercialization. The generic concepts rely heavily on the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor designs developed in the 1980s which were never built but for which pre-licensing or certification activities were conducted. The concept matured more recently under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, specifically in the areas of fuel and material qualification, methods development, and licensing. As all vendor-specific designs proposed under NGNP were all both ‘small’ or medium-sized and ‘modular’ by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Department of Energy (DOE) standards, the technical attributes, challenges, and R&D needs identified, addressed, and documented under NGNP are valid and appropriate in the context of Small Modular Reactor (SMR) applications. Although the term High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is commonly used to denote graphite-moderated, thermal spectrum reactors with coolant temperatures in excess of 650oC at the core outlet, in this report the historical term High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) will be used to distinguish the gas-cooled technology described herein from its liquid salt-cooled cousin. Moreover, in this report it is to be understood that the outlet temperature of the helium in an HTGR has an upper limit of 950 degrees C which corresponds to the temperature to which certain alloys are currently being qualified under DOE’s ARC program. Although similar to the HTGR in just about every respect, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may have an outlet temperature in excess of 950 degrees C and is therefore farther from commercialization because of the challenges posed to materials exposed to these temperatures. The VHTR is the focus of R&D under the

  1. Small velocity and finite temperature variations in kinetic relaxation models

    KAUST Repository

    Markowich, Peter; Jü ngel, Ansgar; Aoki, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    A small Knuden number analysis of a kinetic equation in the diffusive scaling is performed. The collision kernel is of BGK type with a general local Gibbs state. Assuming that the flow velocity is of the order of the Knudsen number, a Hilbert expansion yields a macroscopic model with finite temperature variations, whose complexity lies in between the hydrodynamic and the energy-transport equations. Its mathematical structure is explored and macroscopic models for specific examples of the global Gibbs state are presented. © American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

  2. Probabilistic measures of climate change vulnerability, adaptation action benefits, and related uncertainty from maximum temperature metric selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWeber, Jefferson T.; Wagner, Tyler

    2018-01-01

    Predictions of the projected changes in species distributions and potential adaptation action benefits can help guide conservation actions. There is substantial uncertainty in projecting species distributions into an unknown future, however, which can undermine confidence in predictions or misdirect conservation actions if not properly considered. Recent studies have shown that the selection of alternative climate metrics describing very different climatic aspects (e.g., mean air temperature vs. mean precipitation) can be a substantial source of projection uncertainty. It is unclear, however, how much projection uncertainty might stem from selecting among highly correlated, ecologically similar climate metrics (e.g., maximum temperature in July, maximum 30‐day temperature) describing the same climatic aspect (e.g., maximum temperatures) known to limit a species’ distribution. It is also unclear how projection uncertainty might propagate into predictions of the potential benefits of adaptation actions that might lessen climate change effects. We provide probabilistic measures of climate change vulnerability, adaptation action benefits, and related uncertainty stemming from the selection of four maximum temperature metrics for brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), a cold‐water salmonid of conservation concern in the eastern United States. Projected losses in suitable stream length varied by as much as 20% among alternative maximum temperature metrics for mid‐century climate projections, which was similar to variation among three climate models. Similarly, the regional average predicted increase in brook trout occurrence probability under an adaptation action scenario of full riparian forest restoration varied by as much as .2 among metrics. Our use of Bayesian inference provides probabilistic measures of vulnerability and adaptation action benefits for individual stream reaches that properly address statistical uncertainty and can help guide conservation

  3. Probabilistic measures of climate change vulnerability, adaptation action benefits, and related uncertainty from maximum temperature metric selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWeber, Jefferson T; Wagner, Tyler

    2018-06-01

    Predictions of the projected changes in species distributions and potential adaptation action benefits can help guide conservation actions. There is substantial uncertainty in projecting species distributions into an unknown future, however, which can undermine confidence in predictions or misdirect conservation actions if not properly considered. Recent studies have shown that the selection of alternative climate metrics describing very different climatic aspects (e.g., mean air temperature vs. mean precipitation) can be a substantial source of projection uncertainty. It is unclear, however, how much projection uncertainty might stem from selecting among highly correlated, ecologically similar climate metrics (e.g., maximum temperature in July, maximum 30-day temperature) describing the same climatic aspect (e.g., maximum temperatures) known to limit a species' distribution. It is also unclear how projection uncertainty might propagate into predictions of the potential benefits of adaptation actions that might lessen climate change effects. We provide probabilistic measures of climate change vulnerability, adaptation action benefits, and related uncertainty stemming from the selection of four maximum temperature metrics for brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), a cold-water salmonid of conservation concern in the eastern United States. Projected losses in suitable stream length varied by as much as 20% among alternative maximum temperature metrics for mid-century climate projections, which was similar to variation among three climate models. Similarly, the regional average predicted increase in brook trout occurrence probability under an adaptation action scenario of full riparian forest restoration varied by as much as .2 among metrics. Our use of Bayesian inference provides probabilistic measures of vulnerability and adaptation action benefits for individual stream reaches that properly address statistical uncertainty and can help guide conservation actions. Our

  4. Evaluating the Benefits of Electronic Commerce in Small and Medium Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Marshall

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines and analyses the behaviours of small and medium enterprises with respect to the evaluation of electronic commerce investments, and the subsequent realisation of the anticipated benefits from those investments. The responses of executives who participated in the study suggested that on-going involvement in electronic commerce did not come cheaply. Nonetheless, our study suggests that there were generally ad hoc approaches to evaluation of the proposed electronic commerce investments, almost non-existent post-implementation reviews, few measures of success, and generally speaking, there was little evidence of there being proactive management of the realisation of benefits of those investments. Perhaps not surprisingly, the group interviewed seemed somewhat disappointed with the outcomes of their electronic commerce initiatives. The implications of these findings are discussed, particularly for countries where small and medium enterprises contribute a large proportion of total economic activity, and where thus it is vital for small and medium enterprises to successfully engage in electronic commerce if the country is to derive the benefits of the new economy.

  5. Biofuels from stumps and small roundwood - Costs and CO{sub 2} benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Lisa Naeslund; Gustavsson, Leif [Ecotechnology, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics, Mid Sweden University, SE-831 25 Oestersund (Sweden)

    2008-10-15

    In this study, we analysed and compared costs, primary energy use and CO{sub 2} benefits of recovering stumps and small roundwood from thinnings, together with logging residues. Small roundwood, chipped at a terminal or end-user, has a cost comparable to the chip system and a primary energy use comparable to the bundle system used for recovery of logging residues. The small roundwood system with roadside chipping is more expensive. As productivity in the cutting process improves, the small roundwood alternatives become more cost-effective. The stump system has costs in the same range as or lower than the chip and bundle systems. Forestry operations for stump and small roundwood recovery require considerable primary energy, but net recovery per hectare is much greater than for the chip and bundle systems, which means that more fossil fuel can be displaced per hectare of clearcut than with a chip or a bundle system. Stumps and small roundwood from thinnings can become as cost-effective as logging residues in the near future. Furthermore, when stumps and small roundwood from thinnings are also used to replace fossil fuels, the potential CO{sub 2} reduction will be about four times as great as when only logging residues are used with a traditional chip system. (author)

  6. Low temperature corrosion in bark fuelled, small boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindau, Leif; Goldschmidt, Barbara

    2008-05-15

    A number of small (3-12 MW), new biofuel boiler plants in southern Sweden, and (at least) in Austria, have suffered a high (wastage of mm/yrs) corrosion rate on the low temperature boiler side. This problem has been investigated with respect to its occurrence and its character by contacts with operators, by plant inspections, and by analysis of cold-side deposits. The plants affected have low feed water temperatures (< 100 deg C). The plants fire most types of Swedish biofuel: chips, bark, hog fuel, and 'GROT' (=twigs and tops). The results found give basis for a hypothesis that the corrosion results from the presence of an aqueous phase in the deposits, this phase being stabilized by dissolved salts having high solubility. It then follows that for each salt, there is a critical relative humidity (calculated from the flue gas water partial pressure and the cooling surface temperature as is common practice among boiler engineers) for both the presence of the aqueous phase and the corrosion. Some critical single salts, ZnCl{sub 2} and CaCl{sub 2} have been identified, and they give critical 'relative humidities' of 5% and 18% respectively. These figures are a lower bound. The corresponding figure, derived from the practical experience and the reported plant operational data, is between 20 and 30%. Corrosion tests have been carried out by exposing an air-cooled probe in the flue gases at a 12 MW boiler at Saevelundsverket in Alingsaas, and the material wastage at different temperatures has been measured with a profilometer. The high corrosion rates were reproduced in the tests for high relative humidities. The corrosion rate was small and not measurable (<0.1 mm/year) for relative humidity <22%. The work shows by means of indirect evidence that the corrosion critical components are ZnCl{sub 2} and possibly CaCl{sub 2} as well. The practical engineering design criterion derived from the work is that the relative humidity (calculated from the flue

  7. BENEFITS AND SUCCESS FACTORS OF OPEN-SOURCE WEB SERVICES DEVELOPMENT PLATFORMS FOR SMALL SOFTWARE HOUSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter de Assis Moreno Jr.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It is usually difficult for companies to keep up with the development of new information technologies and adapt to them in face of the opportunities and threats their advances may represent. This is especially true for small and medium enterprises (SME in emerging economies, where resources tend to be scarce and markets more volatile. This paper describes an action research conducted in a small Brazilian software house that adopted an open-source Web Services development platform in order to improve its software development process. Data analysis revealed critical success factors (CSF in the adoption process, as well as specific benefits and barriers prone to be faced by small software houses in their adoption efforts. In the process of overcoming such barriers, SME may acquire intellectual capital that represents an essential resource to ensure their competitiveness and survival in emerging economies.

  8. The Benefit of Variable-Speed Turbine Operation for Low Temperature Thermal Energy Power Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Brasz, Joost J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes, given the large variation in turbine discharge pressure with changing ambient temperatures, whether variable-speed radial-inflow turbine operation has a similar benefit for Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) power recovery systems as variable-speed centrifugal compression has for chiller applications. The benefit of variable-speed centrifugal compression over fixed-speed operation is a reduction in annual electricity consumption of almost 40 %. Air-conditioning systems are by ne...

  9. Small reactors for low-temperature nuclear heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    In accordance with the Member States' calls for information exchange in the field of nuclear heat application (NHA) two IAEA meetings were organized already in 1976 and 1977. After this ''promising period'', the development of relevant programmes in IAEA Member States was slowed down and therefore only after several years interruption a new Technical Committee Meeting with a Workshop was organized in late 1983, to review the status of NHA, after a few new specific plans appeared in some IAEA Member States in the early 1980's for the use of heat from existing or constructed NPPs and for developing nuclear heating plants (NHP). In June 1987 an Advisory Group Meeting was convened in Winnipeg, Canada, to discuss and formulate a state-of-the-art review on ''Small Reactors for Low Temperature Nuclear Heat Application''. Information on this subject gained up to 1987 in the Member States whose experts attended this meeting is embodied in the present Technical Report. Figs and tabs

  10. Business Benefits from Enterprise Systems Implementation in Small and Medium-sized Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Mathrani

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The market for enterprise systems (ESs continues to grow as business becomes increasingly global and competitive. Increasingly, the market focus for ES vendors is on small businesses. The purpose of this study is to provide a unique ES vendor/consultant perspective on (a the business benefits small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs expect from their ES investment and (b to examine current practices of ES implementation in SMEs through a conceptual framework that considers the organisational, process and strategic context of the implementation. This study does so with interview data collected from ES vendors, ES consultants and IT research firms, who are the key players in the New Zealand ES industry. A distinctive contribution of this research is the vendor/consultant perspective as the unit of analysis, rather than the SME perspective commonly used in similar research. The vendor/consultant perspective offers a comprehensive viewpoint that extends across numerous SMEs in a variety of industries. Findings from interviews with these professionals indicate that although many ES implementations are several years old now, SMEs have only recently started tracking benefits through analytical processes in expectation to realise business value from their ES investment. The results also identify how ES implementation practices are adapting to be more suitable to the SME sector, an important market for ES vendors given the saturation of the large enterprise market for ES implementation.

  11. Benefits of Group Foraging Depend on Prey Type in a Small Marine Predator, the Little Penguin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Grace J; Hoskins, Andrew J; Arnould, John P Y

    2015-01-01

    Group foraging provides predators with advantages in over-powering prey larger than themselves or in aggregating small prey for efficient exploitation. For group-living predatory species, cooperative hunting strategies provide inclusive fitness benefits. However, for colonial-breeding predators, the benefit pay-offs of group foraging are less clear due to the potential for intra-specific competition. We used animal-borne cameras to determine the prey types, hunting strategies, and success of little penguins (Eudyptula minor), a small, colonial breeding air-breathing marine predator that has recently been shown to display extensive at-sea foraging associations with conspecifics. Regardless of prey type, little penguins had a higher probability of associating with conspecifics when hunting prey that were aggregated than when prey were solitary. In addition, success was greater when individuals hunted schooling rather than solitary prey. Surprisingly, however, success on schooling prey was similar or greater when individuals hunted on their own than when with conspecifics. These findings suggest individuals may be trading-off the energetic gains of solitary hunting for an increased probability of detecting prey within a spatially and temporally variable prey field by associating with conspecifics.

  12. Benefits of Considering More than Temperature Acceleration for GaN HEMT Life Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald A. Coutu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to investigate the validity of Arrhenius accelerated-life testing when applied to gallium nitride (GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMT lifetime assessments, where the standard assumption is that only critical stressor is temperature, which is derived from operating power, device channel-case, thermal resistance, and baseplate temperature. We found that power or temperature alone could not explain difference in observed degradation, and that accelerated life tests employed by industry can benefit by considering the impact of accelerating factors besides temperature. Specifically, we found that the voltage used to reach a desired power dissipation is important, and also that temperature acceleration alone or voltage alone (without much power dissipation is insufficient to assess lifetime at operating conditions.

  13. Effect of peritoneal lavage solution temperature on body temperature in anaesthetised cats and small dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, D C; Leece, E A; Trimble, T A; Demetriou, J L

    2017-05-20

    A prospective, randomised, non-blinded, clinical study to assess the effect of peritoneal lavage using warmed fluid on body temperature in anesthetised cats and dogs of less than 10 kg body mass undergoing coeliotomy. A standardised anaesthetic protocol was used. Oesophageal and rectal temperatures were measured at various time points. At the end of surgery, group 1 patients (n=10) were lavaged with 200 ml/kg sterile isotonic saline at 34±1°C and group 2 (n=10) at 40±1°C. Groups were similar with respect to age, mass, body condition and surgical incision length. Duration of anaesthesia, surgical procedures and peritoneal lavage was similar between groups. Linear regression showed no significant change in oesophageal temperature during the lavage period for group 1 (P=0.64), but a significant increase for group 2 patients (Ptemperature changes of -0.5°C (from (36.3°C to 35.9°C) and +0.9°C (from 35.4°C to 36.3°C), respectively. Similar results were found for rectal temperature, with mean changes of -0.5°C and +0.8°C (P=0.922 and 0.045), respectively. The use of isotonic crystalloid solution for peritoneal lavage at a temperature of 40±1°C significantly warms small animal patients, when applied in a clinical setting, compared with lavage solution at 34±1°C. British Veterinary Association.

  14. Thermoelectric energy harvesting from small ambient temperature transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, Andre

    2012-07-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) represent a key technology, used, for instance, in structural health monitoring, building automation systems, or traffic surveillance. Supplying power to a network of spatially distributed sensor nodes, especially at remote locations, is a large challenge: power grids are reliable but costly to install, whereas batteries provide a high flexibility in the installation but have a limited lifetime. This dilemma can be overcome by micro energy harvesting which offers both: reliability and flexibility. Micro energy harvesters are able to convert low grade ambient energy into useful electrical energy and thus provide power for wireless sensor networks or other electronic devices - in-situ, off-grid, and with an almost unlimited lifetime. Thermal energy is an omnipresent source of ambient energy: The day-night-cycle of the sun causes a temperature variation in the ambient air as well as arbitrary solids (soil, building walls, etc.). Unlike the air, solids have a large thermal inertia which dampens the temperature variation. This physical process leads to a temperature difference {Delta}T = T{sub air} - T{sub solid} between air and solid that can be converted directly into electrical energy by a thermoelectric generator (TEG). Thermal and electrical interfaces are necessary to connect the TEG to the thermal energy source (T{sub air}, T{sub solid}) and the electrical load (WSN). Reliable operation of the WSN may only be ensured if the harvester provides sufficient electrical energy, i.e. operates at its maximum power point. The goal of this thesis is to study, design, and test thermoelectric harvesters generating electrical energy from small ambient temperature transients in order to self-sufficiently power a WSN. Current research into thermoelectric energy harvesting, especially analytical modeling and application in the field are treated insufficiently. Therefore, a time-dependent analytical model of the harvester's output power is set

  15. Executive summary: The health and fitness benefits of regular participation in small-sided football games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krustrup, Peter; Dvorak, J.; Junge, A.

    2010-01-01

    The present special issue of Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports deals with health and fitness benefits of regular participation in small-sided football games. One review article and 13 original articles were the result of a 2-year multi-center study in Copenhagen and Zurich...... and include studies of different age groups analyzed from a physiological, medical, social and psychological perspective. The main groups investigated were middle-aged, former untrained, healthy men and women who were followed for up to 16 months. In addition, elderly, children and hypertensive patients were...... studied. A summary and interpretations of the main findings divided into an analysis of the physical demands during training of various groups and the effect of a period of training on performance, muscle adaptations and health profile follow. In addition, social and psychological effects on participation...

  16. Modeling Air Temperature/Water Temperature Relations Along a Small Mountain Stream Under Increasing Urban Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedders, E. R.; Anderson, W. P., Jr.; Hengst, A. M.; Gu, C.

    2017-12-01

    Boone Creek is a headwater stream of low to moderate gradient located in Boone, North Carolina, USA. Total impervious surface coverage in the 5.2 km2 catchment drained by the 1.9 km study reach increases from 13.4% in the upstream half of the reach to 24.3% in the downstream half. Other markers of urbanization, including culverting, lack of riparian shade vegetation, and bank armoring also increase downstream. Previous studies have shown the stream to be prone to temperature surges on short timescales (minutes to hours) caused by summer runoff from the urban hardscaping. This study investigates the effects of urbanization on the stream's thermal regime at daily to yearly timescales. To do this, we developed an analytical model of daily average stream temperatures based on daily average air temperatures. We utilized a two-part model comprising annual and biannual components and a daily component consisting of a 3rd-order Markov process in order to fit the thermal dynamics of our small, gaining stream. Optimizing this model at each of our study sites in each studied year (78 total site-years of data) yielded annual thermal exchange coefficients (K) for each site. These K values quantify the strength of the relationship between stream and air temperature, or inverse thermal stability. In a uniform, pristine catchment environment, K values are expected to decrease downstream as the stream gains discharge volume and, therefore, thermal inertia. Interannual average K values for our study reach, however, show an overall increase from 0.112 furthest upstream to 0.149 furthest downstream, despite a near doubling of stream discharge between these monitoring points. K values increase only slightly in the upstream, less urban, half of the reach. A line of best fit through these points on a plot of reach distance versus K value has a slope of 2E-6. But the K values of downstream, more urbanized sites increase at a rate of 2E-5 per meter of reach distance, an order of magnitude

  17. Sharing a Personal Trainer: Personal and Social Benefits of Individualized, Small-Group Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayment, Heidi A; McDonald, Rachael L

    2017-11-01

    Wayment, HA and McDonald, RL. Sharing a personal trainer: personal and social benefits of individualized, small-group training. J Strength Cond Res 31(11): 3137-3145, 2017-We examined a novel personal fitness training program that combines personal training principles in a small-group training environment. In a typical training session, exercisers warm-up together but receive individualized training for 50 minutes with 1-5 other adults who range in age, exercise experience, and goals for participation. Study participants were 98 regularly exercising adult members of a fitness studio in the southwestern United States (64 women and 32 men), aged 19-78 years (mean, 46.52 years; SD = 14.15). Average membership time was 2 years (range, 1-75 months; mean, 23.54 months; SD = 20.10). In collaboration with the program directors, we developed a scale to assess satisfaction with key features of this unique training program. Participants completed an online survey in Fall 2015. Hypotheses were tested with a serial mediator model (model 6) using the SPSS PROCESS module. In support of the basic tenets of self-determination theory, satisfaction with small-group, individualized training supported basic psychological needs, which in turn were associated with greater autonomous exercise motivation and life satisfaction. Satisfaction with this unique training method was also associated with greater exercise self-efficacy. Autonomous exercise motivation was associated with both exercise self-efficacy and greater self-reported health and energy. Discussion focuses on why exercise programs that foster a sense of social belonging (in addition to motivation and efficacy) may be helpful for successful adherence to an exercise program.

  18. Small-size low-temperature scanning tunnel microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al'tfeder, I.B.; Khajkin, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    A small-size scanning tunnel microscope, designed for operation in transport helium-filled Dewar flasks is described. The microscope design contains a device moving the pin to the tested sample surface and a piezoelectric fine positioning device. High vibration protection of the microscope is provided by its suspension using silk threads. The small-size scanning tunnel microscope provides for atomic resolution

  19. SMALL INVESTORS: CHALLENGES AND BENEFITS OF IPO - A CASE STUDY IN A SMALL BUSINESS IN THE REGION OF THE CAPÃO REDONDO - SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loide Priscila Cacheche

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze the importance of knowledge of managers about market capitals (in terms of benefits and challenges and the relevance of the inclusion of small business context in this market. A case study was conducted by open questions interview with a CEO of a small business in Sao Paulo. Results showed that despite the CEO has knowledge about the capital market; the company was not structurally prepared to accept the challenges of capital markets.

  20. Executive summary: the health and fitness benefits of regular participation in small-sided football games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krustrup, P; Dvorak, J; Junge, A; Bangsbo, J

    2010-04-01

    The present special issue of Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports deals with health and fitness benefits of regular participation in small-sided football games. One review article and 13 original articles were the result of a 2-year multi-center study in Copenhagen and Zurich and include studies of different age groups analyzed from a physiological, medical, social and psychological perspective. The main groups investigated were middle-aged, former untrained, healthy men and women who were followed for up to 16 months. In addition, elderly, children and hypertensive patients were studied. A summary and interpretations of the main findings divided into an analysis of the physical demands during training of various groups and the effect of a period of training on performance, muscle adaptations and health profile follow. In addition, social and psychological effects on participation in recreational football are considered, the comparison of football training and endurance running is summarized and the effects of football practice on the elderly and children and youngsters are presented.

  1. Recent developments in small punch testing: Applications at elevated temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dymáček, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 86, DEC (2016), s. 25-33 ISSN 0167-8442 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Small punch test * Creep rupture * Stress relaxation Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.659, year: 2016

  2. High temperature salting of mince of small sized fish

    OpenAIRE

    Sorinmade, S.O.; Talabi, S.O.; Aliu, A.

    1982-01-01

    Freshly caught small sized fish species were transported to the laboratory gutted and washed before mechanical separation into bone and mince. Duplicate batches of the mince were then treated with seven different concentrations (wt/wt) of sodium chloride before cooking. The cooked mince was divided into two groups, pressed and unpressed. Percentage residual salt in the salted cooked mince, free and press water and salted cooked pressed mince were determined. Also, the moisture contents of...

  3. The Benefits of Using Dense Temperature Sensor Networks to Monitor Urban Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twine, T. E.; Snyder, P. K.; Kucharik, C. J.; Schatz, J.

    2015-12-01

    Urban heat islands (UHIs) occur when urban and suburban areas experience temperatures that are elevated relative to their rural surroundings because of differences in the fraction of gray and green infrastructure. Studies have shown that communities most at risk for impacts from climate-related disasters (i.e., lower median incomes, higher poverty, lower education, and minorities) tend to live in the hottest areas of cities. Development of adequate climate adaptation tools for cities relies on knowledge of how temperature varies across space and time. Traditionally, a city's urban heat island has been quantified using near-surface air temperature measurements from a few sites. This methodology assumes (1) that the UHI can be characterized by the difference in air temperature from a small number of points, and (2) that these few points represent the urban and rural signatures of the region. This methodology ignores the rich information that could be gained from measurements across the urban to rural transect. This transect could traverse elevations, water bodies, vegetation fraction, and other land surface properties. Two temperature sensor networks were designed and implemented in the Minneapolis-Saint Paul, MN and Madison, WI metropolitan areas beginning in 2011 and 2012, respectively. Both networks use the same model sensor and record temperature every 15 minutes from ~150 sensors. Data from each network has produced new knowledge of how temperature varies diurnally and seasonally across the cities and how the UHI magnitude is influenced by weather phenomena (e.g., wind, snow cover, heat waves) and land surface characteristics such as proximity to inland lakes. However, the two metropolitan areas differ in size, population, structure, and orientation to water bodies. In addition, the sensor networks were established in very different manners. We describe these differences and present lessons learned from the design and ongoing efforts of these two dense networks

  4. Three responses to small changes in stream temperature by autumn-emerging aquatic insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judith L. Li; Sherri L. Johnson; Janel Banks. Sobota

    2011-01-01

    In this experimental study, conducted in coastal Oregon USA, we examined how small increases in summer water temperatures affected aquatic insect growth and autumn emergence. We maintained naturally fluctuating temperatures from 2 nearby streams and a 3rd regime, naturally fluctuating temperatures warmed by 3-5°C, in flow-through troughs from mid...

  5. Potential benefits and shortcomings of marine protected areas for small seabirds revealed using miniature tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M Maxwell

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Marine protected areas are considered important tools for protecting marine biodiversity, and animal tracking is a key way to determine if boundaries are effectively placed for protection of key marine species, including seabirds. We tracked chick-rearing brown noddies (Anous stolidus from the Dry Tortugas National Park in Florida USA in 2016 using 1.8 g Nanofix GPS tags (n = 10, making this the first time this species has ever been tracked. We determined movement parameters, such as flight speed, distance traveled and home range, and how birds used a complex of marine protected areas including the Dry Tortugas National Park which is largely no-take (i.e., no fishing or extraction permitted, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, of which two Ecological Reserves totaling 517.9 km2 are no-take. Birds remained largely within marine protected areas, with 91.3% of birds’ locations and 58.8% of the birds’ total home range occurring within the MPAs, and 79.2% of birds’ locations and 18.2% of the birds’ total home range within no-take areas. However areas of probable foraging, indicated by locations where birds had high-residence time, were found within one of the MPAs only 64.7% of the time, and only 6.7% of those locations were in no-take areas. Birds traveled a mean straight line distance from the colony of 37.5 km, primarily using the region to the southwest of the colony where the shelf break and Loop Current occur. High-residence-time locations were found in areas of significantly higher sea surface temperature and closer to the shelf break than low residency locations. A sea surface temperature front occurs near the shelf edge, likely indicative of where Sargassum seaweed is entrained, providing habitat for forage species. Much of this region, however, falls outside the boundaries of the marine protected areas, and brown noddies and other species breeding in the Dry Tortugas may interact with fisheries via resource competition

  6. Workplace Learning and Its Organizational Benefits for Small Enterprises: Evidence from Greek Industrial Firms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotakopoulos, Antonios

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore small firm owners' perceptions of the impact of employee training on small firm competitiveness in the context of Greece. Design/methodology/approach: The research adopts a qualitative orientation. Empirical data were collected from 43 owners of small and micro-firms operating in various sectors of…

  7. Achieving global environmental benefits through local development of clean energy? The case of small hilly hydel in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, V. Ratna; Uitto, Juha I.; Frans, Dirk R.; Matin, Nilufar

    2006-01-01

    Energy and development are closely intertwined. Yet, increasing fossil fuel-based energy consumption contributes significantly to environmental problems both locally and globally. This article explores the interlinkages between local livelihood and environmental benefits from the provision of energy to remote rural households through small hydropower development. The analysis is based on research carried out around a large development project designed to assist the Government of India in the optimum utilization of small hydropower resources in the Himalayan and sub-Himalayan regions. There are about 100,000 villages in India that are not connected to electricity supply, many of them in the hilly regions with ample hydropower potential. The project aimed to demonstrate the utility of and options for providing electricity to such villages through clean mini-hydro. The article addresses the nature of the impacts of the demonstration small hydel schemes on the local communities, to what extent they translate into environmental benefits both locally and globally, and the perceptions and participation of the local communities in these small hydro schemes. The study explores the impacts of the schemes on financial capital, natural capital, social capital, physical capital, human capital, and gender equity in the local communities. It further provides a discussion on the links between local and global environmental benefits. Overall, it is found that the schemes' impacts both on the local communities and the environment are mostly marginally positive or neutral, although achieving clearly demonstrable benefits would require major upscaling of the effort involving broader changes than possible under this project. Furthermore, it is argued that some of the assumptions behind the project design were faulty. Involvement of the local communities and direct livelihood benefits to them are essential for the long-term sustainability of the small hydro schemes. The discussion and

  8. Small magnetic energy storage systems using high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on magnetic energy storage for power systems that has been considered for commercial utility power, air and ground mobile power sources, and spacecraft applications. Even at the current technology limits of energy storage (100 KJ/Kg*), superconducting magnetic energy storage inductors do not offer a strong advantage over state-of-the-art batteries. The commercial utility application does not have a weight and volume limitation, and is under intense study in several countries for diurnal cycle energy storage and high power delivery. The advent of high temperature superconductors has reduced one of the penalties of superconducting magnetic energy storage in that refrigeration and cryocontainers become greatly simplified. Still, structural and current density issues that limit the energy density and size of superconducting inductors do not change. Cold weather starting of aircraft engines is an application where these limitations are not as significant, and where current systems lack performance. The very cold environments make it difficult to achieve high power densities in state-of-the-art batteries and hydraulically activated starters. The same cold environments make it possible to cool superconducting systems for weeks using a single charge of liquid nitrogen. At the same, the ground carts can handle the size and weight of superconducting magnetic storage (SMES) devices

  9. Emissions and temperature benefits: The role of wind power in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Hongbo, E-mail: hbduan@ucas.ac.cn

    2017-01-15

    Background: As a non-fossil technology, wind power has an enormous advantage over coal because of its role in climate change mitigation. Therefore, it is important to investigate how substituting wind power for coal-fired electricity will affect emission reductions, changes in radiative forcing and rising temperatures, particularly in the context of emission limits. Methods: We developed an integrated methodology that includes two parts: an energy-economy-environmental (3E) integrated model and an emission-temperature response model. The former is used to simulate the dynamic relationships between economic output, wind energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; the latter is used to evaluate changes in radiative forcing and warming. Results: Under the present development projection, wind energy cannot serve as a major force in curbing emissions, even under the strictest space-restraining scenario. China's temperature contribution to global warming will be up to 21.76% if warming is limited to 2 degrees. With the wind-for-coal power substitution, the corresponding contribution to global radiative forcing increase and temperature rise will decrease by up to 10% and 6.57%, respectively. Conclusions: Substituting wind power for coal-fired electricity has positive effects on emission reductions and warming control. However, wind energy alone is insufficient for climate change mitigation. It forms an important component of the renewable energy portfolio used to combat global warming. - Highlights: • We assess the warming benefits associated with substitution of wind power for coal. • The effect of emission space limits on climate responses is deeply examined. • China is responsible for at most 21.76% of global warming given the 2-degree target. • Wind power alone may not be sufficient to face the challenge of climate change. • A fertile policy soil and an aggressive plan are necessary to boost renewables.

  10. Emissions and temperature benefits: The role of wind power in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    Background: As a non-fossil technology, wind power has an enormous advantage over coal because of its role in climate change mitigation. Therefore, it is important to investigate how substituting wind power for coal-fired electricity will affect emission reductions, changes in radiative forcing and rising temperatures, particularly in the context of emission limits. Methods: We developed an integrated methodology that includes two parts: an energy-economy-environmental (3E) integrated model and an emission-temperature response model. The former is used to simulate the dynamic relationships between economic output, wind energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; the latter is used to evaluate changes in radiative forcing and warming. Results: Under the present development projection, wind energy cannot serve as a major force in curbing emissions, even under the strictest space-restraining scenario. China's temperature contribution to global warming will be up to 21.76% if warming is limited to 2 degrees. With the wind-for-coal power substitution, the corresponding contribution to global radiative forcing increase and temperature rise will decrease by up to 10% and 6.57%, respectively. Conclusions: Substituting wind power for coal-fired electricity has positive effects on emission reductions and warming control. However, wind energy alone is insufficient for climate change mitigation. It forms an important component of the renewable energy portfolio used to combat global warming. - Highlights: • We assess the warming benefits associated with substitution of wind power for coal. • The effect of emission space limits on climate responses is deeply examined. • China is responsible for at most 21.76% of global warming given the 2-degree target. • Wind power alone may not be sufficient to face the challenge of climate change. • A fertile policy soil and an aggressive plan are necessary to boost renewables.

  11. Using Estimated On-Site Ambient Temperature Has Uncertain Benefit When Estimating Postmortem Interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Dourel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The forensic entomologist uses weather station data as part of the calculation when estimating the postmortem interval (PMI. To reduce the potential inaccuracies of this method caused by the distance between the crime scene and the meteorological station, temperature correlation data from the site of the corpse may be used. This experiment simulated the impact of retrospective weather data correction using linear regression between seven stations and sites in three climatic exposure groups during three different seasons as part of the accumulated degree days calculation for three necrophagous species (Diptera: Calliphoridae. No consistent benefit in the use of correlation or the original data from the meteorological stations was observed. In nine cases out of 12, the data from the weather station network limited the risk of a deviation from reality. The forensic entomologist should be cautious when using this correlation model.

  12. Validation of temperature-sensitive radio transmitters for measurement of body temperature in small animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, Joseph B.; Tieleman, B. I.; Shobrak, Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    As part of a study on the core body temperature (T(b)) of desert birds, we purposed to use temperature-sensitive implantable radio transmitters. Because of the difficulty in recapturing these birds, we needed to know if these electronic devices held their calibration over the duration of normal

  13. Maximizing Benefits from Maintenance Pemetrexed with Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Oligoprogressive Non-Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Lun Lu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance pemetrexed offers survival benefit with well-tolerated toxicities for advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We present 3 consecutively enrolled patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC, receiving stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR for oligoprogressive disease during maintenance pemetrexed. All of them had sustained local control of thoracic oligoprogression after the SABR, while maintenance pemetrexed were kept for additionally long progression-free interval. SABR targeting oligoprogression with continued pemetrexed is an effective and safe approach to extend exposure of maintenance pemetrexed, thus maximizing the benefit from it.

  14. Ancillary benefits of climate policy in a small open economy: The case of Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krook Riekkola, Anna; Ahlgren, Erik O.; Soederholm, Patrik

    2011-01-01

    It is increasingly recognised that GHG reduction policies can have important ancillary benefits in the form of positive local and regional environmental impacts. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the domestic ancillary pollution benefits of climate policy in Sweden, and investigate how these are affected by different climate policy designs. The latter differ primarily in terms of how the country chooses to meet a specific target and where the necessary emission reductions take place. The analysis relies on simulations within the energy system optimisation model TIMES-Sweden, and focuses on four non-GHG pollutants: Nitrogen Oxides (NO X ), Non Methane Volatile Organic Compounds (NMVOC), inhalable particles (PM 2.5 ), and Sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ). The simulations permit detailed assessments of the respective technology and fuel choices that underlie any net changes in the estimated ancillary effects. The results indicate that the ancillary benefits constitute a far from insignificant share of total system costs, and this share appears to be highest in the scenarios that entail the largest emission reductions domestically. This result reflects the fact that carbon dioxide emission reductions abroad also implies a lost opportunity of achieving substantial domestic welfare gain from the reductions of regional and local environmental pollutants. - Highlights: → We estimate the domestic ancillary pollution benefits of climate policy in Sweden. → These constitute a sizeable share of total system costs. → The ancillary benefits are highest in the policy scenarios that entail the largest emission reductions domestically.

  15. A Benefit-Risk Analysis Approach to Capture Regulatory Decision-Making: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, G K; Gurumurthi, K; Domike, R; Kazandjian, D; Blumenthal, G; Pazdur, R; Woodcock, J

    2016-12-01

    Drug regulators around the world make decisions about drug approvability based on qualitative benefit-risk analyses. There is much interest in quantifying regulatory approaches to benefit and risk. In this work the use of a quantitative benefit-risk analysis was applied to regulatory decision-making about new drugs to treat advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Benefits and risks associated with 20 US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) decisions associated with a set of candidate treatments submitted between 2003 and 2015 were analyzed. For benefit analysis, the median overall survival (OS) was used where available. When not available, OS was estimated based on overall response rate (ORR) or progression-free survival (PFS). Risks were analyzed based on magnitude (or severity) of harm and likelihood of occurrence. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis was explored to demonstrate analysis of systematic uncertainty. FDA approval decision outcomes considered were found to be consistent with the benefit-risk logic. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  16. Advanced technologies related to a high temperature superconductor for small laboratory experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yuichi; Mito, Toshiyuki; Yanagi, Nagato

    2006-01-01

    Advanced technologies related to a high temperature superconductor materials and small refrigerator are reviewed. Mini-RT/RT-1 is designed and constructed as a plasma examination device. The element technology of low temperature apparatus, the results of performance tests and application examples are explained. The superconductors such as Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 (Bi-2212) for the low temperature phase, Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 (Bi-2223) for the high temperature phase, and YBa 2 Cu 3 O y (YBCO or Y123) are described. Advanced 4K-Giford-Mcmahon (GM) refrigerator on the market put superconductor coil made of low temperature superconductor metals to practical use and extends its application field. Small laboratory is able to experiment on the high temperature superconductor materials. (S.Y.)

  17. Higher Education Business Management Staff and the MBA: A Small Study Analysing Intrinsic and Extrinsic Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gander, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Higher education is a key sector for the United Kingdom contributing over £70 billion of output. It functions in an increasingly complex operating, regulatory, and legislative environment that has led to an increased need for effective nonacademic business managers. This study evaluates the benefits of a specialist master of business…

  18. Big Numbers about Small Children: Estimating the Economic Benefits of Addressing Undernutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Harold; Behrman, Jere R; Puett, Chloe

    2017-02-01

    Different approaches have been used to estimate the economic benefits of reducing undernutrition and to estimate the costs of investing in such programs on a global scale. While many of these studies are ultimately based on evidence from well-designed efficacy trials, all require a number of assumptions to project the impact of such trials to larger populations and to translate the value of the expected improvement in nutritional status into economic terms. This paper provides a short critique of some approaches to estimating the benefits of investments in child nutrition and then presents an alternative set of estimates based on different core data. These new estimates reinforce the basic conclusions of the existing literature: the economic value from reducing undernutrition in undernourished populations is likely to be substantial.

  19. Extreme Temperature Performance of Automotive-Grade Small Signal Bipolar Junction Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomer, Kristen; Damron, Benny; Gray, Josh; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2018-01-01

    Electronics designed for space exploration missions must display efficient and reliable operation under extreme temperature conditions. For example, lunar outposts, Mars rovers and landers, James Webb Space Telescope, Europa orbiter, and deep space probes represent examples of missions where extreme temperatures and thermal cycling are encountered. Switching transistors, small signal as well as power level devices, are widely used in electronic controllers, data instrumentation, and power management and distribution systems. Little is known, however, about their performance in extreme temperature environments beyond their specified operating range; in particular under cryogenic conditions. This report summarizes preliminary results obtained on the evaluation of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) automotive-grade NPN small signal transistors over a wide temperature range and thermal cycling. The investigations were carried out to establish a baseline on functionality of these transistors and to determine suitability for use outside their recommended temperature limits.

  20. A temperature monitor circuit with small voltage sensitivity using a topology-reconfigurable ring oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Tadashi; Ishihara, Tohru; Onodera, Hidetoshi

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a temperature monitor circuit that exhibits a small supply voltage sensitivity adopting a circuit topology of a reconfigurable ring oscillator. The circuit topology of the monitor is crafted such that the oscillation frequency is determined by the amount of subthreshold leakage current, which has an exponential dependence on temperature. Another important characteristic of the monitor is its small supply voltage sensitivity. The measured oscillation frequency of a test chip fabricated in a 65 nm CMOS process varies only 2.6% under a wide range of supply voltages from 0.4 to 1.0 V at room temperature. The temperature estimation error ranges from -0.3 to 0.4 °C over a temperature range of 10 to 100 °C.

  1. Large Industries in Small Towns: Who Benefits? Working Paper RID 73.9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Frank; Summers, Gene F.

    The impact of a large manufacturing plant on a small village in "middle America" was explored in this paper. Research was conducted in Illinois using Putnam County as an "experimental" region and Iroquois County as a "control." In the spring of 1966, the Jones and Laughlin Steel Corporation began construction of a…

  2. Jobs without benefits: the health insurance crisis faced by small businesses and their workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Ruth; Stremikis, Kristof; Collins, Sara R; Doty, Michelle M; Davis, Karen

    2012-11-01

    The share of U.S. workers in small firms who were offered, eligible for, and covered by health insurance through their jobs has declined over the past decade. Less than half of workers in companies with fewer than 50 employees were both offered and eligible for health insurance through their jobs in 2010, down from 58 percent in 2003. In contrast, about 90 percent of workers in companies with 100 or more employees were offered and eligible for their employer's health plans in both 2003 and 2010. Workers in the smallest firms--and those with the lowest wages--continue to be less likely to get coverage from their employers and more likely to be uninsured than workers in larger firms or with higher wages. The Affordable Care Act includes new subsidies that will lower the cost of health insurance for small businesses and workers who must purchase coverage on their own.

  3. Investigating the benefits of molecular profiling of advanced non-small cell lung cancer tumors to guide treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alifrangis, Costi; Carter, Philip; Cereser, Biancastella; Chandrasinghe, Pramodh; Belluz, Lisa Del Bel; Lim, Eric; Moderau, Nina; Poyia, Fotini; Tabassum, Neha; Zhang, Hua; Krell, Jonathan; Stebbing, Justin

    2018-02-27

    In this study we utilized data on patient responses to guided treatments, and we evaluated their benefit for a non-small cell lung cancer cohort. The recommended therapies used were predicted using tumor molecular profiles that involved a range of biomarkers but primarily used immunohistochemistry markers. A dataset describing 91 lung non-small cell lung cancer patients was retrospectively split into two. The first group's drugs were consistent with a treatment plan whereby all drugs received agreed with their tumor's molecular profile. The second group each received one or more drug that was expected to lack benefit. We found that there was no significant difference in overall survival or mortality between the two groups. Patients whose treatments were predicted to be of benefit survived for an average of 402 days, compared to 382 days for those that did not ( P = 0.7934). In the matched treatment group, 48% of patients were deceased by the time monitoring had finished compared to 53% in the unmatched group ( P = 0.6094). The immunohistochemistry biomarker for the ERCC1 receptor was found to be a marker that could be used to predict future survival; ERCC1 loss was found to be predictive of poor survival.

  4. An Investigation into the Potential Benefits of Distributed Electric Propulsion on Small UAVs at Low Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baris, Engin

    Distributed electric propulsion systems benefit from the inherent scale independence of electric propulsion. This property allows the designer to place multiple small electric motors along the wing of an aircraft instead of using a single or several internal combustion motors with gear boxes or other power train components. Aircraft operating at low Reynolds numbers are ideal candidates for benefiting from increased local flow velocities as provided by distributed propulsion systems. In this study, a distributed electric propulsion system made up of eight motor/propellers was integrated into the leading edge of a small fixed wing-body model to investigate the expected improvements on the aerodynamics available to small UAVs operating at low Reynolds numbers. Wind tunnel tests featuring a Design of Experiments (DOE) methodology were used for aerodynamic characterization. Experiments were performed in four modes: all-propellers-on, wing-tip-propellers-alone-on, wing-alone mode, and two-inboard-propellers-on-alone mode. In addition, the all-propeller-on, wing-alone, and a single-tractor configuration were analyzed using VSPAERO, a vortex lattice code, to make comparisons between these different configurations. Results show that the distributed propulsion system has higher normal force, endurance, and range features, despite a potential weight penalty.

  5. Temperature-associated population diversity in salmon confers benefits to mobile consumers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Casey P.; Schindle, Daniel E.; Armstrong, Jonathan B.; Bentle, Kale T.; Brooks, Gabriel T.; Holtgrieve, Gordon W.; McGlauflin, Molly T.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Seeb, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Habitat heterogeneity can generate intraspecific diversity through local adaptation of populations. While it is becoming increasingly clear that population diversity can increase stability in species abundance, less is known about how population diversity can benefit consumers that can integrate across population diversity in their prey. Here we demonstrate cascading effects of thermal heterogeneity on trout–salmon interactions in streams where rainbow trout rely heavily on the seasonal availability of anadromous salmon eggs. Water temperature in an Alaskan stream varied spatially from 5°C to 17.5°C, and spawning sockeye salmon showed population differentiation associated with this thermal heterogeneity. Individuals that spawned early in cool regions of the 5 km long stream were genetically differentiated from those spawning in warmer regions later in the season. Sockeye salmon spawning generates a pulsed resource subsidy that supports the majority of seasonal growth in stream-dwelling rainbow trout. The spatial and temporal structuring of sockeye salmon spawn timing in our focal stream extended the duration of the pulsed subsidy compared to a thermally homogeneous stream with a single population of salmon. Further, rainbow trout adopted movement strategies that exploited the multiple pulses of egg subsidies in the thermally heterogeneous stream. Fish that moved to track the resource pulse grew at rates about 2.5 times higher than those that remained stationary or trout in the reference stream with a single seasonal pulse of eggs. Our results demonstrate that habitat heterogeneity can have important effects on the population diversity of dominant species, and in turn, influence their value to species that prey upon them. Therefore, habitat homogenization may have farther-reaching ecological effects than previously considered.

  6. Effect of prewarming on the body temperature of small dogs undergoing inhalation anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigotti, Clara F; Jolliffe, Colette T; Leece, Elizabeth A

    2015-10-01

    To investigate whether prewarming affects body temperature of small dogs (weighing dogs weighing temperature was recorded. Before IM administration of buprenorphine hydrochloride and acepromazine maleate, dogs were randomly assigned to be placed in a pediatric incubator at 33°C (91.4°F) for approximately 30 to 60 minutes (prewarming group) or to receive no prewarming (control group); subsequently, dogs underwent inhalation anesthesia with isoflurane in oxygen. Rectal, esophageal, and ambient temperatures were measured every 5 minutes from induction of anesthesia (IOA) for > 1 hour by an observer who was unaware of treatment. If a dog became hypothermic (esophageal temperature dogs, anesthesia, temperatures, hypothermia, and study withdrawal were compared between groups. 1 dog was excluded from the prewarming group after becoming excessively excited in the incubator. Between groups, age, weight, body condition score, degree of preanesthesia sedation, interval from sedation to IOA, duration of anesthesia, baseline rectal temperature, rectal temperatures immediately prior to IOA, esophageal temperature following IOA, ambient temperature during the first 70 minutes of anesthesia, esophageal or rectal temperature during the first 90 minutes of anesthesia, and incidence of hypothermia and study withdrawal (5 dogs/group) did not differ significantly. Prewarming in an incubator prior to IOA failed to improve or maintain body temperature of dogs weighing < 10 kg during inhalation anesthesia.

  7. How and Why Does Stream Water Temperature Vary at Small Spatial Scales in a Headwater Stream?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J. C.; Gannon, J. P.; Kelleher, C.

    2017-12-01

    The temperature of stream water is controlled by climatic variables, runoff/baseflow generation, and hyporheic exchange. Hydrologic conditions such as gaining/losing reaches and sources of inflow can vary dramatically along a stream on a small spatial scale. In this work, we attempt to discern the extent that the factors of air temperature, groundwater inflow, and precipitation influence stream temperature at small spatial scales along the length of a stream. To address this question, we measured stream temperature along the perennial stream network in a 43 ha catchment with a complex land use history in Cullowhee, NC. Two water temperature sensors were placed along the stream network on opposite sides of the stream at 100-meter intervals and at several locations of interest (i.e. stream junctions). The forty total sensors recorded the temperature every 10 minutes for one month in the spring and one month in the summer. A subset of sampling locations where stream temperature was consistent or varied from one side of the stream to the other were explored with a thermal imaging camera to obtain a more detailed representation of the spatial variation in temperature at those sites. These thermal surveys were compared with descriptions of the contributing area at the sample sites in an effort to discern specific causes of differing flow paths. Preliminary results suggest that on some branches of the stream stormflow has less influence than regular hyporheic exchange, while other tributaries can change dramatically with stormflow conditions. We anticipate this work will lead to a better understanding of temperature patterns in stream water networks. A better understanding of the importance of small-scale differences in flow paths to water temperature may be able to inform watershed management decisions in the future.

  8. Who benefits from outsourcing? A study of one italian region’s small firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignazio Drudi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the production outsourcing of Emilia-Romagna’s small clothing manufacturers, using a new rich firm-level dataset. This dataset has the considerable advantage of containing interesting information about the outsourcing of certain phases of the production process that no other data source offers. The production process of these firms, which may be of a totally integrated or more fragmented nature, is thus analysed, and the effects of outsourcing are investigated. Since the analysis of the impact of outsourcing at the firm level has always focused more on productivity than on profitability (Olsen 2006, we are going to study the impact of outsourcing decisions both on a firm’s value added and on its gross earnings, by estimating econometric models. These models allow us to incorporate a firm’s outsourcing propensity into the impact evaluation, by adjusting for possible selection bias (Amemija 1985; Schnedler 2005. Our findings show that outsourcing has a positive effect on both productivity and, in particular, on profitability, thus confirming that Italian small clothing businesses tend to place immediate profit before productivity and growth.

  9. A simple technique for measuring the superconducting critical temperature of small (>= 10 μg) samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, R.F.R.; Meyer, E.; Silveira, M.F. da.

    1983-01-01

    A simple technique for measuring the superconducting critical temperature of small (>=10μg) samples is described. The apparatus is built in the form of a probe, which can be introduced directly into a liquid He storage dewar and permits the determination of the critical temperature, with an imprecision of +- 0.05 K above 4.2 K, in about 10 minutes. (Author) [pt

  10. Macroscopic High-Temperature Structural Analysis Model of Small-Scale PCHE Prototype (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kee Nam; Lee, Heong Yeon; Hong, Sung Deok; Park, Hong Yoon

    2011-01-01

    The IHX (intermediate heat exchanger) of a VHTR (very high-temperature reactor) is a core component that transfers the high heat generated by the VHTR at 950 .deg. C to a hydrogen production plant. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute manufactured a small-scale prototype of a PCHE (printed circuit heat exchanger) that was being considered as a candidate for the IHX. In this study, as a part of high-temperature structural integrity evaluation of the small-scale PCHE prototype, we carried out high-temperature structural analysis modeling and macroscopic thermal and elastic structural analysis for the small-scale PCHE prototype under small-scale gas-loop test conditions. The modeling and analysis were performed as a precedent study prior to the performance test in the small-scale gas loop. The results obtained in this study will be compared with the test results for the small-scale PCHE. Moreover, these results will be used in the design of a medium-scale PCHE prototype

  11. Can Small Countries Benefit from the E-waste Global Value Chain?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meine Pieter, Dijk van

    2016-01-01

    E-waste is a term used to cover items of all types of electrical and electronic equipment and its parts that have been discarded by the owners as waste without the intention of re-use, because this equipment has ceased to be of any value to its owners. E-waste is one of the fastestgrowing waste streams globally. Since the Rio Summit Earth summit organized by the United Nations in 1992, the concept of sustainability extends to rendering basic services such as Solid Waste Management and dealing with e-waste. People are afraid of e-waste because of its possible negative effects on health and because it could pollute the environment. Indicators of unsustainable service provision concerninge-waste include irregular collection, open dumping, burning of solid and e-waste in open spaces. Often collection covers a small part of the country, cost recovery is limited or not existent, and one notes poor utilization of available resources with no or very limited reuse and recycling

  12. Urban Lighting Project for a Small Town: Comparing Citizens and Authority Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Cellucci

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The smart and resilient city evolves by slow procedures of mutation without radical changes, increasing the livability of its territory. The value of the city center in a Smart City can increase through urban lighting systems: its elements on the territory can collect and convey data to increase services to city users; the electrical system becomes the so-called Smart Grid. This paper presents a study of smart lighting for a small town, a touristic location inside a nature reserve on the Italian coast. Three different approaches have been proposed, from minimal to more invasive interventions, and their effect on the territory has been investigated. Based on street typology and its surroundings, the work analyzes the opportunity to introduce smart and useful services for the citizens starting from a retrofitting intervention. Smart city capabilities are examined, showing how it is possible to provide new services to the cities through ICT (Information and Communication Technology without deep changes and simplifying the control of basic city functions. The results evidence an important impact on annual energy costs, suggesting smart grid planning not only for metropolis applications, but also in smaller towns, such as the examined one.

  13. Can Small Countries Benefit from the E-waste Global Value Chain?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meine Pieter, Dijk van, E-mail: mpvandijk@iss.nl [UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Erasmus University in Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-01-09

    E-waste is a term used to cover items of all types of electrical and electronic equipment and its parts that have been discarded by the owners as waste without the intention of re-use, because this equipment has ceased to be of any value to its owners. E-waste is one of the fastestgrowing waste streams globally. Since the Rio Summit Earth summit organized by the United Nations in 1992, the concept of sustainability extends to rendering basic services such as Solid Waste Management and dealing with e-waste. People are afraid of e-waste because of its possible negative effects on health and because it could pollute the environment. Indicators of unsustainable service provision concerninge-waste include irregular collection, open dumping, burning of solid and e-waste in open spaces. Often collection covers a small part of the country, cost recovery is limited or not existent, and one notes poor utilization of available resources with no or very limited reuse and recycling.

  14. Note: surface acoustic wave resonators for detecting of small changes of temperature: a thermometric "magnifying glass".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryshtal, R G; Medved, A V

    2014-02-01

    Application of surface acoustic wave resonators with a phase format of an output signal as the thermometric "magnifying glass" is suggested. Possibilities of monitoring and measuring of small changes of temperature from 0.001 K to 0.3 K of objects having thermal contact with the resonator's substrate are shown experimentally.

  15. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Study of Structural Changes in Temperature-Sensitive Microgel Colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stieger, M.A.; Richtering, W.; Pedersen, J.S.; Lindner, P.

    2004-01-01

    The structure of temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) microgels in dilute suspension was investigated by means of small-angle neutron scattering. A direct modeling expression for the scattering intensity distribution was derived which describes very well the experimental data at all

  16. The Energy Savings and Environmental Benefits for Small and Medium Enterprises by Cloud Energy Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chieh Tseng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Small and medium enterprises (SMES play an important role in Taiwan’s economy. The reduction of energy costs and carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions are critical to preserving the environment. This paper uses the experimental results from 65 sites, gathered over two years since 2012, to determine how the integration of Internet communication, cloud computing technologies and a cloud energy management service (cloud EMS can reduce energy consumption by cost-effective means. The EMS has three levels: infrastructure as a service (IaaS, platform as a service (PaaS and software as a service (SaaS. Working jointly with ChungHwa Telecom, Taiwan’s leading telecom service provider, data from detection devices, control devices, air-conditioning and lighting systems are all uploaded to a cloud EMS platform, to give a so called intelligent energy management network application service platform (IEN-ASP. Various energy saving management functions are developed using this platform: (1 air conditioning optimization; (2 lighting system optimization; (3 scheduling control; (4 power billing control and (5 occupancy detection and timing control. Using the international performance measurement and verification protocol (IPMVP, the energy used at the test sites, before and after the use of the IEN-ASP, are compared to calculate the energy saved. The experimental results show that there is an average energy saving of 5724 kWh per year, which represents a saving ratio of 5.84%. This translates to a total reduction in CO2 emissions of 9,926,829 kg per year. Using the data collected, a regression model is used to demonstrate the correlation between the power that is consumed, the energy that is saved and the area of the sites. Another interesting result is that, if the experimental sites are maintained by experienced electricians or other personnel and EMS protocols are followed, the energy saving can be as great as 6.59%.

  17. Non-invasicve measurement of the temperature using scanning small coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Takeo; Noguchi, Kenichi

    2002-01-01

    The temperature measurement of the tumor is important for hyperthermia. A thermocouple thermometer is stabbed in the living body, and temperature measurement is being done. The problem of this method is that it can get only a part of temperature and it has large invasion to the patient. Therefore, it can't know even if a part of temperature rises. We researched the matter whether temperature measurement could be done without stabbing a thermometer by using the small coils. A magnetic field is born when it is charged with electricity of the high frequency to the objects. It is caught with the coil which put this magnetic field on making it stand opposite to each other. The electric fields decrease with 1/ (2π r). Then, we can calculate the profile of the electric fields using this equation. There are high collation between RF current and temperature in this object. Therefore, we can estimate the temperature distribution in the heating object non-invasively. The results of this study confirmed, there was high correlation between temperature distribution using thermography and distribution of RF currents from our methods

  18. Small-amplitude vibrations at a finite temperature in the liquid drop model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Providencia, J. da Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The ground state of a hot nucleus is studied in the classical limit. The equations of motion and boundary conditions of the liquid drop model are derived from the variational principle. The effect of the surface tension is taken into account. The temperature dependence of small-amplitude vibrations in the liquid drop model is investigated. It is shown that the breathing mode suffers a 6.3% decrease in energy when the temperature increases from 0 to 5 MeV. The present model allows for a description of surface modes with an A -1/2 dependence of the energy. It is also found that the surface modes will show an appreciable temperature dependence if a reasonable temperature dependence of the surface tension is postulated. It is shown that the model satisfies the energy-weighted sum rule and the inverse energy-weighted sum rule. (orig.)D

  19. [Development of a simultaneous strain and temperature sensor with small-diameter FBG].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong-mei; Liang, Da-kai

    2011-03-01

    Manufacture of the small diameter FBG was designed. Cross sensitivity of temperature and strain at sensing point was solved. Based on coupled-mode theory, optical properties of the designed FBG were studied. The reflection and transmission spectra of the designed FBG in small diameter were studied A single mode optical fiber, whose cladding diameter is 80 microm, was manufactured to a fiber Bragg grating (phi80FBG). According to spectrum simulation, the grating length and period were chosen as the wavelength was 1528 nm. The connector of the small diameter FBG with demodulation was designed too. In applications, the FBG measures the total deformation including strain due to forces applied to the structures as well as thermal expansion. In order to overcome this inconvenience and to measure both parameters at the same time and location, a novel scheme for simultaneous strain and temperature sensor was presented. Since the uniform strength beam has same deformation at all points, a pair of phi80 FBG was attached on a uniform strength cantilever. One of the FBG was on the upper surface, with the other one on the below. Therefore, the strains at the monitoring points were equal in magnitude but of opposite sign. The strain and temperature in sensing point could be discriminated by matrix equation. The determination of the K is not null and thus matrix inversion is well conditioned, even the values for the K elements are close. Consequently, the cross sensitivity of the FBG with temperature and strain can be experimentally solved. Experiments were carried out to study the strain discriminability of small-diameter FBG sensors. The temperature and strain were calculated and the errors were, respectively, 5% and 6%.

  20. Target tailoring and proton beam therapy to reduce small bowel dose in cervical cancer radiotherapy. A comparison of benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, Peter de; Westerveld, Henrike; Smit, Mark; Bel, Arjan; Rasch, Coen R.N.; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Schoot, Agustinus J.A.J. van de; Buist, Marrije R.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the potential clinical benefit from both target tailoring by excluding the tumour-free proximal part of the uterus during image-guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) and improved dose conformity based on intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The study included planning CTs from 11 previously treated patients with cervical cancer with a >4-cm tumour-free part of the proximal uterus on diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). IGART and robustly optimised IMPT plans were generated for both conventional target volumes and for MRI-based target tailoring (where the non-invaded proximal part of the uterus was excluded), yielding four treatment plans per patient. For each plan, the V 15Gy , V 30Gy , V 45Gy and D mean for bladder, sigmoid, rectum and bowel bag were compared, and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for ≥grade 2 acute small bowel toxicity was calculated. Both IMPT and MRI-based target tailoring resulted in significant reductions in V 15Gy , V 30Gy , V 45Gy and D mean for bladder and small bowel. IMPT reduced the NTCP for small bowel toxicity from 25% to 18%; this was further reduced to 9% when combined with MRI-based target tailoring. In four of the 11 patients (36%), NTCP reductions of >10% were estimated by IMPT, and in six of the 11 patients (55%) when combined with MRI-based target tailoring. This >10% NTCP reduction was expected if the V 45Gy for bowel bag was >275 cm 3 and >200 cm 3 , respectively, during standard IGART alone. In patients with cervical cancer, both proton therapy and MRI-based target tailoring lead to a significant reduction in the dose to surrounding organs at risk and small bowel toxicity. (orig.) [de

  1. Benefit of brain prophylactic irradiation in patients suffering from a small-cell bronchial cancer: retrospective study on 289 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assouline, A.; Tai, P.; Jancewicz, M.; Joseph, K.; Krzisch, C.; Yu, E.

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a study which aimed at determining the benefit of a brain prophylactic irradiation for patients suffering from a localized small-cell bronchial cancer and in partial response to the local-regional treatment of their disease. A retrospective analysis has been performed on a set of 289 patients who had been treated by chemo-radiotherapy with or without brain prophylactic irradiation between 1981 and 2007. Data are discussed in terms of remission level, survival with respect to the level of response to the local-regional treatment. Depending on this response level the irradiation increases or not the probability of global survival, or the probability of specific survival. Short communication

  2. Advance High Temperature Inspection Capabilities for Small Modular Reactors: Part 1 - Ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Leonard J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Bowler, John R. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2017-08-30

    The project objective was to investigate the development non-destructive evaluation techniques for advanced small modular reactors (aSMR), where the research sought to provide key enabling inspection technologies needed to support the design and maintenance of reactor component performance. The project tasks for the development of inspection techniques to be applied to small modular reactor are being addressed through two related activities. The first is focused on high temperature ultrasonic transducers development (this report Part 1) and the second is focused on an advanced eddy current inspection capability (Part 2). For both inspection techniques the primary aim is to develop in-service inspection techniques that can be carried out under standby condition in a fast reactor at a temperature of approximately 250°C in the presence of liquid sodium. The piezoelectric material and the bonding between layers have been recognized as key factors fundamental for development of robust ultrasonic transducers. Dielectric constant characterization of bismuth scantanate-lead titanate ((1-x)BiScO3-xPbTiO3) (BS-PT) has shown a high Curie temperature in excess of 450°C , suitable for hot stand-by inspection in liquid metal reactors. High temperature pulse-echo contact measurements have been performed with BS-PT bonded to 12.5 mm thick 1018-low carbon steel plate from 20C up to 260 C. High temperature air-backed immersion transducers have been developed with BS-PT, high temperature epoxy and quarter wavlength nickel plate, needed for wetting ability in liquid sodium. Ultrasonic immersion measurements have been performed in water up to 92C and in silicone oil up to 140C. Physics based models have been validated with room temperature experimental data with benchmark artifical defects.

  3. Land surface skin temperature climatology: benefitting from the strengths of satellite observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Menglin; Dickinson, Robert E

    2010-01-01

    Surface skin temperature observations (T skin ), as obtained by satellite remote sensing, provide useful climatological information of high spatial resolution and global coverage that enhances the traditional ground observations of surface air temperature (T air ) and so, reveal new information about land surface characteristics. This letter analyzes nine years of moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) skin temperature observations to present monthly skin temperature diurnal, seasonal, and inter-annual variations at a 0.05 deg. latitude/longitude grid over the global land surface and combines these measurements with other MODIS-based variables in an effort to understand the physical mechanisms responsible for T skin variations. In particular, skin temperature variations are found to be closely related to vegetation cover, clouds, and water vapor, but to differ from 2 m surface T air in terms of both physical meaning and magnitude. Therefore, the two temperatures (T skin and T air ) are complementary in their contribution of valuable information to the study of climate change.

  4. Low-temperature heat capacity of small Nb3Sn polycrystals by ac calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, R.; Johnston, D.C.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown by an ac calorimetry technique that the multiple heat capacity anomalies which occur below the superconducting transition temperature for small polycrystalline Nb 3 Sn samples are intrinsic to these samples. The recent suggestions that shear stresses can account for these results are analyzed for their validity. The dependence of the occurrence of these multiple anomalies upon the thermal history of the samples was investigated

  5. Insight into small RNA abundance and expression in high- and low-temperature stress response using deep sequencing in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baev, Vesselin; Milev, Ivan; Naydenov, Mladen; Vachev, Tihomir; Apostolova, Elena; Mehterov, Nikolay; Gozmanva, Mariyana; Minkov, Georgi; Sablok, Gaurav; Yahubyan, Galina

    2014-11-01

    Small RNA profiling and assessing its dependence on changing environmental factors have expanded our understanding of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of plant stress responses. Insufficient data have been documented earlier to depict the profiling of small RNA classes in temperature-associated stress which has a wide implication for climate change biology. In the present study, we report a comparative assessment of the genome-wide profiling of small RNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana using two conditional responses, induced by high- and low-temperature. Genome-wide profiling of small RNAs revealed an abundance of 21 nt small RNAs at low temperature, while high temperature showed an abundance of 21 nt and 24 nt small RNAs. The two temperature treatments altered the expression of a specific subset of mature miRNAs and displayed differential expression of a number of miRNA isoforms (isomiRs). Comparative analysis demonstrated that a large number of protein-coding genes can give rise to differentially expressed small RNAs following temperature shifts. Low temperature caused accumulation of small RNAs, corresponding to the sense strand of a number of cold-responsive genes. In contrast, high temperature stimulated the production of small RNAs of both polarities from genes encoding functionally diverse proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Small distributed generation versus centralised supply: a social cost-benefit analysis in the residential and service sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulli, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims at measuring the social benefits of small CHP distributed generation (DG) in the residential and service sectors. We do this by comparing the social costs of decentralised and centralised supplies, simulating 'ideal' situations in which any source of allocative inefficiencies is eliminated. This comparison focuses on assessing internal and external costs. The internal costs are calculated by simulating the optimal prices of the electricity and gas inputs. The external costs are estimated by using and elaborating the results of the dissemination process of the ExternE project, one of the most recent and accurate methodologies in this field. The analysis takes into account the main sources of uncertainty about the parameter values, including uncertainty about external cost estimations. Despite these sources of uncertainty, the paper concludes that centralised supply is still preferable to small DG. In fact, the overall range of DG social competitiveness is restricted, even considering further remarkable improvements in DG electrical efficiency and investment costs. The results are particularly unfavourable for the residential sector, whereas, in the service sector, the performance of DG technologies is slightly better

  7. Room temperature synthesis and optical properties of small diameter (5 nm) ZnO nanorod arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seungho; Jang, Ji-Wook; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2010-10-01

    We report a simple wet-chemical synthesis of ∼5 nm diameter ZnO nanorod arrays at room temperature (20 °C) and normal atmospheric pressure (1 atm) and their optical properties. They were single crystalline in nature, and grew in the [001] direction. These small diameter ZnO nanorod arrays can also be synthesized at 0 °C. Control experiments were also conducted. On the basis of the results, we propose a mechanism for the spontaneous growth of the small diameter ZnO structures. The optical properties of the 5 nm diameter ZnO nanorod arrays synthesized using this method were probed by UV-Visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. A clear blue-shift, relative to the absorption band from 50 nm diameter ZnO nanorod arrays, was attributed to the quantum confinement effects caused by the small nanocrystal size in the 5 nm diameter ZnO nanorods.

  8. Small punch creep test: A promising methodology for high temperature plant components life evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tettamanti, S. [CISE SpA, Milan (Italy); Crudeli, R. [ENEL SpA, Milan (Italy)

    1998-12-31

    CISE and ENEL are involved for years in a miniaturization creep methodology project to obtain similar non-destructive test with the same standard creep test reliability. The goal can be reached with `Small punch creep test` that collect all the requested characteristics; quasi nondestructive disk specimens extracted both on external or internal side of components, than accurately machined and tested on little and cheap apparatus. CISE has developed complete creep small punch procedure that involved peculiar test facility and correlation`s law comparable with the more diffused isostress methodology for residual life evaluation on ex-serviced high temperature plant components. The aim of this work is to obtain a simple and immediately applicable relationship useful for plant maintenance managing. More added work is need to validate the Small Punch methodology and for relationship calibration on most diffusion high temperature structural materials. First obtained results on a comparative work on ASTM A355 P12 ex-serviced pipe material are presented joint with a description of the Small Punch apparatus realized in CISE. (orig.) 6 refs.

  9. Small punch creep test: A promising methodology for high temperature plant components life evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tettamanti, S [CISE SpA, Milan (Italy); Crudeli, R [ENEL SpA, Milan (Italy)

    1999-12-31

    CISE and ENEL are involved for years in a miniaturization creep methodology project to obtain similar non-destructive test with the same standard creep test reliability. The goal can be reached with `Small punch creep test` that collect all the requested characteristics; quasi nondestructive disk specimens extracted both on external or internal side of components, than accurately machined and tested on little and cheap apparatus. CISE has developed complete creep small punch procedure that involved peculiar test facility and correlation`s law comparable with the more diffused isostress methodology for residual life evaluation on ex-serviced high temperature plant components. The aim of this work is to obtain a simple and immediately applicable relationship useful for plant maintenance managing. More added work is need to validate the Small Punch methodology and for relationship calibration on most diffusion high temperature structural materials. First obtained results on a comparative work on ASTM A355 P12 ex-serviced pipe material are presented joint with a description of the Small Punch apparatus realized in CISE. (orig.) 6 refs.

  10. Investigation of metrological parameters of measuring system for small temperature changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samynina M. G.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Metrological parameters of the non-standard contact device were investigated to characterize its performance in temperature change measurements in the specified temperature range. Several series thermistors with a negative temperature coefficient of resistance connected into a linearization circuit were used as the sensing element of the semiconductor device. Increasing the number of thermistors leads to improved circuitry resolving power and reduced dispersion of this parameter. However, there is the question of optimal ratio of the number of thermistors and implemented temperature resolution, due to the nonlinear resolution dependence of the number of series-connected thermoelements. An example of scheme of four similar thermistors as the primary sensor and of a standard measuring instrument, which is working in ohmmeter mode, shows the ability to measure temperature changes at the level of hundredth of a Celsius degree. In this case, a quantization error, which is determined by a resolution of the measuring system, and the ohmmeter accuracy make the main contribution to the overall accuracy of measuring small temperature changes.

  11. Fuel properties effect on the performance of a small high temperature rise combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Waldo A.; Beckel, Stephen A.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of an advanced small high temperature rise combustor was experimentally determined at NASA-Lewis. The combustor was designed to meet the requirements of advanced high temperature, high pressure ratio turboshaft engines. The combustor featured an advanced fuel injector and an advanced segmented liner design. The full size combustor was evaluated at power conditions ranging from idle to maximum power. The effect of broad fuel properties was studied by evaluating the combustor with three different fuels. The fuels used were JP-5, a blend of Diesel Fuel Marine/Home Heating Oil, and a blend of Suntec C/Home Heating Oil. The fuel properties effect on the performance of the combustion in terms of pattern factor, liner temperatures, and exhaust emissions are documented.

  12. Emissions and temperature benefits: The role of wind power in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    As a non-fossil technology, wind power has an enormous advantage over coal because of its role in climate change mitigation. Therefore, it is important to investigate how substituting wind power for coal-fired electricity will affect emission reductions, changes in radiative forcing and rising temperatures, particularly in the context of emission limits. We developed an integrated methodology that includes two parts: an energy-economy-environmental (3E) integrated model and an emission-temperature response model. The former is used to simulate the dynamic relationships between economic output, wind energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; the latter is used to evaluate changes in radiative forcing and warming. Under the present development projection, wind energy cannot serve as a major force in curbing emissions, even under the strictest space-restraining scenario. China's temperature contribution to global warming will be up to 21.76% if warming is limited to 2 degrees. With the wind-for-coal power substitution, the corresponding contribution to global radiative forcing increase and temperature rise will decrease by up to 10% and 6.57%, respectively. Substituting wind power for coal-fired electricity has positive effects on emission reductions and warming control. However, wind energy alone is insufficient for climate change mitigation. It forms an important component of the renewable energy portfolio used to combat global warming. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Abdominal desmoplastic small round cell tumor without extraperitoneal metastases: Is there a benefit for HIPEC after macroscopically complete cytoreductive surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Honoré

    Full Text Available Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor (DSRCT is a rare disease affecting predominantly children and young adults and for which the benefit of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC after complete cytoreductive surgery (CCRS remains unknown.To identify patients with DSRCT without extraperitoneal metastases (EPM who underwent CCRS between 1991 and 2015, a retrospective nation-wide survey was conducted by crossing the prospective and retrospective databases of the French Network for Rare Peritoneal Malignancies, French Reference Network in Sarcoma Pathology, French Sarcoma Clinical Network and French Pediatric Cancer Society.Among the 107 patients with DSRCT, 48 had no EPM and underwent CCRS. The median peritoneal cancer index (PCI was 9 (range: 2-27. Among these 48 patients, 38 (79% had pre- and/or postoperative chemotherapy and 23 (48% postoperative whole abdominopelvic radiotherapy (WAP-RT. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy was administered to 11 patients (23%: two received early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC and nine HIPEC. After a median follow-up of 30 months, the median overall survival (OS of the entire cohort was 42 months. The 2-y and 5-y OS were 72% and 19%. The 2-y and 5-y disease-free survival (DFS were 30% and 12%. WAP-RT was the only variable associated with longer peritoneal recurrence-free survival and DFS after CCRS. The influence of HIPEC/EPIC on OS and DFS was not statistically conclusive.The benefit of HIPEC is still unknown and should be evaluated in a prospective trial. The value of postoperative WAP-RT seems to be confirmed.

  14. Recovery benefits of using a heat and moisture exchange mask during sprint exercise in cold temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, John G; Frost, Jeremy; St Cyr, John A

    2017-01-01

    Breathing cold air can lead to bronchoconstriction and peripheral vasoconstriction, both of which could impact muscular performance by affecting metabolic demands during exercise. Successful solutions dealing with these physiological changes during exercise in the cold has been lacking; therefore, we investigated the influence of a heat and moisture exchange mask during exercise in the cold. There were three trial arms within this study: wearing the heat and moisture exchange mask during the rest periods in the cold, no-mask application during the rest periods in the cold, and a trial at room temperature (22°C). Eight subjects cycled in four 35 kJ sprint sessions with each session separated by 20 min rest period. Workload was 4% of body mass. Mean sprint times were faster with heat and moisture exchange mask and room temperature trial than cold, no-mask trial (133.8 ± 8.6, 134.9 ± 8.8, and 138.0 ± 8.4 s (p = 0.001)). Systolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure were greater during the cold trial with no mask (15% and 13%, respectively), and heart rate was 10 bpm less during the third rest or recovery period during cold, no mask compared to the heat and moisture exchange mask and room temperature trials. Subjects demonstrated significant decreases in vital capacity and peak expiratory flow rate during the cold with no mask applied during the rest periods. These negative responses to cold exposure were alleviated by the use of a heat and moisture exchange mask worn during the rest intervals by minimizing cold-induced temperature stress on the respiratory system with subsequent maintenance of cardiovascular function.

  15. Anaphylaxis Imaging: Non-Invasive Measurement of Surface Body Temperature and Physical Activity in Small Animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisztina Manzano-Szalai

    Full Text Available In highly sensitized patients, the encounter with a specific allergen from food, insect stings or medications may rapidly induce systemic anaphylaxis with potentially lethal symptoms. Countless animal models of anaphylaxis, most often in BALB/c mice, were established to understand the pathophysiology and to prove the safety of different treatments. The most common symptoms during anaphylactic shock are drop of body temperature and reduced physical activity. To refine, improve and objectify the currently applied manual monitoring methods, we developed an imaging method for the automated, non-invasive measurement of the whole-body surface temperature and, at the same time, of the horizontal and vertical movement activity of small animals. We tested the anaphylaxis imaging in three in vivo allergy mouse models for i milk allergy, ii peanut allergy and iii egg allergy. These proof-of-principle experiments suggest that the imaging technology represents a reliable non-invasive method for the objective monitoring of small animals during anaphylaxis over time. We propose that the method will be useful for monitoring diseases associated with both, changes in body temperature and in physical behaviour.

  16. Maximising the benefits of satellite LST within the user community: ESA DUE GlobTemperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghent, D.

    2014-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is the mean radiative skin temperature of an area of land resulting from the mean balance of solar heating and land-atmosphere cooling fluxes. It is a basic determinant of the terrestrial thermal behaviour, as it controls the effective radiating temperature of the Earth's surface. The sensitivity of LST to soil moisture and vegetation cover means it is an important component in numerous applications. With the demand for LST data from Earth Observation currently experiencing considerable growth it is important that the users of this data are appropriately engaged by the LST data providers. The GlobTemperature project under the Data User Element of ESA's 4th Earth Observation Envelope Programme (2013-2017) aims to promote the wider uptake of global-scale satellite LST by the research and operational user communities; the key to success depending on the coherence and openness of the interactions between the LST and user communities. By incorporating detailed user input into the specifications, their subsequent testing of the LST data sets, and sustained access to data in a user-friendly manner through common data formats GlobTemperature is enhancing the portfolio of LST products from Earth Observation, while concurrently breaking down the barriers to successful application of such data through its programme of dialogue between the data providers and data users. Here we present the outcomes from the first phase of the project, which is achieving some innovative developments: a globally representative and consistent matchup database enabling validation and intercomparison of multi-sensor LST data sets; a prototype combined geostationary earth orbit (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO) global data set for LST to resolve the diurnal cycle which is a key request from users of LST data; the delivery of the first LST data sets via a dedicated Data Portal in harmonised data format; and the establishment, in collaboration with international colleagues

  17. Estimating the value of non-use benefits from small changes in the provision of ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Adam; Edwards-Jones, Gareth; Macdonald, David W

    2010-12-01

    The unit of trade in ecosystem services is usually the use of a proportion of the parcels of land associated with a given service. Valuing small changes in the provision of an ecosystem service presents obstacles, particularly when the service provides non-use benefits, as is the case with conservation of most plants and animals. Quantifying non-use values requires stated-preference valuations. Stated-preference valuations can provide estimates of the public's willingness to pay for a broad conservation goal. Nevertheless, stated-preference valuations can be expensive and do not produce consistent measures for varying levels of provision of a service. Additionally, the unit of trade, land use, is not always linearly related to the level of ecosystem services the land might provide. To overcome these obstacles, we developed a method to estimate the value of a marginal change in the provision of a non-use ecosystem service--in this case conservation of plants or animals associated with a given land-cover type. Our method serves as a tool for calculating transferable valuations of small changes in the provision of ecosystem services relative to the existing provision. Valuation is achieved through stated-preference investigations, calculation of a unit value for a parcel of land, and the weighting of this parcel by its ability to provide the desired ecosystem service and its effect on the ability of the surrounding land parcels to provide the desired service. We used the water vole (Arvicola terrestris) as a case study to illustrate the method. The average present value of a meter of water vole habitat was estimated at UK £ 12, but the marginal value of a meter (based on our methods) could range between £ 0 and £ 40 or more. © 2010 Society for Conservation Biology.

  18. [Benefits of cisplatin-based polychemotherapy in non-small cell bronchogenic carcinoma. Kyushu Lung Cancer Chemotherapy Study Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, M; Hara, N; Ichikawa, Y; Kanda, T; Shima, K; Tamura, K; Hokama, M

    1988-06-01

    We studied the efficacy of cisplatin-based polychemotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer. One hundred nineteen patients with adenocarcinoma or large cell carcinoma were randomized to receive cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, cisplatin and mitomycin C (CAPM) or mitomycin C, cytosine arabinoside and tegafur (MCT), and 48 patients with squamous cell carcinoma were randomized to receive cisplatin, adriamycin and peplomycin (PAP) or mitomycin C, cyclophosphamide, tespamine, toyomycin and tegafur (MCTTT). Radiation was given to the chest in patients with stage I-III disease. The response rates were CAPM, 34.5%; MCT, 13.1% (p less than 0.01) and PAP, 63.3%; MCTTT, 42.3%. A significant difference in response rate between the CAPM and MCT regimens was observed only in stage IV patients and not in stage I-III patients. The median survival was 9.5 months in the CAPM arm vs. 6.5 months in the MCT arm (p less than 0.007), and 8.5 months in the PAP arm vs. 6.5 months in the MCTTT arm. Improved median survival for the CAPM regimen was noted only in stage IV patients and not in stage I-III patients when compared to patients given the MCT regimen, respectively. Nausea and vomiting were significantly increased in patients with cisplatin-based polychemotherapy. Myelosuppression was more severe with the CAPM regimen than with the other chemotherapy regimens. We concluded that cisplatin-based polychemotherapy, CAPM and PAP therapy were of more benefit to patients with disseminated non-small-cell lung cancer than MCT and MCTTT therapy.

  19. Benefits of applying low-temperature plasma treatment to wound care and hemostasis from the viewpoints of physics and pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tetsuji; Ikehara, Yuzuru

    2017-12-01

    Over the last decade, low-temperature plasma (LTP) technology has reached the life sciences and introduced the benefits of using such technology at atmospheric pressure for medical applications. The active elements from LTP, such as reactive molecular species, charged particles and photons, appear to react with biomolecules on wounds and at bleeding points. This action by LTP might be analogous with semiconductor fabrication techniques such as etching and surface modification. From this perspective, we discuss the general aspects and principles of LTP devices used at atmospheric pressure in wound care and hemostasis as an interdisciplinary fusion of applied physics and pathology.

  20. Cost-benefit of minimally invasive staging of non-small cell lung cancer: a decision tree sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfort, Daniel P; Liew, Danny; Conron, Matthew; Hutchinson, Anastasia F; Irving, Louis B

    2010-10-01

    Accurate staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is critical for optimal management. Minimally invasive pathologic assessment of mediastinal lymphadenopathy is increasingly being performed. The cost-benefit (minimization of health care costs) of such approaches, in comparison with traditional surgical methods, is yet to be established. Decision-tree analysis was applied to compare downstream costs of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA), conventional TBNA, and surgical mediastinoscopy. Calculations were based on real costs derived from actual patient data at a major teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. One- and two-way sensitivity analyses were undertaken to account for potential variation in input parameter values. For the base-case analysis, initial evaluation with EBUS-TBNA (with negative results being surgically confirmed) was the most cost-beneficial approach (AU$2961) in comparison with EBUS-TBNA (negative results not surgically confirmed) ($3344), conventional TBNA ($3754), and mediastinoscopy ($8859). The sensitivity of EBUS-TBNA for detecting disease had the largest impact on cost, whereas the prevalence of mediastinal lymph node metastases determined whether surgical confirmation of negative EBUS-TBNA results remained cost-beneficial. Our study confirms that minimally invasive staging of NSCLC is cost-beneficial in comparison with traditional surgical techniques. EBUS-TBNA was the most cost-beneficial approach for mediastinal staging of patients with NSCLC across all studied parameters.

  1. Survival benefit from chemotherapy with mitomycin-c vinblastine and cisplatin in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joaquin, C.F.

    1992-01-01

    Between January 1989 and May 1991 a prospective trial was conducted among the patients in the Lung Center of the Philippines who were diagnosed to have unresectable and metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). There were two groups of patients: those who consented to chemotherapy with the mitomycin, vinblastine and cisplatin regimen (n=31) and those who refused any form of chemotherapy or radiation (n=15). These groups were followed up and compared as to patient characteristics and duration of survival. The results show no identifiable features in the responders and non-responders to chemotherapy which could predict tumor response. The median survival of the untreated group was 15 weeks and that of the treated group was 34 weeks. This was statistically significant. No significant difference in survival between the responders and the non-responders was observed. The objective tumor response rate to the MVP regimen was 25.8%. The most common toxic effects were emesis and hematologic abnormalities. The study recommends the option of chemotherapy with the MVP regimen rather than no treatment at all after considering the risks and benefits for the patient with advanced stage NSCLC. (auth.). 19 refs.; 2 figs.; 4 tabs

  2. Magnetic phase diagram of MnSi near critical temperature studied by neutron small angle scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Yoshikazu; Arai, Masatoshi

    1984-01-01

    The magnetic phase diagram of MnSi near the critical temperature T sub(N)=29.5K has been studied by neutron small angle scattering at KENS. It has been found that the anomalous new phase predicted by various methods to exist around at 28 K and 2 kOe is the paramagnetic phase where the magnetic correlations exhibit the same characteristics as those found at 29.5 K and zero magnetic field. This phenomenon, together with the sharp decrease of the magnetic phase boundary at T sub(N) and the substantial increase of the satellite Q vector at this temperature, has been found not to be interpreted by the current theories. (author)

  3. Small-Scale High Temperature Melter-1 (SSHTM-1) Data Package. Appendix B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This appendix provides the data for Alternate HTM Flowsheet 2 (Glycolic Acid) melter feed preparation activities in both the laboratory- and small-scale testing. The first section provides an outline of this appendix. The melter feed preparation data are presented in the next two main sections, laboratory melter feed preparation data and small-scale melter feed preparation data. Section 3.0 provides the laboratory data which is discussed in the main body of the Small-Scale High Temperature-1 (SSHTM-1) Data Package, milestone C95-02.02Y. Section 3.1 gives the flowsheet in outline form as used in the laboratory-scale tests. This section also includes the ``Laboratory Melter Feed Preparation Activity Log`` which gives A chronological account of the test in terms of time, temperature, slurry pH, and specific observations about slurry appearance, acid addition rates, and samples taken. The ``Laboratory Melter Feed Preparation Activity Log`` provides a road map to the reader by which all the activity and data from the laboratory can be easily accessed. A summary of analytical data is presented next, section 3.2, which covers starting materials and progresses to the analysis of the melter feed. The next section, 3.3, characterizes the off-gas generation that occurs during the slurry processing. The following section, 3.4, provides the rheology data gathered including gram waste oxide loading information for the various slurries tested. The final section, 3.5, includes data from standard crucible redox testing. Section 4.0 provides the small-scale data in parallel form to section 3.0. Section 5.0 concludes with the references for this appendix.

  4. Target tailoring and proton beam therapy to reduce small bowel dose in cervical cancer radiotherapy. A comparison of benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boer, Peter de; Westerveld, Henrike; Smit, Mark; Bel, Arjan; Rasch, Coen R.N.; Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schoot, Agustinus J.A.J. van de [The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Buist, Marrije R. [Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2018-03-15

    The aim of the study was to investigate the potential clinical benefit from both target tailoring by excluding the tumour-free proximal part of the uterus during image-guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) and improved dose conformity based on intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The study included planning CTs from 11 previously treated patients with cervical cancer with a >4-cm tumour-free part of the proximal uterus on diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). IGART and robustly optimised IMPT plans were generated for both conventional target volumes and for MRI-based target tailoring (where the non-invaded proximal part of the uterus was excluded), yielding four treatment plans per patient. For each plan, the V{sub 15Gy}, V{sub 30Gy}, V{sub 45Gy} and D{sub mean} for bladder, sigmoid, rectum and bowel bag were compared, and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for ≥grade 2 acute small bowel toxicity was calculated. Both IMPT and MRI-based target tailoring resulted in significant reductions in V{sub 15Gy}, V{sub 30Gy}, V{sub 45Gy} and D{sub mean} for bladder and small bowel. IMPT reduced the NTCP for small bowel toxicity from 25% to 18%; this was further reduced to 9% when combined with MRI-based target tailoring. In four of the 11 patients (36%), NTCP reductions of >10% were estimated by IMPT, and in six of the 11 patients (55%) when combined with MRI-based target tailoring. This >10% NTCP reduction was expected if the V{sub 45Gy} for bowel bag was >275 cm{sup 3} and >200 cm{sup 3}, respectively, during standard IGART alone. In patients with cervical cancer, both proton therapy and MRI-based target tailoring lead to a significant reduction in the dose to surrounding organs at risk and small bowel toxicity. (orig.) [German] In der vorliegenden Studie wurden die moeglichen klinischen Vorteile einer Zielvolumenpraezisierung durch Ausschluss des tumorfreien proximalen Gebaermutteranteils bei der ''image-guided adaptive radiotherapy

  5. Small high temperature gas-cooled reactors with innovative nuclear burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liem, Peng Hong; Ismail; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Since the innovative concept of CANDLE (Constant Axial shape of Neutron Flux, nuclide densities and power shape During Life of Energy producing reactor) burning strategy was proposed, intensive research works have been continuously conducted to evaluate the feasibility and the performance of the burning strategy on both fast and thermal reactors. We learned that one potential application of the burning strategy for thermal reactors is for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) with prismatic/block-type fuel elements. Several characteristics of CANDLE burning strategy such as constant reactor characteristics during burn-up, no need for burn-up reactivity control mechanism, proportionality of core height with core lifetime, sub-criticality of fresh fuel elements, etc. enable us to design small sized HTGR with a high degree of safety easiness of operation and maintenance, and long core lifetime which are required for introducing the reactors into remote areas or developing countries with limited infrastructures and resources. In the present work, we report our evaluation results on small sized block-type HTGR designs with CANDLE burning strategy and compared with other existing small HTGR designs including the ones with pebble fuel elements, under both uranium and thorium fuel cycles. (author)

  6. Low temperature corrosion in bark fuelled, small boilers; Laagtemperaturkorrosion i barkeldade, mindre pannor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindau, Leif; Goldschmidt, Barbara [Sycon Energikonsult AB, Malmoe (Sweden)

    2002-04-01

    A number of small (3-12 MW), new biofuel boiler plants in South Sweden, and (at least) in Austria, have suffered a high (wastage of mm/yrs.) corrosion rate on the low temperature boiler side. This problem has been investigated with respect to its occurrence and its character by contacts with operators, by plant inspections, and by analysis of cold side deposits. The plants affected have low feed water temperatures (< 100 deg C ). The plants fire most types of Swedish biofuel: chips, bark, hog fuel, and 'GROT'(=twigs and tops). The results found give basis for a hypothesis that the corrosion results from the presence of an aqueous phase in the deposits, this phase being stabilized by dissolved salts having high solubility. It then follows that for each salt, there is a critical relative humidity (calculated from the flue gas water partial pressure and the cooling surface temperature as is common practice among boiler engineers) for both the presence of the aqueous phase and the corrosion. Some critical single salts, ZnC12 and CaC12 have been identified, and they give critical 'relative humidities' of 5% and 18% respectively. These figures are a lower bound. The corresponding figure, derived from the practical experience and the reported plant operational data, is between 20 and 30%. Corrosion tests have been carried out by exposing an air-cooled probe in the fluegases at a 12 MW boiler at Saevelundsverket in Alingsaas, and the material wastage at different temperatures has been measured with a profilometer. The high corrosion rates were reproduced in the tests for high relative humidities. The corrosion rate was small and not measurable (<0.1 mm/yr) for relative humidity < 22%. The work shows by means of indirect evidence that the corrosion critical components are ZnCl{sub 2} and possibly CaCl{sub 2} as well. The practical engineering design criterion derived from the work is that the relative humidity (calculated from the flue gas water partial

  7. Studies of Interactions of Positive Helium Ions with Small Neutrals at Temperatures Below 50K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Martin Michael

    1990-01-01

    Interactions of He^+ ions with small neutrals are important because of their fundamental nature and applicability to other areas of research. In the past, very little work has been done on such systems at very low temperatures (T Boehringer and Arnold (1986) and Johnsen, Chen, and Biondi (1980). A new method of detecting the ions in the trap was also developed and implemented. The Fourier Transform Ion Z-resonance (FTIZR) technique took advantage of an induced coherence in the oscillations of the ions in the trap. This method allowed for measurement of faster ion -neutral reactions. This method was demonstrated by studying the non -resonant charge transfer process ^3He ^+{+}^4He{toatop >=ts}^3He{+}^4He^+. These measurements confirmed that the forward reaction is endothermic by about 1.1 meV.

  8. Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium commercial buildings in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, D H; Fisk, W; Apte, M G; Wu, X; Trout, A; Faulkner, D; Sullivan, D

    2012-08-01

    This field study of 37 small and medium commercial buildings throughout California obtained information on ventilation rate, temperature, and heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system characteristics. The study included seven retail establishments; five restaurants; eight offices; two each of gas stations, hair salons, healthcare facilities, grocery stores, dental offices, and fitness centers; and five other buildings. Fourteen (38%) of the buildings either could not or did not provide outdoor air through the HVAC system. The air exchange rate averaged 1.6 (s.d. = 1.7) exchanges per hour and was similar between buildings with and without outdoor air supplied through the HVAC system, indicating that some buildings have significant leakage or ventilation through open windows and doors. Not all buildings had sufficient air exchange to meet ASHRAE 62.1 Standards, including buildings used for fitness centers, hair salons, offices, and retail establishments. The majority of the time, buildings were within the ASHRAE temperature comfort range. Offices were frequently overcooled in the summer. All of the buildings had filters, but over half the buildings had a filter with a minimum efficiency reporting value rating of 4 or lower, which are not very effective for removing fine particles. Most U.S. commercial buildings (96%) are small- to medium-sized, using nearly 18% of the country's energy, and sheltering a large population daily. Little is known about the ventilation systems in these buildings. This study found a wide variety of ventilation conditions, with many buildings failing to meet relevant ventilation standards. Regulators may want to consider implementing more complete building inspections at commissioning and point of sale. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Managing runoff and flow pathways in a small rural catchment to reduce flood risk with other multi-purpose benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Mark; Welton, Phil; Kerr, Peter; Quinn, Paul; Jonczyk, Jennine

    2010-05-01

    From 2000 to 2009 there have been a high number of flood events throughout Northern Europe. Meanwhile, there is a demand for land in which to construct homes and businesses on, which is encroaching on land which is prone to flooding. Nevertheless, flood defences usually protect us from this hazard. However, the severity of floods and this demand for land has increased the number of homes which have been flooded in the past ten years. Public spending on flood defences can only go so far which targets the large populations first. Small villages and communities, where in many cases normal flood defences are not cost effective, tend to wait longer for flood mitigation strategies. The Belford Burn (Northumberland, UK) catchment is a small rural catchment that drains an area of 6 km2. It flows through the village of Belford. There is a history of flooding in Belford, with records of flood events dating back to 1877. Normal flood defences are not suitable for this catchment as it failed the Environment Agency (EA) cost benefit criteria for support. There was a desire by the local EA Flood Levy Team and the Northumbria Regional Flood Defence Committee at the Environment Agency to deliver an alternative catchment-based solution to the problem. The EA North East Flood Levy team and Newcastle University have created a partnership to address the flood problem using soft engineered runoff management features. Farm Integrated Runoff Management (FIRM) plans manage flow paths directly by storing slowing and filtering runoff at source on farms. The features are multipurpose addressing water quality, trapping sediment, creating new habitats and storing and attenuating flood flow. Background rainfall and stream stage data have been collected since November 2007. Work on the first mitigation features commenced in July 2008. Since that date five flood events have occurred in the catchment. Two of these flood events caused widespread damage in other areas of the county. However, in

  10. The benefits of corporate social responsibility introduction in small and medium-sized enterprises: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Hodinková

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Corporate social responsibility is considered as an important part of entrepreneur’s strategic behaviour. Its purpose is not only to achieve and maintain the good economic results, but at the same time also effort to do well to the environmental and social impact of business on the society. The systematic review of the literature was used to compare attitude of domestic and foreign SMEs and to identify the benefits of CSR implementation in business practice. The research findings point to the fact that the Czech SMEs do not realize enough the benefits of CSR introduction for their business.

  11. Evaluation of Biomarkers Predictive of Benefit from the PD-1 Inhibitor MK-3475 in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Brain Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Small Cell Lung Cancer and Brain Metastases PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Sarah B. Goldberg, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Yale University New Haven, CT...benefit in patients with non- small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the overall response rate is only 20-30% and there is no clearly-defined...9. Appendices……………………………………………………………14 4 1. INTRODUCTION: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, resulting in more

  12. [Evaluation on the eco-economic benefits of small watershed in Beijing mountainous area: a case of Yanqi River watershed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hui-Jie; Wei, Zi-Gang; Wang, Qing; Zhu, Xiao-Bo

    2012-12-01

    Based on the theory of harmonious development of ecological economy, a total of 13 evaluation indices were selected from the ecological, economic, and social sub-systems of Yanqi River watershed in Huairou District of Beijing. The selected evaluation indices were normalized by using trapezoid functions, and the weights of the evaluation indices were determined by analytic hierarchy process. Then, the eco-economic benefits of the watershed were evaluated with weighted composite index method. From 2004 to 2011, the ecological, economic, and social benefits of Yanqi River watershed all had somewhat increase, among which, ecological benefit increased most, with the value changed from 0.210 in 2004 to 0.255 in 2011 and an increment of 21.5%. The eco-economic benefits of the watershed increased from 0.734 in 2004 to 0.840 in 2011, with an increment of 14.2%. At present, the watershed reached the stage of advanced ecosystem, being in beneficial circulation and harmonious development of ecology, economy, and society.

  13. Multiple benefits and values of trees in urban landscapes in two small towns in northern South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shackleton, S.; Chinyimba, A.; Hebinck, P.G.M.; Shackleton, C.; Kaoma, H.

    2015-01-01

    Cities and towns can be conceptualised as complex social-ecological systems or landscapes that are composed of different spatial elements. Trees in urban landscapes provide a variety of tangible and intangible benefits (ecosystem services) that may be valued differently across diverse households and

  14. Temperature Response of a Small Mountain Stream to Thunderstorm Cloud-Cover: Application of DTS Fiber-Optic Temperature Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, D.; Klatt, A. L.; Miller, S. N.; Ohara, N.

    2014-12-01

    From a hydrologic point of view, the critical zone in alpine areas contains the first interaction of living systems with water which will flow to streams and rivers that sustain lowland biomes and human civilization. A key to understanding critical zone functions is understanding the flow of energy, and we can measure temperature as a way of looking at energy transfer between related systems. In this study we installed a Distributed Temperature Sensor (DTS) and fiber-optic cable in a zero-order stream at 9,000 ft in the Medicine Bow National Forest in southern Wyoming. We measured the temperature of the stream for 17 days from June 29 to July 16; the first 12 days were mostly sunny with occasional afternoon storms, and the last 5 experienced powerful, long-lasting storms for much of the day. The DTS measurements show a seasonal warming trend of both minimum and maximum stream temperature for the first 12 days, followed by a distinct cooling trend for the five days that experienced heavy storm activity. To gain insights into the timing and mechanisms of energy flow through the critical zone systems, we analyzed the timing of stream temperature change relative to solar short-wave radiation, and compared the stream temperature temporal response to the temporal response of soil temperature adjacent to the stream. Since convective thunderstorms are a dominant summer weather pattern in sub-alpine regions in the Rocky Mountains, this study gives us further insight into interactions of critical zone processes and weather in mountain ecosystems.

  15. Benefits of home-based multidisciplinary exercise and supportive care in inoperable non-small cell lung cancer – protocol for a phase II randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Edbrooke, Lara; Aranda, Sanchia; Granger, Catherine L.; McDonald, Christine F.; Krishnasamy, Mei; Mileshkin, Linda; Irving, Louis; Braat, Sabine; Clark, Ross A.; Gordon, Ian; Denehy, Linda

    2017-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers, and is a leading cause of cancer mortality world-wide. Due to lack of early specific symptoms, the majority of patients present with advanced, inoperable disease and five-year relative survival across all stages of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is 14%. People with lung cancer also report higher levels of symptom distress than those with other forms of cancer. Several benefits for survival and patient reported outcomes ...

  16. High-Temperature Structural Analysis of a Small-Scale Prototype of a Process Heat Exchanger (IV) - Macroscopic High-Temperature Elastic-Plastic Analysis -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kee Nam; Hong, Sung Deok; Park, Hong Yoon

    2011-01-01

    A PHE (Process Heat Exchanger) is a key component required to transfer heat energy of 950 .deg. C generated in a VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) to a chemical reaction that yields a large quantity of hydrogen. A small-scale PHE prototype made of Hastelloy-X was scheduled for testing in a small-scale gas loop at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. In this study, as a part of the evaluation of the high-temperature structural integrity of the PHE prototype, high-temperature structural analysis modeling, and macroscopic thermal and elastic-plastic structural analysis of the PHE prototype were carried out under the gas-loop test conditions as a preliminary qwer123$ study before carrying out the performance test in the gas loop. The results obtained in this study will be used to design the performance test setup for the modified PHE prototype

  17. Temperature Dependence of Charge Localization in High-Mobility, Solution-Crystallized Small Molecule Semiconductors Studied by Charge Modulation Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meneau, Aurélie Y. B.; Olivier, Yoann; Backlund, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    In solution-processable small molecule semiconductors, the extent of charge carrier wavefunction localization induced by dynamic disorder can be probed spectroscopically as a function of temperature using charge modulation spectroscopy (CMS). Here, it is shown based on combined fi eld-effect tran......In solution-processable small molecule semiconductors, the extent of charge carrier wavefunction localization induced by dynamic disorder can be probed spectroscopically as a function of temperature using charge modulation spectroscopy (CMS). Here, it is shown based on combined fi eld......-effect transistor and CMS measurements as a function of temperature that in certain molecular semiconductors, such as solution-processible pentacene, charge carriers become trapped at low temperatures in environments in which the charges become highly localized on individual molecules, while in some other molecules...

  18. Small sensitivity to temperature variations of Si-photonic Mach-Zehnder interferometer using Si and SiN waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraki, Tatsurou; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Yamada, Koji; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrated a small sensitivity to temperature variations of delay-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer (DL MZI) on a Si photonics platform. The key technique is to balance a thermo-optic effect in the two arms by using waveguide made of different materials. With silicon and silicon nitride waveguides, the fabricated DL MZI with a free-spectrum range of ~40 GHz showed a wavelength shift of -2.8 pm/K with temperature variations, which is 24 times smaller than that of the conventional Si-waveguide DL MZI. We also demonstrated the decoding of the 40-Gbit/s differential phase-shift keying signals to on-off keying signals with various temperatures. The tolerable temperature variation for the acceptable power penalty was significantly improved due to the small wavelength shifts.

  19. Use of cost benefit analysis methodology in the meaning of motorization level from small and medium hydroelectric power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzon, J.G.; Simoes, N.S.; Ramos, D.S.; Ishida, S.

    1989-01-01

    The technical and economic justifications that bringing the waterfall division reformulation between Lucas Nogueira Garcez Plant and Capivara Plant in Paranapanema River (Brazil) are described, including a comparative economic of Canoas (Alta), Canoas I and Canoas II passages, motorization study and energetic benefits. The reasons of the Bulbo turbines choice and dimensioning definition of the installed power by the new reference economic parameters are also presented. (C.G.C.). 5 refs, 11 tabs

  20. High temperature strength analysis of welded joint of RAF's by small punch test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, T. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineeering, Hokkaido (Japan); Komazaki, S.; Kohno, Y. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran (Japan); Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Kohyama, A. [Kyoto Univ., Institute of Advanced Energy (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Nucleation and growth of microvoids and/or small cracks in fine-grained heat affected zone (HAZ) after long-term service operation, which is recognized as Type IV creep damage, has recently been a worldwide issue for high Cr ferritic steels. In our group, a small punch (SP) creep test has been successfully applied to evaluate this damage of low alloy ferritic steel. However, the HAZ of fusion reactor material welded by electron-beam (EB) welding is so narrow that it is not easy to evaluate its mechanical properties by conventional tests including the SP creep test with a plate-type specimen (10 x 10 x 0.5 mm{sup 3}). In this study, the SP creep test using a further miniaturized specimen was developed and applied to the welded joint of reduced activation ferritic steels (RAFs), F82H-IEA (Fe-8Cr-2W-0.2V-0.02Ta), for measuring creep properties of the HAZ. For the SP creep test, TEM disk-type samples (diam. 3.0 x 0.30 mm) were removed from the base metal (BM), weld metal (WM) and HAZ, respectively. The specimen surfaces were polished up to a 0.05 {mu}m alumina powder finish and the specimen's thickness was finally adjusted to 0.25 mm. The SP creep tests were performed at temperatures of 823{approx}973 K and under loads ranging from 20 to 200 N. A constant load was applied to the center of the specimen through the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} bail (diam. 1.0 mm) using the electric servo motor. The central deflection of the specimen was monitored by measuring the displacement of the compression rod. The tests were carried out in an argon gas atmosphere and the gas was continuously passed through during the test to prevent severe oxidation of the specimen. The differences in SP creep properties such as rupture time and minimum creep rate between the BM, WM and HAZ were discussed in terms of microstructural changes during welding thermal cycles. In addition, the result obtained from the BM was correlated with those of uniaxial creep test

  1. Investigation of Temperature Dynamics in Small and Shallow Reservoirs, Case Study: Lake Binaba, Upper East Region of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abbasi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An unsteady fully three-dimensional model of Lake Binaba (a shallow small reservoir in semi-arid Upper East Region of Ghana has been developed to simulate its temperature dynamics. The model developed is built on the Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS equations, utilizing the Boussinesq approach. As the results of the model are significantly affected by the physical conditions on the boundaries, allocating appropriate boundary conditions, particularly over a water surface, is essential in simulating the lake’s thermal structure. The thermal effects of incoming short-wave radiation implemented as a heat source term in the temperature equation, while the heat fluxes at the free water surface, which depend on wind speed, air temperature, and atmospheric stability conditions are considered as temperature boundary condition. The model equations were solved using OpenFOAM CFD toolbox. As the flow is completely turbulent, which is affected by the complex boundary conditions, a new heat transfer solver and turbulence model were developed to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of temperature in small and shallow inland water bodies using improved time-dependent boundary conditions. The computed temperature values were compared with four days of observed field data. Simulated and observed temperature profiles show reasonable agreement where the root mean square error (RMSE over the simulation period ranges from 0.11 to 0.44 °C in temporal temperature profiles with an average value of 0.33 °C. Results indicate that the model is able to simulate the flow variables and the temperature distribution in small inland water bodies with complex bathymetry.

  2. Small grain size zirconium-based coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, O., E-mail: omar.jimenez.udg@gmail.com [Departamento de Ingeniería de Proyectos, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, AP 307, CP 45101 Zapopan, Jal (Mexico); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Audronis, M.; Leyland, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Flores, M.; Rodriguez, E. [Departamento de Ingeniería de Proyectos, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, AP 307, CP 45101 Zapopan, Jal (Mexico); Kanakis, K.; Matthews, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-30

    Hard, partly amorphous, ZrTiB(N) coatings were deposited by Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) onto (111) silicon wafers at low substrate temperatures of 85 and 110 °C using Closed Field Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering. A segmented rectangular sputter target composed of three pieces (Zr/TiB{sub 2}/Zr) was used as the source of evaporation of coating components. Two different substrate biases (i.e. floating potential and − 50 V) and N{sub 2} reactive-gas flow rates of 2, 4 and 6 sccm were employed as the main deposition parameter variables. The chemical composition, structure, morphology and mechanical properties were investigated using a variety of analytical techniques such as Glow-Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy, cross-sectional Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Glancing Angle X-ray Diffraction (GAXRD) and nanoindentation. With other parameters fixed, coating properties were found to be dependent on the substrate negative bias and nitrogen flow rate. Linear scan profiles and SEM imaging revealed that all coatings were smooth, dense and featureless (in fracture cross section) with no apparent columnar morphology or macro-defects. GAXRD structural analysis revealed that mostly metallic phases were formed for coatings containing no nitrogen, whereas a solid solution (Zr,Ti)N single phase nitride was found in most of the reactively deposited coatings — exhibiting a very small grain size due to nitrogen and boron grain refinement effects. Hardness values from as low as 8.6 GPa up to a maximum of 25.9 GPa are related mainly to solid solution strengthening effects. The measured elastic moduli correlated with the trends in hardness behaviour; values in the range of 120–200 GPa were observed depending on the selected deposition parameters. Also, high H/E values (> 0.1) were achieved with several of the coatings.

  3. Solvation of a Small Metal-Binding Peptide in Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Youngseon; Jung, Younjoon [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung J. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Structural properties of a small hexapeptide molecule modeled after metal-binding siderochrome immersed in a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) are studied via molecular dynamics simulations. We consider two different RTILs, each of which is made up of the same cationic species, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (BMI{sup +}), but different anions, hexafluorophosphate (PF{sub 6}{sup -}) and chloride (Cl{sup -}). We investigate how anionic properties such as hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity or hydrogen bonding capability affect the stabilization of the peptide in RTILs. To examine the effect of peptide-RTIL electrostatic interactions on solvation, we also consider a hypothetical solvent BMI{sup 0}Cl{sup 0}, a non-ionic counter-part of BMI{sup +}Cl{sup -}. For reference, we investigate solvation structures in common polar solvents, water and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Comparison of BMI{sup +}Cl{sup -} and BMI{sup 0}Cl{sup 0} shows that electrostatic interactions of the peptide and RTIL play a significant role in the conformational fluctuation of the peptide. For example, strong electrostatic interactions between the two favor an extended conformation of the peptide by reducing its structural fluctuations. The hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of RTIL anions also exerts a notable influence; specifically, structural fluctuations of the peptide become reduced in more hydrophilic BMI{sup +}Cl{sup -}, compared with those in more hydrophobic BMI{sup +}PF{sub 6}{sup -}. This is ascribed to the good hydrogen-bond accepting power of chloride anions, which enables them to bind strongly to hydroxyl groups of the peptide and to stabilize its structure. Transport properties of the peptide are examined briefly. Translations of the peptide significantly slow down in highly viscous RTILs.

  4. Coastal upwelling seasonality and variability of temperature and chlorophyll in a small coastal embayment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Ryan K.; Armenta, Kevin J.; Shearer, Brandon; Robbins, Ian; Steinbeck, John

    2018-02-01

    While the seasonality of wind-driven coastal upwelling in eastern boundary upwelling systems has long been established, many studies describe two distinct seasons (upwelling and non-upwelling), a generalized framework that does not capture details relevant to marine ecosystems. In this contribution, we present a more detailed description of the annual cycle and upwelling seasonality for an understudied location along the central California coast. Using both the mean monthly upwelling favorable wind stress and the monthly standard deviation, we define the following seasons (contiguous months) and a transitional period (non-contiguous months): "Winter Storms" season (Dec-Jan-Feb), "Upwelling Transition" period (Mar and Jun), "Peak Upwelling" season (Apr-May), "Upwelling Relaxation" season (Jul-Aug-Sep), and "Winter Transition" season (Oct-Nov). In order to describe the oceanic response to this upwelling wind seasonality, we take advantage of nearly a decade of full water-column measurements of temperature and chlorophyll made using an automated profiling system at the end of the California Polytechnic State University Pier in San Luis Obispo Bay, a small ( 2 km wide near study site) and shallow ( 10 m average bay depth) coastal embayment. Variability and average-year patterns are described inside the bay during the various upwelling seasons. Moreover, the role of the local coastline orientation and topography on bay dynamics is also assessed using long-term measurements collected outside of the bay. The formation of a seasonally variable upwelling shadow system and potential nearshore retention zone is discussed. The observations presented provide a framework on which to study interannual changes to the average-year seasonal cycle, assess the contribution of higher-frequency features to nearshore variability, and better predict dynamically and ecologically important events.

  5. Evaluating Expected Costs and Benefits of Granting Access to New Treatments on the Basis of Progression-Free Survival in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakdawalla, Darius N; Chou, Jacquelyn W; Linthicum, Mark T; MacEwan, Joanna P; Zhang, Jie; Goldman, Dana P

    2015-05-01

    Surrogate end points may be used as proxy for more robust clinical end points. One prominent example is the use of progression-free survival (PFS) as a surrogate for overall survival (OS) in trials for oncologic treatments. Decisions based on surrogate end points may expedite regulatory approval but may not accurately reflect drug efficacy. Payers and clinicians must balance the potential benefits of earlier treatment access based on surrogate end points against the risks of clinical uncertainty. To present a framework for evaluating the expected net benefit or cost of providing early access to new treatments on the basis of evidence of PFS benefits before OS results are available, using non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as an example. A probabilistic decision model was used to estimate expected incremental social value of the decision to grant access to a new treatment on the basis of PFS evidence. The model analyzed a hypothetical population of patients with NSCLC who could be treated during the period between PFS and OS evidence publication. Estimates for delay in publication of OS evidence following publication of PFS evidence, expected OS benefit given PFS benefit, incremental cost of new treatment, and other parameters were drawn from the literature on treatment of NSCLC. Incremental social value of early access for each additional patient per month (in 2014 US dollars). For "medium-value" model parameters, early reimbursement of drugs with any PFS benefit yields an incremental social cost of more than $170,000 per newly treated patient per month. In contrast, granting early access on the basis of PFS benefit between 1 and 3.5 months produces more than $73,000 in incremental social value. Across the full range of model parameter values, granting access for drugs with PFS benefit between 3 and 3.5 months is robustly beneficial, generating incremental social value ranging from $38,000 to more than $1 million per newly treated patient per month, whereas access

  6. A large piece of a small pie: Minimum wages and unemployment benefits in an assignment model with search frictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Gautier (Pieter); C.N. Teulings (Coen)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractMost empirical studies on the minimum wage find a spike at the minimum wage, compression of wage differentials at a large interval above the minimum wage and small employment losses. This paper offers a search model which is consistent with these facts. We consider a continuum of worker

  7. Phonon renormalization at small q values in the high-temperature phase of CsCuCl sub 3

    CERN Document Server

    Foerster, U; Schotte, U; Stuhr, U

    1997-01-01

    The hexagonal perovskite CsCuCl sub 3 exhibits a structural phase transition from a dynamically disordered high-temperature phase to an ordered low-temperature phase due to the cooperative Jahn-Teller effect. The lattice dynamics of the high-temperature phase has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering experiments. The investigations concentrated on small wave vectors q, where for the first time renormalized phonons at q=0.02-0.05 A sup - sup 1 could be observed. The measurements confirm the predictions of a theoretical approach based on the coupling between dynamic reorientation processes and acoustic lattice waves (pseudo-spin phonon coupling). (author)

  8. [Effect of annealing temperature on the crystallization and spectroscopic response of a small-molecule semiconductor doped in polymer film].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ming; Zhang, Xin-Ping; Liu, Hong-Mei

    2012-11-01

    The crystallization properties of the perylene (EPPTC) molecules doped in the solid film of the derivative of polyfluorene (F8BT) at different annealing temperatures, as well as the consequently induced spectroscopic response of the exciplex emission in the heterojunction structures, were studied in the present paper. Experimental results showed that the phase separation between the small and the polymer molecules in the blend film is enhanced with increasing the annealing temperature, which leads to the crystallization of the EPPTC molecules due to the strong pi-pi stacking. The size of the crystal phase increases with increasing the annealing temperature. However, this process weakens the mechanisms of the heterojunction configuration, thus, the total interfacial area between the small and the polymer molecules and the amount of exciplex are reduced significantly in the blend film. Meanwhile, the energy transfer from the polymer to the small molecules is also reduced. As a result, the emission from the exciplex becomes weaker with increasing the annealing temperature, whereas the stronger emission from the polymer molecules and from the crystal phase of the small molecules can be observed. These experimental results are very important for understanding and tailoring the organic heterojunction structures. Furthermore, this provides photophysics for improving the performance of photovoltaic or solar cell devices.

  9. Progress in generating fracture data base as a function of loading rate and temperature using small-scale tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couque, H.; Hudak, S.J. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Structural integrity assessment of nuclear pressure vessels requires small specimen fracture testing to generate data over a wide range of material loading, and temperature conditions. Small scale testing is employed since extensive testing is required including small radiation embrittled samples from nuclear surveillance capsules. However, current small scale technology does not provide the needed dynamic fracture toughness relevant to the crack arrest/reinitiation events that may occur during pressurized thermal shock transients following emergency shutdown. This paper addresses the generation of this much needed dynamic toughness data using a novel experimental-computational approach involving a coupled pressure bars (CPB) technique and a viscoplastic dynamic fracture code. CPB data have been generated to testing temperatures never before reached: 37 to 100 degrees C -- 60 to 123 degrees C above the nil ductility transition temperature. Fracture behavior of pressure vessel steel from lower shelf to upper shelf temperatures and previous toughness estimates for the 10 6 MPa√m s -1 loading rate regime are assessed in light of the new CPB data. 26 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs

  10. High-Temperature Structural Analysis of a Small-Scale PHE Prototype under the Test Condition of a Small-Scale Gas Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, K.; Hong, S.; Park, H.

    2012-01-01

    A process heat exchanger (PHE) is a key component for transferring the high-temperature heat generated from a very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) to a chemical reaction for the massive production of hydrogen. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has designed and assembled a small-scale nitrogen gas loop for a performance test on VHTR components and has manufactured a small-scale PHE prototype made of Hastelloy-X alloy. A performance test on the PHE prototype is underway in the gas loop, where different kinds of pipelines connecting to the PHE prototype are tested for reducing the thermal stress under the expansion of the PHE prototype. In this study, to evaluate the high-temperature structural integrity of the PHE prototype under the test condition of the gas loop, a realistic and effective boundary condition imposing the stiffness of the pipelines connected to the PHE prototype was suggested. An equivalent spring stiffness to reduce the thermal stress under the expansion of the PHE prototype was computed from the bending deformation and expansion of the pipelines connected to the PHE. A structural analysis on the PHE prototype was also carried out by imposing the suggested boundary condition. As a result of the analysis, the structural integrity of the PHE prototype seems to be maintained under the test condition of the gas loop.

  11. Crossed, Small-Deflection Energy Analyzer for Wind/Temperature Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Federico A.; Finne, Theodore T.

    2010-01-01

    Determination of neutral winds and ion drifts in low-Earth-orbit missions requires measurements of the angular and energy distributions of the flux of neutrals and ions entering the satellite from the ram direction. The magnitude and direction of the neutral-wind (or ion-drift) determine the location of the maximum in the angular distribution of the flux. Knowledge of the angle of maximum flux with respect to satellite coordinates (pointing) is essential to determine the wind (or ion-drift) vector. The crossed Small-Deflection Energy Analyzer (SDEA) spectrometer (see Figure 1) occupies minimal volume and consumes minimal power. Designed for upper atmosphere/ionosphere investigations at Earth altitudes above 100 km, the spectrometer operates by detecting the angular and energy distributions of neutral atoms/molecules and ions in two mutually perpendicular planes. In this configuration, the two detection planes actually cross at the spectrometer center. It is possible to merge two SDEAs so they share a common optical axis and alternate measurements between two perpendicular planes, and reduce the number of ion sources from two to one. This minimizes the volume and footprint significantly and reduces the ion source power by a factor of two. The area of the entrance aperture affects the number of ions detected/second and also determines the energy resolution. Thermionic emitters require heater power of about 100 mW to produce 1 mA of electron beam current. Typically, electron energy is about 100 eV and requires a 100-V supply for electron acceleration to supply an additional 100 mW of power. Thus, ion source power is at most 200 mW. If two ion sources were to be used, the ion source power would be, at most, 400 mW. Detector power, deflection voltage power, and microcontroller and other functions require less than 150 mW. A WTS (wind/ temperature spectrometer) with two separate optical axes would consume about 650 mW, while the crossed SDEA described here consumes about

  12. Impact of small variations in temperature and humidity on the reproductive activity and survival of Aedes aegypti (Diptera, Culicidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Ethiene Arruda Pedrosa de Almeida; Santos, Eloina Maria de Mendonca; Correia, Juliana Cavalcanti; Albuquerque, Cleide Maria Ribeiro de

    2010-01-01

    In short space of time increase in temperature and rainfall can affect vector populations and, consequently, the diseases for them transmitted. The present study analyzed the effect of small temperature and humidity variations on the fecundity, fertility and survival of Aedes aegypti. These parameters were analyzed using individual females at temperatures ranging from 23 to 27 deg C (mean 25 deg C); 28 to 32 deg C (mean 30 deg C) and 33 to 37 deg C (mean 35 deg C) associated to 60 +- 8% and 80 +- 6% relative humidity. Females responded to an increase in temperature by reducing egg production, oviposition time and changing oviposition patterns. At 25 deg C and 80% relative humidity, females survived two-fold more and produced 40% more eggs when compared to those kept at 35 deg C and 80% relative humidity. However, in 45% of females kept at 35 deg C and 60% relative humidity oviposition was inhibited and only 15% females laid more than 100 eggs, suggesting that the intensity of the temperature effect was influenced by humidity. Gradual reductions in egg fertility at 60% relative humidity were observed with the increase in temperature, although such effect was not found in the 80% relative humidity at 25 deg C and 30 deg C. These results suggest that the reduction in population densities recorded in tropical areas during seasons when temperatures reach over 35 deg C is likely to be strongly influenced by temperature and humidity, with a negative effect on several aspects of mosquito biology. (author)

  13. Development of small punch tests for ductile-brittle transition temperature measurement of temper embrittled Ni-Cr steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, J.M.; Kameda, J.; Buck, O.

    1983-01-01

    Small punch tests were developed to determine the ductile-brittle transition temperature of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) steels having various degrees of temper embrittlement and various microstructures. It was found that the small punch test clearly shows the ductile-brittle transition behavior of the temper-embrittled steels. The measured values were compared with those obtained from Charpy impact and uniaxial tensile tests. The effects of punch tip shape, a notch, and the strain rate on the ductile-brittle transition behavior were examined. It was found that the combined use of a notch, high strain rates, and a small punch tip strongly affects the ductile-brittle transition behavior. Considerable variations in the data were observed when the small punch tests were performed on coarse-grained steels. Several factors controlling embrittlement measurements of steels are discussed in terms of brittle fracture mechanisms

  14. Effects of pressure and temperature on pore structure of ceramic synthesized from rice husk: A small angle neutron scattering investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raut Dessai, R., E-mail: reshooin@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Goa University, Taleigao Plateau, Goa 403 206 (India); Desa, J.A.E. [Department of Physics, Goa University, Taleigao Plateau, Goa 403 206 (India); Sen, D.; Mazumder, S. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: ► A porous ceramic has been prepared from silica obtained from rice husk. ► The ceramic has a hierarchical pore structure from micrometric to nano-metric. ► Small Angle Neutron Scattering data indicate nano-pore connectivity to micro-pores. ► Pore morphology can be tuned by compaction pressure and sintering temperature. -- Abstract: Ceramic powder has been synthesized from rice husk as the source of silica. In order to probe the evolution of its hierarchical mesoscopic and microscopic porous structure, the ceramic powder was compacted at different pressures and was sintered at different temperatures. A glassy ceramic to crystalline transition under thermal treatment (up to 1000 °C) was revealed by X-ray diffraction. Existence of pores in two widely separated length scales was indicated by small angle neutron scattering with the smaller ones having mass fractal arrangement. Although no significant change in small pore structure under thermal effect was indicated, a significant modification of the same has been revealed by small angle neutron scattering at different compaction pressures. Connectivity between the pores was ascertained from scattering experiments on the ceramic compact impregnated with heavy water. Scanning electron microscopy shows the microstructure to undergo appreciable coalescence of micrometric ceramic particles for sintering temperature and pressure changes.

  15. Comparison of the Argon Triple-Point Temperature in Small Cells of Different Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołodziej, B.; Kowal, A.; Lipiński, L.; Manuszkiewicz, H.; Szmyrka-Grzebyk, A.

    2017-06-01

    The argon triple point (T_{90} = 83.8058 \\hbox {K}) is a fixed point of the International Temperature Scale of Preston-Thomas (Metrologia 27:3, 1990). Cells for realization of the fixed point have been manufactured by several European metrology institutes (Pavese in Metrologia 14:93, 1978; Pavese et al. in Temperature, part 1, American Institute of Physics, College Park, 2003; Hermier et al. in Temperature, part 1, American Institute of Physics, College Park, 2003; Pavese and Beciet in Modern gas-based temperature and pressure measurement, Springer, New York, 2013). The Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research has in its disposal a few argon cells of various constructions used for calibration of capsule-type standard platinum resistance thermometers (CSPRT) that were produced within 40 years. These cells differ in terms of mechanical design and thermal properties, as well as source of gas filling the cell. This paper presents data on differences between temperature values obtained during the realization of the triple point of argon in these cells. For determination of the temperature, a heat-pulse method was applied (Pavese and Beciet in Modern gas-based temperature and pressure measurement, Springer, New York, 2013). The comparisons were performed using three CSPRTs. The temperatures difference was determined in relation to a reference function W(T)=R(T_{90})/R(271.16\\hbox {K}) in order to avoid an impact of CSPRT resistance drift between measurements in the argon cells. Melting curves and uncertainty budgets of the measurements are given in the paper. A construction of measuring apparatus is also presented in this paper.

  16. Progress report on irradiation experiment on small size specimens in high temperature flux module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramesh, M.; Jacquet, P.; Chaouadi, R.

    2011-02-15

    This report describes the progress made in IFREC/DEMO Research and Development Program during the year 2010 at SCK/CEN. This task is part of demonstrating the possibility to irradiate small specimens in the HFTM modules that will be used in DEMO. Different small specimens of three candidate materials of DEMO fusion reactor will be irradiated with the objective of validating the specimen geometry and size to reliably characterize the mechanical properties of unirradiated and in future of irradiated materials.

  17. High Temperature Effects on Yeast-like Endosymbiotes and Pesticide Resistance of the Small Brown Planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-jie ZHANG

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The newly-hatched nymphs of the small brown planthopper (SBPH, Laodelphax striatellus, including field and sensitive populations, were subjected to the high-temperature (35°C treatment. The number of yeast-like endosymbiotes in SBPH reduced by 23.47%–34.23%, 57.86%–61.51% and 88.96%–90.71% after the high-temperature treatment for 1 d, 2 d, and 3 d, respectively. However, the size of yeast-like endosymbiotes was not obviously affected. Resistance of SBPH to three insecticides (imidacloprid, chlorpyrifos and fipronil decreased with the increase of treatment time.

  18. Interpreting small treatment differences from quality of life data in cancer trials: an alternative measure of treatment benefit and effect size for the EORTC-QLQ-C30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Iftekhar; Bashir, Zahid; Forster, Martin

    2015-11-14

    The EORTC-QLQ-C30 is a widely used health related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaire in lung cancer patients. Small HRQoL treatment effects are often reported as mean differences (MDs) between treatments, which are rarely justified or understood by patients and clinicians. An alternative approach using odds ratios (OR) for reporting effects is proposed. This may offer advantages including facilitating alignment between patient and clinician understanding of HRQoL effects. Data from six CRUK sponsored randomized controlled lung cancer trials (2 small cell and 4 in non-small cell, in 2909 patients) were used to HRQoL effects. Results from Beta-Binomial (BB) standard mixed effects were compared. Preferences for ORs vs MDs were determined and Time to Deterioration (TD) was also compared. HRQoL effects using ORs offered coherent interpretations: MDs >0 resulted in ORs >1 and vice versa; effect sizes were classified as 'Trivial' if the OR was between 1 ± 0.05 (i.e. 0.95 to 1.05); 'Small': for 1 ± 0.1; 'Medium': 1 ± 0.2 and 'Large': OR 1.20. Small HRQoL effects on the MD scale may translate to important treatment differences on the OR scale: for example, a worsening in symptoms (MD) by 2.6 points (p = 0.1314) would be a 17 % deterioration (p small ORs are unlikely to yield large MDs because methods based on OR model skewed data well. Initial evidence also suggests oncologists prefer ORs over MDs since interpretation is similar to hazard ratios. Reporting HRQoL benefits as MDs can be misleading. Estimates of HRQoL treatment effects in terms of ORs are preferred over MDs. Future analysis of QLQ-C30 and other HRQoL measures should consider reporting HRQoL treatment effects as ORs.

  19. Cardenolide-Induced Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization Demonstrates Therapeutic Benefits in Experimental Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Mijatovic

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs are the leading cause of cancer deaths in most developed countries. Targeting heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 expression and function, together with the induction of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP, could overcome the multiple anti-cell death mechanisms evidenced in NSCLCs that are responsible for the failure of currently used chemotherapeutic drugs. Because cardenolides bind to the sodium pump, they affect multiple signaling pathways and thus have a number of marked effects on tumor cell behavior. The aim of the present study was to characterize in vitro and in vivo the antitumor effects of a new cardenolide (UNBS1450 on experimental human NSCLCs. UNBS1450 is a potent source of in vivo antitumor activity in the case of paclitaxeland oxaliplatin-resistant subcutaneous human NCIH727 and orthotopic A549 xenografts in nude mice. In vitro UNBS1450-mediated antitumor activity results from the induction of nonapoptotic cell death. UNBS1450 mediates the decrease of Hsp70 at both mRNA and protein levels, and this is at least partly due to UNBS1450-induced downregulation of NFAT5/ TonEBP (a factor responsible for the transcriptional control of Hsp70. These effects were paralleled by the induction of LMP, as evidenced by acridine orange staining and immunofluorescence analysis for cathepsin B accumulation.

  20. Allocating the economic benefits of renewable energy between stakeholders on Small Island Developing States (SIDS): Arguments for a balanced approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegel-Feld, Danielle; Rudyk, Bryce; Philippidis, George

    2016-01-01

    For many Small Island Developing States (SIDS) the cost of producing electricity from imported fossil fuels is so high and the cost of renewable energy technology has fallen so significantly that transitioning towards renewable energy is likely to produce cost savings. A recent workshop at NYU School of Law, which brought together SIDS utility representatives with a leading renewable energy developer and other stakeholders, provided strong support for this prediction. Utilities are likely to own the majority of renewable energy assets in SIDS and will therefore be the initial custodians of any cost savings renewable energy provides. This raises a key policy question: to what extent should SIDS utilities pass on these savings to consumers by lowering electricity rates? We analyze this overlooked element of energy policy and highlight undesirable consequences that complete disbursement of the savings to consumers could cause. - Highlights: • Renewables will create savings in SIDS by lowering electricity production costs. • Utilities are likely to own the bulk of renewable energy assets in SIDS. • Policymakers will need to decide how to divide savings among stakeholders. • There are compelling reasons to allow utilities to retain part of the savings. • Creditors can play a role in ensuring a prudent distribution of savings.

  1. Response of surface air temperature to small-scale land clearing across latitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Mi; Wang, Wei; Lee, Xuhui; Yu, Guirui; Wang, Huimin; Han, Shijie; Yan, Junhua; Zhang, Yiping; Li, Yide; Ohta, Takeshi; Hirano, Takashi; Kim, Joon; Yoshifuji, Natsuko

    2014-01-01

    Climate models simulating continental scale deforestation suggest a warming effect of land clearing on the surface air temperature in the tropical zone and a cooling effect in the boreal zone due to different control of biogeochemical and biophysical processes. Ongoing land-use/cover changes mostly occur at local scales (hectares), and it is not clear whether the local-scale deforestation will generate temperature patterns consistent with the climate model results. Here we paired 40 and 12 flux sites with nearby weather stations in North and South America and in Eastern Asia, respectively, and quantified the temperature difference between these paired sites. Our goal was to investigate the response of the surface air temperature to local-scale (hectares) land clearing across latitudes using the surface weather stations as proxies for localized land clearing. The results show that north of 10°N, the annual mean temperature difference (open land minus forest) decreases with increasing latitude, but the temperature difference shrinks with latitude at a faster rate in the Americas [−0.079 (±0.010) °C per degree] than in Asia [−0.046 (±0.011) °C per degree]. Regression of the combined data suggests a transitional latitude of about 35.5°N that demarks deforestation warming to the south and cooling to the north. The warming in latitudes south of 35°N is associated with increase in the daily maximum temperature, with little change in the daily minimum temperature while the reverse is true in the boreal latitudes. (paper)

  2. The impact of humidity on evaporative cooling in small desert birds exposed to high air temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Alexander R; Smith, Eric Krabbe; Smit, Ben; McKechnie, Andrew E; Wolf, Blair O

    2014-01-01

    Environmental temperatures that exceed body temperature (Tb) force endothermic animals to rely solely on evaporative cooling to dissipate heat. However, evaporative heat dissipation can be drastically reduced by environmental humidity, imposing a thermoregulatory challenge. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of humidity on the thermoregulation of desert birds and to compare the sensitivity of cutaneous and respiratory evaporation to reduced vapor density gradients. Rates of evaporative water loss, metabolic rate, and Tb were measured in birds exposed to humidities ranging from ∼2 to 30 g H2O m(-3) (0%-100% relative humidity at 30°C) at air temperatures between 44° and 56°C. In sociable weavers, a species that dissipates heat primarily through panting, rates of evaporative water loss were inhibited by as much as 36% by high humidity at 48°C, and these birds showed a high degree of hyperthermia. At lower temperatures (40°-44°C), evaporative water loss was largely unaffected by humidity in this species. In Namaqua doves, which primarily use cutaneous evaporation, increasing humidity reduced rates of evaporative water loss, but overall rates of water loss were lower than those observed in sociable weavers. Our data suggest that cutaneous evaporation is more efficient than panting, requiring less water to maintain Tb at a given temperature, but panting appears less sensitive to humidity over the air temperature range investigated here.

  3. Survival benefit of radiotherapy to patients with small cell esophagus carcinoma: an analysis of Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yaqi; Wang, Wanwei; Tao, Guangzhou; Zhu, Weiguo; Zhou, Xilei; Pan, Peng

    2016-03-29

    Small cell esophageal carcinoma (SCEC) is a rare malignant tumor. So far, few studies are found to research the effect of radiotherapy (RT) to it. This study is designed to explore the prognostic factors, and analyze survival benefit of RT to patients with SCEC. Patients with SCEC were more likely to be in female, older, higher disease stage than those with non-small cell esophageal carcinoma. RT was used in more than 50% SCEC patients. RT tended be reduced as the disease stage raise in SCEC. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that age, year, disease stage, and RT were the prognostic factors of survival (P 0.05) and nearly 30% risks of death in distant stage (P > 0.05). SCEC patients between 1973 and 2012 were searched from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data. Clinical factors including age, year, sex, race, stage, surgery, and RT were summarized. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to explore the independent prognostic factors of SCEC. Cox regression survival analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of RT to SCEC based on different stages. Stage, age, year, and RT are independent prognostic factors of SCEC. Survival benefit of RT exists in any disease stage, but is only statistically significant in localized stage of SCEC.

  4. Benefits of adding small financial incentives or optional group meetings to a web-based statewide obesity initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahey, Tricia M; Subak, Leslee L; Fava, Joseph; Schembri, Michael; Thomas, Graham; Xu, Xiaomeng; Krupel, Katie; Kent, Kimberly; Boguszewski, Katherine; Kumar, Rajiv; Weinberg, Brad; Wing, Rena

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether adding either small, variable financial incentives or optional group sessions improves weight losses in a community-based, Internet behavioral program. Participants (N = 268) from Shape Up Rhode Island 2012, a 3-month Web-based community wellness initiative, were randomized to: Shape Up+Internet behavioral program (SI), Shape Up+Internet program+incentives (SII), or Shape Up+Internet program+group sessions (SIG). At the end of the 3-month program, SII achieved significantly greater weight losses than SI (SII: 6.4% [5.1-7.7]; SI: 4.2% [3.0-5.6]; P = 0.03); weight losses in SIG were not significantly different from the other two conditions (SIG: 5.8% [4.5-7.1], P's ≥ 0.10). However, at the 12-month no-treatment follow-up visit, both SII and SIG had greater weight losses than SI (SII: 3.1% [1.8-4.4]; SIG: 4.5% [3.2-5.8]; SI: 1.2% [-0.1-2.6]; P's ≤ 0.05). SII was the most cost-effective approach at both 3 (SII: $34/kg; SI: $34/kg; SIG: $87/kg) and 12 months (SII: $64/kg; SI: $140/kg; SIG: $113/kg). Modest financial incentives enhance weight losses during a community campaign, and both incentives and optional group meetings improved overall weight loss outcomes during the follow-up period. However, the use of the financial incentives is the most cost-effective approach. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  5. Experimental investigation on a small pumpless ORC (organic rankine cycle) system driven by the low temperature heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, P.; Wang, L.W.; Wang, R.Z.; Jiang, L.; Zhou, Z.S.

    2015-01-01

    A small pumpless ORC (organic rankine cycle) system with different scroll expanders modified from compressors of the automobile air-conditioner is established, and the refrigerant R245fa is chosen as the working fluid. Different hot water temperatures of 80, 85, 90 and 95 °C are employed to drive the pumpless ORC system. Experimental results show that a maximum shaft power of 361.0 W is obtained under the hot water temperature of 95 °C, whereas the average shaft power is 155.8 W. The maximum energy efficiency of 2.3% and the maximum exergy efficiency of 12.8% are obtained at the hot water temperature of 90 °C. Meanwhile a test rig for investigating the mechanical loss of the scroll expander is established. The torque caused by the internal mechanical friction of the expander is about 0.4 N m. Additionally, another scroll expander with a displacement of 86 ml/r is also employed to investigate how scroll expander displacement influences the performance of the pumpless ORC system. Finally, the performance of the pumpless ORC system is compared with that of the conventional ORC system, and experimental results show that the small pumpless ORC system has more advantages for the low-grade heat recovery. - Highlights: • A small pumpless ORC (organic rankine cycle) system is established, and different scroll expanders are tested. • The maximum energy and exergy efficiency are 2.3% and 12.8% respectively. • A maximum shaft power of 361.0 W is obtained under the heat source temperature of 95 °C. • The small pumpless ORC system has characteristics of the high efficiency.

  6. Assessing functional status and the survival benefit of chemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer using administrative claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, Josephine; Gardner, Lisa; Hendrick, Franklin; Edelman, Martin J; Davidoff, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Borderline or poor performance status (PS) patients comprise a significant proportion of those diagnosed with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (AdvNSCLC), but are often excluded from clinical trials. It is difficult to draw conclusions about the benefit of therapy in borderline PS patients due to lack of reliable PS assessments, and small clinical trial samples. Retrospective population-based secondary analyses may allow investigators to study under-represented populations in clinical trials. We hypothesized that patients with poor functional status derive benefit from chemotherapy compared good functional status, but that the magnitude of the benefit is lower compared to patients with good functional status. By utilizing a "disability status" (DS) measure as a proxy for PS, we offer a reliable mechanism for patient stratification that can be implemented in administrative claims data. Medicare beneficiaries diagnosed with AdvNSCLC between 2001 and 2005 were selected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database linked to Medicare claims. Disability status, a previously developed and validated claims-based proxy for baseline PS, was implemented. Patients were assigned to good versus poor DS. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the differential effects of chemotherapy for the two DS groups on all-cause mortality, controlling for tumor and patient characteristics. Most patients in the cohort (n=21,019) were ≥75 years of age (59%), and non-Hispanic white (85%); 91% were assigned to good DS; 38% received chemotherapy. Chemotherapy had a strong protective effect among good DS patients (hazard ratio, 0.43; CI 0.42-0.45; pChemotherapy improves survival for advanced NSCLC patients with poor DS but to a lower magnitude than for good DS patients. The DS measure opens the door to assess outcomes for cancer patients with poor functional status using insurance claims data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pre-Conceptual Design of a Fluoride-Salt-Cooled Small Modular Advanced High Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Sherrell R [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Carbajo, Juan J [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Cisneros, Anselmo T [ORNL; Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Bradley, Eric Craig [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Pappano, Peter J [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL

    2011-02-01

    This document presents the results of a study conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory during 2010 to explore the feasibility of small modular fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactors (FHRs). A preliminary reactor system concept, SmATHR (for Small modular Advanced High Temperature Reactor) is described, along with an integrated high-temperature thermal energy storage or salt vault system. The SmAHTR is a 125 MWt, integral primary, liquid salt cooled, coated particle-graphite fueled, low-pressure system operating at 700 C. The system employs passive decay heat removal and two-out-of-three , 50% capacity, subsystem redundancy for critical functions. The reactor vessel is sufficiently small to be transportable on standard commercial tractor-trailer transport vehicles. Initial transient analyses indicated the transition from normal reactor operations to passive decay heat removal is accomplished in a manner that preserves robust safety margins at all times during the transient. Numerous trade studies and trade-space considerations are discussed, along with the resultant initial system concept. The current concept is not optimized. Work remains to more completely define the overall system with particular emphasis on refining the final fuel/core configuration, salt vault configuration, and integrated system dynamics and safety behavior.

  8. Radio frequency-induced temperature elevations in the human head considering small anatomical structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, G.; Ueberbacher, R.; Samaras, T.

    2007-01-01

    In order to enable a detailed numerical radio frequency (RF) dosimetry and the computations of RF-induced temperature elevations, high-resolution (0.1 mm) numerical models of the human eye, the inner ear organs and the pineal gland were developed and inserted into a commercially available head model. As radiation sources, generic models of handsets at 400, 900 and 1850 MHz operating in close proximity to the head were considered. The results, obtained by finite-difference time domain-based computations, showed a highly heterogeneous specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution and SAR-peaks inside the inner ear structures; however, the corresponding RF-induced temperature elevations were well below 0.1 deg. C, when considering typical output power values of hand-held devices. In case of frontal exposure, with the radiation sources ∼2.5 cm in front of the closed eye, maximum temperature elevations in the eye in the range of ∼0.2-0.6 deg. C were found for typical device output powers. A reduction in tissue perfusion mainly affected the maximum RF-induced temperature elevation of tissues deep inside the head. Similarly, worst-case considerations regarding pulsed irradiation affected temperature elevations in deep tissue significantly more than in superficial tissues. (authors)

  9. A new small modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor plant concept based on proven technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Goodjohn, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Based on the established and proven high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technologies from the Peach Bottom 1 and Fort St. Vrain utility-operated units, a new small modular HTGR reactor is currently being evaluated. The basic nuclear reactor heat source, with a prismatic core, is being designed so that the decay heat can be removed by passive means (i.e., natural circulation). Although this concept is still in the preconceptual design stage, emphasis is being placed on establishing an inherently safe or benign concept which, when engineered, will have acceptable capital cost and power generation economics. The proposed new HTGR concept has a variety of applications, including electrical power generation, cogeneration, and high-temperature process heat. This paper discusses the simplest application, i.e., a steam Rankine cycle electrical power generating version. The gas-cooled modular reactor concepts presented are based on a graphite moderated prismatic core of low-power density (i.e., 4.1 W/cm 3 ) with a thermal rating of 250 MW(t). With the potential for inherently safe characteristics, a new small reactor could be sited close to industrial and urban areas to provide electrical power and thermal heating needs (i.e., district and space heating). Incorporating a multiplicity of small modular units to provide a larger power output is also discussed. The potential for a small, inherently safe HTGR reactor concept is highlighted

  10. The Analysis of Predictive Factors for the Identification of Patients Who Could Benefit from Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Seong Soon; Park, Ji Chan

    2009-01-01

    4DCT scans performed for radiotherapy were retrospectively analyzed to assess the possible benefits of respiratory gating in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and established the predictive factors for identifying patients who could benefit from this approach. Three treatment planning was performed for 15 patients with stage I∼III NSCLC using different planning target volumes (PTVs) as follows: 1) PTVroutine, derived from the addition of conventional uniform margins to gross tumor volume (GTV) of a single bin, 2) PTVall phases (patient-specific PTV), derived from the composite GTV of all 6 bins of the 4DCT, and 3) PTVgating, derived from the composite GTV of 3 consecutive bins at end-exhalation. The reductions in PTV were 43.2% and 9.5%, respectively, for the PTVall phases vs. PTVroutine and PTVgating vs. PTVall phases. Compared to PTVroutine, the use of PTVall phases and PTVgating reduced the mean lung dose (MLD) by 18.1% and 21.6%, and V20 by 18.2% and 22.0%, respectively. Significant correlations were seen between certain predictive factors selected from the tumor mobility and volume analysis, such as the 3D mobility vector, the reduction in 3D mobility and PTV with gating, and the ratio of GTV overlap between 2 extreme bins and additional reductions in both MLD and V20 with gating. The additional benefits with gating compared to the use of patient-specific PTV were modest; however, there were distinct correlations and differences according to the predictive factors. Therefore, these predictive factors might be useful for identifying patients who could benefit from respiratory-gated radiotherapy

  11. Temperature and rainfall are related to fertility rate after spring artificial insemination in small ruminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abecia, J. A.; Arrébola, F.; Macías, A.; Laviña, A.; González-Casquet, O.; Benítez, F.; Palacios, C.

    2016-10-01

    A total number of 1092 artificial inseminations (AIs) performed from March to May were documented over four consecutive years on 10 Payoya goat farms (36° N) and 19,392 AIs on 102 Rasa Aragonesa sheep farms (41° N) over 10 years. Mean, maximum, and minimum ambient temperatures, mean relative humidity, mean solar radiation, and total rainfall on each insemination day were recorded. Overall, fertility rates were 58 % in goats and 45 % in sheep. The fertility rates of the highest and lowest deciles of each of the meteorological variables indicated that temperature and rainfall had a significant effect on fertility in goats. Specifically, inseminations that were performed when mean (68 %), maximum (68 %), and minimum (66 %) temperatures were in the highest decile, and rainfall was in the lowest decile (59 %), had a significantly ( P goats and sheep.

  12. Effect of electron temperature on small-amplitude electron acoustic solitary waves in non-planar geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Sona; Aggarwal, Munish; Gill, Tarsem Singh

    2018-04-01

    Effects of electron temperature on the propagation of electron acoustic solitary waves in plasma with stationary ions, cold and superthermal hot electrons is investigated in non-planar geometry employing reductive perturbation method. Modified Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived in the small amplitude approximation limit. The analytical and numerical calculations of the KdV equation reveal that the phase velocity of the electron acoustic waves increases as one goes from planar to non planar geometry. It is shown that the electron temperature ratio changes the width and amplitude of the solitary waves and when electron temperature is not taken into account,our results completely agree with the results of Javidan & Pakzad (2012). It is found that at small values of τ , solitary wave structures behave differently in cylindrical ( {m} = 1), spherical ( {m} = 2) and planar geometry ( {m} = 0) but looks similar at large values of τ . These results may be useful to understand the solitary wave characteristics in laboratory and space environments where the plasma have multiple temperature electrons.

  13. Portable mini-chamber for temperature dependent studies using small angle and wide angle x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Arun Singh; Kumar, Dileep; Potdar, Satish; Pandit, Pallavi; Roth, Stephan V.; Gupta, Ajay

    2018-04-01

    The present work describes the design and performance of a vacuum compatible portable mini chamber for temperature dependent GISAXS and GIWAXS studies of thin films and multilayer structures. The water cooled body of the chamber allows sample annealing up to 900 K using ultra high vacuum compatible (UHV) pyrolytic boron nitride heater, thus making it possible to study the temperature dependent evolution of structure and morphology of two-dimensional nanostructured materials. Due to its light weight and small size, the chamber is portable and can be accommodated at synchrotron facilities worldwide. A systematic illustration of the versatility of the chamber has been demonstrated at beamline P03, PETRA-III, DESY, Hamburg, Germany. Temperature dependent grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering (GIWAXS) measurements were performed on oblique angle deposited Co/Ag multilayer structure, which jointly revealed that the surface diffusion in Co columns in Co/Ag multilayer enhances by increasing temperature from RT to ˜573 K. This results in a morphology change from columnar tilted structure to densely packed morphological isotropic multilayer.

  14. Production of small diameter high-temperature-strength refractory metal wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrasek, D. W.; Signorelli, R. A.; King, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    Special thermomechanical techniques (schedules) have been developed to produce small diameter wire from three refractory metal alloys: colombian base alloy, tantalum base alloy, and tungsten base alloy. High strengths of these wires indicate their potential for contributing increased strength to metallic composites.

  15. High-temperature hydrogen-air-steam detonation experiments in the BNL small-scale development apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsburg, T.; Boccio, J.; Economos, C.; Finfrock, C.; Gerlach, L.; Sato, K.; Kinoshita, M.

    1994-08-01

    The Small-Scale Development Apparatus (SSDA) was constructed to provide a preliminary set of experimental data to characterize the effect of temperature on the ability of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonations and, equally important, to support design of the larger scale High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) by providing a test bed for solution of a number of high-temperature design and operational problems. The SSDA, the central element of which is a 10-cm inside diameter, 6.1-m long tubular test vessel designed to permit detonation experiments at temperatures up to 700K, was employed to study self-sustained detonations in gaseous mixtures of hydrogen, air, and steam at temperatures between 300K and 650K at a fixed initial pressure of 0.1 MPa. Hydrogen-air mixtures with hydrogen composition from 9 to 60 percent by volume and steam fractions up to 35 percent by volume were studied for stoichiometric hydrogen-air-steam mixtures. Detonation cell size measurements provide clear evidence that the effect of hydrogen-air gas mixture temperature, in the range 300K-650K, is to decrease cell size and, hence, to increase the sensitivity of the mixture to undergo detonations. The effect of steam content, at any given temperature, is to increase the cell size and, thereby, to decrease the sensitivity of stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixtures. The hydrogen-air detonability limits for the 10-cm inside diameter SSDA test vessel, based upon the onset of single-head spin, decreased from 15 percent hydrogen at 300K down to between 9 and 10 percent hydrogen at 650K. The one-dimensional ZND model does a very good job at predicting the overall trends in the cell size data over the range of hydrogen-air-steam mixture compositions and temperature studied in the experiments

  16. Development of evaluation technique of high temperature creep characteristics by small punch-creep test method (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seung Se; Na, Sung Hun; Yu, Hyo Sun; Na, Eui Gyun

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a Small Punch Creep(SP-Creep) test using miniaturized specimen(10 x 10 x 0.5mm) is described to develop the new creep test method for high temperature structural materials. The SP-Creep test is applied to 2.25Cr-1Mo(STBA24) steel which is widely used as boiler tube material. The test temperatures applied for the creep deformation of miniaturized specimens are between 550∼600 .deg. C. The SP-Creep curves depend definitely on applied load and creep temperature, and show the three stages of creep behavior like in conventional uniaxial tensile creep curves. The load exponent of miniaturized specimen decrease with increasing test temperature, and its behavior is similar to stress exponent behavior of uniaxial creep test. The creep activation energy obtained from the relationship between SP-Creep rate and test temperature decreases as the applied load increases. A predicting equation of SP-Creep rate for 2.25Cr-1Mo steel is suggested, and a good agreement between experimental and calculated data has been found

  17. Availability and the use of work-life balance benefits guaranteed by the Polish Labour Code among workers employed on the basis of employment contracts in small and medium enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandra Andysz; Aleksandra Jacukowicz; Aleksander Stańczak; Marcin Drabek

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Polish Labour Code provides employees with a range of solutions (benefits) supporting them in achieving balance between work and private life. This paper was aimed at indicating availability and the use of legal benefits supporting work-life balance (WLB) among Polish workers of small and medium enterprises. Material and Methods: The study sample included 219 respondents, aged 22–64, working in small and medium enterprises and employed on the basis of employment contracts for at l...

  18. MHD model including small-scale perturbations in a plasma with temperature variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuvshinov, B.N.; Mikhailovskii, A.B.

    1996-01-01

    The possibility is studied of using a hydrodynamic model to describe a magnetized plasma with density and temperature variations on scales that are arbitrary with respect to the ion Larmor radius. It is shown that the inertial component of the transverse ion thermal flux should be taken into account. This component is found from the collisionless kinetic equation. It can also be obtained from the equations of the Grad type. A set of two-dimensional hydrodynamic equations for ions is obtained with this component taken into account. These equations are used to derive model hydrodynamic expressions for the density and temperature variations. It is shown that, for large-scale perturbations (when the wavelengths are longer than the ion Larmor radius), the expressions derived coincide with the corresponding kinetic expressions and, for perturbations on sub-Larmor scales (when the wavelengths are shorter than the Larmor radius), they agree qualitatively. Hydrodynamic dispersion relations are derived for several types of drift waves with arbitrary wavenumbers. The range of applicability of the MHD model is determined from a comparison of these dispersion relations with the kinetic ones. It is noted that, on the basis of results obtained, drift effects can be included in numerical MHD codes for studying plasma instabilities in high-temperature regimes in tokamaks

  19. RF HEATING AND TEMPERATURE OSCILLATIONS DUE TO A SMALL GAP IN A PEP-II VACUUM CHAMBER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novokhatski, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    Wake fields excited in a small gap of a vacuum chamber by ampere beams can have enough amplitude to heat the chamber. The electric component of these fields can be above the arcing limit. Usually flange connections in a vacuum chamber contain a vacuum gasket and an inner RF gasket. If a small gap occurs between the RF gasket and flange surface, wake fields can heat the flanges. The flanges are usually made of stainless steel, which efficiently absorbs RF power. Some flanges consist of two parts (like a vacuum valve flange) and are mechanically connected but have poor thermal contact. A temperature rise can lengthen the inner part of the flange and make firmer the thermal contact to the outer part of the flange. The heat will then flow to the outer part of the flange, which is air and water-cooled. This cooling lowers the flange temperature and the thermal contact becomes poor again. This ''quasi'' periodic mechanism can explain the nature of temperature oscillations observed at several locations in PEP-II, the SLAC B-factory

  20. Dynamics and inherent safety features of small modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, R.M.; Ball, S.J.; Cleveland, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations were made at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to characterize the dynamics and inherent safety features of various modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) designs. This work was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's HTGR Safety Research program. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Gas Cooled Reactor Associates (GCRA) have sponsored studies of several modular HTGR concepts, each having it own unique advantageous economic and inherent safety features. The DOE design team has recently choses a 350-MW(t) annular core with prismatic, graphite matrix fuel for its reference plant. The various safety features of this plant and of the pebble-bed core designs similar to those currently being developed and operated in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) are described. A varity of postulated accident sequences involving combinations of loss of forced circulation of the helium primary coolant, loss of primary coolant pressurization, and loss of normal and backup heat sinks were studied and are discussed. Results demonstrate that each concept can withstand an uncontrolled heatup accident without reaching excessive peak fuel temperatures. Comparisons of calculated and measured response for a loss of forced circulation test on the FRG reactor, AVR, are also presented. 10 refs

  1. An energy-based body temperature threshold between torpor and normothermia for small mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Craig K R

    2007-01-01

    Field studies of use of torpor by heterothermic endotherms suffer from the lack of a standardized threshold differentiating torpid body temperatures (T(b)) from normothermic T(b)'s. This threshold can be more readily observed if metabolic rate (MR) is measured in the laboratory. I digitized figures from the literature that depicted simultaneous traces of MR and T(b) from 32 respirometry runs for 14 mammal species. For each graph, I quantified the T(b) measured when MR first began to drop at the onset of torpor (T(b-onset)). I used a general linear model to quantify the effect of ambient temperature (T(a)) and body mass (BM) on T(b-onset). For species lighter than 70 g, the model was highly significant and was described by the equation Tb-onset=(0.055+/-0.014)BM+(0.071+/-0.031)Ta+(31.823+/-0.740). To be conservative, I recommend use of these model parameters minus 1 standard error, which modifies the equation to Tb-onset-1 SE=(0.041)BM+(0.040)Ta+31.083. This approach provides a standardized threshold for differentiating torpor from normothermia that is based on use of energy, the actual currency of interest for studies of torpor in the wild. Few laboratory studies have presented the time-course data required to quantify T(b-onset), so more data are needed to validate this relationship.

  2. Measurements of the Temperature Structure-Function Parameters with a Small Unmanned Aerial System Compared with a Sodar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Timothy A.; Goines, David C.; Scott, Aaron K.; Wainwright, Charlotte E.; Gibbs, Jeremy A.; Chilson, Phillip B.

    2015-06-01

    The structure function is often used to quantify the intensity of spatial inhomogeneities within turbulent flows. Here, the Small Multifunction Research and Teaching Sonde (SMARTSonde), an unmanned aerial system, is used to measure horizontal variations in temperature and to calculate the structure function of temperature at various heights for a range of separation distances. A method for correcting for the advection of turbulence in the calculation of the structure function is discussed. This advection correction improves the data quality, particularly when wind speeds are high. The temperature structure-function parameter can be calculated from the structure function of temperature. Two case studies from which the SMARTSonde was able to take measurements used to derive at several heights during multiple consecutive flights are discussed and compared with sodar measurements, from which is directly related to return power. Profiles of from both the sodar and SMARTSonde from an afternoon case exhibited generally good agreement. However, the profiles agreed poorly for a morning case. The discrepancies are partially attributed to different averaging times for the two instruments in a rapidly evolving environment, and the measurement errors associated with the SMARTSonde sampling within the stable boundary layer.

  3. The impact of component performance on the overall cycle performance of small-scale low temperature organic Rankine cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M.; Sayma, A. I.

    2015-08-01

    Low temperature organic Rankine cycles offer a promising technology for the generation of power from low temperature heat sources. Small-scale systems (∼10kW) are of significant interest, however there is a current lack of commercially viable expanders. For a potential expander to be economically viable for small-scale applications it is reasonable to assume that the same expander must have the ability to be implemented within a number of different ORC applications. It is therefore important to design and optimise the cycle considering the component performance, most notably the expander, both at different thermodynamic conditions, and using alternative organic fluids. This paper demonstrates a novel modelling methodology that combines a previously generated turbine performance map with cycle analysis to establish at what heat source conditions optimal system performance can be achieved using an existing turbine design. The results obtained show that the same turbine can be effectively utilised within a number of different ORC applications by changing the working fluid. By selecting suitable working fluids, this turbine can be used to convert pressurised hot water at temperatures between 360K and 400K, and mass flow rates between 0.45kg/s and 2.7kg/s, into useful power with outputs between 1.5kW and 27kW. This is a significant result since it allows the same turbine to be implemented into a variety of applications, improving the economy of scale. This work has also confirmed the suitability of the candidate turbine for a range of low temperature ORC applications.

  4. PD-L1 protein expression assessed by immunohistochemistry is neither prognostic nor predictive of benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy in resected non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, M-S; Le Teuff, G; Shepherd, F A; Landais, C; Hainaut, P; Filipits, M; Pirker, R; Le Chevalier, T; Graziano, S; Kratze, R; Soria, J-C; Pignon, J-P; Seymour, L; Brambilla, E

    2017-04-01

    The expression of programmed death (PD) ligand 1 (PD-L1) protein expression assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) has been correlated with response and survival benefit from anti-PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint inhibitor therapies in advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). The efficacy of several agents appears correlated with PD-L1 expression. It remains controversial whether PD-L1 is prognostic in NSCLC. We assessed the prognostic value of PD-L1 IHC and its predictive role for adjuvant chemotherapy in early stage NSCLC. Tumor sections from three pivotal adjuvant chemotherapy trials (IALT, JBR.10, CALGB 9633) using the E1L3N antibody were studied in this pooled analysis. PD-L1 staining intensity and percentage in both tumor cells (TCs) and immune cells (ICs) were scored by two pathologists. The average or consensus PD-L1 expression levels across intensities and/or percent cells stained were correlated with clinicopathological and molecular features, patient survivals and potential benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. Results from 982 patients were available for analysis. Considering staining at any intensities for overall PD-L1 expression, 314 (32.0%), 204 (20.8%) and 141 (14.3%) tumor samples were positive for PD-L1 staining on TCs using cut-offs at ≥1%, ≥10% and ≥25%, respectively. For PD-L1 expressing ICs, 380 (38.7%), 308 (31.4%) and 148 (15.1%) were positive at ≥ 1%, ≥10% and 25% cut-offs, respectively. Positive PD-L1 was correlated with squamous histology, intense lymphocytic infiltrate, and KRAS but not with TP53 mutation. EGFR mutated tumors showed statistically non-significant lower PD-L1 expression. PD-L1 expression was neither prognostic with these cut-offs nor other exploratory cut-offs, nor were predictive for survival benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. PD-L1 IHC is not a prognostic factor in early stage NSCLC patients. It is also not predictive for adjuvant chemotherapy benefit in these patients. © The Author 2017. Published by

  5. High-temperature hydrogen-air-steam detonation experiments in the BNL small-scale development apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.; Economos, C.; Finfrock, C.; Gerlach, L.; Sato, K.

    1994-01-01

    The Small-Scale Development Apparatus (SSDA) was constructed to provide a preliminary set of experimental data to characterize the effect of temperature on the ability of hydrogen-air-steam-mixtures to undergo detonations and, equally important, to support design of the larger-scale High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) by providing a test bed for solution of a number of high-temperature design and operational problems. The SSDA, the central element of which is 10-cm inside diameter, 6.1-m long tubular test vessel designed to permit detonation experiments at temperatures up to 700K, was employed to study self-sustained detonations in gaseous mixtures of hydrogen, air, and steam at temperature between 300K and 650K at a fixed pressure of 0.1 MPa. Detonation cell size measurements provide clear evidence that the effect of hydrogen-air gas mixture temperature, in the range 300K to 650K, is to decrease cell size and, hence, to increase the sensitivity of the mixture to undergo detonations. The effect of steam content, at any given temperature, is to increase the cell size and, thereby, to decrease the sensitivity of stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixtures. The one-dimensional ZND model does a very good job at predicting the overall trends in the cell size data over the range of hydrogen-air-steam mixture compositions and temperature studied in the experiments. Experiments were conducted to measure the rate of hydrogen oxidation in the absence of ignition sources at temperatures of 500K and 650K, for hydrogen-air mixtures of 15% and 50%, and for a mixture of equimolar hydrogen-air and 30% steam at 650K. The rate of hydrogen oxidation was found to be significant at 650K. Reduction of hydrogen concentration by chemical reaction from 50 to 44% hydrogen, and from 15 to 11% hydrogen, were observed on a time frame of minutes. The DeSoete rate equation predicts the 50% experiment very well, but greatly underestimates the reaction rate of the lean mixtures

  6. Accurate prediction of severe allergic reactions by a small set of environmental parameters (NDVI, temperature).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notas, George; Bariotakis, Michail; Kalogrias, Vaios; Andrianaki, Maria; Azariadis, Kalliopi; Kampouri, Errika; Theodoropoulou, Katerina; Lavrentaki, Katerina; Kastrinakis, Stelios; Kampa, Marilena; Agouridakis, Panagiotis; Pirintsos, Stergios; Castanas, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Severe allergic reactions of unknown etiology,necessitating a hospital visit, have an important impact in the life of affected individuals and impose a major economic burden to societies. The prediction of clinically severe allergic reactions would be of great importance, but current attempts have been limited by the lack of a well-founded applicable methodology and the wide spatiotemporal distribution of allergic reactions. The valid prediction of severe allergies (and especially those needing hospital treatment) in a region, could alert health authorities and implicated individuals to take appropriate preemptive measures. In the present report we have collecterd visits for serious allergic reactions of unknown etiology from two major hospitals in the island of Crete, for two distinct time periods (validation and test sets). We have used the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), a satellite-based, freely available measurement, which is an indicator of live green vegetation at a given geographic area, and a set of meteorological data to develop a model capable of describing and predicting severe allergic reaction frequency. Our analysis has retained NDVI and temperature as accurate identifiers and predictors of increased hospital severe allergic reactions visits. Our approach may contribute towards the development of satellite-based modules, for the prediction of severe allergic reactions in specific, well-defined geographical areas. It could also probably be used for the prediction of other environment related diseases and conditions.

  7. Temperature measurements in small holes drilled in superconducting bulk during pulsed field magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishiro, H.; Naito, T.; Furuta, D.; Kakehata, K.

    2010-11-01

    The time dependence of the temperatures T(z, t) has been measured along the thickness direction z in several drilled holes in a superconducting bulk during pulsed field magnetization (PFM) and the heat generation and heat transfer in the bulk have been discussed. In the previous paper [H. Fujishiro, S. Kawaguchi, K. Kakehata, A. Fujiwara, T. Tateiwa, T. Oka, Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19 (2006) S540], we calculated the T(z, t) profiles in the bulk by solving a three-dimensional heat-diffusion equation to reproduce the measured T(t) on the bulk surface; the heat generation took place adiabatically and the calculated T(z, t) was isothermal along the z direction. In this study, the measured T(z, t) at the top surface was higher than that at the bottom surface just after the pulse field application at t < 0.5 s, and then became isothermal with increasing time. These results suggest that the magnetic flux intrudes inhomogeneously into the bulk from the edge of the top surface and the periphery at the early stage. The inhomogeneous magnetic flux intrusion and the flux trap during PFM change depending on the strength of the pulsed field and the pulse number in the successive pulse field application.

  8. Small-Scale Gravity Waves in ER-2 MMS/MTP Wind and Temperature Measurements during CRYSTAL-FACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Alexander, M. J.; Bui, T. P.; Mahoney, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    Lower stratospheric wind and temperature measurements made from NASA's high-altitude ER-2 research aircraft during the CRYSTAL-FACE campaign in July 2002 were analyzed to retrieve information on small scale gravity waves (GWs) at the aircraft's flight level (typically approximately 20 km altitude). For a given flight segment, the S-transform (a Gaussian wavelet transform) was used to search for and identify small horizontal scale GW events, and to estimate their apparent horizontal wavelengths. The horizontal propagation directions of the events were determined using the Stokes parameter method combined with the cross S-transform analysis. The vertical temperature gradient was used to determine the vertical wavelengths of the events. GW momentum fluxes were calculated from the cross S-transform. Other wave parameters such as intrinsic frequencies were calculated using the GW dispersion relation. More than 100GW events were identified. They were generally high frequency waves with vertical wavelength of approximately 5 km and horizontal wavelength generally shorter than 20 km. Their intrinsic propagation directions were predominantly toward the east, whereas their ground-based propagation directions were primarily toward the west. Among the events, approximately 20% of them had very short horizontal wavelength, very high intrinsic frequency, and relatively small momentum fluxes, and thus they were likely trapped in the lower stratosphere. Using the estimated GW parameters and the background winds and stabilities from the NCAR/NCEP reanalysis data, we were able to trace the sources of the events using a simple reverse ray-tracing. More than 70% of the events were traced back to convective sources in the troposphere, and the sources were generally located upstream of the locations of the events observed at the aircraft level. Finally, a probability density function of the reversible cooling rate due to GWs was obtained in this study, which may be useful for cirrus

  9. Small-scale gravity waves in ER-2 MMS/MTP wind and temperature measurements during CRYSTAL-FACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Lower stratospheric wind and temperature measurements made from NASA's high-altitude ER-2 research aircraft during the CRYSTAL-FACE campaign in July 2002 were analyzed to retrieve information on small scale gravity waves (GWs at the aircraft's flight level (typically ~20 km altitude. For a given flight segment, the S-transform (a Gaussian wavelet transform was used to search for and identify small horizontal scale GW events, and to estimate their apparent horizontal wavelengths. The horizontal propagation directions of the events were determined using the Stokes parameter method combined with the cross S-transform analysis. The vertical temperature gradient was used to determine the vertical wavelengths of the events. GW momentum fluxes were calculated from the cross S-transform. Other wave parameters such as intrinsic frequencies were calculated using the GW dispersion relation. More than 100GW events were identified. They were generally high frequency waves with vertical wavelength of ~5 km and horizontal wavelength generally shorter than 20 km. Their intrinsic propagation directions were predominantly toward the east, whereas their ground-based propagation directions were primarily toward the west. Among the events, ~20% of them had very short horizontal wavelength, very high intrinsic frequency, and relatively small momentum fluxes, and thus they were likely trapped in the lower stratosphere. Using the estimated GW parameters and the background winds and stabilities from the NCAR/NCEP reanalysis data, we were able to trace the sources of the events using a simple reverse ray-tracing. More than 70% of the events were traced back to convective sources in the troposphere, and the sources were generally located upstream of the locations of the events observed at the aircraft level. Finally, a probability density function of the reversible cooling rate due to GWs was obtained in this study, which may be useful for cirrus cloud models.

  10. [Resected non-small cell bronchogenic carcinoma stage pIIIA-N2. Which patients will benefit most from adjuvant therapy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Ana M; Jarabo, José Ramón; Fernandez, Cristina; Calatayud, Joaquín; Fernández, Elena; Torres, Antonio J; Balibrea, José L; Hernando, Florentino

    2014-04-01

    Controversy persists as regards the indications and results of surgery in the treatment of patients with stage pIIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The objective of this study was to analyze the overall survival of a multicentre series of these patients and the role of adjuvant treatment, looking for factors that may define subgroups of patients with an increased benefit from this treatment. A retrospective study was conducted on 287 patients, with stage pIIIA-N2 NSCLC subjected to complete resection, taken from a multi-institutional database of 2.994 prospectively collected consecutive patients who underwent surgery for lung cancer. Adjuvant treatment was administered in 238 cases (82.9%). Analyses were made of the age, gender, histological type, administration of induction and adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy treatments. The 5-year survival was 24%, with a median survival of 22 months. Survival was 26.5% among patients receiving with adjuvant treatment, versus 10.7% for those without it (P=.069). Age modified the effect of adjuvant treatment on survival (interaction P=.049). In patients under 70 years of age with squamous cell carcinoma, adjuvant treatment reduced the mortality rate by 37% (hazard ratio: 0,63; 95% CI; 0,42-0,95; P=.036). Completely resected patients with stage pIIIA-N2 NSCLC receiving adjuvant treatment reached higher survival rates than those who did not. Maximum benefit was achieved by the subgroup of patients under 70 years of age with squamous cell carcinoma. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Thermal Fluxes and Temperatures in Small Urban Headwater Streams of the BES LTER: Landscape Forest and Impervious Patches and the Importance of Spatial and Temporal Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Belt, K. T.; Welty, C.; Heisler, G.; Pouyat, R. V.; McGuire, M. P.; Stack, W. P.

    2006-05-01

    Water and material fluxes from urban landscape patches to small streams are modulated by extensive "engineered" drainage networks. Small urban headwater catchments are different in character and function from their larger receiving streams because of their extensive, direct connections to impervious surface cover (ISC) and their sometimes buried nature. They need to be studied as unique functional hydrologic units if impacts on biota are to be fully understood. As part of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study LTER project, continuous water temperature data are being collected at 2-minute intervals at over twenty small catchments representing various mixtures of forest and ISC. Suburban stream sites with greater ISC generally have higher summer water temperatures. Suburban catchments with most of their channel drainage contained within storm drain pipes show subdued diurnal variation and cool temperatures, but with very large spikes in summer runoff events. Conversely, high ISC urban piped streams have elevated "baseline" temperatures that stand well above all the other monitoring sites. There is a pronounced upstream-downstream effect; nested small headwater catchments experience more frequent, larger temperature spikes related to runoff events than downstream sites. Also, runoff-initiated temperature elevations at small stream sites unexpectedly last much longer than the storm runoff hydrographs. These observations suggest that for small headwater catchments, urban landscapes not only induce an ambient, "heat island" effect on stream temperatures, but also introduce thermal disturbance regimes and fluxes that are not trivial to aquatic biota.

  12. An ultrasound-based liquid pressure measurement method in small diameter pipelines considering the installation and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Song, Zhengxiang

    2015-04-09

    Liquid pressure is a key parameter for detecting and judging faults in hydraulic mechanisms, but traditional measurement methods have many deficiencies. An effective non-intrusive method using an ultrasound-based technique to measure liquid pressure in small diameter (less than 15 mm) pipelines is presented in this paper. The proposed method is based on the principle that the transmission speed of an ultrasonic wave in a Kneser liquid correlates with liquid pressure. Liquid pressure was calculated using the variation of ultrasonic propagation time in a liquid under different pressures: 0 Pa and X Pa. In this research the time difference was obtained by an electrical processing approach and was accurately measured to the nanosecond level through a high-resolution time measurement module. Because installation differences and liquid temperatures could influence the measurement accuracy, a special type of circuit called automatic gain control (AGC) circuit and a new back propagation network (BPN) model accounting for liquid temperature were employed to improve the measurement results. The corresponding pressure values were finally obtained by utilizing the relationship between time difference, transient temperature and liquid pressure. An experimental pressure measurement platform was built and the experimental results confirm that the proposed method has good measurement accuracy.

  13. Benefits of home-based multidisciplinary exercise and supportive care in inoperable non-small cell lung cancer - protocol for a phase II randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edbrooke, Lara; Aranda, Sanchia; Granger, Catherine L; McDonald, Christine F; Krishnasamy, Mei; Mileshkin, Linda; Irving, Louis; Braat, Sabine; Clark, Ross A; Gordon, Ian; Denehy, Linda

    2017-09-29

    Lung cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers, and is a leading cause of cancer mortality world-wide. Due to lack of early specific symptoms, the majority of patients present with advanced, inoperable disease and five-year relative survival across all stages of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is 14%. People with lung cancer also report higher levels of symptom distress than those with other forms of cancer. Several benefits for survival and patient reported outcomes are reported from physical activity and exercise in other tumour groups. We report the protocol for a study investigating the benefits of exercise, behaviour change and symptom self-management for patients with recently diagnosed, inoperable, NSCLC. This multi-site, parallel-group, assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial, powered for superiority, aims to assess functional and patient-reported outcomes of a multi-disciplinary, home-based exercise and supportive care program for people commencing treatment. Ninety-two participants are being recruited from three tertiary-care hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. Following baseline testing, participants are randomised using concealed allocation, to receive either: a) 8 weeks of home-based exercise (comprising an individualised endurance and resistance exercise program and behaviour change coaching) and nurse-delivered symptom self-management intervention or b) usual care. The primary outcome is the between-group difference in the change in functional exercise capacity (six-minute walk distance) from baseline to post-program assessment. Secondary outcomes include: objective and self-reported physical activity levels, physical activity self-efficacy, behavioural regulation of motivation to exercise and resilience, muscle strength (quadriceps and grip), health-related quality of life, anxiety and depression and symptom interference. There is a lack of evidence regarding the benefit of exercise intervention for people with NSCLC, particularly

  14. Benefits of using vaccines out of the cold chain: delivering meningitis A vaccine in a controlled temperature chain during the mass immunization campaign in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipursky, Simona; Djingarey, Mamoudou Harouna; Lodjo, Jean-Claude; Olodo, Laifoya; Tiendrebeogo, Sylvestre; Ronveaux, Olivier

    2014-03-14

    In October 2012, the Meningococcal A conjugate vaccine MenAfriVac was granted a label variation to allow for its use in a controlled temperature chain (CTC), at temperatures of up to 40°C for not more than four days. This paper describes the first field use of MenAfriVac in a CTC during a campaign in Benin, December 2012, and assesses the feasibility and acceptability of the practice. We implemented CTC in one selected district, Banikoara (target population of 147,207; 1-29 years of age), across 14 health facilities and 150 villages. We monitored the CTC practice using temperature indicators and daily monitoring sheets. At the end of the campaign we conducted a face-to-face survey to assess vaccinators' and supervisors' experience with CTC. A mix of strategies were implemented in the field to maximize the benefits from CTC practice, depending on the distance from health centre to populations and the availability of a functioning refrigerator in the health centre. Coverage across Banikoara was 105.7%. Over the course of the campaign only nine out of approx. 15,000 vials were discarded due to surpassing the 4 day CTC limit and no vial was discarded because of exposure to a temperature higher than 40°C or due to the Vaccine Vial Monitor (VVM) reaching its endpoint. Overall confidence and perceived usefulness of the CTC approach were very high among vaccinators and supervisors. Vaccinators and supervisors see clear benefits from the CTC approach in low income settings, especially in hard-to-reach areas or where cold chain is weak. Taking advantage of the flexibility offered by CTC opens the door for the implementation of new immunization strategies to ensure all those at risk are protected. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Survival benefit associated with metformin use in inoperable non-small cell lung cancer patients with diabetes: A population-based retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Chun Chuang

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effects of metformin use on the survival of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with diabetes using the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database.In total, 7,620 patients were eligible in this study, among them, 3,578 patients were metformin users and 4,042 were non-users. Propensity score matching was used to reduce possible confounding factors. In total, 4,182 patients (2,091 matched pairs were included in the matched cohort. Cox proportional hazard model with time-dependent covariate were also applied to evaluate the association between metformin use and overall survival (OS.A total of 3,578 patients were metformin users at the time of diagnosis of NSCLC. Cox proportional hazard model with time-dependent covariate revealed that metformin use was associated with a significantly longer OS (HR: 0.85, 95.0% CI: 0.80-0.90. The survival benefit of metformin use was maintained after propensity score matching at a ratio of 1:1 (HR: 0.90, 95.0% CI: 0.84-0.97.Metformin use is associated with longer OS in inoperable NSCLC patients with diabetes, suggesting a potential anti-tumorigenic effect for metformin. Further research is needed to investigate the actual role of metformin in the treatment of NSCLC patients with diabetes.

  16. Senior Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information Medicaid Public Health Centers Temporary "Cash" Assistance Senior Benefits Program GovDelivery Skip Navigation Links Health and Social Services > Public Assistance > Senior Benefits Page Content Senior Benefits Senior Benefits Logo Senior Benefits Fact Sheet - June, 2016 Reduction Information

  17. Eastern equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature annual cycle in the Kiel climate model: simulation benefits from enhancing atmospheric resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengel, C.; Latif, M.; Park, W.; Harlaß, J.; Bayr, T.

    2018-05-01

    A long-standing difficulty of climate models is to capture the annual cycle (AC) of eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) sea surface temperature (SST). In this study, we first examine the EEP SST AC in a set of integrations of the coupled Kiel Climate Model, in which only atmosphere model resolution differs. When employing coarse horizontal and vertical atmospheric resolution, significant biases in the EEP SST AC are observed. These are reflected in an erroneous timing of the cold tongue's onset and termination as well as in an underestimation of the boreal spring warming amplitude. A large portion of these biases are linked to a wrong simulation of zonal surface winds, which can be traced back to precipitation biases on both sides of the equator and an erroneous low-level atmospheric circulation over land. Part of the SST biases also is related to shortwave radiation biases related to cloud cover biases. Both wind and cloud cover biases are inherent to the atmospheric component, as shown by companion uncoupled atmosphere model integrations forced by observed SSTs. Enhancing atmosphere model resolution, horizontal and vertical, markedly reduces zonal wind and cloud cover biases in coupled as well as uncoupled mode and generally improves simulation of the EEP SST AC. Enhanced atmospheric resolution reduces convection biases and improves simulation of surface winds over land. Analysis of a subset of models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) reveals that in these models, very similar mechanisms are at work in driving EEP SST AC biases.

  18. Enhancement of High Temperature Strength of 2219 Alloys Through Small Additions of Nb and Zr and a Novel Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondol, S.; Makineni, S. K.; Kumar, S.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a detailed investigation on the effect of small amount of Nb and Zr additions to 2219 Al alloy coupled with a novel three-stage heat treatment process. The main aim of the work is to increase the high temperature strength of 2219 alloy by introducing thermally stable L12 type ordered precipitates in the matrix as well as by reducing the coarsening of metastable strengthening θ″ and θ' precipitates. To achieve this, small amounts of Nb and Zr are added to 2219 alloy melt and retained in solid solution by suction casting in a water-cooled copper mould having a cooling rate of 102 to 103 K/s. The suction cast alloy is directly aged at 673 K (400 °C) to form L12 type ordered coherent Al3Zr precipitates. Subsequently, the alloy is solution treated at 808 K (535 °C) for 30 minutes to get supersaturation of Cu in the matrix without significantly affecting the Al3Zr precipitates. Finally, the alloy is aged at 473 K (200 °C), which results in the precipitation of θ″ and θ'. Microstructural characterization reveals that θ″ and θ' are heterogeneously precipitated on pre-existing uniformly distributed Al3Zr precipitates, which leads to a higher number density of these precipitates. This results in a significant increase in strength at room temperature as well as at 473 K (200 °C) as compared to the 2219 alloy. Furthermore, the alloy remains thermally stable after prolonged exposure at 473 K (200 °C), which is attributed to the elastic strain energy minimization by the conjoint Al3Zr/θ' or Al3Zr/θ″ precipitates, and the high Zr and Nb solute-vacancy binding energy, retarding the growth and coarsening of θ″ and θ' precipitates.

  19. Two fast temperature sensors for probing of the atmospheric boundary layer using small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Wildmann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Two types of temperature sensors are designed and tested: a thermocouple and a fine wire resistance thermometer. The intention of this study is to figure out which kind of measurement principle is in general more suited for atmospheric boundary layer meteorology with small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA. The sensors are calibrated in a NIST traceable climate chamber and validated in flight against tower measurements, radiosondes and remote sensing. The sensors have a measurement range of at least −10–50 °C, an absolute RMS error of less than ±0.2 K which is stable over the lifetime of the sensors, and a resolution of about 0.01 K. Both devices are tested for typical errors like radiation error and adiabatic heating, as well as for their dynamic response. Spectral resolutions of up to approximately 10 Hz can be obtained with both sensors, which makes them suitable for turbulence measurement. Their low cost of less than 100 EUR in pure hardware is a major advantage for research with small RPA.

  20. Two fast temperature sensors for probing of the atmospheric boundary layer using small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildmann, N.; Mauz, M.; Bange, J.

    2013-08-01

    Two types of temperature sensors are designed and tested: a thermocouple and a fine wire resistance thermometer. The intention of this study is to figure out which kind of measurement principle is in general more suited for atmospheric boundary layer meteorology with small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA). The sensors are calibrated in a NIST traceable climate chamber and validated in flight against tower measurements, radiosondes and remote sensing. The sensors have a measurement range of at least -10-50 °C, an absolute RMS error of less than ±0.2 K which is stable over the lifetime of the sensors, and a resolution of about 0.01 K. Both devices are tested for typical errors like radiation error and adiabatic heating, as well as for their dynamic response. Spectral resolutions of up to approximately 10 Hz can be obtained with both sensors, which makes them suitable for turbulence measurement. Their low cost of less than 100 EUR in pure hardware is a major advantage for research with small RPA.

  1. Availability and the use of work-life balance benefits guaranteed by the Polish Labour Code among workers employed on the basis of employment contracts in small and medium enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Andysz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Polish Labour Code provides employees with a range of solutions (benefits supporting them in achieving balance between work and private life. This paper was aimed at indicating availability and the use of legal benefits supporting work-life balance (WLB among Polish workers of small and medium enterprises. Material and Methods: The study sample included 219 respondents, aged 22–64, working in small and medium enterprises and employed on the basis of employment contracts for at least a year. The respondents completed a questionnaire on availability and the use of benefits guaranteed by the Polish Labour Code, referring to their current workplaces. Results: Most frequently the studied employees took sick leave because of one’s own illness and leave on demand. In our sample, 45% of the women took maternity leave and 26% of the men took paternity leave. The respondents took educational and parental leave the least frequently. More than half of the respondents (58% did not return to the same position after leave devoted to childcare, even though they had such a possibility. Conclusions: In fact, most of work-life balance benefits guaranteed by law were available to the employees of small and medium enterprises, regardless of their gender. Availability and the use of the majority of benefits were similar among the women and men. Availability of benefits depended on the specificity of industry and a profession, thus, future research on work-life balance policy should control for variables related to the character of work.

  2. On violations of Le Chatelier's principle for a temperature change in small systems observed for short times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Searles, Debra J.; Ajloo, Davood; Evans, Denis J.; Williams, Stephen R.

    2009-12-01

    Le Chatelier's principle states that when a system is disturbed, it will shift its equilibrium to counteract the disturbance. However for a chemical reaction in a small, confined system, the probability of observing it proceed in the opposite direction to that predicted by Le Chatelier's principle, can be significant. This work gives a molecular level proof of Le Chatelier's principle for the case of a temperature change. Moreover, a new, exact mathematical expression is derived that is valid for arbitrary system sizes and gives the relative probability that a single experiment will proceed in the endothermic or exothermic direction, in terms of a microscopic phase function. We show that the average of the time integral of this function is the maximum possible value of the purely irreversible entropy production for the thermal relaxation process. Our result is tested against computer simulations of the unfolding of a polypeptide. We prove that any equilibrium reaction mixture on average responds to a temperature increase by shifting its point of equilibrium in the endothermic direction.

  3. Coastal flood implications of 1.5°C, 2°C and 2.5°C global mean temperature stabilization targets for small island nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, D.; Buchanan, M. K.; Kopp, R. E.; Oppenheimer, M.

    2017-12-01

    Sea-level rise (SLR) is magnifying the frequency and severity of flooding in coastal regions. The rate and amount of global-mean SLR is a function of the trajectory of the global mean surface temperature (GMST). Therefore, temperature stabilization targets (e.g., 1.5°C or 2°C, as from the Paris Agreement) have important implications for regulating coastal flood risk. Quantifying the differences in the impact from SLR between these and other GMST stabilization targets is necessary for assessing the benefits and harms of mitigation goals. Low-lying small island nations are particularly vulnerable to inundation and coastal flooding from SLR because building protective and resilient infrastructure may not be physically or economically feasible. For small island nations, keeping GMST below a specified threshold may be the only option for maintaining habitability. Here, we assess differences in the return levels of coastal floods for small island nations between 1.5°C, 2.0°C, and 2.5°C GMST stabilization. We employ probabilistic, localized SLR projections and long-term hourly tide gauge records to construct estimates of local flood risk. We then estimate the number of small island nations' inhabitants at risk for permanent inundation under different GMST stabilization targets.

  4. Viscosity and not biological mechanisms often controls the effects of temperature on ciliary activity and swimming velocity of small aquatic organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul Scheel; Riisgård, H. U.

    2009-01-01

    organisms using cilia or small appendages for propulsion. Here we summarize results from the literature and from own studies on bio-mechanical activities in response to changing temperature or manipulated viscosity at constant temperature, both having the same change in kinematic viscosity. The survey......A number of studies have shown that temperature-dependent viscosity of the ambient water controls or strongly affects bio-mechanical activity such as beat frequency of water-pumping cilia in mussels and ascidians, swimming velocity of sperm cells, ciliates and small (micro- and meso-scale) aquatic...

  5. Benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy after resection of stage II (T1-2N1M0) non-small cell lung cancer in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Mark F; Coleman, Brooke K; Curtis, Lesley H; Worni, Mathias; D'Amico, Thomas A; Akushevich, Igor

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated the use and efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy after resection of T1-2N1M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in elderly patients. Factors associated with the use of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients older than 65 years of age who underwent surgical resection of T1-2N1M0 NSCLC without induction chemotherapy or radiation in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database from 1992 to 2006 were assessed using a multivariable logistic regression model that included treatment, patient, tumor, and census tract characteristics. Overall survival (OS) was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier approach and inverse probability weight-adjusted Cox proportional hazard models. Overall, 2,781 patients who underwent surgical resection as the initial treatment for T1-2N1M0 NSCLC and survived at least 31 days after surgery were identified, with adjuvant chemotherapy given to 784 patients (28.2 %). Factors that predicted adjuvant chemotherapy use were younger age and higher T status. The 5-year OS was significantly better for patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy compared with patients not given adjuvant chemotherapy: 35.8 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 31.9-39.6) vs. 28.0 % (95 % CI 25.9-30.0) (p = 0.008). In the inverse probability weight-adjusted Cox proportional hazard regression model, adjuvant chemotherapy use predicted significantly improved survival (hazard ratio 0.84; 95 % CI 0.76-0.92; p = 0.0002). Adjuvant chemotherapy after resection of T1-2N1M0 NSCLC is associated with significantly improved survival in patients older than 65 years. These data can be used to provide elderly patients with realistic expectations of the potential benefits when considering adjuvant chemotherapy in this setting.

  6. Three dimensional optimization of small-scale axial turbine for low temperature heat source driven organic Rankine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Jubori, Ayad; Al-Dadah, Raya K.; Mahmoud, Saad; Bahr Ennil, A.S.; Rahbar, Kiyarash

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Three-dimensional optimization of axial turbine stage is presented. • Six organic fluids suitable for low-temperature heat source are considered. • Three-dimensional optimization has been done for each working fluid. • The results showed highlight the potential of optimization technique. • The performance of optimized turbine has been improved off-design conditions. - Abstract: Advances in optimization techniques can be used to enhance the performance of turbines in various applications. However, limited work has been reported on using such optimization techniques to develop small-scale turbines for organic Rankine cycles. This paper investigates the use of multi-objective genetic algorithm to optimize the stage geometry of a small-axial subsonic turbine. This optimization is integrated with organic Rankine cycle analysis using wide range of high density organic working fluids like R123, R134a, R141b, R152a, R245fa and isobutane suitable for low temperature heat sources <100 °C such as solar energy to achieve the best turbine design and highest organic Rankine cycle efficiency. The isentropic efficiency of the turbine in most of the reported organic Rankine cycle studies was assumed constant, while the current work allows the turbine isentropic efficiency to change (dynamic value) with both operating conditions and working fluids. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics analysis and multi-objective genetic algorithm optimization were performed using three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with k-omega shear stress transport turbulence model in ANSYS"R"1"7-CFX and design exploration for various working fluids. The optimization was carried out using eight design parameters for the turbine stage geometry optimization including stator and rotor number of blades, rotor leading edge beta angle, trailing edge beta angle, stagger angle, throat width, trailing half wedge angle and shroud tip clearance. Results showed that

  7. Method for biological tissue temperature measuring in the area of laser radiation exposure with a small size beam profile during laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabkin, Dmitrii I.

    2018-04-01

    Connection is not strong enough In case of insufficient or excessive temperature of the laser welding. As a result, the temperature measurement in laser welding is an important problem. Measurement area surface is small (3.12 mm2) and measurements shall be carried out by a Non-contact method, which makes them challenging. Method of temperature measurement by an infrared sensor in two positions has been offered. This method allows you to measure the temperature at a distance of up to 5 cm from the measured area with an accuracy of 8%.

  8. Physiological benefits of being small in a changing world: responses of Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch to an acute thermal challenge and a simulated capture event.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy D Clark

    Full Text Available Evidence is building to suggest that both chronic and acute warm temperature exposure, as well as other anthropogenic perturbations, may select for small adult fish within a species. To shed light on this phenomenon, we investigated physiological and anatomical attributes associated with size-specific responses to an acute thermal challenge and a fisheries capture simulation (exercise+air exposure in maturing male coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch. Full-size females were included for a sex-specific comparison. A size-specific response in haematology to an acute thermal challenge (from 7 to 20 °C at 3 °C h(-1 was apparent only for plasma potassium, whereby full-size males exhibited a significant increase in comparison with smaller males ('jacks'. Full-size females exhibited an elevated blood stress response in comparison with full-size males. Metabolic recovery following exhaustive exercise at 7 °C was size-specific, with jacks regaining resting levels of metabolism at 9.3 ± 0.5 h post-exercise in comparison with 12.3 ± 0.4 h for full-size fish of both sexes. Excess post-exercise oxygen consumption scaled with body mass in male fish with an exponent of b = 1.20 ± 0.08. Jacks appeared to regain osmoregulatory homeostasis faster than full-size males, and they had higher ventilation rates at 1 h post-exercise. Peak metabolic rate during post-exercise recovery scaled with body mass with an exponent of b~1, suggesting that the slower metabolic recovery in large fish was not due to limitations in diffusive or convective oxygen transport, but that large fish simply accumulated a greater 'oxygen debt' that took longer to pay back at the size-independent peak metabolic rate of ~6 mg min(-1 kg(-1. Post-exercise recovery of plasma testosterone was faster in jacks compared with full-size males, suggesting less impairment of the maturation trajectory of smaller fish. Supporting previous studies, these findings suggest that environmental change and non

  9. Availability and the use of work-life balance benefits guaranteed by the Polish Labour Code among workers employed on the basis of employment contracts in small and medium enterprises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andysz, Aleksandra; Jacukowicz, Aleksandra; Stańczak, Aleksander; Drabek, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Polish Labour Code provides employees with a range of solutions (benefits) supporting them in achieving balance between work and private life. This paper was aimed at indicating availability and the use of legal benefits supporting work-life balance (WLB) among Polish workers of small and medium enterprises. The study sample included 219 respondents, aged 22-64, working in small and medium enterprises and employed on the basis of employment contracts for at least a year. The respondents completed a questionnaire on availability and the use of benefits guaranteed by the Polish Labour Code, referring to their current workplaces. Most frequently the studied employees took sick leave because of one's own illness and leave on demand. In our sample, 45% of the women took maternity leave and 26% of the men took paternity leave. The respondents took educational and parental leave the least frequently. More than half of the respondents (58%) did not return to the same position after leave devoted to childcare, even though they had such a possibility. In fact, most of work-life balance benefits guaranteed by law were available to the employees of small and medium enterprises, regardless of their gender. Availability and the use of the majority of benefits were similar among the women and men. Availability of benefits depended on the specificity of industry and a profession, thus, future research on work-life balance policy should control for variables related to the character of work. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  10. Doubling the annual coefficient of performance of air-conditioning units by taking advantage of small temperature lifts; Verdoppelung der Jahresarbeitszahl von Klimakaelteanlagen durch Ausnuetzung eines kleinen Temperaturhubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellig, B.; Kegel, B.; Meier, M.

    2006-07-01

    The seasonal performance factor (SPF) of chilled water systems (CWS) is closely related to the temperature lift, i.e. the difference between the temperature of the heat source and the heat sink. In many applications in building services engineering, a temperature lift of 10-20 K is in principle sufficient. However, the potential for highly efficient refrigerating systems is not fully exploited as standard chillers are designed for lifts of 30-60 K. The exergy analysis of typical CWS shows that the external exergy losses are greater than the exergy losses of the chiller. The second-law (or exergetic) efficiency is usually far below 10%. It is therefore important to avoid unnecessarily high temperature lifts. Measurements on refrigeration systems in two office buildings have shown that even in state-of-the-art CWS, considerable energy savings (up to 50%) can be achieved by persistent use of small temperature lifts. However, SPF-values around 5-6 can hardly be exceeded in systems with electric driven chillers. SPFs higher than 10 or even above 20 can only be reached with optimized free cooling processes. Basic decisions, which ultimately lead to CWS with unnecessarily high temperature lifts, are taken in the early project stages. Therefore, this study presents guidelines for the design and operation of CWS with small temperature lifts. The implementation of these simple measures will lead to a considerable reduction of energy consumption and operating costs. (author)

  11. Measurement of the specific heat of small vanadium particles in the normal- and superconducting state in the temperature range of 1.5-12 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergara Garcia, O.

    1982-01-01

    The specific heat of small crystalline vanadium particles in form of polyeders with diameters between 2.9 and 13.2 mm was measured in the temperature range of 1.5-12 K. Quantum effects are interpreted in the frame of theoretical models. (BEF)

  12. Method of determining coking temperature of coke. [Experimental method of determining final coking temperature using a small sample and calibration graph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mel' nichuk, A.Yu.; Bondarenko, A.K.; Fialkov, B.S.; Khegay, L.U.; Khvan, L.A.; Muzyzhuk, V.D.; Zakharov, A.G.; Zelenskiy, V.P.

    1985-01-01

    The coking temperature of coke should be determined from the magnitude of the ionization current of the medium during heating (3/sup 0//min) of a coke sample (2 g, fraction < 0.2 mm) in an oxidation medium with air supply (1 1/min). The coking temperature is determined from the maximum magnitude of current using a graduated graph constructed during analysis of coke samples obtained with different final coking temperatures. The discrepancy between the established coking temperature and that defined from the proposed method is 8-19/sup 0/, and that defined from electrical resistance of coke is 26-43/sup 0/. In addition to high accuracy, this method reduces the time outlays for making the analysis.

  13. The scaling of stress distribution under small scale yielding by T-scaling method and application to prediction of the temperature dependence on fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Kenichi; Hamada, Takeshi; Meshii, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new method for scaling the crack tip stress distribution under small scale yielding condition was proposed and named as T-scaling method. This method enables to identify the different stress distributions for materials with different tensile properties but identical load in terms of K or J. Then by assuming that the temperature dependence of a material is represented as the stress-strain relationship temperature dependence, a method to predict the fracture load at an arbitrary temperature from the already known fracture load at a reference temperature was proposed. This method combined the T-scaling method and the knowledge “fracture stress for slip induced cleavage fracture is temperature independent.” Once the fracture load is predicted, fracture toughness J c at the temperature under consideration can be evaluated by running elastic-plastic finite element analysis. Finally, the above-mentioned framework to predict the J c temperature dependency of a material in the ductile-to-brittle temperature distribution was validated for 0.55% carbon steel JIS S55C. The proposed framework seems to have a possibility to solve the problem the master curve is facing in the relatively higher temperature region, by requiring only tensile tests. (author)

  14. Small punch tensile/fracture test data and 3D specimen surface data on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel from cryogenic to room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchhausen, Matthias; Lapetite, Jean-Marc; Ripplinger, Stefan; Austin, Tim

    2016-12-01

    Raw data from small punch tensile/fracture tests at two displacement rates in the temperature range from -196 °C to room temperature on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel are presented. A number of specimens were analyzed after testing by means of X-ray computed tomography (CT). Based on the CT volume data detailed 3D surface maps of the specimens were established. All data are open access and available from Online Data Information Network (ODIN)https://odin.jrc.ec.europa.eu. The data presented in the current work has been analyzed in the research article "On the determination of the ductile to brittle transition temperature from small punch tests on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel" (M. Bruchhausen, S. Holmström, J.-M. Lapetite, S. Ripplinger, 2015) [1].

  15. Small-angle x-ray scattering and density measurements of liquid Se50-Te50 mixture at high temperatures and high pressures using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajihara, Y; Inui, M; Matsuda, K; Tomioka, Y

    2010-01-01

    We have carried out small-angle x-ray scattering and x-ray transmission measurements of liquid Se 50 -Te 50 mixture at SPring-8 in Japan and obtained the structure factor S(Q) at small-Q region (0.6 -1 ) and the density at high temperatures and high pressures up to 1000 0 C and 180 MPa. We report preliminary results in this paper. With increasing temperature, the density shows a minimum at around 500 0 C and a maximum at around 700 0 C. On the other hand, S(0) becomes maximum and S(Q) strongly depends on Q at around 600 0 C, which is about the middle temperature where the density shows the minimum and maximum. The temperatures shift to lower side when the pressure increases. These results prove that, with increasing temperature, the sample exhibits gradual transition from low-density structure to high-density structure, which causes mesoscopic density fluctuations in the intermediate temperature region.

  16. Ambient temperature regulates the expression of a small set of sRNAs influencing plant development through NF-YA2 and YUC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyula, Péter; Baksa, Ivett; Tóth, Tamás; Mohorianu, Irina; Dalmay, Tamás; Szittya, György

    2018-06-01

    Plants substantially alter their developmental program upon changes in the ambient temperature. The 21-24 nt small RNAs (sRNAs) are important gene expression regulators, which play a major role in development and adaptation. However, little is known about how the different sRNA classes respond to changes in the ambient temperature. We profiled the sRNA populations in four different tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown at 15, 21 and 27 °C. We found that only a small fraction (0.6%) of the sRNA loci are ambient temperature-controlled. We identified thermoresponsive miRNAs and identified their target genes using degradome libraries. We verified that the target of the thermoregulated miR169, NF-YA2, is also ambient temperature-regulated. NF-YA2, as the component of the conserved transcriptional regulator NF-Y complex, binds the promoter of the flowering time regulator FT and the auxin biosynthesis gene YUC2. Other differentially expressed loci include thermoresponsive phased siRNA loci that target various auxin pathway genes and tRNA fragments. Furthermore, a temperature dependent 24-nt heterochromatic siRNA locus in the promoter of YUC2 may contribute to the epigenetic regulation of auxin homeostasis. This holistic approach facilitated a better understanding of the role of different sRNA classes in ambient temperature adaptation of plants. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of high temperature ECC injection on small and large break BWR LOCA simulation tests in ROSA-III program (RUNs 940 and 941)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Hideo; Kumamaru, Hiroshige; Anoda, Yoshinari; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Murata, Hideo; Tasaka, Kanji

    1990-03-01

    The ROSA-III program, of which principal results are summarized in a report of JAERI 1307, conducted small and large-break loss-of-coolant experiments (RUNs 940 and 941) with high water temperature of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) are one of the parametric study with respect to the ECCS effect on core cooling. This report presents all the experiment results of these two tests and describes additional finding with respect to the hot ECC effects on core cooling phenomena. By comparing these two tests (water temperature of 393 K) with the standard ECC tests of RUNs 922 and 926 (water temperature of 313 K), it was found that the ECC subcooling variation had a small influence on the core cooling phenomena in 5 % small break tests but had larger influence on them in 200 % break tests. The ECC subcooling effects described in the previous report are reviewed and the temperature distribution in the pressure vessel is investigated for these four tests. (author)

  18. Ambient Air Temperature Does Not Predict whether Small or Large Workers Forage in Bumble Bees (Bombus impatiens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret J. Couvillon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bumble bees are important pollinators of crops and other plants. However, many aspects of their basic biology remain relatively unexplored. For example, one important and unusual natural history feature in bumble bees is the massive size variation seen between workers of the same nest. This size polymorphism may be an adaptation for division of labor, colony economics, or be nonadaptive. It was also suggested that perhaps this variation allows for niche specialization in workers foraging at different temperatures: larger bees might be better suited to forage at cooler temperatures and smaller bees might be better suited to forage at warmer temperatures. This we tested here using a large, enclosed growth chamber, where we were able to regulate the ambient temperature. We found no significant effect of ambient or nest temperature on the average size of bees flying to and foraging from a suspended feeder. Instead, bees of all sizes successfully flew and foraged between 16∘C and 36∘C. Thus, large bees foraged even at very hot temperatures, which we thought might cause overheating. Size variation therefore could not be explained in terms of niche specialization for foragers at different temperatures.

  19. Focus of B-to-B e-commerce initiatives and related benefits in manufacturing small- and medium-sized enterprises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elie, E.; Lefebvre, L.A.; Lefebvre, E.

    2007-01-01

    Empirical research into business-to-business e-commerce issues involving manufacturing small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) is still embryonic. In an attempt to partially fill this gap, this paper presents empirical data from an electronic survey conducted among 96 manufacturing SMEs to

  20. The business case for safety and health at work : cost-benefit analyses of interventions in small and medium-sized enterprises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Targoutzidis, A.; Koukoulaki, T.; Schmitz-Felten, E.; Kuhl, K.; Oude Hengel, K.M.; Rijken, E.; Broek K. van den; Kluser, R.

    2014-01-01

    This report examines the economic aspects of occupational safety and health (OSH) interventions in small and medium-sized businesses (SMEs). First, case studies in the existing literature were identified and examined. Second, 13 new case studies on OSH initiatives in European SMEs were developed,

  1. Focus of B-to-B e-commerce initiatives and related benefits in manufacturing small- and medium-sized enterprises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elie, E.; Lefebvre, L.A.; Lefebvre, E.

    2007-01-01

    Empirical research into business-to-business e-commerce issues involving manufacturing small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) is still embryonic. In an attempt to partially fill this gap, this paper presents empirical data from an electronic survey conducted among 96 manufacturing SMEs to

  2. Development of a versatile high-temperature short-time (HTST) pasteurization device for small-scale processing of cell culture medium formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Patrick; Curtin, Sean; Kaisermayer, Christian; Lindeberg, Anna; Bones, Jonathan

    2018-07-01

    The compatibility of CHO cell culture medium formulations with all stages of the bioprocess must be evaluated through small-scale studies prior to scale-up for commercial manufacturing operations. Here, we describe the development of a bespoke small-scale device for assessing the compatibility of culture media with a widely implemented upstream viral clearance strategy, high-temperature short-time (HTST) treatment. The thermal stability of undefined medium formulations supplemented with soy hydrolysates was evaluated upon variations in critical HTST processing parameters, namely, holding times and temperatures. Prolonged holding times of 43 s at temperatures of 110 °C did not adversely impact medium quality while significant degradation was observed upon treatment at elevated temperatures (200 °C) for shorter time periods (11 s). The performance of the device was benchmarked against a commercially available mini-pilot HTST system upon treatment of identical formulations on both platforms. Processed medium samples were analyzed by untargeted LC-MS/MS for compositional profiling followed by chemometric evaluation, which confirmed the observed degradation effects caused by elevated holding temperatures but revealed comparable performance of our developed device with the commercial mini-pilot setup. The developed device can assist medium optimization activities by reducing volume requirements relative to commercially available mini-pilot instrumentation and by facilitating fast throughput evaluation of heat-induced effects on multiple medium lots.

  3. Application of a three-dimensional model for assessing effects of small clear-cuttings on radiation and soil temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olchev, A.; Radler, K.; Sogachev, Andrey

    2009-01-01

    , solar radiation, wind speed and direction, soil temperatures at 10 and 20 cm depth were measured by five automatic stations within the clear-cut area. One reference station was placed about 100 m from the clear-cut inside the forest stand. Comparisons of modelled and measured solar radiation fluxes...... and soil temperature profiles showed that the model adequately describes the spatial heterogeneity and dynamics of these variables under different weather conditions. The model can be used to explore solar radiation and soil temperature patterns within heterogeneous forest plots, with applications......A three-dimensional model Mixfor-3D of soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer (SVAT) was developed and applied to estimate possible effects of tree clear-cutting on radiation and soil temperature regimes of a forest ecosystem. The Mixfor-3D model consists of several closely coupled 3D sub...

  4. Benefits and challenges of using social media in marketing strategy:investigating small- and medium-sized companies in the Oulu region

    OpenAIRE

    Orajärvi, P. (Paavo)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This thesis explains what social media marketing is as a phenomenon and what kind of roles it can fill in a company’s overall marketing strategies. The thesis also provides very practical information on how small/medium-sized companies can use social media channels in their daily marketing activities. This has been achieved through a literature review on the topic supported by an empirical multi-case study. The mot...

  5. Can distributed generation offer substantial benefits in a Northeastern American context? A case study of small-scale renewable technologies using a life cycle methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amor, Mourad Ben; Samson, Rejean; Lesage, Pascal; Pineau, Pierre-Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Renewable distributed electricity generation can play a significant role in meeting today's energy policy goals, such as reducing greenhouse gas emissions, improving energy security, while adding supply to meet increasing energy demand. However, the exact potential benefits are still a matter of debate. The objective of this study is to evaluate the life cycle implications (environmental, economic and energy) of distributed generation (DG) technologies. A complementary objective is to compare the life cycle implications of DG technologies with the centralized electricity production representing the Northeastern American context. Environmental and energy implications are modeled according to the recommendations in the ISO 14040 standard and this, using different indicators: Human Health; Ecosystem Quality; Climate Change; Resources and Non-Renewable Energy Payback Ratio. Distinctly, economic implications are modeled using conventional life cycle costing. DG technologies include two types of grid-connected photovoltaic panels (3 kWp mono-crystalline and poly-crystalline) and three types of micro-wind turbines (1, 10 and 30 kW) modeled for average, below average and above average climatic conditions in the province of Quebec (Canada). A sensitivity analysis was also performed using different scenarios of centralized energy systems based on average and marginal (short- and long-term) technology approaches. Results show the following. First, climatic conditions (i.e., geographic location) have a significant effect on the results for the environmental, economic and energy indicators. More specifically, it was shown that the 30 kW micro-wind turbine is the best technology for above average conditions, while 3 kWp poly-crystalline photovoltaic panels are preferable for below average conditions. Second, the assessed DG technologies do not show benefits in comparison to the centralized Quebec grid mix (average technology approach). On the other hand, the 30 kW micro

  6. Can distributed generation offer substantial benefits in a Northeastern American context? A case study of small-scale renewable technologies using a life cycle methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amor, Mourad Ben; Samson, Rejean [CIRAIG, Department of Chemical Engineering, P.O. Box 6079, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal (Qc) (Canada); Lesage, Pascal [CIRAIG, Department of Chemical Engineering, P.O. Box 6079, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal (Qc) (Canada); Sylvatica, 7379 St-Hubert, Montreal (Qc) (Canada); Pineau, Pierre-Olivier [HEC Montreal, 3000 Chemin de la Cote-Sainte-Catherine, Montreal (Qc) (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    Renewable distributed electricity generation can play a significant role in meeting today's energy policy goals, such as reducing greenhouse gas emissions, improving energy security, while adding supply to meet increasing energy demand. However, the exact potential benefits are still a matter of debate. The objective of this study is to evaluate the life cycle implications (environmental, economic and energy) of distributed generation (DG) technologies. A complementary objective is to compare the life cycle implications of DG technologies with the centralized electricity production representing the Northeastern American context. Environmental and energy implications are modeled according to the recommendations in the ISO 14040 standard and this, using different indicators: Human Health; Ecosystem Quality; Climate Change; Resources and Non-Renewable Energy Payback Ratio. Distinctly, economic implications are modeled using conventional life cycle costing. DG technologies include two types of grid-connected photovoltaic panels (3 kWp mono-crystalline and poly-crystalline) and three types of micro-wind turbines (1, 10 and 30 kW) modeled for average, below average and above average climatic conditions in the province of Quebec (Canada). A sensitivity analysis was also performed using different scenarios of centralized energy systems based on average and marginal (short- and long-term) technology approaches. Results show the following. First, climatic conditions (i.e., geographic location) have a significant effect on the results for the environmental, economic and energy indicators. More specifically, it was shown that the 30 kW micro-wind turbine is the best technology for above average conditions, while 3 kWp poly-crystalline photovoltaic panels are preferable for below average conditions. Second, the assessed DG technologies do not show benefits in comparison to the centralized Quebec grid mix (average technology approach). On the other hand, the 30 kW micro

  7. Characterization of a 14Cr ODS steel by means of small punch and uniaxial testing with regard to creep and fatigue at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruchhausen, M., E-mail: matthias.bruchhausen@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Turba, K. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Lund University, Division of Materials Engineering, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Haan, F. de; Hähner, P.; Austin, T. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Carlan, Y. de [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2014-01-15

    A 14Cr ODS steel was characterized at elevated temperatures with regard to its behavior in small punch and uniaxial creep tests and in low cycle fatigue tests. A comparison of small punch and uniaxial creep tests at 650 °C revealed a strong anisotropy of the material when strained parallel and perpendicular to the extrusion direction with rupture times being several orders of magnitude lower for the perpendicular direction. The stress-rupture and Larson–Miller plots show a very large scatter of the creep data. This scatter is strongly reduced when rupture time is plotted against minimum deflection rate or minimum creep rate (Monkman–Grant plot). Fatigue tests have been carried out at 650 °C and 750 °C. The alloy is cyclically very stable with practically no hardening/softening. Results from the tests at both temperatures can be described by a common power law. An increase in the test temperature has little influence on the fatigue ductility exponent. For a given total strain level, the fatigue life of the alloy is reduced with increasing temperature.

  8. Walker occupancy has an impact on changing airborne bacterial communities in an underground pedestrian space, as small-dust particles increased with raising both temperature and humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Torahiko; Osaki, Takako; Nozaki, Eriko; Uemura, Akira; Sakai, Kouhei; Matushita, Mizue; Matsuo, Junji; Nakamura, Shinji; Kamiya, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Although human occupancy is a source of airborne bacteria, the role of walkers on bacterial communities in built environments is poorly understood. Therefore, we visualized the impact of walker occupancy combined with other factors (temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, dust particles) on airborne bacterial features in the Sapporo underground pedestrian space in Sapporo, Japan. Air samples (n = 18; 4,800L/each sample) were collected at 8:00 h to 20:00 h on 3 days (regular sampling) and at early morning / late night (5:50 h to 7:50 h / 22:15 h to 24:45 h) on a day (baseline sampling), and the number of CFUs (colony forming units) OTUs (operational taxonomic units) and other factors were determined. The results revealed that temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure changed with weather. The number of walkers increased greatly in the morning and evening on each regular sampling day, although total walker numbers did not differ significantly among regular sampling days. A slight increase in small dust particles (0.3-0.5μm) was observed on the days with higher temperature regardless of regular or baseline sampling. At the period on regular sampling, CFU levels varied irregularly among days, and the OTUs of 22-phylum types were observed, with the majority being from Firmicutes or Proteobacteria (γ-), including Staphylococcus sp. derived from human individuals. The data obtained from regular samplings reveled that although no direct interaction of walker occupancy and airborne CFU and OTU features was observed upon Pearson's correlation analysis, cluster analysis indicated an obvious lineage consisting of walker occupancy, CFU numbers, OTU types, small dust particles, and seasonal factors (including temperature and humidity). Meanwhile, at the period on baseline sampling both walker and CFU numbers were similarly minimal. Taken together, the results revealed a positive correlation of walker occupancy with airborne bacteria that increased with increases in

  9. Contribution to the explanation of the spalling of small specimen without any mechanical restraint exposed to high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, Marcus V.G. de; Pliya, Prosper; Noumowe, Albert; Beaucour, Anne-Lise; Ortola, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    The behaviour of concrete subjected to high temperature is studied. The aim of the study is to explain the spalling or bursting phenomenon observed during experimental studies in the laboratory. Mechanical computations are carried out with the finite element code CAST3M developed at the French Atomic Energy Agency (CEA). Heat gradient and water vapour pressure inside the concrete element are determined by using a thermo-hydrous model. Then, the mechanical stresses generated in the studied concrete element are calculated according to two behaviour assumptions: the linear isotropic elastic law and an elastoplastic model. Numerical simulations show that, during the heating cycles, tension stresses are developed in the central part and compression stresses at the surface of the cylindrical concrete element. The highest stresses appear when the surface temperature of the concrete element is about 300 o C. The tension stresses in the specimens then exceed the concrete tensile strength.

  10. Contribution to the explanation of the spalling of small specimen without any mechanical restraint exposed to high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Marcus V.G. de, E-mail: mvmorais@unb.b [Cergy-Pontoise University - L2MGC, 5 mail Gay-Lussac Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France); Pliya, Prosper [Cergy-Pontoise University - L2MGC, 5 mail Gay-Lussac Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France); Noumowe, Albert, E-mail: Albert.Noumowe@u-cergy.f [Cergy-Pontoise University - L2MGC, 5 mail Gay-Lussac Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France); Beaucour, Anne-Lise; Ortola, Sophie [Cergy-Pontoise University - L2MGC, 5 mail Gay-Lussac Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France)

    2010-10-15

    The behaviour of concrete subjected to high temperature is studied. The aim of the study is to explain the spalling or bursting phenomenon observed during experimental studies in the laboratory. Mechanical computations are carried out with the finite element code CAST3M developed at the French Atomic Energy Agency (CEA). Heat gradient and water vapour pressure inside the concrete element are determined by using a thermo-hydrous model. Then, the mechanical stresses generated in the studied concrete element are calculated according to two behaviour assumptions: the linear isotropic elastic law and an elastoplastic model. Numerical simulations show that, during the heating cycles, tension stresses are developed in the central part and compression stresses at the surface of the cylindrical concrete element. The highest stresses appear when the surface temperature of the concrete element is about 300 {sup o}C. The tension stresses in the specimens then exceed the concrete tensile strength.

  11. Moessbauer study of small amounts of iron in graphite, around the diamond-graphite pressure-temperature stability region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.L.S. de; Silva, M.T.X.; Vasquez, A.; Jornada, J.A.H. da

    1991-01-01

    An exploratory Moessbauer spectroscopy study of the Fe-C system in the C rich region, prepared by high pressure-high temperature treatment near the graphite-diamond stability line, was made. The results obtained for the different processing conditions give no evidence of Fe intercalation in graphite. The presence of some water in the cell produced hydrated Fe complexes, which can explain the deleterious effect of water or hydrogen in the high pressure diamond synthesis. (orig.)

  12. Effect of Atmospheric Pressure and Temperature on a Small Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engine’s Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    aid of a pump . A carbureted 10 engine uses the principles of a venturi or system of venturis to produce the required fuel flow. The carburetor...fuel R specific gas constant Sg specific gravity t time ttot total time T torque (Eq. 4), (Eq. 6) T temperature (Eq. 10), (Eq. 13), (Eq. 22...meters the fuel based on a pressure difference created by the venturi . This fuel flow mixes with the air stream in the intake of the engine before it

  13. Chromatographic behavior of small organic compounds in low-temperature high-performance liquid chromatography using liquid carbon dioxide as the mobile phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motono, Tomohiro; Nagai, Takashi; Kitagawa, Shinya; Ohtani, Hajime

    2015-07-01

    Low-temperature high-performance liquid chromatography, in which a loop injector, column, and detection cell were refrigerated at -35ºC, using liquid carbon dioxide as the mobile phase was developed. Small organic compounds (polyaromatic hydrocarbons, alkylbenzenes, and quinones) were separated by low-temperature high-performance liquid chromatography at temperatures from -35 to -5ºC. The combination of liquid carbon dioxide mobile phase with an octadecyl-silica (C18 ) column provided reversed phase mode separation, and a bare silica-gel column resulted in normal phase mode separation. In both the cases, nonlinear behavior at approximately -15ºC was found in the relationship between the temperature and the retention factors of the analytes (van't Hoff plots). In contrast to general trends in high-performance liquid chromatography, the decrease in temperature enhanced the separation efficiency of both the columns. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Research results from a prototype for power generation from low temperature heat sources in small and medium sized sawmills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tveit, Tor-Martin; Hoeeg, Arne; Asphjell, Trond-Atle; Horn, Henning

    2010-07-01

    In this paper we present research results from a low temperature power generation unit prototype, SPP 2-67A, installed at the timber company Moelven Eidsvold Vaerk in Norway. The power generation unit is a Stirling cycle reciprocating engine connected to a generator, which is designed to combine the mature technology for high temperature Stirling engines (as seen for instance as air independent propulsion (AIP) units in submarines) and recent academic work on low temperature Stirling engines. The power generation unit is installed in a boiler room at the Moelven Eidsvold Vaerk plant and uses steam at approximately 1.5 bar pressure as a heat source. The steam is generated in the 5.5 MW biomass-fuelled boiler, where bark of Norway spruce (Picea abies) is the main biofuel. The installation has been intended both to use hot water as a heat sink to demonstrate CHP operation, and cold water from the grid to demonstrate maximum power generation from surplus steam. The installation is part of a research project partly financed by the Research Council of Norway, with the goal of testing new technology to improve the use of bioenergy resources and conversion of heat from biofuels to power. (Author)

  15. Radiation clusters formation and evolution in FCC metals at low-temperature neutron irradiation up to small damage fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, A.V.; Shcherbakov, E.N.; Asiptsov, O.I.; Skryabin, L.A.; Portnykh, I.A.

    2006-01-01

    Methods of transmission electron microscopy and precision size measurements are used to study the formation of radiation-induced clusters in FCC metals (Ni, Pt, austenitic steels EhI-844, ChS-68) irradiated with fast neutron (E>0.1 MeV) fluences from 7 x 10 21 up to 3.5 x 10 22 m -2 at a temperature of 310 K. Using statistical thermodynamic methods the process of radiation clusters formation and evolution is described quantitatively. The change in the concentration of point defects under irradiation as well as size variations of irradiated specimens on annealing are calculated [ru

  16. Clinical responses to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor retreatment in non-small cell lung cancer patients who benefited from prior effective gefitinib therapy: a retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Miyabayashi, Takao; Narita, Ichiei; Yoshizawa, Hirohisa; Tanaka, Junta; Ota, Takeshi; Kondo, Rie; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Kagamu, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Kosuke; Koshio, Jun; Baba, Junko

    2011-01-01

    Gefitinib was the first epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) approved for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Few treatment options are available for NSCLC patients who have responded to gefitinib treatment and demonstrated tumor progression. The present study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of the 2 nd EGFR-TKI administration. We retrospectively analyzed 11 patients who had obtained a partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD) with gefitinib treatment and were re-treated with EGFR-TKI after failure of the initial gefitinib treatment. Three patients (27%) were treated with gefitinib as the 2 nd EGFR-TKI, and 8 patients (73%) received erlotinib. Only one patient (9%) showed PR, 7 (64%) achieved SD, and 3 (27%) had progressive disease. The disease control rate was 73% (95% CI, 43% - 91%) and the median progression-free survival was 3.4 months (95% CI, 2 - 5.2). The median overall survival from the beginning of the 2 nd EGFR-TKI and from diagnosis were 7.3 months (95% CI, 2.7 - 13) and 36.7 months (95% CI, 23.6 - 43.9), respectively. No statistical differences in PFS or OS were observed between gefitinib and erlotinib as the 2 nd EGFR-TKI (PFS, P = 0.23 and OS, P = 0.052). The toxicities associated with the 2 nd EGFR-TKI were generally acceptable and comparable to those observed for the initial gefitinib therapy. Our results indicate that a 2 nd EGFR-TKI treatment can be an effective treatment option for gefitinib responders

  17. Positron emission tomography with selected mediastinoscopy compared to routine mediastinoscopy offers cost and clinical outcome benefits for pre-operative staging of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, Kelvin K.; Yap, Kenneth S.K.; Byrne, Amanda J.; Berlangieri, Salvatore U.; Poon, Aurora; Harris, Anthony; Tauro, Andrew; Mitchell, Paul; Knight, Simon R.; Clarke, Peter C.; Rowe, Christopher C.; Scott, Andrew M.

    2005-01-01

    18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging is an important staging procedure in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We aimed to demonstrate, through a decision tree model and the incorporation of real costs of each component, that routine FDG-PET imaging as a prelude to curative surgery will reduce requirements for routine mediastinoscopy and overall hospital costs. A decision tree model comparing routine whole-body FDG-PET imaging to routine staging mediastinoscopy was used, with baseline variables of sensitivity, specificity and prevalence of non-operable and metastatic disease obtained from institutional data and a literature review. Costings for hospital admissions for mediastinoscopy and thoracotomy of actual patients with NSCLC were determined. The overall and average cost of managing patients was then calculated over a range of FDG-PET costs to derive projected cost savings to the community. The prevalence of histologically proven mediastinal involvement in patients with NSCLC presenting for surgical assessment at our institution is 20%, and the prevalence of distant metastatic disease is 6%. Based on literature review, the pooled sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET for detection of mediastinal spread are 84% and 89% respectively, and for mediastinoscopy, 81% and 100%. The average cost of mediastinoscopy for NSCLC in our institution is AUD$4,160, while that of thoracotomy is AUD$15,642. The cost of an FDG-PET scan is estimated to be AUD$1,500. Using these figures and the decision tree model, the average cost saving is AUD$2,128 per patient. Routine FDG-PET scanning with selective mediastinoscopy will save AUD$2,128 per patient and will potentially reduce inappropriate surgery. These cost savings remain robust over a wide range of disease prevalence and FDG-PET costs. (orig.)

  18. Neutron physical investigations on the shutdown effect of small boronated absorbing spheres for pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgouridis, S.; Schurrer, F.; Muller, H.; Ninaus, W.; Oswald, K.; Neef, R.D.; Schaal, H.

    1987-01-01

    An emergency shutdown system for high-temperature gas-cooled pebble-bed reactors is proposed in addition to the common absorber rod shutdown system. This system is based on the strongly absorbing effect of small boronated graphite spheres (called KLAK), which trickle in case of emergency by gravity from the top reflector into the reactor core. The inner reflector of the Siemens-Argonaut reactor was substituted by an assembly of spherical Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor fuel elements, and the shutdown effect was examined by installing well-defined KLAK nests inside this assembly. The purpose was to develop and prove a calculational procedure for determining criticality values for assemblies of large fuel spheres and small absorbing spheres

  19. Novel High Temperature and Radiation Resistant Infrared Glasses and Optical Fibers for Sensing in Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballato, John [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    2018-01-22

    One binary and three series of ternary non-oxide pure sulfide glasses compositions were investigated with the goal of synthesizing new glasses that exhibit high glass transition (Tg) and crystallization (Tc) temperatures, infrared transparency, and reliable glass formability. The binary glass series consisted of Ges2 and La2S3 and the three glass series in the x(nBaS + mLa2S3) + (1-2x)GeS2 ternary system have BaS:La2S3 modifier ratios of 1:1, 1:2, and 2:1 with . With these glasses, new insights were realized as to how ionic glasses form and how glass modifiers affect both structure and glass formability. All synthesized compositions were characterized by Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies and differential thermal analysis (DTA) to better understand the fundamental structure, optical, and thermal characteristics of the glasses. After a range of these glasses were synthesized, optimal compositions were formed into glass disks and subjected to gamma irradiation. Glass disks were characterized both before and after irradiation by microscope imaging, measuring the refractive index, density, and UV-VIS-IR transmission spectra. The final total dose the samples were subjected to was ~2.5 MGy. Ternary samples showed a less than 0.4% change in density and refractive index and minimal change in transmission window. The glasses also resisted cracking as seen in microscope images. Overall, many glass compositions were developed that possess operating temperatures above 500 °C, where conventional chalcogenide glasses such as As2S3 and have Tgs from ~200-300 °C, and these glasses have a greater than Tc – Tg values larger than 100 °C and this shows that these glasses have good thermal stability of Tg such that they can be fabricated into optical fibers and as such can be considered candidates for high temperature infrared fiber optics. Initial fiber fabrication efforts showed that selected glasses could be drawn but larger

  20. Novel Synthesis of Ultra-Small Dextran Coated Maghemite Nanoparticles for MRI and CT Contrast Agents via a Low Temperature Co-Precipitation Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabias, Ioannis; Fardis, Michael; Kehagias, Thomas; Kletsas, Dimitris; Pratsinis, Harris; Tsitrouli, Danai; Maris, Thomas G; Papavassiliou, George

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-small dextran coated maghemite nanoparticles are synthesized via a low temperature modified co-precipitation method. A monoethylene glycol/water solution of 1:1 molar ratios and a fixed apparatus is used at a constant temperature of 5-10 degrees C. The growth of nanoparticles is prohibited due to low temperature synthesis and differs from usual thermal decomposition methods via Ostwald ripening. Strict temperature control and reaction timing of less than 20 minutes are essential to maintain narrow distribution in particle size. These nanoparticles are water-dispersible and biocompatible by capping with polyethylene glycol ligands. The aqueous suspensions are tested for cytotoxic activity on normal human skin fibroblasts. There is no reduction of the cells' viability at any concentration tested, the highest being 1% v/v of the suspension in culture medium, corresponding to the highest concentrations to be administered in vivo. Initial comparison with a T1 MRI contrast agent in sale shows that maghemite nanoparticles exhibit high r1 and r2 relaxivities in MRI tomography and strong contrast in computed tomography, demonstrating that these nanoparticles can be efficient T1, T2 and CT contrast agents.

  1. Development of a high temperature high strength Al alloy by addition of small amounts of Sc and Mg to 2219 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondol, S. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Alam, T.; Banerjee, R. [Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Processes Institute and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203-5017 (United States); Kumar, S. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Chattopadhyay, K., E-mail: kamanio@materials.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2017-02-27

    The paper reports a significant improvement in tensile properties, in particular at 200 °C, of commercial 2219 Al alloy by addition of small amounts of Sc (0.8 wt%) and Mg (0.45 wt%), and employing copper mould suction casting followed by natural ageing and cold rolling. Microstructural examination and measurement of hardness were performed in order to explain the effects of Sc and Mg at each processing step. It is found that the remarkable improvement of room temperature strength occurs due to fine grain size, Al{sub 3}Sc and Al{sub 3}(Sc,Zr) dispersoids, GP zones on {100} and {111} planes, and work hardening. On exposure at 200 °C, the GP zones transform primarily to θ′ precipitates and a few Ω precipitates. Sc and Mg atoms segregate at the θ′/matrix interface, which suppress the coarsening of θ′ precipitates and make them stable at higher temperatures. Thus, the work reports extremely high 0.2% proof stress of 542 MPa at room temperature, 378 MPa at 200 °C and 495 MPa at room temperature after 200 h exposure at 200 °C accompanied by reasonable ductility. Theoretical yield strength is calculated on the basis of the observed microstructure and is found to be in good agreement with the experimentally obtained value.

  2. Development of a high temperature high strength Al alloy by addition of small amounts of Sc and Mg to 2219 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondol, S.; Alam, T.; Banerjee, R.; Kumar, S.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2017-01-01

    The paper reports a significant improvement in tensile properties, in particular at 200 °C, of commercial 2219 Al alloy by addition of small amounts of Sc (0.8 wt%) and Mg (0.45 wt%), and employing copper mould suction casting followed by natural ageing and cold rolling. Microstructural examination and measurement of hardness were performed in order to explain the effects of Sc and Mg at each processing step. It is found that the remarkable improvement of room temperature strength occurs due to fine grain size, Al 3 Sc and Al 3 (Sc,Zr) dispersoids, GP zones on {100} and {111} planes, and work hardening. On exposure at 200 °C, the GP zones transform primarily to θ′ precipitates and a few Ω precipitates. Sc and Mg atoms segregate at the θ′/matrix interface, which suppress the coarsening of θ′ precipitates and make them stable at higher temperatures. Thus, the work reports extremely high 0.2% proof stress of 542 MPa at room temperature, 378 MPa at 200 °C and 495 MPa at room temperature after 200 h exposure at 200 °C accompanied by reasonable ductility. Theoretical yield strength is calculated on the basis of the observed microstructure and is found to be in good agreement with the experimentally obtained value.

  3. In-Situ Monitoring of the Microstructure of TATB-based Explosive Formulations During Temperature Cycling using Ultra-small Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willey, T M; Hoffman, D M; van Buuren, T; Lauderbach, L; Ilavsky, J; Gee, R H; Maiti, A; Overturf, G; Fried, L

    2008-02-06

    TATB (1,3,5 triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene), an extremely insensitive explosive, is used both in plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) and as an ultra-fine pressed powder (UFTATB). With both PBXs and UFTATB, an irreversible expansion occurs with temperature cycling known as ratchet growth. In TATB-based explosives using Kel-F 800 as binder (LX-17 and PBX-9502), additional voids, sizes hundreds of nanometers to a few microns account for much of the volume expansion caused by temperature cycling. These voids are in the predicted size regime for hot-spot formation during ignition and detonation, and thus an experimental measure of these voids is important feedback for hot-spot theory and for determining the relationship between void size distributions and detonation properties. Also, understanding the mechanism of ratchet growth allows future choice of explosive/binder mixtures to minimize these types of changes to explosives, further extending PBX shelf life. This paper presents the void size distributions of LX-17, UFTATB, and PBXs using commercially available Cytop M, Cytop A, and Hyflon AD60 binders during temperature cycling between -55 C and 70 C. These void size distributions are derived from ultra-small angle x-ray scattering (USAXS), a technique sensitive to structures from about 10 nm to about 2 mm. Structures with these sizes do not appreciably change in UFTATB, indicating voids or cracks larger than a few microns appear in UFTATB during temperature cycling. Compared to Kel-F 800 binders, Cytop M and Cytop A show relatively small increases in void volume from 0.9% to 1.3% and 0.6% to 1.1%, respectively, while Hyflon fails to prevent irreversible volume expansion (1.2% to 4.6%). Computational mesoscale models of ratchet growth and binder wetting and adhesion properties point to mechanisms of ratchet growth, and are discussed in combination with the experimental results.

  4. Streamflow, sediment-transport, and water-temperature characteristics of the three small watersheds in the Alsea River basin, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David Dell; Williams, Robert Charles

    1971-01-01

    Data collected during the prelogging period 1959-65 indicate an average annual runoff for Needle Branch and Deer and Flynn Creeks of 74.2, 75.1, and 77.7 inches, respectively. The measured precipitation at Flynn Creek of 92.9 inches was 5 inches less than at either Needle Branch or Deer Creek. Unit flood runoff during the prelogging period was found to be lowest on Flynn Creek and highest on Needle Branch. On Needle Branch, there appear to be two distinct low-flow patterns, one for a saturated and one for an unsaturated soil condition. The average annual sediment yield was highest on Flynn Creek, 321 tons per square mile, and lowest on Needle Branch, 166 tons per square mile. Maximum water temperatures were 62?F on Flynn Creek and 61?F on Needle Branch and Deer Creek.

  5. A novel one-pot room-temperature synthesis route to produce very small photoluminescent silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas-Gallardo, Oscar A.; Burgos-Paci, Maxi A.; Mendoza-Cruz, Rubén; Putnam, Karl G.; Josefina Arellano-Jiménez, M.; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Mariscal, Marcelo M.; Macagno, Vicente A.; Sánchez, Cristián G.; Pérez, Manuel A.

    2018-03-01

    A novel strategy to synthesize photoluminescent silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) from a reaction between tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and trimethyl-hexadecyl-ammonium borohydride (CTABH4) in organic solvent is presented. The formation reaction occurs spontaneously at room temperature in homogeneous phase. The produced silicon nanocrystals are characterized by using their photoluminescent properties and via HRTEM. In addition, theoretical calculations of the optical absorption spectrum of silicon quantum dots in vacuum with different sizes and surface moieties were performed in order to compare with the experimental findings. The new chemical reaction is simple and can be implemented to produce silicon nanocrystal with regular laboratory materials by performing easy and safe procedures. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Benefits of Silica Core-Shell Structures on the Temperature Sensing Properties of Er,Yb:GdVO4 Up-Conversion Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchuk, Oleksandr A; Carvajal, Joan J; Cascales, C; Aguiló, M; Díaz, F

    2016-03-23

    We studied the temperature-dependent luminescence of GdVO4 nanoparticles co-doped with Er(3+) (1 mol %) and Yb(3+) (20 mol %) and determined their thermal sensing properties through the fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR) technique. We also analyzed how a silica coating, in a core-shell structure, affects the temperature sensing properties of this material. Spectra were recorded in the range of biological temperatures (298-343 K). The absolute sensitivity for temperature determination calculated for the core-shell nanoparticles is double the one calculated for bare nanoparticles, achieving a thermal resolution of 0.4 K. Moreover, silica-coated nanoparticles show good dispersibility in different solvents, such as water, DMSO, and methanol. Also, they show good luminescence stability without interactions with solvent molecules. Furthermore, we also observed that the silica coating shell prevents progressive heating of the nanoparticles during prolonged excitation periods with the 980 nm laser, preventing effects on their thermometric applications.

  7. Does mycorrhizal inoculation benefit plant survival, plant development and small-scale soil fixation? Results from a perennial eco-engineering field experiment in the Swiss Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bast, Alexander; Grimm, Maria; Graf, Frank; Baumhauer, Roland; Gärtner, Holger

    2015-04-01

    In mountain environments superficial slope failures on coarse grained, vegetation-free slopes are common processes and entail a certain risk for humans and socio-economic structures. Eco-engineering measures can be applied to mitigate slope instabilities. In this regard, limited plant survival and growth can be supported by mycorrhizal inoculation, which was successfully tested in laboratory studies. However, related studies on a field scale are lacking. Furthermore, mycorrhizae are known to enhance soil aggregation, which is linked to soil physics such as shear strength, and hence it is a useful indicator for near-surface soil/slope stability. The overall objective of our contribution was to test whether mycorrhizal inoculation can be used to promote eco-engineering measures in steep alpine environments based on a five-year field experiment. We hypothesized that mycorrhizal inoculation (i) enhances soil aggregation, (ii) stimulate plant survival and fine root development, (iii) effects plant performance, (iv) the stimulated root development in turn influences aggregate stability, and (v) that climatic variations play a major role in fine-root development. We established mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal treated eco-engineered research plots (hedge layers mainly consisting of Alnus spp. and Salix spp.) on a field experimental scale. The experimental site is in the eastern Swiss Alps at an erosion-prone slope where many environmental conditions can be seen as homogeneous. Soil aggregation, fine root development and plant survival was quantified at the end of four growing seasons (2010, '11, '12, '14). Additionally, growth properties of Alnus spp. and Salix spp. were measured and their biomass estimated. Meteorological conditions, soil temperature and soil water content were recorded. (i) The introduced eco-engineering measures enhanced aggregate stability significantly. In contrast to published greenhouse and laboratory studies, mycorrhizal inoculation delayed soil

  8. Gas, benefits and question marks. The Oklo reactors: 100 % natural. The Kyoto protocol: use it or lose it?. Small hydro power: a great leap forward. The energy mix of South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    This issue of Alternatives newsletter contains a main press-kit about natural gas economics worldwide and 4 articles dealing with the Oklo natural reactor, the Kyoto protocol, the small hydro-power in China, and the energy mix of South Korea: 1 - 'Gas benefits and question marks': The world's most widely distributed fossil fuel, natural gas is also the fastest-growing energy source of the past thirty years. Its position as the fuel of choice in the global energy mix is due in large part to its many domestic and industrial applications. 2 - 'The Oklo reactors: 100% natural': Another look at this extraordinary 2 billion year-old phenomenon in words and pictures: the nuclear fission reaction that created the natural reactors of Gabon. 3 - 'The Kyoto Protocol: use it or lose it?': Nearly eight years after its signature, the Kyoto Protocol is still hotly debated. Two experts give us their views: Spencer Abraham, former U.S. Secretary for Energy, and Jean-Charles Hourcade of CIRED, the international center for research on the environment and development. 4 - 'Small hydro power: a great leap forward': The Chinese government has responded to the need for rural electrification with an aid program for the country's poorest cantons. Enter the small hydro plant in northern Guangxi province. 5 - 'The energy mix of South Korea': Faced with continuing strong economic growth and energy demand, South Korea has multiplied its projects, from hydropower to tidal power to nuclear and even hydrogen in the longer term

  9. Multiple Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Beth

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of dome architecture for a community's middle- and high-school multi-purpose facility. The dome construction is revealed as being cost effective in construction and in maintenance and energy costs. (GR)

  10. A development strategy for the business plan of Mitsubishi Small-sized High Temperature Gas-cooled Modular Reactor (MHR-50/100is)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minatsuki, Isao; Otani, Tomomi; Shimizu, Katsusuke; Mizokami, Yorikata; Oyama, Sunao; Tsukamoto, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    A business plan and a new concept of Mitsubishi Small-sized High Temperature Gas-cooled Modular Reactor (MHR-50/100is) has been investigated toward a commercialization in near future by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries cooperated with Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in Japan. The potential market of small sized reactor is expected to increase from the points of view of smaller investment, industrial use of the nuclear heat and IPP (Independent Power Producer). Especially minimization of construction unit cost including R and D and plant construction period are important issues in order to realize a business plan for them. The study includes four pertinent subject areas of (1) a market analysis, (2) a conceptual design, (3) improvement of safety design and (4) plant dynamics. In summary, the MHR-50/100 is designed to target a short construction period, competitive cost, and an inherent safety feature while applying only the verified technology of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of JAEA or conventional technologies

  11. A development strategy for the business plan of Mitsubishi Small-sized High Temperature Gas-cooled Modular Reactor (MHR-50/100is)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minatsuki, Isao, E-mail: isao_minatsuki@mhi.co.jp [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 16-5, Konan 2-Chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Otani, Tomomi; Shimizu, Katsusuke [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 16-5, Konan 2-Chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Mizokami, Yorikata; Oyama, Sunao; Tsukamoto, Hiroki [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 1-1 Wadasaki-cho 1-Chome, Hyogo-ku, Kobe (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    A business plan and a new concept of Mitsubishi Small-sized High Temperature Gas-cooled Modular Reactor (MHR-50/100is) has been investigated toward a commercialization in near future by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries cooperated with Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in Japan. The potential market of small sized reactor is expected to increase from the points of view of smaller investment, industrial use of the nuclear heat and IPP (Independent Power Producer). Especially minimization of construction unit cost including R and D and plant construction period are important issues in order to realize a business plan for them. The study includes four pertinent subject areas of (1) a market analysis, (2) a conceptual design, (3) improvement of safety design and (4) plant dynamics. In summary, the MHR-50/100 is designed to target a short construction period, competitive cost, and an inherent safety feature while applying only the verified technology of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of JAEA or conventional technologies.

  12. Heterologous expression of three Camellia sinensis small heat shock protein genes confers temperature stress tolerance in yeast and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingle; Zou, Zhongwei; Li, Qinghui; Xin, Huahong; Zhu, Xujun; Chen, Xuan; Li, Xinghui

    2017-07-01

    CsHSP17.7, CsHSP18.1, and CsHSP21.8 expressions are induced by heat and cold stresses, and CsHSP overexpression confers tolerance to heat and cold stresses in transgenic Pichia pastoris and Arabidopsis thaliana. Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are crucial for protecting plants against biotic and abiotic stresses, especially heat stress. However, knowledge concerning the functions of Camellia sinensis sHSP in heat and cold stresses remains poorly understood. In this study, three C. sinensis sHSP genes (i.e., CsHSP17.7, CsHSP18.1, and CsHSP21.8) were isolated and characterized using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technology. The CsHSPs expression levels in C. sinensis leaves were significantly up-regulated by heat and cold stresses. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that CsHSP17.7, CsHSP18.1, and CsHSP21.8 belong to sHSP Classes I, II, and IV, respectively. Heterologous expression of the three CsHSP genes in Pichia pastoris cells enhanced heat and cold stress tolerance. When exposed to heat and cold treatments, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing CsHSP17.7, CsHSP18.1, and CsHSP21.8 had lower malondialdehyde contents, ion leakage, higher proline contents, and transcript levels of stress-related genes (e.g., AtPOD, AtAPX1, AtP5CS2, and AtProT1) compared with the control line. In addition, improved seed germination vigor was also observed in the CsHSP-overexpressing seeds under heat stress. Taken together, our results suggest that the three identified CsHSP genes play key roles in heat and cold tolerance.

  13. A temperature-sensitive dcw1 mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is cell cycle arrested with small buds which have aberrant cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagaki, Hiroshi; Ito, Kiyoshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2004-10-01

    Dcw1p and Dfg5p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are homologous proteins that were previously shown to be involved in cell wall biogenesis and to be essential for growth. Dcw1p was found to be a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane protein. To investigate the roles of these proteins in cell wall biogenesis and cell growth, we constructed mutant alleles of DCW1 by random mutagenesis, introduced them into a Deltadcw1 Deltadfg5 background, and isolated a temperature-sensitive mutant, DC61 (dcw1-3 Deltadfg5). When DC61 cells were incubated at 37 degrees C, most cells had small buds, with areas less than 20% of those of the mother cells. This result indicates that DC61 cells arrest growth with small buds at 37 degrees C. At 37 degrees C, fewer DC61 cells had 1N DNA content and most of them still had a single nucleus located apart from the bud neck. In addition, in DC61 cells incubated at 37 degrees C, bipolar spindles were not formed. These results indicate that DC61 cells, when incubated at 37 degrees C, are cell cycle arrested after DNA replication and prior to the separation of spindle pole bodies. The small buds of DC61 accumulated chitin in the bud cortex, and some of them were lysed, which indicates that they had aberrant cell walls. A temperature-sensitive dfg5 mutant, DF66 (Deltadcw1 dfg5-29), showed similar phenotypes. DCW1 and DFG5 mRNA levels peaked in the G1 and S phases, respectively. These results indicate that Dcw1p and Dfg5p are involved in bud formation through their involvement in biogenesis of the bud cell wall.

  14. [Studies on high temperature oxidation of noble metal alloys for dental use. (III) On high temperature oxidation resistance of noble metal alloys by adding small amounts of alloying elements. (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, H

    1976-11-01

    The previous report pointed out the undesirable effects of high temperature oxidation on the casting. The influence of small separate additions of Zn, Mg, Si, Be and Al on the high temperature oxidation of the noble metal alloys was examined. These alloying elements were chosen because their oxide have a high electrical resistivity and they have much higher affinity for oxygen than Cu. The casting were oxidized at 700 degrees C for 1 hour in air. The results obtained were as follows: 1. The Cu oxides are not observed on the as-cast surface of noble metal alloys containing small amounts of Zn, Mg, Si, Be, and Al. The castings have gold- or silver-colored surface. 2. After heating of the unpolished and polished castings, the additions of Si, Be and Al are effective in preventing oxidation of Cu in the 18 carats gold alloys. Especially the golden surface is obtained by adding Be and Al. But there is no oxidation-resistance on the polished castings in the alloys containing Zn and Mg. 3. The zinc oxide film formed on the as-cast specimen is effective in preventing of oxidation Cu in 18 carats gold alloys. 4. It seems that the addition of Al is most available in dental application.

  15. Modeling the effect in of criticality from changes in key parameters for small High Temperature Nuclear Reactor (U-BatteryTM) using MCNP4C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauzi, A M

    2013-01-01

    The neutron transport code, Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) which was wellkown as the gold standard in predicting nuclear reaction was used to model the small nuclear reactor core called U -battery TM, which was develop by the University of Manchester and Delft Institute of Technology. The paper introduces on the concept of modeling the small reactor core, a high temperature reactor (HTR) type with small coated TRISO fuel particle in graphite matrix using the MCNPv4C software. The criticality of the core were calculated using the software and analysed by changing key parameters such coolant type, fuel type and enrichment levels, cladding materials, and control rod type. The criticality results from the simulation were validated using the SCALE 5.1 software by [1] M Ding and J L Kloosterman, 2010. The data produced from these analyses would be used as part of the process of proposing initial core layout and a provisional list of materials for newly design reactor core. In the future, the criticality study would be continued with different core configurations and geometries.

  16. A high sensitivity SQUID-method for the measurement of magnetic susceptibility of small samples in the temperature range 1.5 K-40 K and application on small palladium particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu Nguyen Quang.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper a method is developed for magnetic susceptibility measurements which is superior to the common methods. The method is based on the SQUID-principle (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) using the tunnel effect of a superconducting point contact and magnetic flux quantization for measuring electric and magnetic quantities. Due to this refined method susceptibility changes of very small palladium particles could be detected in the temperature range 1.5 K-40 K with respect to the bulk. In addition susceptibility differences of particle distributions with different means diameters (81 Angstroem and 65 Angstroem) have been measured for the first time. A quantitative comparison of the measurements with theoretical results shows satisfactory agreement. (orig./WBU) [de

  17. Storage on maternal plants affects light and temperature on requirements during germination in two small seeded halophytes in the arabian deserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.; Gairola, S.

    2015-01-01

    Seeds are either stored in a soil seed bank or retained on maternal plants until they are released (aerial seed bank). Though there are extensive studies on the germination requirements of seeds in soil banks of saline habitats, studies conducted for halophytes with aerial seed banks are rare. We assessed the impact of aerial and room-temperature storages on the light and temperature requirements during germination in two small-seeded halophytes: Halocnmum strobilaceum having a short-term aerial seed bank (less than one year) and Halopeplis perfoliata having a longer term aerial seed bank (up to two years). Seed storage in the aerial bank reduced the germination in H. strobilaceum, but either increased it (5-months storage) or had no effect (17-months storage) in H. perfoliata. Seeds of both species that were stored in aerial bank germinated to higher percentages in light than in darkness, indicating that considerable portions of the seed populations are light sensitive. Seeds of H. perfoliata attained less than 5.0 percentage germination in darkness at higher temperatures, compared to more than 90.0 percentage in light. The results support the hypothesis that the aerial seed bank is an adaptive strategy for survival in the saline habitats of the two species. (author)

  18. Magnitude of the benefit of progression-free survival as a potential surrogate marker in phase 3 trials assessing targeted agents in molecularly selected patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer: systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuyuki Hotta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In evaluation of the clinical benefit of a new targeted agent in a phase 3 trial enrolling molecularly selected patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, overall survival (OS as an endpoint seems to be of limited use because of a high level of treatment crossover for ethical reasons. A more efficient and useful indicator for assessing efficacy is needed. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We identified 18 phase 3 trials in the literature investigating EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKIs or ALK-TKIs, now approved for use to treat NSCLC, compared with standard cytotoxic chemotherapy (eight trials were performed in molecularly selected patients and ten using an "all-comer" design. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to identify the best threshold by which to divide the groups. Although trials enrolling molecularly selected patients and all-comer trials had similar OS-hazard ratios (OS-HRs (0.99 vs. 1.04, the former exhibited greater progression-free survival-hazard ratios (PFS-HR (mean, 0.40 vs. 1.01; P<0.01. A PFS-HR of 0.60 successfully distinguished between the two types of trials (sensitivity 100%, specificity 100%. The odds ratio for overall response was higher in trials with molecularly selected patients than in all-comer trials (mean: 6.10 vs. 1.64; P<0.01. An odds ratio of 3.40 for response afforded a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 90%. CONCLUSION: The notably enhanced PFS benefit was quite specific to trials with molecularly selected patients. A PFS-HR cutoff of ∼0.6 may help detect clinical benefit of molecular targeted agents in which OS is of limited use, although desired threshold might differ in an individual trial.

  19. Sustainable Offices: Small Practices for Big Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE MAY 2012 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES...16 Reducing Fuel Consumption • Participate in meetings via telephone • Telecommute or alternate work schedules • Carpool • Bike or walk around

  20. Benefits | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    flexible work environment that enables and encourages a good work/life balance A growing, changing exceptional work. A woman riding her bike past the NREL entrance sign. Hundreds of NREL employees opt out of their cars, cycling to work, to take part in Bike To Work Day each year. Benefits Package NREL's

  1. Fringe Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgursky, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Uses statistics from the National Center for Education Statistics and the Bureau of Labor Statistics to examine teacher salaries and benefits. Discusses compensation of teachers compared with nonteachers. Asserts that statistics from the American Federation of Teachers and the National Education Association underestimate teacher compensation…

  2. Preparation and Characterization of a Small Library of Thermally-Labile End-Caps for Variable-Temperature Triggering of Self-Immolative Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taimoory, S Maryamdokht; Sadraei, S Iraj; Fayoumi, Rose Anne; Nasri, Sarah; Revington, Matthew; Trant, John F

    2018-04-20

    The reaction between furans and maleimides has increasingly become a method of interest as its reversibility makes it a useful tool for applications ranging from self-healing materials, to self-immolative polymers, to hydrogels for cell culture and for the preparation of bone repair. However, most of these applications have relied on simple monosubstituted furans and simple maleimides and have not extensively evaluated the potential thermal variability inherent in the process that is achievable through simple substrate modification. A small library of cycloadducts suitable for the above applications was prepared, and the temperature dependence of the retro-Diels-Alder processes was determined through in situ 1 H NMR analyses complemented by computational calculations. The practical range of the reported systems ranges from 40 to >110 °C. The cycloreversion reactions are more complex than would be expected based on simple trends expected based on frontier molecular orbital analyses of the materials.

  3. Who benefits?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Frederik Georg

    2016-01-01

    Cross-border welfare rights for citizens of European Union member states are intensely contested, yet there is limited research into voter opposition to such rights, sometimes denoted ‘welfare chauvinism’. We highlight an overlooked aspect in scholarly work: the role of stereotypes about benefici...... recipient identity. These effects are strongest among respondents high in ethnic prejudice and economic conservatism. The findings imply that stereotypes about who benefits from cross-border welfare rights condition public support for those rights....

  4. Small Acute Benefits of 4 Weeks Processing Speed Training Games on Processing Speed and Inhibition Performance and Depressive Mood in the Healthy Elderly People: Evidence from a Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouchi, Rui; Saito, Toshiki; Nouchi, Haruka; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Processing speed training using a 1-year intervention period improves cognitive functions and emotional states of elderly people. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether short-term processing speed training such as 4 weeks can benefit elderly people. This study was designed to investigate effects of 4 weeks of processing speed training on cognitive functions and emotional states of elderly people. Methods: We used a single-blinded randomized control trial (RCT). Seventy-two older adults were assigned randomly to two groups: a processing speed training game (PSTG) group and knowledge quiz training game (KQTG) group, an active control group. In PSTG, participants were asked to play PSTG (12 processing speed games) for 15 min, during five sessions per week, for 4 weeks. In the KQTG group, participants were asked to play KQTG (four knowledge quizzes) for 15 min, during five sessions per week, for 4 weeks. We measured several cognitive functions and emotional states before and after the 4 week intervention period. Results: Our results revealed that PSTG improved performances in processing speed and inhibition compared to KQTG, but did not improve performance in reasoning, shifting, short term/working memory, and episodic memory. Moreover, PSTG reduced the depressive mood score as measured by the Profile of Mood State compared to KQTG during the 4 week intervention period, but did not change other emotional measures. Discussion: This RCT first provided scientific evidence related to small acute benefits of 4 week PSTG on processing speed, inhibition, and depressive mood in healthy elderly people. We discuss possible mechanisms for improvements in processing speed and inhibition and reduction of the depressive mood. Trial registration: This trial was registered in The University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN000022250).

  5. Pore Characterization of Shale Rock and Shale Interaction with Fluids at Reservoir Pressure-Temperature Conditions Using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, M.; Hjelm, R.; Watkins, E.; Xu, H.; Pawar, R.

    2015-12-01

    Oil/gas produced from unconventional reservoirs has become strategically important for the US domestic energy independence. In unconventional realm, hydrocarbons are generated and stored in nanopores media ranging from a few to hundreds of nanometers. Fundamental knowledge of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes that control fluid flow and propagation within nano-pore confinement is critical for maximizing unconventional oil/gas production. The size and confinement of the nanometer pores creates many complex rock-fluid interface interactions. It is imperative to promote innovative experimental studies to decipher physical and chemical processes at the nanopore scale that govern hydrocarbon generation and mass transport of hydrocarbon mixtures in tight shale and other low permeability formations at reservoir pressure-temperature conditions. We have carried out laboratory investigations exploring quantitative relationship between pore characteristics of the Wolfcamp shale from Western Texas and the shale interaction with fluids at reservoir P-T conditions using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). We have performed SANS measurements of the shale rock in single fluid (e.g., H2O and D2O) and multifluid (CH4/(30% H2O+70% D2O)) systems at various pressures up to 20000 psi and temperature up to 150 oF. Figure 1 shows our SANS data at different pressures with H2O as the pressure medium. Our data analysis using IRENA software suggests that the principal changes of pore volume in the shale occurred on smaller than 50 nm pores and pressure at 5000 psi (Figure 2). Our results also suggest that with increasing P, more water flows into pores; with decreasing P, water is retained in the pores.

  6. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    OpenAIRE

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-01-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and as...

  7. Benefit from the association of small amounts of tannin-rich shrub foliage (Acacia cyanophylla Lindl.) with soya bean meal given as supplements to Barbarine sheep fed on oaten hay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Salem, H.; Makkar, H.P.S.; Nefzaoui, A.; Abidi, S.; Hassayoun, L.

    2005-01-01

    Two trials were conducted to test the hypotheses that (i) feeding small amount of a tanniniferous shrub foliage (Acacia cyanophylla Lindl., acacia) increases the proportion of rumen undegradable protein, and consequently benefits growth performance in Barbarine lamb; and (ii) such positive effect depends on the timing of feeding tannin source (i.e. acacia) relative to protein source (soya bean meal, SBM). Total (TT) and condensed tannin (CT) concentrations in air-dried acacia leaves used in this study averaged 29 g tannic acid and 48 g leucocyanidin equivalents per kg dry matter (DM), respectively. In trial 1, rumen fistulated ewes received oaten hay (hay) ad libitum and 200 g SBM (D1), D1 and 100 g acacia fed with the SBM (D2, mixed strategy) or as D2, but the SBM fed 1 h later than acacia when acacia was consumed completely (D3, sequential strategy). Hay intake, diet digestibility, rumen fermentation parameters (pH, ammonia nitrogen (NH 3 -N) and total volatile fatty acids) and in situ degradation of SBM nitrogen were similar between D1 and D2 (P > 0.05). However, the sequential strategy (D3) resulted in efficient use of N as reflected by the decrease of crude protein digestibility (CPD), plasma urea, NH 3 -N concentration and in situ degradation of SBM nitrogen. In trial 2, four groups each of six Barbarine lambs (initial LW 35.3 ± 3.7 kg) received for 90 days: hay ad libitum and 200 g SBM (D1), D1 and 20 g polyethylene glycol (PEG, MW 4000) mixed with SBM (D2), D1 and 100 g acacia with the SBM fed 1 h later when acacia was completely consumed (sequential strategy) (D3) or D3 and 20 g PEG fed with the SBM (D4). Polyethylene glycol was here used to deactivate tannins. Hay intake and DM, organic matter and neutral detergent fibre digestibility were similar among dietary treatment (P > 0.05). However, supplementing lambs with SBM and acacia without PEG (D3) resulted in a significant decrease (P 0.05). However, those supplemented with acacia without PEG (D3) had

  8. Benefit from the association of small amounts of tannin-rich shrub foliage (Acacia cyanophylla Lindl.) with soya bean meal given as supplements to Barbarine sheep fed on oaten hay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Salem, H. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie, Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia)]. E-mail: bensalem.hichem@iresa.agrinet.tn; Makkar, H.P.S. [Animal Production and Health Section, Joint FAO/IAEA Division, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Nefzaoui, A.; Abidi, S. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie, Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia); Hassayoun, L. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie, Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia); Ecole Superieure d' Agriculture de Mateur, Mateur (Tunisia)

    2005-08-19

    Two trials were conducted to test the hypotheses that (i) feeding small amount of a tanniniferous shrub foliage (Acacia cyanophylla Lindl., acacia) increases the proportion of rumen undegradable protein, and consequently benefits growth performance in Barbarine lamb; and (ii) such positive effect depends on the timing of feeding tannin source (i.e. acacia) relative to protein source (soya bean meal, SBM). Total (TT) and condensed tannin (CT) concentrations in air-dried acacia leaves used in this study averaged 29 g tannic acid and 48 g leucocyanidin equivalents per kg dry matter (DM), respectively. In trial 1, rumen fistulated ewes received oaten hay (hay) ad libitum and 200 g SBM (D1), D1 and 100 g acacia fed with the SBM (D2, mixed strategy) or as D2, but the SBM fed 1 h later than acacia when acacia was consumed completely (D3, sequential strategy). Hay intake, diet digestibility, rumen fermentation parameters (pH, ammonia nitrogen (NH{sub 3}-N) and total volatile fatty acids) and in situ degradation of SBM nitrogen were similar between D1 and D2 (P > 0.05). However, the sequential strategy (D3) resulted in efficient use of N as reflected by the decrease of crude protein digestibility (CPD), plasma urea, NH{sub 3}-N concentration and in situ degradation of SBM nitrogen. In trial 2, four groups each of six Barbarine lambs (initial LW 35.3 {+-} 3.7 kg) received for 90 days: hay ad libitum and 200 g SBM (D1), D1 and 20 g polyethylene glycol (PEG, MW 4000) mixed with SBM (D2), D1 and 100 g acacia with the SBM fed 1 h later when acacia was completely consumed (sequential strategy) (D3) or D3 and 20 g PEG fed with the SBM (D4). Polyethylene glycol was here used to deactivate tannins. Hay intake and DM, organic matter and neutral detergent fibre digestibility were similar among dietary treatment (P > 0.05). However, supplementing lambs with SBM and acacia without PEG (D3) resulted in a significant decrease (P < 0.001) of CPD (0.664 versus 0.597, respectively for D1 and

  9. Impact of small variations in temperature and humidity on the reproductive activity and survival of Aedes aegypti (Diptera, Culicidae); Impacto de pequenas variacoes de temperatura e umidade na atividade reprodutiva e sobrevivencia de Aedes aegypti (Diptera, Culicidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Ethiene Arruda Pedrosa de Almeida; Santos, Eloina Maria de Mendonca; Correia, Juliana Cavalcanti; Albuquerque, Cleide Maria Ribeiro de, E-mail: cleide.ufpe@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Zoologia

    2010-07-01

    In short space of time increase in temperature and rainfall can affect vector populations and, consequently, the diseases for them transmitted. The present study analyzed the effect of small temperature and humidity variations on the fecundity, fertility and survival of Aedes aegypti. These parameters were analyzed using individual females at temperatures ranging from 23 to 27 deg C (mean 25 deg C); 28 to 32 deg C (mean 30 deg C) and 33 to 37 deg C (mean 35 deg C) associated to 60 +- 8% and 80 +- 6% relative humidity. Females responded to an increase in temperature by reducing egg production, oviposition time and changing oviposition patterns. At 25 deg C and 80% relative humidity, females survived two-fold more and produced 40% more eggs when compared to those kept at 35 deg C and 80% relative humidity. However, in 45% of females kept at 35 deg C and 60% relative humidity oviposition was inhibited and only 15% females laid more than 100 eggs, suggesting that the intensity of the temperature effect was influenced by humidity. Gradual reductions in egg fertility at 60% relative humidity were observed with the increase in temperature, although such effect was not found in the 80% relative humidity at 25 deg C and 30 deg C. These results suggest that the reduction in population densities recorded in tropical areas during seasons when temperatures reach over 35 deg C is likely to be strongly influenced by temperature and humidity, with a negative effect on several aspects of mosquito biology. (author)

  10. Extreme-temperature lab on a chip for optogalvanic spectroscopy of ultra small samples - key components and a first integration attempt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, Martin; Khaji, Zahra; Persson, Anders; Sturesson, Peter; Breivik, Johan Söderberg; Thornell, Greger; Klintberg, Lena

    2016-01-01

    This is a short summary of the authors’ recent R and D on valves, combustors, plasma sources, and pressure and temperature sensors, realized in high-temperature co-fired ceramics, and an account for the first attempt to monolithically integrate them to form a lab on a chip for sample administration, preparation and analysis, as a stage in optogalvanic spectroscopy. (paper)

  11. The Effect in Vitro of Ionizing Irradiation and Small Rises in Temperature on the Uptake and Release of Labelled Lipids by the Human Erythrocyte Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Karle, H.; Stender, S.

    1978-01-01

    1. The effect of X-irradiation (50 000 rad) and an increase in temperature from 37 to 42° C on the synthesis, uptake and release of labelled lipids by erythrocytes was studied in plasma incubations in vitro. 2. Both irradiation and a rise in temperature resulted in an enhanced synthesis of [32P]phosphatidic...

  12. Characterizing the transition region of an A508 cl3 steel using small specimens by the reference temperature and the weak-link distances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, C.A.J.

    2001-01-01

    An experimental program was developed to characterize the transition region of an A508 cl3 steel. Some fracture mechanic specimens were tested in the transition region using three geometries with thickness B c values, the reference temperature values, To, associated with each geometry and test temperature, and the measured r wl distances and the theoretical ones. (author)

  13. No effects of huddling on core body temperature in rock hyrax ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Huddling is a behavioural energy conservation mechanism that is widely used by many small endotherms at low ambient temperatures. Huddling has many benefits, including decreasing the metabolic cost of maintaining body temperature (Tb), reducing the amount of heat lost to the environment, and increasing the local ...

  14. Oceanographic profile plankton, temperature, salinity collected using bottle from various unknown small boats in the South Pacific Ocean from 1981 to 1982 (NODC Accession 0002138)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity and other measurements found in dataset OSD taken from unknown platform(s)in the Coastal S Pacific, Equatorial Pacific and other locations from...

  15. QUANTIFYING BENEFITS FOR COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Attila GYORGY; Nicoleta VINTILA; Florian GAMAN

    2014-01-01

    Cost Benefit Analysis is one of the most widely used financial tools to select future investment projects in public and private sector. This method is based on comparing costs and benefits in terms of constant prices. While costs are easier to predict and monetize, the benefits should be identified not only in direct relation with the investment, but also widening the sphere of analysis to indirect benefits experienced by the community from the neighbourhood or the whole society. During finan...

  16. Liquid fuel concept benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hron, M.

    1996-01-01

    There are principle drawbacks of any kind of solid nuclear fuel listed and analyzed in the first part of the paper. One of the primary results of the analyses performed shows that the solid fuel concept, which was to certain degree advantageous in the first periods of a nuclear reactor development and operation, has guided this branch of a utilization of atomic nucleus energy to a death end. On the background of this, the liquid fuel concept and its benefits are introduced and briefly described in the first part of the paper, too. As one of the first realistic attempts to utilize the advantages of liquid fuels, the reactor/blanket system with molten fluoride salts in the role of fuel and coolant simultaneously, as incorporated in the accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) being proposed and currently having been under development in the Los Alamos National Laboratory, will be studied both theoretically and experimentally. There is a preliminary design concept of an experimental assembly LA-O briefly introduced in the paper which is under preparation in the Czech Republic for such a project. Finally, there will be another very promising concept of a small low power ADTT system introduced which is characterized by a high level of safety and economical efficiency. In the conclusion, the overall survey of principal benefits which may be expected by introducing liquid nuclear fuel in nuclear power and research reactor systems is given and critically analyzed. 7 refs, 4 figs

  17. Temperature-induced phase transformations of the small-pore zirconosilicate Na2ZrSi2O7 center dot H2O

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrova, N.R.; Noriaki, N.; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Bezdička, Petr; Vladislav, K.K.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 5 (2011), s. 1187-1190 ISSN 1293-2558 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : Sodium zirconosilicate * Small-pore material * Topotactic dehydration * Phase transition Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.856, year: 2011

  18. Benefits of Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wellness Preventing Illness Benefits of Coffee Print Email Benefits of Coffee Reviewed by Taylor Wolfram, MS, RDN, ... your daily cup (or three) provides some health benefits as well. Drinking moderate amounts of coffee (including ...

  19. Benefits of quitting tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your risk of many serious health problems . THE BENEFITS OF QUITTING You may enjoy the following when ... about $2,000 a year on cigarettes. HEALTH BENEFITS Some health benefits begin almost immediately. Every week, ...

  20. Small-angle reflectometry of milk protein (β -casein) at the air/serum interface and its conformational changes due to fat content and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidari, R.; White, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The surface structure of dispersed emulsions play a key role in stability of the system. Proteins being one of the most important surface-active components in foods stabilise interfaces by self-interaction, resulting in a stiff visco-elastic adsorbed layer. These interactions are sensitive to disruptive effects of lipids. Previous kinetics studies by the group 1 using the X-ray reflectivity method to investigate the surface adsorption of milk proteins indicate that β -casein had a stronger affinity for the air-liquid interface compared to whey proteins. It has been shown that initially a dense protein layer, with the thickness of 20 Angstroms is formed then a second more diffuse layer with lower volume density of protein follows. Here we report the conformational changes (with particular emphasise on the β -casein tail) occurred at the air-milk serum interface due to the effects of milk fat content, temperature and the milk preparation technique (ie homogenisation vs microfluidisation). In the effect of fat content on the adsorption of protein into the interface the key conclusion is that at lower temperatures the surface composition remains unchanged. The compositional changes, however, become significant at room temperature indicating adsorption of less reflective-water-soluble components into the surface layer. Repulsive interactions between casein aggregates are also involved. Microfluidised samples having the advantage of smaller particle size prove to be more stable to fat or temperature effects compared to the corresponding homogenised milks

  1. Use of cost benefit analysis methodology in the meaning of motorization level from small and medium hydroelectric power plants; Aplicacao de metodologia do tipo analise custo x beneficio na definicao do nivel de motorizacao de pequenas e medias centrais hidroeletricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzon, J G; Simoes, N S; Ramos, D S; Ishida, S [Companhia Energetica de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1990-12-31

    The technical and economic justifications that bringing the waterfall division reformulation between Lucas Nogueira Garcez Plant and Capivara Plant in Paranapanema River (Brazil) are described, including a comparative economic of Canoas (Alta), Canoas I and Canoas II passages, motorization study and energetic benefits. The reasons of the Bulbo turbines choice and dimensioning definition of the installed power by the new reference economic parameters are also presented. (C.G.C.). 5 refs, 11 tabs.

  2. Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator (EEBC) was developed to assist organizations in estimating the environmental benefits of greening their purchase,...

  3. Emissions - problems and benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, C.; Hurd, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    Air pollution due to emissions arising from the use of biomass in electricity generation is discussed. One of the most attractive aspects of the use of biomass is that there is no net increase of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. During growth biomass absorbs CO 2 ; during combustion, either directly or as biomass derived fuels, it releases CO 2 , making a closed cycle. Another benefit from the use of biomass is its typically very low sulphur content and the consequent low sulphur oxide emissions from biomass-fired generation plants. Biomass is, however, less satisfactory in relation to nitrogen oxides (NO x ). Control of the nitrogen content of the biomass feedstock, advanced high technology combustion techniques and some post-engine treatment may all be necessary to comply with the legal limits for NO x emissions. The low ash content of biomass, particularly biomass derived oils, makes it possible to limit particulate emission to very low levels. It will be important, though, to bear in mind the need to limit the sodium and potassium content to below 1 ppm by mass in bio-oil to be used in a high temperature gas turbine. Levels of micropollutants will be low if the chlorine content of biomass feedstock is low. However, residence times at peak temperature in typical gas turbines combustors are too short to destroy some micropollutants. (UK)

  4. Exploration of the viscosity temperature dependences and microstructure of magnesium-based commercial alloy AZ91D with small additions of calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abaturov, I S; Popel, P S; Brodova, I G; Astafiev, V V; Li Peijie

    2008-01-01

    The technique of rotating oscillation damping of a crucible filled in with the melt under investigation was used for measurement of viscosity of the Mg-based AZ91D commercial alloy with various additions of calcium. The viscosity was measured in liquid state in temperature interval from 600 up to 840 deg. C. The comparative metallographic investigation of the structure of samples with calcium content of 0.0, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 wt.% which were crystallized just after re-melting at the temperature of 640 deg. C and after heating in liquid state up to 850 deg. C were made. It was shown that the thermal treatment of samples in liquid state is accompanied by considerable changes in the cast structure that forms after the crystallization of the samples

  5. Effect of small additions of silicon, iron, and aluminum on the room-temperature tensile properties of high-purity uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Eleven binary and ternary alloys of uranium and very low concentrations of iron, silicon, and aluminum were prepared and tested for room-temperature tensile properties after various heat treatments. A yield strength approximately double that of high-purity derby uranium was obtained from a U-400 ppM Si-200 ppM Fe alloy after beta solution treatment and alpha aging. Higher silicon plus iron alloy contents resulted in increased yield strength, but showed an unacceptable loss of ductility

  6. Enhancing electrical energy storage capability of dielectric polymer nanocomposites via the room temperature Coulomb blockade effect of ultra-small platinum nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liwei; Huang, Xingyi; Zhu, Yingke; Jiang, Pingkai

    2018-02-14

    Introducing a high dielectric constant (high-k) nanofiller into a dielectric polymer is the most common way to achieve flexible nanocomposites for electrostatic energy storage devices. However, the significant decrease of breakdown strength and large increase of dielectric loss has long been known as the bottleneck restricting the enhancement of practical energy storage capability of the nanocomposites. In this study, by introducing ultra-small platinum (energy density of the Pt@PDA@BT nanocomposites is increased by nearly 70% because of the improved energy storage efficiency. This research provides a simple, promising and unique way to enhance energy storage capability of high-k polymer nanocomposites.

  7. Forced convection of ammonia. Part.1. Liquid ammonia. Small temperature differences between the fluid and the wall; Convection forcee de l'ammoniac. Premiere partie. Ammoniac liquide. Cas de faibles ecarts de temperatures entre fluide et paroi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perroud, P; Rebiere, J; Rowe, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 38 - Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-07-01

    Experiments have been performed in a cylindrical smooth Inconel tube: 3 mm ID, 3.5 mm OD, electrically heated (50 Hz) along 300 mm length. Pressure varied from 5 to 100 bars (P{sub c} = 113 bars) mass velocity from 40 to 500 g/cm{sup 2}. s, inlet temperature from - 33 deg C to 95 deg C, heat fluxes to 315 W/cm{sup 2}, maximum wall temperatures 850 deg C, quality 0 to 0.80. The correlation Nu = CRe{sup 0.8} Pr{sup 0.4} is found available for homogeneous liquid-phase heat transfer coefficients with C = 0.021. Influences of P, G, t{sub e} and x on critical heat fluxes is discussed. A correlation of the type q{sub c} = A(P)G{sup m} {delta}t{sub sub}{sup n} (Jens and Lottes) is chosen for the negative qualities and for positive qualities we propose q{sub c} = B(P)/G{sup b(P)} x (1000/H{sub c}){sup 2.5}. Two-phase pressure drops can be calculated by Martinelli-Nelson method with a good approximation. Experimental results are presented in tables (burn-out) and measured temperatures profiles are separately published. (authors) [French] Les experiences ont ete realisees a l'aide d'un tube cylindrique lisse en inconel de 3 x 3,5 mm de diametre, chauffe electriquement (50 Hz) sur une longueur de 300 mm. Domaine explore - pression P: de 5 a 100 bars (P{sub c} = 113 bars); vitesse massique G: de 40 a 500 g/cm{sup 2}. s; temperature d'entree t{sub e}: de - 33 deg C a + 95 deg C; densite de flux de chaleur q: jusqu'a 315 W/cm{sup 2}; temperature maximale de paroi tp: 850 deg C; titre de vapeur x jusqu'a 0,80. La correlation classique Nu = C Re{sup 0,8} Pr{sup 0,4} se trouve etre confirmee pour les coefficients d'echange en phase liquide homogene avec C = 0,021. On discute l'influence de P, G, t{sub e} et x sur le flux de chaleur critique q{sub c}. Pour les titres negatifs on a adopte une correlation du type Jens et Lottes q{sub c} = A(P) G{sup m} {delta}{sub sub}{sup n} et pour les titres positifs, on propose q{sub c} B(P)/G{sup b(P)} x (1000/H{sub c}){sup 2.5}. Les pertes de

  8. Large, but not small, antigens require time- and temperature-dependent processing in accessory cells before they can be recognized by T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1986-01-01

    We have studied if antigens of different size and structure all require processing in antigen-presenting cells of guinea-pigs before they can be recognized by T cells. The method of mild paraformaldehyde fixation was used to stop antigen-processing in the antigen-presenting cells. As a measure...... of antigen presentation we used the proliferative response of appropriately primed T cells during a co-culture with the paraformaldehyde-fixed and antigen-exposed presenting cells. We demonstrate that the large synthetic polypeptide antigen, dinitrophenyl-poly-L-lysine, requires processing. After an initial......-dependent and consequently energy-requiring. Processing is strongly inhibited by the lysosomotrophic drug, chloroquine, suggesting a lysosomal involvement in antigen processing. The existence of a minor, non-lysosomal pathway is suggested, since small amounts of antigen were processed even at 10 degrees C, at which...

  9. The small ubiquitin-like modifier E3 ligase MdSIZ1 promotes anthocyanin accumulation by sumoylating MdMYB1 under low-temperature conditions in apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Jie; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Rui-Fen; Zhang, Chun-Ling; Xie, Xing-Bin; Zhao, Cheng; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2017-10-01

    MdMYB1 acts as a crucial component of the MYB-bHLH-WD40 complex to regulate anthocyanin biosynthesis in red-skinned apples (Malus domestica), but little is known about its post-translational regulation. Here, a small ubiquitin-like modifier E3 ligase MdSIZ1 was screened out as an MdMYB1-interacting protein with a yeast two-hybridization approach. The interaction between MdSIZ1 and MdMYB1 was further verified with pull-down and CoIP assays. Furthermore, it was found that MdSIZ1 directly sumoylated MdMYB1 proteins in vivo and in vitro, especially under moderately low temperature (17 °C) conditions, and that this sumoylation was required for MdMYB1 protein stability. Moreover, the transcription level of MdSIZ1 gene was remarkably induced by low temperature and phosphorus deficiency, and MdSIZ1 overexpression exerted a large positive influence on anthocyanin accumulation and red fruit coloration, suggesting its important role in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis under stress conditions. Our findings reveal an important role for a small ubiquitin-like modifier modification of MYB transcription factors in regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis in plants. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Benefits of Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... activity into your life. To get the most benefit, you should try to get the recommended amount ... likely even live longer. What are the health benefits of exercise? Regular exercise and physical activity may ...

  11. Medicare Hospice Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Medicare Hospice Benefits This official government booklet includes information about Medicare hospice benefits: Who’s eligible for hospice care What services are included in hospice care How ...

  12. Employee motivation and benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Březíková, Tereza

    2009-01-01

    The topic of my bachelor's thesis is the employee motivation and benefits. The thesis is divided in two parts, a theoretical one and a practical one. The theoretical part deals with the theory of motivation and individual employee benefits. The practical part describes employee benefits in ČSOB, where I did my research by questionnaires that were filled in by employees from different departments of ČSOB. These employees answered questions about their work motivation and benefits. The resultts...

  13. Analysis of benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Kováříková, Kamila

    2012-01-01

    This master thesis deals with employee benefits in the current labour market, especially from the perspective of young employees. The first part is focused on the theory of motivation and employee benefits also with their tax impact on employee's income. Employee benefits in the current labour market, employee's satisfaction and employer's attitude to this issue are analyzed in the second part of this thesis.

  14. The Development of an INL Capability for High Temperature Flow, Heat Transfer, and Thermal Energy Storage with Applications in Advanced Small Modular Reactors, High Temperature Heat Exchangers, Hybrid Energy Systems, and Dynamic Grid Energy Storage C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Kim, Inhun; O'Brien, James; Sabharwall, Piyush

    2014-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to support Idaho National Laboratory in developing a new advanced high temperature multi fluid multi loop test facility that is aimed at investigating fluid flow and heat transfer, material corrosion, heat exchanger characteristics and instrumentation performance, among others, for nuclear applications. Specifically, preliminary research has been performed at The Ohio State University in the following areas: 1. A review of fluoride molten salts' characteristics in thermal, corrosive, and compatibility performances. A recommendation for a salt selection is provided. Material candidates for both molten salt and helium flow loop have been identified. 2. A conceptual facility design that satisfies the multi loop (two coolant loops [i.e., fluoride molten salts and helium]) multi purpose (two operation modes [i.e., forced and natural circulation]) requirements. Schematic models are presented. The thermal hydraulic performances in a preliminary printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) design have been estimated. 3. An introduction of computational methods and models for pipe heat loss analysis and cases studies. Recommendations on insulation material selection have been provided. 4. An analysis of pipe pressure rating and sizing. Preliminary recommendations on pipe size selection have been provided. 5. A review of molten fluoride salt preparation and chemistry control. An introduction to the experience from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been provided. 6. A review of some instruments and components to be used in the facility. Flowmeters and Grayloc connectors have been included. This report primarily presents the conclusions drawn from the extensive review of literatures in material selections and the facility design progress at the current stage. It provides some useful guidelines in insulation material and pipe size selection, as well as an introductory review of facility process and

  15. The Development of an INL Capability for High Temperature Flow, Heat Transfer, and Thermal Energy Storage with Applications in Advanced Small Modular Reactors, High Temperature Heat Exchangers, Hybrid Energy Systems, and Dynamic Grid Energy Storage C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiaodong [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Zhang, Xiaoqin [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Kim, Inhun [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); O' Brien, James [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The overall goal of this project is to support Idaho National Laboratory in developing a new advanced high temperature multi fluid multi loop test facility that is aimed at investigating fluid flow and heat transfer, material corrosion, heat exchanger characteristics and instrumentation performance, among others, for nuclear applications. Specifically, preliminary research has been performed at The Ohio State University in the following areas: 1. A review of fluoride molten salts’ characteristics in thermal, corrosive, and compatibility performances. A recommendation for a salt selection is provided. Material candidates for both molten salt and helium flow loop have been identified. 2. A conceptual facility design that satisfies the multi loop (two coolant loops [i.e., fluoride molten salts and helium]) multi purpose (two operation modes [i.e., forced and natural circulation]) requirements. Schematic models are presented. The thermal hydraulic performances in a preliminary printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) design have been estimated. 3. An introduction of computational methods and models for pipe heat loss analysis and cases studies. Recommendations on insulation material selection have been provided. 4. An analysis of pipe pressure rating and sizing. Preliminary recommendations on pipe size selection have been provided. 5. A review of molten fluoride salt preparation and chemistry control. An introduction to the experience from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been provided. 6. A review of some instruments and components to be used in the facility. Flowmeters and Grayloc connectors have been included. This report primarily presents the conclusions drawn from the extensive review of literatures in material selections and the facility design progress at the current stage. It provides some useful guidelines in insulation material and pipe size selection, as well as an introductory review of facility process and components.

  16. 77 FR 76215 - Small Business Size Regulations, Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-27

    ... overall goal of simplification and maximization of benefits for small businesses, SBA proposed amendments... franchisee. F. Section 121.704--When SBA Determines Size and Eligibility SBA's proposed regulations for the...

  17. Small Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Pemberton (Steven)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractThe term “Open Data” often goes hand in hand with the term “Big Data”, where large data sets get released allowing for analysis, but the Cinderella of the Open Data ball is Small Data, small amounts of data, nonetheless possibly essential, that are too small to be put in some database or

  18. Is There a Survival Benefit of First-Line Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine-Kinase Inhibitor Monotherapy Versus Chemotherapy in Patients with Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer?: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guetz, Gaetan Des; Landre, Thierry; Uzzan, Bernard; Chouahnia, Kader; Nicolas, Patrick; Morere, Jean-François

    2016-02-01

    Tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs) markedly improve progression-free survival (PFS) of patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) mutated for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Results on overall survival (OS) are less clear-cut. We performed a publication-based meta-analysis to address further this issue. We did a PubMed query using keywords simultaneously (lung neoplasm, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, epidermal growth factor receptor mutation, survival, and randomized controlled trials). We also searched for relevant abstracts in annual proceedings of ASCO, ESMO, and WCLC meetings. We cross-checked all references from all eligible articles. Only phase III randomized controlled trials comparing TKI monotherapy and platinum-based doublet chemotherapy in first-line treatment of metastatic or advanced NSCLC were included. We used EasyMA software to perform statistical analyses. A random effect model was used in case of heterogeneity between studies (and a fixed effect model in absence of heterogeneity). The eight eligible studies included 2962 patients (780 males, 2182 females, mostly Asian, median age 60 years), 2909 adenocarcinomas (98 %), 1739 mutated tumors (897 exon 19 deletion, 699 L858 mutation), 448 stage IIIB, and 2222 stage IV (75 %) tumours and 2453 never smokers (83 %). Four studies assessed gefitinib, two studies assessed erlotinib, and two studies assessed afatinib. Chemotherapies were doublets including a platinum salt. All studies included patients with EGFR mutations, but six studies included only EGFR mutated patients. OS was similar among patients who first received TKI or chemotherapy (HR 0.98, 95 % CI 0.87-1.10, fixed effect model). Conversely, compared with chemotherapy, EGFR TKIs significantly improved PFS in patients with EGFR-mutated tumours (HR 0.37, 95 % CI 0.29-0.49, random effect model). Concerning side effects, rash (RR 6.29, 95 % CI 4.05-9.77), diarrhoea (RR 3.51, 95 % CI 2.15-5.75), stomatitis (RR 3.57, 95 % CI 1

  19. Analysis of Employee Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Burešová, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    The target of this bachelor thesis is to analyze employee benefits from the perspective of employees and to employers suggest possible ideas to improve their provision. The work is divided into two parts: theoretical and practical. The theoretical part describes the overal remuneration of employees, payroll system and employee benefits. Benefits are included in the remuneration system, broken and some of them are defined. The practical part presents a survey among employees in the Czech Repub...

  20. Transit Benefit Program Data -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — This data set contains information about any US government agency participating in the transit benefits program, funding agreements, individual participating Federal...

  1. Unemployment Benefit Exhaustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Pico Geerdsen, Lars; Knudsen, Anne-Sofie Due

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review studied the impact of exhaustion of unemployment benefits on the exit rate out of unemployment and into employment prior to benefit exhaustion or shortly thereafter. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to prepare this review, and ultimately located 12...

  2. Putting Paid to Benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stella Hoff; Gerda Jehoel-Gijsbers; J.M. Wildeboer Schut

    2003-01-01

    Original title: De uitkering van de baan. A good deal of time, money and effort is invested in the reintegration of benefit claimants. What is the result? How many recipients of disability, unemployment or social assistance benefit are in principle capable of working but are currently not

  3. Nanocosmetics: benefits and risks

    OpenAIRE

    Shokri, Javad

    2017-01-01

    Summary Various nanomaterials/nanoparticles (NPs) have been used for the development of cosmetic products - a field so-called nanocosmetic formulations. These advanced materials offer some benefits, while their utilization in the cosmetic formulations may be associated with some risks. The main aim of this editorial is to highlight the benefits and risks of the nanomaterials used in the cosmetic products.

  4. Who Benefits from Religion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochon, Daniel; Norton, Michael I.; Ariely, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have documented the benefits of religious involvement. Indeed, highly religious people tend to be healthier, live longer, and have higher levels of subjective well-being. While religious involvement offers clear benefits to many, in this paper we explore whether it may also be detrimental to some. Specifically, we examine in detail…

  5. Wellbeing or welfare benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handlos, Line Neerup; Kristiansen, Maria; Nørredam, Marie Louise

    2016-01-01

    This debate article debunks the myth that migrants are driven primarily by the size of the welfare benefits in the host country, when they decide where to migrate to. We show that instead of welfare benefits, migrants are driven by a desire for safety, wellbeing, social networks and opportunities...

  6. Distributed generation: definition, benefits and issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepermans, G.; Driesen, J.; Haeseldonckx, D.; Belmans, R.; D'haeseleer, W.

    2005-01-01

    This paper starts from the observation that there is a renewed interest in small-scale electricity generation. The authors start with a survey of existing small-scale generation technologies and then move on with a discussion of the major benefits and issues of small-scale electricity generation. Different technologies are evaluated in terms of their possible contribution to the listed benefits and issues. Small-scale generation is also commonly called distributed generation, embedded generation or decentralised generation. In a final section, an attempt is made to define the latter concepts more precisely. It appears that there is no consensus on a precise definition as the concept encompasses many technologies and applications

  7. Small Data

    OpenAIRE

    Pemberton, Steven

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractThe term “Open Data” often goes hand in hand with the term “Big Data”, where large data sets get released allowing for analysis, but the Cinderella of the Open Data ball is Small Data, small amounts of data, nonetheless possibly essential, that are too small to be put in some database or online dataset to be put to use. RDFa is a technology that allows Cinderella to go to the ball.

  8. Health benefits of particle filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, W J

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also, reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, for example, 7% to 25%. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air. Published 2013. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also, reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percent age improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, for example, 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  10. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  11. Drug packaging in 2013: small changes would reap big benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Drug packaging is important both in protecting and informing patients. Some improvements were made in 2013, but many of the products examined by Prescrire still had poor-quality or even dangerous packaging. Problem packaging is a major concern for patients who are more vulnerable to adverse effects, particularly children and pregnant women. Several problems were noted with products intended for self-medication (umbrella brands), oral solutions sold with dosing devices, and injectable drugs. Looking back at 20 years of Red Cards that Prescrire has issued to products with dangerous packaging reveals several improvements, but too many dangers persist. Urgent action needs to be taken by regulatory agencies and drug companies: patient leaflets must be more explicit with regard to adverse effects, especially those of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs during pregnancy; accidental ingestion by children must be prevented; and companies must design safer dosing devices. Healthcare professionals and patients must remain vigilant and report all packaging issues to the relevant authorities.

  12. Small Business Programs: Benefits, Barriers, Bridges and Critical Success Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Decreased product development time cycles • Product, process and technology innovation • Joint marketing and advertising • Access to new markets or...Increased Joint Marketing and Advertising Yuva (2005) Increased Penetration into New Markets Yuva (2005); Terrill (2007) Improved Forecasting and Response

  13. Benefits of carbon markets to small and medium enterprises (SMEs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    furniture can store carbon for more than 100 years. (Haripriya Gundimeda .... centre of wholesale and retail trade, particularly in grain, timber and textiles. The description of ... local wood carving cottage industry and other demands. There are ...

  14. Contraceptives with novel benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ying; Lian, Qing-Quan; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2012-01-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) agonists (progestins) and antagonists are developed for female contraceptives. However, non-contraceptive applications of newer progestins and PR modulators are being given more attention. The newer PR agonists including drospirenone, nomegestrol, trimegestone, dienogest and nestorone are being evaluated as contraceptives with health benefits because of their unique pharmacological properties. The selective PR modulators (SPRM; PR antagonists with PR agonistic properties) are under development not only for emergency contraception but also for other health benefits such as the treatment of endometritis and leiomyoma. After searching the literature from PubMed, clinicaltrials.gov and patent database, this review focuses on the effects and mechanisms of these progestins, and SPRMs as contraceptives with other health benefits. PR agonists and antagonists that have novel properties may generate better contraceptive effects with other health benefits.

  15. Benefits of being biased!

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Journal of Genetics, Vol. 83, No. 2, August 2004. Keywords. codon bias; alcohol dehydrogenase; Darwinian ... RESEARCH COMMENTARY. Benefits of being biased! SUTIRTH DEY*. Evolutionary Biology Laboratory, Evolutionary & Organismal Biology Unit,. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research,.

  16. Benefits of CHP Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the benefits of being a EPA CHP Partner, which include expert advice and answers to questions, CHP news, marketing resources, publicity and recognition, and being associated with EPA through a demonstrated commitment to CHP.

  17. Low Cost Benefit Suggestions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyel, Hoyt W.; McMillan, John D.

    1980-01-01

    Outlines eight low-cost employee benefits and summarizes their relative advantages. The eight include a stock ownership program, a sick leave pool, flexible working hours, production incentives, and group purchase plans. (IRT)

  18. Benefits at risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Jesper; Sandøe, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Herbicide resistant GM plants have been promoted as a tool in the development of more environment-friendly agriculture. The environmental benefits here, however, depend not only on farmer's acceptance of GM crops as such, but also on their willingness to use herbicides in accordance with altered ...... spraying plans. In this paper, we will argue that factors driving the spraying practices of Danish farmers may hamper efforts to secure the environmental benefits of the new crops....

  19. Benefits for handicapped children

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of long-term care benefits within the CERN Health Insurance Scheme requires the coordination of the benefits foreseen for handicapped children. Measures were adopted by the Management following the recommendation made by the Standing Concertation Committee on 26 March 2003. A document clarifying these measures is available on the Web at the following address: http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/soc/Social_affairs/social_affairs.asp Social Affairs Service 74201

  20. Nanocomposite Strain Gauges Having Small TCRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Otto; Chen, Ximing

    2009-01-01

    Ceramic strain gauges in which the strain-sensitive electrically conductive strips made from nanocomposites of noble metal and indium tin oxide (ITO) are being developed for use in gas turbine engines and other power-generation systems in which gas temperatures can exceed 1,500 F (about 816 C). In general, strain gauges exhibit spurious thermally induced components of response denoted apparent strain. When temperature varies, a strain-gauge material that has a nonzero temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) exhibits an undesired change in electrical resistance that can be mistaken for the change in resistance caused by a change in strain. It would be desirable to formulate straingauge materials having TCRs as small as possible so as to minimize apparent strain. Most metals exhibit positive TCRs, while most semiconductors, including ITO, exhibit negative TCRs. The present development is based on the idea of using the negative TCR of ITO to counter the positive TCRs of noble metals and of obtaining the benefit of the ability of both ITO and noble metals to endure high temperatures. The noble metal used in this development thus far has been platinum. Combinatorial libraries of many ceramic strain gauges containing nanocomposites of various proportions of ITO and platinum were fabricated by reactive co-sputtering from ITO and platinum targets onto alumina- and zirconia-based substrates mounted at various positions between the targets.

  1. Design of a Low-Power, Small-Area AEC-Q100-Compliant SENT Transmitter in Signal Conditioning IC for Automotive Pressure and Temperature Complex Sensors in 180 Nm CMOS Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikhan, Behnam Samadpoor; Kim, Dong-Gyu; Lee, Dong-Soo; Rehman, Muhammad Riaz Ur; Abbasizadeh, Hamed; Asif, Muhammad; Lee, Minjae; Yang, Youngoo; Lee, Kang-Yoon

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a low-power and small-area Single Edge Nibble Transmission (SENT) transmitter design is proposed for automotive pressure and temperature complex sensor applications. To reduce the cost and size of the hardware, the pressure and temperature information is processed with a single integrated circuit (IC) and transmitted at the same time to the electronic control unit (ECU) through SENT. Due to its digital nature, it is immune to noise, has reduced sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), and generates low EMI. It requires only one PAD for its connectivity with ECU, and thus reduces the pin requirements, simplifies the connectivity, and minimizes the printed circuit board (PCB) complexity. The design is fully synthesizable, and independent of technology. The finite state machine-based approach is employed for area efficient implementation, and to translate the proposed architecture into hardware. The IC is fabricated in 1P6M 180 nm CMOS process with an area of (116 μm × 116 μm) and 4.314 K gates. The current consumption is 50 μA from a 1.8 V supply with a total 90 μW power. For compliance with AEC-Q100 for automotive reliability, a reverse and over voltage protection circuit is also implemented with human body model (HBM) electro-static discharge (ESD) of +6 kV, reverse voltage of −16 V to 0 V, over voltage of 8.2 V to 16 V, and fabricated area of 330 μm × 680 μm. The extensive testing, measurement, and simulation results prove that the design is fully compliant with SAE J2716 standard. PMID:29757996

  2. Defined contribution health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronstin, P

    2001-03-01

    This Issue Brief discusses the emerging issue of "defined contribution" (DC) health benefits. The term "defined contribution" is used to describe a wide variety of approaches to the provision of health benefits, all of which have in common a shift in the responsibility for payment and selection of health care services from employers to employees. DC health benefits often are mentioned in the context of enabling employers to control their outlay for health benefits by avoiding increases in health care costs. DC health benefits may also shift responsibility for choosing a health plan and the associated risks of choosing a plan from employers to employees. There are three primary reasons why some employers currently are considering some sort of DC approach. First, they are once again looking for ways to keep their health care cost increases in line with overall inflation. Second, some employers are concerned that the public "backlash" against managed care will result in new legislation, regulations, and litigation that will further increase their health care costs if they do not distance themselves from health care decisions. Third, employers have modified not only most employee benefit plans, but labor market practices in general, by giving workers more choice, control, and flexibility. DC-type health benefits have existed as cafeteria plans since the 1980s. A cafeteria plan gives each employee the opportunity to determine the allocation of his or her total compensation (within employer-defined limits) among various employee benefits (primarily retirement or health). Most types of DC health benefits currently being discussed could be provided within the existing employment-based health insurance system, with or without the use of cafeteria plans. They could also allow employees to purchase health insurance directly from insurers, or they could drive new technologies and new forms of risk pooling through which health care services are provided and financed. DC health

  3. Small hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, K.; Tung, T.

    1995-01-01

    A small hydro plant in Canada is defined as any project between 1 MW and 15 MW but the international standard is 10 MW. The global market for small hydro development was considered good. There are some 1000 to 2000 MW of generating capacity being added each year. In Canada, growth potential is considered small, primarily in remote areas, but significant growth is anticipated in Eastern Europe, Africa and Asia. Canada with its expertise in engineering, manufacturing and development is considered to have a good chance to take advantage of these growing markets

  4. Calibration of micro-thermal analysis for the detection of glass transition temperatures and melting points: repeatability and reproducibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, H.R.

    2008-01-01

    Micro-thermal analysis (μTATM) is a technique in which thermal analysis is performed on surfaces of test specimens on a small (ca. 2×2 μm) scale. Like any thermal analysis technique, interpretation of results benefits from accurate temperature information and knowledge of the precision of the

  5. Deserving social benefits?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esmark, Anders; Richardt Schoop, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    welfare reforms involving reductions of social benefits in Denmark in 2005 and 2013, the article analyses the frames used by politicians supporting and opposing reform, as well as the frames used by the media. The article shows, first, that political reforms reducing social benefits are followed...... by increased framing of recipients as undeserving. The article finds a strong correlation between the political objective of reducing benefits and the reliance on frames that position recipients as undeserving. Second, the article shows that media framing remains significantly different from political framing......The article contributes to the growing literature on framing of deservingness as an alternative to ‘blame avoidance’ strategies in the politics of welfare retrenchment. In particular, the article focuses on the interplay between political framing and media framing. Based on an analysis of two major...

  6. Accelerating time to benefit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per; Geraldi, Joana; Grex, Sara

    Despite the ubiquitous pressure for speed, our approaches to accelerate projects remain constrained to the old-fashioned understanding of the project as a vehicle to deliver products and services, not value. This article explores an attempt to accelerate time to benefit. We describe and deconstruct...... of the time. Although all cases valued speed and speed to benefit, and implemented most practices proposed by the methodology, only three of the five projects were more successful in decreasing time to speed. Based on a multi-case study comparison between these five different projects and their respective...

  7. BenefitClaimWebServiceBean/BenefitClaimWebService

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — A formal or informal request for a type of monetary or non-monetary benefit. This service provides benefit claims and benefit claim special issues data, allows the...

  8. Maximizing benefits from resource development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjelbred, B.

    2002-01-01

    The main objectives of Norwegian petroleum policy are to maximize the value creation for the country, develop a national oil and gas industry, and to be at the environmental forefront of long term resource management and coexistence with other industries. The paper presents a graph depicting production and net export of crude oil for countries around the world for 2002. Norway produced 3.41 mill b/d and exported 3.22 mill b/d. Norwegian petroleum policy measures include effective regulation and government ownership, research and technology development, and internationalisation. Research and development has been in five priority areas, including enhanced recovery, environmental protection, deep water recovery, small fields, and the gas value chain. The benefits of internationalisation includes capitalizing on Norwegian competency, exploiting emerging markets and the assurance of long-term value creation and employment. 5 figs

  9. Environmental tipping points significantly affect the cost-benefit assessment of climate policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yongyang; Judd, Kenneth L; Lenton, Timothy M; Lontzek, Thomas S; Narita, Daiju

    2015-04-14

    Most current cost-benefit analyses of climate change policies suggest an optimal global climate policy that is significantly less stringent than the level required to meet the internationally agreed 2 °C target. This is partly because the sum of estimated economic damage of climate change across various sectors, such as energy use and changes in agricultural production, results in only a small economic loss or even a small economic gain in the gross world product under predicted levels of climate change. However, those cost-benefit analyses rarely take account of environmental tipping points leading to abrupt and irreversible impacts on market and nonmarket goods and services, including those provided by the climate and by ecosystems. Here we show that including environmental tipping point impacts in a stochastic dynamic integrated assessment model profoundly alters cost-benefit assessment of global climate policy. The risk of a tipping point, even if it only has nonmarket impacts, could substantially increase the present optimal carbon tax. For example, a risk of only 5% loss in nonmarket goods that occurs with a 5% annual probability at 4 °C increase of the global surface temperature causes an immediate two-thirds increase in optimal carbon tax. If the tipping point also has a 5% impact on market goods, the optimal carbon tax increases by more than a factor of 3. Hence existing cost-benefit assessments of global climate policy may be significantly underestimating the needs for controlling climate change.

  10. Environmental tipping points significantly affect the cost−benefit assessment of climate policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yongyang; Judd, Kenneth L.; Lenton, Timothy M.; Lontzek, Thomas S.; Narita, Daiju

    2015-01-01

    Most current cost−benefit analyses of climate change policies suggest an optimal global climate policy that is significantly less stringent than the level required to meet the internationally agreed 2 °C target. This is partly because the sum of estimated economic damage of climate change across various sectors, such as energy use and changes in agricultural production, results in only a small economic loss or even a small economic gain in the gross world product under predicted levels of climate change. However, those cost−benefit analyses rarely take account of environmental tipping points leading to abrupt and irreversible impacts on market and nonmarket goods and services, including those provided by the climate and by ecosystems. Here we show that including environmental tipping point impacts in a stochastic dynamic integrated assessment model profoundly alters cost−benefit assessment of global climate policy. The risk of a tipping point, even if it only has nonmarket impacts, could substantially increase the present optimal carbon tax. For example, a risk of only 5% loss in nonmarket goods that occurs with a 5% annual probability at 4 °C increase of the global surface temperature causes an immediate two-thirds increase in optimal carbon tax. If the tipping point also has a 5% impact on market goods, the optimal carbon tax increases by more than a factor of 3. Hence existing cost−benefit assessments of global climate policy may be significantly underestimating the needs for controlling climate change. PMID:25825719

  11. Cogeneration using small sized series connected units: Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tondelli, F.; Bergamini, G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper evidences the technical/economic feasibility of the use of methane fuelled modular cogeneration systems based on small series connected Otto or Diesel cycle engines delivering from 20 to 90 kW of power. Ample reference is made to the successful application of modular cogeneration systems to supply low temperature thermal energy to hospitals, hotels, food processing firms, etc., in Italy. The cost benefit analysis covers many aspects: design, manufacturing, operation, performance, maintenance and safety. Suggestions are also made as to optimum contractual arrangements for equipment service and maintenance, as well as, for the exchange of power with local utilities

  12. Ionizing radiation: benefits vs. risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    No one has been identifiably injured by radiation within the levels set by the NCRP and ICRP in 1934. This fact and the level of natural radiation (average dose 102 millirems/year) help provide standards against which the authors can view the relative increases in exposure from manmade sources of radiation. Because one person in five in the US will die of cancer from all causes, it is impossible to detect small increases in some types of cancer from radiation. A valid assumption is that any exposure to radiation carries some possibility of harm and should be kept below the level of the expected benefits. More is known about radiation toxicity than about any other potentially toxic substances. An obstacle to progress in the use of radioactive materials in biology and medicine is an exaggerated impression by the public of the risk of radiation. Several studies indicate that the public perceives the risk of radiation to be the greatest of all societal risks and at times does not distinguish peaceful from military uses of radiation. It behooves scientists and physicians to inform the public about the benefits as well as the risks of procedures involving radiation

  13. APPLE PHYTOCHEMICALS FOR HUMAN BENEFITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Chakole

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that a diet high in fruits and vegetables may decrease the risk of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer, and phytochemicals including phenolics, flavonoids and carotenoids from fruits and vegetables may play a key role in reducing chronic disease risk. Apples are a widely consumed, rich source of phytochemicals, and epidemiological studies have linked the consumption of apples with reduced risk of some cancers, cardiovascular disease, asthma, and diabetes. In the laboratory, apples have been found to have very strong antioxidant activity, inhibit cancer cell proliferation, decrease lipid oxidation, and lower cholesterol. Apples contain a variety of phytochemicals, including quercetin, catechin, phloridzin and chlorogenic acid, all of which are strong antioxidants. The phytochemical composition of apples varies greatly between different varieties of apples, and there are also small changes in phytochemicals during the maturation and ripening of the fruit. Storage has little to no effect on apple phytochemicals, but processing can greatly affect apple phytochemicals. While extensive research exists, a literature review of the health benefits of apples and their phytochemicals has not been compiled to summarize this work. The purpose of this paper is to review the most recent literature regarding the health benefits of apples and their phytochemicals, phytochemical bioavailability and antioxidant behavior, and the effects of variety, ripening, storage and processing on apple phytochemicals

  14. Nowcasting daily minimum air and grass temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Site-specific and accurate prediction of daily minimum air and grass temperatures, made available online several hours before their occurrence, would be of significant benefit to several economic sectors and for planning human activities. Site-specific and reasonably accurate nowcasts of daily minimum temperature several hours before its occurrence, using measured sub-hourly temperatures hours earlier in the morning as model inputs, was investigated. Various temperature models were tested for their ability to accurately nowcast daily minimum temperatures 2 or 4 h before sunrise. Temperature datasets used for the model nowcasts included sub-hourly grass and grass-surface (infrared) temperatures from one location in South Africa and air temperature from four subtropical sites varying in altitude (USA and South Africa) and from one site in central sub-Saharan Africa. Nowcast models used employed either exponential or square root functions to describe the rate of nighttime temperature decrease but inverted so as to determine the minimum temperature. The models were also applied in near real-time using an open web-based system to display the nowcasts. Extrapolation algorithms for the site-specific nowcasts were also implemented in a datalogger in an innovative and mathematically consistent manner. Comparison of model 1 (exponential) nowcasts vs measured daily minima air temperatures yielded root mean square errors (RMSEs) <1 °C for the 2-h ahead nowcasts. Model 2 (also exponential), for which a constant model coefficient ( b = 2.2) was used, was usually slightly less accurate but still with RMSEs <1 °C. Use of model 3 (square root) yielded increased RMSEs for the 2-h ahead comparisons between nowcasted and measured daily minima air temperature, increasing to 1.4 °C for some sites. For all sites for all models, the comparisons for the 4-h ahead air temperature nowcasts generally yielded increased RMSEs, <2.1 °C. Comparisons for all model nowcasts of the daily grass

  15. Benthic invertebrate fauna, small streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Bruce Wallace; S.L. Eggert

    2009-01-01

    Small streams (first- through third-order streams) make up >98% of the total number of stream segments and >86% of stream length in many drainage networks. Small streams occur over a wide array of climates, geology, and biomes, which influence temperature, hydrologic regimes, water chemistry, light, substrate, stream permanence, a basin's terrestrial plant...

  16. PENSION FUND BENEFITS SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Benefits Service

    2002-01-01

    Please note that from now on, our offices (5-1-030) will be opened to members and beneficiaries on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 10 to 12 a.m. and from 3 to 5 p.m. We are otherwise available but by appointment only. Benefits Service (tel. 79194 / 72738)

  17. PENSION FUND BENEFITS SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Benefits Service

    2002-01-01

    Please note that from now on, our offices will be opened to members and beneficiaries on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 10 to 12 a.m. and from 3 to 5 p.m. We are otherwise available but by appointment only. Benefits Service 5-1-030 tel. 79194 / 72738

  18. Bayesian benefits with JASP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsman, M.; Wagenmakers, E.-J.

    2017-01-01

    We illustrate the Bayesian approach to data analysis using the newly developed statistical software program JASP. With JASP, researchers are able to take advantage of the benefits that the Bayesian framework has to offer in terms of parameter estimation and hypothesis testing. The Bayesian

  19. Studies Highlight Biodiesel's Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    , Colo., July 6, 1998 — Two new studies highlight the benefits of biodiesel in reducing overall air Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted both studies: An Overview of Biodiesel and Petroleum Diesel Life Cycles and Biodiesel Research Progress, 1992-1997. Biodiesel is a renewable diesel

  20. Your Medicare Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... schedule a lung cancer screening counseling and shared decision making visit with your doctor to discuss the benefits ... when they’re available in your MyMedicare.gov account. 58 Section 3: For more information Visit Medicare. gov for general information about Medicare ...

  1. Foraging patch selection in winter: a balance between predation risk and thermoregulation benefit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Villén-Pérez

    Full Text Available In winter, foraging activity is intended to optimize food search while minimizing both thermoregulation costs and predation risk. Here we quantify the relative importance of thermoregulation and predation in foraging patch selection of woodland birds wintering in a Mediterranean montane forest. Specifically, we account for thermoregulation benefits related to temperature, and predation risk associated with both illumination of the feeding patch and distance to the nearest refuge provided by vegetation. We measured the amount of time that 38 marked individual birds belonging to five small passerine species spent foraging at artificial feeders. Feeders were located in forest patches that vary in distance to protective cover and exposure to sun radiation; temperature and illumination were registered locally by data loggers. Our results support the influence of both thermoregulation benefits and predation costs on feeding patch choice. The influence of distance to refuge (negative relationship was nearly three times higher than that of temperature (positive relationship in determining total foraging time spent at a patch. Light intensity had a negligible and no significant effect. This pattern was generalizable among species and individuals within species, and highlights the preponderance of latent predation risk over thermoregulation benefits on foraging decisions of birds wintering in temperate Mediterranean forests.

  2. Projected benefits of actinide partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, C.; Goldstein, M.

    1976-05-01

    Possible benefits that could accrue from actinide separation and transmutations are presented. The time frame for implementing these processes is discussed and the expected benefits are qualitatively described. These benefits are provisionally quantified in a sample computation

  3. Social Security and Medicare Benefits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Cash benefits and rehabilitation benefits paid in each year from the Old-Age and Survivors Insurance, and Disability Insurance Trust Funds, and benefits paid from...

  4. Lipo sarcoma in small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Iglesias, J.; Pineyro Gutierrez, A.; Taroco Medeiros, L.; Fein Kolodny, C.; Navarrete Pedocchi, H.

    1987-01-01

    A case is presented by primitive liposarcoma in small intestine , an extensive bibliographical review foreigner and national in this case. It detach the exceptional of the intestinal topography of the liposarcomas; and making stress in the relative value of the computerized tomography and ultrasonography in the diagnose of the small intestine tumors . As well as in the sarcomas of another topography, chemo and radiotherapy associated to the exeresis surgery, it can be of benefit [es

  5. New HTGR plant concept with inherently safe features aimed at small energy users needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Silady, F.S.; Shenoy, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    A small high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) concept is proposed which could provide the energy needs for certain sectors of industrialized nations and the developing countries. The key to the economic success for small reactors, which have potential benefits for special markets, lies in altering the traditional scaling laws. Toward this goal, a small HTGR concept embodying passive decay heat removal features is currently being evaluated. This paper emphasizes the safety-related aspects of a small HTGR. The proposed small reactor concept is new and still in the design development stage, and a significant effort must be expended to establish a design which is technically and economically feasible and will meet the increasingly demanding safety and licensing goals for reactors of the future

  6. Climate Action Benefits: Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page provides background on the relationship between human health and climate change and describes what the CIRA Health analyses cover. It provides links to the subsectors Air Quality, Extreme Temperature, Labor, and Water Quality.

  7. Natural gas benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The General Auditor in the Netherlands studied the natural gas policy in the Netherlands, as has been executed in the past decades, in the period 1997-1999. The purpose of the study is to inform the Dutch parliament on the planning and the backgrounds of the natural gas policy and on the policy risks with respect to the benefits for the Dutch State, taking into account the developments in the policy environment. The final conclusion is that the proposed liberalization of the national natural gas market will result in a considerable deprivation of income for the State in case the benefit policy is not adjusted. This report includes a reaction of the Dutch Minister of Economic Affairs and an afterword of the General Auditor. In the appendix an outline is given of the natural gas policy

  8. Harnessing natural ventilation benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, John

    2013-04-01

    Making sure that a healthcare establishment has a good supply of clean fresh air is an important factor in keeping patients, staff, and visitors, free from the negative effects of CO2 and other contaminants. John O'Leary of Trend Controls, a major international supplier of building energy management solutions (BEMS), examines the growing use of natural ventilation, and the health, energy-saving, and financial benefits, that it offers.

  9. Benefits of transmission interconnections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, D.

    2006-01-01

    The benefits of new power transmission interconnections from Alberta were discussed with reference to the challenges and measures needed to move forward. Alberta's electricity system has had a long period of sustained growth in generation and demand and this trend is expected to continue. However, no new interconnections have been built since 1985 because the transmission network has not expanded in consequence with the growth in demand. As such, Alberta remains weakly interconnected with the rest of the western region. The benefits of stronger transmission interconnections include improved reliability, long-term generation capability, hydrothermal synergies, a more competitive market, system efficiencies and fuel diversity. It was noted that the more difficult challenges are not technical. Rather, the difficult challenges lie in finding an appropriate business model that recognizes different market structures. It was emphasized that additional interconnections are worthwhile and will require significant collaboration among market participants and governments. It was concluded that interties enable resource optimization between systems and their benefits far exceed their costs. tabs., figs

  10. The Benefits of Formalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, John; Torm, Nina Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Based on unique panel data consisting of both formal and informal firms, this paper uses a matched double difference approach to examine the relationship between legal status and firm level outcomes in micro, small and medium manufacturing enterprises (SMEs) in Vietnam. Controlling for determinin...

  11. Remote Working Technologies, Benefits and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, Gurjit

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: "More and more . . . work is becoming something you do, not a place you go to." - Woody Leonhard, The Underground Guide to Telecommuting (1995). Many organisations now have Remote Working initiatives, not just the large multi-nationals, but increasingly small and medium enterprises as well. There are many benefits of Remote Working which firms can exploit to increase performance such as cost savings, work-life balance, increased productivity, reduced absenteeism, loyalty, re...

  12. Benefiting through partnering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, T.J.

    2000-01-01

    As a consequence of dramatic changes in the world market in nuclear services over the last decade, BNFL has embarked on a comprehensive strategic review of its business. Central to this review has been the need for the company to achieve cost reduction and improved efficiency in all aspects of its business. An area where substantial benefits can be gained is in improved efficiency in the discharge of the capital expenditure programme. This paper focuses on the opportunity of profiting through partnering in capital project delivery. (author)

  13. Cost-benefit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A critical review of the cost benefit analysis is given for the LMFBR-type reactor development program given in an environmental impact statement of AEC. Several methodological shortcomings are signalled. As compared with a HTGR-type/LWR-type mix of reactors the LMFBR-type reactor will not be competitive until the U 3 O 8 prices reach a level of $ 50/lb which is not likely to happen before the year 2020. It is recommended to review the draft of the ZEC document and include timing as one of the issues. Deferal of the LMFBR-type reactor development program if necessary will not be intolerably costly

  14. The relationship of thermospheric density anomaly with electron temperature, small-scale FAC, and ion up-flow in the cusp region, as observed by CHAMP and DMSP satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Kervalishvili

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present in a statistical study a comparison of thermospheric mass density enhancements (ρrel with electron temperature (Te, small-scale field-aligned currents (SSFACs, and vertical ion velocity (Vz at high latitudes around noon magnetic local time (MLT. Satellite data from CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload and DMSP (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program sampling the Northern Hemisphere during the years 2002–2005 are used. In a first step we investigate the distribution of the measured quantities in a magnetic latitude (MLat versus MLT frame. All considered variables exhibit prominent peak amplitudes in the cusp region. A superposed epoch analysis was performed to examine causal relationship between the quantities. The occurrence of a thermospheric relative mass density anomaly, ρrel >1.2, in the cusp region is defining an event. The location of the density peak is taken as a reference latitude (Δ MLat = 0°. Interestingly, all the considered quantities, SSFACs, Te, and Vz are co-located with the density anomaly. The amplitudes of the peaks exhibit different characters of seasonal variation. The average relative density enhancement of the more prominent density peaks considered in this study amounts to 1.33 during all seasons. As expected, SSFACs are largest in summer with average amplitudes equal to 2.56 μA m−2, decaying to 2.00 μA m−2 in winter. The event related enhancements of Te and Vz are both largest in winter (Δ Te =730 K, Vz =136 m s−1 and smallest in summer (Δ Te = 377 K, Vz = 57 m s−1. Based on the similarity of the seasonal behaviour we suggest a close relationship between these two quantities. A correlation analysis supports a linear relation with a high coefficient greater than or equal to 0.93, irrespective of season. Our preferred explanation is that dayside reconnection fuels Joule heating of the thermosphere causing air upwelling and at the same time heating of the electron gas that pulls up ions

  15. Radiation: cost or benefit?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouch, D.

    1988-01-01

    In a previous issue of SCRAM it was argued that the apparent increased incidence of child leukaemia around nuclear power stations could have been caused by radioactive discharges into the environment. The National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) claim that the known levels of contamination could not be responsible for the observed cancer rates. NRPB estimates of radiation risk are, however, considered to be underestimates. The NRPB is criticised for its study of the Sellafield workforce which excluded ex-employees and which revealed, when a statistical mistake was put right, a significant excess of myeloma amongst the Windscale workforce. The radiation protection philosophy of the NRPB is based on a cost benefit analysis which balances the cost of protection against the benefits of power generation. Criticism is made of NRPB, not only for ignoring long-term risks and costs but also for suggesting that some levels of radiation exposure are acceptable. The Board is also accused of not being independent of the nuclear industry. (UK)

  16. Not Too Small To Care: Small Businesses and Child Care. National Advisory Panel Exchange #2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichman, Caroline; Reisman, Barbara

    This report of the Child Care Action Committee's National Advisory Panel profiles 29 small businesses employing under 250 workers in 15 states which offer child care benefits to their employees. These businesses do not constitute a representative sample of small businesses. A series of factors for small businesses to consider when planning a child…

  17. Small talk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Przybylski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The poem Small talk conjures up a communicative situation in which the main character, a newcomer from Poland, answers conventional questions related to their country. Bearing in mind the fact that this poem is set during a military dictatorship, superficial interest in his homeland may trigger a feeling of impatience. This is at least the impression formed if we adopt the perspective defined within the romantic tradition, and when taking into account the conventional poetry of martial law in Poland. Nevertheless, Barańczak retains an ironic distance towards such communicative situations and, as a consequence, does not create poetry that meets most readersʼ expectations. His poetic imperative for verbal art to be the expression of mistrust remains valid.

  18. Small Composers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgersen, Sven-Erik; Bruun, Peter; Tjagvad, Mette

    2018-01-01

    the study: What expectations do the class teacher and the professional musicians have to the creative practice, i.e. to the collaboration and to the musical outcome? To which extent do the collaborating partners share a common understanding of the aim, content and method of the workshop? How do the roles......The present chapter discusses roles and responsibilities of the collaborating partners in a creative music workshop called Small Composers. The aim is to be attentive to a number of potential alterations implicated by the collaborating partners’ different backgrounds. The following questions guided...... and responsibilities of the collaborating partners become visible through the practice? How do the professional identities of the teacher and the musicians become visible and what are the implications for the workshop as a musical community of practice?...

  19. Helicopter EMS: Research Endpoints and Potential Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen H. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients, EMS systems, and healthcare regions benefit from Helicopter EMS (HEMS utilization. This article discusses these benefits in terms of specific endpoints utilized in research projects. The endpoint of interest, be it primary, secondary, or surrogate, is important to understand in the deployment of HEMS resources or in planning further HEMS outcomes research. The most important outcomes are those which show potential benefits to the patients, such as functional survival, pain relief, and earlier ALS care. Case reports are also important “outcomes” publications. The benefits of HEMS in the rural setting is the ability to provide timely access to Level I or Level II trauma centers and in nontrauma, interfacility transport of cardiac, stroke, and even sepsis patients. Many HEMS crews have pharmacologic and procedural capabilities that bring a different level of care to a trauma scene or small referring hospital, especially in the rural setting. Regional healthcare and EMS system's benefit from HEMS by their capability to extend the advanced level of care throughout a region, provide a “backup” for areas with limited ALS coverage, minimize transport times, make available direct transport to specialized centers, and offer flexibility of transport in overloaded hospital systems.

  20. Making benefit transfers work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bateman, I.J.; Brouwer, R.; Ferrini, S.

    We develop and test guidance principles for benefits transfers. These argue that when transferring across relatively similar sites, simple mean value transfers are to be preferred but that when sites are relatively dissimilar then value function transfers will yield lower errors. The paper also...... provides guidance on the appropriate specification of transferable value functions arguing that these should be developed from theoretical rather than ad-hoc statistical principles. These principles are tested via a common format valuation study of water quality improvements across five countries. Results...... support our various hypotheses providing a set of principles for future transfer studies. The application also considers new ways of incorporating distance decay, substitution and framing effects within transfers and presents a novel water quality ladder....

  1. PESTICIDES: BENEFITS AND HAZARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Maksymiv

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides are an integral part of modern life used to prevent growth of unwanted living  organisms. Despite the fact that scientific statements coming from many toxicological works provide indication on the low risk of the pesticides and their residues, the community especially last years is deeply concerned about massive application of pesticides in diverse fields. Therefore evaluation of hazard risks particularly in long term perspective is very important. In the fact there are at least two clearly different approaches for evaluation of pesticide using: the first one is defined as an objective or probabilistic risk assessment, while the second one is the potential economic and agriculture benefits. Therefore, in this review the author has considered scientifically based assessment of positive and negative effects of pesticide application and discusses possible approaches to find balance between them.

  2. University Benefits Survey. Part 1 (All Benefits Excluding Pensions).

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of Western Ontario, London.

    Results of a 1983 survey of benefits, excluding pensions, for 17 Ontario, Canada, universities are presented. Information is provided on the following areas: whether the university self-administers insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes in benefits, provision of life and dismemberment insurance, maternity leave policy,…

  3. Does Gender Influence the Provision of Fringe Benefits?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, John; Tarp, Finn

    2011-01-01

    This contribution studies the provision of fringe benefits using a unique survey of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Vietnam. Analysis of the survey reveals that women who own SMEs are more likely than men who own similar firms to provide employees with fringe benefits such as annual...... and workforce structure, worker recruitment mechanisms, and the degree of unionization. However, these factors cannot fully account for the observed differences in fringe benefits along the “gender of owner” dimension. There remains a sizable and unexplained fringe benefits premium paid to employees in women...

  4. Containment for low temperature district nuclear-heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Shuyan; Dong Duo

    1992-03-01

    Integral arrangement is adopted for Low Temperature District Nuclear-heating Reactor. Primary heat exchangers, control rod drives and spent fuel elements are put in the reactor pressure vessel together with reactor core. Primary coolant flows through reactor core and primary heat exchangers in natural circulation. Primary coolant pipes penetrating the wall of reactor pressure vessel are all of small diameters. The reactor vessel constitutes the main part of pressure boundary of primary coolant. Therefore the small sized metallic containment closed to the wall of reactor vessel can be used for the reactor. Design principles and functions of the containment are as same as the containment for PWR. But the adoption of small sized containment brings about some benefits such as short period of manufacturing, relatively low cost, and easy for sealing. Loss of primary coolant accident would not be happened during the rupture accident of primary coolant pressure boundary inside the containment owing to its intrinsic safety

  5. Landfill Gas Energy Benefits Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains the LFG Energy Benefits Calculator to estimate direct, avoided, and total greenhouse gas reductions, as well as environmental and energy benefits, for a landfill gas energy project.

  6. Electrometry - constraints and benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabol, J.

    1980-01-01

    The main parameters are defined and described of an electrometer, including input resistance, input quiescent current, current noise equivalent, voltage and current stability, minimum input capacity, response time, time constant, range, accuracy, linearity, a-c component suppression, and zero drift. The limiting factors in measurement mainly include temperature noise, insulator quality, radioactivity background, electrostatic and electromagnetic interference, contact potential difference, and resistor stability. Electrometers are classified into three basic groups, viz., electrostatic electrometers, d-c amplifier-based electrometers (electron tube electrometers and FET electrometers), electrometers with modulation of measured signal (electrometers using vibration capacitors, electrometers with varactors). Diagrams and specifications are presented for selected electrometers. (J.B.)

  7. The employee motivation and benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Fuhrmannová, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor's study is to describe and analyze the employee motivation and benefits in the payroll system and human recources field. Theoretical part attends to general terms as the employee motivation, the theory of the motivation,the types of the employee benefits, the influence of benefits to the employee's working performance. The practial part focuses on Elanor company, includes introduction of the company, it's history and the present, the offer of the employee benefits. Ne...

  8. Corporate benefits of CSR activities

    OpenAIRE

    Maja Żychlewicz

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of the paper is to present the benefits that a company may derive from socially responsible activities. The paper lists various definitions of CSR that indicate the expected benefits stemming from its use. Both in theory and in practice, there is observed the need for strategic connection between the CSR concept and its real-life benefits.

  9. Corporate benefits of CSR activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Żychlewicz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the paper is to present the benefits that a company may derive from socially responsible activities. The paper lists various definitions of CSR that indicate the expected benefits stemming from its use. Both in theory and in practice, there is observed the need for strategic connection between the CSR concept and its real-life benefits.

  10. Cost benefit analysis vs. referenda

    OpenAIRE

    Martin J. Osborne; Matthew A. Turner

    2007-01-01

    We consider a planner who chooses between two possible public policies and ask whether a referendum or a cost benefit analysis leads to higher welfare. We find that a referendum leads to higher welfare than a cost benefit analyses in "common value" environments. Cost benefit analysis is better in "private value" environments.

  11. Benefit-based tree valuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.G. McPherson

    2007-01-01

    Benefit-based tree valuation provides alternative estimates of the fair and reasonable value of trees while illustrating the relative contribution of different benefit types. This study compared estimates of tree value obtained using cost- and benefit-based approaches. The cost-based approach used the Council of Landscape and Tree Appraisers trunk formula method, and...

  12. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm 2 , 1000 0 C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm 2 , 1200 0 C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370 0 C

  13. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

  14. How isotopes benefit industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The life of bus engines and the time taken to make beer are not at first sight connected with atomic energy. Yet the first has been considerably lengthened and the second even more considerably shortened in different countries as a result of using nuclear techniques and materials. They are only two examples; there are many others which have improved efficiency in factories, oilfields, chemical plants and other industries. They indicate not only the results of ingenuity but the rewards possible from more widespread use of the new methods. At a symposium on radioisotope tracers in industry and geophysics organized by the Agency and held in Prague during November many reports showed not only what is possible but what is actually being accomplished in a number of industries as a matter of daily routine. The economic benefits were also demonstrated, and although the developments have been mainly in countries already highly industrialized, the potential for new industries in developing countries was clear. Research to improve performance of motorcar, aircraft and tractor engines has been directed at establishing the causes of friction, corrosion and wear. In brewing beer it has been possible to accelerate fermentation. Pollution both of water and air can be reduced and methods of waste disposal improved. Many economies have been effected in oil production. Better quality and lower costs have resulted from work in chemical plants and processes such as glass making, metal refining, plastics and many others. Dams and railways were also mentioned among the great variety of subjects suitable for radioisotope techniques

  15. Cardiovascular benefits of exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal SK

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Shashi K AgarwalMedical Director, Agarwal Health Center, NJ, USAAbstract: Regular physical activity during leisure time has been shown to be associated with better health outcomes. The American Heart Association, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Sports Medicine all recommend regular physical activity of moderate intensity for the prevention and complementary treatment of several diseases. The therapeutic role of exercise in maintaining good health and treating diseases is not new. The benefits of physical activity date back to Susruta, a 600 BC physician in India, who prescribed exercise to patients. Hippocrates (460–377 BC wrote “in order to remain healthy, the entire day should be devoted exclusively to ways and means of increasing one's strength and staying healthy, and the best way to do so is through physical exercise.” Plato (427–347 BC referred to medicine as a sister art to physical exercise while the noted ancient Greek physician Galen (129–217 AD penned several essays on aerobic fitness and strengthening muscles. This article briefly reviews the beneficial effects of physical activity on cardiovascular diseases.Keywords: exercise, cardiovascular disease, lifestyle changes, physical activity, good health

  16. Environmental benefits of ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    The environmental benefits of ethanol blended fuels in helping to reduce harmful emissions into the atmosphere are discussed. The use of oxygenated fuels such as ethanol is one way of addressing air pollution concerns such as ozone formation. The state of California has legislated stringent automobile emissions standards in an effort to reduce emissions that contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone. Several Canadian cities also record similar hazardous exposures to carbon monoxide, particularly in fall and winter. Using oxygenated fuels such as ethanol, is one way of addressing the issue of air pollution. The net effect of ethanol use is an overall decrease in ozone formation. For example, use of a 10 per cent ethanol blend results in a 25-30 per cent reduction in carbon monoxide emissions by promoting a more complete combustion of the fuel. It also results in a 6-10 per cent reduction of carbon dioxide, and a seven per cent overall decrease in exhaust VOCs (volatile organic compounds). The environmental implications of feedstock production associated with the production of ethanol for fuel was also discussed. One of the Canadian government's initiatives to address the climate change challenge is its FleetWise initiative, in which it has agreed to a phased-in acquisition of alternative fuel vehicles by the year 2005. 9 refs

  17. How isotopes benefit industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1967-02-15

    The life of bus engines and the time taken to make beer are not at first sight connected with atomic energy. Yet the first has been considerably lengthened and the second even more considerably shortened in different countries as a result of using nuclear techniques and materials. They are only two examples; there are many others which have improved efficiency in factories, oilfields, chemical plants and other industries. They indicate not only the results of ingenuity but the rewards possible from more widespread use of the new methods. At a symposium on radioisotope tracers in industry and geophysics organized by the Agency and held in Prague during November many reports showed not only what is possible but what is actually being accomplished in a number of industries as a matter of daily routine. The economic benefits were also demonstrated, and although the developments have been mainly in countries already highly industrialized, the potential for new industries in developing countries was clear. Research to improve performance of motorcar, aircraft and tractor engines has been directed at establishing the causes of friction, corrosion and wear. In brewing beer it has been possible to accelerate fermentation. Pollution both of water and air can be reduced and methods of waste disposal improved. Many economies have been effected in oil production. Better quality and lower costs have resulted from work in chemical plants and processes such as glass making, metal refining, plastics and many others. Dams and railways were also mentioned among the great variety of subjects suitable for radioisotope techniques

  18. The benefits of visibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupnick, A.; DeWitt, D.

    1994-01-01

    The benefits of visibility improvement (or the damages with additional degradation) refer to increases (or decreases) in utility obtained in three different dimensions. The first of these is associated with the nature of the visibility change. Visual range may be improved so that features of an area become more distinct or the sky becomes clearer. Alternatively, normal features of an area may be marred, say by the site of a power plant or its plume (called plume blight). The second dimension is the location of the change: in an urban area, in a rural setting, or in a recreational area or area of particular beauty, such as the Grand Canyon. The third dimension is the type of value: use or non-use. Thus, a person who visits the Grand Canyon (or may visit it in the future) may hold use values for improving his view of the Canyon or its surroundings and may also old non-use values for improved visibility (whether for altruistic or other reasons) irrespective of present or planned visits. In all, therefore, there are 12 possible combinations of the elements in these three dimension, each of which is logically distinct from the others and which demands attention in the literature to derive willingness to pay (WTP)

  19. The benefits of visibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupnick, A; DeWitt, D

    1994-07-01

    The benefits of visibility improvement (or the damages with additional degradation) refer to increases (or decreases) in utility obtained in three different dimensions. The first of these is associated with the nature of the visibility change. Visual range may be improved so that features of an area become more distinct or the sky becomes clearer. Alternatively, normal features of an area may be marred, say by the site of a power plant or its plume (called plume blight). The second dimension is the location of the change: in an urban area, in a rural setting, or in a recreational area or area of particular beauty, such as the Grand Canyon. The third dimension is the type of value: use or non-use. Thus, a person who visits the Grand Canyon (or may visit it in the future) may hold use values for improving his view of the Canyon or its surroundings and may also old non-use values for improved visibility (whether for altruistic or other reasons) irrespective of present or planned visits. In all, therefore, there are 12 possible combinations of the elements in these three dimension, each of which is logically distinct from the others and which demands attention in the literature to derive willingness to pay (WTP)

  20. Melting temperature of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, V.N.; Savvatimskiy, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: Pulse of electrical current is used for fast heating (∼ 1 μs) of metal and graphite specimens placed in dielectric solid media. Specimen consists of two strips (90 μm in thick) placed together with small gap so they form a black body model. Quasy-monocrystal graphite specimens were used for uniform heating of graphite. Temperature measurements were fulfilled with fast pyrometer and with composite 2-strip black body model up to melting temperature. There were fulfilled experiments with zirconium and tungsten of the same black body construction. Additional temperature measurements of liquid zirconium and liquid tungsten are made. Specific heat capacity (c P ) of liquid zirconium and of liquid tungsten has a common feature in c P diminishing just after melting. It reveals c P diminishing after melting in both cases over the narrow temperature range up to usual values known from steady state measurements. Over the next wide temperature range heat capacity for W (up to 5000 K) and Zr (up to 4100 K) show different dependencies of heat capacity on temperature in liquid state. The experiments confirmed a high quality of 2-strip black body model used for graphite temperature measurements. Melting temperature plateau of tungsten (3690 K) was used for pyrometer calibration area for graphite temperature measurement. As a result, a preliminary value of graphite melting temperature of 4800 K was obtained. (author)

  1. Technological transfer. 2. Through developing small businesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrie, T W; Leslie, D

    1978-12-01

    The transfer of small businesses to developing countries is proposed as the most effective way to build upon existing capabilities and small resources while benefiting the largest number of people. Labor-intensive small businesses require little capital investment and can bring immediate progress to both urban and rural areas. One drawback to this approach is the need for organizational effort by the government, although the Civil Service in India has been able to fill this function. Small businesses can be promoted through tax exemptions or benefits, the restriction of some manufacturing to small-scale industries, and government support of equipment research. This approach is less disruptive of social patterns and lifestyles than urbanization and its associated costs while still providing the opportunity for an improved standard of living. Electrification can be handled at the village level with diesel generators or by central power plants, although consumer cooperatives have worked better than the small business concept in this area.

  2. Advanced control system for temperature control in the pressurized fluid bed of Escatron Thermal Plant Power; Sistema de Control Avanzado para Control de la Temperatura del Lecho Fluido a Presion de la Central Termica de Escatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In the P. F-B. C a small problem appears, particularly in Escatron the bed temperature gradient is very high. Such gradient very occasionally reaches 50 degree centigree in a same plane. With the reduction of bed difference of temperature, the average bed temperature could be increased with the result steam cycle benefit, at the same time combustion gases would go at a higher temperature to the gas turbine, increasing therefore its performance. The SCAP system will allow to face the resolution of the injection of combustible problem and in this manner achieve the homogenization of bed temperature in Escatron PFBC Thermal Power Station. (Author)

  3. Study of the quenching and subsequent return to room temperature of uranium-chromium, uranium-iron, and uranium-molybdenum alloys containing only small amounts of the alloying element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaplace, J.

    1960-09-01

    By means of an apparatus which makes possible thermal pre-treatments in vacuo, quenching carried out in a high purity argon atmosphere, and simultaneous recording of time temperature cooling and thermal contraction curves, the author has examined the transformations which occur in uranium-chromium, uranium-iron and uranium-molybdenum alloys during their quenching and subsequent return to room temperature. For uranium-chromium and uranium-iron alloys, the temperature at which the γ → β transformation starts varies very little with the rate of cooling. For uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 atom per cent of Mo, this temperature is lowered by 120 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn. The temperature at which the β → α transformation starts is lowered by 170 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn in the case of uranium-chromium alloy containing 0,37 atom per cent of Cr. The temperature is little affected in the case of uranium-iron alloys. The addition of chromium or iron makes it possible to conserve the form β at ordinary temperatures after quenching from the β and γ regions. The β phase is particularly unstable and changes into needles of the α form even at room temperatures according to an autocatalytic transformation law similar to the austenitic-martensitic transformation law in the case of iron. The β phase obtained by quenching from the β phase region is more stable than that obtained by quenching from the γ region. Chromium is a more effective stabiliser of the β phase than is iron. Unfortunately it causes serious surface cracking. The β → α transformation in uranium-chromium alloys has been followed at room temperature by means of micro-cinematography. The author has not observed the direct γ → α transformation in uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 per cent of molybdenum even for cooling rates of up to 2000 deg. C/s. He has however observed the formation of several martensitic structures. (author) [fr

  4. Purchasing cooperatives for small employers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallozzi, J

    1997-12-01

    Despite a booming economy, the number of uninsured Americans is rising. It hit nearly 42 million in 1996. Many of the uninsured work at businesses with fewer than 50 employees. Because small firms have traditionally found it difficult to provide health benefits, purchasing cooperatives have grown in scope and size across the country in recent years. By bringing small businesses together to buy insurance as a group, these organizations can help employers provide greater choice to their workers at a lower cost. However, to operate well in the insurance market, purchasing cooperatives must be well-designed and provided with adequate legal protections.

  5. Economic benefits of the nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The historical and projected benefits of nuclear power are estimated as the cost differential between nuclear power and an alternative baseload generating source times the quantity of electricity generated. From 1976 through 1981 coal and nuclear power were close competitors in most regions, with nuclear power holding a small cost advantage overall in 1976 and 1977 that subsequently eroded. When nuclear power costs are contrasted to coal power costs, national benefits from nuclear power are estimated to be $336 million from 1976 to 1981, with an additional $1.8 billion for the present value of existing plants. Fuel oil has been the dominant source of baseload generation in California, Florida, and New England. When nuclear power costs are contrasted to those of fuel oil, the benefits of nuclear power in these three regions are estimated to be $8.3 billion and $28.1 billion in terms of present value. The present value of benefits of future nuclear plants is estimated to be $8.2 billion under a midcase scenario and $43 billion under an optimistic scenario. 18 references, 10 tables

  6. The domestic benefits of tropical forests: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomitz, K M; Kumari, K

    1998-02-01

    This review focuses on forests in the humid tropics and on two of their potentially most important benefits. These include hydrological benefits, such as erosion control and regulation of stream flows, and non-timber forest products, such as rubber, rattan, fruits, and nuts. The first benefit is motivational. Host countries capture only a small proportion of the global benefits, which stem from biodiversity conservation. Demonstration of palpable local benefits could help to build support for biodiversity-oriented projects. The second benefit is the magnitude of domestic benefits that could influence project financing. Sufficiently large net domestic benefits could justify financing of a project on narrow economic grounds, with biodiversity conservation as a by-product. Overall, it is noted that the quantifiable benefits of forest preservation in providing hydrological services and non-timber forest products are highly variable. These classes of domestic benefits may in general be smaller than popularly supposed. In view of this, the need for financing conservation from the Global Environmental Facility or other global sources is emphasized rather than placing the burden on domestic resources.

  7. Benefits in cash or in kind? A community consultation on types of benefits in health research on the Kenyan Coast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen Njue

    Full Text Available Providing benefits and payments to participants in health research, either in cash or in kind, is a common but ethically controversial practice. While much literature has concentrated on appropriate levels of benefits or payments, this paper focuses on less well explored ethical issues around the nature of study benefits, drawing on views of community members living close to an international health research centre in Kenya.The consultation, including 90 residents purposively chosen to reflect diversity, used a two-stage deliberative process. Five half-day workshops were each followed by between two and four small group discussions, within a two week period (total 16 groups. During workshops and small groups, facilitators used participatory methods to share information, and promote reflection and debate on ethical issues around types of benefits, including cash, goods, medical and community benefits. Data from workshop and field notes, and voice recordings of small group discussions, were managed using Nvivo 10 and analysed using a Framework Analysis approach.The methods generated in-depth discussion with high levels of engagement. Particularly for the most-poor, under-compensation of time in research carries risks of serious harm. Cash payments may best support compensation of costs experienced; while highly valued, goods and medical benefits may be more appropriate as an 'appreciation' or incentive for participation. Community benefits were seen as important in supporting but not replacing individual-level benefits, and in building trust in researcher-community relations. Cash payments were seen to have higher risks of undue inducement, commercialising relationships and generating family conflicts than other benefits, particularly where payments are high. Researchers should consider and account for burdens families may experience when children are involved in research. Careful context-specific research planning and skilled and consistent

  8. Benefits in cash or in kind? A community consultation on types of benefits in health research on the Kenyan Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njue, Maureen; Molyneux, Sassy; Kombe, Francis; Mwalukore, Salim; Kamuya, Dorcas; Marsh, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    Providing benefits and payments to participants in health research, either in cash or in kind, is a common but ethically controversial practice. While much literature has concentrated on appropriate levels of benefits or payments, this paper focuses on less well explored ethical issues around the nature of study benefits, drawing on views of community members living close to an international health research centre in Kenya. The consultation, including 90 residents purposively chosen to reflect diversity, used a two-stage deliberative process. Five half-day workshops were each followed by between two and four small group discussions, within a two week period (total 16 groups). During workshops and small groups, facilitators used participatory methods to share information, and promote reflection and debate on ethical issues around types of benefits, including cash, goods, medical and community benefits. Data from workshop and field notes, and voice recordings of small group discussions, were managed using Nvivo 10 and analysed using a Framework Analysis approach. The methods generated in-depth discussion with high levels of engagement. Particularly for the most-poor, under-compensation of time in research carries risks of serious harm. Cash payments may best support compensation of costs experienced; while highly valued, goods and medical benefits may be more appropriate as an 'appreciation' or incentive for participation. Community benefits were seen as important in supporting but not replacing individual-level benefits, and in building trust in researcher-community relations. Cash payments were seen to have higher risks of undue inducement, commercialising relationships and generating family conflicts than other benefits, particularly where payments are high. Researchers should consider and account for burdens families may experience when children are involved in research. Careful context-specific research planning and skilled and consistent communication about

  9. Who Benefits from Volunteering? Variations in Perceived Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Hong, Song-Iee; Tang, Fengyan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to document the benefits of volunteering perceived by older adults and to explain variation in these self-perceived benefits. Design and Methods: This is a quantitative study of 13 volunteer programs and 401 older adults serving in those programs. Program directors completed telephone interviews, and older…

  10. Private benefits and board size: International evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Shinozaki

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In our analyses of 10,390 companies from 51 countries, we find that in countries that have small capital markets free cash flow is positively related to board size. However, this positive relation becomes significantly weak for companies in large securities markets. This result suggests that managers in underdeveloped capital markets have an incentive to construct less effective boards to extract private benefits. However, the distorted managerial incentive is alleviated in developed countries that have various disciplinary mechanisms to ensure good governance practices. We do not find clear evidence that legal protection of shareholder rights mitigates the managerial incentive to construct less effective boards.

  11. Identifying the Costs and Benefits of Educational Psychology: A Preliminary Exploration in Two Local Authorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Simon; Papps, Ivy

    2017-01-01

    This article provides an account of a small-scale pilot study of the cost and perceived benefits of the educational psychology services in two comparably small local authorities in England. This study is preparatory to a more detailed examination of the costs and likely benefits of state provision of educational psychology services in England. The…

  12. State Mandated Benefits and Employer Provided Health Insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Gruber

    1992-01-01

    One popular explanation for this low rate of employee coverage is the presence of numerous state regulations which mandate that group health insurance plans must include certain benefits. By raising the minimum costs of providing any health insurance coverage, these mandated benefits make it impossible for firms which would have desired to offer minimal health insurance at a low cost to do so. I use data on insurance coverage among employees in small firms to investigate whether this problem ...

  13. Small Business Development Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) provide assistance to small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs throughout the United States and its territories. SBDCs...

  14. Possible Future Role of Small and Medium Sized Reactors (SMRs) in Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alujevic, L.

    2016-01-01

    Small and Medium Sized Reactors (SMRs) could have enormous potential as options for enhancing the energy supply security, as well as providing a lower capital investment compared to conventional Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). The trend in SMR development has been towards design certification of small modular reactors, defined as advanced reactors that produce electric power up to 300 MW(e), designed to be built in factories and shipped to utilities for installation as demand arises. The factory-built small modular reactors aim to reduce lengthy construction times while simultaneously increasing quality, thereby minimizing the costs associated with the current time for construction that spans 5 to 8 years. SMR designs include water-cooled reactors, high temperature gas cooled reactors, as well as liquid metal cooled reactors with fast neutron spectrum. Also, many are designed to be emplaced below ground level, giving a high resistance to terrorist threats. The projected timelines of readiness for deployment of SMRs generally range from the present to 2025 - 2030. Currently there are more than 45 SMR designs under development for different application issues. This paper will try to elaborate the benefits and drawbacks of SMRs, as well as describe a couple of designs. Furthermore, some timelines and cost estimates will be provided, depending on the data currently available. Taking all that into account, the conclusion will try to ascertain the suitability of SMRs for Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids, namely Croatia. (author).

  15. The benefits of playing video games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granic, Isabela; Lobel, Adam; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2014-01-01

    Video games are a ubiquitous part of almost all children's and adolescents' lives, with 97% playing for at least one hour per day in the United States. The vast majority of research by psychologists on the effects of "gaming" has been on its negative impact: the potential harm related to violence, addiction, and depression. We recognize the value of that research; however, we argue that a more balanced perspective is needed, one that considers not only the possible negative effects but also the benefits of playing these games. Considering these potential benefits is important, in part, because the nature of these games has changed dramatically in the last decade, becoming increasingly complex, diverse, realistic, and social in nature. A small but significant body of research has begun to emerge, mostly in the last five years, documenting these benefits. In this article, we summarize the research on the positive effects of playing video games, focusing on four main domains: cognitive, motivational, emotional, and social. By integrating insights from developmental, positive, and social psychology, as well as media psychology, we propose some candidate mechanisms by which playing video games may foster real-world psychosocial benefits. Our aim is to provide strong enough evidence and a theoretical rationale to inspire new programs of research on the largely unexplored mental health benefits of gaming. Finally, we end with a call to intervention researchers and practitioners to test the positive uses of video games, and we suggest several promising directions for doing so. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Costs and benefits of cold acclimation in field released Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Torsten N; Hoffmann, Ary A; Overgaard, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    -acclimated were up to 36 times more likely to find food than the cold-acclimated flies when temperatures were warm. Such costs and strong benefits were not evident in laboratory tests where we found no reduction in heat survival of the cold-acclimated flies. Field release studies, therefore, reveal costs of cold......One way animals can counter the effects of climatic extremes is via physiological acclimation, but acclimating to one extreme might decrease performance under different conditions. Here, we use field releases of Drosophila melanogaster on two continents across a range of temperatures to test...... for costs and benefits of developmental or adult cold acclimation. Both types of cold acclimation had enormous benefits at low temperatures in the field; in the coldest releases only cold-acclimated flies were able to find a resource. However, this advantage came at a huge cost; flies that had not been cold...

  17. High speed machining of aluminium gear box without temperature stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abilio P. SILVA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available At the present time both clutch and mechanism housings, which are the main components from automotive gear boxes, are made of special aluminium alloys. These alloys are extremely light when compared with steel, making them a perfect choice to mitigate the cars weight and machining costs. Nonetheless they possess a high thermal expansion coefficient, which can be considered a major disadvantage since it makes necessary to pay extraordinary attention to dimensional variations during the production cycle due to temperature deviations. High speed machining of precision components made of aluminium requests thus their temperature to become previously stable. This procedure is the only way to force dimensions to stay inside its tolerance intervals. The main purpose of the present work was to assess the possibility to avoid the use of special ovens to make the clutch housing temperature become stable prior to machining. The dimensional stabilization of 40 sample parts, pre-heated at three temperature levels, was accomplished through the use of this system. The achieved results were made possible by analysing the part’s temperature at the machine’s entrance, the machine’s interior temperature, 35 measured dimensions and their tolerance intervals as well as the average temperature deviations of each of the five considered batches. By analysing the obtained results in detail it was possible to determine which dimensions show high sensitiveness to temperature (high correlation between dimension’s variation and temperature. Among these dimensions we can point out the ones related with depth, since they display the highest deviations due to temperature. Being a work with practical application it was possible to confirm the benefit of using this methodology by achieving significant enhancements on production efficiency, energy savings and reduction on maintenance costs, through the application of small adjustments to the machining sequence and by

  18. Childcare Programs Benefit Employers, Too.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Donald J.; Massengill, Douglas

    1988-01-01

    The person selecting a childcare program should consider how various plans would benefit employers as well as employees. The needs of the employees and the company must be considered and the options, benefits, and drawbacks of programs must be studied. (JOW)

  19. Retrieval Practice Benefits Deductive Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglington, Luke G.; Kang, Sean H. K.

    2018-01-01

    Retrieval practice has been shown to benefit learning. However, the benefit has sometimes been attenuated with more complex materials that require integrating multiple units of information. Critically, Tran et al. "Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 22," 135-140 (2015) found that retrieval practice improves sentence memory but not the…

  20. Who Benefits from Pension Enhancements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koedel, Cory; Ni, Shawn; Podgursky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    During the late 1990s public pension funds across the United States accrued large actuarial surpluses. The seemingly flush conditions of the pension funds led legislators in most states to substantially improve retirement benefits for public workers, including teachers. In this study we examine the benefit enhancements to the teacher pension…

  1. How Small School Districts Can Organize to Afford Their Small Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Christine

    2010-01-01

    While the research continues to mount on the benefits of school downsizing and decentralizing efforts in urban areas, there exists a paradox for small school Administrators who continue to struggle against forces of consolidation. Small schools in rural and suburban districts have fought for their existence against the pressures of consolidation…

  2. Small hydro plant- present scenario and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purohit, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    The article, deals with the methodology of power generation by small hydro power resources, especially in the Himalayan and sub Himalayan regions and the benefits it will bestow to the inhabitants of this region. The development of small hydro power projects in the Himalayas and sub Himalayas would serve as a model for environment- friendly sources of energy to benefit small communities world wide. The use of water turbine generators for the generation of cheaper power is also discussed. 4 refs

  3. Surface Temperature Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Ruedy, Reto

    2012-01-01

    Small global mean temperature changes may have significant to disastrous consequences for the Earth's climate if they persist for an extended period. Obtaining global means from local weather reports is hampered by the uneven spatial distribution of the reliably reporting weather stations. Methods had to be developed that minimize as far as possible the impact of that situation. This software is a method of combining temperature data of individual stations to obtain a global mean trend, overcoming/estimating the uncertainty introduced by the spatial and temporal gaps in the available data. Useful estimates were obtained by the introduction of a special grid, subdividing the Earth's surface into 8,000 equal-area boxes, using the existing data to create virtual stations at the center of each of these boxes, and combining temperature anomalies (after assessing the radius of high correlation) rather than temperatures.

  4. Electrochemical reduction of oxygen on small platinum particles supported on carbon in concentrated phosphoric acid. 2. Effects of teflon content in the catalyst layer and baking temperature of the electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maoka, T.

    1988-03-01

    A relation between hydrophobicity (or wettability) of a porous gas diffusion electrode for use in a phosphoric acid fuel cell and its cathode performance (activity toward electrochemical oxygen reduction) was examined. The hydrophobicity of the gas diffusion electrode was regulated by changing either the amount of Teflon (PTFE) content in the catalyst layer or baking temperature of the electrode. The Tafel slope or electrochemical oxygen reduction became twice as high as that of the ordinary electrode when the wettability of electrode toward phosphoric acid was high. This fact supports a flooded agglomerate model as the mode of this type of porous gas diffusion electrode.

  5. Demand side management. Benefits and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strbac, Goran

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the major benefits and challenges of electricity demand side management (DSM) are discussed in the context of the UK electricity system. The relatively low utilisation of generation and networks (of about 50%) means that there is significant scope for DSM to contribute to increasing the efficiency of the system investment. The importance of the diversity of electricity load is discussed and the negative effects of DSM on load diversity illustrated. Ageing assets, the growth in renewable and other low-carbon generation technologies and advances in information and communication technologies are identified as major additional drivers that could lead to wider applications of DSM in the medium term. Potential benefits of DSM are discussed in the context of generation and of transmission and distribution networks. The provision of back-up capacity by generation may not be efficient as it will be needed relatively infrequently, and DSM may be better placed to support security. We also present an analysis of the value of DSM in balancing generation and demand in a future UK electricity system with significant variable renewable generation. We give a number of reasons for the relatively slow uptake of DSM, particularly in the residential, commercial and small business sectors. They include a lack of metering, information and communication infrastructure, lack of understanding of the benefits of DSM, problems with the competitiveness of DSM when compared with traditional approaches, an increase in the complexity of system operation and inappropriate market incentives. (author)

  6. Temperature Pill

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Ingestible Thermal Monitoring System was developed at Johns Hopkins University as means of getting internal temperature readings for treatments of such emergency conditions as dangerously low (hypothermia) and dangerously high (hyperthermia) body temperatures. ITMS's accuracy is off no more than one hundredth of a degree and provides the only means of obtaining deep body temperature. System has additional applicability in fertility monitoring and some aspects of surgery, critical care obstetrics, metabolic disease treatment, gerontology (aging) and food processing research. Three-quarter inch silicone capsule contains telemetry system, micro battery, and a quartz crystal temperature sensor inserted vaginally, rectally, or swallowed.

  7. Do conditional benefits reduce equilibrium unemployment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, F.

    2006-01-01

    Although unconditional unemployment benefits destroy jobs in competitive and noncompetitive labor markets, conditional benefits can spur job growth in noncompetitive labor markets. Unconditional benefits reduce the penalty of shirking and misconduct, while conditional benefits increase this penalty.

  8. MEMS Device Being Developed for Active Cooling and Temperature Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2001-01-01

    High-capacity cooling options remain limited for many small-scale applications such as microelectronic components, miniature sensors, and microsystems. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) is currently under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center to meet this need. It uses a thermodynamic cycle to provide cooling or heating directly to a thermally loaded surface. The device can be used strictly in the cooling mode, or it can be switched between cooling and heating modes in milliseconds for precise temperature control. Fabrication and assembly are accomplished by wet etching and wafer bonding techniques routinely used in the semiconductor processing industry. Benefits of the MEMS cooler include scalability to fractions of a millimeter, modularity for increased capacity and staging to low temperatures, simple interfaces and limited failure modes, and minimal induced vibration.

  9. Superconductivity of small particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leavens, C.R.; Fenton, E.W.

    1981-01-01

    The Eliashberg gap equations are used to investigate the contribution of surface-phonon softening to the size dependence of the superconducting transition temperature (T/sub c/) of small metallic particles. Because of our limited quantitative knowledge of phonon spectra and electron-phonon coupling in the surface region, the effect cannot be calculated with certainty. Previous calculations which agree with experiment depend on a fortuitous choice of input parameters which cannot be justified at present. For this reason the absence of any observable size effect for T/sub c/ in Pb is especially important. This null effect is obtained in Pb if the electron-phonon coupling strength is the same in the surface region as in the bulk. This assumption can be tested experimentally because it means that the energy gap of Pb should not be independent of particle size but rather should increase significantly with decreasing radius. Hence, measurement of the size dependence of the energy gap for well-characterized small particles of Pb could provide information regarding the importance of the phonon-softening mechanism, at least for Pb

  10. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Rorabaugh, Michael; Shorey, Mark

    2002-10-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 pound payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs.

  11. Formation of small sparks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, E.; Jurenka, H.; Reynolds, S.I.

    1977-01-01

    The formation of a small incendiary spark at atmospheric pressure is identified with the transition from a weakly to a strongly ionized plasma. It is shown that initial gaseous ionization produced by avalanches and/or streamers always creates a high-temperature ideal electron gas that can shield the applied voltage difference and reduce ionization in the volume of the gas. The electron gas is collision dominated but able to maintain its high temperature, for times long compared to discharge events, through long-range Coulomb forces. In fact, electrons in the weakly ionized plasma constitute a collisionless independent fluid with a thermodynamic state that can be affected directly by field or density changes. Accordingly, with metal electrodes, cathode spot emission is always associated with the transition to a strongly ionized plasma. Neutral heating can be accomplished in two different ways. Effective dispersal of the electrons from the cathode leads to electron heating dominated by diffusion effects. Conversely, a fast rate of emission or rapid field changes can produce nonlinear wave propagation. It is shown that solitary waves are possible, and it is suggested that some spark transitions are associated with shock waves in the collisionless electron gas. In either the diffuse or nonlinear regime, neutral gas heating is controlled by collisions of ions with isotropic thermal electrons. This interaction is always subsequent to changes in state of the electron gas population. The basic results obtained should apply to all sparks

  12. Magnetic resonance force microscopy of paramagnetic electron spins at millikelvin temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinante, A; Wijts, G; Usenko, O; Schinkelshoek, L; Oosterkamp, T H

    2011-12-06

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a powerful technique to detect a small number of spins that relies on force detection by an ultrasoft magnetically tipped cantilever and selective magnetic resonance manipulation of the spins. MRFM would greatly benefit from ultralow temperature operation, because of lower thermomechanical noise and increased thermal spin polarization. Here we demonstrate MRFM operation at temperatures as low as 30 mK, thanks to a recently developed superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based cantilever detection technique, which avoids cantilever overheating. In our experiment, we detect dangling bond paramagnetic centres on a silicon surface down to millikelvin temperatures. Fluctuations of such defects are supposedly linked to 1/f magnetic noise and decoherence in SQUIDs, as well as in several superconducting and single spin qubits. We find evidence that spin diffusion has a key role in the low-temperature spin dynamics.

  13. Cannabis and neuropsychiatry, 1: benefits and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-05-01

    Cannabis is popularly believed to be a relatively benign substance. Cannabis is also considered to have potential medical benefits, and medical marijuana has been legislated in many parts of the world. However, a recent meta-analysis found that cannabinoids were associated with only modest benefits for chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting, small and inconsistent benefits for pain and spasticity, and inconclusive benefits for other indications such as improvement of appetite and weight, reduction in tic severity, and improvement of mood or sleep. On the flip side, cannabinoids and cannabis have acute and long-term adverse effects. In randomized controlled trials, cannabinoids increase the risk of total adverse events, serious adverse events, and dropout due to adverse events. Cannabis impairs cognition, and driving after cannabis use is associated with an increased risk of traffic accidents, including fatal accidents. Long-term cannabis use may lead to dependence, respiratory conditions, psychosis, and possibly cancer, as well. Cannabis use during pregnancy may compromise certain pregnancy outcomes such as fetal growth, and use during adolescence may compromise neurodevelopment, social adjustment, and vocational success. The composition and bioavailability of cannabis vary across preparations of the substance and routes of administration; this limits the ability to generalize the findings of studies. The findings of older research may no longer apply to current strains of cannabis that are higher in psychotogenic content. It is important for medical professionals and the lay public to understand the limitations of the efficacy data and the seriousness of the risks associated with cannabis use in medical and recreational contexts. © Copyright 2016 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  14. Comparative costs and benefits of hydrogen vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, G.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The costs and benefits of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel are compared to gasoline, natural gas, and battery-powered vehicles. Costs, energy, efficiency, and tail-pipe and full fuel cycle emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases were estimated for hydrogen from a broad range of delivery pathways and scales: from individual vehicle refueling systems to large stations refueling 300 cars/day. Hydrogen production from natural gas, methanol, and ammonia, as well as water electrolysis based on alkaline or polymer electrolytes and steam electrolysis using solid oxide electrolytes are considered. These estimates were compared to estimates for competing fuels and vehicles, and used to construct oil use, air pollutant, and greenhouse gas emission scenarios for the U.S. passenger car fleet from 2005-2050. Fuel costs need not be an overriding concern in evaluating the suitability of hydrogen as a fuel for passenger vehicles. The combined emissions and oil import reduction benefits of hydrogen cars are estimated to be significant, valued at up to {approximately}$400/yr for each hydrogen car when primarily clean energy sources are used for hydrogen production. These benefits alone, however, become tenuous as the basis supporting a compelling rationale for hydrogen fueled vehicles, if efficient, advanced fossil-fuel hybrid electric vehicles (HEV`s) can achieve actual on-road emissions at or below ULEV standards in the 2005-2015 timeframe. It appears a robust rationale for hydrogen fuel and vehicles will need to also consider unique, strategic, and long-range benefits of hydrogen vehicles which can be achieved through the use of production, storage, delivery, and utilization methods for hydrogen which are unique among fuels: efficient use of intermittent renewable energy sources, (e,g, wind, solar), small-scale feasibility, fuel production at or near the point of use, electrolytic production, diverse storage technologies, and electrochemical conversion to electricity.

  15. Advanced public transportation systems benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Benefits and cost savings for various Advanced Public Transportation Systems are outlined here. Operational efficiencies are given for Transit Management Systems in different locales, as well as compliant resolution and safety. Electronic Fare Paymen...

  16. 78 FR 76574 - Burial Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-18

    ..., Congress' clear motivation was to make burial benefits ``easier to administer, i.e., through existing VA...'' means any action taken to honor the memory of a deceased individual. 38 CFR 38.600. 3.1701 Deceased...

  17. Broadening Your Employee Benefit Portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaski, Nancy J.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Cost increases and realization of the diverse needs of employees have prompted organizations to review the cost and value of employee benefits. Examines alternatives including "cafeteria plans," managed care programs, and disability income plans. (MLF)

  18. Employee Benefit Reporting After ERISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Wesley W.

    1976-01-01

    The statutory reporting requirements of ERISA and some of the regulations recently promulgated are discussed. All type of employee benefit plans are covered. For journal availability see HE 508 741. (LBH)

  19. Benefits of using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lira, Elda Vilaca

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present, especially for high school students, the benefits of the use of nuclear energy, promoting a deeper knowledge of this technology, encouraging critical thinking of students and society around them

  20. Benefits of Green Power Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary partnership program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. Learn about the benefits of becoming a Green Power Partner.

  1. RFID Benefits; Looking Beyond ROI

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guilford, Shane; Kutis, Mark C

    2005-01-01

    ...) into the logistics process that are not captured by traditional Return on Investment (ROI) analysis. The authors seek to identify some of these benefits to determine their overall contribution to the value of new technology implementation...

  2. Benefit sharing in health research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-02

    Aug 2, 2015 ... [4] Those who contribute to scientific research ought to share in its benefits. .... women to form new relationships, social networks and develop a sense of ... or discoveries about the indigenous biological resources before.

  3. Environmental benefits and social cost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, H.J.; Kjær, J.; Brüsh, W.

    2007-01-01

    There is a need for introducing interdisciplinary tools and approaches in water management for participatory integrated assessment of water protection costs and environmental benefits for different management scenarios. This is required for the Water Framework Directive. Bayesian belief networks...

  4. The benefits of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This article briefly outlines the benefits of nuclear power. Nuclear electricity generation is compared with fossil-fuel generated electricity in terms of environmental pollution and accidents and disease hazards

  5. The measurement of employment benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtraw, D.

    1994-01-01

    The consideration of employment effects and so-called 'hidden employment benefits' is one of the most confused and contentious issues in benefit-cost analysis and applied welfare economics generally. New investments create new employment opportunities, and often advocates for specific investments cite these employment opportunities as alleged benefits associated with the project. Indeed, from the local perspective, such employment opportunities may appear to be beneficial because they appear to come for free. If there is unemployment in the local area, then new investments create valuable employment opportunities for those in the local community. Even if there is full employment in the local area then new investments create incentives for immigrant from other locations that may have pecuniary benefits locally through increased property values, business revenues, etc. The focus in this study is on net economic benefits from a broad national perspective. From this perspective, many of the alleged employment benefits at the local level are offset by lost benefits at other locales, and do not count as benefits according to economic theory. This paper outlines a methodology for testing this rebuttable presumption with empirical data pertaining to labor markets that would be affected by a specific new investment. The theoretical question that is relevant is whether the social opportunity cost of new employment is less than the market wage. This would be the case, for example, if one expects unemployment or underemployment to persist in a specific region of the economy or occupational category affected by the new investment. In this case, new employment opportunities produce a net increase in social wealth rather than just a transfer of income

  6. The measurement of employment benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtraw, D

    1994-07-01

    The consideration of employment effects and so-called 'hidden employment benefits' is one of the most confused and contentious issues in benefit-cost analysis and applied welfare economics generally. New investments create new employment opportunities, and often advocates for specific investments cite these employment opportunities as alleged benefits associated with the project. Indeed, from the local perspective, such employment opportunities may appear to be beneficial because they appear to come for free. If there is unemployment in the local area, then new investments create valuable employment opportunities for those in the local community. Even if there is full employment in the local area then new investments create incentives for immigrant from other locations that may have pecuniary benefits locally through increased property values, business revenues, etc. The focus in this study is on net economic benefits from a broad national perspective. From this perspective, many of the alleged employment benefits at the local level are offset by lost benefits at other locales, and do not count as benefits according to economic theory. This paper outlines a methodology for testing this rebuttable presumption with empirical data pertaining to labor markets that would be affected by a specific new investment. The theoretical question that is relevant is whether the social opportunity cost of new employment is less than the market wage. This would be the case, for example, if one expects unemployment or underemployment to persist in a specific region of the economy or occupational category affected by the new investment. In this case, new employment opportunities produce a net increase in social wealth rather than just a transfer of income.

  7. Employees' motivation and emloyees' benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Nedzelská, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this bachelor thesis is analysing methods how to stimulate and motivate employees. The theoretical part of the thesis deals with the concept of motivation, concepts close to motivation and selected existing theories of motivation. It also deals with employee benefits, function, division and benefits which are frequently offered to employees. The practical part of the thesis, mainly based on written and online questionnaires, concentrates on motivation of employees at Nedcon Boh...

  8. Employee benefits or wage increase?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Duda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper comes from a survey done during the years 2007–2009. It focused on employee satisfaction with the provision of employee benefits. The research included 21 companies, 7 companies were from the engineering sector, 7 companies from the food industry, 3 companies represented the budgetary sphere, 3 companies the services sector and one company operates in pharmaceutical industry.The questionnaire survey consisted of 14 questions, including 5 identification-questions. The paper presents results of the questions on dealing with employees’ awareness of employee benefits and on choosing between employees’ preferences of wage increase or increase in value of benefits provided.Employees are informed about all options of providing employee benefits. Only in 3 cases employees stated dissatisfaction with information. This answer was related with the responses to the second monitored question. Employees of these companies preferred pay increases before benefits’ increases. There was no effect of gender of the respondents, neither the influence of the sector of operation, in the preference of increases in wages or in benefits. Exceptions were the employees of companies operating in the financial sector, who preferred employee benefits before a wage increase. It was found that employees of companies who participated in research in 2009, preferred wage increases before the extension of employee benefits, although the value of the net wage increase is lower than the monetary value of benefits increase.The paper is a part of solution of the research plan MSM 6215648904 The Czech economy in the process of integration and globalization, and the development of agricultural sector and the sector of services under the new conditions of the integrated European market.

  9. Microelectronic temperature sensor; silicon temperature sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitner, M.; Kanert, W.; Reichert, H.

    1982-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop a silicon temperature sensor with a sensitivity and a reliability as high and a tolerance as small as possible, for use in measurement and control. By employing the principle of spreading-resistance, using silicon doped by neutron transmutation, and trimming of the single wafer tolerances of resistance less than +- 5% can be obtained; overstress tests yielded a long-term stability better than 0.2%. Some applications show the advantageous use of this sensor. (orig.) [de

  10. Food biotechnology: benefits and concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Michael C; Chassy, Bruce M; Harlander, Susan K; Hoban, Thomas J; McGloughlin, Martina N; Akhlaghi, Amin R

    2002-06-01

    Recent advances in agricultural biotechnology have highlighted the need for experimental evidence and sound scientific judgment to assess the benefits and risks to society. Nutrition scientists and other animal biologists need a balanced understanding of the issues to participate in this assessment. To date most modifications to crop plants have benefited producers. Crops have been engineered to decrease pesticide and herbicide usage, protect against stressors, enhance yields and extend shelf life. Beyond the environmental benefits of decreased pesticide and herbicide application, consumers stand to benefit by development of food crops with increased nutritional value, medicinal properties, enhanced taste and esthetic appeal. There remains concern that these benefits come with a cost to the environment or increased risk to the consumer. Most U.S. consumers are not aware of the extent that genetically modified foods have entered the marketplace. Consumer awareness of biotechnology seems to have increased over the last decade, yet most consumers remain confused over the science. Concern over the impact on the safety of the food supply remains low in the United States, but is substantially elevated in Europe. Before a genetically engineered crop is introduced into commerce it must pass regulatory scrutiny by as many as four different federal regulatory bodies to ensure a safe food supply and minimize the risk to the environment. Key areas for more research are evaluation of the nutritional benefits of new crops, further investigation of the environmental impact, and development of better techniques to identify and track genetically engineered products.

  11. Desert Southwest Community Tree Guide: Benefits, Costs and Strategic Planting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greg McPherson; J.R. Simpson; P.J. Peper; S.E. Maco; Q. Xiao; E. Mulrean

    2004-01-01

    This report quantifies benefits and costs for typical large-, medium-, small-stature, deciduous trees (Fraxinus uhdei, Prosopis chilensis, Acacia farnesiana), as well as a conifer (Pinus halapensis). The analysis assumed that trees were planted in a residential yard site or a public (street/park) site, a 40-year time frame, and...

  12. Piedmont community tree guide: benefits, costs, and strategic planting

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Gregory McPherson; James R. Simpson; Paula J. Peper; Shelley L. Gardner; Kelaine E. Vargas; Scott E. Maco; Qingfu Xiao

    2006-01-01

    This report quantifies benefits and costs for small, medium, and large broadleaf trees and one coniferous tree in the Piedmont region: the species chosen as representative are dogwood (Cornus florida), Southern magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora), red maple (Acer rubrum), and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda...

  13. Midwest community tree guide: benefits, costs, and strategic planting

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Gregory McPherson; James R. Simpson; Paula J. Peper; Scott E. Maco; Shelley L. Gardner; Shauna K. Cozad; Qingfu Xiao

    2006-01-01

    This report quantifies benefits and costs for typical small, medium, and large deciduous (losing their leaves every autumn) trees: crabapple, red oak, and hackberry (see "Common and Scientific Names" section). The analysis assumed that trees were planted in a residential yard or public site (streetside or park) with a 60 percent survival rate over a 40-year...

  14. Coastal plain community tree guide: benefits, costs, and strategic planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Gregory McPherson; James R. Simpson; Paula J. Peper; Shelley L. Gardner; Kelaine E. Vargas; Scott E. Maco; Qingfu Xiao

    2006-01-01

    This report quantifies benefits and costs for representative large, medium, and small broadleaf trees and coniferous trees in the Coastal Plain region: the species chosen as representative are the Southern live oak (Quercus virginiana), Southern magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora), flowering dogwood (Cornus florida...

  15. Effects of Three Different Additives and Two Different Bulk Densities on Maize Silage Characteristics, Temperature Profiles, CO2 and O2–Dynamics in Small Scale Silos during Aerobic Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Helena Jungbluth

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Silage quality and aerobic stability are sometimes insufficient. If management requirements are not met, or to improve silage quality, additives are often used. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of different factors on silage during aerobic conditions. Whole-crop forage maize was harvested and 24 buckets (65 L were filled and assigned to one of four treatment groups: (1 control (no treatment; (2 chemical additive (sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate, sodium acetate; (3 a mixed biological inoculant containing Lactobacillus buchneri, L. plantarum, and Pediococcus acidilacti; and (4 a mixed biological inoculant containing L. buchneri, L. plantarum, and L. rhamnosus. An untreated variation was also ensiled. Two different densities were adjusted during ensiling. After opening, the temperature was measured for seven days and O2 and CO2 concentrations were analysed. The findings show that the chemical additive very effectively prevented silage from reheating and deteriorating. Aerobic reheating of silage was also successfully inhibited through biological additives and high density.

  16. Determination of benefit of early identification of severe forms of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Aims: A pilot study to determine benefits of early identification of severe forms of malaria in peripheral centres was carried out in 3 rural communities of South Eastern Nigeria. Methodology: The study area is located in the rain forest belt of South Eastern Nigeria with high temperature and humidity. It is a typical ...

  17. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  18. Small millets, big potential

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    consumption of small millets, mainly due to limited productivity, high ... for effective integration of small millets in the ... replicated in other cities. ... to micro-, small- and medium-entrepreneurs producing millet-based ... and Activities Network,.

  19. Study of the quenching and subsequent return to room temperature of uranium-chromium, uranium-iron, and uranium-molybdenum alloys containing only small amounts of the alloying element; Etude de la trempe et du revenu a la temperature ordinaire d'alliages uranium-chrome, uranium-fer et uranium-molybdene, a faible teneur en element d'alliage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delaplace, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-09-15

    By means of an apparatus which makes possible thermal pre-treatments in vacuo, quenching carried out in a high purity argon atmosphere, and simultaneous recording of time temperature cooling and thermal contraction curves, the author has examined the transformations which occur in uranium-chromium, uranium-iron and uranium-molybdenum alloys during their quenching and subsequent return to room temperature. For uranium-chromium and uranium-iron alloys, the temperature at which the {gamma} {yields} {beta} transformation starts varies very little with the rate of cooling. For uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 atom per cent of Mo, this temperature is lowered by 120 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn. The temperature at which the {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation starts is lowered by 170 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn in the case of uranium-chromium alloy containing 0,37 atom per cent of Cr. The temperature is little affected in the case of uranium-iron alloys. The addition of chromium or iron makes it possible to conserve the form {beta} at ordinary temperatures after quenching from the {beta} and {gamma} regions. The {beta} phase is particularly unstable and changes into needles of the {alpha} form even at room temperatures according to an autocatalytic transformation law similar to the austenitic-martensitic transformation law in the case of iron. The {beta} phase obtained by quenching from the {beta} phase region is more stable than that obtained by quenching from the {gamma} region. Chromium is a more effective stabiliser of the {beta} phase than is iron. Unfortunately it causes serious surface cracking. The {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-chromium alloys has been followed at room temperature by means of micro-cinematography. The author has not observed the direct {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 per cent of molybdenum even for cooling rates of up to 2000 deg. C

  20. Study of the quenching and subsequent return to room temperature of uranium-chromium, uranium-iron, and uranium-molybdenum alloys containing only small amounts of the alloying element; Etude de la trempe et du revenu a la temperature ordinaire d'alliages uranium-chrome, uranium-fer et uranium-molybdene, a faible teneur en element d'alliage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delaplace, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-09-15

    By means of an apparatus which makes possible thermal pre-treatments in vacuo, quenching carried out in a high purity argon atmosphere, and simultaneous recording of time temperature cooling and thermal contraction curves, the author has examined the transformations which occur in uranium-chromium, uranium-iron and uranium-molybdenum alloys during their quenching and subsequent return to room temperature. For uranium-chromium and uranium-iron alloys, the temperature at which the {gamma} {yields} {beta} transformation starts varies very little with the rate of cooling. For uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 atom per cent of Mo, this temperature is lowered by 120 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn. The temperature at which the {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation starts is lowered by 170 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn in the case of uranium-chromium alloy containing 0,37 atom per cent of Cr. The temperature is little affected in the case of uranium-iron alloys. The addition of chromium or iron makes it possible to conserve the form {beta} at ordinary temperatures after quenching from the {beta} and {gamma} regions. The {beta} phase is particularly unstable and changes into needles of the {alpha} form even at room temperatures according to an autocatalytic transformation law similar to the austenitic-martensitic transformation law in the case of iron. The {beta} phase obtained by quenching from the {beta} phase region is more stable than that obtained by quenching from the {gamma} region. Chromium is a more effective stabiliser of the {beta} phase than is iron. Unfortunately it causes serious surface cracking. The {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-chromium alloys has been followed at room temperature by means of micro-cinematography. The author has not observed the direct {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 per cent of molybdenum even for cooling rates of up to 2000 deg. C

  1. Business Process Modeling: Perceived Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indulska, Marta; Green, Peter; Recker, Jan; Rosemann, Michael

    The process-centered design of organizations and information systems is globally seen as an appropriate response to the increased economic pressure on organizations. At the methodological core of process-centered management is process modeling. However, business process modeling in large initiatives can be a time-consuming and costly exercise, making it potentially difficult to convince executive management of its benefits. To date, and despite substantial interest and research in the area of process modeling, the understanding of the actual benefits of process modeling in academia and practice is limited. To address this gap, this paper explores the perception of benefits derived from process modeling initiatives, as reported through a global Delphi study. The study incorporates the views of three groups of stakeholders - academics, practitioners and vendors. Our findings lead to the first identification and ranking of 19 unique benefits associated with process modeling. The study in particular found that process modeling benefits vary significantly between practitioners and academics. We argue that the variations may point to a disconnect between research projects and practical demands.

  2. The benefits of reduced morbidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupnick, A; Hood, C; Harrison, K

    1994-07-01

    Morbidity benefits refer to increases in utility arising from reductions in incidents of acute health impairments and from increases in the probability of developing chronic diseases. The impairments would run the gamut from a cough-day to a bed-disability-day, while the chronic diseases include classic pollution-related diseases, such as cancer, to in utero effects and learning disabilities. As with mortality benefits, there could be benefits to oneself and family and friends as well as benefits based on altruism. A major difference between the mortality and morbidity valuation literatures is that while estimates of the former are always based on risk (one is never trying to obtain values for avoiding certain death), estimates of the latter generally are not. That is, most of the theory and empirical estimates are based on models where the effect to be avoided is certain. This assumption holds reasonably well for estimating common acute effects, for example, the willingness to pay (WTP) for one less cough-day. It works less well, if at all, for chronic illness endpoints, where benefits seem to be appropriately expressed in terms of reduced risk of developing a disease or impairment.

  3. The benefits of reduced morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupnick, A.; Hood, C.; Harrison, K.

    1994-01-01

    Morbidity benefits refer to increases in utility arising from reductions in incidents of acute health impairments and from increases in the probability of developing chronic diseases. The impairments would run the gamut from a cough-day to a bed-disability-day, while the chronic diseases include classic pollution-related diseases, such as cancer, to in utero effects and learning disabilities. As with mortality benefits, there could be benefits to oneself and family and friends as well as benefits based on altruism. A major difference between the mortality and morbidity valuation literatures is that while estimates of the former are always based on risk (one is never trying to obtain values for avoiding certain death), estimates of the latter generally are not. That is, most of the theory and empirical estimates are based on models where the effect to be avoided is certain. This assumption holds reasonably well for estimating common acute effects, for example, the willingness to pay (WTP) for one less cough-day. It works less well, if at all, for chronic illness endpoints, where benefits seem to be appropriately expressed in terms of reduced risk of developing a disease or impairment

  4. Do `negative' temperatures exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavenda, B. H.

    1999-06-01

    A modification of the second law is required for a system with a bounded density of states and not the introduction of a `negative' temperature scale. The ascending and descending branches of the entropy versus energy curve describe particle and hole states, having thermal equations of state that are given by the Fermi and logistic distributions, respectively. Conservation of energy requires isentropic states to be isothermal. The effect of adiabatically reversing the field is entirely mechanical because the only difference between the two states is their energies. The laws of large and small numbers, leading to the normal and Poisson approximations, characterize statistically the states of infinite and zero temperatures, respectively. Since the heat capacity also vanishes in the state of maximum disorder, the third law can be generalized in systems with a bounded density of states: the entropy tends to a constant as the temperature tends to either zero or infinity.

  5. BRANDING IN SMALL BUSINESS

    OpenAIRE

    Catalin Mihail BARBU; Radu Florin OGARCA; Mihai Razvan Constantin BARBU

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we analyzed the branding in small business. Using a desk research on Internet and the press we have identified the practices small businesses use to enhance their brand and the brand dynamics in small business. Our main contribution is that we tried to figure out the strategy of branding in small business. This need further to be investigated in order to understand how branding works in small business and to better capture the role of branding in small business.

  6. Room temperature synthesis of ultra-small, near-unity single-sized lead halide perovskite quantum dots with wide color emission tunability, high color purity and high brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lucheng; Geng, Jing; Ai, Lisha; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Renguo; Yang, Wensheng

    2016-08-01

    Phosphor with extremely narrow emission line widths, high brightness, and wide color emission tunability in visible regions is required for display and lighting applications, yet none has been reported in the literature so far. In the present study, single-sized lead halide perovskite (APbX 3; A = CH3NH3 and Cs; X = Cl, Br, and I) nanocrystalline (NC) phosphors were achieved for the first time in a one-pot reaction at room temperature (25 °C). The size-dependent samples, which included four families of CsPbBr3 NCs and exhibited sharp excitonic absorption peaks and pure band gap emission, were directly obtained by simply varying the concentration of ligands. The continuity of the optical spectrum can be successively tuned over the entire UV-visible spectral region (360-610 nm) by preparing CsPbCl3, CsPbI3, and CsPb(Y/Br)3 (Y = Cl and I) NCs with the use of CsPbBr3 NCs as templates by anion exchange while maintaining the size of NCs and high quantum yields of up to 80%. Notably, an emission line width of 10-24 nm, which is completely consistent with that of their single particles, indicates the formation of single-sized NCs. The versatility of the synthetic strategy was validated by extending it to the synthesis of single-sized CH3NH3PbX 3 NCs by simply replacing the cesium precursor by the CH3NH3 X precursor.

  7. analysis of an analysis of an intelligent temperature transmitter

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    temperature sensors and analyze a typical Rosemount Intelligent Temperature Transmitter (RITT) with a view to identifying and ... material science and communication technologies [2]. ... Some benefits of the 4-20mA transmission standard.

  8. Temperature metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, J.; Fellmuth, B.

    2005-05-01

    The majority of the processes used by the manufacturing industry depend upon the accurate measurement and control of temperature. Thermal metrology is also a key factor affecting the efficiency and environmental impact of many high-energy industrial processes, the development of innovative products and the health and safety of the general population. Applications range from the processing, storage and shipment of perishable foodstuffs and biological materials to the development of more efficient and less environmentally polluting combustion processes for steel-making. Accurate measurement and control of temperature is, for instance, also important in areas such as the characterization of new materials used in the automotive, aerospace and semiconductor industries. This paper reviews the current status of temperature metrology. It starts with the determination of thermodynamic temperatures required on principle because temperature is an intensive quantity. Methods to determine thermodynamic temperatures are reviewed in detail to introduce the underlying physical basis. As these methods cannot usually be applied for practical measurements the need for a practical temperature scale for day-to-day work is motivated. The International Temperature Scale of 1990 and the Provisional Low Temperature Scale PLTS-2000 are described as important parts of the International System of Units to support science and technology. Its main importance becomes obvious in connection with industrial development and international markets. Every country is strongly interested in unique measures, in order to guarantee quality, reproducibility and functionability of products. The eventual realization of an international system, however, is only possible within the well-functioning organization of metrological laboratories. In developed countries the government established scientific institutes have certain metrological duties, as, for instance, the maintenance and dissemination of national

  9. Temperature metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, J; Fellmuth, B

    2005-01-01

    The majority of the processes used by the manufacturing industry depend upon the accurate measurement and control of temperature. Thermal metrology is also a key factor affecting the efficiency and environmental impact of many high-energy industrial processes, the development of innovative products and the health and safety of the general population. Applications range from the processing, storage and shipment of perishable foodstuffs and biological materials to the development of more efficient and less environmentally polluting combustion processes for steel-making. Accurate measurement and control of temperature is, for instance, also important in areas such as the characterization of new materials used in the automotive, aerospace and semiconductor industries. This paper reviews the current status of temperature metrology. It starts with the determination of thermodynamic temperatures required on principle because temperature is an intensive quantity. Methods to determine thermodynamic temperatures are reviewed in detail to introduce the underlying physical basis. As these methods cannot usually be applied for practical measurements the need for a practical temperature scale for day-to-day work is motivated. The International Temperature Scale of 1990 and the Provisional Low Temperature Scale PLTS-2000 are described as important parts of the International System of Units to support science and technology. Its main importance becomes obvious in connection with industrial development and international markets. Every country is strongly interested in unique measures, in order to guarantee quality, reproducibility and functionability of products. The eventual realization of an international system, however, is only possible within the well-functioning organization of metrological laboratories. In developed countries the government established scientific institutes have certain metrological duties, as, for instance, the maintenance and dissemination of national

  10. Small Business Size Standards

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Certain government programs, such as SBA loan programs and contracting opportunities, are reserved for small business concerns. In order to qualify, businesses must...

  11. Health benefits of Moringa oleifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdull Razis, Ahmad Faizal; Ibrahim, Muhammad Din; Kntayya, Saie Brindha

    2014-01-01

    Phytomedicines are believed to have benefits over conventional drugs and are regaining interest in current research. Moringa oleifera is a multi-purpose herbal plant used as human food and an alternative for medicinal purposes worldwide. It has been identified by researchers as a plant with numerous health benefits including nutritional and medicinal advantages. Moringa oleifera contains essential amino acids, carotenoids in leaves, and components with nutraceutical properties, supporting the idea of using this plant as a nutritional supplement or constituent in food preparation. Some nutritional evaluation has been carried out in leaves and stem. An important factor that accounts for the medicinal uses of Moringa oleifera is its very wide range of vital antioxidants, antibiotics and nutrients including vitamins and minerals. Almost all parts from Moringa can be used as a source for nutrition with other useful values. This mini-review elaborate on details its health benefits.

  12. Cardiovascular Benefits of Dark Chocolate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, Erin; Taub, Pam R

    2015-12-01

    The use of cacao for health benefits dates back at least 3000 years. Our understanding of cacao has evolved with modern science. It is now felt based on extensive research the main health benefits of cacao stem from epicatechin, a flavanol found in cacao. The process of manufacturing dark chocolate retains epicatechin, whereas milk chocolate does not contain significant amounts of epicatechin. Thus, most of the current research studies are focused on dark chocolate. Both epidemiological and clinical studies suggest a beneficial effect of dark chocolate on blood pressure, lipids, and inflammation. Proposed mechanisms underlying these benefits include enhanced nitric oxide bioavailability and improved mitochondrial structure/function. Ultimately, further studies of this promising compound are needed to elucidate its potential for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases as well as other diseases that have underlying mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction and nitric oxide deficiency.

  13. Benefits of exercise during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Heidi; Spitznagle, Tracy; Hunt, Devyani

    2012-11-01

    There is a direct link between healthy mothers and healthy infants. Exercise and appropriate nutrition are important contributors to maternal physical and psychological health. The benefits and potential risks of exercise during pregnancy have gained even more attention, with a number of studies having been published after the 2002 American College of Obstetrics and Gynecologists guidelines. A review of the literature was conducted by using PubMed, Scopus, and Embase to assess the literature regarding the benefits of exercise during pregnancy. The search revealed 219 publications, which the authors then narrowed to 125 publications. The purpose of this review is to briefly summarize the known benefits of exercise to the mother, fetus, and newborn. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Temperature compensation and entrainment in circadian rhythms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodenstein, C; Heiland, I; Schuster, S

    2012-01-01

    To anticipate daily variations in the environment and coordinate biological activities into a daily cycle many organisms possess a circadian clock. In the absence of external time cues the circadian rhythm persists with a period of approximately 24 h. The clock phase can be shifted by single pulses of light, darkness, chemicals, or temperature and this allows entrainment of the clock to exactly 24 h by cycles of these zeitgebers. On the other hand, the period of the circadian rhythm is kept relatively constant within a physiological range of constant temperatures, which means that the oscillator is temperature compensated. The mechanisms behind temperature compensation and temperature entrainment are not fully understood, neither biochemically nor mathematically. Here, we theoretically investigate the interplay of temperature compensation and entrainment in general oscillatory systems. We first give an analytical treatment for small temperature shifts and derive that every temperature-compensated oscillator is entrainable to external small-amplitude temperature cycles. Temperature compensation ensures that this entrainment region is always centered at the endogenous period regardless of possible seasonal temperature differences. Moreover, for small temperature cycles the entrainment region of the oscillator is potentially larger for rectangular pulses. For large temperature shifts we numerically analyze different circadian clock models proposed in the literature with respect to these properties. We observe that for such large temperature shifts sinusoidal or gradual temperature cycles allow a larger entrainment region than rectangular cycles. (paper)

  15. Reflective ‘cool’ roofs under aerosol-burdened skies: radiative benefits across selected Indian cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millstein, D E; Fischer, M L

    2014-01-01

    The use of reflective surfaces offers one low-cost solution for reducing solar loading to urban environments and the Earth that should be considered as part of sustainable urban design. Here, we characterize the radiative benefits, i.e. the additional shortwave radiation leaving the atmosphere, from the installation of highly reflective ‘cool’ roofs in urban areas in India that face relatively large local aerosol burdens. We use a previously tested column radiative transfer model to estimate the energy per unit area reflected to space from increasing the surface albedo at six cities within India. The model is used to characterize radiative transfer each day over five years (2008–2012) based on mid-day satellite retrievals of MODIS aerosol depth, cloud water path, and average surface albedo and MERRA atmospheric profiles of temperature and composition. Compared against ten months of field observations in two cities, the model derived incoming surface shortwave radiation estimates relative to observations show small biases (0.5% and −2.6%, at Pantnagar and Nainital, respectively). Despite the high levels of local aerosols we found cool roofs provided significant radiative benefits at all locations. Averaged over the five year period we found that increasing the albedo of 1 m 2 of roof area by 0.5 would reflect to space 0.9–1.2 kWh daily from 08:30–15:30 LST, depending on location. This is equivalent to a constant forcing of 37–50 W m −2 (equivalent to reducing CO 2 emissions by 74 to 101 kg CO 2 m −2 roof area). Last, we identify a co-benefit of improving air quality, in that removing aerosols from the atmosphere could increase the radiative benefits from cool roofs by 23–74%, with the largest potential increase found at Delhi and the smallest change found at Nainital. (letter)

  16. TAX BENEFITS FOR REGIONAL BUSINESS: NEED, SUFFICIENCY, EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina P. Dovbiy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the tax benefits for the enterprises of Russia. Their analysis is carried out in the context of territorial affiliation of tax benefit. Tax benefits were granted as anti-crisis measures: promotion of entrepreneurship, reduction of informal employment, implementation of investment projects. Their granting was often characterized by haphazard nature. There were cases of abuse in the application of tax benefits. The entrepreneur must be ready to prove their right to benefits. Tax benefits have a triple effect: economic, fiscal-budgetary, social. The state tax policy allowed reducing the level of debt burden for 2016. Simultaneously, the increase in tax and non-tax revenues of the consolidated budgets was ensured. The authors analyze the regional and sectoral tax benefits. They are very diverse, especially for small businesses. This is due to socio-economic differentiation of regions. The magnitude of the regional tax burden is determined by the complex of factors: external and internal. The application of tax benefits is associated with big problems. First of all, this is a concealment of income. Secondly, there is a problem of “double” taxation. Difficulties are also associated with applying individual tax regimes: special economic zones, territories of advanced development. The problem of drawing “out of the shadow” of selfemployed citizens is very acute. There must be a special fee regime for them: there is no guarantee of employment for such citizens. The problems of regional taxation of entrepreneurial activity include, on the one hand, the availability and development of various benefits, and on the other hand, their nonsystem character, the impossibility of identifying and using various mechanisms in the aggregate, for example, the mechanisms for the development of entire industries and social directions in entrepreneurship. The authors emphasize that the conditions in which the modern economy of Russia is

  17. Information Portal Costs and Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena BATAGAN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available All transformations of our society are the product of the large use of Information and Communications Technologies (ICT and Internet. ICT are technologies which facilitate communication, processing, and transmission of information by electronic means. It is very important to use the new technologies to the correct value because this determinate an increase of global benefits. Portal provides a consistent way to select, evaluate, prioritize and plan the right information. In research we point the important costs and benefits for an informational portal. The portal for local administrative determinate for citizens the access to information of interest and on the other hand make easier for employer to manage the documents.

  18. Dynamic capabilities and network benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helge Svare

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of publicly funded initiatives to establish or strengthen networks and clusters, in order to enhance innovation, has been increasing. Returns on such investments vary, and the aim of this study is to explore to what extent the variation in benefits for firms participating in networks or clusters can be explained by their dynamic capabilities (DC. Based on survey data from five Norwegian networks, the results suggest that firms with higher DC are more successful in harvesting the potential benefits of being member of a network.

  19. Current therapy of small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, M; Lassen, U; Hansen, H H

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the most important recent clinical trials on the treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Two randomized studies addressing the timing of thoracic radiotherapy in limited stage SCLC are discussed. In the smaller of the two studies (n = 103), a survival benefit was associated...

  20. Risk assessment for invasive species produces net bioeconomic benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Reuben P; Lodge, David M; Finnoff, David C

    2007-01-02

    International commerce in live organisms presents a policy challenge for trade globalization; sales of live organisms create wealth, but some nonindigenous species cause harm. To reduce damage, some countries have implemented species screening to limit the introduction of damaging species. Adoption of new risk assessment (RA) technologies has been slowed, however, by concerns that RA accuracy remains insufficient to produce positive net economic benefits. This concern arises because only a small proportion of all introduced species escape, spread, and cause harm (i.e., become invasive), so a RA will exclude many noninvasive species (which provide a net economic benefit) for every invasive species correctly identified. Here, we develop a simple cost:benefit bioeconomic framework to quantify the net benefits from applying species prescreening. Because invasive species are rarely eradicated, and their damages must therefore be borne for long periods, we have projected the value of RA over a suitable range of policy time horizons (10-500 years). We apply the model to the Australian plant quarantine program and show that this RA program produces positive net economic benefits over the range of reasonable assumptions. Because we use low estimates of the financial damage caused by invasive species and high estimates of the value of species in the ornamental trade, our results underestimate the net benefit of the Australian plant quarantine program. In addition, because plants have relatively low rates of invasion, applying screening protocols to animals would likely demonstrate even greater benefits.

  1. Optimization of catalyst system reaps economic benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roy, C.F.; Hanshaw, M.J.; Fischer, S.M.; Malik, T.; Kooiman, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    Champlin Refining and Chemicals Inc. is learning to optimize its catalyst systems for hydrotreating Venezuelan gas oils through a program of research, pilot plant testing, and commercial unit operation. The economic results of this project have been evaluated, and the benefits are most evident in improvements in product yields and qualities. The project has involved six commercial test runs, to date (Runs 10-15), with a seventh run planned. A summary of the different types of catalyst systems used in the test runs, and the catalyst philosophy that developed is given. Runs 10 and 11 used standard CoMo and NiMo catalysts for heavy gas oils hydrotreating. These catalysts had small pore sizes and suffered high deactivation rates because of metals contamination. When it was discovered that metals contamination was a problem, catalyst options were reviewed

  2. Immigration and welfare state cash benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peder J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to summarize existing evidence on welfare dependence among immigrants in Denmark and to produce new evidence with focus on the most recent years. Design/methodology/approach – The paper combines a broad descriptive/analytical approach with multivariate...... estimation on the impact on welfare dependence from individual background factors. Findings – The main finding is the importance of aggregate low unemployment for immigrants to assimilate out of welfare dependence. Fairly small effects are reported from policy changes intending to influence the economic...... policy programs and to extend the analysis to cover the period including the financial crisis years. Social implications – The paper has a potential to influence public attitudes in this area and to inform further public policy regarding benefit programs. Originality/value – The main new result...

  3. Benefits of Exercise Training in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motl, Robert W; Sandroff, Brian M

    2015-09-01

    Exercise training represents a behavioral approach for safely managing many of the functional, symptomatic, and quality of life consequences of multiple sclerosis (MS). This topical review paper summarizes evidence from literature reviews and meta-analyses, supplemented by recent individual studies, indicating that exercise training can yield small but important improvements in walking, balance, cognition, fatigue, depression, and quality of life in MS. The paper highlights limitations of research on exercise training and its consequences and future research directions and provides an overview for promotion of exercise training in MS based on recent prescriptive guidelines. Collectively, the evidence for the benefits of exercise training in MS suggests that the time is ripe for the promotion of exercise by healthcare providers, particularly neurologists as a central part of the clinical care and management of MS patients.

  4. 42 CFR 411.204 - Medicare benefits secondary to LGHP benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medicare benefits secondary to LGHP benefits. 411... benefits secondary to LGHP benefits. (a) Medicare benefits are secondary to benefits payable by an LGHP for services furnished during any month in which the individual— (1) Is entitled to Medicare Part A benefits...

  5. 42 CFR 409.60 - Benefit periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benefit periods. 409.60 Section 409.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Scope of Hospital Insurance Benefits § 409.60 Benefit periods. (a) When benefit...

  6. 29 CFR 4022.3 - Guaranteed benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guaranteed benefits. 4022.3 Section 4022.3 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION COVERAGE AND BENEFITS BENEFITS PAYABLE IN TERMINATED SINGLE-EMPLOYER PLANS General Provisions; Guaranteed Benefits § 4022.3 Guaranteed...

  7. 34 CFR 106.56 - Fringe benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fringe benefits. 106.56 Section 106.56 Education... benefits. (a) Fringe benefits defined. For purposes of this part, fringe benefits means: Any medical, hospital, accident, life insurance or retirement benefit, service, policy or plan, any profit-sharing or...

  8. Fiber and Prebiotics: Mechanisms and Health Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    The health benefits of dietary fiber have long been appreciated. Higher intakes of dietary fiber are linked to less cardiovascular disease and fiber plays a role in gut health, with many effective laxatives actually isolated fiber sources. Higher intakes of fiber are linked to lower body weights. Only polysaccharides were included in dietary fiber originally, but more recent definitions have included oligosaccharides as dietary fiber, not based on their chemical measurement as dietary fiber by the accepted total dietary fiber (TDF) method, but on their physiological effects. Inulin, fructo-oligosaccharides, and other oligosaccharides are included as fiber in food labels in the US. Additionally, oligosaccharides are the best known “prebiotics”, “a selectively fermented ingredient that allows specific changes, both in the composition and/or activity in the gastrointestinal microflora that confers benefits upon host well-bring and health.” To date, all known and suspected prebiotics are carbohydrate compounds, primarily oligosaccharides, known to resist digestion in the human small intestine and reach the colon where they are fermented by the gut microflora. Studies have provided evidence that inulin and oligofructose (OF), lactulose, and resistant starch (RS) meet all aspects of the definition, including the stimulation of Bifidobacterium, a beneficial bacterial genus. Other isolated carbohydrates and carbohydrate-containing foods, including galactooligosaccharides (GOS), transgalactooligosaccharides (TOS), polydextrose, wheat dextrin, acacia gum, psyllium, banana, whole grain wheat, and whole grain corn also have prebiotic effects. PMID:23609775

  9. Apple phytochemicals and their health benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Rui

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Evidence suggests that a diet high in fruits and vegetables may decrease the risk of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer, and phytochemicals including phenolics, flavonoids and carotenoids from fruits and vegetables may play a key role in reducing chronic disease risk. Apples are a widely consumed, rich source of phytochemicals, and epidemiological studies have linked the consumption of apples with reduced risk of some cancers, cardiovascular disease, asthma, and diabetes. In the laboratory, apples have been found to have very strong antioxidant activity, inhibit cancer cell proliferation, decrease lipid oxidation, and lower cholesterol. Apples contain a variety of phytochemicals, including quercetin, catechin, phloridzin and chlorogenic acid, all of which are strong antioxidants. The phytochemical composition of apples varies greatly between different varieties of apples, and there are also small changes in phytochemicals during the maturation and ripening of the fruit. Storage has little to no effect on apple phytochemicals, but processing can greatly affect apple phytochemicals. While extensive research exists, a literature review of the health benefits of apples and their phytochemicals has not been compiled to summarize this work. The purpose of this paper is to review the most recent literature regarding the health benefits of apples and their phytochemicals, phytochemical bioavailability and antioxidant behavior, and the effects of variety, ripening, storage and processing on apple phytochemicals.

  10. DER Benefits Analysis Studies: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iannucci, J. J.; Cibulka, L.; Eyer, J. M.; Pupp, R. L.

    2003-09-01

    The electric power industry in the United States is undergoing dramatic change. Once totally controlled by utilities that had monopolistic holds on the supply, transmission and distribution of electricity in their service areas, the electric power system is being deregulated, introducing competition among electricity providers who can distinguish themselves by price, services and other factors. The new electric power system will feature advanced technologies and services that can be used on-site or located in close proximity to the load, instead of depending solely upon large, central station generation and transmission. Using a variety of advanced modular generating technologies (including small-scale renewables), distributed energy resource (DER) plants supply base-load power, peaking power, backup power, remote power and/or heating and cooling, and in some cases supply higher and more reliable quality power. Currently, DER represent a minor part of the electric supply system. If the potential of DER is to be realized in the new electric power market, a full understanding of the value and benefits these technologies provide to the electric system is necessary. This report includes 30 key quantitative studies reporting on the values and benefits of distributed energy generation technologies (including renewables) in various applications, as well as a matrix that permits key comparisons.

  11. Fiber and Prebiotics: Mechanisms and Health Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Slavin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The health benefits of dietary fiber have long been appreciated. Higher intakes of dietary fiber are linked to less cardiovascular disease and fiber plays a role in gut health, with many effective laxatives actually isolated fiber sources. Higher intakes of fiber are linked to lower body weights. Only polysaccharides were included in dietary fiber originally, but more recent definitions have included oligosaccharides as dietary fiber, not based on their chemical measurement as dietary fiber by the accepted total dietary fiber (TDF method, but on their physiological effects. Inulin, fructo-oligosaccharides, and other oligosaccharides are included as fiber in food labels in the US. Additionally, oligosaccharides are the best known “prebiotics”, “a selectively fermented ingredient that allows specific changes, both in the composition and/or activity in the gastrointestinal microflora that confers benefits upon host well-bring and health.” To date, all known and suspected prebiotics are carbohydrate compounds, primarily oligosaccharides, known to resist digestion in the human small intestine and reach the colon where they are fermented by the gut microflora. Studies have provided evidence that inulin and oligofructose (OF, lactulose, and resistant starch (RS meet all aspects of the definition, including the stimulation of Bifidobacterium, a beneficial bacterial genus. Other isolated carbohydrates and carbohydrate-containing foods, including galactooligosaccharides (GOS, transgalactooligosaccharides (TOS, polydextrose, wheat dextrin, acacia gum, psyllium, banana, whole grain wheat, and whole grain corn also have prebiotic effects.

  12. The Benefits of Grid Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Roy

    2005-01-01

    In the article, the author talks about the benefits of grid networks. In speaking of grid networks the author is referring to both networks of computers and networks of humans connected together in a grid topology. Examples are provided of how grid networks are beneficial today and the ways in which they have been used.

  13. Benefits of Multilingualism in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okal, Benard Odoyo

    2014-01-01

    The article gives a brief analytical survey of multilingualism practices, its consequences, its benefits in education and discussions on the appropriate ways towards its achievement in education. Multilingualism refers to speaking more than one language competently. Generally there are both the official and unofficial multilingualism practices. A…

  14. Cost Benefit Studies. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Arthur; Marson, Arthur A.

    This document applies Dr. Mehar Aurora's method for conducting cost benefit studies to the Food Manufacturing Technology-Dairy and the Food Manufacturing Technology-Canning and Freezing programs offered by the Moraine Park Technical Institute. Costs to individual students enrolled in the programs include tuition, fees, housing, travel, books,…

  15. Extended unemployment and UI benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Robert G. Valletta; Katherine Kuang

    2010-01-01

    During the current labor market downturn, unemployment duration has reached levels well above its previous highs. Analysis of unemployment data suggests that extended unemployment insurance benefits have not been important factors in the increase in the duration of unemployment or in the elevated unemployment rate.

  16. Benefits of ecological engineering practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Boomen, R.; Chaudhuri, N.; Heeb, J.; Jenssen, P.; Kalin, M.; Schönborn, A.; Brüll, A.; Van Bohemen, H.; Costanza, R.; Mitsch, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    With the intention to further promote the field of ecological engineering and the solutions it provides, a workshop on “Benefits of Ecological Engineering Practices” was held 3 Dec 2009. It was conducted by the International Ecological Engineering Society in Paris at the conference “Ecological

  17. Business benefits protocol: March 2009

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This document sets out guidelines in relation to promoting the business benefits of the Games. In particular it provides guidance in relation to statements, announcements and other comments made publicly about suppliers, contractors or agents etc which are undertaking work in relation to London 2012.

  18. Benefits for People with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Waste or Abuse Site Map Other Government Websites: Benefits.gov Disability.gov MyMoney.gov Regulations.gov USA.gov Other Government Sites Follow: Twitter Facebook YouTube Blog More Social Media This website is produced and published at U.S. ...

  19. Commercial Vessel Safety Economic Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    accidents, including basic steps in conducting cost- benefit analyses. 15 Ill. ASSUMPTIONS AND DEFINITIONS This section is used to define the scope...Analysis. Alexandria: Department of Defense, 1978. Devanney, J. W., et al. "Conference Ratemaking and the West Coast of South America," Journal of Transport

  20. Small, but growing fast - small wind turbine sales soar in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gipe, P.

    2001-01-01

    The power crisis in California has created a flourishing market for small wind turbines which are said to be 'sprouting across the state.' Both the manufacturers and the customers are benefiting from the state subsidy. The article covers: (i) the buy-down costs; (ii) who qualifies for state support; (iii) the benefits of batteries; (iv) supplying the national grid; (v) permits and contracts for subsidy and (vi) the potential market outside California

  1. World Small Hydropower Development Report 2013 - Southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jonker Klunne, W

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available of electricity. Lesotho has a very small electricity sector, thus recognizes the benefits of renewable energies. By 2020 the target for Lesotho is that 35 per cent of its electricity for rural electrification should come from renewables....

  2. [Wholegrain cereals and sanitary benefits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Rosa M; Aparicio Vizuete, Aránzazu; Jiménez Ortega, Ana Isabel; Rodríguez Rodríguez, Elena

    2015-07-18

    Dietary guidelines indicate that to get a proper nutrition is recommended eating 3 or more servings per day of whole grain. However, the recommendation is little known in the Spanish population, and almost the entire population doesn't fulfill it. Therefore, the aim of this review is to analyze the nutritional and health benefits associated with the consumption of whole grain cereals and the potential benefits related to the meeting of this guideline. Literature search regarding the topic. Whole grain cereals are rich in carbohydrates, fiber, vitamins and minerals, and its contribution to the average diet helps to achieve current recommended intakes and nutritional goals, so its consumption in the recommended amount supposes a nutritional benefit. Moreover, several studies indicate that increased consumption of whole grain cereal is associated with protection against various chronic degenerative diseases (cardiovascular, diabetes, cancer and metabolic syndrome), assisting in the maintenance of digestive health and body weight. These results may be due to the contribution of nutrients, fiber and phytochemicals of these foods, as well as the displacement of the diet of other products with a less desirable nutritional profile, taking into account the composition of the average Spanish diet. In fact, the consumption of whole grain cereals has been linked with a possible improvement in the intestinal microbiota and antioxidant protection. In spite of these advantages, cereal consumption is looked with suspicion by many individuals, especially those concerned about weight control and additional benefits associated to consumption of whole grain cereals are not known. Whole grain cereals should be daily consumed in amounts of 3 or more servings/day, to achieve the nutritional and health benefits described in numerous investigations. More outreach is needed to ensure that the guideline is known and it's applied. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA

  3. 76 FR 2142 - Employee Benefits Security Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration Hearing on Definition of ``Fiduciary'' AGENCY: Employee Benefits Security Administration, Labor. ACTION: Notice of hearing and extension of comment period. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Employee Benefits Security Administration will...

  4. 29 CFR 1604.9 - Fringe benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., accident, life insurance and retirement benefits; profit-sharing and bonus plans; leave; and other terms... maternity benefits while female employees receive no such benefits. (e) It shall not be a defense under...

  5. Analysis of employee satisfaction with benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Málková, Eliška

    2013-01-01

    This bachelor thesis is focused on an issue of providing employee benefits. The first part describes the benefits from a theoretical point of view, here is also mentioned a research about the benefits and an impact of the economic crisis on providing the benefits. The second part is focused on describing the benefits of a particular company, KOMIX Inc., an analysis of an employee satisfaction with the benefits with using a questionnaire survey and suggestion of ways to improve the current sys...

  6. Encouraging the Domestic Small Turbine Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, T.

    2001-01-01

    The state incentives for home-based renewables in the domestic market continue to grow and change creating opportunities for the small wind turbine market. Tracking the opportunities to get small wind turbines included in incentive policies and developing a proactive industry approach is important because market changes can occur anytime. There are near-term opportunities to work with states in developing their strategies for disbursing system benefit charges, adding tags to existing policies for other small renewables to include small wind, and developing state-wide net metering programs. Other opportunities to improve the domestic market exist but will be quite challenging to implement. Other opportunities include federal tax credits, state wind access laws, equipment verification for specific states, and leasing programs for small wind turbines

  7. The Economic Benefits of Space Tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, P.

    The recent growth of activities towards developing passenger space travel services is very promising; however there is a widespread but mistaken idea that space tourism will remain a small-scale activity of the very wealthy. The truth is that, having been delayed for over three decades by government space agencies' failure to develop more than a small fraction of the commercial potential of space, the start of space travel services is long overdue, and so they are capable of growing rapidly into a major new industry. That is, the technical and business know-how exists to enable space tourism to grow to a turnover of 100 billion Euros/year within a few decades if it receives public support of even 10% of space agencies budgets. This development would sharply reduce the cost of accessing the resources of space, which could prevent the spread of the “resource wars” which have begun so ominously. No activity therefore offers greater economic benefits than the rapid development of low-cost space tourism services. A range of government policies should be revised to reflect this.

  8. TEMPERATURE REGULATION OF YOUNG JACKASS PENGUINS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    25° 37' E, off the south-east Mrican coast, revealed that these birds never leave .... "nest" temperature and, therefore, the rectal temperatures of chicks of varying ..... benefit from being protected from the gulls by the close attendance of their ...

  9. The effect of sexual selection on adaptation and extinction under increasing temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrett, Jonathan M; Knell, Robert J

    2018-04-25

    Strong sexual selection has been reported to both enhance and hinder the adaptive capacity and persistence of populations when exposed to novel environments. Consequently, how sexual selection influences population adaption and persistence under stress remains widely debated. Here, we present two empirical investigations of the fitness consequences of sexual selection on populations of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella, exposed to stable or gradually increasing temperatures. When faced with increasing temperatures, strong sexual selection was associated with both increased fecundity and offspring survival compared with populations experiencing weak sexual selection, suggesting sexual selection acts to drive adaptive evolution by favouring beneficial alleles. Strong sexual selection did not, however, delay extinction when the temperature became excessively high. By manipulating individuals' mating opportunities during fitness assays, we were able to assess the effect of multiple mating independently from the effect of population-level sexual selection, and found that polyandry has a positive effect on both fecundity and offspring survival under increasing temperatures in those populations evolving with weak sexual selection. Within stable temperatures, there were some benefits from strong sexual selection but these were not consistent across the entire experiment, possibly reflecting changing costs and benefits of sexual selection under stabilizing and directional selection. These results indicate that sexual selection can provide a buffer against climate change and increase adaptation rates within a continuously changing environment. These positive effects of sexual selection may, however, be too small to protect populations and delay extinction when environmental changes are relatively rapid. © 2018 The Author(s).

  10. Body temperature changes during simulated bacterial infection in a songbird: fever at night and hypothermia during the day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sköld-Chiriac, Sandra; Nord, Andreas; Tobler, Michael; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2015-09-01

    Although fever (a closely regulated increase in body temperature in response to infection) typically is beneficial, it is energetically costly and may induce detrimentally high body temperatures. This can increase the susceptibility to energetic bottlenecks and risks of overheating in some organisms. Accordingly, it could be particularly interesting to study fever in small birds, which have comparatively high metabolic rates and high, variable body temperatures. We therefore investigated two aspects of fever and other sickness behaviours (circadian variation, dose dependence) in a small songbird, the zebra finch. We injected lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at the beginning of either the day or the night, and subsequently monitored body temperature, body mass change and food intake for the duration of the response. We found pronounced circadian variation in the body temperature response to LPS injection, manifested by (dose-dependent) hypothermia during the day but fever at night. This resulted in body temperature during the peak response being relatively similar during the day and night. Day-to-night differences might be explained in the context of circadian variation in body temperature: songbirds have a high daytime body temperature that is augmented by substantial heat production peaks during activity. This might require a trade-off between the benefit of fever and the risk of overheating. In contrast, at night, when body temperature is typically lower and less variable, fever can be used to mitigate infection. We suggest that the change in body temperature during infection in small songbirds is context dependent and regulated to promote survival according to individual demands at the time of infection. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. The Complex Sol-Gel Process for producing small ThO2 microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brykala, Marcin; Rogowski, Marcin

    2016-05-01

    Thorium based fuels offer several benefits compared to uranium based fuels thus they might be an attractive alternative to conventional fuel types. This study is devoted to the synthesis and the characterization of small thorium dioxide microspheres (Ø solution the solid thorium nitrate was dissolved and partially neutralized by aqueous ammonia under pH control. The microspheres of thorium-ascorbate gel were obtained using the ICHTJ Process (INCT in English). Studies allowed to determine an optimal heat treatment with calcination temperature of 700 °C and temperature rate not higher than 2 °C/min which enabled us to obtain a crack-free surface of microspheres. The main parameters which have a strong influence on the synthesis method and features of the spherical particles of thorium dioxide are described in this article.

  12. Perturbative QCD at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altherr, T.

    1989-03-01

    We discuss an application of finite temperature QCD to lepton-pair production in a quark-gluon plasma. The perturbative calculation is performed within the realtime formalism. After cancellation of infrared and mass singularities, the corrections at O (α s ) are found to be very small in the region where the mass of the Drell-Yan pair is much larger than the temperature of the plasma. Interesting effects, however, appear at the annihilation threshold of the thermalized quarks

  13. Wages, Welfare Benefits and Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennan, John; Walker, James R

    2010-05-01

    Differences in economic opportunities give rise to strong migration incentives, across regions within countries, and across countries. In this paper we focus on responses to differences in welfare benefits across States. We apply the model developed in Kennan and Walker (2008), which emphasizes that migration decisions are often reversed, and that many alternative locations must be considered. We model individual decisions to migrate as a job search problem. A worker starts the life-cycle in some home location and must determine the optimal sequence of moves before settling down. The model is sparsely parameterized. We estimate the model using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979). Our main finding is that income differences do help explain the migration decisions of young welfare-eligible women, but large differences in benefit levels provide surprisingly weak migration incentives.

  14. Wider benefits of adult education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuller, Tom; Desjardins, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the measurement of the social outcomes of learning. It extends the discussion beyond employment and labor market outcomes to consider the impact of adult learning on social domains, with particular focus on health and civic engagement. It emphasizes the distinction between ...... public and private, and monetary and nonmonetary benefits. It reviews methodological issues on measuring outcomes, and identifies a number of channels through which adult learning has its effects....

  15. Nuclear power: the environmental benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, R.; Turner, W.

    1994-01-01

    There are many environmental benefits arising from the generation of electricity from nuclear power. These are accompanied by a minimal detrimental environmental impact, which is strictly regulated and monitored to a far greater degree than any other comparable industry. Because it does not produce greenhouse gases or acid rain emissions, the generation of electricity from nuclear energy is a vital component of a sustainable energy future for our planet. (Author)

  16. RFID solution benefits Cambridge hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    Keeping track of thousands of pieces of equipment in a busy hospital environment is a considerable challenge, but, according to RFID tagging and asset tracking specialist, Harland Simon, RFID technology can make the task considerably simpler. Here Andrew James, the company's RFID sales manager, describes the positive benefits the technology has brought the Medical Equipment Library (MEL) at Addenbrooke's Hospital, one of the world's most famous teaching hospitals.

  17. Risk versus benefit in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The risks of radiology may be grouped into a) those inherent in the use of ionizing radiation which today are well known and b) those associated with the use of any scientific method in medicine. Inherent risks of scientific methods like inadequate examination and the interpretation of results are discussed. Radiology brought major benefits in medical care and some of the newer methods are considered

  18. Methodology of cost benefit analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrik, M.; Babic, P.

    2000-10-01

    The report addresses financial aspects of proposed investments and other steps which are intended to contribute to nuclear safety. The aim is to provide introductory insight into the procedures and potential of cost-benefit analyses as a routine guide when making decisions on costly provisions as one of the tools to assess whether a particular provision is reasonable. The topic is applied to the nuclear power sector. (P.A.)

  19. The failure of community benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, John D

    2005-01-01

    Though proponents of tax exemption for health care providers continue to extol the virtues of the community-benefit test, Part II of this article illustrates that the train pretty much has already left the station on this front. Both the federal government and the states increasingly look to uncompensated care as the touchstone of exemption for health care providers. To a great extent, this transition back to a "relief of the poor" standard for exemption is the result of the inherent lack of precision in community benefit standards, along with the general trend of empirical evidence that nonprofit health care providers behave similarly to their for-profit counterparts. Faced with this situation, federal and state policymakers naturally have focused on charity care as the one quantifiable behavioral difference to justify exemption. Nevertheless, some empirical evidence suggests that nonprofits may engage in socially desirable behavior other than simply free care for the poor, and the arguments that a mixed ownership system provides the best overall health care model cannot be dismissed out of hand. Thus, despite my past criticisms of the community benefit formulation, I have come to the view that we should seriously consider the options available beyond complete repeal of the community benefit test or a return to a strict charity-care exemption standard. I continue to believe that we should demand a fairly high level of "accountability" from exemption, however, and that exemption should have some direct causal connection to whatever socially-desirable behavior we are seeking. While one option along these lines is to adopt Nina Crimm's approach of rewarding specific behaviors through a deduction or credit system, using "enhancing access" as a test of exemption may provide the best combination of flexibility and verifiable behavioral differences to support continued exemption for health care providers.

  20. Nuclear power: the environmental benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, R.; Turner, W. (Nuclear Electric plc, Barnwood (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    There are many environmental benefits arising from the generation of electricity from nuclear power. These are accompanied by a minimal detrimental environmental impact, which is strictly regulated and monitored to a far greater degree than any other comparable industry. Because it does not produce greenhouse gases or acid rain emissions, the generation of electricity from nuclear energy is a vital component of a sustainable energy future for our planet. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  1. The health benefits of wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, J B; Walzem, R L

    2000-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies from numerous disparate populations reveal that individuals with the habit of daily moderate wine consumption enjoy significant reductions in all-cause and particularly cardiovascular mortality when compared with individuals who abstain or who drink alcohol to excess. Researchers are working to explain this observation in molecular and nutritional terms. Moderate ethanol intake from any type of beverage improves lipoprotein metabolism and lowers cardiovascular mortality risk. The question now is whether wine, particularly red wine with its abundant content of phenolic acids and polyphenols, confers additional health benefits. Discovering the nutritional properties of wine is a challenging task, which requires that the biological actions and bioavailability of the >200 individual phenolic compounds be documented and interpreted within the societal factors that stratify wine consumption and the myriad effects of alcohol alone. Further challenge arises because the health benefits of wine address the prevention of slowly developing diseases for which validated biomarkers are rare. Thus, although the benefits of the polyphenols from fruits and vegetables are increasingly accepted, consensus on wine is developing more slowly. Scientific research has demonstrated that the molecules present in grapes and in wine alter cellular metabolism and signaling, which is consistent mechanistically with reducing arterial disease. Future research must address specific mechanisms both of alcohol and of polyphenolic action and develop biomarkers of their role in disease prevention in individuals.

  2. temperature overspecification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Dehghan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Two different finite difference schemes for solving the two-dimensional parabolic inverse problem with temperature overspecification are considered. These schemes are developed for indentifying the control parameter which produces, at any given time, a desired temperature distribution at a given point in the spatial domain. The numerical methods discussed, are based on the (3,3 alternating direction implicit (ADI finite difference scheme and the (3,9 alternating direction implicit formula. These schemes are unconditionally stable. The basis of analysis of the finite difference equation considered here is the modified equivalent partial differential equation approach, developed from the 1974 work of Warming and Hyett [17]. This allows direct and simple comparison of the errors associated with the equations as well as providing a means to develop more accurate finite difference schemes. These schemes use less central processor times than the fully implicit schemes for two-dimensional diffusion with temperature overspecification. The alternating direction implicit schemes developed in this report use more CPU times than the fully explicit finite difference schemes, but their unconditional stability is significant. The results of numerical experiments are presented, and accuracy and the Central Processor (CPU times needed for each of the methods are discussed. We also give error estimates in the maximum norm for each of these methods.

  3. 20 CFR 416.421 - Determination of benefits; computation of prorated benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of benefits; computation of prorated benefits. 416.421 Section 416.421 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Amount of Benefits § 416.421 Determination of benefits...

  4. How do preparers perceive costs and benefits of IFRS for SMEs? Empirical evidence from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litjens, R.; Bissessur, S.; Langendijk, H.; Vergoossen, R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines how preparers perceive the association between costs and benefits of International Financial Reporting Standard for Small and Medium-sized Entities (IFRS for SMEs). Extant research on costs and benefits associated with IFRS for SMEs is inconclusive. Our results suggest that

  5. How do preparers perceive costs and benefits of IFRS for SMEs? : Empirical evidence from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litjens, H.J.R. (Robin); Langendijk, H.P.A.J.; Bissessar, A.M.; Vergoossen, R.G.A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines how preparers perceive the association between costs and benefits of International Financial Reporting Standard for Small and Medium-sized Entities (IFRS for SMEs). Extant research on costs and benefits associated with IFRS for SMEs is inconclusive. Our results suggest that

  6. IMPLEMENTING SMALL AND MEDIUM IT PROJECTS IN SMALL AND MEDIUM ENERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix DUMITRESCU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Information technology is essential nowadays for all companies. Small enterprises are an important part of the economy and this article aims at providing some useful insight in implementing modern IT projects to their benefit. Due to the limited funding available for the IT infrastructure in most start-ups and small businesses, the projects should be adapted to fulfill the needs of the company for the lowest cost. The paper will start by defining small and medium project management theory and outlining the target of the study, small and medium sized companies. Next it will show a number of case studies of IT projects implemented in different types of small companies in Romania. Based on these implementations the article will draw some conclusions relevant to most small companies which need to design or improve their IT infrastructure.

  7. An overview of possible High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors - Gas Turbine (HTGR-GT) systems for the production of electricity and heat. Includes a technical assessment of the suitability for a small Dutch cogeneration plant; Een overzicht van mogelijke HTGR-GT systemen voor produktie van elektriciteit en warmte. Met technische beoordeling van geschiktheid voor een kleine Nederlandse W/K centrale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikstra, J.F

    1997-06-01

    There is a large number of different configurations for the combination of a closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) system and a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). Based on the results of a literature survey an overview of such configurations is presented and a comparison is made for their appropriateness for a small cogeneration system (<60 MWt) to be used in the Netherlands. However, most cycles can only be applied for large-scale energy production or supply heat on a too low temperature level. The direct, recuperated cycle is the only suitable cycle, while that cycle is a simple system and shows an acceptable electric and total efficiency. Calculations were carried out for the co-production of hot water (75-125C and 40-70C) and for steam (10 bar, 220C). By means of a static model and an optimizer the feasible efficiencies for different heat demand are determined. The maximum electric efficiency is 42% for the co-production of hot water and 38% for the co-production of steam. 28 refs.

  8. Small angle spectrometers: Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courant, E.; Foley, K.J.; Schlein, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    Aspects of experiments at small angles at the Superconducting Super Collider are considered. Topics summarized include a small angle spectrometer, a high contingency spectrometer, dipole and toroid spectrometers, and magnet choices

  9. Small Community Training & Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Operators Small Systems Small Community Training & Education education, training and professional implement the 1996 Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). • EPA Environmental Education Center

  10. 20 CFR 229.45 - Employee benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee benefit. 229.45 Section 229.45 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT SOCIAL SECURITY OVERALL MINIMUM GUARANTEE Computation of the Overall Minimum Rate § 229.45 Employee benefit. The original...

  11. Improving Employee Benefits: Doing the Right Thing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Joe

    1990-01-01

    With some exceptions, child care workers receive fewer employee benefits than workers in other occupations. The employer's and the employee's point of view on employee benefits are discussed. Also considers availability of benefits in child care and the obstacles to improved benefits for workers. (DG)

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas

  13. Employment effects of the Danish rehabilitation benefit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Palle B; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2012-01-01

    Social benefits aim to bring marginalised citizens back into the labour force. As benefits constitute a burden for tax payers, attention has been given to measure the effect. We used register data to assess the employment effect of rehabilitation benefit; the most liberal social benefit in Denmark....

  14. 22 CFR 191.21 - Applicable benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicable benefits. 191.21 Section 191.21 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE HOSTAGE RELIEF HOSTAGE RELIEF ASSISTANCE Medical Benefits § 191.21 Applicable benefits. A person eligible for benefits under this part shall be eligible for authorized medical...

  15. 36 CFR 1211.525 - Fringe benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fringe benefits. 1211.525... Prohibited § 1211.525 Fringe benefits. (a) “Fringe benefits” defined. For purposes of these Title IX regulations, fringe benefits means: Any medical, hospital, accident, life insurance, or retirement benefit...

  16. 22 CFR 192.31 - Applicable benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicable benefits. 192.31 Section 192.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE HOSTAGE RELIEF VICTIMS OF TERRORISM COMPENSATION Medical Benefits for Captive Situations § 192.31 Applicable benefits. A person eligible for benefits under this part...

  17. 18 CFR 1317.525 - Fringe benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fringe benefits. 1317... benefits. (a) “Fringe benefits” defined. For purposes of these Title IX regulations, fringe benefits means: Any medical, hospital, accident, life insurance, or retirement benefit, service, policy or plan, any...

  18. 38 CFR 9.14 - Accelerated Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accelerated Benefits. 9...' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE AND VETERANS' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE § 9.14 Accelerated Benefits. (a) What is an Accelerated Benefit? An Accelerated Benefit is a payment of a portion of your Servicemembers' Group Life...

  19. 45 CFR 148.220 - Excepted benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excepted benefits. 148.220 Section 148.220 Public... FOR THE INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE MARKET Preemption; Excepted Benefits § 148.220 Excepted benefits... provision of the benefits described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section (or any combination of the...

  20. 5 CFR 630.1209 - Health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Health benefits. 630.1209 Section 630... LEAVE Family and Medical Leave § 630.1209 Health benefits. An employee enrolled in a health benefits plan under the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (established under chapter 89 of title 5...