WorldWideScience

Sample records for small solenoidal magnetic

  1. Dirac equation in magnetic-solenoid field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilov, S.P. [Dept. Fisica e Quimica, UNESP, Campus de Guaratingueta (Brazil); Gitman, D.M.; Smirnov, A.A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    We consider the Dirac equation in the magnetic-solenoid field (the field of a solenoid and a collinear uniform magnetic field). For the case of Aharonov-Bohm solenoid, we construct self-adjoint extensions of the Dirac Hamiltonian using von Neumann's theory of deficiency indices. We find self-adjoint extensions of the Dirac Hamiltonian and boundary conditions at the AB solenoid. Besides, for the first time, solutions of the Dirac equation in the magnetic-solenoid field with a finite radius solenoid were found. We study the structure of these solutions and their dependence on the behavior of the magnetic field inside the solenoid. Then we exploit the latter solutions to specify boundary conditions for the magnetic-solenoid field with Aharonov-Bohm solenoid. (orig.)

  2. Growth techniques for monolithic YBCO solenoidal magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scruggs, S.J.; Putman, P.T.; Fang, H.; Alessandrini, M.; Salama, K.

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of growing large single domain YBCO solenoids by the use of a large seed has been investigated. There are two known methods for producing a similar solenoid. This first is a conventional top seeded melt growth process followed by a post processing machining step to create the bore. The second involves using multiple seeds spaced around the magnet bore. The appeal of the new technique lies in decreasing processing time compared to the single seed technique, while avoiding alignment problems found in the multiple seeding technique. By avoiding these problems, larger diameter monoliths can be produced. Large diameter monoliths are beneficial because the maximum magnetic field produced by a trapped field magnet is proportional to the radius of the sample. Furthermore, the availability of trapped field magnets with large diameter could enable their use in applications that traditionally have been considered to require wound electromagnets, such as beam bending magnets for particle accelerators or electric propulsion. A comparison of YBCO solenoids grown by the use of a large seed and grown by the use of two small seeds simulating multiple seeding is made. Trapped field measurements as well as microstructure evaluation were used in characterization of each solenoid. Results indicate that high quality growth occurs only in the vicinity of the seeds for the multiple seeded sample, while the sample with the large seeded exhibited high quality growth throughout the entire sample

  3. Growth techniques for monolithic YBCO solenoidal magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scruggs, S.J. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)]. E-mail: Sscruggs2@uh.edu; Putman, P.T. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Fang, H. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Alessandrini, M. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Salama, K. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2006-10-01

    The possibility of growing large single domain YBCO solenoids by the use of a large seed has been investigated. There are two known methods for producing a similar solenoid. This first is a conventional top seeded melt growth process followed by a post processing machining step to create the bore. The second involves using multiple seeds spaced around the magnet bore. The appeal of the new technique lies in decreasing processing time compared to the single seed technique, while avoiding alignment problems found in the multiple seeding technique. By avoiding these problems, larger diameter monoliths can be produced. Large diameter monoliths are beneficial because the maximum magnetic field produced by a trapped field magnet is proportional to the radius of the sample. Furthermore, the availability of trapped field magnets with large diameter could enable their use in applications that traditionally have been considered to require wound electromagnets, such as beam bending magnets for particle accelerators or electric propulsion. A comparison of YBCO solenoids grown by the use of a large seed and grown by the use of two small seeds simulating multiple seeding is made. Trapped field measurements as well as microstructure evaluation were used in characterization of each solenoid. Results indicate that high quality growth occurs only in the vicinity of the seeds for the multiple seeded sample, while the sample with the large seeded exhibited high quality growth throughout the entire sample.

  4. Error field generation of solenoid magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Many applications for large solenoids and solenoidal arrays depend on the high precision of the axial field profile. In cases where requirements of ΔB/B for nonaxial fields are on the order of 10 -4 , the actual winding techniques of the solenoid need to be considered. Whereas an ideal solenoid consisting of current loops would generate no radial fields along the axis, in reality, the actual current-carrying conductors must follow spiral or helical paths. A straightforward method for determining the radial error fields generated by coils wound with actual techniques employed in magnet fabrication has been developed. The method devised uses a computer code which models a magnet by sending a single, current-carrying filament along the same path taken by the conductor during coil winding. Helical and spiral paths are simulated using small, straight-line current segments. This technique, whose results are presented in this paper, was used to predict radial field errors for the Elmo Bumpy Torus-Proof of Principle magnet. These results include effects due to various winding methods, not only spiral/helical and layer-to-layer transitions, but also the effects caused by worst-case tolerance conditions both from the conductor and the winding form (bobbin). Contributions made by extraneous circuitry (e.g., overhead buswork and incoming leads) are also mentioned

  5. Progress in ATLAS central solenoid magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, A; Makida, Y; Tanaka, K; Haruyama, T; Yamaoka, H; Kondo, T; Mizumaki, S; Mine, S; Wada, K; Meguro, S; Sotoki, T; Kikuchi, K; ten Kate, H H J

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS central solenoid magnet is being developed to provide a magnetic field of 2 Tesla in the central tracking volume of the ATLAS detector under construction at the CERN/LHC project. The solenoid coil design features high-strength aluminum stabilized superconductor to make the coil thinnest while maintaining its stability and the pure-aluminum strip technique for quench protection and safety. The solenoid coil is installed in a common cryostat with the LAr calorimeter in order to minimize the cryostat wall. A transparency of 0.66 radiation length is achieved with these integrated efforts. The progress in the solenoid coil fabrication is reported. (8 refs).

  6. Design of permanent magnetic solenoids for REGAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrke, Tim

    2013-10-15

    The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) is a small linear accelerator at DESY in Hamburg, which produces short, low emittance electron bunches. It is originally designed and built for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) within the framework of the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL). Additionally, two future experiments are planned at REGAE. First, an external injection experiment for Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWA) will be performed in the framework of the LAOLA collaboration (LAboratory fOr Laser- and beam-driven plasma Acceleration). This experiment will provide a method for the reconstruction of the electric field distribution within a linear plasma wakefield. Second, a time resolving high energy Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) will be implemented. Among others it is designed to allow for living cell imaging. Both experiments require strong focusing magnets inside the new target chamber at REGAE. Permanent magnetic solenoids (PMSs) can provide the needed focusing strength due to their enormous surface current density, while having compact dimensions at the same time. The present thesis deals with the design of such strong focusing PMSs. Since short and strong solenoids, as required for REGAE, exhibit a distinct non-linearity, the induced emittance growth is relatively large. This emittance growth is investigated and minimized for different set-ups with axially and radially magnetized annular magnets. Furthermore a magnetic shielding is developed. Together with a mechanical lifting system it assures that magnetic leakage fields do not disturb experiments, where the PMSs are removed from the beamline.

  7. Design of permanent magnetic solenoids for REGAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrke, Tim

    2013-10-01

    The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) is a small linear accelerator at DESY in Hamburg, which produces short, low emittance electron bunches. It is originally designed and built for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) within the framework of the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL). Additionally, two future experiments are planned at REGAE. First, an external injection experiment for Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWA) will be performed in the framework of the LAOLA collaboration (LAboratory fOr Laser- and beam-driven plasma Acceleration). This experiment will provide a method for the reconstruction of the electric field distribution within a linear plasma wakefield. Second, a time resolving high energy Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) will be implemented. Among others it is designed to allow for living cell imaging. Both experiments require strong focusing magnets inside the new target chamber at REGAE. Permanent magnetic solenoids (PMSs) can provide the needed focusing strength due to their enormous surface current density, while having compact dimensions at the same time. The present thesis deals with the design of such strong focusing PMSs. Since short and strong solenoids, as required for REGAE, exhibit a distinct non-linearity, the induced emittance growth is relatively large. This emittance growth is investigated and minimized for different set-ups with axially and radially magnetized annular magnets. Furthermore a magnetic shielding is developed. Together with a mechanical lifting system it assures that magnetic leakage fields do not disturb experiments, where the PMSs are removed from the beamline.

  8. CERN tests largest superconducting solenoid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "CERN's Compacts Muon Solenoid (CMS) - the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet - has reached full field in testing. The instrument is part of the proton-proton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project, located in a giant subterranean chamber at Cessy on the Franco-Swiss border." (1 page)

  9. Compact muon solenoid magnet reaches full field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Scientist of the U.S. Department of Energy in Fermilab and collaborators of the US/CMS project announced that the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet has reached full field in tests at CERN. (1 apge)

  10. Field Mapping System for Solenoid Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Kim, D. E.; Lee, H. G.; Park, S. J.; Chung, C. W.; Kang, B. K.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional Hall probe mapping system for measuring the solenoid magnet of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun has been developed. It can map the solenoid field either in Cartesian or in cylindrical coordinate system with a measurement reproducibility better than 5 × 10-5 T. The system has three axis motors: one for the azimuthal direction and the other two for the x and z direction. This architecture makes the measuring system simple in fabrication. The magnetic center was calculated using the measured axial component of magnetic field Bz in Cartesian coordinate system because the accuracy of magnetic axis measurement could be improved significantly by using Bz, instead of the radial component of magnetic field Br. This paper describes the measurement system and summarizes the measurement results for the solenoid magnetic of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun.

  11. Successful mapping of the solenoid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Aleksa, M.

    The ATLAS solenoid coil is about 5.3m long, has a diameter of 2.5m and is designed to deliver a magnetic field of approximately 2T for the ATLAS inner detector. The superconducting solenoid coil has been integrated inside the LAr barrel cryostat and was installed at its final position inside the cavern in November 2005. This summer - after completion of the extended barrel calorimeters and before the installation of the inner detector - the end cap calorimeters (LAr end caps and Tile extended barrels) were moved for the first time into their final position in order to create conditions as close as possible to final for the solenoid tests and for mapping the field inside the solenoid bore. Design and construction of the mapping machine The requirement on the absolute precision of the field measurements are 0.05% on the field integrals seen by particles; if this is achieved the momentum error coming from insufficient knowledge of the magnetic field will be negligible compared to the error stemming from the inn...

  12. Superconducting solenoid model magnet test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carcagno, R.; Dimarco, J.; Feher, S.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Hess, C.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Terechkine, I.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Superconducting solenoid magnets suitable for the room temperature front end of the Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (formerly known as Proton Driver), an 8 GeV superconducting H- linac, have been designed and fabricated at Fermilab, and tested in the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. We report here results of studies on the first model magnets in this program, including the mechanical properties during fabrication and testing in liquid helium at 4.2 K, quench performance, and magnetic field measurements. We also describe new test facility systems and instrumentation that have been developed to accomplish these tests.

  13. Superconducting solenoid model magnet test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcagno, R.; Dimarco, J.; Feher, S.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Hess, C.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.C.; Wokas, T.; Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    Superconducting solenoid magnets suitable for the room temperature front end of the Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (formerly known as Proton Driver), an 8 GeV superconducting H- linac, have been designed and fabricated at Fermilab, and tested in the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. We report here results of studies on the first model magnets in this program, including the mechanical properties during fabrication and testing in liquid helium at 4.2 K, quench performance, and magnetic field measurements. We also describe new test facility systems and instrumentation that have been developed to accomplish these tests

  14. Design and characterization of permanent magnetic solenoids for REGAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hachmann, M.; Flöttmann, K.; Gehrke, T.; Mayet, F.

    2016-01-01

    REGAE is a small electron linear accelerator at DESY. In order to focus short and low charged electron bunches down to a few μm permanent magnetic solenoids were designed, assembled and field measurements were done. Due to a shortage of space close to the operation area an in-vacuum solution has been chosen. Furthermore a two-ring design made of wedges has been preferred in terms of beam dynamic issues. To keep the field quality of a piecewise built magnet still high a sorting algorithm for the wedge arrangement including a simple magnetic field model has been developed and used for the construction of the magnets. The magnetic field of these solenoids has been measured with high precision and compared to simulations. - Highlights: • presenting a two-ring radially magnetized permanent magnetic solenoid design. • development of a analytical field description and field quality factor. • development of a sorting algorithm for permanent magnetic pieces to form a magnet. • performing a high-precision field measurement of a high gradient field.

  15. R108 view inside the solenoid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    One can see the four sets of cylindrical drift chambers and, between the vacuum tubes, a small device for the detection of magnetic monopoles introduced as a "parasite" experiment by another Collaboration (R109, by Rome-CERN Collaboration)

  16. Development of a permanent magnet alternative for a solenoidal ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, J.; Fahy, A.; Barr, M. [Centre for Organic Electronics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Jardine, A.; Allison, W. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Dastoor, P.C., E-mail: Paul.Dastoor@newcastle.edu.au [Centre for Organic Electronics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2014-12-01

    The most sensitive desktop-sized ionizer utilising electron bombardment is currently the solenoidal ion source. We present an alternate design for such an ion source whereby the solenoidal windings of the electromagnet are replaced by a shaped cylindrical permanent magnet in order to reduce the complexity and running costs of the instrument. Through finite element modelling of the magnetic field in COMSOL and experimental measurements on a small-scale prototype magnet stack, we demonstrate the required shape of the permanent magnet in order to generate the needed field, and the necessity of soft iron collars to smooth fluctuations along the central axis.

  17. Design of a Solenoid Magnet for a Microwave Ion Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Sub; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Kim, Dae Il

    2011-01-01

    A microwave ion source has many advantages, such as long-life time, low emittance, high brightness, and compactness. Also it is a big merit that 2.45GHz rf systems are easily available and inexpensive. Due to the reasons microwave ion sources are very attractive for industrial applications. But microwave ion sources need a solenoid magnet which is usually an electromagnet with a DC current power supply. The electromagnet solenoids of microwave ion sources can be installed in two methods. The first method is to use isolation transformer to supply electrical power to DC current power supply for the magnets. In this case the magnet is compact because it has the same potential with the extraction voltage. The second method is to put an electrical insulator, such as G10, between ion sources and magnets. In this case the solenoid magnet is bigger than one in the first method, especially for higher extraction voltage, because the space for the insulator is required. Permanent magnets can be a good candidate to make microwave ion source more compact. But it is difficult to control the magnetic field profile and the magnetic flux density for the permanent magnet solenoids. Due to the reason, in the case that the best performances in many operating conditions should be achieved by adjusting the profile and strength of the solenoid, electromagnet is better than permanent magnet. But in the case of industrial applications where operating conditions is usually fixed and the compactness is required, permanent magnet is better choice to build an ion source

  18. A Cryogenic Test Stand for Large Superconducting Solenoid Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabehl, R. [Fermilab; Carcagno, R. [Fermilab; Nogiec, J. [Fermilab; Orris, D. [Fermilab; Soyars, W. [Fermilab; Sylvester, C. [Fermilab

    2013-01-01

    A new test stand for testing large superconducting solenoid magnets at the Fermilab Central Helium Liquifier (CHL) has been designed, and operated. This test stand has been used to test a coupling coil for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), and future uses include solenoids for the Fermilab mu2e experiment. This paper describes the test stand design and operation including controlled cool-down and warm-up. Overviews of the process controls system and the quench management system are also included.

  19. Strain-based quench detection for a solenoid superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xingzhe; Guan Mingzhi; Ma Lizhen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a non-electric quench detection method based on the strain gauge measurement of a superconducting solenoid magnet at cryogenic temperature under an intense magnetic field. Unlike the traditional voltage measurement of quench detection, the strain-based detection method utilizes low-temperature strain gauges, which evidently reduce electromagnetic noise and breakdown, to measure the magneto/thermo-mechanical behavior of the superconducting magnet during excitation. The magnet excitation, quench tests and trainings were performed on a prototype 5 T superconducting solenoid magnet. The transient strains and their abrupt changes were compared with the current, magnetic field and temperature signals collected during excitation and quench tests to indicate that the strain gauge measurements can detect the quench feature of the superconducting magnet. The proposed method is expected to be able to detect the quench of a superconducting coil independently or utilized together with other electrical methods. In addition, the axial quench propagation velocity of the solenoid is evaluated by the quench time lags among different localized strains. The propagation velocity is enhanced after repeated quench trainings. (paper)

  20. Manufacture and Test of a Small Ceramic-Insulated Nb$_{3}$Sn Split Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Bordini, B; Rossi, L; Tommasini, D

    2008-01-01

    A small split solenoid wound with high-Jc Nb$_{3}$Sn conductor, constituted by a 0.8 mm Rod Re-stack Process (RRP®) strand, was built and tested at CERN in order to study the applicability of: 1) ceramic wet glass braid insulation without epoxy impregnation of the magnet; 2) a new heat treatment devised at CERN and particularly suitable for reacting RRP® Nb$_{3}$Sn strands. This paper briefly describes the solenoid and the experimental results obtained during 4.4 K and 1.9 K tests. The split solenoid consists of two coils (25 mm inner diameter, 51.1 mm outer diameter, 12.9 mm height). The coils were initially separately tested, in an iron mirror configuration, and then tested together in split solenoid configuration. In all the tests at 4.4 K the coils reached a current higher than 95 % of their short sample limits at the first quench; in split solenoid configuration the maximum field values in the coils and in the aperture were respectively 10.7 T and 12.5 T. At 1.9 K the coils had premature quenches due ...

  1. Magnetic Alignment of Pulsed Solenoids Using the Pulsed Wire Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbelaez, D.; Madur, A.; Lipton, T.M.; Waldron, W.L.; Kwan, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    A unique application of the pulsed-wire measurement method has been implemented for alignment of 2.5 T pulsed solenoid magnets. The magnetic axis measurement has been shown to have a resolution of better than 25 (micro)m. The accuracy of the technique allows for the identification of inherent field errors due to, for example, the winding layer transitions and the current leads. The alignment system is developed for the induction accelerator NDCX-II under construction at LBNL, an upgraded Neutralized Drift Compression experiment for research on warm dense matter and heavy ion fusion. Precise alignment is essential for NDCX-II, since the ion beam has a large energy spread associated with the rapid pulse compression such that misalignments lead to corkscrew deformation of the beam and reduced intensity at focus. The ability to align the magnetic axis of the pulsed solenoids to within 100 pm of the induction cell axis has been demonstrated.

  2. Mechanical design of a 250 kilogauss solenoidal magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonanos, P.

    1975-12-01

    The mechanical design and construction of a 5 cm bore, 23 cm long solenoidal magnet operated at 250 kilogauss is described. The magnet provides confining field for a plasma heated by a CO 2 laser. Radial diagnostic ports with a clear aperture of 0.41 cm allow viewing access near the magnet midplane. The on-axis field homogeneity is within 5 percent over a central length of 12 cm. The magnet sustained 500 to 1000 pulses at the highest field levels before catastrophic failure

  3. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Okamura, Masahiro; Sekine, Megumi; Cushing, Eric; Jandovitz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  4. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Sekine, Megumi; Okamura, Masahiro; Cushing, Eric; Jandovitz, Peter

    2013-01-01

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  5. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Sekine, Megumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States) and RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (United States); Cushing, Eric [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Jandovitz, Peter [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  6. Analysis of an adjustable field permanent magnet solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris-Mog, T.; Burns, M.; Chavez, A.; Schillig, J.

    2017-10-01

    A feasibility study has been performed on an adjustable-field permanent magnet (PM) solenoid concept in an effort to reduce the dependence that linear induction accelerators have on large direct current power supplies and associated cooling systems. The concept relies on the ability to reorient sections of the PMs and thus redirect their magnetization vector to either add to or subtract from the on-axis magnetic field. This study concentrated on the focal strengths and emittance growths for two different designs, both with 19 cm bore diameters extending 53 cm in length. The first design is expected to produce peak magnetic fields ranging from 260 to 900 G (0.026 to 0.09 T) while the second design is expected to produce peak magnetic fields ranging from 580 to 2100 G (0.058 to 0.21 T). Although the PM configuration generates a variable magnetic field and the torques acting on PMs within the assembly appear manageable, the emittance growth is larger than that of a DC solenoid.

  7. Test results of the g-2 superconducting solenoid magnet system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunce, G; Morse, WM; Benante, J; Cullen, MH; Danby, GT; Endo, K; Fedotovich, GV; Geller, J; Green, MA; Grossmann, A; GrossePerdckamp, M; Haeberlen, U; Hseuh, H; Hirabayashi, H; Hughes, VW; Jackson, JW; Jia, LX; Jungmann, K; Krienen, F; Larsen, R; Khazin, B; Kawall, D; Meng, W; Pai, C; Polk, T.; Prigl, R; Putlitz, GZ; Redin, S; Roberts, BL; Ryskulov, N; Semertzidas, Y; Shutt, R; Snydstrup, L; Tallerico, T; vonWalter, P; Woodle, K; Yamamoto, A

    The g-2 experiment dipole consists of a single 48 turn, 15.1 meter diameter outer solenoid and a pair of 24 turn inner solenoids, 13.4 meters in diameter. The inner solenoids are hooked in series and are run at a polarity that is opposite that of the outer solenoid, thus creating a dipole field in

  8. Generation of ten kilotesla longitudinal magnetic fields in ultraintense laser-solenoid target interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, K. D.; Zhou, C. T.; Zhang, H.; Huang, T. W.; Li, R.; Qiao, B.; Cao, J. M.; Cai, T. X.; Ruan, S. C.; He, X. T.

    2018-01-01

    Production of the huge longitudinal magnetic fields by using an ultraintense laser pulse irradiating a solenoid target is considered. Through three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, it is shown that the longitudinal magnetic field up to ten kilotesla can be observed in the ultraintense laser-solenoid target interactions. The finding is associated with both fast and return electron currents in the solenoid target. The huge longitudinal magnetic field is of interest for a number of impo...

  9. Derivation of magnetic Coulomb's law for thin, semi-infinite solenoids

    OpenAIRE

    Kitano, Masao

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that the magnetic force between thin, semi-infinite solenoids obeys a Coulomb-type law, which corresponds to that for magnetic monopoles placed at the end points of each solenoid. We derive the magnetic Coulomb law from the basic principles of electromagnetism, namely from the Maxwell equations and the Lorentz force.

  10. A superconducting solenoid and press for permanent magnet fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulcahy, T. M.; Hull, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    For the first time, a superconducting solenoid (SCM) was used to increase the remnant magnetization of sintered NdFeB permanent magnets (PMs). In particular, improved magnetic alignment of commercial-grade PM powder was achieved, as it was axial die pressed into 12.7-mm diameter cylindrical compacts in the 76.2-mm warm bore of a 9-T SCM. The press used to compact the powder is unique and was specifically designed for use with the SCM. Although the press was operated in the batch mode for this proof of concept study, its design is intended to enable automated production. In operation, a simple die and punch set made of nonmagnetic materials was filled with powder and loaded into a nonmagnetic press tube. The cantilevered press tube was inserted horizontally, on a carrier manually advanced along a track, into the SCM. The robustness of the mechanical components and the SCM, in its liquid helium dewar, were specifically designed to allow for insertion and extraction of the magnetic powder and compacts, while operating at 9 T. Compaction was achieved by pressing the punches between the closed end of the press tube and the hydraulic cylinder mounted on the opposite end. Improvements up to 10% in magnetization and 20% in energy products of the permanent magnets were obtained, as the alignment fields were increased above the 2-T maximum field of the electromagnets used in industry. Increases in magnetization of 3% are significant in the mature sintered magnet industry

  11. Design of an elliptical solenoid magnet for transverse beam matching to the spiral inflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Pandit, V.S.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we present the design study of an elliptical solenoid magnet to be used for transverse beam matching at the input of a spiral inflector for efficient transmission. We have studied the dependence of axial field and gradients in the transverse directions of the elliptical solenoid magnet with ellipticity of the aperture. Using the beam envelope equations we have studied the feasibility of using an elliptical solenoid for transverse beam matching to the acceptance of a spiral inflector. (author)

  12. Adjustment of Adiabatic Transition Magnetic Field of Solenoid-Induced Helicla Wiggler

    CERN Document Server

    Tsunawaki, Y

    2005-01-01

    We have been constructed a solenoid-induced helical wiggler for a compact free electron maser operated in a usual small laboratory which does not have electric source capacity available enough. It consists of two staggered-iron arrays inserted perpendicularly to each other in a solenoid electromagnet. In order to lead/extract an electron beam into/from the wiggler, adiabatic transition (AT) field is necessary at both ends of the wiggler. In this work the AT field was produced by setting staggered-nickel plates with different thickness in the five periods. The thickness of each nickel plate was decided by the field analysis using the MAGTZ computational code based on a magnetic moment method. Exact thickness was, however, found by the precise measurement of the field distribution with the greatest circumspection to obtain a homogeneous increment of the AT field. The change of AT field distribution was studied by referring to an equivalent electric circuit of the wiggler.

  13. Method to reduce non-specific tissue heating of small animals in solenoid coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ananda; Attaluri, Anilchandra; Mallipudi, Rajiv; Cornejo, Christine; Bordelon, David; Armour, Michael; Morua, Katherine; Deweese, Theodore L; Ivkov, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Solenoid coils that generate time-varying or alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) are used in biomedical devices for research, imaging and therapy. Interactions of AMF and tissue produce eddy currents that deposit power within tissue, thus limiting effectiveness and safety. We aim to develop methods that minimise excess heating of mice exposed to AMFs for cancer therapy experiments. Numerical and experimental data were obtained to characterise thermal management properties of water using a continuous, custom water jacket in a four-turn simple solenoid. Theoretical data were obtained with method-of-moments (MoM) numerical field calculations and finite element method (FEM) thermal simulations. Experimental data were obtained from gel phantoms and mice exposed to AMFs having amplitude >50 kA/m and frequency of 160 kHz. Water has a high specific heat and thermal conductivity, is diamagnetic, polar, and nearly transparent to magnetic fields. We report at least a two-fold reduction of temperature increase from gel phantom and animal models when a continuous layer of circulating water was placed between the sample and solenoid, compared with no water. Thermal simulations indicate the superior efficiency in thermal management by the developed continuous single chamber cooling system over a double chamber non-continuous system. Further reductions of heating were obtained by regulating water temperature and flow for active cooling. These results demonstrate the potential value of a contiguous layer of circulating water to permit sustained exposure to high intensity alternating magnetic fields at this frequency for research using small animal models exposed to AMFs.

  14. Performance of a proximity cryogenic system for the ATLAS central solenoid magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Doi, Y; Makida, Y; Kondo, Y; Kawai, M; Aoki, K; Haruyama, T; Kondo, T; Mizumaki, S; Wachi, Y; Mine, S; Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Passardi, Giorgio; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS central solenoid magnet has been designed and constructed as a collaborative work between KEK and CERN for the ATLAS experiment in the LHC project The solenoid provides an axial magnetic field of 2 Tesla at the center of the tracking volume of the ATLAS detector. The solenoid is installed in a common cryostat of a liquid-argon calorimeter in order to minimize the mass of the cryostat wall. The coil is cooled indirectly by using two-phase helium flow in a pair of serpentine cooling line. The cryogen is supplied by the ATLAS cryogenic plant, which also supplies helium to the Toroid magnet systems. The proximity cryogenic system for the solenoid has two major components: a control dewar and a valve unit In addition, a programmable logic controller, PLC, was prepared for the automatic operation and solenoid test in Japan. This paper describes the design of the proximity cryogenic system and results of the performance test. (7 refs).

  15. Computer simulations of quench properties of thin, large superconducting solenoid magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Takeshi; Mori, Shigeki; Noguchi, Masaharu

    1983-01-01

    Measured quench data of a 1 m diameter x 1 m thin superconducting solenoid magnet with a single layer aluminum-stabilized NbTi/Cu superconductor of 269 turns were fitted by computer simulations using the one-dimensional approximation. Parameters obtained were used to study quench properties of a 3 m diameter x 5 m (1.5 Tesla) thin superconducting solenoid magnet with a stored magnetic energy of 30 x 10 6 J. Conductor dimensions with which the solenoid could be built substantially safe for the full field quench were optimized. (author)

  16. Pressure control valve using proportional electro-magnetic solenoid actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, So Nam; Ham, Young Bog; Park, Pyoung Won

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental characteristics of electro-hydraulic proportional pressure control valve. In this study, poppet and valve body which are assembled into the proportional solenoid were designed and manufactured. The constant force characteristics of proportional solenoid actuator in the control region should be independent of the plunger position in order to be used to control the valve position in the fluid flow control system. The stroke-force characteristics of the proportional solenoid actuator is determined by the shape (or parameters) of the control cone. In this paper, steady state and transient characteristics of the solenoid actuator for electro-hydraulic proportional valve are analyzed using finite element method and it is confirmed that the proportional solenoid actuator has a constant attraction force in the control region independently on the stroke position. The effects of the parameters such as control cone length, thickness and taper length are also discussed

  17. Design features of the solenoid magnets for the central cell of the MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohlwend, J.W.; Tatro, R.E.; Ring, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    The 14 superconducting solenoid magnets which form the central cell of the MFTF-B are being designed and fabricated by General Dynamics for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Each solenoid coil has a mean diameter of five meters and contains 600 turns of a proven conductor type. Structural loading resulting from credible fault events, cooldown and warmup requirements, and manufacturing processes consistent with other MFTF-B magnets have been considered in the selection of 304 LN as the structural material for the magnet. The solenoid magnets are connected by 24 intercoil beams and 20 solid struts which resist the longitudinal seismic and electromagnetic attractive forces and by 24 hanger/side supports which react magnet dead weight and seismic loads. A modular arrangement of two solenoid coils within a vacuum vessel segment allow for sequential checkout and installation

  18. Behavior of moving plasma in solenoidal magnetic field in a laser ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, S.; Takahashi, K.; Okamura, M.; Horioka, K.

    2016-01-01

    In a laser ion source, a solenoidal magnetic field is useful to guide the plasma and to control the extracted beam current. However, the behavior of the plasma drifting in the magnetic field has not been well understood. Therefore, to investigate the behavior, we measured the plasma ion current and the total charge within a single pulse in the solenoid by changing the distance from the entrance of the solenoid to a detector. We observed that the decrease of the total charge along the distance became smaller as the magnetic field became larger and then the charge became almost constant with a certain magnetic flux density. The results indicate that the transverse spreading speed of the plasma decreased with increasing the field and the plasma was confined transversely with the magnetic flux density. We found that the reason of the confinement was not magnetization of ions but an influence induced by electrons

  19. Behavior of moving plasma in solenoidal magnetic field in a laser ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, S., E-mail: ikeda.s.ae@m.titech.ac.jp [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0108 (Japan); Takahashi, K. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2137 (Japan); Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States); Horioka, K. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    In a laser ion source, a solenoidal magnetic field is useful to guide the plasma and to control the extracted beam current. However, the behavior of the plasma drifting in the magnetic field has not been well understood. Therefore, to investigate the behavior, we measured the plasma ion current and the total charge within a single pulse in the solenoid by changing the distance from the entrance of the solenoid to a detector. We observed that the decrease of the total charge along the distance became smaller as the magnetic field became larger and then the charge became almost constant with a certain magnetic flux density. The results indicate that the transverse spreading speed of the plasma decreased with increasing the field and the plasma was confined transversely with the magnetic flux density. We found that the reason of the confinement was not magnetization of ions but an influence induced by electrons.

  20. Behavior of moving plasma in solenoidal magnetic field in a laser ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, S.; Takahashi, K.; Okamura, M.; Horioka, K.

    2016-02-01

    In a laser ion source, a solenoidal magnetic field is useful to guide the plasma and to control the extracted beam current. However, the behavior of the plasma drifting in the magnetic field has not been well understood. Therefore, to investigate the behavior, we measured the plasma ion current and the total charge within a single pulse in the solenoid by changing the distance from the entrance of the solenoid to a detector. We observed that the decrease of the total charge along the distance became smaller as the magnetic field became larger and then the charge became almost constant with a certain magnetic flux density. The results indicate that the transverse spreading speed of the plasma decreased with increasing the field and the plasma was confined transversely with the magnetic flux density. We found that the reason of the confinement was not magnetization of ions but an influence induced by electrons.

  1. Fourier Bessel transform method for efficiently calculating the magnetic field of solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachamkin, J.; Maggiore, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical procedure for calculating the magnetic field of a selenoid is derived. Based on the properties of Bessel functions, the procedure is shown to be convergent everywhere, including within the windings of the solenoid. The most critical part of the procedure is detailed in the main text. A simple method is used to ensure numerical significance while allowing economical computational times. In the appendix the procedure is generalized to universal convergence by appropriate partitioning of the solenoid windings

  2. Solenoidal magnetic field influences the beam neutralization by a background plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, I.

    2004-01-01

    An analytical electron fluid model has been developed to describe the plasma response to a propagating ion beam. The model predicts very good charge neutralization during quasi-steady-state propagation, provided the beam pulse duration is much longer than the electron plasma period. In the opposite limit, the beam pulse excites large-amplitude plasma waves. Figure 1 shows the influence of a solenoidal magnetic field on charge and current neutralization. Analytical studies show that the solenoidal magnetic field begins to influence the radial electron motion when ω ce > βω pe . Here, ω ce is the electron gyrofrequency, ω pe is the electron plasma frequency, and β = V b /c is the ion beam velocity. If a solenoidal magnetic field is not applied, plasma waves do not propagate. In contrast, in the presence of a solenoidal magnetic field, whistler waves propagate ahead of the beam and can perturb the plasma ahead of the beam pulse. In the limit ω ce >> βω pe , the electron current completely neutralizes the ion beam current and the beam self magnetic field greatly diminishes. Application of an external solenoidal magnetic field clearly makes the collective processes of ion beam-plasma interactions rich in physics content. Many results of the PIC simulations remain to be explained by analytical theory. Four new papers have been published or submitted describing plasma neutralization of an intense ion beam pulse

  3. A New Facility for Testing Superconducting Solenoid Magnets with Large Fringe Fields at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orris, D. [Fermilab; Carcagno, R. [Fermilab; Nogiec, J. [Fermilab; Rabehl, R. [Fermilab; Sylvester, C. [Fermilab; Tartaglia, M. [Fermilab

    2013-09-01

    Testing superconducting solenoid with no iron flux return can be problematic for a magnet test facility due to the large magnetic fringe fields generated. These large external fields can interfere with the operation of equipment while precautions must be taken for personnel supporting the test. The magnetic forces between the solenoid under test and the external infrastructure must also be taken under consideration. A new test facility has been designed and built at Fermilab specifically for testing superconducting magnets with large external fringe fields. This paper discusses the test stand design, capabilities, and details of the instrumentation and controls with data from the first solenoid tested in this facility: the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) coupling coil.

  4. ATLAS solenoid operates underground

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    A new phase for the ATLAS collaboration started with the first operation of a completed sub-system: the Central Solenoid. Teams monitoring the cooling and powering of the ATLAS solenoid in the control room. The solenoid was cooled down to 4.5 K from 17 to 23 May. The first current was established the same evening that the solenoid became cold and superconductive. 'This makes the ATLAS Central Solenoid the very first cold and superconducting magnet to be operated in the LHC underground areas!', said Takahiko Kondo, professor at KEK. Though the current was limited to 1 kA, the cool-down and powering of the solenoid was a major milestone for all of the control, cryogenic, power and vacuum systems-a milestone reached by the hard work and many long evenings invested by various teams from ATLAS, all of CERN's departments and several large and small companies. Since the Central Solenoid and the barrel liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter share the same cryostat vacuum vessel, this achievement was only possible in perfe...

  5. Design of wide flat-topped low transverse field solenoid magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Xiaobing; Chen Nan; Li Qin

    2010-01-01

    A wide flat-topped low transverse error field solenoid magnet design for linear induction accelerator is presented. The design features non-uniform winding to reduce field fluctuation due to the magnets' gap, and homogenizer rings within the solenoid to greatly reduce the effects of winding errors. Numerical modeling of several designs for 12 MeV linear induction accelerator (LIA) in China Academy of Engineering Physics has demonstrated that by using these two techniques the magnetic field fluctuations in the accelerator gap can be reduced by 70% and the transverse error field can be reduced by 96.5%. (authors)

  6. Controlling Charge and Current Neutralization of an Ion Beam Pulse in a Background Plasma by Application of a Solenoidal Magnetic Field I: Weak Magnetic Field Limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganovich, I. D., Startsev, E. A., Sefkow, A. B., Davidson, R. C.

    2008-10-10

    Propagation of an intense charged particle beam pulse through a background plasma is a common problem in astrophysics and plasma applications. The plasma can effectively neutralize the charge and current of the beam pulse, and thus provides a convenient medium for beam transport. The application of a small solenoidal magnetic field can drastically change the self-magnetic and self- electric fields of the beam pulse, thus allowing effective control of the beam transport through the background plasma. An analytic model is developed to describe the self-magnetic field of a finite- length ion beam pulse propagating in a cold background plasma in a solenoidal magnetic field. The analytic studies show that the solenoidal magnetic field starts to infuence the self-electric and self-magnetic fields when ωce > ωpeβb, where ωce = eβ/mec is the electron gyrofrequency, ωpe is the electron plasma frequency, and βb = Vb/c is the ion beam velocity relative to the speed of light. This condition typically holds for relatively small magnetic fields (about 100G). Analytical formulas are derived for the effective radial force acting on the beam ions, which can be used to minimize beam pinching. The results of analytic theory have been verified by comparison with the simulation results obtained from two particle-in-cell codes, which show good agreement.

  7. Controlling Charge and Current Neutralization of an Ion Beam Pulse in a Background Plasma by Application of a Solenoidal Magnetic Field I: Weak Magnetic Field Limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Davidson, R. C.

    2008-01-01

    Propagation of an intense charged particle beam pulse through a background plasma is a common problem in astrophysics and plasma applications. The plasma can effectively neutralize the charge and current of the beam pulse, and thus provides a convenient medium for beam transport. The application of a small solenoidal magnetic field can drastically change the self-magnetic and self- electric fields of the beam pulse, thus allowing effective control of the beam transport through the background plasma. An analytic model is developed to describe the self-magnetic field of a finite-length ion beam pulse propagating in a cold background plasma in a solenoidal magnetic field. The analytic studies show that the solenoidal magnetic field starts to influence the self-electric and self-magnetic fields when ω ce ∼> ω pe β b , where ω ce = eB/m e c is the electron gyrofrequency, ω pe is the electron plasma frequency, and β b = V b /c is the ion beam velocity relative to the speed of light. This condition typically holds for relatively small magnetic fields (about 100G). Analytical formulas are derived for the effective radial force acting on the beam ions, which can be used to minimize beam pinching. The results of analytic theory have been verified by comparison with the simulation results obtained from two particle-in-cell codes, which show good agreement

  8. Coherent states of non-relativistic electron in the magnetic-solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagrov, V G; Gavrilov, S P; Filho, D P Meira; Gitman, D M

    2010-01-01

    In the present work we construct coherent states in the magnetic-solenoid field, which is a superposition of the Aharonov-Bohm field and a collinear uniform magnetic field. In the problem under consideration there are two kinds of coherent states, those which correspond to classical trajectories which embrace the solenoid and those which do not. The constructed coherent states reproduce exactly classical trajectories, maintain their form under the time evolution and form a complete set of functions, which can be useful in semiclassical calculations. In the absence of the solenoid field these states are reduced to the well known in the case of uniform magnetic field Malkin-Man'ko coherent states.

  9. Coherent states of non-relativistic electron in the magnetic-solenoid field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V G [Department of Physics, Tomsk State University, 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Gavrilov, S P; Filho, D P Meira [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gitman, D M, E-mail: bagrov@phys.tsu.r, E-mail: gavrilovsergeyp@yahoo.co, E-mail: gitman@dfn.if.usp.b, E-mail: dmeira@dfn.if.usp.b [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, CP 66318, CEP 05315-970 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-09-03

    In the present work we construct coherent states in the magnetic-solenoid field, which is a superposition of the Aharonov-Bohm field and a collinear uniform magnetic field. In the problem under consideration there are two kinds of coherent states, those which correspond to classical trajectories which embrace the solenoid and those which do not. The constructed coherent states reproduce exactly classical trajectories, maintain their form under the time evolution and form a complete set of functions, which can be useful in semiclassical calculations. In the absence of the solenoid field these states are reduced to the well known in the case of uniform magnetic field Malkin-Man'ko coherent states.

  10. Electrons in a positive-ion beam with solenoid or quadrupole magnetic transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Cohen, R.; Coleman, J.; Sharp, W.; Bieniosek, F.; Friedman, A.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.M.; Faltens, A.; Vay, J.L.; Prost, L.

    2007-01-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) is used to study beam transport and accumulation of electrons in quadrupole magnets and the Neutralized Drift-Compression Experiment (NDCX) to study beam transport through and accumulation of electrons in magnetic solenoids. We find that both clearing and suppressor electrodes perform as intended, enabling electron cloud densities to be minimized. Then, the measured beam envelopes in both quadrupoles and solenoids agree with simulations, indicating that theoretical beam current transport limits are reliable, in the absence of electrons. At the other extreme, reversing electrode biases with the solenoid transport effectively traps electrons; or, in quadrupole magnets, grounding the suppressor electrode allows electron emission from the end wall to flood the beam, in both cases producing significant degradation in the beam

  11. Fabrication of a solenoid-type inductor with Fe-based soft magnetic core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Chong; Zhou Yong; Gao Xiaoyu; Ding Wen; Cao Ying; Choi, Hyung; Won, Jonghwa

    2007-01-01

    A solenoid-type inductor was fabricated by MEMS (Microelectromechanical systems) technique. The fabrication process uses UV-LIGA, dry etching, fine polishing, and electroplating technique to achieve high performance of the solenoid-type inductor. Fe-based soft magnetic thin film was sputtered as the magnetic core, and polyimide was used as the insulation materials. The inductor was in size of 4x4 mm with coil width of 20 μm and space of 35 μm. The inductance is 1.61 μH at a frequency of 5 MHz with the maximum quality factor of 1.42

  12. Development of large high current density superconducting solenoid magnets for use in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1977-05-01

    The development of a unique type of large superconducting solenoid magnet, characterized by very high current density windings and a two-phase helium tubular cooling system is described. The development of the magnet's conceptual design and the construction of two test solenoids are described. The successful test of the superconducting coil and its tubular cooling refrigeration system is presented. The safety, environmental and economic impacts of the test program on future developments in high energy physics are shown. Large solid angle particle detectors for colliding beam physics will analyze both charged and neutral particles. In many cases, these detectors will require neutral particles, such as gamma rays, to pass through the magnet coil with minimum interaction. The magnet coils must be as thin as possible. The use of superconducting windings allows one to minimize radiation thickness, while at the same time maximizing charged particle momentum resolution and saving substantial quantities of electrical energy. The results of the experimental measurements show that large high current density solenoid magnets can be made to operate at high stored energies. The superconducting magnet development described has a positive safety and environmental impact. The use of large high current density thin superconducting solenoids has been proposed in two high energy physics experiments to be conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and Cornell University as a result of the successful experiments described

  13. GigaGauss solenoidal magnetic field inside bubbles excited in under-dense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lécz, Zs.; Konoplev, I. V.; Seryi, A.; Andreev, A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel and effective method for generating GigaGauss level, solenoidal quasi-static magnetic fields in under-dense plasma using screw-shaped high intensity laser pulses. This method produces large solenoidal fields that move with the driving laser pulse and are collinear with the accelerated electrons. This is in contrast with already known techniques which rely on interactions with over-dense or solid targets and generates radial or toroidal magnetic field localized at the stationary target. The solenoidal field is quasi-stationary in the reference frame of the laser pulse and can be used for guiding electron beams. It can also provide synchrotron radiation beam emittance cooling for laser-plasma accelerated electron and positron beams, opening up novel opportunities for designs of the light sources, free electron lasers, and high energy colliders based on laser plasma acceleration.

  14. CALCULATIONS FOR A MERCURY JET TARGET IN A SOLENOID MAGNET CAPTURE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GALLARDO, J.; KAHN, S.; PALMER, R.B.; THIEBERGER, P.; WEGGEL, R.J.; MCDONALD, K.

    2001-01-01

    A mercury jet is being considered as the production target for a muon storage ring facility to produce an intense neutrino beam. A 20 T solenoid magnet that captures pions for muon production surrounds the mercury target. As the liquid metal jet enters or exits the field eddy currents are induced. We calculate the effects that a liquid metal jet experiences in entering and exiting the magnetic field for the magnetic configuration considered in the Neutrino Factory Feasibility Study II

  15. Effect of superconducting solenoid model cores on spanwise iron magnet roll control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britcher, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with conventional ferromagnetic fuselage cores, superconducting solenoid cores appear to offer significant reductions in the projected cost of a large wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system. The provision of sufficient magnetic roll torque capability has been a long-standing problem with all magnetic suspension and balance systems; and the spanwise iron magnet scheme appears to be the most powerful system available. This scheme utilizes iron cores which are installed in the wings of the model. It was anticipated that the magnetization of these cores, and hence the roll torque generated, would be affected by the powerful external magnetic field of the superconducting solenoid. A preliminary study has been made of the effect of the superconducting solenoid fuselage model core concept on the spanwise iron magnet roll torque generation schemes. Computed data for one representative configuration indicate that reductions in available roll torque occur over a range of applied magnetic field levels. These results indicate that a 30-percent increase in roll electromagnet capacity over that previously determined will be required for a representative 8-foot wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system design.

  16. Conceptual design of a superconducting solenoid for a magnetic SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, R.W.; Grimson, J.H.; Kephart, R.D.; Krebs, H.J.; Stone, M.E.; Theriot, D.; Wands, R.H.

    1988-07-01

    The conceptual design of a large superconducting solenoid suitable for a magnetic detector at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) has begun at Fermilab. The magnet will provide a magnetic field of 2 T over a volume 8 m in diameter by 16 m long. The particle-physics calorimetry will be inside the field volume and so the coil will be bath cooled and cryostable; the vessels will be stainless steel. Predictibility of performance and the ability to safely negotiate all probable failure modes, including a quench, are important items of the design philosophy. Although the magnet is considerably larger than existing solenoids of this type and although many issues of manufacturability, transportability and cost have not been completely addressed, our conceptual design has convinced us that this magnet is a reasonable extrapolation of present technology. 2 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Performance of Nb3Sn multifilamentary superconductors in solenoidal magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampson, W.B.; Suenaga, M.; Robins, K.E.

    High current Nb 3 Sn multifilamentary conductors have been formed by heat treating cables braided from three types of composite wire. In the simplest configuration, these wires contain niobium filaments in a pure copper matrix. After braiding the conductor is coated with a layer of tin which diffuses through the copper during heat treatment to form Nb 3 S n filaments. The second configuration is made from wires containing niobium filaments in a copper-tin alloy and requires only heat treatment to form the Nb 3 Sn filaments. The third type of braid has wires which consist of groups of niobium filaments in the bronze matrix which are in turn in a copper matrix. Tantalum barriers surround each group of filaments to prevent the tin from contaminating the pure copper matrix. The cables have been wound into solenoids after heat treatment and the effect of mechanical handling was studied by monitoring the resistive voltage distribution in the coils. (U.S.)

  18. CO2-laser--produced plasma columns in a solenoidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offenberger, A.A.; Cervenan, M.R.; Smy, P.R.

    1976-01-01

    A 1-GW CO 2 laser pulse has been used to produce extended column breakdown of hydrogen at low pressure in a 20-cm-long solenoid. Magnetic fields of up to 110 kG were used to inhibit radial losses of the plasma column. A differential pumping scheme was devised to prevent formation of an opaque absorption wave travelling out of the solenoid back toward the focusing lens. Target burns give direct evidence for trapped laser beam propagation along the plasma column

  19. Effect of high solenoidal magnetic fields on breakdown voltages of high vacuum 805 MHz cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretti, A.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Qian, Z.; Norem, J.; Li, D.; Zisman, M.; Torun, Y.; Rimmer, R.; Errede, D.

    2005-01-01

    There is an on going international collaboration studying the feasibility and cost of building a muon collider or neutrino factory [1,2]. An important aspect of this study is the full understanding of ionization cooling of muons by many orders of magnitude for the collider case. An important muon ionization cooling experiment, MICE [3], has been proposed to demonstrate and validate the technology that could be used for cooling. Ionization cooling is accomplished by passing a high-emittance muon beam alternately through regions of low Z material, such as liquid hydrogen, and very high accelerating RF Cavities within a multi-Tesla solenoidal field. To determine the effect of very large solenoidal magnetic fields on the generation of dark current, x-rays and on the breakdown voltage gradients of vacuum RF cavities, a test facility has been established at Fermilab in Lab G. This facility consists of a 12 MW 805 MHz RF station and a large warm bore 5 T solenoidal superconducting magnet containing a pill box type cavity with thin removable window apertures. This system allows dark current and breakdown studies of different window configurations and materials. The results of this study will be presented. The study has shown that the peak achievable accelerating gradient is reduced by a factor greater than 2 when solenoidal field of greater than 2 T are applied to the cavity

  20. The cryogenic system for the superconducting solenoid magnet of the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Delikaris, D; Passardi, Giorgio; Lottin, J C; Lottin, J P; Lyraud, C

    1998-01-01

    The design concept of the CMS experiment, foreseen for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project at CERN, is based on a superconducting solenoid magnet. The large coil will be made of a four layers winding generating the 4 T uniform magnetic induction required by the detector. The length of the solenoid is 13 m with an inner diameter of 5.9 m. The mass kept at liquid helium temperature totals 220 t and the electromagnetic stored energy is 2.7 GJ. The windings are indirectly cooled with a liquid helium flow driven by a thermosyphon effect. The external cryogenic system consists of a 1.5 kW at 4.5 K (entropy equivalent) cryoplant including an additional liquid nitrogen precooling unit and a 5000 litre liquid helium buffer. The whole magnet and cryogenic system will be tested at the surface by 2003 before final installation in the underground area of LHC.

  1. Magnetic field, inductance of circular coil and solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Hoyos, P.; Barbero Garcia, A.J.; Mafe Matoses, S.

    1995-01-01

    The self-inductance of a current-carrying circular coil and the mutual inductances of the Helmholtz coils and coil-sole-noid systems have been measured and calculated theoretically. The experiments and the required equipment are suited to an undergraduate laboratory. The theoretical calculation involve the use of simple numerical integration methods for evaluating the magnetic field of the circular coil and the inductances. The calculated values agree with the measurements within the experimental error. The material presented can be proposed to the students as a laboratory project. (Author) 7 refs

  2. Effect of High Solenoidal Magnetic Fields on Breakdown Voltages of High Vacuum 805 MHz Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Moretti, A; Geer, S; Qian, Z

    2004-01-01

    The demonstration of muon ionization cooling by a large factor is necessary to demonstrate the feasilibility of a collider or neutrino factory. An important cooling experiment, MICE [1], has been proposed to demonstrate 10 % cooling which will validate the technology. Ionization cooling is accomplished by passing a high-emittance beam in a multi-Tesla solenoidal channel alternately through regions of low Z material and very high accelerating RF Cavities. To determine the effect of very large solenoidal magnetic fields on the generations of Dark current, X-Rays and breakdown Voltage gradients of vacuum RF cavities, a test facility has been established at Fermilab in Lab G. This facility consists of a 12 MW 805 MHz RF station, and a large bore 5 T solenoidal superconducting magnet containing a pill box type Cavity with thin removable window apertures allowing dark current studies and breakdown studies of different materials. The results of this study will be presented. The study has shown that the peak achievab...

  3. Effect Of The LEBT Solenoid Magnetic Field On The Beam Generation For Particle Tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Yarmohammadi Satri, M; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2013-01-01

    Linac4 is a 160 MeV H- linear accelerator which will replace the 50 MeV proton Linac2 for upgrade of the LHC injectors with higher intensity and eventually an increase of the LHC luminosity. Linac4 structure is a source, a 45 keV low energy beam transport line (LEBT) with two solenoids, a 3 MeV Radiofrequency Quadrupole (RFQ), a Medium Energy Beam Transport line (MEBT), a 50 Mev DTL, a 100 Mev CCDTL and PIMS up to 160 Mev. We use Travel v4.07 and PathManager code for simulation. Firstly, we need to a file as a source and defining the beginning point (last point in tracking back) of simulation. We recognise the starting point base on the solenoid magnetic property of LEBT.

  4. Fabrication of solenoid-type inductor with electroplated NiFe magnetic core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xiaoyu; Cao Ying; Zhou Yong; Ding Wen; Lei Chong; Chen Jian

    2006-01-01

    Solenoid-type inductor with ultra-low profile was fabricated by MEMS (Microelectromechanical systems) technique. NiFe film was electroplated as the magnetic core, and polyimide with a low relative permittivity was used as the insulation material. In the fabrication process, UV-LIGA, dry etching, fine polishing and electroplating technique have been adopted to achieve high performance of the solenoid-type inductor. The inductor was in size of 1.5 mmx0.9 mmx0.1 mm with coil width of 20 μm and aspect ratio of 5:1. The inductance and the quality factor were 0.42-0.345 μH and 1.8-5.3 in the frequency range of 1-10 MHz, respectively

  5. A harmonic expansion for the magnetic field of the helical solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewar, R.L.; Gardner, H.J.

    1987-03-01

    We discuss the boundary value problem for calculating the scalar magnetic potentials inside and outside of a helically symmetric solenoid. Under some circumstances the potentials can be expanded in infinite series of cylindrical harmonics. For a circular cross-section solenoid, we derive a Green's function integral representation of the series coefficients and calculate the radii of convergence of the series by a saddle point method. In some cases the cylinders of convergence can intersect the coil, so that there are physically accessible regions where the series fail to converge. Numerical evidence is presented to show that, even in some of these cases, the potentials can be accurately approximated by finite sums of cylindrical harmonics using boundary collocation

  6. Enhanced collective focusing of intense neutralized ion beam pulses in the presence of weak solenoidal magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    The design of ion drivers for warm dense matter and high energy density physics applications and heavy ion fusion involves transverse focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams to a small spot size on the target. To facilitate the process, the compression occurs in a long drift section filled with a dense background plasma, which neutralizes the intense beam self-fields. Typically, the ion bunch charge is better neutralized than its current, and as a result a net self-pinching (magnetic) force is produced. The self-pinching effect is of particular practical importance, and is used in various ion driver designs in order to control the transverse beam envelope. In the present work we demonstrate that this radial self-focusing force can be significantly enhanced if a weak (B ∼ 100 G) solenoidal magnetic field is applied inside the neutralized drift section, thus allowing for substantially improved transport. It is shown that in contrast to magnetic self-pinching, the enhanced collective self-focusing has a radial electric field component and occurs as a result of the overcompensation of the beam charge by plasma electrons, whereas the beam current becomes well-neutralized. As the beam leaves the neutralizing drift section, additional transverse focusing can be applied. For instance, in the neutralized drift compression experiments (NDCX) a strong (several Tesla) final focus solenoid is used for this purpose. In the present analysis we propose that the tight final focus in the NDCX experiments may possibly be achieved by using a much weaker (few hundred Gauss) magnetic lens, provided the ion beam carries an equal amount of co-moving neutralizing electrons from the preceding drift section into the lens. In this case the enhanced focusing is provided by the collective electron dynamics strongly affected by a weak applied magnetic field.

  7. Stress Analysis of the D-Zero Solenoid Magnet Lifting Fixture PPD Fixture No.102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaczek, M.

    1997-01-01

    This engineering note presents stress analysis calculations for the below the hook lifting fixture which will be used to move the D-Zero solenoid magnet during installation work at the D-Zero Assembly building. Load bearing structural members are shown to have a minimum design factor of 3 based on yield strength as required by ASME B30.20. All bolts were analyzed and shown to be kept below allowable loads/stresses listed in the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) manual. The lifting fixture will be manufactured at Fermilab using some material scavenged from an existing lifting fixture that was shipped with the magnet from the magnet manufacturer, Toshiba Corporation. The fixture is designed with built in versatility so that the solenoid magnet can be maneuvered through the stages of preparation and installation into it's final mounted position. The structure has been analyzed for all phases of its use, although the analysis of the structure as a below the hook lifting device is the main purpose of this note.

  8. Optimal laser heating of plasmas confined in strong solenoidal magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitela, J.; Akcasu, A.Z.

    1987-01-01

    Optimal Control Theory is used to analyze the laser-heating of plasmas confined in strong solenoidal magnetic fields. Heating strategies that minimize a linear combination of heating time and total energy spent by the laser system are found. A numerical example is used to illustrate the theory. Results of this example show that by an appropriate modulation of the laser intensity, significant savings in the laser energy are possible with only slight increases in the heating time. However, results may depend strongly on the initial state of the plasma and on the final ion temperature. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic shielding for a transversely polarized target in the longitudinal field of the PANDA solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehlich, Bertold; Ahmed, Samer; Dbeyssi, Alaa; Mora Espi, Maria Carmen; Gerz, Kathrin; Lin, Dexu; Maas, Frank; Martinez, Ana Penuelas; Morales, Cristina; Wang, Yadi [Helmholtz Institut Mainz (Germany); Aguar Bartolome, Patricia [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    A transversely polarized target in PANDA would allow for the first time access to the imaginary part of the time like electromagnetic proton form factors, namely the phase angle in the imaginary plane between electric and magnetic form factors. Moreover it would allow for a number of other target single spin asymmetries revealing nucleon structure observables connected with the transverse spin structure of the proton. As a first step for achieving a transverse target polarization, the target region has to be shielded against the 2 T longitudinal magnetic flux from the solenoid of the PANDA spectrometer. We present experimental results on intense magnetic flux shielding using a BSCCO-2212 high temperature superconducting hollow cylinder at liquid helium temperature.

  10. Comparison analysis of superconducting solenoid magnet systems for ECR ion source based on the evolution strategy optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Shao Qing; Lee, Sang Jin [Uiduk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is an essential component of heavy-ion accelerator. For a given design, the intensities of the highly charged ion beams extracted from the source can be increased by enlarging the physical volume of ECR zone. Several models for ECR ion source were and will be constructed depending on their operating conditions. In this paper three simulation models with 3, 4 and 6 solenoid system were built, but it's not considered anything else except the number of coils. Two groups of optimization analysis are presented, and the evolution strategy (ES) is adopted as an optimization tool which is a technique based on the ideas of mutation, adaptation and annealing. In this research, the volume of ECR zone was calculated approximately, and optimized designs for ECR solenoid magnet system were presented. Firstly it is better to make the volume of ECR zone large to increase the intensity of ion beam under the specific confinement field conditions. At the same time the total volume of superconducting solenoids must be decreased to save material. By considering the volume of ECR zone and the total length of solenoids in each model with different number of coils, the 6 solenoid system represented the highest coil performance. By the way, a certain case, ECR zone volume itself can be essential than the cost. So the maximum ECR zone volume for each solenoid magnet system was calculated respectively with the same size of the plasma chamber and the total magnet space. By comparing the volume of ECR zone, the 6 solenoid system can be also made with the maximum ECR zone volume.

  11. Simulation of adiabatic thermal beams in a periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Barton

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are performed to verify earlier theoretical predictions of adiabatic thermal beams in a periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field [K. R. Samokhvalova, J. Zhou, and C. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 14, 103102 (2007PHPAEN1070-664X10.1063/1.2779281; J. Zhou, K. R. Samokhvalova, and C. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 15, 023102 (2008PHPAEN1070-664X10.1063/1.2837891]. In particular, results are obtained for adiabatic thermal beams that do not rotate in the Larmor frame. For such beams, the theoretical predictions of the rms beam envelope, the conservations of the rms thermal emittances, the adiabatic equation of state, and the Debye length are verified in the simulations. Furthermore, the adiabatic thermal beam is found be stable in the parameter regime where the simulations are performed.

  12. Strength-limited magnetic field intensity of toroidal magnet systems fabricated or the base of layer-by-layer shrouded solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinnko, Yu.A.

    1982-01-01

    The possibilities, as to the ultimate magnetic field strength, of tokamak magnet systems made on the base of layer-by-laeyer shrouded coils are considered numerically. The toroidal magnet system is considered which consists of N skewe, layer-by-layer shrouded, equistrong coils in the ideal torus approximation. The dependences of the ragnetic field strength on the internal- and external torus radii, pulse duration and aspect ratio for copper coils shrouded with fiberglass are calculated as an example. The analysis of the obtained results shows that using of the layer-by-layer shrouding scheme for toroidal solenoid coils leads to a considerable growth of the ultimate magnetic field strengths in a wide duration range. For example, the limiting field strength along the toroidal solenoid axis of the considered type inside the ''FT'' installation toroidal solenoid at equivalent field pulse duration of approximately 0.3 s reaches H 0 =1.3zx10 7 A/m

  13. The CMS superconducting solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The huge solenoid that will generate the magnetic field for the CMS experiment at the LHC is shown stored in the assembly hall above the experimental cavern. The solenoid is made up of five pieces totaling 12.5 m in length and 6 m in diameter. It weighs 220 tonnes and will produce a 4 T magnetic field, 100 000 times the strength of the Earth's magnetic field, storing enough energy to melt 18 tonnes of gold.

  14. Study of blood flow inside the stenosis vessel under the effect of solenoid magnetic field using ferrohydrodynamics principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badfar, Homayoun; Motlagh, Saber Yekani; Sharifi, Abbas

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, biomagnetic blood flow in the stenosis vessel under the effect of the solenoid magnetic field is studied using the ferrohydrodynamics (FHD) model. The parabolic profile is considered at an inlet of the axisymmetric stenosis vessel. Blood is modeled as electrically non-conducting, Newtonian and homogeneous fluid. Finite volume and the SIMPLE (Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure Linked Equations) algorithm are utilized to discretize governing equations. The investigation is studied at different magnetic numbers ( MnF=164, 328, 1640 and 3280) and the number of the coil loops (three, five and nine loops). Results indicate an increase in heat transfer, wall shear stress and energy loss (pressure drop) with an increment in the magnetic number (ratio of Kelvin force to dynamic pressure force), arising from the FHD, and the number of solenoid loops. Furthermore, the flow pattern is affected by the magnetic field, and the temperature of blood can be decreased up to 1.48 {}°C under the effect of the solenoid magnetic field with nine loops and reference magnetic field ( B0) of 2 tesla.

  15. Application of optimal control theory to laser heating of a plasma in a solenoidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neal, R.D.

    1975-01-01

    Laser heating of a plasma column confined by a solenoidal magnetic field is studied via modern optimal control techniques. A two-temperature, constant pressure model is used for the plasma so that the temperature and density are functions of time and location along the plasma column. They are assumed to be uniform in the radial direction so that refraction of the laser beam does not occur. The laser intensity used as input to the column at one end is taken as the control variable and plasma losses are neglected. The localized behavior of the plasma heating dynamics is first studied and conventional optimal control theory applied. The distributed parameter optimal control problem is next considered with minimum time to reach a specified final ion temperature criterion as the objective. Since the laser intensity can only be directly controlled at the input end of the plasma column, a boundary control situation results. The problem is unique in that the control is the boundary value of one of the state variables. The necessary conditions are developed and the problem solved numerically for typical plasma parameters. The problem of maximizing the space-time integral of neutron production rate in the plasma is considered for a constant distributed control problem where the laser intensity is assumed fixed at maximum and the external magnetic field is taken as a control variable

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance at 310 MHz in a superconducting solenoid; Resonance magnetique nucleaire a 310 MHz dans un solenoide supra-conducteur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunand, J J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1970-07-01

    The realisation of an NMR spectrometer with a superconducting magnet is presented in the first section. The methods to attain the best possible homogeneity of the magnetic field and to minimize the error in the spectrometer are described. The second section is devoted to the study of elastomers and nitr-oxides free radicals. A shift of the transition temperature with the magnetic field appears for the elastomers. The increasing paramagnetic shift has allowed a complete study by NMR of piperidinic and pyrrolidinic nitroxide free radicals. (author) [French] Dans la premiere partie est exposee la realisation d'un spectrometre de RMN utilisant un solenoide supraconducteur. Des solutions sont donnees pour obtenir la meilleure homogeneite possible du champ magnetique et pour minimiser les sources d'erreur apportees par le spectrometre. La deuxieme partie est consacree a l'etude d'elastomeres et de radicaux libres nitroxydes. Une variation de la temperature de transition avec le champ magnetique est mise en evidence pour les elastomeres. L'accroissement du deplacement paramagnetique a permis une etude complete par RMN des radicaux libres nitroxydes piperidiniques et pyrrolidiniques. (auteur)

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance at 310 MHz in a superconducting solenoid; Resonance magnetique nucleaire a 310 MHz dans un solenoide supra-conducteur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunand, J.J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1970-07-01

    The realisation of an NMR spectrometer with a superconducting magnet is presented in the first section. The methods to attain the best possible homogeneity of the magnetic field and to minimize the error in the spectrometer are described. The second section is devoted to the study of elastomers and nitr-oxides free radicals. A shift of the transition temperature with the magnetic field appears for the elastomers. The increasing paramagnetic shift has allowed a complete study by NMR of piperidinic and pyrrolidinic nitroxide free radicals. (author) [French] Dans la premiere partie est exposee la realisation d'un spectrometre de RMN utilisant un solenoide supraconducteur. Des solutions sont donnees pour obtenir la meilleure homogeneite possible du champ magnetique et pour minimiser les sources d'erreur apportees par le spectrometre. La deuxieme partie est consacree a l'etude d'elastomeres et de radicaux libres nitroxydes. Une variation de la temperature de transition avec le champ magnetique est mise en evidence pour les elastomeres. L'accroissement du deplacement paramagnetique a permis une etude complete par RMN des radicaux libres nitroxydes piperidiniques et pyrrolidiniques. (auteur)

  18. INDUCTION HEATING OF NON-MAGNETIC SHEET METALS IN THE FIELD OF A FLAT CIRCULAR MULTITURN SOLENOID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Batygin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical analysis of electromagnetic processes in the system for induction heating presented by a flat circular multiturn solenoid positioned above a plane of thin sheet non-magnetic metal has been conducted. The calculated dependences for the current induced in a metal sheet blank and ratio of transformation determined have been obtained. The maximal value of the transformation ratio with regard to spreading the eddy-currents over the whole area of the sheet metal has been determined.

  19. ATLAS Solenoid Integration

    CERN Multimedia

    Ruber, R

    Last month the central solenoid was installed in the barrel cryostat, which it shares with the liquid argon calorimeter. Figure 1: Some members of the solenoid and liquid argon teams proudly pose in front of the barrel cryosat, complete with detector and magnet. Some two years ago the central solenoid arrived at CERN after being manufactured and tested in Japan. It was kept in storage until last October when it was finally moved to the barrel cryostat integration area. Here a position survey of the solenoid (with respect to the cryostat's inner warm vessel) was performed. Figure 2: The alignment survey by Dirk Mergelkuhl and Aude Wiart. (EST-SU) At the start of the New Year the solenoid was moved to the cryostat insertion stand. Figure 3: The solenoid on the insertion stand, with Akira Yamamoto the solenoid designer and project leader. Figure 4: Taka Kondo, ATLAS Japan spokesperson, and Shoichi Mizumaki, Toshiba project engineer for the ATLAS solenoid, celebrate the insertion. Aft...

  20. Short-circuited coil in a solenoid circuit of a pulse magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivshik, A.F.; Dubrovin, V.Yu.

    1976-01-01

    A short-circuited coil at the end of a long pulse solenoid attenuates the dissipation field by 3-5 times. A plug-configuration field is set up in the middle portion of the pulse solenoid incorporating the short-circuited coils. Shunting of the coils with the induction current by resistor Rsub(shunt) provides for the adjustment of the plug ratio γ

  1. Schrödinger and Dirac operators with the Aharonov-Bohm and magnetic-solenoid fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitman, D M; Tyutin, I V; Voronov, B L

    2012-01-01

    We construct all self-adjoint Schrödinger and Dirac operators (Hamiltonians) with both the pure Aharonov-Bohm (AB) field and the so-called magnetic-solenoid field (a collinear superposition of the AB field and a constant magnetic field). We perform a spectral analysis for these operators, which includes finding spectra and spectral decompositions, or inversion formulae. In constructing the Hamiltonians and performing their spectral analysis, we follow, respectively, the von Neumann theory of self-adjoint extensions of symmetric operators and the Krein method of guiding functionals. (paper)

  2. LCLS Gun Solenoid Design Considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmerge, John

    2010-01-01

    The LCLS photocathode rf gun requires a solenoid immediately downstream for proper emittance compensation. Such a gun and solenoid have been operational at the SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) for over eight years. Based on magnetic measurements and operational experience with the GTF gun solenoid multiple modifications are suggested for the LCLS gun solenoid. The modifications include adding dipole and quadrupole correctors inside the solenoid, increasing the bore to accommodate the correctors, decreasing the mirror plate thickness to allow the solenoid to move closer to the cathode, cutouts in the mirror plate to allow greater optical clearance with grazing incidence cathode illumination, utilizing pancake coil mirror images to compensate the first and second integrals of the transverse fields and incorporating a bipolar power supply to allow for proper magnet standardization and quick polarity changes. This paper describes all these modifications plus the magnetic measurements and operational experience leading to the suggested modifications.

  3. Commissioning and Testing the 1970's Era LASS Solenoid Magnet in JLab's Hall D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballard, Joshua T. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Biallas, George H. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Brown, G.; Butler, David E. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Carstens, Thomas J. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Chudakov, Eugene A. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Creel, Jonathan D. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Egiyan, Hovanes [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Martin, F.; Qiang, Yi [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Smith, Elton S. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Stevens, Mark A. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Spiegel, Scot L. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Whitlatch, Timothy E. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Wolin, Elliott J. [Carnegie Mellon University , Pittsburgh, PA; Ghoshal, Probir K. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA

    2015-06-01

    JLab refurbished and reconfigured the LASS1, 1.85m bore Solenoid and installed it as the principal analysis magnet for nuclear physics in the newly constructed, Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The magnet contains four superconducting coils within an iron yoke. The magnet was built in the early1970's at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and used a second time at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The coils were extensively refurbished and individually tested by JLab. A new Cryogenic Distribution Box provides cryogens and their control valving, current distribution bus, and instrumentation pass-through. A repurposed CTI 2800 refrigerator system and new transfer line complete the system. We describe the re-configuration, the process and problems of re-commissioning the magnet and the results of testing the completed magnet.

  4. Coherent and semiclassical states in a magnetic field in the presence of the Aharonov-Bohm solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V G [Department of Physics, Tomsk State University, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Gavrilov, S P; Gitman, D M; Filho, D P Meira, E-mail: bagrov@phys.tsu.ru, E-mail: gavrilovsergeyp@yahoo.com, E-mail: gitman@dfn.if.usp.br, E-mail: dmeira@dfn.if.usp.br [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, CP 66318, CEP 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-02-04

    A new approach to constructing coherent states (CS) and semiclassical states (SS) in a magnetic-solenoid field is proposed. The main idea is based on the fact that the AB solenoid breaks the translational symmetry in the xy-plane; this has a topological effect such that there appear two types of trajectories which embrace and do not embrace the solenoid. Due to this fact, one has to construct two different kinds of CS/SS which correspond to such trajectories in the semiclassical limit. Following this idea, we construct CS in two steps, first the instantaneous CS (ICS) and then the time-dependent CS/SS as an evolution of the ICS. The construction is realized for nonrelativistic and relativistic spinning particles both in (2 + 1) and (3 + 1) dimensions and gives a non-trivial example of SS/CS for systems with a nonquadratic Hamiltonian. It is stressed that CS depending on their parameters (quantum numbers) describe both pure quantum and semiclassical states. An analysis is represented that classifies parameters of the CS in such respect. Such a classification is used for the semiclassical decompositions of various physical quantities.

  5. Coherent and semiclassical states in a magnetic field in the presence of the Aharonov-Bohm solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagrov, V G; Gavrilov, S P; Gitman, D M; Filho, D P Meira

    2011-01-01

    A new approach to constructing coherent states (CS) and semiclassical states (SS) in a magnetic-solenoid field is proposed. The main idea is based on the fact that the AB solenoid breaks the translational symmetry in the xy-plane; this has a topological effect such that there appear two types of trajectories which embrace and do not embrace the solenoid. Due to this fact, one has to construct two different kinds of CS/SS which correspond to such trajectories in the semiclassical limit. Following this idea, we construct CS in two steps, first the instantaneous CS (ICS) and then the time-dependent CS/SS as an evolution of the ICS. The construction is realized for nonrelativistic and relativistic spinning particles both in (2 + 1) and (3 + 1) dimensions and gives a non-trivial example of SS/CS for systems with a nonquadratic Hamiltonian. It is stressed that CS depending on their parameters (quantum numbers) describe both pure quantum and semiclassical states. An analysis is represented that classifies parameters of the CS in such respect. Such a classification is used for the semiclassical decompositions of various physical quantities.

  6. Motions of CMS detector structures due to the magnetic field forces as observed by the Link alignment system during the test of the 4 T magnet solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Moral, L.A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Martinez, P.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (IFCA), CSIC-Universidad de Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Sobron, M. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (IFCA), CSIC-Universidad de Cantabria, Santander (Spain)], E-mail: sobron@ifca.unican.es; Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain)] (and others)

    2009-07-21

    This document describes results obtained from the Link alignment system data recorded during the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Magnet Test. A brief description of the system is followed by a discussion of the detected relative displacements (from micrometres to centimetres) between detector elements and rotations of detector structures (from microradians to milliradians). Observed displacements are studied as functions of the magnetic field intensity. In addition, the reconstructed positions of active element sensors are compared to their positions as measured by photogrammetry and the reconstructed motions due to the magnetic field strength are described.

  7. Motions of CMS detector structures due to the magnetic field forces as observed by the Link alignment system during the test of the 4 T magnet solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Moral, L.A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Martinez, P.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L.; Sobron, M.; Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    This document describes results obtained from the Link alignment system data recorded during the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Magnet Test. A brief description of the system is followed by a discussion of the detected relative displacements (from micrometres to centimetres) between detector elements and rotations of detector structures (from microradians to milliradians). Observed displacements are studied as functions of the magnetic field intensity. In addition, the reconstructed positions of active element sensors are compared to their positions as measured by photogrammetry and the reconstructed motions due to the magnetic field strength are described.

  8. Design, fabrication, and characterization of a solenoid system to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    system to generate magnetic field for an ECR proton source. S K JAIN .... The bore of the solenoid coils was fabricated using high voltage glass epoxy. Each ... sure drop and flow, the inlet and outlet connections were provided. ... stability of an ECR plasma source, as any small change in the distribution of the axial magnetic.

  9. Inauguration of the CMS solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    In early 2005 the final piece of the CMS solenoid magnet arrived, marked by this ceremony held in the CMS assembly hall at Cessy, France. The solenoid is made up of five pieces totaling 12.5 m in length and 6 m in diameter. Weighing 220 tonnes, it will produce a 4 T magnetic field, 100 000 times the strength of the Earth's magnetic field and store enough energy to melt 18 tonnes of gold.

  10. Laser heating and magnetic compression of plasma in a fast solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoida, H.W.; Vlases, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    A low-β plasma column a few mm in diameter by 22 cm in length is heated by an axially directed CO 2 laser to a high-β state in a fast rising solenoidal field. Successful heating depends on proper timing between the laser pulse and rising field. Typical conditions attained are a line energy density of 6 J/cm, T-barapprox. =40 eV, and n/sub e/approx. =3 x 10 17 e - /cm 3 , with conditions quite uniform along the length. The heating suppresses instabilities which appear under certain conditions in the non-laser-heated case

  11. Measurements of the temporal onset of mega-Gauss magnetic fields in a laser-driven solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyon, Clement; Polllock, B. B.; Turnbull, D. T.; Hazi, A.; Ross, J. S.; Mariscal, D. A.; Patankar, S.; Williams, G. J.; Farmer, W. A.; Moody, J. D.; Fujioka, S.; Law, K. F. F.

    2016-10-01

    We report on experimental results obtained at Omega EP showing a nearly linear increase of the B-field up to about 2 mega-Gauss in 0.75 ns in a 1 mm3 region. The field is generated using 1 TW of 351 nm laser power ( 8*1015 W/cm2) incident on a laser-driven solenoid target. The coil target converts about 1% of the laser energy into the B-field measured both inside and outside the coil using proton deflectometry with a grid and Faraday rotation of probe beam through SiO2 glass. Proton data indicates a current rise up to hundreds of kA with a spatial distribution in the Au solenoid conductor evolving in time. These results give insight into the generating mechanism of the current between the plates and the time behavior of the field. These experiments are motivated by recent efforts to understand and utilize High Energy Density (HED) plasmas in the presence of external magnetic fields in areas of research from Astrophysics to Inertial Confinement Fusion. We will describe the experimental results and scale them to a NIF hohlraum size. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Ultrafast probing of magnetic field growth inside a laser-driven solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyon, C.; Pollock, B. B.; Turnbull, D. P.; Hazi, A.; Divol, L.; Farmer, W. A.; Haberberger, D.; Javedani, J.; Johnson, A. J.; Kemp, A.; Levy, M. C.; Grant Logan, B.; Mariscal, D. A.; Landen, O. L.; Patankar, S.; Ross, J. S.; Rubenchik, A. M.; Swadling, G. F.; Williams, G. J.; Fujioka, S.; Law, K. F. F.; Moody, J. D.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the detection of the time-dependent B-field amplitude and topology in a laser-driven solenoid. The B-field inferred from both proton deflectometry and Faraday rotation ramps up linearly in time reaching 210 ± 35 T at the end of a 0.75-ns laser drive with 1 TW at 351 nm. A lumped-element circuit model agrees well with the linear rise and suggests that the blow-off plasma screens the field between the plates leading to an increased plate capacitance that converts the laser-generated hot-electron current into a voltage source that drives current through the solenoid. ALE3D modeling shows that target disassembly and current diffusion may limit the B-field increase for longer laser drive. Scaling of these experimental results to a National Ignition Facility (NIF) hohlraum target size (˜0.2 cm3 ) indicates that it is possible to achieve several tens of Tesla.

  13. The first module of CMS superconducting magnet is leaving towards CERN: a huge solenoid, which will hold the world record of stored energy

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first module of the five which will make up the CMS superconducting magnet is sailing today from Genova port to CERN. The CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) is one of the experiments that will take place at the accelerator LHC. The device will arrive after 10-days of travel (1 page)

  14. Solenoid for Laser Induced Plasma Experiments at Janus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sallee; Leferve, Heath; Kemp, Gregory; Mariscal, Derek; Rasmus, Alex; Williams, Jackson; Gillespie, Robb; Manuel, Mario; Kuranz, Carolyn; Keiter, Paul; Drake, R.

    2017-10-01

    Creating invariant magnetic fields for experiments involving laser induced plasmas is particularly challenging due to the high voltages at which the solenoid must be pulsed. Creating a solenoid resilient enough to survive through large numbers of voltage discharges, enabling it to endure a campaign lasting several weeks, is exceptionally difficult. Here we present a solenoid that is robust through 40 μs pulses at a 13 kV potential. This solenoid is a vast improvement over our previously fielded designs in peak magnetic field capabilities and robustness. Designed to be operated at small-scale laser facilities, the solenoid housing allows for versatility of experimental set-ups among diagnostic and target positions. Within the perpendicular field axis at the center there is 300 degrees of clearance which can be easily modified to meet the needs of a specific experiment, as well as an f/3 cone for transmitted or backscattered light. After initial design efforts, these solenoids are relatively inexpensive to manufacture.

  15. Processing and characterization of superconducting solenoids made of Bi-2212/Ag-alloy multifilament round wire for high field magnet applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng

    -off and full coil reaction. The coil was successfully tested at the NHMFL generating 33.8 T combined magnetic field in a 31.2 T background field. Multiple quenches occurred safely, which also illustrates that the insulation provided sufficient dielectric standoff. For Bi-2212 RW with a typical as-drawn diameter of 1.0-1.5 mm, this 15 microm thick insulation allows a very high coil packing factor of ~0.74, whereas earlier alumino-silicate braid insulation only allows packing factors of 0.38-0.48. In addition to the commercial TiO2/polymer insulation, we have also investigated sol-gel based ceramic coatings through collaboration with Harran University and another TiO2 based insulation coating at the NHMFL. Since Bi-2212 superconducting coils employ the Wind-and-React (W&R) technology, there are some potential issues in processing Bi-2212 coils, in particular for coils with a large thermal mass and dense oxide insulation coating. For this study, several Bi-2212 test solenoids with an outer diameter (OD) of about 90 mm were built and heat treated in 1 bar flowing oxygen with deadweights applied so as to simulate large coil packs. After the heat treatment (HT), coils were epoxy impregnated and cut. Winding pack was checked using SEM in terms of conductor geometry and insulation. Some samples were extracted to measure transport critical current Ic and critical temperature Tc. The results are very promising: test coils presented low creep behavior after standard partial melt HT under mechanical load, and no Ic degradation was found due to the application of mechanical load, and no inadequate oxygenation issue was seen for thick coils with ceramic coating on the wire. However, coils were partially electrically shorted after 1 bar HT under mechanical load, and we believe that increasing insulation coating thickness is necessary. In addition, several small solenoids were manufactured to study OP processing of Bi-2212 coils. The preliminary results indicate that there are some gaps

  16. Technical Design Report for the PANDA Solenoid and Dipole Spectrometer Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Erni, W; Krusche, B; Steinacher, M; Heng, Y; Liu, Z; Liu, H; Shen, X; Wang, O; Xu, H; Becker, J; Feldbauer, F; Heinsius, F -H; Held, T; Koch, H; Kopf, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Wiedner, U; Zhong, J; Bianconi, A; Bragadireanu, M; Pantea, D; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; De Napoli, M; Giacoppo, F; Raciti, G; Rapisarda, E; Sfienti, C; Bialkowski, E; Budzanowski, A; Czech, B; Kistryn, M; Kliczewski, S; Kozela, A; Kulessa, P; Pysz, K; Schäfer, W; Siudak, R; Szczurek, A; zycki, W Czy; Domagala, M; Hawryluk, M; Lisowski, E; Lisowski, F; Wojnar, L; Gil, D; Hawranek, P; Kamys, B; Kistryn, St; Korcyl, K; Krzemien, W; Magiera, A; Moskal, P; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Smyrski, J; Wronska, A; Al-Turany, M; Augustin, I; Deppe, H; Flemming, H; Gerl, J; Goetzen, K; Hohler, R; Lehmann, D; Lewandowski, B; Lühning, J; Maas, F; Mishra, D; Orth, H; Peters, K; Saitô, T; Schepers, G; Schmidt, C J; Schmitt, L; Schwarz, C; Voss, B; Wieczorek, P; Wilms, A; Brinkmann, K -T; Freiesleben, H; Jaekel, R; Kliemt, R; Wuerschig, T; Zaunick, H -G; Abazov, V M; Alexeev, G; Arefev, A; Astakhov, V I; Barabanov, M Yu; Batyunya, B V; Davydov, Yu I; Dodokhov, V Kh; Efremov, A A; Fedunov, A G; Feshchenko, A A; Galoyan, A S; Grigorian, S; Karmokov, A; Koshurnikov, E K; Kudaev, V Ch; Lobanov, V I; Lobanov, Yu Yu; Makarov, A F; Malinina, L V; Malyshev, V L; Mustafaev, G A; Olshevski, A; Pasyuk, M A; Perevalova, E A; Piskun, A A; Pocheptsov, T A; Pontecorvo, G; Rodionov, V K; Rogov, Yu N; Salmin, R A; Samartsev, A G; Sapozhnikov, M G; Shabratova, A; Shabratova, G S; Skachkova, A N; Skachkov, N B; Strokovsky, E A; Suleimanov, M K; Teshev, R Sh; Tokmenin, V V; Uzhinsky, V V; Vodopyanov, A S; Zaporozhets, S A; Zhuravlev, N I; Zorin, A G; Branford, D; Föhl, K; Glazier, D; Watts, D; Woods, P; Eyrich, W; Lehmann, A; Teufel, A; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K; Tann, B; Tomaradze, A G; Bettoni, D; Carassiti, V; Cecchi, A; Dalpiaz, P; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Negrini, M; Savri`e, M; Stancari, G; Dulach, B; Gianotti, P; Guaraldo, C; Lucherini, V; Pace, E; Bersani, A; Macri, M; Marinelli, M; Parodi, R F; Brodski, I; Döring, W; Drexler, P; Düren, M; Gagyi-Palffy, Z; Hayrapetyan, A; Kotulla, M; Kühn, W; Lange, S; Liu, M; Metag, V; Nanova, M; Novotny, R; Salz, C; Schneider, J; Schoenmeier, P; Schubert, R; Spataro, S; Stenzel, H; Strackbein, C; Thiel, M; Thoering, U; Yang, S; Clarkson, T; Cowie, E; Downie, E; Hill, G; Hoek, M; Ireland, D; Kaiser, R; Keri, T; Lehmann, I; Livingston, K; Lumsden, S; MacGregor, D; McKinnon, B; Murray, M; Protopopescu, D; Rosner, G; Seitz, B; Yang, G; Babai, M; Biegun, A K; Bubak, A; Guliyev, E; Jothi, V S; Kavatsyuk, M; Löhner, H; Messchendorp, J; Smit, H; van der Weele, J C; García, F; Riska, D -O; Büscher, M; Dosdall, R; Dzhygadlo, R; Gillitzer, A; Grunwald, D; Jha, V; Kemmerling, G; Kleines, H; Lehrach, A; Maier, R; Mertens, M; Ohm, H; Prasuhn, D; Randriamalala, T; Ritman, J; Roeder, M; Stockmanns, T; Wintz, P; Wüstner, P; Kisiel, J; Li, S; Li, Z; Sun, Z; Xu, H; Fissum, S; Hansen, K; Isaksson, L; Lundin, M; Schröder, B; Achenbach, P; Espi, M C Mora; Pochodzalla, J; Sanchez, S; Sanchez-Lorente, A; Dormenev, V I; Fedorov, A A; Korzhik, M V; Missevitch, O V; Balanutsa, V; Chernetsky, V; Demekhin, A; Dolgolenko, A; Fedorets, P; Gerasimov, A; Goryachev, V; Boukharov, A; Malyshev, O; Marishev, I; Semenov, A; Hoeppner, C; Ketzer, B; Konorov, I; Mann, A; Neubert, S; Paul, S; Weitzel, Q; Khoukaz, A; Rausmann, T; Täschner, A; Wessels, J; Varma, R; Baldin, E; Kotov, K; Peleganchuk, S; Tikhonov, Yu; Boucher, J; Hennino, T; Kunne, R; Ong, S; Pouthas, J; Ramstein, B; Rosier, P; Sudol, M; Van de Wiele, J; Zerguerras, T; Dmowski, K; Korzeniewski, R; Przemyslaw, D; Slowinski, B; Boca, G; Braghieri, A; Costanza, S; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Lavezzi, L; Montagna, P; Rotondi, A; Belikov, N I; Davidenko, A M; Derevshchikov, A A; Goncharenko, Yu M; Grishin, V N; Kachanov, V A; Konstantinov, D A; Kormilitsin, V A; Kravtsov, V I; Matulenko, Yu A; Melnik, Y M; Meshchanin, A P; Minaev, N G; Mochalov, V V; Morozov, D A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Ryazantsev, A V; Semenov, P A; Soloviev, L F; Uzunian, A V; Vasilev, A N; Yakutin, A E; Baeck, T; Cederwall, B; Bargholtz, C; Geren, L; Tegnér, P E; Belostotskii, S; Gavrilov, G; Itzotov, A; Kiselev, A; Kravchenko, P; Manaenkov, S; Miklukho, O; Naryshkin, Yu; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Zhadanov, A; Fava, L; Panzieri, D; Alberto, D; Amoroso, A; Botta, E; Bressani, T; Bufalino, S; Bussa, M P; Busso, L; De Mori, F; Destefanis, M; Ferrero, L; Grasso, A; Greco, M; Kugathasan, T; Maggiora, M; Marcello, S; Serbanut, G; Sosio, S; Bertini, R; Calvo, D; Coli, S; De Remigis, P; Feliciello, A; Filippi, A; Giraudo, G; Mazza, G; Rivetti, A; Szymanska, K; Tosello, F; Wheadon, R; Morra, O; Agnello, M; Iazzi, F; Szymanska, K; Birsa, R; Bradamante, F; Bressan, A; Martin, A; Clement, H; Ekström, C; Calén, H; Grape, S; Hoeistad, B; Johansson, T; Kupsc, A; Marciniewski, P; Thomé, E; Zlomanczuk, Yu; Díaz, J; Ortiz, A; Borsuk, S; Chlopik, A; Guzik, Z; Kopec, J; Kozlovskii, T; Melnychuk, D; Plominski, M; Szewinski, J; Traczyk, K; Zwieglinski, B; Bühler, P; Gruber, A; Kienle, P; Marton, J; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2009-01-01

    This document is the Technical Design Report covering the two large spectrometer magnets of the PANDA detector set-up. It shows the conceptual design of the magnets and their anticipated performance. It precedes the tender and procurement of the magnets and, hence, is subject to possible modifications arising during this process.

  17. Technical Design Report for the PANDA Solenoid and Dipole Spectrometer Magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erni, W.; Keshelashvili, I; Krusche, B.

    2009-01-01

    This document is the Technical Design Report covering the two large spectrometer magnets of the PANDA detector set-up. It shows the conceptual design of the magnets and their anticipated performance. It precedes the tender and procurement of the magnets and, hence, is subject to possible

  18. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Sekine, Megumi; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface

  19. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  20. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke, E-mail: shunsuke.ikeda@riken.jp; Sekine, Megumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Romanelli, Mark [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States); Cinquegrani, David [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Kumaki, Masafumi [Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Horioka, Kazuhiko [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  1. Design of SC solenoid with high homogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaoliang; Liu Zhong; Luo Min; Luo Guangyao; Kang Qiang; Tan Jie; Wu Wei

    2014-01-01

    A novel kind of SC (superconducting) solenoid coil is designed to satisfy the homogeneity requirement of the magnetic field. In this paper, we first calculate the current density distribution of the solenoid coil section through the linear programming method. Then a traditional solenoid and a nonrectangular section solenoid are designed to produce a central field up to 7 T with a homogeneity to the greatest extent. After comparison of the two solenoid coils designed in magnet field quality, fabrication cost and other aspects, the new design of the nonrectangular section of a solenoid coil can be realized through improving the techniques of framework fabrication and winding. Finally, the outlook and error analysis of this kind of SC magnet coil are also discussed briefly. (authors)

  2. CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The milestone workshops on LHC experiments in Aachen in 1990 and at Evian in 1992 provided the first sketches of how LHC detectors might look. The concept of a compact general-purpose LHC experiment based on a solenoid to provide the magnetic field was first discussed at Aachen, and the formal Expression of Interest was aired at Evian. It was here that the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) name first became public. Optimizing first the muon detection system is a natural starting point for a high luminosity (interaction rate) proton-proton collider experiment. The compact CMS design called for a strong magnetic field, of some 4 Tesla, using a superconducting solenoid, originally about 14 metres long and 6 metres bore. (By LHC standards, this warrants the adjective 'compact'.) The main design goals of CMS are: 1 - a very good muon system providing many possibilities for momentum measurement (physicists call this a 'highly redundant' system); 2 - the best possible electromagnetic calorimeter consistent with the above; 3 - high quality central tracking to achieve both the above; and 4 - an affordable detector. Overall, CMS aims to detect cleanly the diverse signatures of new physics by identifying and precisely measuring muons, electrons and photons over a large energy range at very high collision rates, while also exploiting the lower luminosity initial running. As well as proton-proton collisions, CMS will also be able to look at the muons emerging from LHC heavy ion beam collisions. The Evian CMS conceptual design foresaw the full calorimetry inside the solenoid, with emphasis on precision electromagnetic calorimetry for picking up photons. (A light Higgs particle will probably be seen via its decay into photon pairs.) The muon system now foresaw four stations. Inner tracking would use silicon microstrips and microstrip gas chambers, with over 10 7 channels offering high track finding efficiency. In the central CMS barrel, the tracking elements are

  3. A novel NiZn ferrite integrated magnetic solenoid inductor with a high quality factor at 0.7–6 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinjun Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Integrated inductor is one of the fundamental components and has been widely used in radio frequency integrated circuits (RFICs. It has been challenging to achieve simultaneously high inductance and quality factor, particularly at GHz frequencies. In this work, we reported a novel integrated solenoid inductor with a magnetic NiZn ferrite as the core material, which was deposited by a low-cost spin spray technique. These integrated inductors showed a significant improvement in both inductance and quality factor at GHz frequencies over their air core counterparts. A stable inductance was observed within a wide frequency ranged from 700 MHz to 6 GHz. The peak value of quality factor reached 23, a relatively higher value not reported for solenoid inductors up to date. Our results indicate that the integrated inductor are promising for applications in RFICs.

  4. Analysis of off-axis solenoid fields using the magnetic scalar potential: An application to a Zeeman-slower for cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Sérgio R.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Bhattacharya, M.

    2015-06-01

    In a region free of currents, magnetostatics can be described by the Laplace equation of a scalar magnetic potential, and one can apply the same methods commonly used in electrostatics. Here, we show how to calculate the general vector field inside a real (finite) solenoid, using only the magnitude of the field along the symmetry axis. Our method does not require integration or knowledge of the current distribution and is presented through practical examples, including a nonuniform finite solenoid used to produce cold atomic beams via laser cooling. These examples allow educators to discuss the nontrivial calculation of fields off-axis using concepts familiar to most students, while offering the opportunity to introduce themes of current modern research.

  5. Algorithms for Computing the Magnetic Field, Vector Potential, and Field Derivatives for a Thin Solenoid with Uniform Current Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walstrom, Peter Lowell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-07

    A numerical algorithm for computing the field components Br and Bz and their r and z derivatives with open boundaries in cylindrical coordinates for radially thin solenoids with uniform current density is described in this note. An algorithm for computing the vector potential Aθ is also described. For the convenience of the reader, derivations of the final expressions from their defining integrals are given in detail, since their derivations are not all easily found in textbooks. Numerical calculations are based on evaluation of complete elliptic integrals using the Bulirsch algorithm cel. The (apparently) new feature of the algorithms described in this note applies to cases where the field point is outside of the bore of the solenoid and the field-point radius approaches the solenoid radius. Since the elliptic integrals of the third kind normally used in computing Bz and Aθ become infinite in this region of parameter space, fields for points with the axial coordinate z outside of the ends of the solenoid and near the solenoid radius are treated by use of elliptic integrals of the third kind of modified argument, derived by use of an addition theorem. Also, the algorithms also avoid the numerical difficulties the textbook solutions have for points near the axis arising from explicit factors of 1/r or 1/r2 in the some of the expressions.

  6. Solenoid System for PRISM and COMET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Makoto

    2008-01-01

    An experiment of searching for coherent neutrino-less conversion of muons to electron conversion in muonic atom, μ - +N(A,Z)→e - +N(A,Z), is powerful probe for new physics phenomena beyond the Standard Model. We offer the experiment at a sensitivity of B(μ - N→e - N) -16 with muon beamline consisting of high-field pion capture solenoids, curved solenoids to select beam momenta, and a curved solenoid spectrometer to detect μ - -e - conversion with low-counting-rate conditions. Design of superconducting solenoid magnets of pion capture and transport beam line has been studied and is described in this paper

  7. Concept of a staged FEL enabled by fast synchrotron radiation cooling of laser-plasma accelerated beam by solenoidal magnetic fields in plasma bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seryi, Andrei; Lesz, Zsolt; Andreev, Alexander; Konoplev, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    A novel method for generating GigaGauss solenoidal fields in a laser-plasma bubble, using screw-shaped laser pulses, has been recently presented. Such magnetic fields enable fast synchrotron radiation cooling of the beam emittance of laser-plasma accelerated leptons. This recent finding opens a novel approach for design of laser-plasma FELs or colliders, where the acceleration stages are interleaved with laser-plasma emittance cooling stages. In this concept paper, we present an outline of what a staged plasma-acceleration FEL could look like, and discuss further studies needed to investigate the feasibility of the concept in detail.

  8. On the impact of the elastic-plastic flow upon the process of destruction of the solenoid in a super strong pulsed magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivosheev, S. I.; Magazinov, S. G.; Alekseev, D. I.

    2018-01-01

    At interaction of super strong magnetic fields with a solenoid material, a specific mode of the material flow forms. To describe this process, magnetohydrodynamic approximation is traditionally used. The formation of plastic shock-waves in material in a rapidly increasing pressure of 100 GPa/μs, can significantly alter the distribution of the physical parameters in the medium and affect the flow modes. In this paper, an analysis of supporting results of numerical simulations in comparison with available experimental data is presented.

  9. Some options for the muon collider capture and decay solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1995-11-01

    This report discusses some of the problems associated with using solenoid magnets to capture the secondary particles that are created when an intense beam of 8 to 10 GeV protons interacts with the target at the center of the capture region. Hybrid capture solenoids with inductions of 28 T and a 22T are described. The first 14 to 15 T of the solenoid induction will be generated by a superconducting magnet. The remainder of the field will be generated by a Bitter type of water cooled solenoid. The capture solenoids include a transition section from the high field solenoid to a 7 T decay channel where pions and kaons that come off of the target decay into muons. A short 7 T solenoidal decay channel between the capture solenoid system and the phase rotation system is described. A concept for separation of negative and positive pions and kaons is briefly discussed

  10. H- beam neutralization measurements in a solenoidal beam transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, J.; Pitcher, E.; Stevens, R.; Allison, P.

    1992-01-01

    H minus beam space-charge neutralization is measured for 65-mA, 35-keV beams extracted from a circular-aperture Penning surface-plasma source, the small-angle source. The H minus beam is transported to a RFQ matchpoint by a two-solenoid magnet system. Beam noise is typically ±4%. A four-grid analyzer is located in a magnetic-field-free region between the two solenoid magnets. H minus potentials are deduced from kinetic energy measurements of particles (electrons and positive ions) ejected radially from the beam channel by using a griddled energy analyzer. Background neutral gas density is increased by the introduction of additional Xe and Ar gases, enabling the H minus beam to become overneutralized

  11. Plasma confinement apparatus using solenoidal and mirror coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.; Condit, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    A plasma confinement apparatus is described, wherein multiple magnetic mirror cells are linked by magnetic field lines inside of a solenoid with the mirroring regions for adjacent magnetic mirror cells each formed by a separate mirror coil inside of the solenoid. The magnetic mirror cells may be field reversed

  12. Plasma confinement apparatus using solenoidal and mirror coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, T. Kenneth; Condit, William C.

    1979-01-01

    A plasma confinement apparatus, wherein multiple magnetic mirror cells are linked by magnetic field lines inside of a solenoid with the mirroring regions for adjacent magnetic mirror cells each formed by a separate mirror coil inside of the solenoid. The magnetic mirror cells may be field reversed.

  13. Sprag solenoid brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, P. H.

    1972-01-01

    Operation of solenoid braking mechanism is discussed. Illustrations of construction of the brake are provided. Device is used for braking low or medium speed shaft rotations and produces approximately ten times braking torque of similar solenoid brakes.

  14. Comparative performance analysis of a dual-solenoid mechanical oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V C C; Lee, H V; Harno, H G; Woo, K C

    2015-01-01

    An innovative dual-solenoid electro-mechanical-vibro-impact system has been constructed and experimentally studied. Comparative studies against a mechanical spring system and a permanent magnet system have been performed, where it is shown that the dual-solenoid system is able to produce oscillations better than the permanent magnet system and more energy efficiently. Comparison with a higher-powered dual solenoid system has also been conducted where a stationary solenoid has shown to be a more dominant parameter. In addition, it is also discovered that a mechanical oscillator in the dual-solenoid system is independent of the angular frequency. (paper)

  15. HB+ inserted into the CMS Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Tejinder S. Virdee, CERN

    2006-01-01

    The first half of the barrel hadron calorimeter (HB+) has been inserted into the superconducting solenoid of CMS, in preparation for the magnet test and cosmic challenge. The operation went smoothly, lasting a couple of days.

  16. Impact of detector solenoid on the Compact Linear Collider luminosity performance

    CERN Document Server

    Inntjore Levinsen, Y.; Tomás, Rogelio; Schulte, Daniel

    2014-05-27

    In order to obtain the necessary luminosity with a reasonable amount of beam power, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) design includes an unprecedented collision beam size of {\\sigma} = 1 nm vertically and {\\sigma} = 45 nm horizontally. Given the small and very flat beams, the luminosity can be significantly degraded from the impact of the experimental solenoid field in combination with a large crossing angle. Main effects include y-x'-coupling and increase of vertical dispersion. Additionally, Incoherent Synchrotron Radiation (ISR) from the orbit deflection created by the solenoid field, increases the beam emittance. A detailed study of the impact from a realistic solenoid field and the associated correction techniques for the CLIC Final Focus is presented. In particular, the impact of techniques to compensate the beam optics distortions due to the detector solenoid main field and its overlap with the final focus magnets are shown. The unrecoverable luminosity loss due to ISR has been evaluated, and found to...

  17. Advances in laser solenoid fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Quimby, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    The laser solenoid is an alternate fusion concept based on a laser-heated magnetically-confined plasma column. The reactor concept has evolved in several systems studies over the last five years. We describe recent advances in the plasma physics and technology of laser-plasma coupling. The technology advances include progress on first walls, inner magnet design, confinement module design, and reactor maintenance. We also describe a new generation of laser solenoid fusion and fusion-fission reactor designs

  18. ATLAS's superconducting solenoid takes up position

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS superconducting solenoid was moved to its final destination on 16 January. It has taken up position opposite the ATLAS liquid argon barrel cryostat, which will house the electromagnetic calorimeter. All that remains to do now is to slide it into the insulation vacuum, this will be done in the next few weeks. Built by Toshiba, under responsibility of KEK in Japan, the central solenoid is 2.4 metres in diameter, 5.3 metres long and weighs 5.5 tonnes. "It will provide an axial magnetic field of 2 Tesla that will deflect particles inside the inner detector," as Roger Ruber, on-site project coordinator, explains. The inner detector, which consists of three sub-detectors, will be installed inside the solenoid later. The solenoid during one of the transport operations. Securely attached to the overhead travelling crane, the solenoid is situated in front of the opening to the liquid argon calorimeter, it will be inserted soon.

  19. Small polaron hopping in magnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.; Liu, N.L.H.

    1978-01-01

    In a number of magnetic insulators it has been hypothesized that the charge carriers form small polarons. The transfer of an electron between magnetic sites and how the magnetic nature of the material affects the rate which characterizes small-polaron hops between magnetic sites were studied. The basic transfer processes are addressed from a many-electron point in which the itinerant electron is treated as indistinguishable from those which contribute unpaired spins at the magnetic sites

  20. Form coefficient of helical toroidal solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amelin, V.Z.; Kunchenko, V.B.

    1982-01-01

    For toroidal solenoids with continuous spiral coil, winded according to the laws of equiinclined and simple cylindrical spirals with homogeneous, linearly increasing to the coil periphery and ''Bitter'' distribution of current density, the analytical expressions for the dependence between capacity consumed and generated magnetic field, expressions for coefficients of form similar to Fabry coefficient for cylindrical solenoids are obtained and dependence of the form coefficient and relative volume of solenoid conductor on the number of revolutions of screw line per one circumvention over the large torus radius is also investigated. Analytical expressions of form coefficients and graphical material permit to select the optimum geometry as to capacity consumed both for spiral (including ''force-free'') and conventional toroidal solenoids of magnetic systems in thermonulear installations

  1. Solenoidal fusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linlor, W.I.

    1980-01-01

    This invention discloses apparatus and methods to produce nuclear fusion utilizing fusible material in the form of high energy ion beams confined in magnetic fields. For example, beams of deuterons and tritons are injected in the same direction relative to the axis of a vacuum chamber. The ion beams are confined by the magnetic fields of long solenoids. The products of the fusion reactions, such as neutrons and alpha particles, escape to the wall surrounding the vacuum chamber, producing heat. The momentum of the deuterons is approximately equal to the momentum of the tritons, so that both types of ions follow the same path in the confining magnetic field. The velocity of the deuteron is sufficiently greater than the velocity of the triton so that overtaking collisions occur at a relative velocity which produces a high fusion reaction cross section. Electrons for space charge neutralization are obtained by ionization of residual gas in the vacuum chamber, and additionally from solid material (Irradiated with ultra-violet light or other energetic radiation) adjacent to the confinement region. For start-up operation, injected high-energy molecular ions can be dissociated by intense laser beam, producing trapping via change of charge state. When sufficiently intense deuteron and triton beams have been produced, the laser beam can be removed, and subsequent change of charge state can be achieved by collisions

  2. Structural peculiarities in magnetic small particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haneda, K.; Morrish, A.H.

    1993-01-01

    Nanostructured magnetic materials, consisting of nanometer-sized crystallites, are currently a developing subject. Evidence has been accumulating that they possess properties that can differ substantially from those of bulk materials. This paper illustrates how Moessbauer spectroscopy can yield useful information on the structural peculiarities associated with these small particles. As illustrations, metallic iron and iron-oxide systems are considered in detail. The subjects discussed include: (1) Phase stabilities in small particles, (2) deformed or nonsymmetric atomic arrangements in small particles, and (3) peculiar magnetic structures or non-collinear spin arrangements in small magnetic oxide particles that are correlated with lower specific magnetizations as compared to the bulk values. (orig.)

  3. SSC detector solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, R.W.; Grimson, J.H.; Kephart, R.D.; Krebs, H.J.; Stone, M.E.; Theriot, E.D.; Wands, R.H.

    1989-01-01

    A detector utilizing a superconducting solenoid is being discussed for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). A useful field volume of 8 m diameter x 16 m length at 1.5-2 T (--1 GJ at 2T) is required. It has been decided that all of the particle physics calorimetry will be inside the bore of the solenoid and that there is no need for the coil and cryostat to be ''thin'' in radiation lengths. An iron yoke will reduce the excitation required and will provide muon identification and a redundant momentum measurement of the muons. The authors have developed a conceptual design to meet these requirements. The magnet will use a copper-stabilized Nb-Ti conductor sized for a cryostable pool boiling heat flux --0.025 W/cm/sup 2/. A thermosiphon from a storage vessel above the cryostat will be used to prevent bubble stagnation in the liquid helium bath. The operating current, current density, coil subdivision and dump resistor have been chosen to guarantee that the coil will be undamaged should a quench occur. The axial electromagnetic force will be reacted by metallic support links; the stainless steel coil case will support the radial force. The 5000 metric tons of calorimetry will be supported from the iron yoke through a trussed cylindrical shell structure separate from the cryostat. The coil and case, radiation shield and stainless vacuum vessel would be fabricated and cryogenically tested as two 8-m sections. These would be lowered into the underground experimental hall and installed into the iron flux return yoke to provide the required 16-m length

  4. Small and smart magnet design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Cathrine; Beleggia, Marco; Brok, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Society faces an accumulated need to find ways to produce super strong magnets that can fulfill thegrowing demands for green technology products such as compact and efficient generators and motors. Next‐generation magnets could very likely be composite materials built bottom‐up from nanoparticles....... However, combining the nanoparticles into a compact magnetic material where all magnetic moments are aligned is an engineering challenge. We investigate ‐ with nanoparticle‐resolution – principles of assembly processes and particle arrangements that can generate optimal magnetic order in new materials...... (see e.g.Fig. 1). These studies are enabled by advanced transmission electron microscopy, magnetic modelling and new synthesis protocols. Examples of magnetic ordering and self‐organization will be given....

  5. The D0 solenoid NMR magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sten Uldall Hansen; Terry Kiper; Tom Regan; John Lofgren

    2002-01-01

    A field monitoring system for the 2 Tesla Solenoid of the D0 detector is described. It is comprised of a very small NMR probe cabled to a DSP based signal processing board. The design magnetic field range is from 1.0 to 2.2 Tesla, corresponding to an RF frequency range of 42.57 to 93.67 MHz. The desired an accuracy is one part in 10 5 . To minimize material in the interaction region of the D0 detector, the overall thickness of the NMR probe is 4 mm, including its mounting plate, and its width is 10 mm. To minimize cable mass, 4mm diameter IMR-100A cables are used for transmitting the RF signals from a nearby patch panel 25 meters to each of four probes mounted within the bore of the solenoid. RG213U cables 45 meters long are used to send the RF from the movable counting house to the patch panel. With this setup, the detector signal voltage at the moving counting room is in the range of 250-400 mV

  6. Ultimate Performance of the ATLAS Superconducting Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Ruber, R; Kawai, M; Kondo, Y; Doi, Y; Haruyama, T; Haug, F; Kate, H ten; Kondo, T; Pirotte, O; Metselaar, J; Mizumaki, S; Olesen, G; Sbrissa, E; Yamamoto, A

    2007-01-01

    A 2 tesla, 7730 ampere, 39 MJ, 45 mm thin superconducting solenoid with a 2.3 meters warm bore and 5.3 meters length, is installed in the center of the ATLAS detector and successfully commissioned. The solenoid shares its cryostat with one of the detector's calorimeters and provides the magnetic field required for the inner detectors to accurately track collision products from the LHC at CERN. After several years of a stepwise construction and test program, the solenoid integration 100 meters underground in the ATLAS cavern is completed. Following the on-surface acceptance test, the solenoid is now operated with its final cryogenic, powering and control system. A re-validation of all essential operating parameters is completed. The performance and test results of underground operation are reported and compared to those previously measured.

  7. Modified small angle magnetization rotation method in multilayer magnetic microwires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torrejon, J.; Badini, G.; Pirota, K.; Vazquez, M.

    2007-01-01

    The small angle magnetization rotation (SAMR) technique is a widely used method to quantify magnetostriction in elongated ultrasoft magnetic materials. In the present work, we introduce significant optimization of the method, particularly simplification of the required equipment, profiting of the very peculiar characteristics of a recently introduced family of multilayer magnetic microwires consisting of a soft magnetic core, insulating intermediate layer and a hard magnetic outer layer. The introduced modified SAMR method is used not only to determine the saturation magnetostriction constant of the soft magnetic nucleus but also the magnetoelastic and magnetostatic coupling. This new method has a great potential in multifunctional sensor applications

  8. Survey of the laser-solenoid fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amherd, N.A.

    1975-09-01

    This report surveys the prospects for a laser-solenoid fusion reactor. A sample reactor and scaling laws are used to describe the concept's characteristics. Experimental results are reviewed, and the laser and magnet technologies that undergird the laser-solenoid concept are analyzed. Finally, a systems analysis of fusion power reactors is given, including a discussion of direct conversion and fusion-fission effects, to ascertain the system attributes of the laser-solenoid configuration

  9. The Design Parameters for the MICE Tracker Solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Chen, C.Y.; Juang, Tiki; Lau, Wing W.; Taylor, Clyde; Virostek, Steve P.; Wahrer, Robert; Wang, S.T.; Witte, Holger; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2006-01-01

    The first superconducting magnets to be installed in the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) will be the tracker solenoids. The tracker solenoid module is a five coil superconducting solenoid with a 400 mm diameter warm bore that is used to provide a 4 T magnetic field for the experiment tracker module. Three of the coils are used to produce a uniform field (up to 4 T with better than 1 percent uniformity) in a region that is 300 mm in diameter and 1000 mm long. The other two coils are used to match the muon beam into the MICE cooling channel. Two 2.94-meter long superconducting tracker solenoid modules have been ordered for MICE. The tracker solenoid will be cooled using two-coolers that produce 1.5 W each at 4.2 K. The magnet system is described. The decisions that drive the magnet design will be discussed in this report

  10. Approximate theory the electromagnetic energy of solenoid in special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prastyaningrum, I; Kartikaningsih, S.

    2017-01-01

    Solenoid is a device that is often used in electronic devices. A solenoid is electrified will cause a magnetic field. In our analysis, we just focus on the electromagnetic energy for solenoid form. We purpose to analyze by the theoretical approach in special relativity. Our approach is begun on the Biot Savart law and Lorentz force. Special theory relativity can be derived from the Biot Savart law, and for the energy can be derived from Lorentz for, by first determining the momentum equation. We choose the solenoid form with the goal of the future can be used to improve the efficiency of the electrical motor. (paper)

  11. Laser-heated solenoid fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlases, G.C.

    1977-01-01

    Since the suggestion by Dawson, Hertzberg, and Kidder that high-energy CO 2 lasers could be used to heat magnetically confined plasma columns to thermonuclear temperatures, a great deal of theoretical and experimental work has been performed. In this paper we first review the experiments on the basic laser-plasma interaction phenomena, in which lasers with energies up to 1 kJ have been used to produce plasmas at n/sub e/ greater than 10 18 and T/sub e/ greater than 200 eV. The second part reviews fusion reactor studies based on the laser solenoid

  12. High field laser heated solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, A.L.

    1979-01-01

    A 10 kJ pulsed CO 2 laser and 3.8 cm bore, 15 T, 8 μs rise time, 1-m long fast solenoid facility has been constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of using long wavelength lasers to heat magnetically confined plasmas. The most critical physics requirement is the necessity of creating and maintaining an on-axis electron density minimum to trap the axially directed laser beam. Satisfaction of this requirement has been demonstrated by heating 1.5 Torr deuterium fill plasmas in 2.7 cm bore plasma tubes to line energies of approximately 1 kJ/m. (Auth.)

  13. A solenoidal and monocusp ion source (SAMIS) (abstract)ab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, E.J.; Brainard, J.P.; Draper, C.H.; Ney, R.H.; Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.; Williams, M.D.; Wilde, S.B.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a new magnetic monocusp ion source for single aperture applications such as neutron generators. Coupling solenoidal magnetic fields on both sides of a monocusp magnetic field has generated over 70% atomic deuterium ions at pressures as low as 0.4 Pa (3 mTorr). This article describes the performance and characteristics of the solenoidal and monocusp ion source. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  14. Compensation of oscillation coupling induced by solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelinskij, A.Yu.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Shcherbakov, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Methods for construction of various schemes of oscillation coupling compensation, induced by solenoids in charged particle storage rings, are described. Peculiarities of magnetic structure, enabling to localize oscillation coupling in wide energy range are discussed. Results of calculation of compensation schemes for design of NR-2000 storage ring spin rotation are presented

  15. Central Solenoid On-surface Test

    CERN Multimedia

    Ruber, R

    2004-01-01

    A full scale on-surface test of the central solenoid has been performed before its final installation in the ATLAS cavern starting in November. The successful integration of the central solenoid into the barrel cryostat, as reported in the March 2004 ATLAS eNews, was hardly finished when testing started. After a six-week period to cool down the LAr calorimeter, the solenoid underwent a similar procedure. Cooling it down to 4.6 Kelvin from room temperature took just over five and a half days. Cold and superconducting, it was time to validate the functionality of the control and safety systems. These systems were largely the same as the systems to be used in the final underground installation, and will be used not only for the solenoid and toroid magnets, but parts of it also for other LHC experiments. This solenoid test was the first occasion to test the system functionality in a real working environment. Several days were spent to fine tune the systems, especially the critical safety system, which turned out...

  16. The dynamic behavior of magnetic fluid adsorbed to small permanent magnet in alternating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudo, Seiichi, E-mail: sudo@akita-pu.ac.j [Faculty of Systems Science and Technology, Akita Prefectural University, Ebinokuchi 84-4, Yurihonjo 015-0055 (Japan); Asano, Daisaku [Faculty of Systems Science and Technology, Akita Prefectural University, Ebinokuchi 84-4, Yurihonjo 015-0055 (Japan); Takana, Hidemasa; Nishiyama, Hideya [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    The dynamic behavior of a magnetic fluid adsorbed to a small NdFeB permanent magnet subjected to an alternating magnetic field was studied with a high speed video camera system. The directions of alternating magnetic field are parallel and opposite to that of the permanent magnet. It was found that the surface of magnetic fluid responds to the external alternating magnetic field in elongation and contraction with a lot of spikes. Generation of a capillary magnetic fluid jet was observed in the neighbourhood of a specific frequency of alternating field. The effect of gravitational force on surface phenomena of magnetic fluid adsorbed to the permanent magnet was revealed. - Research Highlights: Magnetic fluid of the system responds to alternating magnetic field with higher frequencies. Large-amplitude surface motions of magnetic fluid occur at the specific frequencies of the external field. Capillary jets of magnetic fluid are generated at the natural frequency of the system.

  17. Validation of Quench Simulation and Simulation of the TWIN Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Pots, Rosalinde Hendrika

    2015-01-01

    For the Future Circular Collider at CERN a multi-purpose detector is proposed. The 6T TWIN Solenoid, a very large magnet system with a stored energy of 53 GJ, is being designed. It is important to protect the magnet against quenches in the system. Therefore several existing quench protection systems are evaluated and simulations have be performed on quenches in the TWIN Solenoid. The simulations on quenches in the TWIN Solenoid have been performed with promising results; the hotspot temperatures do not exceed 120 K and layer to layer voltages stay below 500 V. Adding quench heaters to the system might improve the quench protection system further.

  18. A superconducting focusing solenoid for the neutrino factory linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Lebedev, V.; Strauss, B.P.

    2001-01-01

    The proposed linear Accelerator that accelerates muons from 190 MeV to 2.45 GeV will use superconducting solenoids for focusing the muon beam. The accelerator will use superconducting RF cavities. These cavities are very sensitive to stay magnetic field from the focusing magnets. Superconducting solenoids can produce large stray fields. This report describes the 201.25 MHz acceleration system for the neutrino factory. This report also describes a focusing solenoid that delivers almost no stray field to a neighboring superconducting RF cavity

  19. ATLAS Solenoid Integration

    CERN Multimedia

    Ruber, R

    Last month the central solenoid was installed in the barrel cryostat, which it shares with the liquid argon calorimeter. Some two years ago the central solenoid arrived at CERN after being manufactured and tested in Japan. It was kept in storage until last October when it was finally moved to the barrel cryostat integration area. Here a position survey of the solenoid (with respect to the cryostat's inner warm vessel) was performed. At the start of the New Year the solenoid was moved to the cryostat insertion stand. After a test insertion on 6th February and a few weeks of preparation work it was finally inserted on 27th February. A couple of hectic 24-hours/7-day weeks followed in order to connect all services in the cryostat bulkhead. But last Monday, 15th March, both warm flanges of the cryostat could be closed. In another week's time we expect to finish the connection of the cryogenic cooling lines and the superconducting bus lines with the external services. Then the cool-down and test will commence... ...

  20. An Inexpensive Toroidal Solenoid for an Investigative Student Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferstl, Andrew; Broberg, John

    2008-09-01

    Magnetism and Ampère's law is a common subject in most calculus-based introductory physics courses. Many textbooks offer examples to calculate the magnetic field produced by a symmetric current by using Ampère's law. These examples include the solenoid and the toroidal solenoid (sometimes called a torus; see Fig. 1), which are used in many applications, including the study of plasmas.

  1. A solenoidal synthetic field and the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effects in neutral atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Ming-Xia; Nie, Wei; Hutchinson, David A W; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-08-08

    Cold neutral atoms provide a versatile and controllable platform for emulating various quantum systems. Despite efforts to develop artificial gauge fields in these systems, realizing a unique ideal-solenoid-shaped magnetic field within the quantum domain in any real-world physical system remains elusive. Here we propose a scheme to generate a "hairline" solenoid with an extremely small size around 1 micrometer which is smaller than the typical coherence length in cold atoms. Correspondingly, interference effects will play a role in transport. Despite the small size, the magnetic flux imposed on the atoms is very large thanks to the very strong field generated inside the solenoid. By arranging different sets of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) lasers, the generation of Abelian and non-Abelian SU(2) lattice gauge fields is proposed for neutral atoms in ring- and square-shaped optical lattices. As an application, interference patterns of the magnetic type-I Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect are obtained by evolving atoms along a circle over several tens of lattice cells. During the evolution, the quantum coherence is maintained and the atoms are exposed to a large magnetic flux. The scheme requires only standard optical access, and is robust to weak particle interactions.

  2. A solenoidal synthetic field and the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effects in neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Ming-Xia; Nie, Wei; Hutchinson, David A. W.; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-08-01

    Cold neutral atoms provide a versatile and controllable platform for emulating various quantum systems. Despite efforts to develop artificial gauge fields in these systems, realizing a unique ideal-solenoid-shaped magnetic field within the quantum domain in any real-world physical system remains elusive. Here we propose a scheme to generate a ``hairline'' solenoid with an extremely small size around 1 micrometer which is smaller than the typical coherence length in cold atoms. Correspondingly, interference effects will play a role in transport. Despite the small size, the magnetic flux imposed on the atoms is very large thanks to the very strong field generated inside the solenoid. By arranging different sets of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) lasers, the generation of Abelian and non-Abelian SU(2) lattice gauge fields is proposed for neutral atoms in ring- and square-shaped optical lattices. As an application, interference patterns of the magnetic type-I Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect are obtained by evolving atoms along a circle over several tens of lattice cells. During the evolution, the quantum coherence is maintained and the atoms are exposed to a large magnetic flux. The scheme requires only standard optical access, and is robust to weak particle interactions.

  3. Energy losses in the D0 β solenoid cryostat caused by current changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, A.T.

    1993-11-01

    The proposed D0 β solenoid is a superconducting solenoid mounted inside an aluminum tube which supports the solenoid winding over it's full length. This aluminum support tube, also called bobbin, is therefore very tightly coupled to magnetic flux changes caused by solenoid current variations. These current changes in the solenoid, will cause answer currents to flow in the resistive bobbin wall and therefore cause heat losses. The insertion of an external dump resistor in the solenoid current loop reduces energy dissipation inside the cryostat during a quench and will shorten the discharge time constant. This note presents a simple electrical model for the coupled bobbin and solenoid and makes it easier to understand the circuit behavior and losses. Estimates for the maximum allowable rate of solenoid current changes, based on the maximum permissible rate of losses can be made using this model

  4. First Operation of the Central Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Ruber, R.

    2006-01-01

    A new phase for the ATLAS collaboration started with the first operation of a completed sub-system: the Central Solenoid. It was cooled down from the 17th to 23th May 2006, and the first kA was put into it the same evening as it was cold and superconductive. That makes our solenoid the very first cold and superconducting magnet to be operated in the LHC underground areas. The Central Solenoid in its final position at the heart of ATLAS. The coil current (red line) and voltage (blue line) showing the operation at nominal current of 7.73 kA for a magnetic field of 2.0 T and the subsequent successful commissioning up to 8 kAT The cool down and powering of the solenoid was a major milestone for all control, cryogenic, power and vacuum systems and was achieved in perfect collaboration with the liquid argon detector with which it shares the Barrel Cryostat. Powering up to nominal current had to wait until the last week of July when the End-Cap Calorimeters were in closed position. The Tile Barrel and E...

  5. ATLAS superconducting solenoid on-surface test

    CERN Document Server

    Ruber, Roger J M Y; Doi, Y; Haruyama, T; Haug, F; ten Kate, H H J; Kawai, M; Kondo, T; Kondo, Y; Makida, Y; Mizumaki, S; Olesen, G; Pavlov, O V; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Sbrissa, E; Yamamoto, A

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is presently under construction as one of the five LHC experiment set-ups. It relies on a sophisticated magnet system for the momentum measurement of charged particle tracks. The superconducting solenoid is at the center of the detector, the magnet system part nearest to the proton-proton collision point. It is designed for a 2 Tesla strong axial magnetic field at the collision point, while its thin-walled construction of 0.66 radiation lengths avoids degradation of energy measurements in the outer calorimeters. The solenoid and calorimeter have been integrated in their common cryostat, cooled down and tested on-surface. We review the on-surface set-up and report the performance test results.

  6. Down with Physics: giant compact muon solenoid (CMS) magnet goes underground at CERN UCR physicists to participate in the international experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Scientists of the US CMS collaboration, which includes UC riverside physicists, joined colleagues around the world in announcing today that the heaviest piece of the Compact Muon Solenoid particle detector has begun te momentous journey into its experimenta cavern 100 meters underground." (2,5 pages)

  7. Construction of compact FEM using solenoid-induced helical wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohigashi, N.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Fujita, M.; Imasaki, K.; Mima, K.; Nakai, S.

    2003-01-01

    A prototype of compact Free-Electron Maser (FEM) has been designed for the operation in a usual small laboratory which does not have electric source capacity available enough. The electron energy is 60-120 keV. As it is lower, stronger guiding magnetic field is necessary in addition to wiggler field. To fulfil this condition a solenoid-induced helical wiggler is applied from the viewpoint of saving the electric power of restricted source capacity. The wiggler, for example, with the period of 12 mm creates the field of 92 G in the guiding field of 3.2 kG. The whole system of FEM has been just constructed in a small-scale laboratory. It is so small to occupy the area of 0.7x2.9 m 2

  8. Electron beam solenoid reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, V.; Benford, J.; Cooper, R.; Dakin, D.; Ecker, B.; Lopez, O.; Putman, S.; Young, T.S.T.

    1977-01-01

    The electron Beam Heated Solenoid (EBHS) reactor is a linear magnetically confined fusion device in which the bulk or all of the heating is provided by a relativistic electron beam (REB). The high efficiency and established technology of the REB generator and the ability to vary the coupling length make this heating technique compatible with several radial and axial enery loss reduction options including multiple-mirrors, electrostatic and gas end-plug techniques. This paper addresses several of the fundamental technical issues and provides a current evaluation of the concept. The enhanced confinement of the high energy plasma ions due to nonadiabatic scattering in the multiple mirror geometry indicates the possibility of reactors of the 150 to 300 meter length operating at temperatures > 10 keV. A 275 meter EBHS reactor with a plasma Q of 11.3 requiring 33 MJ of beam eneergy is presented

  9. Small Satellite Passive Magnetic Attitude Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, David T.

    Passive Magnetic Attitude Control (PMAC) is capable of aligning a satellite within 5 degrees of the local magnetic field at low resource cost, making it ideal for a small satellite. However, simulation attempts to date have not been able to predict the attitude dynamics at a level sufficient for mission design. Also, some satellites have suffered from degraded performance due to an incomplete understanding of PMAC system design. This dissertation alleviates these issues by discussing the design, inputs, and validation of PMAC systems for small satellites. Design rules for a PMAC system are defined using the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat as an example. A Multiplicative Extended Kalman Filter (MEKF) is defined for the attitude determination of a PMAC satellite without a rate gyro. After on-orbit calibration of the off-the-shelf magnetometer and photodiodes and an on-orbit fit to the satellite magnetic moment, the MEKF regularly achieves a three sigma attitude uncertainty of 4 degrees or less. CSSWE is found to settle to the magnetic field in seven days, verifying its attitude design requirement. A Helmholtz cage is constructed and used to characterize the CSSWE bar magnet and hysteresis rods both individually and in the flight configuration. Fitted parameters which govern the magnetic material behavior are used as input to a PMAC dynamics simulation. All components of this simulation are described and defined. Simulation-based dynamics analysis shows that certain initial conditions result in abnormally decreased settling times; these cases may be identified by their dynamic response. The simulation output is compared to the MEKF output; the true dynamics are well modeled and the predicted settling time is found to possess a 20 percent error, a significant improvement over prior simulation.

  10. Motions of CMS Detector structures due to the magnetic field forces as observed by the Link Alignment System during the Test of the 4 Tesla Magnet Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Calderón, Alicia; González-Sánchez, F J; Martínez-Rivero, C; Matorras, Francisco; Rodrigo, Teresa; Martínez, P; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobrón, M; Vila, Ivan; Virto, A L; Alberdi, Javier; Arce, Pedro; Barcala, Jose Miguel; Calvo, Enrique; Ferrando, Antonio; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Molinero, Antonio; Navarrete, Jose Javier; Oller, Juan Carlos; Yuste, Ceferino

    2008-01-01

    This document describes results obtained from the Link Alignment System data recorded during the CMS Magnet Test. A brief description of the system is followed by the discussion of the detected relative displacements (from micrometres to centimetres) between detector elements and rotations of detector structures (from microradians to milliradians). Observed displacements are studied as functions of the magnetic field intensity. In addition, the reconstructed positions of active element sensors are compared to their positions as measured by photogrammetry and the reconstructed motions due to the magnetic field strength are described.

  11. High intensity neutrino source superconducting solenoid cyrostat design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, T.M.; Nicol, T.H.; Feher, S.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is involved in the development of a 100 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. The solenoid cryostat will house the helium vessel, suspension system, thermal shield, multilayer insulation, power leads, instrumentation, a vacuum vessel and cryogenic distribution lines. This paper discusses the requirements and detailed design of these superconducting solenoid cryostats.

  12. Cross section of the CMS solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Tejinder S. Virdee, CERN

    2005-01-01

    The pictures show a cross section of the CMS solenoid. One can see four layers of the superconducting coil, each of which contains the superconductor (central part, copper coloured - niobium-titanium strands in a copper coating, made into a "Rutherford cable"), surrounded by an ultra-pure aluminium as a magnetic stabilizer, then an aluminium alloy as a mechanical stabilizer. Besides the four layers there is an aluminium mechanical piece that includes pipes that transport the liquid helium.

  13. Conceptual design of a 20 Tesla pulsed solenoid for a laser solenoid fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, J.J.; Averill, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    Design considerations are described for a strip wound solenoid which is pulsed to 20 tesla while immersed in a 20 tesla bias field so as to achieve within the bore of the pulsed solenoid at net field sequence starting at 20 tesla and going first down to zero, then up to 40 tesla, and finally back to 20 tesla in a period of about 5 x 10 -3 seconds. The important parameters of the solenoid, e.g., aperture, build, turns, stored and dissipated energy, field intensity and powering circuit, are given. A numerical example for a specific design is presented. Mechanical stresses in the solenoid and the subsequent choice of materials for coil construction are discussed. Although several possible design difficulties are not discussed in this preliminary report of a conceptual magnet design, such as uniformity of field, long-term stability of insulation under neutron bombardment and choice of structural materials of appropriate tensile strength and elasticity to withstand magnetic forces developed, these questions are addressed in detail in the complete design report and in part in reference one. Furthermore, the authors feel that the problems encountered in this conceptual design are surmountable and are not a hindrance to the construction of such a magnet system

  14. Focusing solenoid for the front end of a linear RF accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terechkine, I.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Page, T.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    A prototype of a superconducting focusing solenoid for use in an RF linac has been built and tested at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The solenoid is comprised of the main coil, two bucking coils, two dipole corrector windings, and a low carbon steel flux return. At the excitation current of 250 A, the magnetic field reaches 7.2 T in the center of the solenoid and is less than 5 G on the axis at a distance of 150 mm from the center. The length of the solenoid is 150 mm; the length of a cryovessel for the solenoid with a 20 mm diameter 'warm' bore is 270 mm. This paper presents the main design features of the focusing solenoid and discusses results from tests of the solenoid.

  15. Lessons Learned for the MICE Coupling Solenoid from the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, Xinglong; Li, S.Y.; Zheng, S.X.; Virostek, Steve P.; DeMello, Allen J.; Li, Derun; Trillaud, Frederick; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Tests of the spectrometer solenoids have taught us some important lessons. The spectrometer magnet lessons learned fall into two broad categories that involve the two stages of the coolers that are used to cool the magnets. On the first spectrometer magnet, the problems were centered on the connection of the cooler 2nd-stage to the magnet cold mass. On the first test of the second spectrometer magnet, the problems were centered on the cooler 1st-stage temperature and its effect on the operation of the HTS leads. The second time the second spectrometer magnet was tested; the cooling to the cold mass was still not adequate. The cryogenic designs of the MICE and MuCOOL coupling magnets are quite different, but the lessons learned from the tests of the spectrometer magnets have affected the design of the coupling magnets.

  16. Fabrication, Testing and Modeling of the MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virostek, S.P.; Green, M.A.; Trillaud, F.; Zisman, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), an international collaboration sited at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, will demonstrate ionization cooling in a section of realistic cooling channel using a muon beam. A five-coil superconducting spectrometer solenoid magnet will provide a 4 tesla uniform field region at each end of the cooling channel. Scintillating fiber trackers within the 400 mm diameter magnet bore tubes measure the emittance of the beam as it enters and exits the cooling channel. Each of the identical 3-meter long magnets incorporates a three-coil spectrometer magnet section and a two-coil section to match the solenoid uniform field into the other magnets of the MICE cooling channel. The cold mass, radiation shield and leads are currently kept cold by means of three two-stage cryocoolers and one single-stage cryocooler. Liquid helium within the cold mass is maintained by means of a re-condensation technique. After incorporating several design changes to improve the magnet cooling and reliability, the fabrication and acceptance testing of the spectrometer solenoids have proceeded. The key features of the spectrometer solenoid magnets, the development of a thermal model, the results of the recently completed tests, and the current status of the project are presented.

  17. Superconducting Solenoid for Superfast THz Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragin, A. V.; Khrushchev, S. V.; Kubarev, V. V.; Mezencev, N. A.; Tsukanov, V. M.; Sozinov, G. I.; Shkaruba, V. A.

    This project is related to new spectroscopy method in little-developed THz range. The method is founded on using of a free electron laser (NovoFEL) with high spectral power radiation which can be smoothly tuned in desirable range of spectrum. The objects of research of this method are fast processes in physics, chemical and biological reactions. Uniform magnetic field of 6 T value in the research area can considerably increase possibilities of this method. The magnetic field will modulate radiation of free molecules induction on characteristic frequencies of the Zeeman splitting that gives more possibilities of identification of molecules having even weak magnetic momentum. Moreover, the use of magnetic field allows essentially increase sensitivity of this method due to almost complete separation of weak measuring signals from powerful radiation of the laser. A superconducting solenoid was developed for this method. Its design and peculiarities are described in this paper.

  18. Calculus of the Cryebis 2 supraconductor solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, G.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the design of the superconducting solenoid CRYEBIS 2. With the prescribed parameters (5 Teslas central field, 120mm for inner diameter, 1600 mm for length), one determinates the dimensions of coil, its energy, the conductor, the working point of the magnet with its critical limits (intensity, field, temperature). The superconducting switch is calculated in the same manner. The study of a quench shows the good behaviour of the coil which is always safe even the detection system is in failure. In final, the mechanical stresses are verified lower than yield strength [fr

  19. Minimum Q Electrically Small Spherical Magnetic Dipole Antenna - Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2009-01-01

    Practical aspects of applying a magnetic core to approach the Chu lower bound for the radiation Q factor of an electrically small magnetic dipole antenna are considered. It is shown that although a magnetic core does reduce the Q factor, its effect is not as strong as predicted by Wheeler...

  20. Small-polaron formation and motion in magnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.

    1979-01-01

    The fundamental physical processes associated with small-polaron formation are described with various magnetic semi-conductors being cited as examples. Attention is then directed toward the mechanisms of charge transfer and small-polaron hopping motion in magnetic semiconductors

  1. Small-scale dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Jennifer; Schleicher, Dominik; Bovino, Stefano; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2012-12-01

    The present-day Universe is highly magnetized, even though the first magnetic seed fields were most probably extremely weak. To explain the growth of the magnetic field strength over many orders of magnitude, fast amplification processes need to operate. The most efficient mechanism known today is the small-scale dynamo, which converts turbulent kinetic energy into magnetic energy leading to an exponential growth of the magnetic field. The efficiency of the dynamo depends on the type of turbulence indicated by the slope of the turbulence spectrum v(ℓ)∝ℓϑ, where v(ℓ) is the eddy velocity at a scale ℓ. We explore turbulent spectra ranging from incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence with ϑ=1/3 to highly compressible Burgers turbulence with ϑ=1/2. In this work, we analyze the properties of the small-scale dynamo for low magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm, which denotes the ratio of the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm, to the hydrodynamical one, Re. We solve the Kazantsev equation, which describes the evolution of the small-scale magnetic field, using the WKB approximation. In the limit of low magnetic Prandtl numbers, the growth rate is proportional to Rm(1-ϑ)/(1+ϑ). We furthermore discuss the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rmcrit, which is required for small-scale dynamo action. The value of Rmcrit is roughly 100 for Kolmogorov turbulence and 2700 for Burgers. Furthermore, we discuss that Rmcrit provides a stronger constraint in the limit of low Pm than it does for large Pm. We conclude that the small-scale dynamo can operate in the regime of low magnetic Prandtl numbers if the magnetic Reynolds number is large enough. Thus, the magnetic field amplification on small scales can take place in a broad range of physical environments and amplify week magnetic seed fields on short time scales.

  2. Small-scale dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Jennifer; Schleicher, Dominik; Bovino, Stefano; Klessen, Ralf S

    2012-12-01

    The present-day Universe is highly magnetized, even though the first magnetic seed fields were most probably extremely weak. To explain the growth of the magnetic field strength over many orders of magnitude, fast amplification processes need to operate. The most efficient mechanism known today is the small-scale dynamo, which converts turbulent kinetic energy into magnetic energy leading to an exponential growth of the magnetic field. The efficiency of the dynamo depends on the type of turbulence indicated by the slope of the turbulence spectrum v(ℓ)∝ℓ^{ϑ}, where v(ℓ) is the eddy velocity at a scale ℓ. We explore turbulent spectra ranging from incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence with ϑ=1/3 to highly compressible Burgers turbulence with ϑ=1/2. In this work, we analyze the properties of the small-scale dynamo for low magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm, which denotes the ratio of the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm, to the hydrodynamical one, Re. We solve the Kazantsev equation, which describes the evolution of the small-scale magnetic field, using the WKB approximation. In the limit of low magnetic Prandtl numbers, the growth rate is proportional to Rm^{(1-ϑ)/(1+ϑ)}. We furthermore discuss the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm_{crit}, which is required for small-scale dynamo action. The value of Rm_{crit} is roughly 100 for Kolmogorov turbulence and 2700 for Burgers. Furthermore, we discuss that Rm_{crit} provides a stronger constraint in the limit of low Pm than it does for large Pm. We conclude that the small-scale dynamo can operate in the regime of low magnetic Prandtl numbers if the magnetic Reynolds number is large enough. Thus, the magnetic field amplification on small scales can take place in a broad range of physical environments and amplify week magnetic seed fields on short time scales.

  3. A solenoidal and monocusp ion source (SAMIS) (abstract){sup a}{sup b}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, E.J.; Brainard, J.P.; Draper, C.H.; Ney, R.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0516 (United States); Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.; Williams, M.D.; Wilde, S.B. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1996-03-01

    We have developed a new magnetic monocusp ion source for single aperture applications such as neutron generators. Coupling solenoidal magnetic fields on both sides of a monocusp magnetic field has generated over 70{percent} atomic deuterium ions at pressures as low as 0.4 Pa (3 mTorr). This article describes the performance and characteristics of the solenoidal and monocusp ion source. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Cryogenic testing of the TPC superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Smits, R.G.; Taylor, J.D.

    1983-06-01

    This report describes the results of a series of tests on the TPC superconducting magnet cryogenic system which occurred during the winter and spring of 1983. The tests occurred at interaction region 2 of the PEP colliding beam facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The TPC Magnet Cryogenic System which was tested includes the following major components: a remote helium compressor with a full flow liquid nitrogen purification station, 400 meters of high pressure supply and low pressure return lines; and locally a CTi Model 2800 refrigerator with two Sulzer gas bearing turbines, the TPC magnet control dewar, 70 meters of transfer lines, and the TPC thin superconducting solenoid magnet. In addition, there is a conditioner (liquid nitrogen heat exchangers and gas heaters) system for cooldown and warmup of the magnet. This report describes the local cryogenic system and describes the various steps in the cooldown and operation of the TPC magnet. The tests were successful in that they showed that the TPC magnet could be cooled down in 24 hours and the magnet could be operated on the refrigerator or a helium pump with adequate cooling margin. The tests identified problems with the cryogenic system and the 2800 refrigerator. Procedures for successful operation and quenching of the superconducting magnet were developed. 19 references

  5. Structure design of the central solenoid in JT-60SA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakawa, Shuji; Tsuchiya, Katsuhiko; Kuramochi, Masaya; Yoshida, Kiyoshi

    2009-09-01

    The upgrade of JT-60U magnet system to superconducting coils (JT-60SA: JT-60 Super Advanced) has been decided by parties of Japanese government (JA) and European commission (EU) in the framework of the Broader Approach (BA) agreement. The magnet system for JT-60SA consists of a central solenoid (CS), equilibrium field(EF) coils, toroidal field(TF) coils. The central solenoid consists the four winding pack modules. In order to counteract the thermal contraction as well as the electric magnetic repulsion and attraction together with other forces generated in each module, it is necessary to apply pre-loading to the support structure of the solenoid and to pursue a structure which is capable of sustaining such loading. In the present report, the structural design of the supporting structure of the solenoid and the jackets of the modules is verified analytically, and the results indicate that the structural design satisfies the 'Codes for Fusion Facilities - Rules on Superconducting Magnet Structure -'. (author)

  6. Completion of the ITER central solenoid model coils installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, H.

    1999-01-01

    The short article details how dozens of problems, regarding the central solenoid model coils installation, were faced and successfully overcome one by one at JAERI-Naga. A black and white photograph shows K. Kwano, a staff member of the JAERI superconducting magnet laboratory, to be still inside the vacuum tank while the lid is already being brought down..

  7. Insulating process for HT-7U central solenoid model coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Yimin; Pan Wanjiang; Wu Songtao; Wan Yuanxi

    2003-01-01

    The HT-7U superconducting Tokamak is a whole superconducting magnetically confined fusion device. The insulating system of its central solenoid coils is critical to its properties. In this paper the forming of the insulating system and the vacuum-pressure-impregnating (VPI) are introduced, and the whole insulating process is verified under the super-conducting experiment condition

  8. Electromagnetic behaviour of the shield in turbogenerators with superconducting solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Vecchio, P.; Veca, G.M.; Sacerdoti, G.

    1975-11-01

    The structure of turbogenerators with superconducting solenoids is analyzed and the investigation of electromagnetic behaviour of the rotating shield is presented. The cases considered are: (a) An hypothetical operation with a single phase with nominal current; (b) Steady-state operation in inverse sequence with 10% of the nominal current; (c) A step variation of the magnetic field intensity in the shield

  9. Three dimensional multilayer solenoid microcoils inside silica glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangwei; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Shan, Chao; Liu, Keyin; Li, Yanyang; Bian, Hao; Si, Jinhai; Hou, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) solenoid microcoils could generate uniform magnetic field. Multilayer solenoid microcoils are highly pursued for strong magnetic field and high inductance in advanced magnetic microsystems. However, the fabrication of the 3D multilayer solenoid microcoils is still a challenging task. In this paper, 3D multilayer solenoid microcoils with uniform diameters and high aspect ratio were fabricated in silica glass. An alloy (Bi/In/Sn/Pb) with high melting point was chosen as the conductive metal to overcome the limitation of working temperature and improve the electrical property. The inductance of the three layers microcoils was measured, and the value is 77.71 nH at 100 kHz and 17.39 nH at 120 MHz. The quality factor was calculated, and it has a value of 5.02 at 120 MHz. This approach shows an improvement method to achieve complex 3D metal microstructures and electronic components, which could be widely integrated in advanced magnetic microsystems.

  10. Electrically Small Magnetic Dipole Antennas with Magnetic Core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2010-01-01

    This work extends the theory of a spherical magnetic dipole antenna with magnetic core by numerical results for practical antenna configurations that excite higher-order modes besides the main TE10 spherical mode. The multiarm spherical helix (MSH) and the spherical split ring (SSR) antennas...

  11. A large superconducting thin solenoid for the STAR experiment at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1992-06-01

    This Report describes the 4.4 meter, warm bore diameter, thin superconducting solenoid, for the proposed STAR experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The STAR solenoid will generate a very uniform central magnetic induction of 0.5 T within a space which is 4.0 meters in diameter by 4.2 meters long. The solenoid and its cryostat will be 0.7 radiation lengths thick over a length of 5.45 meters, about the center of the magnet making it the largest solenoid less than one radiation length to be built. This report describes a proposed design for the solenoid and cryostat, its flux return iron, its cryogenic system and its power supply and quench protection system

  12. First detector installed inside the ALICE solenoid...

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    ALICE's emblematic red magnet welcomed its first detector on 23 September, when the array of seven Cherenkov detectors, named HMPID, was successfully installed. ALICE team members standing in front of the completed HMPID detector.The red magnet, viewed from its front opening. The HMPID unit, seen from the back (top right corner of photo) is placed on a frame and lifted onto a platform during the installation. After the installation of the ACORDE scintillator array and the muon trigger and tracking chambers, the ALICE collaboration fitted the first detector inside the solenoid. The HMPID, for High Momentum Particle Identification, was installed at the 2 o'clock position in the central and most external region of the space frame, just below the solenoid yoke. It will be used to extend the hadron identification capability of the ALICE experiment up to 5 GeV/c, thus complementing the reach of the other particle identification systems (ITS, TPC and TOF). The HMPID is a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector in a...

  13. Report of the large solenoid detector group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.G.; Mori, S.; Pondrom, L.G.

    1987-09-01

    This report presents a conceptual design of a large solenoid for studying physics at the SSC. The parameters and nature of the detector have been chosen based on present estimates of what is required to allow the study of heavy quarks, supersymmetry, heavy Higgs particles, WW scattering at large invariant masses, new W and Z bosons, and very large momentum transfer parton-parton scattering. Simply stated, the goal is to obtain optimum detection and identification of electrons, muons, neutrinos, jets, W's and Z's over a large rapidity region. The primary region of interest extends over +-3 units of rapidity, although the calorimetry must extend to +-5.5 units if optimal missing energy resolution is to be obtained. A magnetic field was incorporated because of the importance of identifying the signs of the charges for both electrons and muons and because of the added possibility of identifying tau leptons and secondary vertices. In addition, the existence of a magnetic field may prove useful for studying new physics processes about which we currently have no knowledge. Since hermeticity of the calorimetry is extremely important, the entire central and endcap calorimeters were located inside the solenoid. This does not at the moment seem to produce significant problems (although many issues remain to be resolved) and in fact leads to a very effective muon detector in the central region

  14. Laser solenoid: an alternate use of lasers in fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, P.H.

    1977-01-01

    A unique laser assisted fusion approach is under development at Mathematical Sciences Northwest, Inc. (MSNW). This approach captures one of the most developed aspects of high energy laser technology, the efficient, large, scalable, pulsed electron beam initiated, electric discharge, CO 2 infrared laser. This advanced technology is then combined with the simple geometry of a linear magnetic confinement system. The laser solenoid concept will be described, current work and experimental progress will be discussed, and the technological problems of building such a system will be assessed. Finally a comparison will be made of the technology and economics for the laser solenoid and alternative fusion approaches

  15. Concept design of the CFETR central solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Jinxing; Song, Yuntao; Liu, Xufeng; Li, Jiangang; Wan, Yuanxi; Wan, Baonian; Ye, Minyou; Wu, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Main concept design work including coil's geometry, superconductor and support structure has been carried out. • The maximum magnetic field of CS coil is 11.9 T which is calculated by the coils’ operation current based on plasma equilibrium configuration. • The stray field in plasma area is less than 20 Gs under the CS coils’ operation currents designed for the plasma-heating phase. - Abstract: China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) superconducting tokamak is a national scientific research project of China with major and minor radius is 5.7 m and 1.6 m respectively. The magnetic field at the center of plasma with radius as R = 5.7 m is set to be 5.0 T. The major objective of the project is to build a fusion engineering tokamak reactor with fusion power in the range of 50–200 MW and should be self-sufficient by blanket. Six central solenoid coils of CFETR with same structure are made of Nb 3 Sn superconductor. Besides, the stray field in plasma area should be less than 20 Gs with the operation current of CS coils for plasma heating phase. The maximum magnetic field of CS coil is 11.9 T. It is calculated by the coils’ operation current based on plasma equilibrium configuration. The central solenoid needs to have enough stability margin under the condition of high magnetic field and strain. This paper discusses the design parameters, electromagnetic distribution, structure and stability analysis of the CS superconducting magnet for CFETR

  16. A general method, a la Transport, for evaluation of the perturbing effects of solenoidal inserts in storage ring interaction regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.J.

    1976-07-01

    It may be expected that solenoid magnets will be used in many storage ring experiments. Typically an insert would consist of a main solenoid at the interaction point with a symmetrical pair of compensating solenoids located somewhere between the main solenoid and the ends of the interaction region. The magnetic fields of such an insert may significantly affect storage ring performance. We suggest here a simple, systematic method for evaluation of the effects, which together with adequate design supervision and field measurements will help to prevent any serious operational problems that might result if significant perturbations went unnoticed. 5 refs

  17. Magnetic self-assembly of small parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetye, Sheetal B.

    Modern society's propensity for miniaturized end-user products is compelling electronic manufacturers to assemble and package different micro-scale, multi-technology components in more efficient and cost-effective manners. As the size of the components gets smaller, issues such as part sticking and alignment precision create challenges that slow the throughput of conventional robotic pick-n-place systems. As an alternative, various self-assembly approaches have been proposed to manipulate micro to millimeter scale components in a parallel fashion without human or robotic intervention. In this dissertation, magnetic self-assembly (MSA) is demonstrated as a highly efficient, completely parallel process for assembly of millimeter scale components. MSA is achieved by integrating permanent micromagnets onto component bonding surfaces using wafer-level microfabrication processes. Embedded bonded powder methods are used for fabrication of the magnets. The magnets are then magnetized using pulse magnetization methods, and the wafers are then singulated to form individual components. When the components are randomly mixed together, self-assembly occurs when the intermagnetic forces overcome the mixing forces. Analytical and finite element methods (FEM) are used to study the force interactions between the micromagnets. The multifunctional aspects of MSA are presented through demonstration of part-to-part and part-to-substrate assembly of 1 mm x 1mm x 0.5 mm silicon components. Part-to-part assembly is demonstrated by batch assembly of free-floating parts in a liquid environment with the assembly yield of different magnetic patterns varying from 88% to 90% in 20 s. Part-to-substrate assembly is demonstrated by assembling an ordered array onto a fixed substrate in a dry environment with the assembly yield varying from 86% to 99%. In both cases, diverse magnetic shapes/patterns are used to control the alignment and angular orientation of the components. A mathematical model is

  18. Motions of CMS Detector Structures as Observed by the Link Alignment System during the Test of the 4 Tesla Magnet Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J. M.; Calvo, E.; Ferramdp, A.; Josa, M. I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J. C.; Yuste, C.; Calderon, A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F. J.; Martin-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A. L.

    2008-07-01

    This document describes results obtained from the Link Alignment System data recorded during the CMS Magnet Test. A brief description of the system is followed by the discussion of the detected relative displacements (from micro metres to centimetres) between detector elements and rotation of detector structures (from microradiants to milliradiants). Observed displacements are studied as functions of the magnetic fi eld intensity. In addition, a comparison of the reconstructed position of active element sensors with respect to their position as measured by photogrammetry is made and the reconstructed motions due to the magnetic field strength are described. (Author) 19 refs.

  19. Motions of CMS Detector Structures as Observed by the Link Alignment System during the Test of the 4 Tesla Magnet Solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J. M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M. I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J. C.; Yuste, C.; Calderon, A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F. J.; Martin-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A. L.

    2008-01-01

    This document describes results obtained from the Link Alignment System data recorded during the CMS Magnet Test. A brief description of the system is followed by the discussion of the detected relative displacements (from micro metres to centimetres) between detector elements and rotation of detector structures (from microradiants to milliradiants). Observed displacements are studied as functions of the magnetic fi eld intensity. In addition, a comparison of the reconstructed position of active element sensors with respect to their position as measured by photogrammetry is made and the reconstructed motions due to the magnetic field strength are described. (Author) 19 refs

  20. Conceptual design of the CMS 4 Tesla solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baze, J.M.; Desportes, H.; Duthil, R.; Lesmond, C.; Lottin, J.C.; Pabot, Y.

    1992-02-01

    A large and important meeting 'Toward the LHC experimental programme' is due to be held at EVIAN-les-BAINS, on 5-8 March 1992. The major goal accurate measurement of muon momenta makes necessary, for the detectors, the use of large and powerful magnetic system producing high bending power. The CMS experiment is based on a solenoidal magnetic configuration. It has been designed to produce a high magnetic induction (4 T) in a 14 m long, 5.9 m bore cylindrical volume surrounding the interaction point. The diameter has been fixed to the maximum dimension compatible with road transportation to CERN. This long solenoid with its 12 500 ton iron yoke is a fully shielded magnet. The paper presents the conceptual design of the superconducting coil and its technical characteristics

  1. Comparing superconducting and permanent magnets for magnetic refrigeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bjørk

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We compare the cost of a high temperature superconducting (SC tape-based solenoid with a permanent magnet (PM Halbach cylinder for magnetic refrigeration. Assuming a five liter active magnetic regenerator volume, the price of each type of magnet is determined as a function of aspect ratio of the regenerator and desired internal magnetic field. It is shown that to produce a 1 T internal field in the regenerator a permanent magnet of hundreds of kilograms is needed or an area of superconducting tape of tens of square meters. The cost of cooling the SC solenoid is shown to be a small fraction of the cost of the SC tape. Assuming a cost of the SC tape of 6000 $/m2 and a price of the permanent magnet of 100 $/kg, the superconducting solenoid is shown to be a factor of 0.3-3 times more expensive than the permanent magnet, for a desired field from 0.5-1.75 T and the geometrical aspect ratio of the regenerator. This factor decreases for increasing field strength, indicating that the superconducting solenoid could be suitable for high field, large cooling power applications.

  2. Behavior of small ferromagnetic particles in traveling magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deych, V. G.; Terekhov, V. P.

    1985-03-01

    Forces and moments acting on a magnetizable body in a traveling magnetic field are calculated for a body with dimensions much smaller than the wavelength of the magnetic field. It is assumed that a particle of given linear dimension does not have a constant magnetic moment. The material of a particle is characterized by its magnetic permeability and electrical conductivity. The hypothesis that rotation plays a major role in the behavior of small particles is confirmed and the fact that a small particle rolls on a plane, without sliding, when the surface is perfectly rough, in the opposite direction from which the magnetic field travels is explained. Calculations are based on the magnetohydrodynamic equations for a quasi steady magnetic field, and the induced Foucault eddy currents are considered. The results are applicable to transport of ferrofluids and to such metallurgical devices as separators.

  3. Quench tests of Nb3Al small racetrack magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, R.; Kikuchi, A.; Tartaglia, Michael Albert; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Kotelnikov, S.; Lamm, Michael J.; Fermilab; NIMC, Tsukuba; KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-01-01

    Two Cu stabilized Nb3Al strands, F1 (Nb matrixed) and F3 (Ta matrixed), have been made at NIMS and their Rutherford cables were made at Fermilab in collaboration with NIMS. A Small Race-track magnet using F1 Rutherford cable, the first Nb3Al dipole magnet in the world, was constructed and tested to full current at Fermilab. This magnet was tested extensively to full short sample data and its quench characteristics were studied and reported. The 3-D magnetic field calculation was done with ANSYS to find the peak field. The quench characteristics of the magnet are explained with the characteristics of the Nb3Al strand and Rutherford cable. The other Small Race-track magnet using Ta matrixed F3 strand was constructed and will be tested in the near future. The advantages and disadvantages of these Nb3Al cables are discussed

  4. Quench tests of Nb3Al small racetrack magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, R.; Kikuchi, A.; Tartaglia, Michael Albert; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Kotelnikov, S.; Lamm, Michael J.; /Fermilab /NIMC, Tsukuba /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-08-01

    Two Cu stabilized Nb3Al strands, F1 (Nb matrixed) and F3 (Ta matrixed), have been made at NIMS and their Rutherford cables were made at Fermilab in collaboration with NIMS. A Small Race-track magnet using F1 Rutherford cable, the first Nb3Al dipole magnet in the world, was constructed and tested to full current at Fermilab. This magnet was tested extensively to full short sample data and its quench characteristics were studied and reported. The 3-D magnetic field calculation was done with ANSYS to find the peak field. The quench characteristics of the magnet are explained with the characteristics of the Nb3Al strand and Rutherford cable. The other Small Race-track magnet using Ta matrixed F3 strand was constructed and will be tested in the near future. The advantages and disadvantages of these Nb3Al cables are discussed.

  5. Applications of a superconducting solenoidal separator in the experimental investigation of nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinde, D J; Carter, I P; Dasgupta, M; Simpson, E C; Cook, K J; Kalkal, Sunil; Luong, D H; Williams, E

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes applications of a novel superconducting solenoidal separator, with magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla, for studies of nuclear reactions using the Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility at the Australian National University. (paper)

  6. Small angle neutron scattering measurements of magnetic cluster sizes in magnetic recorging disks

    CERN Document Server

    Toney, M

    2003-01-01

    We describe Small Angle Neutron Scattering measurements of the magnetic cluster size distributions for several longitudinal magnetic recording media. We find that the average magnetic cluster size is slightly larger than the average physical grain size, that there is a broad distribution of cluster sizes, and that the cluster size is inversely correlated to the media signal-to-noise ratio. These results show that intergranular magnetic coupling in these media is small and they provide empirical data for the cluster-size distribution that can be incorporated into models of magnetic recording.

  7. Small-scale Magnetic Flux Emergence in the Quiet Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Insertis, F.; Martinez-Sykora, J.; Hansteen, V. H.; Muñoz, D.

    2018-06-01

    Small bipolar magnetic features are observed to appear in the interior of individual granules in the quiet Sun, signaling the emergence of tiny magnetic loops from the solar interior. We study the origin of those features as part of the magnetoconvection process in the top layers of the convection zone. Two quiet-Sun magnetoconvection models, calculated with the radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Bifrost code and with domain stretching from the top layers of the convection zone to the corona, are analyzed. Using 3D visualization as well as a posteriori spectral synthesis of Stokes parameters, we detect the repeated emergence of small magnetic elements in the interior of granules, as in the observations. Additionally, we identify the formation of organized horizontal magnetic sheets covering whole granules. Our approach is twofold, calculating statistical properties of the system, like joint probability density functions (JPDFs), and pursuing individual events via visualization tools. We conclude that the small magnetic loops surfacing within individual granules in the observations may originate from sites at or near the downflows in the granular and mesogranular levels, probably in the first 1 or 1.5 Mm below the surface. We also document the creation of granule-covering magnetic sheet-like structures through the sideways expansion of a small subphotospheric magnetic concentration picked up and pulled out of the interior by a nascent granule. The sheet-like structures that we found in the models may match the recent observations of Centeno et al.

  8. Magnetization reversal in circular vortex dots of small radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiriena-Goikoetxea, M; Guslienko, K Y; Rouco, M; Orue, I; Berganza, E; Jaafar, M; Asenjo, A; Fernández-Gubieda, M L; Fernández Barquín, L; García-Arribas, A

    2017-08-10

    We present a detailed study of the magnetic behavior of Permalloy (Ni 80 Fe 20 alloy) circular nanodots with small radii (30 nm and 70 nm) and different thicknesses (30 nm or 50 nm). Despite the small size of the dots, the measured hysteresis loops manifestly display the features of classical vortex behavior with zero remanence and lobes at high magnetic fields. This is remarkable because the size of the magnetic vortex core is comparable to the dot diameter, as revealed by magnetic force microscopy and micromagnetic simulations. The dot ground states are close to the border of the vortex stability and, depending on the dot size, the magnetization distribution combines attributes of the typical vortex, single domain states or even presents features resembling magnetic skyrmions. An analytical model of the dot magnetization reversal, accounting for the large vortex core size, is developed to explain the observed behavior, providing a rather good agreement with the experimental results. The study extends the understanding of magnetic nanodots beyond the classical vortex concept (where the vortex core spins have a negligible influence on the magnetic behavior) and can therefore be useful for improving emerging spintronic applications, such as spin-torque nano-oscillators. It also delimits the feasibility of producing a well-defined vortex configuration in sub-100 nm dots, enabling the intracellular magneto-mechanical actuation for biomedical applications.

  9. Test Results for HINS Focusing Solenoids at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tartaglia, M.A.; Orris, D.F.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    A focusing lens R&D program is close to completion and industrial production of magnets has begun. Two types of magnets are being built for use in the room temperature RF section at the front end of a superconducting H-minus linac of a High Intensity Neutrino Source. All of the magnets are designed as a solenoid with bucking coils to cancel the field in the vicinity of adjacent RF cavities, and one type incorporates steering dipole corrector coils. We present a summary of the predicted and measured quench and magnetic properties for both R&D and production device samples that have been tested at Fermilab.

  10. The Mechanical Design Optimization of a High Field HTS Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalitha, SL; Gupta, RC

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the conceptual design optimization of a large aperture, high field (24 T at 4 K) solenoid for a 1.7 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage device. The magnet is designed to be built entirely of second generation (2G) high temperature superconductor tape with excellent electrical and mechanical properties at the cryogenic temperatures. The critical parameters that govern the magnet performance are examined in detail through a multiphysics approach using ANSYS software. The analysis results formed the basis for the performance specification as well as the construction of the magnet.

  11. Stabilization of superconducting dry solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, M.; Maeda, H.

    1989-01-01

    Premature quenches in superconducting solenoids, wound with Formvar coated NbTi conductors, have been studied. Some model coils were tested wound with various winding tensions. The experimental results are discussed considering the calculated stress distribution for coil winding, cool-down to liquid helium temperature, and energization at 4.2 K. /Some mechanisms of premature quenches are classified by the winding tension. Some stabilization methods are presented based on these quench mechanisms

  12. Magnetic nanoparticles studied by small angle X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto; Antonel, Soledad; Negri, Martin

    2011-01-01

    because they exhibit magnetic (ferromagnetic) and electrical properties in the same material. Then, the nickel nanoparticles could be used for the development of electroelastic materials. In this case, the electrical conductivity of the material can be strongly dependent on the applied magnetic field, for example the case of nickel metal nanoparticles dispersed in a polymer, resulting in an anisotropic material with combined piezomagnetic and piezoelectric properties. In order to investigate the structural characteristics of cobalt-iron oxides and nickel nanoparticles, powder samples of those magnetic materials were studied by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering. As will be shown, from the analysis and modeling of the scattering data, structural information could be obtained, enabling a detailed description of the structural properties of the studied samples which could be directly correlated to the magnetic properties. (author)

  13. Magnetic nanoparticles studied by small angle X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Grupo de Fluidos Complexos; Antonel, Soledad; Negri, Martin [Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Dept. de Quimica Inorganica, Analitica y Quimica Fisica

    2011-07-01

    nanoparticles are very interesting because they exhibit magnetic (ferromagnetic) and electrical properties in the same material. Then, the nickel nanoparticles could be used for the development of electroelastic materials. In this case, the electrical conductivity of the material can be strongly dependent on the applied magnetic field, for example the case of nickel metal nanoparticles dispersed in a polymer, resulting in an anisotropic material with combined piezomagnetic and piezoelectric properties. In order to investigate the structural characteristics of cobalt-iron oxides and nickel nanoparticles, powder samples of those magnetic materials were studied by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering. As will be shown, from the analysis and modeling of the scattering data, structural information could be obtained, enabling a detailed description of the structural properties of the studied samples which could be directly correlated to the magnetic properties. (author)

  14. 2 T superconducting detector solenoid for the PANDA target spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efremov, A.A.; Koshurnikov, E.K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, High Energy Physics Laboratory, Joliot-Curie, 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Lobanov, Y.Y. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, High Energy Physics Laboratory, Joliot-Curie, 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)], E-mail: lobanov@jinr.ru; Makarov, A.F. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, High Energy Physics Laboratory, Joliot-Curie, 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Orth, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291, Darmstadt (Germany); Sissakian, A.N.; Vodopianov, A.S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, High Energy Physics Laboratory, Joliot-Curie, 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the JINR design of the large 2 T superconducting solenoid for the target spectrometer of the PANDA experiment at HESR (FAIR, GSI, Darmstadt, Germany). The solenoid coil has an inner radius of 1.08 m and a length of 2.90 m. This solenoid is non-centrally split providing a warm bore of 100 mm in diameter through the coil to accommodate sufficient space for the internal target installations. Maximally stored energy in the windings is 22.3 MJ. All tracking and calorimetric detectors surrounding the target point, with exception of a forward cone of 5{sup 0} opening, are placed inside the lqHe-cryostat. The main features of the design and technique are as follows: a copper stabilizer and soldering technique for the superconducting cable; a stainless steel cryostat; winding technique over a mandrel; coreless type of the coil; low operational current. The details of the PANDA solenoid design including the magnetic field and stress-strain calculations are covered.

  15. Improved focus solenoid design for linear induction accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zentler, J.M.; Van Maren, R.D.; Nexsen, W.E.

    1992-08-01

    Our FXR linear induction accelerator produces a 2 KA, 17 MeV electron beam of 60 ns duration. The beam is focused on a tantalum target to produce x-rays for radiography. The FWHM spot size of the focused beam is currently 2.2 mm. We strive to reduce the spot size by 30% by improving the field characteristics of focusing solenoids housed in each of 50 induction cells along the beamline. Tilts in the magnetic axis of the existing solenoids range up to 12 mrad (0.7 degrees). We are building new solenoid assemblies which include ferromagnetic homogenizer rings. These dramatically reduce field errors. A field tilt of under 0.5 mrad has been achieved. Mechanical alignment of the rings is critical. We developed a novel construction method in which the rings are wound with 4 mil thick Si-Fe ribbon into grooves on an aluminum cylinder. The cylinder then becomes the winding mandrel for the focus solenoids. This forms a more accurate and compact assembly than the standard practice of pressing individual solid rings onto a tube

  16. Completeness for coherent states in a magnetic–solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagrov, V G; Gavrilov, S P; Gitman, D M; Górska, K

    2012-01-01

    This paper completes our study of coherent states in the so-called magnetic–solenoid field (a collinear combination of a constant uniform magnetic field and Aharonov–Bohm solenoid field) presented in Bagrov et al (2010 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43 354016, 2011 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 44 055301). Here, we succeeded in proving nontrivial completeness relations for non-relativistic and relativistic coherent states in such a field. In addition, we solve here the relevant Stieltjes moment problem and present a comparative analysis of our coherent states and the well-known, in the case of pure uniform magnetic field, Malkin–Man’ko coherent states. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Coherent states: mathematical and physical aspects’. (paper)

  17. The influence of the iron shield of the solenoid on spin tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toprek Dragan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the iron shield of the solenoid on spin tracking is studied in this paper. In the case of the 200 MeV proton, the study has been numerically done in the ZGOUBI code. The distribution of the magnetic field was done by POISSON. We have come to the conclusion that the influence of the solenoid’s shielding on spin tracking is the same at its entrance and exit and that is directly proportional to the intensity of the magnetic induction B on the axis of the solenoid. We have also determined that the influence of the solenoid’s shielding is much stronger on transversal components of the spin than on its longitudinal component. The differences between components of the spin for the shielded and not-shielded solenoid diminish with the in crease in the distance from the solenoid.

  18. Inservice diagnostic methods for solenoid-operated valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryter, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    Solenoid-operated valves (SOVs) were studied at Oak Ridge National Laboratory as part of the USNRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. The primary objective of the study was to identify, evaluate, and recommend methods for inspection, surveillance, monitoring, and maintenance of SOVs that can help ensure their operational readiness-that is, their ability to perform required safety functions under all anticipated operating conditions, since failure of one of these small and relatively inexpensive devices could have serious consequences under certain circumstances. An earlier (Phase 1) NPAR program study described SOV failure modes and causes and had identified measurable parameters thought to be linked to the progression of everpresent degradation mechanisms that may ultimately result in functional failure of the valve. Using this earlier work as a guide, the present (Phase 11) study focused on devising and then demonstrating the effectiveness of techniques and equipment with which to measure performance parameters that show promise for detecting the presence and trending the progress of such degradations before they reach a critical stage. Intrusive techniques requiring the addition of magnetic or acoustic sensors or the application of special test signals were investigated briefly, but major emphasis was placed on the examination of condition-indicating techniques that can be applied with minimal cost and impact on plant operation. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the technical feasibility and practicality of the monitoring techniques assessed in the study, and recommendations for further work are provided

  19. Quench simulation in the thin superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaka, T.; Takasaki, M.; Wake, M.; Yamada, R.

    1983-07-01

    The propagation velocities of a normal zone were calculated for a 1 mdiameter x 1 m superconducting solenoid and for a 3 mdiameter x 5 m thin solenoid based on a simple model using the one-dimensional thermal equation. The quench back effect can be observed in certain conditions. The quench of the large thin solenoid was also simulated by using the computer program 'QUENCH'. (author)

  20. A new scheme for critical current measurements on straight superconducting cables in a large solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, L.; Volpini, G.

    1991-01-01

    The precision of I c measurement of straight superconducting cables in solenoids can be limited by the magnetic field inhomogeneity. A solution in order to improve the field homogeneity based on iron shims is presented here. A conceptual design for the experimental lay-out of a test station to be used in connection with the SOLEMI-I solenoid at the Milan INFN Section (LASA Laboratory) is given

  1. Central Solenoid Insert Technical Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N [ORNL; Smirnov, Alexandre [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The US ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for the ITER central solenoid (CS) contribution to the ITER project. The Central Solenoid Insert (CSI) project will allow ITER validation the appropriate lengths of the conductors to be used in the full-scale CS coils under relevant conditions. The ITER Program plans to build and test a CSI to verify the performance of the CS conductor. The CSI is a one-layer solenoid with an inner diameter of 1.48 m and a height of 4.45 m between electric terminal ends. The coil weight with the terminals is approximately 820 kg without insulation. The major goal of the CSI is to measure the temperature margin of the CS under the ITER direct current (DC) operating conditions, including determining sensitivity to load cycles. Performance of the joints, ramp rate sensitivity, and stability against thermal or electromagnetic disturbances, electrical insulation, losses, and instrumentation are addressed separately and therefore are not major goals in this project. However, losses and joint performance will be tested during the CSI testing campaign. The USIPO will build the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka, Japan. The industrial vendors (the Suppliers) will report to the USIPO (the Company). All approvals to proceed will be issued by the Company, which in some cases, as specified in this document, will also require the approval of the ITER Organization. Responsibilities and obligations will be covered by respective contracts between the USIPO, called Company interchangeably, and the industrial Prime Contractors, called Suppliers. Different stages of work may be performed by more than one Prime Contractor, as described in this specification. Technical requirements of the contract between the Company and the Prime Contractor will be covered by the Fabrication Specifications developed by the Prime Contractor based on this document and approved by

  2. Superconducting electromagnets for large wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boom, R.W.; Abdelsalam, M.K.; Bakerek, K.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a new design study of a Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (MSBS) for airplane models in a large 8 ft x 8 ft wind tunnel. New developments in the design include: use of a superconducting solenoid as a model core instead of magnetized iron; combination of permanent magnet material in the model wings along with four race-track coils to produce the required roll torque; and mounting of all the magnets in an integral cold structure instead of in separate cryostats. Design of superconducting solenoid model cores and practical experience with a small-scale prototype are discussed

  3. Peltier heat of a small polaron in a magnetic semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, N.H.; Emin, D.

    1985-01-01

    For the first time the heat transported with a small polaron in both antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic semiconductors is calculated. This heat, the Peltier heat, π, is obtained from the change of the entropy of the total system upon introduction of a charge carrier. We explicitly consider both the intrasite and intersite exchange interactions between a small polaron and the interacting spins of a spin-1/2 magnet. There are two competing magnetic contributions to the Peltier heat. First, adding the carrier increases the spin entropy of the system. This provides a positive contribution to π. Second, the exchange between the carrier and the sites about it enhances the exchange binding between these sites. This reduces the energetically allowable spin configurations and provides a negative contribution to π. At extremely high temperatures when kT exceeds the intrasite exchange energy, the first effect dominates. Then π is simply augmented by kT ln 2. However, well below the magnetic transition temperature the second effect dominates. In the experimentally accessible range between these limits both effects are comparable and sizable. The net magnetic contribution to the Peltier heat rises with temperature. Thus, a carrier's interactions with its magnetic environment produces a significant and distinctive contribution to its Peltier heat

  4. Peltier heat of a small polaron in a magnetic semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, N.L.H.; Emin, D.

    1984-01-01

    The heat transported with a small polaron in both antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic semiconductors is calculated. This heat, the Peltier heat, π, is obtained from the change of the entropy of the total system upon introduction of a charge carrier. We explicitly consider both the intrasite and intersite exchange interactions between a small polaron and the interacting spins of a spin-1/2 magnet. There are two competing magnetic contributions to the Peltier heat. First, adding the carrier increases the spin entropy of the system. This provides a positive contribution to π. Second, the exchange between the carrier and the sites about it enhances the exchange binding between these sites. This reduces the energetically allowable spin configurations and provides a negative contribution to π. At extremely high temperature when kT exceeds the intrasite exchange energy, the first effect dominates. Then π is simply augmented by kTln2. However, well below the magnetic transition temperature the second effect dominates. In the experimentally accessible range between these limits both effects are comparable and sizable. The net magnetic contribution to the Peltier heat rises with temperature. Thus, a carrier's interactions with its magnetic environment produces a significant and distinctive contribution to its Peltier heat

  5. LIL-W: Positron conversion target and solenoid (pictures 01 and 04).

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1997-01-01

    In the direction of the beam, from right to left: a steering dipole (DHZ.25); the arm, at 45 deg, of a wire scanner which measures beam size; the conversion target, housed in the small tank with a window, where positrons are produced; immediately afterwards, invisible inside the vacuum chamber, is a pulsed solenoid to focus the emerging positrons; finally, a large solenoid, consisting of 3 pancakes, further focuses the positrons. Towards the left, the linac LIL-W, its accelerating structure hidden under a continuous outer solenoid mantle.

  6. Ion beam transport and focus for LMF using an achromatic solenoidal lens system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, C.L.

    1990-01-01

    The light ion LMF (Laboratory Microfusion Facility) requires an ion beam transport length for bunching and standoff to be about four meters from the diode to the target. The baseline LMF transport scheme uses an achromatic two lens system consisting of the diode (a self-field lens) and a solenoidal lens. Charge and current neutralization are provided by a background gas. A detailed analysis of this system is presented here. The effects of additional magnetic fields are examined, including those produced by non-zero net currents, applied B effects near the diode, and diamagnetic effects in the solenoidal lens. Instabilities are analyzed including the filamentation instability, the two-stream instability (beam ions, plasma electrons), the plasma two-stream instability (plasma electrons, plasma ions), and the ion acoustic instability. Scattering in the foil and gas are shown to be negligible. Gas breakdown processes are analyzed in detail, including ion impact ionization, electron avalanching, and ohmic heating. Special diode requirements are examined, including voltage accuracy, energy spread, and aiming tolerances. The neutral gas and gas pressure are chosen to satisfy several constraints, one being that the net current must be small, and another being that the filamentation instability should be avoided. With the present choice of 1 Torr He, it is concluded that the complete achromatic lens system appears to be viable, simple, and efficient transport and focusing system for LMF

  7. Non-inductive Solenoid-less Plasma Current Start-up in NSTX Using Transient CHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, R.; Mueller, D.; Jarboe, T.R.; Nelson, B.A.; Bell, M.G.; Ono, M.; Bigelow, T.; Kaita, R.; LeBlanc, B.; Lee, K.C.; Maqueda, R.; Menard, J.; Paul, S.; Roquemore, L.

    2007-01-01

    Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) has been successfully used in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) for a demonstration of closed flux current generation without the use of the central solenoid. The favorable properties of the Spherical Torus (ST) arise from its very small aspect ratio. However, small aspect ratio devices have very restricted space for a substantial central solenoid. Thus methods for initiating the plasma current without relying on induction from a central solenoid are essential for the viability of the ST concept. CHI is a promising candidate for solenoid-free plasma startup in a ST. The method has now produced closed flux current up to 160 kA verifying the high current capability of this method in a large ST built with conventional tokamak components.

  8. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-01-01

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS

  9. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-09-01

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  10. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, M. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 2-12-1 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ikeda, S. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Romanelli, M. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States); Kumaki, M. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0072 (Japan); Fuwa, Y. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kanesue, T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Hayashizaki, N. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 2-12-1 (Japan); Lambiase, R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Okamura, M. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  11. Confinement of laser plasma by solenoidal field for laser ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, M.; Kanesue, T.; Kondo, K.; Dabrowski, R.

    2010-01-01

    A laser ion source can provide high current, highly charged ions with a simple structure. However, it was not easy to control the ion pulse width. To provide a longer ion beam pulse, the plasma drift length, which is the distance between laser target and extraction point, has to be extended and as a result the plasma is diluted severely. Previously, we applied a solenoid field to prevent reduction of ion density at the extraction point. Although a current enhancement by a solenoid field was observed, plasma behavior after a solenoid magnet was unclear because plasma behavior can be different from usual ion beam dynamics. We measured a transverse ion distribution along the beam axis to understand plasma motion in the presence of a solenoid field.

  12. Small clusters with anisotropic antiferromagnetic exchange in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, J B; Elliott, R J; Timonen, J

    2004-01-01

    We consider small symmetric clusters of magnetic atoms (spins) with anisotropic exchange interaction between the atoms in a magnetic field at zero temperature. The inclusion of the anisotropy leads to a wealth of different phases as a function of the applied magnetic field. These are not phases in the thermodynamic sense with critical properties but rather physical structures with different arrangements of the spins and hence different symmetries. We study the spatial symmetry of these phases, for the classical and quantum cases. Results are presented mainly for three frustrated systems, the triangle, the tetrahedron and the five-atom ring, which have many interesting features. In the classical limit we obtain phase diagrams in which some of the phase changes occur because of energy crossings and others due to energy bifurcations, corresponding to 'first-' and 'second-order' changes. In the quantum case we show how the symmetries of the states are related to the corresponding classical symmetries

  13. Application of magnetic pulse forming to aeronautic small pieces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sow, C.; Bazin, G.; Daniel, D.; Bon, E.; Priem, D.; Racineux, G.

    2018-05-01

    Stelia Aerospace company is specialized in the forming of small (Lmax 1000 mm) sheets for the aerospace industry. In order to diversify the production facilities of Stelia Aerospace we evaluated the capacity of the magnetic pulse forming to produce small parts. The material used is the aluminum alloy 2024-T4. The sheets used have a thickness of 1 mm, 2 mm and 1.6 mm. Stelia Aerospace manufactures more than 100 different small parts but they are all made up of a limited set of elementary geometries. These elementary geometries include: straight and interrupted straight fallen edges, concave and convex fallen edges, fallen edges holes and joggling. In this paper we present the work we have done to develop forming tools for one of these elementary geometries, the straight fallen edge. Special attention is paid to the geometric and metallurgic quality of parts. In order to evaluate dimensional reproducibility of the process, smalls series of parts were produced.

  14. Solenoidal Fields for Ion Beam Transport and Focusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward P.; Leitner, Matthaeus

    2007-11-01

    In this report we calculate time-independent fields of solenoidal magnets that are suitable for ion beam transport and focusing. There are many excellent Electricity and Magnetism textbooks that present the formalism for magnetic field calculations and apply it to simple geometries [1-1], but they do not include enough relevant detail to be used for designing a charged particle transport system. This requires accurate estimates of fringe field aberrations, misaligned and tilted fields, peak fields in wire coils and iron, external fields, and more. Specialized books on magnet design, technology, and numerical computations [1-2] provide such information, and some of that is presented here. The AIP Conference Proceedings of the US Particle Accelerator Schools [1-3] contain extensive discussions of design and technology of magnets for ion beams - except for solenoids. This lack may be due to the fact that solenoids have been used primarily to transport and focus particles of relatively low momenta, e.g. electrons of less than 50 MeV and protons or H- of less than 1.0 MeV, although this situation may be changing with the commercial availability of superconducting solenoids with up to 20T bore field [1-4]. Internal reports from federal laboratories and industry treat solenoid design in detail for specific applications. The present report is intended to be a resource for the design of ion beam drivers for Inertial Fusion Energy [1-5] and Warm Dense Matter experiments [1-6], although it should also be useful for a broader range of applications. The field produced by specified currents and material magnetization can always be evaluated by solving Maxwell's equations numerically, but it is also desirable to have reasonably accurate, simple formulas for conceptual system design and fast-running beam dynamics codes, as well as for general understanding. Most of this report is devoted to such formulas, but an introduction to the Tosca{copyright} code [1-7] and some

  15. Solenoidal Fields for Ion Beam Transport and Focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Edward P.; Leitner, Matthaeus

    2007-01-01

    In this report we calculate time-independent fields of solenoidal magnets that are suitable for ion beam transport and focusing. There are many excellent Electricity and Magnetism textbooks that present the formalism for magnetic field calculations and apply it to simple geometries (1-1), but they do not include enough relevant detail to be used for designing a charged particle transport system. This requires accurate estimates of fringe field aberrations, misaligned and tilted fields, peak fields in wire coils and iron, external fields, and more. Specialized books on magnet design, technology, and numerical computations (1-2) provide such information, and some of that is presented here. The AIP Conference Proceedings of the US Particle Accelerator Schools (1-3) contain extensive discussions of design and technology of magnets for ion beams - except for solenoids. This lack may be due to the fact that solenoids have been used primarily to transport and focus particles of relatively low momenta, e.g. electrons of less than 50 MeV and protons or H- of less than 1.0 MeV, although this situation may be changing with the commercial availability of superconducting solenoids with up to 20T bore field (1-4). Internal reports from federal laboratories and industry treat solenoid design in detail for specific applications. The present report is intended to be a resource for the design of ion beam drivers for Inertial Fusion Energy (1-5) and Warm Dense Matter experiments (1-6), although it should also be useful for a broader range of applications. The field produced by specified currents and material magnetization can always be evaluated by solving Maxwell's equations numerically, but it is also desirable to have reasonably accurate, simple formulas for conceptual system design and fast-running beam dynamics codes, as well as for general understanding. Most of this report is devoted to such formulas, but an introduction to the Tosca(copyright) code (1-7) and some numerical

  16. Low-Q Electrically Small Spherical Magnetic Dipole Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2010-01-01

    Three novel electrically small antenna configurations radiating a TE10 spherical mode corresponding to a magnetic dipole are presented and investigated: multiarm spherical helix (MSH) antenna, spherical split ring resonator (S-SRR) antenna, and spherical split ring (SSR) antenna. All three antennas...... are self-resonant, with the input resistance tuned to 50 ohms by an excitation curved dipole/monopole. A prototype of the SSR antenna has been fabricated and measured, yielding results that are consistent with the numerical simulations. Radiation quality factors (Q) of these electrically small antennas (in...

  17. ''Massless gaps'' for solenoid + calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marraffino, J.; Wu, W.; Beretvas, A.; Green, D.; Denisenko, K.; Para, A.

    1991-11-01

    The necessary existence of material in front of the first active element in a calorimeter will degrade the performance of that device. The question is by what factor. The follow up question is what can be done to minimize the damage. These questions are usually of primary importance for liquid argon calorimetry because of the necessity of containment dewars. However, the problem is universal. For example, the Solenoid Detector Collaboration, SDC, has proposed a superconducting coil which would be placed in front of the EM calorimeter. Although much effort has been made to minimize the depth of material in the coil, still the resolution and linearity must be optimized if the SDC goal of precision electromagnetic (EM) calorimetry is to be realized

  18. Thermal and Mechanical Performance of the First MICE Coupling Coil and the Fermilab Solenoid Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabehl, Roger [Fermilab; Carcagno, Ruben [Fermilab; Caspi, Shlomo [LBNL, Berkeley; DeMello, Allan [LBNL, Berkeley; Kokoska, Lidija [Fermilab; Orris, D. [Fermilab; Pan, Heng [LBNL, Berkeley; Sylvester, Cosmore [Fermilab; Tartaglia, Michael

    2014-11-06

    The first coupling coil for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) has been tested in a conduction-cooled environment at the Solenoid Test Facility at Fermilab. An overview of the thermal and mechanical performance of the magnet and the test stand during cool-down and power testing of the magnet is presented.

  19. Hybrid design method for air-core solenoid with axial homogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li; Lee, Sang Jin [Uiduk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Suk Jin [Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, a hybrid method is proposed to design an air-core superconducting solenoid system for 6 T axial uniform magnetic field using Niobium Titanium (NbTi) superconducting wire. In order to minimize the volume of conductor, the hybrid optimization method including a linear programming and a nonlinear programming was adopted. The feasible space of solenoid is divided by several grids and the magnetic field at target point is approximated by the sum of magnetic field generated by an ideal current loop at the center of each grid. Using the linear programming, a global optimal current distribution in the feasible space can be indicated by non-zero current grids. Furthermore the clusters of the non-zero current grids also give the information of probable solenoids in the feasible space, such as the number, the shape, and so on. Applying these probable solenoids as the initial model, the final practical configuration of solenoids with integer layers can be obtained by the nonlinear programming. The design result illustrates the efficiency and the flexibility of the hybrid method. And this method can also be used for the magnet design which is required the high homogeneity within several ppm (parts per million)

  20. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, S.; Kumaki, M.; Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL.

  1. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, S.; Kumaki, M.; Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL

  2. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, S., E-mail: ikeda.s.ae@m.titech.ac.jp [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 216-8502 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0108 (Japan); Kumaki, M. [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0108 (Japan); Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL.

  3. Indirectly cooled large thin superconducting CDF solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Kunitaka; Mori, Shigeki; Yoshizaki, Ryozo; Saito, Ryusei; Asano, Katsuhiko.

    1985-01-01

    The manufacturing technique of the indirectly cooled large thin superconducting solenoid for the collider detector facility (CDF solenoid) has been studied through cooperation of University of Tsukuba and the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics of the Ministry of Education of Japan, and the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in the U.S. Fabrication and testing of the solenoid has recently been completed by Hitachi. The CDF solenoid has a large-sized thin structure for meeting the requirement by experiments to be applied. Hitachi has thus developed a variety of new technologies including the design standard, coil cooling method, material selection, and manufacturing technique in accordance with experimental data, which were confirmed in a series of analyses and tests made on various prototypes. The CDF solenoid, built using Hitachi's new technologies, is of the world's top class among equipment of this type. This paper outlines the design criteria for the major components employed in the CDF solenoid and the test results of the solenoid. (author)

  4. The solenoidal detector collaboration silicon detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziock, H.J.; Gamble, M.T.; Miller, W.O.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Thompson, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    Silicon tracking systems (STS) will be fundamental components of the tracking systems for both planned major SSC experiments. The STS is physically a small part of the central tracking system and the calorimeter of the detector being proposed by the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC). Despite its seemingly small size, it occupies a volume of more than 5 meters in length and 1 meter in diameter and is an order of magnitude larger than any silicon detector system previously built. The STS will consist of silicon microstrip detectors and possibly silicon pixel detectors. The other two components are an outer barrel tracker, which will consist of straw tubes or scintillating fibers; and an outer intermediate angle tracker, which will consist of gas microstrips. The components are designed to work as an integrated system. Each componenet has specific strengths, but is individually incapable of providing the overall performance required by the physics goals of the SSC. The large particle fluxes, the short times between beam crossing, the high channel count, and the required very high position measurement accuracy pose challenging problems that must be solved. Furthermore, to avoid degrading the measurements, the solutions must be achieved using only a minimal amount of material. An additional constraint is that only low-Z materials are allowed. If that were not difficlut enough, the solutions must also be affordable

  5. Designing focusing solenoids for superconducting RF accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Page, T.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; Wokas, T.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    The design of a focusing solenoid for use in a superconducting RF linac requires resolving a range of problems with conflicting requirements. Providing the required focusing strength contradicts the goal of minimizing the stray field on the surfaces of adjacent superconducting RF cavities. The requirement of a compact solenoid, able to fit into a gap between cavities, contradicts the need of mechanical support necessary to restrain electromagnetic forces that can result in coil motion and subsequent quenching. In this report we will attempt to address these and other issues arising during the development of focusing solenoids. Some relevant test data will also be presented.

  6. Embedded Solenoid Transformer for Power Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    A resonant power converter for operation in the radio frequency range, preferably in the VHF, comprises at least one PCB-embedded transformer. The transformer is configured for radio frequency operation and comprises a printed circuit board defining a horizontal plane, the printed circuit board...... comprising at least two horizontal conductive layers separated by an isolating layer, a first embedded solenoid forming a primary winding of the transformer and a second embedded solenoid being arranged parallel to the first solenoid and forming a secondary winding of the transformer, wherein the first...

  7. Thermoelectric power of small polarons in magnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, N.H.; Emin, D.

    1984-01-01

    The thermoelectric power (Seebeck coefficient) α of a small polaron in both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic semiconductors and insulators is calculated for the first time. In particular, we obtain the contribution to the Seebeck coefficient arising from exchange interactions between the severely localized carrier (i.e., small polaron) of charge q and the spins of the host lattice. In essence, we study the heat transported along with a carrier. This heat, the Peltier heat, Pi, is related to the Seebeck coefficient by the Kelvin relation: Pi = qTα, where T is the temperature. The heat per carrier is simply the product of the temperature and the change of the entropy of the system when a small polaron is added to it. The magnetic contribution to the Seebeck coefficient is therefore directly related to the change of the magnetic entropy of the system upon introduction of a charge carrier. We explicitly treat the intrasite and intersite exchange interactions between a small polaron and the spins of a spin-1/2 system. These magnetic interactions produce two competing contributions to the Seebeck coefficient. First, adding the carrier tends to provide extra spin freedom (e.g., spin up or spin down of the carrier). This effect augments the entropy of the system, thereby producing a positive contribution to the Peltier heat. Second, however, the additional exchange between the carrier and the sites about it enhances the exchange binding among these sites. This generally reduces the energetically allowable spin configurations. The concomitant reduction of the system's entropy provides a negative contribution to the Peltier heat. At the highest of temperatures, when kT exceeds the intrasite exchange energy, the first effect dominates. Then, the Peltier heat is simply augmented by kT ln2

  8. E-beam heated linear solenoid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benford, J.; Bailey, V.; Oliver, D.

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual design and system analysis shows that electron beam heated linear solenoidal reactors are attractive for near term applications which can use low gain fusion sources. Complete plant designs have been generated for fusion based breeders of fissile fuel over a wide range of component parameters (e.g., magnetic fields, reactor lengths, plasma densities) and design options (e.g., various radial and axial loss mechanisms). It appears possible that a reactor of 100 to 300 meters length operating at power levels of 1000 MWt can economically produce 2000 to 8000 kg/yr of 233 U to supply light water reactor fuel needs beyond 2000 A.D. Pure fusion reactors of 300 to 500 meter lengths are possible. Physics and operational features of reactors are described. Beam heating by classical and anomalous energy deposition is reviewed. The technology of the required beams has been developed to MJ/pulse levels, within a factor of 20 of that needed for full scale production reactors. The required repetitive pulsing appears practical

  9. What caused the failures of the solenoid valve screws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassallo, T.P.; Mumford, J.R.; Hossain, F.

    2001-01-01

    At Seabrook Station on May 5,1998 following a lengthy purge of the pressurizer steam space through Containment isolation sample valve 1-RC-FV-2830, the UL status light associated with this solenoid valve did not come on when the valve was closed from the plant's main control board. The UL status light is used to confirm valve closure position to satisfy the plant's Technical Specification requirements. The incorrect valve position indication on the main control board was initially believed to have resulted from excessive heat from a failed voltage control module that did not reduce the voltage to the valve's solenoid coil. This conclusion was based on a similar event that occurred in November of 1996. Follow-up in-plant testing of the valve determined that the voltage control module had not failed and was functioning satisfactorily. Subsequent investigations determined the root cause of the event to be excessive heat-up of the valve caused by high process fluid temperature and an excessively long purge of the pressurizer. The excessive heat-up of the valve from the high temperature process fluid weakened the magnetic field strength of the valve stem magnet to the extent that the UL status light reed switch would not actuate when the valve was closed. Since the voltage control module was tested and found to be functioning properly it was not replaced. Only the UL status light reed switch was replaced with a more sensitive reed that would respond better to a reduced magnetic field strength that results from a hot magnet. During reed switch replacement, three terminal block screws in the valve housing were found fractured and three other terminal block screws fractured during determination of the electrical conductors. This paper describes the initial plant event and ensuing laboratory tests and examinations that were performed to determine the root cause of the failure of the terminal block screws from the Containment isolation sample solenoid valve. (author)

  10. The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallman, T. R.

    2011-01-01

    The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) was selected by NASA for flight in 2014 to make a sensitive search for X-ray polarization from a wide set of source classes, including stellar black holes, Seyfert galaxies and quasars, blazars, rotation and accretion-powered pulsars, magnetars, shell supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae. Among the primary scientific objectives are determining the effects of the spin of black holes and the geometry of supermassive black hole accretion, determining the configurations of the magnetic fields and the X-ray emission of magnetars, and determining the magnetic structure of the supernova shocks in which cosmic rays are accelerated. GEMS will observe 23 targets during a 16 month prime mission, in observations that will be able to reach predicted levels of polarization. The mission can be extended to provide a guest observer phase. The GEMS instrument has time projection chamber polarimeters with high 2-10 keV efficiency at the focus of thin foil mirrors. The 4.5 m focal length mirrors will be deployed on an extended boom. The spacecraft with the instrument is rotated with a period of about 10 minutes to enable measurement and correction of systematic errors. A small Bragg reflection soft X-ray experiment takes advantage of this rotation to obtain a measurement at 0.5 keV. The design of the GEMS instrument and the mission, the expected performance and the planned science program will be discussed.

  11. Superconducting solenoids for an international muon cooling experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Rey, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The international muon ionization cooling experiment MICE will consist of two focusing cooling cells and a pair of uniform field solenoids used for particle identification and emittance measurements. The 2.75-meter long cooling cells have a pair of field flip coils and a coupling coil. The 0.52-meter diameter field flip coils surround an absorber that removes transverse and longitudinal momentum from the muons to be cooled. The beam in the absorber is at a minimum beta point so that scattering of the muons is minimized. The 1.7-meter diameter coupling coils are outside of conventional 201.25 MHz RF cavities that accelerate the muons putting longitudinal momentum into the muons without putting back the transverse momentum into the beam. A third set of flip coils helps the muon beam transition from and to the experimental solenoids. The 0.6-meter diameter experimental solenoids have a uniform field region (good to about 1 part in 1000) that is 1.3-meters long. The MICE experiment magnets must operate as a single unit so that the field profile will produce the maximum muon cooling

  12. ITER Central Solenoid Module Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, John [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-09-23

    The fabrication of the modules for the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) has started in a dedicated production facility located in Poway, California, USA. The necessary tools have been designed, built, installed, and tested in the facility to enable the start of production. The current schedule has first module fabrication completed in 2017, followed by testing and subsequent shipment to ITER. The Central Solenoid is a key component of the ITER tokamak providing the inductive voltage to initiate and sustain the plasma current and to position and shape the plasma. The design of the CS has been a collaborative effort between the US ITER Project Office (US ITER), the international ITER Organization (IO) and General Atomics (GA). GA’s responsibility includes: completing the fabrication design, developing and qualifying the fabrication processes and tools, and then completing the fabrication of the seven 110 tonne CS modules. The modules will be shipped separately to the ITER site, and then stacked and aligned in the Assembly Hall prior to insertion in the core of the ITER tokamak. A dedicated facility in Poway, California, USA has been established by GA to complete the fabrication of the seven modules. Infrastructure improvements included thick reinforced concrete floors, a diesel generator for backup power, along with, cranes for moving the tooling within the facility. The fabrication process for a single module requires approximately 22 months followed by five months of testing, which includes preliminary electrical testing followed by high current (48.5 kA) tests at 4.7K. The production of the seven modules is completed in a parallel fashion through ten process stations. The process stations have been designed and built with most stations having completed testing and qualification for carrying out the required fabrication processes. The final qualification step for each process station is achieved by the successful production of a prototype coil. Fabrication of the first

  13. Conceptual design of the Mu2e production solenoid cold mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Lamm, M.; Mokhov, N.V.; Nicol, T.H.; Page, T.M.; Pronskikh, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    The Muon-to-Electron conversion experiment (Mu2e), under development at Fermilab, seeks to detect direct muon to electron conversion to provide evidence for a process violating muon and electron lepton number conservation that cannot be explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. The required magnetic field is produced by a series of superconducting solenoids of various apertures and lengths. This paper describes the conceptual design of the 5 T, 4 m long solenoid cold mass with 1.67 m bore with the emphasis on the magnetic, radiation and thermal analyses.

  14. Magnetic and velocity fields in a dynamo operating at extremely small Ekman and magnetic Prandtl numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimkanin, Ján; Kyselica, Juraj

    2017-12-01

    Numerical simulations of the geodynamo are becoming more realistic because of advances in computer technology. Here, the geodynamo model is investigated numerically at the extremely low Ekman and magnetic Prandtl numbers using the PARODY dynamo code. These parameters are more realistic than those used in previous numerical studies of the geodynamo. Our model is based on the Boussinesq approximation and the temperature gradient between upper and lower boundaries is a source of convection. This study attempts to answer the question how realistic the geodynamo models are. Numerical results show that our dynamo belongs to the strong-field dynamos. The generated magnetic field is dipolar and large-scale while convection is small-scale and sheet-like flows (plumes) are preferred to a columnar convection. Scales of magnetic and velocity fields are separated, which enables hydromagnetic dynamos to maintain the magnetic field at the low magnetic Prandtl numbers. The inner core rotation rate is lower than that in previous geodynamo models. On the other hand, dimensional magnitudes of velocity and magnetic fields and those of the magnetic and viscous dissipation are larger than those expected in the Earth's core due to our parameter range chosen.

  15. High magnetic field generation for laser-plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, B. B.; Froula, D. H.; Davis, P. F.; Ross, J. S.; Fulkerson, S.; Bower, J.; Satariano, J.; Price, D.; Krushelnick, K.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2006-01-01

    An electromagnetic solenoid was developed to study the effect of magnetic fields on electron thermal transport in laser plasmas. The solenoid, which is driven by a pulsed power system supplying 30 kJ, achieves magnetic fields of 13 T. The field strength was measured on the solenoid axis with a magnetic probe and optical Zeeman splitting. The measurements agree well with analytical estimates. A method for optimizing the solenoid design to achieve magnetic fields exceeding 20 T is presented

  16. Laser solenoid fusion--fission design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Taussig, R.T.

    1976-01-01

    The dependence of breeding performance on system engineering parameters is examined for laser solenoid fusion-fission reactors. Reactor performance is found to be relatively insensitive to most of the engineering parameters, and compact designs can be built based on reasonable technologies. Point designs are described for the prototype series of reactors (mid-term technologies) and for second generation systems (advanced technologies). It is concluded that the laser solenoid has a good probability of timely application to fuel breeding needs

  17. Pulsed-Field Magnetization Properties of Bulk Superconductors by Employment of Vortex-Type Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z.; Shinohara, N.; Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Tsuzuki, K.; Watasaki, M.; Kawabe, S.; Taguchi, R.; Izumi, M.

    Vortex-type magnetizing coils are gaining more and more attention to activate bulk superconductors in pulsed-field magnetization (PFM) studies, compared with solenoid-type ones. Following existing reports, we present experimental results of the different penetration patterns of magnetic flux between the two kinds of coils. It was found that the magnetic flux will primarily penetrate inside the bulk from the upper and lower surfaces by using vortex coils, rather than from the periphery in the case of solenoid coils. Moreover, the bulk submitted to a small pulsed-field excitation exhibits a similar field profile as the excitation field (convex or concave shape); a phenomenon named field memory effect. The use of vortex- or solenoid-type coils in PFM will pose an influence on the initial flux penetration patterns during the flux trapping processes, but both coils can finally excite the best conical trapped field shape of the bulk.

  18. Magnet system studies for the Zeus experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baynham, D.E.; Coombs, R.C.; Uden, C.N.

    1985-11-01

    The ZEUS experiment will be mounted at the HERA accelerator complex currently under construction at DESY, Hamburg. A large volume of magnetic field will be required for charge selection of particles and track fitting. Two superconducting magnet systems which meet the parameters of the ZEUS Experiment are described; a small solenoid with good radiation transparency and a large aperture Helmholtz coil configuration. Basic design concepts and parameters are presented. (author)

  19. submitter A High Precision 3D Magnetic Field Scanner for Small to Medium Size Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Bergsma, F; Garnier, F; Giudici, P A

    2016-01-01

    A bench to measure the magnetic field of small to-medium-sized magnets with high precision was built. It uses a small-sized head with three orthogonal Hall probes, supported on a long pole at continuous movement during measurement. The head is calibrated in three dimensions by rotation over the full solid angle in a special device. From 0 to 2.5 T, the precision is ±0.2 mT in all components. The spatial range is 1 × 1 × 2 m with precision of ±0.02 mm. The bench and its controls are lightweight and easy to transport. The head can penetrate through small apertures and measure as close as 0.5 mm from the surface of a magnet. The bench can scan complicated grids in Cartesian or cylindrical coordinates, steered by a simple text file on an accompanying PC. The raw data is online converted to magnetic units and stored in a text file.

  20. The Compact Muon Solenoid Detector Control System

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a CERN multi-purpose experiment that exploits the physics of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The Detector Control System (DCS) ensures a safe, correct and efficient experiment operation, contributing to the recording of high quality physics data. The DCS is programmed to automatically react to the LHC changes. CMS sub-detector’s bias voltages are set depending on the machine mode and particle beam conditions. A protection mechanism ensures that the sub-detectors are locked in a safe mode whenever a potentially dangerous situation exists. The system is supervised from the experiment control room by a single operator. A small set of screens summarizes the status of the detector from the approximately 6M monitored parameters. Using the experience of nearly two years of operation with beam the DCS automation software has been enhanced to increase the system efficiency. The automation allows now for configuration commands that can be used to automatically pre-configure hardwar...

  1. A feasibility study of high-strength Bi-2223 conductor for high-field solenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godeke, A.; Abraimov, D. V.; Arroyo, E.; Barret, N.; Bird, M. D.; Francis, A.; Jaroszynski, J.; Kurteva, D. V.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Marks, E. L.; Marshall, W. S.; McRae, D. M.; Noyes, P. D.; Pereira, R. C. P.; Viouchkov, Y. L.; Walsh, R. P.; White, J. M.

    2017-03-01

    We performed a feasibility study on a high-strength Bi{}2-xPb x Sr2Ca2Cu3O{}10-x(Bi-2223) tape conductor for high-field solenoid applications. The investigated conductor, DI-BSCCO Type HT-XX, is a pre-production version of Type HT-NX, which has recently become available from Sumitomo Electric Industries. It is based on their DI-BSCCO Type H tape, but laminated with a high-strength Ni-alloy. We used stress-strain characterizations, single- and double-bend tests, easy- and hard-way bent coil-turns at various radii, straight and helical samples in up to 31.2 T background field, and small 20-turn coils in up to 17 T background field to systematically determine the electro-mechanical limits in magnet-relevant conditions. In longitudinal tensile tests at 77 K, we found critical stress- and strain-levels of 516 MPa and 0.57%, respectively. In three decidedly different experiments we detected an amplification of the allowable strain with a combination of pure bending and Lorentz loading to ≥slant 0.92 % (calculated elastically at the outer tape edge). This significant strain level, and the fact that it is multi-filamentary conductor and available in the reacted and insulated state, makes DI-BSCCO HT-NX highly suitable for very high-field solenoids, for which high current densities and therefore high loads are required to retain manageable magnet dimensions.

  2. Solenoid fringe field compensation for the Cluster Klystron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Fernow, R.C.; Kirk, H.G.; Palmer, R.B.; Zhao, Y.

    1996-04-01

    Optimization of the solenoid pancake currents so as to have a uniform axial magnetic field over an extended volume, is very important for the successful operation of the Cluster Klystron. By boosting the first and the last pancake currents by 35%, a uniform field Br/Bz ≤ 0.1% at radius R ≤ 2 cm can be extended from ± 7 cm to ± 16 cm. The result confirms simulations and the requirements for a 3-beam Cluster Klystron Experiment are achieved

  3. HB+ prepares for insertion into the CMS solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Dave Barney, CERN

    2006-01-01

    With calibration of the first half of the barrel Hadron Calorimeter (HB+) complete (using a radioactive source), preparations begin for its insertion into the solenoid for the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC). It was moved out of its alcove at the beginning of March - a non-trivial (but completely successful) operation due to the proximity of one of the barrel yoke rings (YB+1). The other half of the barrel Hadron Calorimeter (HB-) and one of the endcaps (HE+) should also be calibrated before the MTCC.

  4. Magnetic properties in MnBi alloy of small crystallites for permanent magnet devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, S. K.; Prakash, H. R.; Ram, S., E-mail: jms.sanjeev@gmail.com [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur-721302 (India)

    2016-05-06

    A rare-earth free alloy like MnBi is a potential candidate for developing small magnets and devices. In a commercially viable method, a MnBi alloy was prepared by arc melting Mn and Bi metals in a 1:1 ratio. In terms of the X-ray diffraction a single crystalline MnBi phase is formed of the as prepared alloy. FESEM images delineate thin MnBi layers (25 – 40 nm thickness) of average EDX composition throughout the specimen. A large coercivity 5.501 kOe (6.5 emu/g magnetization) observed in an M-H at 300 K is decreased to 0.171 (9.0 emu/g magnetization) at 100 K in decreasing upon cooling.

  5. Experiments with a double solenoid system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pampa Condori, R.; Lichtenthaeler Filho, R.; Faria, P.N. de; Lepine-Szily, A.; Mendes Junior, D.R.; Pires, K.C.C.; Assuncao, M.; Scarduelli, V.B.; Leistenschneider, E.; Morais, M.C.; Shorto, J.M.B.; Gasques, L. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: RIBRAS [1] is presently the only experimental equipment in South America capable of producing secondary beams of rare isotopes. It consists of two superconducting solenoids, installed in one of the beam lines of the 8 MV Pelletron Tandem accelerator of the University of Sao Paulo. The exotic nuclei are produced in the collision between the primary beam of the Pelletron Accelerator and the primary target. The secondary beam is selected by the in-flight technique and is usually contaminated with particles coming from scattering and reactions in the primary target such as {sup 7}Li, alpha and other light particles as protons, deuterons and tritons. Solenoids are selectors with large acceptance and the double solenoid system provides ways to improve the quality of the secondary beam by using a degrador in the midst of the two solenoids. The main contamination of the secondary beam comes from {sup 7}Li{sup 2+} particles coming from the primary beam. A degrador placed between the two solenoids is able to separate those particles from the {sup 6}He beam providing an additional charge exchange {sup 7}Li{sup 2+-→}3{sup +}. In addition, the differential energy loss in the degrador provides further selection of the light particles as protons, deuterons, tritons and and alpha particles by the second solenoid. Here we present the results of the first experiment performed at RIBRAS using both solenoids. A pure {sup 6}He beam was produced and the reaction {sup 6}He+p was measured using a thick CH{sub 2} target. 1. R. Lichtenthaeler et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 25,s01,733 (2005) and Nucl. Phys. News 15, 25 (2005). (author)

  6. submitter Starting Manufacture of the ITER Central Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Libeyre, P; Dolgetta, N; Gaxiola, E; Jong, C; Lyraud, C; Mitchell, N; Journeaux, J Y; Vollmann, T; Evans, D; Sgobba, S; Langeslag, S; Reiersen, W; Martovetsky, N; Everitt, D; Hatfield, D; Rosenblad, P; Litherland, S; Freudenberg, K; Myatt, L; Smith, J; Brazelton, C; Abbott, R; Daubert, J; Rackers, K; Nentwich, T

    2016-01-01

    The central solenoid (CS) is a key component of the ITER magnet system to provide the magnetic flux swing required to drive induced plasma current up to 15 MA. The manufacture of its different subcomponents has now started, following completion of the design analyses and achievement of the qualification of the manufacturing procedures. A comprehensive set of analyses has been produced to demonstrate that the CS final design meets all requirements. This includes in particular structural analyses carried out with different finite-element models and addressing normal and fault conditions. Following the Final Design Review, held in November 2013, and the subsequent design modifications, the analyses were updated for consistency with the final design details and provide evidence that the Magnet Structural Design Criteria are fully met. Before starting any manufacturing activity of a CS component, a corresponding dedicated qualification program has been carried out. This includes manufacture of mockups using the re...

  7. Testing of the superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab collider detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, R.W.; Holmes, C.N.; Kephart, R.D.

    1985-07-01

    The 3 m phi x 5 m long x 1.5 T superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab Collider Detector has been installed at Fermilab and was tested in early 1985 with a dedicated refrigeration system. The refrigerator and 5.6-Mg magnet cold mass were cooled to 5 K in 210 hours. After testing at low currents, the magnet was charged to the design current of 5 kA in 5-MJ steps. During a 390 A/min charge a spontaneous quench occurred at 4.5 kA due to insufficient liquid helium flow. Three other quenches occurred during ''slow'' discharges which were nevertheless fast enough to cause high eddy current heating in the outer support cylinder. Quench behavior is well understood and the magnet is now quite reliable

  8. Rotatable Small Permanent Magnet Array for Ultra-Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Instrumentation: A Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Michael W; Giorni, Andrea; Vegh, Viktor; Pellicer-Guridi, Ruben; Reutens, David C

    2016-01-01

    We studied the feasibility of generating the variable magnetic fields required for ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry with dynamically adjustable permanent magnets. Our motivation was to substitute traditional electromagnets by distributed permanent magnets, increasing system portability. The finite element method (COMSOL®) was employed for the numerical study of a small permanent magnet array to calculate achievable magnetic field strength, homogeneity, switching time and magnetic forces. A manually operated prototype was simulated and constructed to validate the numerical approach and to verify the generated magnetic field. A concentric small permanent magnet array can be used to generate strong sample pre-polarisation and variable measurement fields for ultra-low field relaxometry via simple prescribed magnet rotations. Using the array, it is possible to achieve a pre-polarisation field strength above 100 mT and variable measurement fields ranging from 20-50 μT with 200 ppm absolute field homogeneity within a field-of-view of 5 x 5 x 5 cubic centimetres. A dynamic small permanent magnet array can generate multiple highly homogeneous magnetic fields required in ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) instruments. This design can significantly reduce the volume and energy requirements of traditional systems based on electromagnets, improving portability considerably.

  9. Manufacturing of Nb3Sn Sample Conductor for CFETR Central Solenoid Model Coil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, Jing Gang; Wu, Yu; Xiang, Bing Lun; Dai, Chao; Mao, Zhe Hua; Jin, Huan; Liao, Guo Jun; Liu, Fang; Xue, Tianjun; Wei, Zhou Rong; Devred, Arnaud; Nijhuis, Arend; Zhou, Chao

    2017-01-01

    China fusion engineering test reactor (CFETR) is a new tokamak device, whose magnet system includes the toroidal field, central solenoid (CS), and poloidal field coils. In order to develop the manufacturing process for the full-size CS coil, the CS model coil (CSMC) project was launched first. The

  10. TESTING OF FRAMED STRUCTURE PARTS OF COMPACT MUON SOLENOID BY NONDESTRUCTIVE METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Larchenkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspension parts of a compact muon solenoid for Large Hadron Collider have been tested in the paper. The paper describes a steady-state and cyclic “tension-compression” load created by superconducting electromagnet with energy of 3 GJ and magnetic induction of 4 tesla. A nondestructive testing method has been applied in the paper.

  11. Counterstreaming electrons in small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, H. Q.; Zhao, G. Q.; Wang, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (SIMFRs) are commonly observed by spacecraft at 1 AU, and their origin still remains disputed. We investigated the counterstreaming suprathermal electron (CSE) signatures of 106 SIMFRs measured by Wind during 1995-2005. We found that 79 (75%) of the 106 flux ropes contain CSEs, and the percentages of counterstreaming vary from 8% to 98%, with a mean value of 51%. CSEs are often observed in magnetic clouds (MCs), and this indicates these MCs are still attached to the Sun at both ends. CSEs are also related to heliospheric current sheets (HCSs) and the Earth's bow shock. We divided the SIMFRs into two categories: The first category is far from HCSs, and the second category is in the vicinity of HCSs. The first category has 57 SIMFRs, and only 7 of 57 ropes have no CSEs. This ratio is similar to that of MCs. The second category has 49 SIMFRs; however, 20 of the 49 events have no CSEs. This ratio is larger than that of MCs. These two categories have different origins. One category originates from the solar corona, and most ropes are still connected to the Sun at both ends. The other category is formed near HCSs in the interplanetary space.

  12. Experimental investigation into the application of a magnetic dense medium cyclone in a production environment / Ilana Katinka Myburgh

    OpenAIRE

    Myburgh, Ilana Katinka

    2001-01-01

    The magnetic dense medium cyclone project was undertaken at Koingnaas Mine on a 250 mm diameter cyclone during 1998 and a 510 mm cyclone during 2000. The aim of the project was to evaluate the performance of a magnetic DM cyclone in a production environment. Previous test work on magnetic DM cyclones were conducted during 1995 and 1996 on small (100 mm) cyclones in a laboratory environment, with medium feed only. Solenoid position, magnetic field strength and medium inlet de...

  13. Laser heated solenoid as a neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Rose, P.H.

    1975-01-01

    Conceptual designs are presented for a radiation test facility based on a laser heated plasma confined in a straight solenoid. The thin plasma column, a few meters in length and less than a centimeter in diameter, serves as a line source of neutrons. Test samples are located within or just behind the plasma tube, at a radius of 1-2 cm from the axis. The plasma is heated by an axially-directed powerful long-wavelength laser beam. The plasma is confined radially in the intense magnetic field supplied by a pulsed solenoid surrounding the plasma tube. The facility is pulsed many times a second to achieve a high time-averaged neutron flux on the test samples. Based on component performance achievable in the near term (e.g., magnetic field, laser pulse energy) and assuming classical physical processes, it appears that average fluxes of 10 13 to 10 14 neutrons/cm 2 -sec can be achieved in such a device. The most severe technical problems in such a facility appear to be rapid pulsing design and lifetime of some electrical and laser components

  14. Large high current density superconducting solenoids for use in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Eberhard, P.H.; Taylor, J.D.

    1976-05-01

    Very often the study of high energy physics in colliding beam storage-rings requires a large magnetic field volume in order to detect and analyze charged particles which are created from the collision of two particle beams. Large superconducting solenoids which are greater than 1 meter in diameter are required for this kind of physics. In many cases, interesting physics can be done outside the magnet coil, and this often requires that the amount of material in the magnet coil be minimized. As a result, these solenoids should have high current density (up to 10 9 A m -2 ) superconducting windings. The methods commonly used to stabilize large superconducting magnets cannot be employed because of this need to minimize the amount of material in the coils. A description is given of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory program for building and testing prototype solenoid magnets which are designed to operate at coil current densities in excess of 10 9 A m -2 with magnetic stored energies which are as high as 1.5 Megajoules per meter of solenoid length. The coils use intrinsically stable multifilament Nb--Ti superconductors. Control of the magnetic field quench is achieved by using a low resistance aluminum bore tube which is inductively coupled to the coil. The inner cryostat is replaced by a tubular cooling system which carries two phase liquid helium. The magnet coil, the cooling tubes, and aluminum bore tube are cast in epoxy to form a single unified magnet and cryogenic system which is about 2 centimeters thick. The results of the magnet coil tests are discussed

  15. A spectrometer using one or two superconducting coaxial solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schapira, J.P.; Gales, S.; Laurent, J.P.

    1979-06-01

    A set of two superconducting solenoidal coils which are presently under construction at the Orsay I.P.N. is described. Because of its optical properties, the system can be used as spectrometer: focusing properties with small geometrical aberrations allowing large solid angles to be used together with good transmission and isochronism. Various types of experiments can be envisaged with such a device: angular correlation at zero degree, study of rare events like exotic reactions, time of flight for mass identification and rapid (much less than 1 μs) and efficient collection of radioactive nuclei for subsequent spectroscopy measurements [fr

  16. Dynamic analysis of fast-acting solenoid valves using finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Ki Tae; Han, Hwa Taik

    2001-01-01

    It is intended to develop an algorithm for dynamic simulation of fast-acting solenoid valves. The coupled equations of the electric, magnetic, and mechanical systems should be solved simultaneously in a transient nonlinear manner. The transient nonlinear electromagnetic field is analyzed by the Finite Element Method (FEM), which is coupled with nonlinear electronic circuitry. The dynamic movement of the solenoid valve is analyzed at every time step from the force balances acting on the plunger, which include the electromagnetic force calculated from the finite element analysis as well as the elastic force by a spring and the hydrodynamic pressure force along the flow passage. Dynamic responses of the solenoid valves predicted by this algorithm agree well the experimental results including bouncing effects

  17. A feasibility study of a linear laser heated solenoid fusion reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.

    1976-02-01

    This report examines the feasibility of a laser heated solenoid as a fusion or fusion-fission reactor system. The objective of this study, was an assessment of the laser heated solenoid reactor concept in terms of its plasma physics, engineering design, and commercial feasibility. Within the study many pertinent reactor aspects were treated including: physics of the laser-plasma interaction; thermonuclear behavior of a slender plasma column; end-losses under reactor conditions; design of a modular first wall, a hybrid (both superconducting and normal) magnet, a large CO 2 laser system; reactor blanket; electrical storage elements; neutronics; radiation damage, and tritium processing. Self-consistent reactor configurations were developed for both pure fusion and fusion-fission designs, with the latter designed both to produce power and/or fissile fuels for conventional fission reactors. Appendix A is a bibliography with commentary of theoretical and experimental studies that have been directed at the laser heated solenoid

  18. A quantitative investigation of the effect of a close-fitting superconducting shield on the coil factor of a solenoid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarøe, Morten; Monaco, R.; Koshelet, V.

    2009-01-01

    Superconducting shields are commonly used to suppress external magnetic interference. We show, that an error of almost an order of magnitude can occur in the coil factor in realistic configurations of the solenoid and the shield. The reason is that the coil factor is determined by not only...... the geometry of the solenoid, but also the nearby magnetic environment. This has important consequences for many cryogenic experiments involving magnetic fields such as the determination of the parameters of Josephson junctions, as well as other superconducting devices. It is proposed to solve the problem...

  19. Floquet Engineering of Optical Solenoids and Quantized Charge Pumping along Tailored Paths in Two-Dimensional Chern Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Botao; Ünal, F. Nur; Eckardt, André

    2018-06-01

    The insertion of a local magnetic flux, as the one created by a thin solenoid, plays an important role in gedanken experiments of quantum Hall physics. By combining Floquet engineering of artificial magnetic fields with the ability of single-site addressing in quantum gas microscopes, we propose a scheme for the realization of such local solenoid-type magnetic fields in optical lattices. We show that it can be employed to manipulate and probe elementary excitations of a topological Chern insulator. This includes quantized adiabatic charge pumping along tailored paths inside the bulk, as well as the controlled population of edge modes.

  20. Quench protection analysis of the Mu2e production solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashikhin, Vadim; Ambrosio, Giorgio; Andreev, Nikolai; Lamm, Michael; Nicol, Thomas; Orris, Darryl; Page, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The Muon-to-Electron conversion experiment (Mu2e), under development at Fermilab, seeks to detect direct muon to electron conversion to provide evidence for a process violating muon and electron lepton number conservation that cannot be explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. The Mu2e magnet system consists of three large superconducting solenoids. In case of a quench, the stored magnetic energy is extracted to an external dump circuit. However, because of the fast current decay, a significant fraction of the energy dissipates inside of the cryostat in the coil support shells made of structural aluminum, and in the radiation shield. A 3D finite-element model of the complete cold-mass was created in order to simulate the quench development and understand the role of the quench-back. The simulation results are reported at the normal and non-standard operating conditions

  1. Quench protection analysis of the Mu2e production solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashikhin, Vadim; Ambrosio, Giorgio; Andreev, Nikolai; Lamm, Michael; Nicol, Thomas; Orris, Darryl; Page, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The Muon-to-Electron conversion experiment (Mu2e), under development at Fermilab, seeks to detect direct muon to electron conversion to provide evidence for a process violating muon and electron lepton number conservation that cannot be explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. The Mu2e magnet system consists of three large superconducting solenoids. In case of a quench, the stored magnetic energy is extracted to an external dump circuit. However, because of the fast current decay, a significant fraction of the energy dissipates inside of the cryostat in the coil support shells made of structural aluminum, and in the radiation shield. A 3D finite-element model of the complete cold-mass was created in order to simulate the quench development and understand the role of the quench-back. The simulation results are reported at the normal and non-standard operating conditions.

  2. Behaviour of large cylindrical drift chambers in a superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, W. de; Fues, W.; Grindhammer, G.; Kotthaus, R.; Lierl, H.; Moss, L.

    1980-04-01

    We describe the construction and behaviour of a set of cylindrical drift chambers operating inside a superconducting solenoid with a central magnetic field of 1.3 T. The chambers are part of the 4 π detector CELLO at the e + e - storage ring PETRA in Hamburg. The chambers were designed without field shaping to keep them as simple as possible. In order to parametrize accurately the nonlinear space-time relation, we used a computer simulation of the drift process in inhomogenous electric and magnetic fields. With such a parametrization we achieved a resolution of 210 μm, averaged over the whole drift cell and angles of incidence up to 30 0 . (orig.)

  3. Design of the pancake-winding central solenoid coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Nishi, Masataka; Tsuji, Hirosi

    1995-01-01

    There was a debate over whether a pancake-winding or layer-winding technique is more appropriate for the Central Solenoid (CS) coil for ITER superconducting magnet. The layer-winding CS has the advantage of homogeneous winding supporting the TF centering force without weak joints, but has many difficulties during manufacturing and quality control. On other hand, the pancake-winding has the advantage of better quality control during manufacturing and module testing but has difficulties with joints and feeders, and pipes located in the load path of the bucking force from the toroidal field coils. The compact joints, reinforcement by preformed amour, sharp bending, and double seals are applied to the design of pancake-winding CS coil and demonstrated by hardware developments. The pancake-winding CS coil by using modified existing technology is compatible with the bucking concept of the ITER magnet system. (author)

  4. Conceptual fusion reactor designs based on the laser heat solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of the laser heated solenoid (LHS) as an approach to fusion and fusion-fission commercial power generation has been examined. The LHS concept is based on magnetic confinement of a long slender plasma column which is partly heated by the axially directed beam from a powerful long wavelength laser. As a pure fusion concept, the LHS configurations studied so far are characterized by fairly difficult engineering constraints, particularly on the magnet, a large laser, and a marginally acceptable system energy balance. As a fusion-fission system, however, the LHS is capable of a very attractive energy balance, has much more relaxed engineering constraints, requires a relatively modest laser, and as such holds great potential as a power generator and fissile fuel breeding scheme

  5. Flowfield Analysis of a Pneumatic Solenoid Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheam-Chyun Lin

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatic solenoid valve has been widely used in the vehicle control systems for meeting the rapid-reaction demand triggered by the dynamic conditions encountered during the driving course of vehicle. For ensuring the safety of human being, the reliable and effective solenoid valve is in great demand to shorten the reaction time and thus becomes the topic of this research. This numerical study chooses a commercial 3/2-way solenoid valve as the reference valve for analysing its performance. At first, CFD software Fluent is adopted to simulate the flow field associated with the valve configuration. Then, the comprehensive flow visualization is implemented to identify the locations of adverse flow patterns. Accordingly, it is found that a high-pressure region exists in the zone between the nozzle exit and the top of iron core. Thereafter, the nozzle diameter and the distance between nozzle and spool are identified as the important design parameters for improving the pressure response characteristics of valve. In conclusion, this work establishes a rigorous and systematic CFD scheme to evaluate the performance of pneumatic solenoid valve.

  6. Applications concepts of small regenerative cryocoolers in superconducitng magnet systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, M.T.G.; van der Laan, M.T.G.; Tax, R.B.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.

    1992-01-01

    Superconducting magnets are in growing use outside laboratories for example MRI scanners in hospitals. Other applications under development are magnet systems for separation, levitated trains and ship propulsion. The application of cryocoolers can make these systems more practical. Interfacing these

  7. First experiment with the double solenoid RIBRAS system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtenthaeler, R.; Condori, R. Pampa; Lepine-Szily, A.; Pires, K. C. C.; Morais, M. C.; Leistenschneider, E.; Scarduelli, V. B.; Gasques, L. R. [Instituto de Fisica da USP, Sao Paulo, Brazil, C.P. 66318, 05314-970 (Brazil); Faria, P. N. de; Mendes, D. R. Jr. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ, 24210-340 (Brazil); Shorto, J. M. B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Assuncao, M. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Campus Diadema, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    A description of the double solenoid system (RIBRAS) operating since 2004 in one of the beam lines of the Pelletron Laboratory of the Institute of Physics of the University of Sao Paulo is presented. The recent installation of the secondary scattering chamber after the second solenoid is reported and the first experiment in RIBRAS using both solenoids is described.

  8. Reproducibility and variability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging markers in cerebral small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guio, F. De; Jouvent, E.; Biessels, G.J.; Black, S.E.; Brayne, C.; Chen, C.; Cordonnier, C.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Dichgans, M.; Doubal, F.; Duering, M.; Dufouil, C.; Duzel, E.; Fazekas, F.; Hachinski, V.; Ikram, M.A.; Linn, J.; Matthews, P.M.; Mazoyer, B.; Mok, V.; Norrving, B.; O'Brien, J.T.; Pantoni, L.; Ropele, S.; Sachdev, P.; Schmidt, R.; Seshadri, S.; Smith, E.E.; Sposato, L.A.; Stephan, B.; Swartz, R.H.; Tzourio, C.; Buchem, M. van; Lugt, A. van der; Oostenbrugge, R.; Vernooij, M.W.; Viswanathan, A.; Werring, D.; Wollenweber, F.; Wardlaw, J.M.; Chabriat, H.

    2016-01-01

    Brain imaging is essential for the diagnosis and characterization of cerebral small vessel disease. Several magnetic resonance imaging markers have therefore emerged, providing new information on the diagnosis, progression, and mechanisms of small vessel disease. Yet, the reproducibility of these

  9. Reproducibility and variability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging markers in cerebral small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Guio, F. (François); Jouvent, E. (Eric); G.J. Biessels (Geert Jan); S.E. Black (Sandra); C. Brayne (Carol); C. Chen (Christopher); C. Cordonnier (Charlotte); H.F. de Leeuw (Frank); C. Kubisch (Christian); Doubal, F. (Fergus); Duering, M. (Marco); C. Dufouil (Carole); Duzel, E. (Emrah); F. Fazekas (Franz); V. Hachinski (Vladimir); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); J. Linn (Jennifer); P.M. Matthews (P.); B. Mazoyer (Bernard); Mok, V. (Vincent); B. Norrving (Bo); O'Brien, J.T. (John T.); Pantoni, L. (Leonardo); S. Ropele (Stefan); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); S. Seshadri (Sudha); E.E. Smith (Eric); L.A. Sposato (Luciano A); B.C.M. Stephan; Swartz, R.H. (Richard H.); C. Tzourio (Christophe); M.A. van Buchem (Mark); A. van der Lugt (Aad); R.J. van Oostenbrugge (Robert); M.W. Vernooij (Meike); Viswanathan, A. (Anand); D.J. Werring (David); Wollenweber, F. (Frank); J.M. Wardlaw (J.); Chabriat, H. (Hugues)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBrain imaging is essential for the diagnosis and characterization of cerebral small vessel disease. Several magnetic resonance imaging markers have therefore emerged, providing new information on the diagnosis, progression, and mechanisms of small vessel disease. Yet, the reproducibility

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging for precise radiotherapy of small laboratory animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenzel, Thorsten [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Bereich Strahlentherapie; Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie und Experimentelle Morphologie; Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Ernst, Thomas Michael; Salamon, Johannes [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Jaeckel, Maria [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Schumacher, Udo [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie und Experimentelle Morphologie; Kruell, Andreas [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Bereich Strahlentherapie

    2017-05-01

    Radiotherapy of small laboratory animals (SLA) is often not as precisely applied as in humans. Here we describe the use of a dedicated SLA magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner for precise tumor volumetry, radiotherapy treatment planning, and diagnostic imaging in order to make the experiments more accurate. Different human cancer cells were injected at the lower trunk of pfp/rag2 and SCID mice to allow for local tumor growth. Data from cross sectional MRI scans were transferred to a clinical treatment planning system (TPS) for humans. Manual palpation of the tumor size was compared with calculated tumor size of the TPS and with tumor weight at necropsy. As a feasibility study MRI based treatment plans were calculated for a clinical 6 MV linear accelerator using a micro multileaf collimator (μMLC). In addition, diagnostic MRI scans were used to investigate animals which did clinical poorly during the study. MRI is superior in precise tumor volume definition whereas manual palpation underestimates their size. Cross sectional MRI allow for treatment planning so that conformal irradiation of mice with a clinical linear accelerator using a μMLC is in principle feasible. Several internal pathologies were detected during the experiment using the dedicated scanner. MRI is a key technology for precise radiotherapy of SLA. The scanning protocols provided are suited for tumor volumetry, treatment planning, and diagnostic imaging.

  11. Reproducibility of small animal cine and scar cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using a clinical 3.0 tesla system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manka, Robert; Jahnke, Cosima; Hucko, Thomas; Dietrich, Thore; Gebker, Rolf; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Graf, Kristof; Paetsch, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the inter-study, inter-reader and intra-reader reproducibility of cardiac cine and scar imaging in rats using a clinical 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) system. Thirty-three adult rats (Sprague–Dawley) were imaged 24 hours after surgical occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery using a 3.0 Tesla clinical MR scanner (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands) equipped with a dedicated 70 mm solenoid receive-only coil. Left-ventricular (LV) volumes, mass, ejection fraction and amount of myocardial scar tissue were measured. Intra-and inter-observer reproducibility was assessed in all animals. In addition, repeat MR exams were performed in 6 randomly chosen rats within 24 hours to assess inter-study reproducibility. The MR imaging protocol was successfully completed in 32 (97%) animals. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated high intra-reader reproducibility (mean bias%: LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), -1.7%; LV end-systolic volume (LVESV), -2.2%; LV ejection fraction (LVEF), 1.0%; LV mass, -2.7%; and scar mass, -1.2%) and high inter-reader reproducibility (mean bias%: LVEDV, 3.3%; LVESV, 6.2%; LVEF, -4.8%; LV mass, -1.9%; and scar mass, -1.8%). In addition, a high inter-study reproducibility was found (mean bias%: LVEDV, 0.1%; LVESV, -1.8%; LVEF, 1.0%; LV mass, -4.6%; and scar mass, -6.2%). Cardiac MR imaging of rats yielded highly reproducible measurements of cardiac volumes/function and myocardial infarct size on a clinical 3.0 Tesla MR scanner system. Consequently, more widely available high field clinical MR scanners can be employed for small animal imaging of the heart e.g. when aiming at serial assessments during therapeutic intervention studies

  12. Force characteristics of solenoid electromagnet with ferromagnetic disc in the coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueorgiev, Vultchan; Yatchev, Ivan; Alexandrov, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents the construction and characteristics of a solenoid electromagnet with ferromagnetic disc placed in the coil. The presence if the disc leads to change of the force characteristic compared with conventional solenoid electromagnets - increasing the force at large air gaps and decreasing the force at small air gaps. This could be very useful for some actuators. It has been studied how the force characteristic depend on disc size, position and material. Finite element method has been used for field and force calculations of the electromagnet. (Author)

  13. How the Performance of a Superconducting Magnet is affected by the Connection between a small cooler and the Magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    As low temperature cryocoolers become more frequently used to cool superconducting magnets, it becomes increasingly apparent that the connection between the cooler and the magnet has an effect on the design and performance of the magnet. In general, the use of small coolers can be considered in two different temperature ranges; (1) from 3.8 to 4.8 K for magnet fabricated with LTS conductor and (2) from 18 to 35 K for magnets fabricated using HTS conductor. In general, both temperature ranges call for the use of a two-stage cooler. The best method for connecting a cooler to the magnet depends on a number of factors. The factors include: (1) whether the cooler must be used to cool down the magnet from room temperature, (2) whether the magnet must have one or more reservoirs of liquid cryogen to keep the magnet cold during a loss of cooling, and (3) constraints on the distance from the cooler cold heads and the magnet and its shield. Two methods for connecting low temperature coolers to superconducting magnets have been studied. The first method uses a cold strap to connect the cold heads directly to the loads. This method is commonly used for cryogen-free magnets. The second method uses a thermal siphon and liquid cryogens to make the connection between the load being cooled and the cold head. The two methods of transferring heat from the magnet to the cooler low temperature cold head are compared for the two temperature ranges given above

  14. Optimization of the Mu2e Production Solenoid Heat and Radiation Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronskikh, V. S.; Coleman, R.; Glenzinski, D.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Mokhov, N. V.

    2014-03-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab is designed to study the conversion of a negative muon to electron in the field of a nucleus without emission of neutrinos. Observation of this process would provide unambiguous evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, and can point to new physics beyond the reach of the LHC. The main parts of the Mu2e apparatus are its superconducting solenoids: Production Solenoid (PS), Transport Solenoid (TS), and Detector Solenoid (DS). Being in the vicinity of the beam, PS magnets are most subjected to the radiation damage. In order for the PS superconducting magnet to operate reliably, the peak neutron flux in the PS coils must be reduced by 3 orders of magnitude by means of sophisticatedly designed massive Heat and Radiation Shield (HRS), optimized for the performance and cost. An issue with radiation damage is related to large residual electrical resistivity degradation in the superconducting coils, especially its Al stabilizer. A detailed MARS15 analysis and optimization of the HRS has been carried out both to satisfy the Mu2e requirements to the radiation quantities (such as displacements per atom, peak temperature and power density in the coils, absorbed dose in the insulation, and dynamic heat load) and cost. Results of MARS15 simulations of these radiation quantities are reported and optimized HRS models are presented; it is shown that design levels satisfy all requirements.

  15. Bent solenoids for spectrometers and emittance exchange sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.

    1999-01-01

    Bent solenoids can be used to transport low energy beams as they provide both confinement and dispersion of particle orbits. Solenoids are being considered both as emittance exchange sections and spectrometers in the muon cooling system as part of the study of the muon collider. They present the results of a study of bent solenoids which considers the design of coupling sections between bent solenoids to straight solenoids, drift compensation fields, aberrations, and factors relating to the construction, such as field ripple, stored energy, coil forces and field errors

  16. Reference Design of the Mu2e Detector Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Feher, S; Brandt,, J; Cheban, S; Coleman, R; Dhanaraj, N; Fang, I; Lamm, M; Lombardo, V; Lopes, M; Miller, J; Ostojic, R ,; Orris, D; Page, T; Peterson, T; Tang, Z; Wands, R

    2014-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab has been approved by the Department of Energy to proceed developing the preliminary design. Integral to the success of Mu2e is the superconducting solenoid system. One of the three major solenoids is the Detector Solenoid that houses the stopping target and the detectors. The goal of the Detector Solenoid team is to produce detailed design specifications that are sufficient for vendors to produce the final design drawings, tooling and fabrication procedures and proceed to production. In this paper we summarize the Reference Design of the Detector Solenoid.

  17. Form factor of some types of toroidal solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koryavko, V.I.; Litvinenko, Yu.A.

    1979-01-01

    Obtained were the type of dependence between consumed power and formed field for toroidal helical-wound solenoids and the expression for the form factor analogous to the Fabry coefficient for cylindrical solenoids. Determined were optimum dimensions of the helical winding of ''forceless'' toroidal solenoids satisfying the condition of the formation of maximum field at minimum consumed power. Investigations also covered some types of conventional toroidal solenoids. Presented in the paper diagrams permitted to chose dimensions of the considered toroidal solenoids according to their consumed power and winding material volume

  18. Magnetization configurations and hysteresis loops of small permalloy ellipses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M; Liszkowski, J; Rahm, M; Wegscheider, W; Weiss, D; Hoffmann, H; Zweck, J

    2003-01-01

    We investigated systematically the easy axis magnetization reversal of 20 nm thick permalloy ellipses with a fixed major axis of 1.47 μm and minor axes of 0.22-1.47 μm. Lorentz transmission electron microscopy was used to image the micromagnetic configurations during magnetization reversal. Hysteresis loops of single ellipses were recorded by means of micro-Hall magnetometry and could be traced back to certain reversal mechanisms observed by Lorentz microscopy. In most cases, the magnetization reversal is initiated by the evolution of a magnetization buckling, followed by the formation of a single, a double, or a trapped vortex configuration. For ellipses with high aspect ratio (length-to-width ratio), the magnetization switches in the reversed magnetic field without creation of a stable vortex configuration. Our experiments show that the characteristic field values for vortex creation, single vortex annihilation, and switching strongly depend on the shape anisotropy of the elements

  19. Energy transfers in dynamos with small magnetic Prandtl numbers

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Rohit

    2015-06-25

    We perform numerical simulation of dynamo with magnetic Prandtl number Pm = 0.2 on 10243 grid, and compute the energy fluxes and the shell-to-shell energy transfers. These computations indicate that the magnetic energy growth takes place mainly due to the energy transfers from large-scale velocity field to large-scale magnetic field and that the magnetic energy flux is forward. The steady-state magnetic energy is much smaller than the kinetic energy, rather than equipartition; this is because the magnetic Reynolds number is near the dynamo transition regime. We also contrast our results with those for dynamo with Pm = 20 and decaying dynamo. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.

  20. Comparing superconducting and permanent magnets for magnetic refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Bahl, C. R. H.

    2016-01-01

    We compare the cost of a high temperature superconducting (SC) tape-based solenoidwith a permanent magnet (PM) Halbach cylinder for magnetic refrigeration.Assuming a five liter active magnetic regenerator volume, the price of each type ofmagnet is determined as a function of aspect ratio...... of the regenerator and desiredinternal magnetic field. It is shown that to produce a 1 T internal field in theregenerator a permanent magnet of hundreds of kilograms is needed or an area ofsuperconducting tape of tens of square meters. The cost of cooling the SC solenoidis shown to be a small fraction of the cost...... of the SC tape. Assuming a cost ofthe SC tape of 6000 $/m2 and a price of the permanent magnet of 100 $/kg, thesuperconducting solenoid is shown to be a factor of 0.3-3 times more expensive thanthe permanent magnet, for a desired field from 0.5-1.75 T and the geometrical aspectratio of the regenerator...

  1. Potential interference of small neodymium magnets with cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolber, Thomas; Ryf, Salome; Binggeli, Christian; Holzmeister, Johannes; Brunckhorst, Corinna; Luechinger, Roger; Duru, Firat

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic fields may interfere with the function of cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). Neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets, which are small in size but produce strong magnetic fields, have become widely available in recent years. Therefore, NdFeB magnets may be associated with an emerging risk of device interference. We conducted a clinical study to evaluate the potential of small NdFeB magnets to interfere with cardiac pacemakers and ICDs. The effect of four NdFeB magnets (two spherical magnets 8 and 10 mm in diameter, a necklace made of 45 spherical magnets, and a magnetic name tag) was tested in forty-one ambulatory patients with a pacemaker and 29 patients with an ICD. The maximum distance at which the magnetic switch of a device was influenced was observed. Magnetic interference was observed in all patients. The maximum distance resulting in device interference was 3 cm. No significant differences were found with respect to device manufacturer and device types. Small NdFeB magnets may cause interference with cardiac pacemakers and ICDs. Patients should be cautioned about the interference risk associated with NdFeB magnets during daily life.

  2. Gastric transit and small intestinal transit time and motility assessed by a magnet tracking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsøe, Jonas; Fynne, Lotte; Gregersen, Tine; Schlageter, Vincent; Christensen, Lisbet A; Dahlerup, Jens F; Rijkhoff, Nico J M; Laurberg, Søren; Krogh, Klaus

    2011-12-29

    Tracking an ingested magnet by the Magnet Tracking System MTS-1 (Motilis, Lausanne, Switzerland) is an easy and minimally-invasive method to assess gastrointestinal transit. The aim was to test the validity of MTS-1 for assessment of gastric transit time and small intestinal transit time, and to illustrate transit patterns detected by the system. A small magnet was ingested and tracked by an external matrix of 16 magnetic field sensors (4 × 4) giving a position defined by 5 coordinates (position: x, y, z, and angle: θ, φ). Eight healthy subjects were each investigated three times: (1) with a small magnet mounted on a capsule endoscope (PillCam); (2) with the magnet alone and the small intestine in the fasting state; and (3) with the magnet alone and the small intestine in the postprandial state. Experiment (1) showed good agreement and no systematic differences between MTS-1 and capsule endoscopy when assessing gastric transit (median difference 1 min; range: 0-6 min) and small intestinal transit time (median difference 0.5 min; range: 0-52 min). Comparing experiments (1) and (2) there were no systematic differences in gastric transit or small intestinal transit when using the magnet-PillCam unit and the much smaller magnetic pill. In experiments (2) and (3), short bursts of very fast movements lasting less than 5% of the time accounted for more than half the distance covered during the first two hours in the small intestine, irrespective of whether the small intestine was in the fasting or postprandial state. The mean contraction frequency in the small intestine was significantly lower in the fasting state than in the postprandial state (9.90 min-1 vs. 10.53 min-1) (p = 0.03). MTS-1 is reliable for determination of gastric transit and small intestinal transit time. It is possible to distinguish between the mean contraction frequency of small intestine in the fasting state and in the postprandial state.

  3. The Cold Mass Support System and the Helium Cooling System for the MICE Focusing Solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Stephanie Q.; Green, Michael A.; Lau, Wing W.; Senanayake, Rohan S.; Witte, Holger

    2006-01-01

    The heart of the absorber focus coil (AFC) module for the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) is the two-coil superconducting solenoid that surrounds the muon absorber. The superconducting magnet focuses the muons that are cooled using ionization cooling, in order to improve the efficiency of cooling. The coils of the magnet may either be run in the solenoid mode (both coils operate at the same polarity) or the gradient (the coils operate at opposite polarity). The AFC magnet cold mass support system is designed to carry a longitudinal force up to 700 kN. The AFC module will be cooled using three pulse tube coolers that produce 1.5 W of cooling at 4.2 K. One of the coolers will be used to cool the liquid (hydrogen or helium) absorber used for ionization cooling. The other two coolers will cool the superconducting solenoid. This report will describe the MICE AFC magnet. The cold mass supports will be discussed. The reasons for using a pulsed tube cooler to cool this superconducting magnet will also be discussed

  4. Magnetic properties of ultra-small goethite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brok, E; Frandsen, C; Madsen, D E; Mørup, S; Jacobsen, H; Birk, J O; Lefmann, K; Bendix, J; Pedersen, K S; Boothroyd, C B; Berhe, A A; Simeoni, G G

    2014-01-01

    Goethite (α-FeOOH) is a common nanocrystalline antiferromagnetic mineral. However, it is typically difficult to study the properties of isolated single-crystalline goethite nanoparticles, because goethite has a strong tendency to form particles of aggregated nanograins often with low-angle grain boundaries. This nanocrystallinity leads to complex magnetic properties that are dominated by magnetic fluctuations in interacting grains. Here we present a study of the magnetic properties of 5.7 nm particles of goethite by use of magnetization measurements, inelastic neutron scattering and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The ‘ultra-small’ size of these particles (i.e. that the particles consist of one or only a few grains) allows for more direct elucidation of the particles' intrinsic magnetic properties. We find from ac and dc magnetization measurements a significant upturn of the magnetization at very low temperatures most likely due to freezing of spins in canted spin structures. From hysteresis curves we estimate the saturation magnetization from uncompensated magnetic moments to be σ s  = 0.044 A m 2  kg −1 at room temperature. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements show a strong signal from excitations of the uniform mode (q = 0 spin waves) at temperatures of 100–250 K and Mössbauer spectroscopy studies show that the magnetic fluctuations are dominated by ‘classical’ superparamagnetic relaxation at temperatures above ∼170 K. From the temperature dependence of the hyperfine fields and the excitation energy of the uniform mode we estimate a magnetic anisotropy constant of around 1.0 × 10 5  J m −3 . (paper)

  5. Calibration of NS value of magnetic probe on EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jiuyu; Shen Biao; Liu Guangjun; Sun Youwen; Qian Jinping; Li Shi; Xiao Bingjia; Chen Dalong; Shi Tonghui

    2014-01-01

    Based on the basic principle of measuring magnetic field by magnetic probe, a solenoid calibration system is constructed by a long solenoid, alternating current power, standard probe and data acquisition system in order to get the accurate magnetic field data. The NS value of magnetic probe on EAST is calibrated accurately by the solenoid calibration system and the data of the calibration is analysed. The obtained results are what we expected and provide the prerequisite for accurate magnetic field measurement in tokamak. (authors)

  6. Energy transfers in dynamos with small magnetic Prandtl numbers

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Rohit; Verma, Mahendra K.; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    We perform numerical simulation of dynamo with magnetic Prandtl number Pm = 0.2 on 10243 grid, and compute the energy fluxes and the shell-to-shell energy transfers. These computations indicate that the magnetic energy growth takes place mainly due

  7. Numerical study of the elastic-plastic cyclic deformation of the ''GLOBUS-M'' compact tokamak central solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykov, V.; Kavin, A.; Krivchenkov, Y.; Panin, A.

    1996-01-01

    The ''GLOBUS-M'' is a compact resistive tokamak with a central solenoid (CS) wound around the inner portion of the toroidal field coils. The magnetic field at the solenoid axis amounts to 8.3 T. The CS incorporates two layers of conductor (CuCr copper alloy) baked into insulation. The solenoid is designed to sustain 80,000 energizing. During each loading cycle the solenoid is subjected to the radial forces accompanied with the vertical compression. The most loaded region has been considered and modeled with the use of 2D axisymmetric finite element (FE) model. The model includes two conductor turns baked into insulation compound, copper cooling tubes and solder. The stress analysis shows that there is some plastic deformation in the copper tube and solder during loading and there is some back plastic deformation in the solder during unloading. The reloading does not cause any change in the solenoid stress-strain state in comparison with the case of loading. The number of cycles to failure has been simulated for all metallic components of the solenoid

  8. CMS - The Compact Muon Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Bergauer, T; Waltenberger, W; Kratschmer, I; Treberer-treberspurg, W; Escalante del valle, A; Andreeva, I; Innocente, V; Camporesi, T; Malgeri, L; Marchioro, A; Moneta, L; Weingarten, W; Beni, N T; Cimmino, A; Rovere, M; Jafari, A; Lange, C G; Vartak, A P; Gilbert, A J; Pantaleo, F; Reis, T; Cucciati, G; Alipour tehrani, N; Stakia, A; Fallavollita, F; Pizzichemi, M; Rauco, G; Zhang, S; Hu, T; Yazgan, E; Zhang, H; Thomas-wilsker, J; Reithler, H K V; Philipps, B; Merschmeyer, M K; Heidemann, C A; Mukherjee, S; Geenen, H; Kuessel, Y; Weingarten, S; Gallo, E; Schwanenberger, C; Walsh bastos rangel, R; Beernaert, K S; De wit, A M; Elwood, A C; Connor, P; Lelek, A A; Wichmann, K H; Myronenko, V; Kovalchuk, N; Bein, S L; Dreyer, T; Scharf, C; Quast, G; Dierlamm, A H; Barth, C; Mol, X; Kudella, S; Schafer, D; Schimassek, R R; Matorras, F; Calderon tazon, A; Garcia ferrero, J; Bercher, M J; Sirois, Y; Callier, S; Depasse, P; Laktineh, I B; Grenier, G; Boudoul, G; Heath, G P; Hartley, D A; Quinton, S; Tomalin, I R; Harder, K; Francis, V B; Thea, A; Zhang, Z; Loukas, D; Hernath, S T; Naskar, K; Colaleo, A; Maggi, G P; Maggi, M; Loddo, F; Calabria, C; Campanini, R; Cuffiani, M; D'antone, I; Grandi, C; Navarria, F; Guiducci, L; Battilana, C; Tosi, N; Gulmini, M; Meola, S; Longo, E; Meridiani, P; Marzocchi, B; Schizzi, A; Cho, S; Ha, S; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Md halid, M F B; Yusli, M N B; Dominik, W M; Bunkowski, K; Olszewski, M; Byszuk, A P; Rasteiro da silva, J C; Varela, J; Leong, Q; Sulimov, V; Vorobyev, A; Denisov, A; Murzin, V; Egorov, A; Lukyanenko, S; Postoev, V; Pashenkov, A; Solovey, A; Rubakov, V; Troitsky, S; Kirpichnikov, D; Lychkovskaya, N; Safronov, G; Fedotov, A; Toms, M; Barniakov, M; Olimov, K; Fazilov, M; Umaraliev, A; Dumanoglu, I; Bakirci, N M; Dozen, C; Demiroglu, Z S; Isik, C; Zeyrek, M; Yalvac, M; Ozkorucuklu, S; Chang, Y; Dolgopolov, A; Gottschalk, E E; Maeshima, K; Heavey, A E; Kramer, T; Kwan, S W L; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S M; Mokhov, N; Marraffino, J M; Mrenna, S; Yarba, V; Banerjee, B; Elvira, V D; Gray, L A; Holzman, B; Dagenhart, W; Canepa, A; Ryu, S C; Strobbe, N C; Adelman-mc carthy, J K; Contescu, A C; Andre, J O; Wu, J; Dittmer, S J; Bucinskaite, I; Zhang, J; Karchin, P E; Thapa, P; Zaleski, S G; Gran, J L; Wang, S; Zilizi, G; Raics, P P; Bhardwaj, A; Naimuddin, M; Smiljkovic, N; Stojanovic, M; Brandao malbouisson, H; De oliveira martins, C P; Tonelli manganote, E J; Medina jaime, M; Thiel, M; Laurila, S H; Graehling, P; Tonon, N; Blekman, F; Postiau, N J S; Leroux, P J; Van remortel, N; Janssen, X J; Di croce, D; Aleksandrov, A; Shopova, M F; Dogra, S M; Shinoda, A A; Arce, P; Daniel, M; Navarrete marin, J J; Redondo fernandez, I; Guirao elias, A; Cela ruiz, J M; Lottin, J; Gras, P; Kircher, F; Levesy, B; Payn, A; Guilloux, F; Negro, G; Leloup, C; Pasztor, G; Panwar, L; Bhatnagar, V; Bruzzi, M; Sciortino, S; Starodubtsev, O; Azzi, P; Conti, E; Lacaprara, S; Margoni, M; Rossin, R; Tosi, M; Fano', L; Lucaroni, A; Biino, C; Dattola, D; Rotondo, F; Ballestrero, A; Obertino, M M; Kiani, M B; Paterno, A; Magana villalba, R; Ramirez garcia, M; Reyes almanza, R; Gorski, M; Wrochna, G; Bluj, M J; Zarubin, A; Nozdrin, M; Ladygin, V; Malakhov, A; Golunov, A; Skrypnik, A; Sotnikov, A; Evdokimov, N; Tiurin, V; Lokhtin, I; Ershov, A; Platonova, M; Tyurin, N; Slabospitskii, S; Talov, V; Belikov, N; Ryazanov, A; Chao, Y; Tsai, J; Foord, A; Wood, D R; Orimoto, T J; Luckey, P D; Jaditz, S H; Stephans, G S; Darlea, G L; Di matteo, L; Maier, B; Trovato, M; Bhattacharya, S; Roberts, J B; Padley, P B; Tu, Z; Rorie, J T; Clarida, W J; Tiras, E; Khristenko, V; Cerizza, G; Pieri, M; Krutelyov, V; Saiz santos, M D; Klein, D S; Derdzinski, M; Murray, M J; Gray, J A; Minafra, N; Castle, J R; Bowen, J L S; Buterbaugh, K; Morrow, S I; Bunn, J; Newman, H; Spiropulu, M; Balcas, J; Lawhorn, J M; Thomas, S D; Panwalkar, S M; Kyriacou, S; Xie, Z; Ojalvo, I R; Salfeld-nebgen, J; Laird, E M; Wimpenny, S J; Yates, B R; Perry, T M; Schiber, C C; Diaz, D C; Uniyal, R; Mesic, B; Kolosova, M; Snow, G R; Lundstedt, C; Johnston, D; Zvada, M; Weitzel, D J; Damgov, J V; Cowden, C S; Giammanco, A; David, P N Y; Zobec, J; Cabrera jamoulle, J B; Daubie, E; Nash, J A; Evans, L; Hall, G; Nikitenko, A; Ryan, M J; Huffman, M A J; Styliaris, E; Evangelou, I; Sharan, M K; Roy, A; Rout, P K; Kalbhor, P N; Bagliesi, G; Braccini, P L; Ligabue, F; Boccali, T; Rizzi, A; Minuti, M; Oh, S; Kim, J; Sen, S; Boz evinay, M; Xiao, M; Hung, W T; Jensen, F O; Mulholland, T D; Kumar, A; Jones, M; Roozbahani, B H; Neu, C C; Thacker, H B; Wolfe, E M; Jabeen, S; Gilmore, J; Winer, B L; Rush, C J; Luo, W; Alimena, J M; Ko, W; Lander, R; Broadley, W H; Shi, M; Furic, I K; Low, J F; Bortignon, P; Alexander, J P; Zientek, M E; Conway, J V; Padilla fuentes, Y L; Florent, A H; Bravo, C B; Crotty, I M; Wenman, D L; Sarangi, T R; Ghabrous larrea, C; Gomber, B; Smith, N C; Long, K D; Roberts, J M; Hildreth, M D; Jessop, C P; Karmgard, D J; Loukas, N; Ferbel, T; Zielinski, M A; Cooper, S I; 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Ferry, S C; Georgette, Z; Malcles, J; Csanad, M; Lal, M K; Walia, G; Kaur, A; Ciulli, V; Lenzi, P; Zanetti, M; Costa, M; Dughera, G; Bartosik, N; Ramirez sanchez, G; Frueboes, T M; Karjavine, V; Skachkov, N; Litvinenko, A; Petrosyan, A; Teryaev, O; Trofimov, V; Makankin, A; Golunov, A; Savrin, V; Korotkikh, V; Vardanyan, I; Lukina, O; Belyaev, A; Korneeva, N; Petukhov, V; Skvortsov, V; Konstantinov, D; Efremov, V; Smirnov, N; Shiu, J; Chen, P; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L R; St john, J M; Morse, D M; Krajczar, K F; Mironov, C M; Niu, X; Wang, J; Charaf, O; Matveev, M; Eppley, G W; Mccliment, E R; Ozok, F; Bilki, B; Zieser, A J; Olivito, D J; Wood, J G; Hashemi, B T; Bean, A L; Wang, Q; Tuo, S; Xu, Q; Roberts, J W; Anderson, D J; Lath, A; Jacques, P; Sun, M; Andrews, M B; Svyatkovskiy, A; Hardenbrook, J R; Heintz, U; Lee, J; Wang, L; Prosper, H B; Adams, J R; Liu, S; Wang, D; Swanson, D; Thiltges, J F; Undleeb, S; Finger, M; Beuselinck, R; Rand, D T; Tapper, A D; Malik, S A; Lane, R C; Panagiotou, A; Diamantopoulou, M; Vourliotis, E; Mallios, S; Mondal, K; Bhattacharya, R; Bhowmik, D; Libby, J F; Azzurri, P; Foa, L; Tenchini, R; Verdini, P G; Ciampa, A; Radburn-smith, B C; Park, J; Swartz, M L; Sarica, U; Borcherding, F O; Barria, P; Goadhouse, S D; Xia, F; Joyce, M L; Belloni, A; Bouhali, O; Toback, D; Osipenkov, I L; Almes, G T; Walker, J W; Bylsma, B G; Lefeld, A J; Conway, J S; Flores, C S; Avery, P R; Terentyev, N; Barashko, V; Ryd, A P E; Tucker, J M; Heltsley, B K; Wittich, P; Riley, D S; Skinnari, L A; Chu, J Y; Ignatenko, M; Lindgren, M A; Saltzberg, D P; Peck, A N; Herve, A A M; Savin, A; Herndon, M F; Mason, W P; Martirosyan, S; Grahl, J; Hansen, P D; Saradhy, R; Mueller, C N; Planer, M D; Suh, I S; Hurtado anampa, K P; De barbaro, P J; Garcia-bellido alvarez de miranda, A A; Korjenevski, S K; Moolekamp, F E; Fallon, C T; Acosta castillo, J G; Gutay, L; Barker, A W; Gough, E; Poyraz, D; Verbeke, W L M; Beniozef, I S; Krasteva, R L; Winn, D R; Fenyvesi, A C; Makovec, A; Munro, C G; Sanchez cruz, S; Bernardino rodrigues, N A; Lokhovitskiy, A; Uribe estrada, C; Rebane, L; Racioppi, A; Kim, H; Kim, T; Puljak, I; Boyaryntsev, A; Saeed, M; Tanwir, S; Butt, U; Hussain, A; Nawaz, A; Khurshid, T; Imran, M; Sultan, A; Naeem, M; Kaadze, K; Modak, A; Taylor, R D; Kim, D; Grab, C; Nessi-tedaldi, F; Fischer, J; Manzoni, R A; Zagozdzinska-bochenek, A A; Berger, P; Reichmann, M P; Hashemi, M; Rezaei hosseinabadi, F; Paganoni, M; Farina, F M; Joshi, Y R; Avila bernal, C A; Cabrera mora, A L; Segura delgado, M A; Gonzalez hernandez, C F; Asavapibhop, B; U-ruekolan, S; Kim, G; Choi, M; Aly, S; El sawy, M; Castaneda hernandez, A M; Pinna, D; Shamdasani, J; Tavkhelidze, D; Hegde, V; Aziz, T; Sur, N; Sutar, B J; Karmakar, S; Ghete, V M; Dragicevic, M G; Brandstetter, J; Marques moraes, A; Molina insfran, J A; Aspell, P; Baillon, P; Barney, D; Honma, A; Pape, L; Sakulin, H; Macpherson, A L; Bangert, N; Guida, R; Steggemann, J; Voutsinas, G G; Da silva gomes, D; Ben mimoun bel hadj, F; Bonnaud, J Y R; Canelli, F M; Bai, J; Qiu, J; Bian, J; Cheng, Y; Kukulies, C; Teroerde, M; Erdmann, M; Hebbeker, T; Zantis, F; Scheuch, F; Erdogan, Y; Campbell, A J; Kasemann, M; Lange, W; Raspiareza, A; Melzer-pellmann, I; Aldaya martin, M; Lewendel, B; Schmidt, R S; Lipka, E; Missiroli, M; Grados luyando, J M; Shevchenko, R; Babounikau, I; Steinbrueck, G; Vanhoefer, A; Ebrahimi, A; Pena rodriguez, K J; Niedziela, M A; Eich, M M; Froehlich, A; Simonis, H J; Katkov, I; Wozniewski, S; Marco de lucas, R J; Lopez virto, A M; Jaramillo echeverria, R W; Hennion, P; Zghiche, A; Chiron, A; Romanteau, T; Beaudette, F; Lobanov, A; Grasseau, G J; Pierre-emile, T B; El mamouni, H; Gouzevitch, M; Goldstein, J; Cussans, D G; Seif el nasr, S A; Titterton, A S; Ford, P J W; Olaiya, E O; Salisbury, J G; Paspalaki, G; Asenov, P; Hidas, P; Kiss, T N; Zalan, P; Shukla, P; Abbrescia, M; De filippis, N; Donvito, G; Radogna, R; Miniello, G; Gelmi, A; Capiluppi, P; Marcellini, S; Odorici, F; Bonacorsi, D; Genta, C; Ferri, G; Saviano, G; Ferrini, M; Minutoli, S; Tosi, S; Lista, L; Passeggio, G; Breglio, G; Merola, M; Diemoz, M; Rahatlou, S; Baccaro, S; Bartoloni, A; Talamo, I G; Cipriani, M; Kim, J Y; Oh, G; Lim, J H; Lee, J; Mohamad idris, F B; Gani, A B; Cwiok, M; Doroba, K; Martins galinhas, B E; Kim, V; Krivshich, A; Vorobyev, A; Ivanov, Y; Tarakanov, V; Lobodenko, A; Obikhod, T; Isayev, O; Kurov, O; Leonidov, A; Lvova, N; Kirsanov, M; Suvorova, O; Karneyeu, A; Demidov, S; Konoplyannikov, A; Popov, V; Pakhlov, P; Vinogradov, S; Klemin, S; Blinov, V; Skovpen, I; Chatrchyan, S; Grigorian, N; Kayis topaksu, A; Sunar cerci, D; Hos, I; Guler, Y; Kiminsu, U; Serin, M; Deniz, M; Turan, I; Eryol, F; Pozdnyakov, A; Liu, Z; Doan, T H; Hanlon, J E; Mcbride, P L; Pal, I; Garren, L; Oleynik, G; Harris, R M; Bolla, G; Kowalkowski, J B; Evans, D E; Vaandering, E W; Patrick, J F; Rechenmacher, R; Prosser, A G; Messer, T A; Tiradani, A R; Rivera, R A; Jayatilaka, B A; Duarte, J M; Todri, A; Harr, R F; Richman, J D; Bhandari, R; Dordevic, M; Cirkovic, P; Mora herrera, C; Rosa lopes zachi, A; De paula carvalho, W; Kinnunen, R L A; Lehti, S T; Maeenpaeae, T H; Bloch, D; Chabert, E C; Rudolf, N G; Devroede, O; Skovpen, K; Lontkovskyi, D; De wolf, E A; Van mechelen, P; Van spilbeeck, A B E; Georgiev, L S; Novaes, S F; Costa, M A; Costa leal, B; Horisberger, R P; De la cruz, B; Willmott, C; Perez-calero yzquierdo, A M; Dejardin, M M; Mehta, A; Barbagli, G; Focardi, E; Bacchetta, N; Gasparini, U; Pantano, D; Sgaravatto, M; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Candelori, A; Pozzobon, N; Boletti, A; Servoli, L; Postolache, V; Rossi, A; Ciangottini, D; Alunni solestizi, L; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Amapane, N C; Lopez fernandez, R; Sanchez hernandez, A; Heredia de la cruz, I; Matveev, V; Kracikova, T; Shmatov, S; Vasilev, S; Kurenkov, A; Oleynik, D; Verkheev, A; Voytishin, N; Proskuryakov, A; Bogdanova, G; Petrova, E; Bagaturia, I; Tsamalaidze, Z; Zhao, Z; Arcaro, D J; Barberis, E; Wamorkar, T; Wang, B; Ralph, D K; Velasco, M M; Odell, N J; Sevova, S; Li, W; Merlo, J; Onel, Y; Mermerkaya, H; Moeller, A R; Haytmyradov, M; Dong, R; Bugg, W M; Ragghianti, G C; Delannoy sotomayor, A G; Thapa, K; Yagil, A; Gerosa, R A; Masciovecchio, M; Schmitz, E J; Kapustinsky, J S; Greene, S V; Zhang, L; Vlimant, J V; Mughal, A; Cury siqueira, S; Gershtein, Y; Arora, S R R; Lin, W X; Stickland, D P; Mc donald, K T; Pivarski, J M C; Lucchini, M T; Higginbotham, S L; Rosenfield, M; Long, O R; Johnson, K F; Adams, T; Susa, T; Rykaczewski, H; Ioannou, A; Ge, Y; Levin, A M; Li, J; Li, L; Bloom, K A; Monroy montanez, J A; Kunori, S; Wang, Z; Favart, D; Maltoni, F; Vidal marono, M; Delcourt, M; Markov, S I; Seez, C; Richards, A J; Ferguson, W; Chatziangelou, M; Karathanasis, G; Kontaxakis, P; Jones, J A; Strologas, J; Katsoulis, P; Dutt, S; Roy chowdhury, S; Bhardwaj, R; Purohit, A; Singh, B; Behera, P K; Sharma, A; Spagnolo, P; Tonelli, G E; Giannini, L; Poulios, S; Groote, J F; Untuc, B; Oztirpan, F O; Koseoglu, I; Luiggi lopez, E E; Hadley, N J; Shin, Y H; Safonov, A; Eusebi, R; Rose, A K; Overton, D A; Erbacher, R D; Funk, G N; Pilot, J R; Regnery, B J; Klimenko, S; Matchev, K; Gleyzer, S; Wang, J; Cadamuro, L; Sun, W M; Soffi, L; Lantz, S R; Wright, D; Cline, D; Cousins jr, R D; Erhan, S; Yang, X; Schnaible, C J; Dasgupta, A; Loveless, R; Bradley, D C; Monzat, D; Dodd, L M; Tikalsky, J L; Kapusta, J; Gilbert, W J; Lesko, Z J; Marinelli, N; Wayne, M R; Heering, A H; Galanti, M; Duh, Y; Roy, A; Arabgol, M; Hacker, T J; Salva, S; Petrov, V; Barychevski, V; Drobychev, G; Lobko, A; Gabusi, M; Fabris, L; Conte, E R E; Kasprowicz, G H; Kyberd, P; Cole, J E; Lopez, J M; Salazar gonzalez, C A; Benzon, A M; Pelagio, L; Walsh, M F; Postnov, A; Lelas, D; Vaitkus, J V; Jurciukonis, D; Sulmanas, B; Ahmad, A; Ahmed, W; Jalil, S H; Kahl, W E; Taylor, D R; Choi, Y I; Jeong, Y; Roy, T; Schoenenberger, M A; Khateri, P; Etesami, S M; Fiorini, E; Pullia, A; Magni, S; Gennai, S; Fiorendi, S; Zuolo, D; Sanabria arenas, J C; Florez bustos, C A; Holguin coral, A; Mendez, H; Srimanobhas, N; Jaikar, A H; Arteche gonzalez, F J; Call, K R; Vazquez valencia, E F; Calderon monroy, M A; Abdelmaguid, A; Mal, P K; Yuan, L; Lomidze, I; Prangishvili, I; Adamov, G; Dube, S S; Dugad, S; Mohanty, G B; Bhat, M A; Bheesette, S; Malawski, M L; Abou kors, D J

    CMS is a general purpose proton-proton detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the LHC. It is also well adapted for studies at the initially lower luminosities. The CMS Collaboration consists of over 1800 scientists and engineers from 151 institutes in 31 countries. The main design goals of CMS are: \\begin{enumerate} \\item a highly performant muon system, \\item the best possible electromagnetic calorimeter \\item high quality central tracking \\item hermetic calorimetry \\item a detector costing less than 475 MCHF. \\end{enumerate} All detector sub-systems have started construction. Engineering Design Reviews of parts of these sub-systems have been successfully carried-out. These are held prior to granting authorization for purchase. The schedule for the LHC machine and the experiments has been revised and CMS will be ready for first collisions now expected in April 2006. \\\\\\\\ ~~~~$\\bullet$ Magnet \\\\ The detector (see Figure) will be built around a long (13~m) and large bore ($\\phi$=5.9~m) high...

  9. SUPERCONDUCTING SOLENOIDS FOR THE MUON COLLIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREEN,M.A.; EYSSA,Y.; KENNY,S.; MILLER,J.R.; PRESTEMON,S.; WEGGEL,R.J.

    2000-06-12

    The muon collider is a new idea for lepton colliders. The ultimate energy of an electron ring is limited by synchrotron radiation. Muons, which have a rest mass that is 200 times that of an electron can be stored at much higher energies before synchrotron radiation limits ring performance. The problem with muons is their short life time (2.1 {micro}s at rest). In order to operate a muon storage ring large numbers of muon must be collected, cooled and accelerated before they decay to an electron and two neutrinos. As the authors see it now, high field superconducting solenoids are an integral part of a muon collider muon production and cooling systems. This report describes the design parameters for superconducting and hybrid solenoids that are used for pion production and collection, RF phase rotations of the pions as they decay into muons and the muon cooling (reduction of the muon emittance) before acceleration.

  10. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro

    2014-01-01

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 10 11 , which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator

  11. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanesue, Takeshi, E-mail: tkanesue@bnl.gov; Okamura, Masahiro [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-7501 (Japan); RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kondo, Kotaro [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2014-11-10

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 10{sup 11}, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  12. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-01

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  13. Start-up of spherical tokamak without a center solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Takashi; Nagata, Masayoshi

    2012-01-01

    For low-aspect tokamak reactors, spherical tokamak reactors, ST-type FESF/CTFs, it is essential to remove or minimize a central solenoid (CS). Even with the minimized CS, non-inductive start up of the plasma current is required. Rapid increase in the spontaneous plasma current at the final stage of current start-up drives ignition. At the initial stage, formation of plasma and magnetic surfaces are required. As non-inductive plasma start-up scenarios, ECH/ECCD, LHCD, HHFW, DC HELICITY injection, plasma merging and NBI have been studied. In the present article, the present status and future prospect of experimental and theoretical works on these subjects. (author)

  14. Alternative connections for the large MFTF-B solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.; Wang, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    The MFTF-B central-cell solenoids are a set of twelve closely coupled, large superconducting magnets with similar but not exactly equal currents. Alternative methods of connecting them to their power supplies and dump resistors are investigated. The circuits are evaluated for operating conditions and fault conditions. The factors considered are the voltage to ground during a dump, short circuits, open circuits, quenches, and failure of the protection system to detect a quench. Of particular interest are the current induced in coils that remain superconducting when one or more coils quench. The alternative connections include separate power supplies, combined power supplies, individual dump resistors, series dump resistors and combinations of these. A new circuit that contains coupling resistors is proposed. The coupling resistors do not affect normal fast dumps but reduce the peak induced currents while also reducing the energy rating of the dump resistors. Another novel circuit, the series circuit with diodes, is discussed in detail

  15. Bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, H.; Deboi, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    The design, fabrication, assembly and test of a development configuration bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve suitable for the control hydrazine and liquid fluorine to an 800 pound thrust rocket engine is described. The valve features a balanced poppet, utilizing metal bellows, a hard poppet/seat interface and a flexure support system for the internal moving components. This support system eliminates sliding surfaces, thereby rendering the valve free of self generated particles.

  16. Design of new central solenoid for SST-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Upendra; Pradhan, Subrata; Ghate, Mahesh; Raj, Piyush; Tanna, V. L.; Khan, Ziauddin; Roy, Swati; Santra, Prosenjit; Biswas, Prabal; Sharma, A. N.; Khristi, Yohan; Kanaber, Deven; Varmora, Pankaj

    2017-04-01

    The key role of central solenoid (CS) magnet of a Tokamak is for gas breakdown, ramp up and maintaining of plasma current. The magnetic flux change in CS along with other PF coils generates magnetic null and induces electric field in toroidal direction. The induced toroidal electric field accelerates the residual electrons which collide with the neutrals and an avalanche takes place which led to the net plasma in the vacuum vessel of a Tokamak. In order to maximize the CS volt-sec capability, the higher magnetic field with a greater magnetic flux linkage is necessary. In order to facilitate all these requirements of SST-1 a new superconducting CS has been designed for SST-1. The design of new central solenoid has two bases; first one is physics and second is smart engineering in limited bore diameter of ∼ 655 mm. The physics basis of the design includes volt-sec storage capacity of ∼ 0.8 volt-sec, magnetic field null around 0.2 m over major radius of 1.1 m and toroidal electric field of ∼ 0.3 volt/m. The engineering design of new CS consists of Nb3Sn cable in conduit conductor (CICC) of operating current of 14 kA @ 4.5 K at 6 T, consolidated winding pack, smart quench detection system, protection system, housing cryostat and conductor terminations and joint design. The winding pack consists of 576 numbers of turns distributed in four layers with 0.75 mm FRP tape soaked with cyanide Easter based epoxy resin turn insulation and 3 mm of ground insulation. The interlayer low resistance (∼1 nΩ) terminal praying hand joints at 14 kA at 4.5 K has been designed for making winding pack continuous. The total height of winding pack is 2500 mm. The stored energy of this winding pack is ∼ 3 MJ at 14 kA of operating current. The expected heat load at cryogenic temperature is ∼ 10 W per layer, which requires helium mass flow rate of 1.4 g/s at 1.4 bars @ 4.5 K. The typical diameter and height of housing cryostat are 650 mm and 2563 mm with 80 K shield respectively

  17. Design of new central solenoid for SST-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Upendra; Pradhan, Subrata; Ghate, Mahesh; Raj, Piyush; Tanna, V L; Khan, Ziauddin; Roy, Swati; Santra, Prosenjit; Biswas, Prabal; Sharma, A N; Khristi, Yohan; Kanaber, Deven; Varmora, Pankaj

    2017-01-01

    The key role of central solenoid (CS) magnet of a Tokamak is for gas breakdown, ramp up and maintaining of plasma current. The magnetic flux change in CS along with other PF coils generates magnetic null and induces electric field in toroidal direction. The induced toroidal electric field accelerates the residual electrons which collide with the neutrals and an avalanche takes place which led to the net plasma in the vacuum vessel of a Tokamak. In order to maximize the CS volt-sec capability, the higher magnetic field with a greater magnetic flux linkage is necessary. In order to facilitate all these requirements of SST-1 a new superconducting CS has been designed for SST-1. The design of new central solenoid has two bases; first one is physics and second is smart engineering in limited bore diameter of ∼ 655 mm. The physics basis of the design includes volt-sec storage capacity of ∼ 0.8 volt-sec, magnetic field null around 0.2 m over major radius of 1.1 m and toroidal electric field of ∼ 0.3 volt/m. The engineering design of new CS consists of Nb3Sn cable in conduit conductor (CICC) of operating current of 14 kA @ 4.5 K at 6 T, consolidated winding pack, smart quench detection system, protection system, housing cryostat and conductor terminations and joint design. The winding pack consists of 576 numbers of turns distributed in four layers with 0.75 mm FRP tape soaked with cyanide Easter based epoxy resin turn insulation and 3 mm of ground insulation. The interlayer low resistance (∼1 nΩ) terminal praying hand joints at 14 kA at 4.5 K has been designed for making winding pack continuous. The total height of winding pack is 2500 mm. The stored energy of this winding pack is ∼ 3 MJ at 14 kA of operating current. The expected heat load at cryogenic temperature is ∼ 10 W per layer, which requires helium mass flow rate of 1.4 g/s at 1.4 bars @ 4.5 K. The typical diameter and height of housing cryostat are 650 mm and 2563 mm with 80 K shield respectively

  18. Design of new superconducting central solenoid of SST-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Upendra; Pradhan, Subrata; Ghate, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    The key role of the central solenoid (CS) magnet of a Tokamak is for gas breakdown, ramp up and maintaining of plasma current for longer duration. The magnetic flux change in CS along with other PF coils generates magnetic null and induces electric field in toroidal direction. The induced toroidal electric field accelerates the residual electrons which collide with the neutrals and an avalanche takes place which led to the net plasma in the vacuum vessel of a Tokamak. In order to maximize the CS volt-sec capability, the higher magnetic field with a greater magnetic flux linkage is necessary. In order to facilitate all these requirements of SST-1 a new superconducting CS has been designed for SST-1. The design of new central solenoid has two bases; first one is physics and second is smart engineering in limited bore diameter of ∼655 mm. The physics basis of the design includes volt-sec storage capacity of ∼0.8 volt-sec, magnetic field null around 0.2 m over major radius of 1.1 m and toroidal electric field of ∼0.3 volt/m.The engineering design of new CS consists of Nb 3 Sn cable in conduit conductor (CICC) of operating current of 14 kA @ 4.5 K at 6 T, consolidated winding pack, smart quench detection system, protection system, housing cryostat and conductor terminations and joint design. The winding pack consists of 576 numbers of turns distributed in four layers with 0.75 mm FRP tape soaked with cyanide Easter based epoxy resin turn insulation and 3 mm of ground insulation. The inter-layer low resistance (∼1 nΩ) at 14 kA @ 4.5 K terminal praying hand joints has been designed for making winding pack continuous. The total height of winding pack is 2500 mm. The stored energy of this winding pack is ∼3 MJ at 14 kA of operating current. The expected heat load at cryogenic temperature is ∼10 W per layer, which requires helium mass flow rate of 1.4 g/s at 1.4 bars @ 4.5 K. The typical diameter and height of housing cryostat are 650 mm and 2563 mm with 80 K

  19. Energy transfers and magnetic energy growth in small-scale dynamo

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Rohit Raj

    2013-12-01

    In this letter we investigate the dynamics of magnetic energy growth in small-scale dynamo by studying energy transfers, mainly energy fluxes and shell-to-shell energy transfers. We perform dynamo simulations for the magnetic Prandtl number Pm = 20 on 10243 grid using the pseudospectral method. We demonstrate that the magnetic energy growth is caused by nonlocal energy transfers from the large-scale or forcing-scale velocity field to small-scale magnetic field. The peak of these energy transfers moves towards lower wave numbers as dynamo evolves, which is the reason why the integral scale of the magnetic field increases with time. The energy transfers U2U (velocity to velocity) and B2B (magnetic to magnetic) are forward and local. Copyright © EPLA, 2013.

  20. Characterization of Plasmadynamics within a Small Magnetic Nozzle

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal presents an experimental and theoretical research project intended to develop a more refined model of the underlying physics of magnetic nozzles. The...

  1. Magnetic energy storage devices for small scale applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper covers basic principles of magnetic energy storage, structure requirements and limitations, configurations of inductors, attributes of high-T c superconducting materials including thermal instabilities, a relative comparison with the state-of-the-art high energy density power sources, and refrigeration requirements. Based on these fundamental considerations, the design parameters of a micro superconducting magnetic energy unit for Air Force applications is presented and discussed

  2. Minimum Q Electrically Small Spherical Magnetic Dipole Antenna - Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Olav; Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2009-01-01

    The stored energies, radiated power, and quality factor of a magnetic-dipole antenna, consisting of a spherical electrical surface current density enclosing a magnetic core, is obtained through direct spatial integration of the internally and externally radiated field expressed in terms...... of spherical vector waves. The obtained quality factor agrees with that of Wheeler and Thal for vanishing free-space electric radius but holds also for larger radii and facilitates the optimal choice of permeability in the presence of the resonances....

  3. Superconducting solenoids for suspension of high-speed overhead transportation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omel' yanenko, V I [Kharkov Polytechnical Inst., USSR; Bocharov, V I; Dolgosheev, E A; Usichenko, Y G

    1977-08-01

    A superconducting solenoid is the most important component of a suspension for overhead transportation facilities operating on the repulsion principle. Its design is aimed at producing an adequate magnetic field within the active zone, to ensure a high ratio of lifting force to braking force, the necessary speed dependence of both forces, and a high ratio of lifting force to solenoid mass. The design must also be both technologically and economically feasible. For safety considerations, the magnetic field intensity inside the passenger compartment must be minimum. A survey of existing designs indicates a preference for race track solenoids of quasi-rectangular shape. While all designers already agree on a coil width within 0.25 to 0.6 m, the optimum coil length has not yet been established. Intrinsic stabilization of superconductors by stranding and twisting has pushed the maximum allowable current density to 200 A/mm/sup 2/ and the energy storing capacity of magnets to 100 kJ, a capacity of 1 MJ being within reach. The recommended coil dimensions for laboratory models are 1 m length and 0.3 m width, to carry magnetizing currents up to 0.3 MA.

  4. Electronic and magnetic properties of small rhodium clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soon, Yee Yeen; Yoon, Tiem Leong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lim, Thong Leng [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Melaka Campus, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    We report a theoretical study of the electronic and magnetic properties of rhodium-atomic clusters. The lowest energy structures at the semi-empirical level of rhodium clusters are first obtained from a novel global-minimum search algorithm, known as PTMBHGA, where Gupta potential is used to describe the atomic interaction among the rhodium atoms. The structures are then re-optimized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with exchange-correlation energy approximated by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation. For the purpose of calculating the magnetic moment of a given cluster, we calculate the optimized structure as a function of the spin multiplicity within the DFT framework. The resultant magnetic moments with the lowest energies so obtained allow us to work out the magnetic moment as a function of cluster size. Rhodium atomic clusters are found to display a unique variation in the magnetic moment as the cluster size varies. However, Rh{sub 4} and Rh{sub 6} are found to be nonmagnetic. Electronic structures of the magnetic ground-state structures are also investigated within the DFT framework. The results are compared against those based on different theoretical approaches available in the literature.

  5. Static stress analysis of coupling superconducting solenoid coil assembly for muon ionization cooling experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Heng; Wang Li; Wu Hong; Guo Xinglong; Xu Fengyu

    2010-01-01

    The stresses in the coupling superconducting solenoid coil assembly, which is applied in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), are critical for the structure design and mechanical stability because of a large diameter and relative high magnetic field. This paper presents an analytical stress solution for the MICE coupling coil assembly. The stress due to winding tension is calculated by assuming the coil package as a set of combined cylinders. The thermal and electromechanical stresses are obtained by solving the partial differential equations of displacement based on the power series expansion method. The analytical stress solution is proved to be feasible by calculating stresses in a tested superconducting solenoid with 2.58 m bore at room temperature. The analytical result of the MICE coupling coil is in good agreement with that of the finite element which shows that the transverse shear stress induced by Lorentz force is principally dominant to magnet instability. (authors)

  6. Aberrations due to solenoid focusing of a multiply charged high-current ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Grégoire, G; Lisi, N; Schnuriger, J C; Scrivens, R; Tambini, J

    2000-01-01

    At the output of a laser ion source, a high current of highly charged ions with a large range of charge states is available. The focusing of such a beam by magnetic elements causes a nonlinear space-charge field to develop which can induce large aberrations and emittance growth in the beam. Simulation of the beam from the CERN laser ion source will be presented for an ideal magnetic and electrostatic system using a radially symmetric model. In addition, the three dimensional software KOBRA3 is used for the simulation of the solenoid line. The results of these simulations will be compared with experiments performed on the CERN laser ion source with solenoids (resulting in a hollow beam) and a series of gridded electrostatic lenses. (5 refs).

  7. Spin magnetic moments from single atoms to small Cr clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeglin, C.; Decker, R.; Bulou, H.; Scheurer, F.; Chado, I. [IPCMS-GSI - UMR 7504, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Ohresser, P. [LURE, 91405 Orsay (France); Dhesi, S.S. [ESRF, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Present permanent address: Diamond Light Source, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Gaudry, E. [LMCP, 4, place Jussieu, 75252 Paris (France); Lazarovits, B. [CCMS, T.U. Vienna, Gumpendorfstr. 1a, 1060 Wien (Austria)

    2005-07-01

    Morphology studies at the first stages of the growth of Cr/Au(111) are reported and compared to the magnetic properties of the nanostructures. We analyze by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Low Energy Electron Diffraction the Cr clusters growth between 200 K and 300 K. In the early stages of the growth the morphology of the clusters shows monoatomic high islands located at the kinks of the herringbone reconstructed Au(111) surface. By X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism performed on the Cr L{sub 2,3} edges it is shown that the temperature dependent morphology strongly influences the magnetic properties of the Cr clusters. We show that in the sub-monolayer regime Cr clusters are antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic when the size reaches the atomic limit. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Stable particle motion in a linear accelerator with solenoid focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadlinger, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    The equation governing stable particle motion in a linear ion accelerator containing discrete rf and either discrete or continuous solenoid focusing was derived. It was found for discrete solenoid focusing that: cos μ = (1 + dΔ) cos theta/2 + (lΔ/theta - dtheta/2l - thetaΔd 2 /4l) sin theta/2, Δ = 1/f and l + 2d = βlambda, where μ, theta, f, l, and d are the phase advance per cell, precession angle in the solenoid, focal length of the rf lens, length of the solenoid in one cell, and the drift distance between the center of the rf gap and the effective edge of the solenoid. The relation for a continuous solenoid is found by setting d equal to zero. The boundaries of the stability region for theta vs Δ with fixed l and d are obtained when cos μ =+-1

  9. Small-scale magnetic fluctuations inside the Macrotor tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Menyuk, C.R.; Taylor, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic pickup loops inserted into the Macrotor tokamak have shown a broad spectrum of oscillation in B/sub r/ and B/sub p/ up to f approx. = 100 kHz. The high-frequency B/sub r/ have short radial and poloidal correlation lengths L > 5 cm. The observed magnitude summationvertical-barB/sub r/vertical-bar/B/sub T/ > 10 -5 , where the summation extends over all f > 30 kHz, is in the range in which such radial magnetic perturbations may be contributing to anomalous electron energy transport

  10. Armature reaction of permanent magnet-excited small dc motors with shell type magnets and possibilities of power increase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutt, H J; Tran, Q N

    1983-07-01

    Permanent magnet-excited small dc motors allow an increase of power up to 30% compared with present permanent excited motors. The calculation of immediate irreversible demagnetization of the air-gap situated shell type magnets is necessary for a good motor design. Numerical calculated field line plots show the critical zones of the irreversible demagnetization at high armature reaction and refer how to avoid the flux loss and to increase the motor power.

  11. Improvement of a magnetization method on a small-size superconducting bulk magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, K.; Oka, T.; Noto, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposed an effective magnetizing method of high-T c bulk superconductors. The magnetic pass was artificially formed by field-cooling using a permanent magnet. The trapped field was increased by 20-25% as compared with the conventional method. We observed that the channel was formed partially in the trapped field distribution. A pulsed-filed magnetization (PFM) is an important technique for industrial applications of superconducting bulk magnets, and several advanced PFM methods are proposed to enhance the trapped field. In the well-known IMRA method, the channel through the magnetic flux is formed by the flux flow caused by heat generation when applying the strong pulsed-field, and the magnetic flux is made to penetrate into the bulk through the channel in the following pulse application. On the other hand, large applied field leads to large heat generation, and, therefore, the trapped field is decreased greatly. This paper proposes an effective magnetizing method in which the channel composed of magnetic field is artificially formed by field-cooling (FC) using a permanent magnet and the magnetic flux by PFM is induced to the channel. To confirm the validity of this method, the bulk was magnetized by FC using Nd-Fe-B magnets of the rectangular and the ring shapes, and thereafter, a pulsed-field of 6.2 T was applied. As a result, the trapped field of the bulk magnetized by FC using the ring magnet was increased by about 20-25% as compared with that of the conventional PFM, and, moreover, it was observed that the channel was formed partially by measurement of the magnetic field distribution.

  12. Small magnetic energy storage systems using high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on magnetic energy storage for power systems that has been considered for commercial utility power, air and ground mobile power sources, and spacecraft applications. Even at the current technology limits of energy storage (100 KJ/Kg*), superconducting magnetic energy storage inductors do not offer a strong advantage over state-of-the-art batteries. The commercial utility application does not have a weight and volume limitation, and is under intense study in several countries for diurnal cycle energy storage and high power delivery. The advent of high temperature superconductors has reduced one of the penalties of superconducting magnetic energy storage in that refrigeration and cryocontainers become greatly simplified. Still, structural and current density issues that limit the energy density and size of superconducting inductors do not change. Cold weather starting of aircraft engines is an application where these limitations are not as significant, and where current systems lack performance. The very cold environments make it difficult to achieve high power densities in state-of-the-art batteries and hydraulically activated starters. The same cold environments make it possible to cool superconducting systems for weeks using a single charge of liquid nitrogen. At the same, the ground carts can handle the size and weight of superconducting magnetic storage (SMES) devices

  13. Improvement in thrust force estimation of solenoid valve considering minor hysteresis loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Hwan Yoon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Solenoid valve is a very important hydraulic actuator for an automatic transmission in terms of shift quality. The same form of pressure for the clutch and the input current are required for an ideal control. However, the gap between a pressure and a current can occur which brings a delay in a transmission and a decrease in quality. This problem is caused by hysteresis phenomenon. As the ascending or descending magnetic field is applied to the solenoid, different thrust forces are generated. This paper suggests the calculation method of the thrust force considering the hysteresis phenomenon and consequently the accurate force can be obtained. Such hysteresis occurs in ferromagnetic materials, however the hysteresis phenomenon includes a minor hysteresis loop which begins with an initial magnetization curve and is generated by DC biased field density. As the core of the solenoid is ferromagnetic material, an accurate thrust force is obtained by applying the minor hysteresis loop compared to the force calculated by considering only the initial magnetization curve. An analytical background and the detailed explanation of measuring the minor hysteresis loop are presented. Furthermore experimental results and finite element analysis results are compared for the verification.

  14. Functional and genomic analyses of alpha-solenoid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, David; Palidwor, Gareth A; Shcherbinin, Sergey; Szengel, Angelika; Schaefer, Martin H; Perez-Iratxeta, Carol; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-solenoids are flexible protein structural domains formed by ensembles of alpha-helical repeats (Armadillo and HEAT repeats among others). While homology can be used to detect many of these repeats, some alpha-solenoids have very little sequence homology to proteins of known structure and we expect that many remain undetected. We previously developed a method for detection of alpha-helical repeats based on a neural network trained on a dataset of protein structures. Here we improved the detection algorithm and updated the training dataset using recently solved structures of alpha-solenoids. Unexpectedly, we identified occurrences of alpha-solenoids in solved protein structures that escaped attention, for example within the core of the catalytic subunit of PI3KC. Our results expand the current set of known alpha-solenoids. Application of our tool to the protein universe allowed us to detect their significant enrichment in proteins interacting with many proteins, confirming that alpha-solenoids are generally involved in protein-protein interactions. We then studied the taxonomic distribution of alpha-solenoids to discuss an evolutionary scenario for the emergence of this type of domain, speculating that alpha-solenoids have emerged in multiple taxa in independent events by convergent evolution. We observe a higher rate of alpha-solenoids in eukaryotic genomes and in some prokaryotic families, such as Cyanobacteria and Planctomycetes, which could be associated to increased cellular complexity. The method is available at http://cbdm.mdc-berlin.de/~ard2/.

  15. Modeling, design and experimental validation of a small-sized magnetic gear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanis, R.; Borisavljevic, A.; Jansen, J.W.; Lomonova, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    A magnetostatic analytical model is created to analyze and design a small-sized magnetic gear for a robotic application. Through a parameter variation study, it is found that the inner rotor magnet height is highly influential to the torque, and based on which, the design is performed. Several

  16. Energy transfers and magnetic energy growth in small-scale dynamo

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Rohit Raj; Verma, Mahendra K.; Samtaney, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    In this letter we investigate the dynamics of magnetic energy growth in small-scale dynamo by studying energy transfers, mainly energy fluxes and shell-to-shell energy transfers. We perform dynamo simulations for the magnetic Prandtl number Pm = 20

  17. Quality factor of an electrically small magnetic dipole antenna with magneto-dielectric core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the radiation Q of electrically small magnetic dipole antennas with magneto-dielectric core versus the antenna electrical size, permittivity and permeability of the core. The investigation is based on the exact theory for a spherical magnetic dipole antenna...

  18. Numerical analysis of modified Central Solenoid insert design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodak, Andrei, E-mail: akhodak@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Martovetsky, Nicolai; Smirnov, Aleksandre [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Titus, Peter [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Modified design of coil for testing ITER superconducting cable is presented. • Numerical analysis allowed design verification. • Three-dimensional current sharing temperature distributions are obtained from the results. - Abstract: The United States ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for fabrication of the Central Solenoid (CS) for ITER project. The ITER machine is currently under construction by seven parties in Cadarache, France. The CS Insert (CSI) project should provide a verification of the conductor performance in relevant conditions of temperature, field, currents and mechanical strain. The US IPO designed the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at JAEA, Naka. To validate the modified design three-dimensional numerical simulations were performed using coupled solver for simultaneous structural, thermal and electromagnetic analysis. Thermal and electromagnetic simulations supported structural calculations providing necessary loads and strains. According to current analysis design of the modified coil satisfies ITER magnet structural design criteria for the following conditions: (1) room temperature, no current, (2) temperature 4 K, no current, (3) temperature 4 K, current 60 kA direct charge, and (4) temperature 4 K, current 60 kA reverse charge. Fatigue life assessment analysis is performed for the alternating conditions of: temperature 4 K, no current, and temperature 4 K, current 45 kA direct charge. Results of fatigue analysis show that parts of the coil assembly can be qualified for up to 1 million cycles. Distributions of the Current Sharing Temperature (TCS) in the superconductor were obtained from numerical results using parameterization of the critical surface in the form similar to that proposed for ITER. Special ADPL scripts were developed for ANSYS allowing one-dimensional representation of TCS along the cable, as well as three-dimensional fields of TCS in superconductor

  19. ITER central solenoid manufacturing R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jay Jayakumar, R.; Tsuji, H.; Ohsaki, O.

    2001-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Engineering Design Activity (EDA) includes the development of high performance superconductors, high current joints between superconducting cables and insulating materials. Also in the EDA, the resulting products of this R and D are incorporated in a Central Solenoid Model Coil which utilizes full size conductors. The manufacturing of the model coil and components has led to the development of the design, materials, tooling and process which are fully applicable to the manufacture of the ITER relevant CS coil. The R and D is essentially complete and final stages of the CS Model Coil manufacturing are underway. (author)

  20. ITER central solenoid manufacturing R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, R.J.; Tsuji, H.; Ohsaki, O.

    1999-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Engineering Design Activity (EDA) includes the development of high performance superconductors, high current joints between superconducting cables and insulating materials. Also in the EDA, the resulting products of this R and D are incorporated in a Central Solenoid Model Coil which utilizes full size conductors. The manufacturing of the model coil and components has led to the development of the design, materials, tooling and process which are fully applicable to the manufacture of the ITER relevant CS coil. The R and D is essentially complete and final stages of the CS Model Coil manufacturing are underway. (author)

  1. C.A.P. plasma physics summer school, Banff, June 1975. I. Experiments on laser-heated solenoids and pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlases, G.C.

    1975-01-01

    A review is given of experimental progress on the use of long wavelength lasers (CO 2 or CO) to heat long, magnetically confined plasma columns to thermonuclear temperatures. Theoretical studies of the feasibility of the concept for controlled fusion power are reviewed. The laser-heated solenoid concept is reviewed in particular

  2. Gastric transit and small intestinal transit time and motility assessed by a magnet tracking system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WorsØe Jonas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tracking an ingested magnet by the Magnet Tracking System MTS-1 (Motilis, Lausanne, Switzerland is an easy and minimally-invasive method to assess gastrointestinal transit. The aim was to test the validity of MTS-1 for assessment of gastric transit time and small intestinal transit time, and to illustrate transit patterns detected by the system. Methods A small magnet was ingested and tracked by an external matrix of 16 magnetic field sensors (4 × 4 giving a position defined by 5 coordinates (position: x, y, z, and angle: θ, ϕ. Eight healthy subjects were each investigated three times: (1 with a small magnet mounted on a capsule endoscope (PillCam; (2 with the magnet alone and the small intestine in the fasting state; and (3 with the magnet alone and the small intestine in the postprandial state. Results Experiment (1 showed good agreement and no systematic differences between MTS-1 and capsule endoscopy when assessing gastric transit (median difference 1 min; range: 0-6 min and small intestinal transit time (median difference 0.5 min; range: 0-52 min. Comparing experiments (1 and (2 there were no systematic differences in gastric transit or small intestinal transit when using the magnet-PillCam unit and the much smaller magnetic pill. In experiments (2 and (3, short bursts of very fast movements lasting less than 5% of the time accounted for more than half the distance covered during the first two hours in the small intestine, irrespective of whether the small intestine was in the fasting or postprandial state. The mean contraction frequency in the small intestine was significantly lower in the fasting state than in the postprandial state (9.90 min-1 vs. 10.53 min-1 (p = 0.03. Conclusion MTS-1 is reliable for determination of gastric transit and small intestinal transit time. It is possible to distinguish between the mean contraction frequency of small intestine in the fasting state and in the postprandial state.

  3. Cable testing for Fermilab's high field magnets using small racetrack coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feher, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Bordini, B.; Bossert, R.; Carcagno, R.; Kashikhin, V.I.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Novitski, I.; Orris, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the High Field Magnet program at Fermilab simple magnets have been designed utilizing small racetrack coils based on a sound mechanical structure and bladder technique developed by LBNL. Two of these magnets have been built in order to test Nb 3 Sn cables used in cos-theta dipole models. The powder-in-tube strand based cable exhibited excellent performance. It reached its critical current limit within 14 quenches. Modified jelly roll strand based cable performance was limited by magnetic instabilities at low fields as previously tested dipole models which used similar cable

  4. MODELING THE SUN’S SMALL-SCALE GLOBAL PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, K. A. [Division of Computing and Mathematics, Abertay University, Kydd Building, Dundee, Bell Street, DD1 1HG, Scotland (United Kingdom); Mackay, D. H., E-mail: k.meyer@abertay.ac.uk [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, KY16 9SS, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-20

    We present a new model for the Sun’s global photospheric magnetic field during a deep minimum of activity, in which no active regions emerge. The emergence and subsequent evolution of small-scale magnetic features across the full solar surface is simulated, subject to the influence of a global supergranular flow pattern. Visually, the resulting simulated magnetograms reproduce the typical structure and scale observed in quiet Sun magnetograms. Quantitatively, the simulation quickly reaches a steady state, resulting in a mean field and flux distribution that are in good agreement with those determined from observations. A potential coronal magnetic field is extrapolated from the simulated full Sun magnetograms to consider the implications of such a quiet photospheric magnetic field on the corona and inner heliosphere. The bulk of the coronal magnetic field closes very low down, in short connections between small-scale features in the simulated magnetic network. Just 0.1% of the photospheric magnetic flux is found to be open at 2.5 R {sub ⊙}, around 10–100 times less than that determined for typical Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager synoptic map observations. If such conditions were to exist on the Sun, this would lead to a significantly weaker interplanetary magnetic field than is currently observed, and hence a much higher cosmic ray flux at Earth.

  5. Design of 95 GHz gyrotron based on continuous operation copper solenoid with water cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodin, Dmitri; Ben-Moshe, Roey; Einat, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    The design work for 2nd harmonic 95 GHz, 50 kW gyrotron based on continuous operation copper solenoid is presented. Thermionic magnetron injection gun specifications were calculated according to the linear trade off equation, and simulated with CST program. Numerical code is used for cavity design using the non-uniform string equation as well as particle motion in the “cold” cavity field. The mode TE02 with low Ohmic losses in the cavity walls was chosen as the operating mode. The Solenoid is designed to induce magnetic field of 1.8 T over a length of 40 mm in the interaction region with homogeneity of ±0.34%. The solenoid has six concentric cylindrical segments (and two correction segments) of copper foil windings separated by water channels for cooling. The predicted temperature in continuous operation is below 93 °C. The parameters of the design together with simulation results of the electromagnetic cavity field, magnetic field, electron trajectories, and thermal analyses are presented

  6. Design of 95 GHz gyrotron based on continuous operation copper solenoid with water cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodin, Dmitri; Ben-Moshe, Roey; Einat, Moshe [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Ariel University, Ariel 40700 (Israel)

    2014-07-15

    The design work for 2nd harmonic 95 GHz, 50 kW gyrotron based on continuous operation copper solenoid is presented. Thermionic magnetron injection gun specifications were calculated according to the linear trade off equation, and simulated with CST program. Numerical code is used for cavity design using the non-uniform string equation as well as particle motion in the “cold” cavity field. The mode TE02 with low Ohmic losses in the cavity walls was chosen as the operating mode. The Solenoid is designed to induce magnetic field of 1.8 T over a length of 40 mm in the interaction region with homogeneity of ±0.34%. The solenoid has six concentric cylindrical segments (and two correction segments) of copper foil windings separated by water channels for cooling. The predicted temperature in continuous operation is below 93 °C. The parameters of the design together with simulation results of the electromagnetic cavity field, magnetic field, electron trajectories, and thermal analyses are presented.

  7. On the Suitability of a Solenoid Horn for the ESS Neutrino Superbeam

    CERN Document Server

    Olvegård, Maja; Ruber, R; Ziemann, R; Koutchouk, J -P

    2015-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS), now under construction in Lund, Sweden, offers unique opportunities for experimental physics, not only in neutron science but potentially in particle physics. The ESS neutrino superbeam project plans to use a 5 MW proton beam from the ESS linac to generate a high intensity neutrino superbeam, with the final goal of detecting leptonic CP-violation in an underground megaton Cherenkov water detector. The neutrino production requires a second target station and a complex focusing system for the pions emerging from the target. The normal-conducting magnetic horns that are normally used for these applications cannot accept the 2.86 ms long proton pulses of the ESS linac, which means that pulse shortening in an accumulator ring would be required. That, in turn, requires H- operation in the linac to accommodate the high intensity. As an attractive alternative, we investigate the possibility of using superconducting solenoids for the pion focusing. This solenoid horn system needs ...

  8. Conceptual design of a 2 tesla superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab D{O} detector upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brzezniak, J.; Fast, R.W.; Krempetz, K.

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents a conceptual design of a superconducting solenoid to be part of a proposed upgrade for the D0 detector. This detector was completed in 1992, and has been taking data since then. The Fermilab Tevatron had scheduled a series of luminosity enhancements prior to the startup of this detector. In response to this accelerator upgrade, efforts have been underway to design upgrades for D0 to take advantage of the new luminosity, and improvements in detector technology. This magnet is conceived as part of the new central tracking system for D0, providing a radiation-hard high-precision magnetic tracking system with excellent electron identification.

  9. Small-scale gradients of charged particles in the heliospheric magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Fan; Giacalone, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Using numerical simulations of charged-particles propagating in the heliospheric magnetic field, we study small-scale gradients, or 'dropouts,' in the intensity of solar energetic particles seen at 1 AU. We use two turbulence models, the foot-point random motion model and the two-component model, to generate fluctuating magnetic fields similar to spacecraft observations at 1 AU. The turbulence models include a Kolmogorov-like magnetic field power spectrum containing a broad range of spatial scales from those that lead to large-scale field-line random walk to small scales leading to resonant pitch-angle scattering of energetic particles. We release energetic protons (20 keV-10 MeV) from a spatially compact and instantaneous source. The trajectories of energetic charged particles in turbulent magnetic fields are numerically integrated. Spacecraft observations are mimicked by collecting particles in small windows when they pass the windows at a distance of 1 AU. We show that small-scale gradients in the intensity of energetic particles and velocity dispersions observed by spacecraft can be reproduced using the foot-point random motion model. However, no dropouts are seen in simulations using the two-component magnetic turbulence model. We also show that particle scattering in the solar wind magnetic field needs to be infrequent for intensity dropouts to form.

  10. [Development of RF coil of permanent magnet mini-magnetic resonance imager and mouse imaging experiments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shulian; Xie, Huantong; Chen, Wei; Wang, Guangxin; Zhao, Qiang; Li, Shiyu

    2014-10-01

    In the development of radio frequency (RF) coils for better quality of the mini-type permanent magnetic resonance imager for using in the small animal imaging, the solenoid RF coil has a special advantage for permanent magnetic system based on analyses of various types.of RF coils. However, it is not satisfied for imaging if the RF coils are directly used. By theoretical analyses of the magnetic field properties produced from the solenoid coil, the research direction was determined by careful studies to raise further the uniformity of the magnetic field coil, receiving coil sensitivity for signals and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The method had certain advantages and avoided some shortcomings of the other different coil types, such as, birdcage coil, saddle shaped coil and phased array coil by using the alloy materials (from our own patent). The RF coils were designed, developed and made for keeled applicable to permanent magnet-type magnetic resonance imager, multi-coil combination-type, single-channel overall RF receiving coil, and applied for a patent. Mounted on three instruments (25 mm aperture, with main magnetic field strength of 0.5 T or 1.5 T, and 50 mm aperture, with main magnetic field strength of 0.48 T), we performed experiments with mice, rats, and nude mice bearing tumors. The experimental results indicated that the RF receiving coil was fully applicable to the permanent magnet-type imaging system.

  11. Small-Scale Dayside Magnetic Reconnection Analysis via MMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, K. R.; Burch, J. L.; Fuselier, S. A.; Webster, J.; Genestreti, K.; Torbert, R. B.; Rager, A. C.; Phan, T.; Argall, M. R.; Le Contel, O.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Giles, B. L.

    2017-12-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission has the primary objective of understanding the physics of the reconnection electron diffusion region (EDR), where magnetic energy is transformed into particle energy. In this poster, we present data from an EDR encounter that occurred in late December 2016 at approximately 11:00 MLT with a moderate guide field. The spacecraft were in a tetrahedral formation with an average inter-spacecraft distance of approximately 7 kilometers. During this event electron crescent-shaped distributions were observed in the electron stagnation region as is typical for asymmetric reconnection. Based on the observed ion velocity jets, the spacecraft traveled just south of the EDR. Because of the close spacecraft separation, fairly accurate computation of the Hall, electron pressure divergence, and electron inertia components of the reconnection electric field could be made. In the region of the crescent distributions good agreement was observed, with the strongest component being the normal electric field and the most significant sources being electron pressure divergence and the Hall electric field. While the strongest currents were in the out-of-plane direction, the dissipation was strongest in the normal direction because of the larger magnitude of the normal electric field component. These results are discussed in light of recent 3D PIC simulations performed by other groups.

  12. q-Space imaging using small magnetic field gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, Eizou; Yamaguchi, Kojiro; Yoshikawa, Mayo; Ueoku, Sachiko; Tanaka, Eiji

    2006-01-01

    q-space diffusion analysis is a method to obtain the probability density function of the translational displacement of diffusing water molecules. Several quantities can be extracted from the function that indicate a characteristic of the water diffusion in tissue, e.g., the mean displacement of the diffusion, probability for zero displacement, and kurtosis of the function. These quantities are expected to give information about the microstructure of tissues in addition to that obtained from the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC); however, this method requires high q (i.e., high b) values, which are undesirable in practical applications of the method using clinical magnetic resonance (MR) imaging equipment. We propose a method to obtain certain quantities that indicate a characteristic of the diffusion and that uses low q-value measurements. The quantities we can obtain are the moments of translational displacement, R; the n-th order moment is defined as the average of R n (n: integer). Kurtosis can also be calculated from the second and fourth moments. We tried to map the moments and kurtosis using clinical MR imaging equipment. We also estimated the inherent errors of the moments obtained. Our method requires precision in measuring spin echo signals and setting q values rather than using high q-value measurements. Although our results show that further error reductions are desired, our method is workable using ordinary clinical MR imaging equipment. (author)

  13. A conduction-cooled, 680-mm-long warm bore, 3-T Nb3Sn solenoid for a Cerenkov free electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, Wilhelm A.J.; den Ouden, A.; Krooshoop, Hendrikus J.G.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.; Wieland, J.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.

    1999-01-01

    A compact, cryocooler cooled Nb3Sn superconducting magnet system for a Cerenkov free electron laser has been designed, fabricated and tested. The magnet is positioned directly behind the electron gun of the laser system. The solenoidal field compresses and guides a tube-shaped 100 A, 500 kV electron

  14. Small angle neutron scattering investigations of spin disorder in nanocomposite soft magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vecchini, C.; Moze, O.; Suzuki, K.; Cadogan, J.M.; Pranzas, K.; Michels, A.; Weissmueller, J.

    2006-01-01

    The technique of SANS (small angle neutron scattering) furnishes unique information on the characteristic magnetic length scales and local magnetic anisotropies at the nanoscale in nanocomposite ferromagnets. Such information is not presently available using any other microscopic technique. The basic principles and results of the technique will be presented with regard to a unique and unexpected observation of a dipole field controlled spin disorder in a prototypical soft nanocomposite ferromagnet of the Nanoperm type

  15. Lower Bound for the Radiation $Q$ of Electrically Small Magnetic Dipole Antennas With Solid Magnetodielectric Core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2011-01-01

    A new lower bound for the radiation $Q$ of electrically small spherical magnetic dipole antennas with solid magnetodielectric core is derived in closed form using the exact theory. The new bound approaches the Chu lower bound from above as the antenna electrical size decreases. For $ka, the new...... bound is lower than the bounds for spherical magnetic as well as electric dipole antennas composed of impressed electric currents in free space....

  16. Magnetic particles studied with neutron depolarization and small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosman, R.

    1991-01-01

    Materials containing magnetic single-domain particles, referred to as 'particulate media', have been studied using neutron depolarization (ND) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). In a ND experiment the polarization vector of a polarized neutron beam is analyzed after transmission through a magnetic medium. Such an analysis in general yields the correlation length of variations in magnetic induction along the neutron path (denoted 'magnetic correlation length'), mean orientation of these variations and mean magnetic induction. In a SANS experiment, information about nuclear and magnetic inhomogeneities in the medium is derived from the broadening of a generally unpolarized neutron beam due to scattering by these inhomogeneities. Spatial and magnetic microstructure of a variety of particulate media have been studied using ND and/or SANS, by determination of the magnetic or nuclear correlation length in these media in various magnetic states. This thesis deals with the ND theory and its application to particulate media. ND and SANS experiments on a variety of particulate media are discussed. (author). 178 refs., 97 figs., 8 tabs

  17. Numerical simulation for the magnetic force distribution in electromagnetic forming of small size flat sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaowei; Wang, Wenping; Wan, Min

    2013-12-01

    It is essential to calculate magnetic force in the process of studying electromagnetic flat sheet forming. Calculating magnetic force is the basis of analyzing the sheet deformation and optimizing technical parameters. Magnetic force distribution on the sheet can be obtained by numerical simulation of electromagnetic field. In contrast to other computing methods, the method of numerical simulation has some significant advantages, such as higher calculation accuracy, easier using and other advantages. In this paper, in order to study of magnetic force distribution on the small size flat sheet in electromagnetic forming when flat round spiral coil, flat rectangular spiral coil and uniform pressure coil are adopted, the 3D finite element models are established by software ANSYS/EMAG. The magnetic force distribution on the sheet are analyzed when the plane geometries of sheet are equal or less than the coil geometries under fixed discharge impulse. The results showed that when the physical dimensions of sheet are less than the corresponding dimensions of the coil, the variation of induced current channel width on the sheet will cause induced current crowding effect that seriously influence the magnetic force distribution, and the degree of inhomogeneity of magnetic force distribution is increase nearly linearly with the variation of induced current channel width; the small size uniform pressure coil will produce approximately uniform magnetic force distribution on the sheet, but the coil is easy to early failure; the desirable magnetic force distribution can be achieved when the unilateral placed flat rectangular spiral coil is adopted, and this program can be take as preferred one, because the longevity of flat rectangular spiral coil is longer than the working life of small size uniform pressure coil.

  18. Current-voltage characteristics of a superconducting slab under a superimposed small AC magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Teruo; Yamafuji, Kaoru; Sakamoto, Nobuyoshi.

    1977-01-01

    In case of applying superconductors to electric machinery or high intensity field magnets for fusion reactors, the superconductors are generally expected to be sensible to small field fluctuation besides DC magnetic field. The behavior of superconductors in DC magnetic field superimposed with small AC magnetic field has been investigated often experimentally, and the result has been obtained that the critical current at which DC flow voltage begins to appear extremely decreased or disappeared. Some theoretical investigations have been carried out on this phenomenon so far, however, their application has been limited to the region where frequency is sufficiently low or which is close to the critical magnetic field. Purpose of this report is to deal with the phenomenon in more unified way by analyzing the behavior of magnetic flux lines in a superconductor under a superimposed small AC field using the criticalstate model including viscous force. In order to solve the fundamental equation in this report, first the solution has been obtained in the quasi-static state neglecting viscous force, then about the cases that current density J is not more than Jc and J is larger than Jc, concerning the deviation from the quasi-static limit by employing successive approximation. Current-voltage characteristics have been determined by utilizing the above results. This method seems to be most promising at present except the case of extremely high frequency. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  19. Development of high-strength and high-RRR aluminum-stabilized superconductor for the ATLAS thin solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Wada, K; Sakamoto, H; Shimada, T; Nagasu, Y; Inoue, I H; Tsunoda, K; Endo, S; Yamamoto, A; Makida, Y; Tanaka, K; Doi, Y; Kondo, T

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS central solenoid magnet is being constructed to provide a magnetic field of 2 Tesla in the central tracking part of the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Since the solenoid coil is placed in front of the liquid-argon electromagnetic calorimeter, the solenoid coil must be as thin (and transparent) as possible. The high-strength and high- RRR aluminum-stabilized superconductor is a key technology for the solenoid to be thinnest while keeping its stability. This has been developed with an alloy of 0.1 wt% nickel addition to 5N pure aluminum and with the subsequent mechanical cold working of 21% in area reduction. A yield strength of 110 MPa at 4.2 K has been realized keeping a residual resistivity ratio (RRR) of 590, after a heat treatment corresponding to coil curing at 130 degrees C for 15 hrs. This paper describes the optimization of the fabrication process and characteristics of the developed conductor. (8 refs).

  20. Quench protection and safety of the ATLAS central solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Makida, Y; Haruyama, T; ten Kate, H H J; Kawai, M; Kobayashi, T; Kondo, T; Kondo, Y; Mizumaki, S; Olesen, G; Sbrissa, E; Yamamoto, A; Yamaoka, H

    2002-01-01

    Fabrication of the ATLAS central solenoid was completed and the performance test has been carried out. The solenoid was successfully charged up to 8.4 kA, which is 10% higher than the normal operational current of 7.6 kA. Two methods for quench protection, pure aluminum strips accelerating quench propagation and quench protection heaters distributing normal zones, are applied in order to safely dissipate the stored energy. In this paper, quench characteristics and protection methods of the ATLAS central solenoid are described. (14 refs).

  1. Study on antilock brake system with elastic membrane vibration generated by controlled solenoid excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wibowo,; Zakaria,; Lambang, Lullus; Triyono,; Muhayat, Nurul

    2016-01-01

    The most effective chassis control system for improving vehicle safety during severe braking is anti-lock braking system (ABS). Antilock effect can be gained by vibrate the pad brake at 7 to 20 cycle per second. The aim of this study is to design a new method of antilock braking system with membrane elastic vibrated by solenoid. The influence of the pressure fluctuations of brake fluid is investigated. Vibration data is collected using a small portable accelerometer-slam stick. The experiment results that the vibration of brake pad caused by controlled solenoid excitation at 10 Hz is obtained by our new method. The result of measurements can be altered by varying brake fluid pressure.

  2. Study on antilock brake system with elastic membrane vibration generated by controlled solenoid excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wibowo,, E-mail: wibowo-uns@yahoo.com; Zakaria,, E-mail: zakaaria27@gmail.com; Lambang, Lullus, E-mail: lulus-l@yahoo.com; Triyono,, E-mail: tyon-bila@yahoo.co.id; Muhayat, Nurul, E-mail: nurulmuhayat@ymail.com [Mechanical Engineering Department, Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta 57128 (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    The most effective chassis control system for improving vehicle safety during severe braking is anti-lock braking system (ABS). Antilock effect can be gained by vibrate the pad brake at 7 to 20 cycle per second. The aim of this study is to design a new method of antilock braking system with membrane elastic vibrated by solenoid. The influence of the pressure fluctuations of brake fluid is investigated. Vibration data is collected using a small portable accelerometer-slam stick. The experiment results that the vibration of brake pad caused by controlled solenoid excitation at 10 Hz is obtained by our new method. The result of measurements can be altered by varying brake fluid pressure.

  3. Solenoid-free Plasma Startup in NSTX using Coaxial Helicity Injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roger Raman; Jarboe, Thomas R.; Bell, Michael G.; Dennis Mueller; Nelson, Brian A.; Benoit LeBlanc; Charles Bush; Masayoshi Nagata; Ted Biewer

    2005-01-01

    The favorable properties of the Spherical Torus (ST) arise from its very small aspect ratio. However, small aspect ratio devices have very restricted space for a substantial central solenoid. Thus methods for initiating the plasma current without relying on induction from a central solenoid are essential for the viability of the ST concept. Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) is a promising candidate for solenoid-free plasma startup in a ST. Recent experiments on the HIT-II ST at the University of Washington, have demonstrated the capability of a new method, referred to as transient CHI, to produce a high quality, closed-flux equilibrium that has then been coupled to induction, with a reduced requirement for transformer flux [R. Raman, T.R. Jarboe, B.A. Nelson, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 (February 2003) 075005-1]. An initial test of this method on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has produced about 140 kA of toroidal current. Modifications are now underway to improve capability for transient CHI in NSTX

  4. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mei; Park, S.Y.; Hirshfield, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude

  5. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Mei; Hirshfield, J L

    1999-01-01

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude.

  6. WE-D-17A-04: Magnetically Focused Proton Irradiation of Small Volume Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAuley, G; Slater, J [Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Wroe, A [Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the advantages of magnetic focusing for small volume proton irradiations and the potential clinical benefits for radiosurgery targets. The primary goal is to create narrow elongated proton beams of elliptical cross section with superior dose delivery characteristics compared to current delivery modalities (eg, collimated beams). In addition, more general beam shapes are also under investigation. Methods: Two prototype magnets consisting of 24 segments of samarium-cobalt (Sm2Co17) permanent magnetic material adhered into hollow cylinders were manufactured for testing. A single focusing magnet was placed on a positioning track on our Gantry 1 treatment table and 15 mm diameter proton beams with energies and modulation relevant to clinical radiosurgery applications (127 to 186 MeV, and 0 to 30 mm modulation) were delivered to a terminal water tank. Beam dose distributions were measured using a PTW diode detector and Gafchromic EBT2 film. Longitudinal and transverse dose profiles were analyzed and compared to data from Monte Carlo simulations analogous to the experimental setup. Results: The narrow elongated focused beam spots showed high elliptical symmetry indicating high magnet quality. In addition, when compared to unfocused beams, peak-to-entrance depth dose ratios were 11 to 14% larger (depending on presence or extent of modulation), and minor axis penumbras were 11 to 20% smaller (again depending on modulation) for focused beams. These results suggest that the use of rare earth magnet assemblies is practical and could improve dose-sparing of normal tissue and organs at risk while delivering enhanced dose to small proton radiosurgery targets. Conclusion: Quadrapole rare earth magnetic assemblies are a promising and inexpensive method to counteract particle out scatter that tends to degrade the peak to entrance performance of small field proton beams. Knowledge gained from current experiments will inform the design of a prototype treatment

  7. Beam collimation and transport of quasineutral laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harres, K.; Alber, I.; Guenther, M.; Nuernberg, F.; Otten, A.; Schuetrumpf, J.; Roth, M.; Tauschwitz, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Daido, H.; Tampo, M.; Schollmeier, M.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports about controlling laser-accelerated proton beams with respect to beam divergence and energy. The particles are captured by a pulsed high field solenoid with a magnetic field strength of 8.6 T directly behind a flat target foil that is irradiated by a high intensity laser pulse. Proton beams with energies around 2.3 MeV and particle numbers of 10 12 could be collimated and transported over a distance of more than 300 mm. In contrast to the protons the comoving electrons are strongly deflected by the solenoid field. They propagate at a submillimeter gyroradius around the solenoid's axis which could be experimentally verified. The originated high flux electron beam produces a high space charge resulting in a stronger focusing of the proton beam than expected by tracking results. Leadoff particle-in-cell simulations show qualitatively that this effect is caused by space charge attraction due to the comoving electrons. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications such as postacceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  8. Shear- and magnetic-field-induced ordering in magnetic nanoparticle dispersion from small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, V.V.; Bhandar, A.S.; Piao, M.; Zoto, I.; Lane, A.M.; Nikles, D.E.; Wiest, J.M.; Mankey, G.J.; Porcar, L.; Glinka, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering experiments have been performed to investigate orientational ordering of a dispersion of rod-shaped ferromagnetic nanoparticles under the influence of shear flow and static magnetic field. In this experiment, the flow and flow gradient directions are perpendicular to the direction of the applied magnetic field. The scattering intensity is isotropic in zero-shear-rate or zero-applied-field conditions, indicating that the particles are randomly oriented. Anisotropic scattering is observed both in a shear flow and in a static magnetic field, showing that both flow and field induce orientational order in the dispersion. The anisotropy increases with the increase of field and with the increase of shear rate. Three states of order have been observed with the application of both shear flow and magnetic field. At low shear rates, the particles are aligned in the field direction. When increasing shear rate is applied, the particles revert to random orientations at a characteristic shear rate that depends on the strength of the applied magnetic field. Above the characteristic shear rate, the particles align along the flow direction. The experimental results agree qualitatively with the predictions of a mean field model

  9. Foucault imaging and small-angle electron diffraction in controlled external magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Kotani, Atsuhiro; Harada, Ken; Ishii, Yui; Mori, Shigeo

    2016-12-01

    We report a method for acquiring Foucault images and small-angle electron diffraction patterns in external magnetic fields using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any modification. In the electron optical system that we have constructed, external magnetic fields parallel to the optical axis can be controlled using the objective lens pole piece under weak excitation conditions in the Foucault mode and the diffraction mode. We observe two ferromagnetic perovskite-type manganese oxides, La 0.7 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 (LSMO) and Nd 0.5 Sr 0.5 MnO 3 , in order to visualize magnetic domains and their magnetic responses to external magnetic fields. In rhombohedral-structured LSMO, pinning of magnetic domain walls at crystallographic twin boundaries was found to have a strong influence on the generation of new magnetic domains in external applied magnetic fields. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Interaction between granulation and small-scale magnetic flux observed by Hinode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jun; Yang Shuhong; Jin Chunlan

    2009-01-01

    With the polarimetric observations obtained by the Spectro-Polarimeter on board Hinode, we study the relationship between granular development and magnetic field evolution in the quiet Sun. Six typical cases are displayed to exhibit interaction between granules and magnetic elements, and we have obtained the following results. (1) A granule develops centrosymmetrically when no magnetic flux emerges within the granular cell. (2) A granule develops and splits noncentrosymmetrically while flux emerges at an outer part of the granular cell. (3) Magnetic flux emergence in a cluster of mixed polarities is detected at the position of a granule as soon as the granule breaks up. (4) A dipole emerges accompanied by the development of a granule, and the two elements of the dipole are rooted in the adjacent intergranular lanes and face each other across the granule. Advected by the horizontal granular motion, the positive element of the dipole then cancels with the pre-existing negative flux. (5) Flux cancellation also takes place between a positive element, which is advected by granular flow, and its surrounding negative flux. (6) While magnetic flux cancellation takes place in a granular cell, the granule shrinks and then disappears. (7) Horizontal magnetic fields are enhanced at the places where dipoles emerge and where opposite polarities cancel each other, but only the horizontal fields between the dipolar elements point in an orderly way from the positive elements to the negative ones. Our results reveal that granules and small-scale magnetic fluxes influence each other. Granular flow advects magnetic flux, and magnetic flux evolution suppresses granular development. There exist extremely large Doppler blue-shifts at the site of one canceling magnetic element. This phenomenon may be caused by the upward flow produced by magnetic reconnection below the photosphere. (research papers)

  11. The solenoidal transport option: IFE drivers, near term research facilities, and beam dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.P.; Briggs, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    Solenoidal magnets have been used as the beam transport system in all the high current electron induction accelerators that have been built in the past several decades. They have also been considered for the front end transport system for heavy ion accelerators for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) drivers, but this option has received very little attention in recent years. The analysis reported here was stimulated mainly by the recent effort to define an affordable open-quotes Integrated Research Experimentclose quotes (IRE) that can meet the near term needs of the IFE program. The 1996 FESAC IFE review panel agreed that an integrated experiment is needed to fully resolve IFE heavy ion driver science and technology issues; specifically, open-quotes the basic beam dynamics issues in the accelerator, the final focusing and transport issues in a reactor-relevant beam parameter regime, and the target heating phenomenologyclose quotes. The development of concepts that can meet these technical objectives and still stay within the severe cost constraints all new fusion proposals will encounter is a formidable challenge. Solenoidal transport has a very favorable scaling as the particle mass is decreased (the main reason why it is preferred for electrons in the region below 50 MeV). This was recognized in a recent conceptual study of high intensity induction linac-based proton accelerators for Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technologies, where solenoidal transport was chosen for the front end. Reducing the ion mass is an obvious scaling to exploit in an IRE design, since the output beam voltage will necessarily be much lower than that of a full scale driver, so solenoids should certainly be considered as one option for this experiment as well

  12. A conduction-cooled, 680-mm-long warm bore, 3-T Nb3Sn solenoid for a Cerenkov free electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Wessel, Wilhelm A.J.; den Ouden, A.; Krooshoop, Hendrikus J.G.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.; Wieland, J.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.

    1999-01-01

    A compact, cryocooler cooled Nb3Sn superconducting magnet system for a Cerenkov free electron laser has been designed, fabricated and tested. The magnet is positioned directly behind the electron gun of the laser system. The solenoidal field compresses and guides a tube-shaped 100 A, 500 kV electron beam. A two-stage GM cryocooler, equipped with a first generation ErNi5 regenerator, cools the epoxy impregnated solenoid down to the operating temperature of about 7.5 K. This leaves a conservati...

  13. Quench tests and FEM analysis of Nb3Al Rutherford cables and small racetrack magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, R.; Kikuchi, A.; Chlachidze, G.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Carcagno, R.; Kashikin, V.V.; Kotelnikov, S.; Lamm, M.; Novitski, I.

    2008-01-01

    In collaboration between NIMS and Fermilab, we have made copper stabilized Nb 3 Al Rutherford cables, using Nb-matrixed and Ta-matrixed strands. First these cables were investigated at high current in low self field using a flux pump. Using these Rutherford cables, we built and tested small racetrack magnets. The magnet made with the Nb-matrixed strand showed the flux jump instability in low field. The small racetrack magnet wound with the Ta-matrixed Nb 3 Al Rutherford cable was very stable at 4.5 K operation without any instability, as well as at 2.2 K operation. With the successful operation of the small racetrack magnet up to its short sample data, the feasibility of the Nb 3 Al strand and its Rutherford cable for their application to high field magnets is established. The characteristics of Nb 3 Al Rutherford cable is compared with that of the Nb 3 Sn Rutherford cable and the advantages of Nb 3 Al Rutherford cable are discussed

  14. Quench tests and FEM analysis of Nb3Al Rutherford cables and small racetrack magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, R.; Kikuchi, A.; Chlachidze, G.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Carcagno, R.; Kashikin, V.V.; Kotelnikov, S.; Lamm, M.; Novitski, I.; /Fermilab /Tsukuba Magnet Lab. /KEK, Tsukuba

    2008-12-01

    In collaboration between NIMS and Fermilab, we have made copper stabilized Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cables, using Nb-matrixed and Ta-matrixed strands. First these cables were investigated at high current in low self field using a flux pump. Using these Rutherford cables, we built and tested small racetrack magnets. The magnet made with the Nb-matrixed strand showed the flux jump instability in low field. The small racetrack magnet wound with the Ta-matrixed Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable was very stable at 4.5 K operation without any instability, as well as at 2.2 K operation. With the successful operation of the small racetrack magnet up to its short sample data, the feasibility of the Nb{sub 3}Al strand and its Rutherford cable for their application to high field magnets is established. The characteristics of Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable is compared with that of the Nb{sub 3}Sn Rutherford cable and the advantages of Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable are discussed.

  15. The g-2 storage ring superconducting magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1993-09-01

    The g-2 μ lepton (muon) storage ring is a single dipole magnet that is 44 meters in circumference. The storage ring dipole field is created by three large superconducting solenoid coils. A single outer solenoid, 15.1 meters in diameter, carries 254 kA. Two inner solenoids, 13.4 meters in diameter, carry 127 kA each in opposition to the current carried by the outer solenoid. A room temperature C shaped iron yoke returns the magnetic flux and shapes the magnetic field in a 180 mm gap where the stored muon beam circulates. The gap induction will be 1.47 T. This report describes the three large superconducting solenoids, the cryogenic system needed to keep them cold, the solenoid power supply and the magnet quench protection system

  16. Small-angle neutron-scattering studies of the magnetic phase diagram of MnSi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, P.; Lebech, B.; Hae Seop Shim

    1995-01-01

    The antiferromagnetic order of MnSi has been studied as function of temperature and applied magnetic field using small-angle neutron scattering. The results were analyzed using the three-dimensional resolution function and the scattering cross-section to model the diffraction data. Physical...

  17. Three-dimensional magnetic nanoparticle imaging using small field gradient and multiple pickup coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasayama, Teruyoshi, E-mail: sasayama@sc.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Tsujita, Yuya; Morishita, Manabu; Muta, Masahiro; Yoshida, Takashi; Enpuku, Keiji

    2017-04-01

    We propose a magnetic particle imaging (MPI) method based on third harmonic signal detection using a small field gradient and multiple pickup coils. First, we developed a system using two pickup coils and performed three-dimensional detection of two magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) samples, which were spaced 15 mm apart. In the experiments, an excitation field strength of 1.6 mT was used at an operating frequency of 3 kHz. A DC gradient field with a typical value of 0.2 T/m was also used to produce the so-called field-free line. A third harmonic signal generated by the MNP samples was detected using the two pickup coils, and the samples were then mechanically scanned to obtain field maps. The field maps were subsequently analyzed using the nonnegative least squares method to obtain three-dimensional position information for the MNP samples. The results show that the positions of the two MNP samples were estimated with good accuracy, despite the small field gradient used. Further improvement in MPI performance will be achieved by increasing the number of pickup coils used. - Highlights: • 3D magnetic particle imaging system combining field-free line and two pickup coils. • Imaging method based on third harmonic signal detection and small field gradient. • Nonnegative least squares method for 3D magnetic nanoparticle image reconstruction. • High spatial resolution despite use of small field gradient.

  18. Simulation of small-scale coronal explosives due to magnetic reconnections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Quanlin; Feng Xueshang; Xiang Changqing; Zhong Dingkun

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of small-scale explosive phenomena in the lower corona have been simulated by solving the compressible magnetohydrodynamic equations. Numerical results show that the magnetic reconnections in a long coronal current sheet consist of a series of discrete small reconnection events, coalescence of magnetic islands, and plasmoid ejections, corresponding to the explosive events occurring intermittently and as bursts in a mentioned observational case. The generation of magnetic islands via multiple-X-point reconnection and their coalescence processes, to some extent, are qualitatively similar to the sequence of brightenings in the active region NOAA 8668. The strong ejections are possibly related to the recorded extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emitting structures. Morphological comparison and quantitative check of the plasma parameters support this candidate mechanism, and the idea that explosive events that appear to last long may not be single events, but a succession of explosive events either resolved or unresolved. The temporal energy conversion process is also examined

  19. Solenoid hammer valve developed for quick-opening requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrench, E. H.

    1967-01-01

    Quick-opening lightweight solenoid hammer valve requires a low amount of electrical energy to open, and closes by the restoring action of the mechanical springs. This design should be applicable to many quick-opening requirements in fluid systems.

  20. Low-energy nuclear reactions with double-solenoid- based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    solenoids to produce low-energy radioactive nuclear beams. In these systems the ... For many years, the disadvantage in these investigations ... fusion or breakup reaction, preferred with large forward-peaked cross-sections. To transfer the ...

  1. Detailed design of the ITER central solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libeyre, P.; Mitchell, N.; Bessette, D.; Gribov, Y.; Jong, C.; Lyraud, C.

    2009-01-01

    The central solenoid (CS) of the ITER tokamak contributes to the inductive flux to drive the plasma, to the shaping of the field lines in the divertor region and to vertical stability control. It is made of 6 independent coils, using a Nb3Sn cable-in-conduit superconducting conductor, held together by a vertical precompression structure. This design enables ITER to access a wide operating window of plasma parameters, up to 17 MA and covering inductive and non-inductive operation. Each coil is based on a stack of multiple pancake winding units to minimise joints. A glass-polyimide electrical insulation, impregnated with epoxy resin, is giving a high voltage operating capability, tested up to 29 kV. The CS performance is fatigue driven mainly by the stress levels in the conductor jacket and in the precompression structure needed to keep the modules in contact during the repulsive forces which can arise in operation. A rigid connection to the TF coils provided at one end and a centering support at the other end allow to resist net vertical forces as well as unbalanced radial forces while avoiding torsion transmission from the TF Coils to the CS assembly.

  2. Magnetic phase diagram of MnSi near critical temperature studied by neutron small angle scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Yoshikazu; Arai, Masatoshi

    1984-01-01

    The magnetic phase diagram of MnSi near the critical temperature T sub(N)=29.5K has been studied by neutron small angle scattering at KENS. It has been found that the anomalous new phase predicted by various methods to exist around at 28 K and 2 kOe is the paramagnetic phase where the magnetic correlations exhibit the same characteristics as those found at 29.5 K and zero magnetic field. This phenomenon, together with the sharp decrease of the magnetic phase boundary at T sub(N) and the substantial increase of the satellite Q vector at this temperature, has been found not to be interpreted by the current theories. (author)

  3. Influence of external resonant magnetic perturbation field on edge plasma of small tokamak HYBTOK-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Y., E-mail: hayashi-yuki13@ees.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Suzuki, Y.; Ohno, N. [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Okamoto, M. [Ishikawa National College of Technology, Kitachujo, Tsubata-cho, Kahoku-gun, Ishikawa 929-0392 (Japan); Kikuchi, Y. [University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Sakakibara, S.; Watanabe, K.; Takemura, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Radial profile of externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field with mode numbers of m = 6 and n = 2 in a small tokamak device HYBTOK-II have been investigated using a magnetic probe array, which is able to measure the radial profile of magnetic field perturbation induced by applying RMP. Results of RMP penetration into the plasma show that the RMP decreased toward the plasma center, while they were amplified around the resonant surface with a safety factor q = 3 due to the formation of magnetic islands. This suggests that RMP fields for controlling edge plasmas may trigger some kind of MHD instabilities. In addition, simulation results, based on a linearized four-field model, which agrees with the experimental ones, indicates that the penetration and amplification process of RMP strongly depend on a Doppler-shifted frequency between the RMP and plasma rotation.

  4. Gracing incidence small angle neutron scattering of incommensurate magnetic structures in MnSi thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, Birgit; Pfleiderer, Christian; Boeni, Peter [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Zhang, Shilei; Hesjedal, Thorsten [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Khaydukov, Yury; Soltwedel, Olaf; Keller, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung (Germany); Max Planck Society, Outstation at FRM-II (Germany); Muehlbauer, Sebastian [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier Leibnitz, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Chacon, Alfonso [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier Leibnitz, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The topological stability of skyrmions in bulk samples of MnSi and the observation of spin transfer torque effects at ultra-low current densities have generated great interest in skyrmions in chiral magnets as a new route towards next generation spintronics devices. Yet, the formation of skyrmions in MBE grown thin films of MnSi reported in the literature is highly controversial. We report gracing incidence small angle neutron scattering (GISANS) of the magnetic order in selected thin films of MnSi grown by state of the art MBE techniques. In combination with polarised neutron reflectometry (PNR) and magnetisation measurements of the same samples our data provide direct reciprocal space information of the incommensurate magnetic order, clarifying the nature of magnetic phase diagram.

  5. Evidence of small-scale magnetic concentrations dragged by vortex motion of solar photospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmaceda, L.; Vargas Domínguez, S.; Palacios, J.; Cabello, I.; Domingo, V.

    2010-04-01

    Vortex-type motions have been measured by tracking bright points in high-resolution observations of the solar photosphere. These small-scale motions are thought to be determinant in the evolution of magnetic footpoints and their interaction with plasma and therefore likely to play a role in heating the upper solar atmosphere by twisting magnetic flux tubes. We report the observation of magnetic concentrations being dragged towards the center of a convective vortex motion in the solar photosphere from high-resolution ground-based and space-borne data. We describe this event by analyzing a series of images at different solar atmospheric layers. By computing horizontal proper motions, we detect a vortex whose center appears to be the draining point for the magnetic concentrations detected in magnetograms and well-correlated with the locations of bright points seen in G-band and CN images.

  6. Testing of ITER central solenoid coil insulation in an array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, R.; Martovetsky, N.N.; Perfect, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    A glass-polyimide insulation system has been proposed by the US team for use in the Central Solenoid (CS) coil of the international Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) machine and it is planned to use this system in the CS model coil inner module. The turn insulation will consist of 2 layers of combined prepreg and Kapton. Each layer is 50% overlapped with a butt wrap of prepreg and an overwrap of S glass. The coil layers will be separated by a glass-resin composite and impregnated in a VPI process. Small scale tests on the various components of the insulation are complete. It is planned to fabricate and test the insulation in a 4 x 4 insulated CS conductor array which will include the layer insulation and be vacuum impregnated. The conductor array will be subjected to 20 thermal cycles and 100000 mechanical load cycles in a Liquid Nitrogen environment. These loads are similar to those seen in the CS coil design. The insulation will be electrically tested at several stages during mechanical testing. This paper will describe the array configuration, fabrication: process, instrumentation, testing configuration, and supporting analyses used in selecting the array and test configurations

  7. A nonintrusive method for measuring the operating temperature of a solenoid-operated valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryter, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental data are presented to show that the in-service operating temperature of a solenoid-operated valve (SOV) can be interred simply and nondisruptively by using the copper winding of the solenoid coil as a self-indicating, permanently available resistance thermometer. The principal merits of this approach include (a) there is no need for an add-on temperature sensor, (b) the true temperature of a critical --- and likely the hottest --- part of the SOV (namely, the electrical coil) is measured directly, (c) temperature readout can be provided at any location at which the SOV electrical lead wires are accessible (even though remote from the valve), (d) the SOV need not be disturbed (whether normally energized or deenergized) to measure its temperature in situ, and (e) the method is applicable to all types of SOVs, large and small, ac- and dc-powered. Laboratory tests comparing temperatures measured both by coil resistance and by a conventional thermometer placed in contact with the external surface of the potted solenoid coil indicate that temperature within the coil may be on the order of 40 degree C higher than that measured externally, a fact that is important to life-expectancy calculations made on the basis of Arrhenius theory. Field practicality is illustrated with temperature measurements made using this method on a SOV controlling the flow of refrigerant in a large chilled-water air-conditioning system. 5 refs., 7 figs

  8. Small-scale instrumentation for nuclear magnetic resonance of porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico; Dabrowski, Martin; Danieli, Ernesto; Haber, Agnes; Van Landeghem, Maxime; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Olaru, Alexandra; Perlo, Juan; Sucre, Oscar; Evertz, Loribeth

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of fluids confined to porous media is the oldest topic of investigation with small-scale nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) instruments, as such instruments are mobile and can be moved to the site of the object, such as the borehole of an oil well. While the analysis was originally restricted by the inferior homogeneity of the employed magnets to relaxation measurements, today, portable magnets are available for all types of NMR measurements concerning relaxometry, imaging and spectroscopy in two types of geometries. These geometries refer to closed magnets that surround the sample and open magnets, which are brought close to the object for measurement. The current state of the art of portable, small-scale NMR instruments is reviewed and recent applications of such instruments are featured. These include the porosity analysis and description of diesel particulate filters, the determination of the moisture content in walls from gray concrete, new approaches to analyze the pore space and moisture migration in soil, and the constitutional analysis of the mortar base of ancient wall paintings.

  9. Measurement of magnetic fluctuations at small spatial scales in the Tokapole II tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, E.J.

    1991-08-01

    This thesis is a presentation of the measurements of short-wavelength, high-frequency radial magnetic fluctuations performed on the Tokapole 2 tokamak at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Theories of electron temperature gradient (η e ) driven turbulence predict the existence of increased magnetic fluctuation power at small spatial scales near the collisionless skin depth c/ω pe and over a wide range of frequencies near and below the electron diamagnetic drift frequency ω* ne . Small magnetic probes of sizes down to 1 m m have been constructed and used to resolve short poloidal and radial wavelength magnetic fluctuations. These probes have been used with larger probes to make comparisons of fluctuation spectra measured in various ranges of wavelength and over the range of frequencies from 10 kHz to 6 MHz in Tokapole 2 plasmas. A calculation of the short-wavelength, high-frequency response of an electrostatically shielded model B r probe has been performed to guide the interpretation of the power comparison measurements. Comparisons of magnetic fluctuation spectra at various positions within the plasma, and for discharges with edge safety factor 1, 2, and 3 are presented. The linear and nonlinear theories and numerical simulations of η e turbulence are reviewed and compared, where possible with the experimental parameters and results

  10. Solar Coronal Loops Associated with Small-scale Mixed Polarity Surface Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitta, L. P.; Peter, H.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Hirzberger, J.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Noort, M. van [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Rodríguez, J. Blanco [Grupo de Astronomía y Ciencias del Espacio, Universidad de Valencia, E-46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Iniesta, J. C. Del Toro; Suárez, D. Orozco [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Apartado de Correos 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Schmidt, W. [Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik, Schöneckstr. 6, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Pillet, V. Martínez [National Solar Observatory, 3665 Discovery Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Knölker, M., E-mail: chitta@mps.mpg.de [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    How and where are coronal loops rooted in the solar lower atmosphere? The details of the magnetic environment and its evolution at the footpoints of coronal loops are crucial to understanding the processes of mass and energy supply to the solar corona. To address the above question, we use high-resolution line-of-sight magnetic field data from the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment instrument on the Sunrise balloon-borne observatory and coronal observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory of an emerging active region. We find that the coronal loops are often rooted at the locations with minor small-scale but persistent opposite-polarity magnetic elements very close to the larger dominant polarity. These opposite-polarity small-scale elements continually interact with the dominant polarity underlying the coronal loop through flux cancellation. At these locations we detect small inverse Y-shaped jets in chromospheric Ca ii H images obtained from the Sunrise Filter Imager during the flux cancellation. Our results indicate that magnetic flux cancellation and reconnection at the base of coronal loops due to mixed polarity fields might be a crucial feature for the supply of mass and energy into the corona.

  11. Solar Coronal Loops Associated with Small-scale Mixed Polarity Surface Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitta, L. P.; Peter, H.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Hirzberger, J.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Noort, M. van; Rodríguez, J. Blanco; Iniesta, J. C. Del Toro; Suárez, D. Orozco; Schmidt, W.; Pillet, V. Martínez; Knölker, M.

    2017-01-01

    How and where are coronal loops rooted in the solar lower atmosphere? The details of the magnetic environment and its evolution at the footpoints of coronal loops are crucial to understanding the processes of mass and energy supply to the solar corona. To address the above question, we use high-resolution line-of-sight magnetic field data from the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment instrument on the Sunrise balloon-borne observatory and coronal observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory of an emerging active region. We find that the coronal loops are often rooted at the locations with minor small-scale but persistent opposite-polarity magnetic elements very close to the larger dominant polarity. These opposite-polarity small-scale elements continually interact with the dominant polarity underlying the coronal loop through flux cancellation. At these locations we detect small inverse Y-shaped jets in chromospheric Ca ii H images obtained from the Sunrise Filter Imager during the flux cancellation. Our results indicate that magnetic flux cancellation and reconnection at the base of coronal loops due to mixed polarity fields might be a crucial feature for the supply of mass and energy into the corona.

  12. MMS Multipoint Electric Field Observations of Small-Scale Magnetic Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Katherine A.; Ergun, Robert E.; Wilder, Frederick; Burch, James; Torbert, Roy; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Lindqvist, Per-Arne; Russell, Christopher; Strangeway, Robert; Magnus, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Small-scale magnetic holes (MHs), local depletions in magnetic field strength, have been observed multiple times in the Earths magnetosphere in the bursty bulk flow (BBF) braking region. This particular subset of MHs has observed scale sizes perpendicular to the background magnetic field (B) less than the ambient ion Larmor radius (p(sib i)). Previous observations by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) indicate that this subset of MHs can be supported by a current driven by the E x B drift of electrons. Ions do not participate in the E x B drift due to the small-scale size of the electric field. While in the BBF braking region, during its commissioning phase, the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft observed a small-scale MH. The electric field observations taken during this event suggest the presence of electron currents perpendicular to the magnetic field. These observations also suggest that these currents can evolve to smaller spatial scales.

  13. THE SUN'S SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC ELEMENTS IN SOLAR CYCLE 23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, C. L.; Wang, J. X.; Song, Q.; Zhao, H.

    2011-01-01

    With the unique database from the Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory in an interval embodying solar cycle 23, the cyclic behavior of solar small-scale magnetic elements is studied. More than 13 million small-scale magnetic elements are selected, and the following results are found. (1) The quiet regions dominated the Sun's magnetic flux for about 8 years in the 12.25 year duration of cycle 23. They contributed (0.94-1.44) x10 23 Mx flux to the Sun from the solar minimum to maximum. The monthly average magnetic flux of the quiet regions is 1.12 times that of the active regions in the cycle. (2) The ratio of quiet region flux to that of the total Sun equally characterizes the course of a solar cycle. The 6 month running average flux ratio of the quiet regions was larger than 90.0% for 28 continuous months from July 2007 to October 2009, which very well characterizes the grand solar minima of cycles 23-24. (3) From the small to the large end of the flux spectrum, the variations of numbers and total flux of the network elements show no correlation, anti-correlation, and correlation with sunspots, respectively. The anti-correlated elements, covering the flux of (2.9-32.0)x10 18 Mx, occupy 77.2% of the total element number and 37.4% of the quiet-Sun flux. These results provide insight into the reason for anti-correlations of small-scale magnetic activity during the solar cycle.

  14. Electrical characterization of S/C conductor for the CMS solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Greco, Michela; Kircher, F; Musenich, R

    2005-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the general-purpose detectors to be provided for the LHC project at CERN. The design field of the CMS superconducting magnet is 4 T, the magnetic length is 12.5 m and the free bore is 6 m. The coil is wound from 20 high purity aluminum-stabilized NbTi conductors with a total length of 45 km. The main peculiarity of the CMS magnet among other existing thin detector solenoids is its sandwich-type aluminum-stabilized superconductor. This special feature was chosen in order to have a mechanically self-supporting winding structure. We measured the critical current of all the 21 finished conductors in fields up to 6 T using the Ma.Ri.S.A. test facility at INFN-Genova. We compare these results with the critical current of single strands measured by CEA- Saclay, extracted from the conductor after the co-extrusion. A comparison among the measurements provides information about the possible critical current degradation and assures an accurate quality control of the conductor pr...

  15. Design and fabrication of a 30 T superconducting solenoid using overpressure processed Bi2212 round wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, Gene [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-02-18

    High field superconducting magnets are used in particle colliders, fusion energy devices, and spectrometers for medical imaging and advanced materials research. Magnets capable of generating fields of 20-30 T are needed by future accelerator facilities. A 20-30 T magnet will require the use of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) and therefore the challenges of high field HTS magnet development need to be addressed. Superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (Bi2212) conductors fabricated by the oxide-powder-in-tube (OPIT) technique have demonstrated the capability to carry large critical current density of 105 A/cm2 at 4.2 K and in magnetic fields up to 45 T. Available in round wire multi-filamentary form, Bi2212 may allow fabrication of 20-50 T superconducting magnets. Until recently the performance of Bi2212 has been limited by challenges in realizing high current densities (Jc ) in long lengths. This problem now is solved by the National High Magnetic Field Lab using an overpressure (OP) processing technique, which uses external pressure to process the conductor. OP processing also helps remove the ceramic leakage that results when Bi-2212 liquid leaks out from the sheath material and reacts with insulation, coil forms, and flanges. Significant advances have also been achieved in developing novel insulation materials (TiO2 coating) and Ag-Al sheath materials that have higher mechanical strengths than Ag-0.2wt.% Mg, developing heat treatment approaches to broadening the maximum process temperature window, and developing high-strength, mechanical reinforced Bi-2212 cables. In the Phase I work, we leveraged these new opportunities to prototype overpressure processed solenoids and test them in background fields of up to 14 T. Additionally a design of a fully superconducting 30 T solenoid was produced. This work in conjunction with the future path outlined in the Phase II proposal would

  16. Design and analysis of tubular permanent magnet linear generator for small-scale wave energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Man; Koo, Min-Mo; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Hong, Keyyong; Cho, Il-Hyoung; Choi, Jang-Young

    2017-05-01

    This paper reports the design and analysis of a tubular permanent magnet linear generator (TPMLG) for a small-scale wave-energy converter. The analytical field computation is performed by applying a magnetic vector potential and a 2-D analytical model to determine design parameters. Based on analytical solutions, parametric analysis is performed to meet the design specifications of a wave-energy converter (WEC). Then, 2-D FEA is employed to validate the analytical method. Finally, the experimental result confirms the predictions of the analytical and finite element analysis (FEA) methods under regular and irregular wave conditions.

  17. Static properties of small Josephson tunnel junctions in a transverse magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, R.; Aarøe, Morten; Mygind, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic field distribution in the barrier of small planar Josephson tunnel junctions is numerically simulated in the case when an external magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the barrier plane. The simulations allow for heuristic analytical solutions for the Josephson static phase...... profile from which the dependence of the maximum Josephson current on the applied field amplitude is derived. The most common geometrical configurations are considered and, when possible, the theoretical findings are compared with the experimental data. ©2008 American Institute of Physics...

  18. The LASS [Larger Aperture Superconducting Solenoid] spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Barnett, B.

    1986-04-01

    LASS is the acronym for the Large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid spectrometer which is located in an rf-separated hadron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This spectrometer was constructed in order to perform high statistics studies of multiparticle final states produced in hadron reactions. Such reactions are frequently characterized by events having complicated topologies and/or relatively high particle multiplicity. Their detailed study requires a spectrometer which can provide good resolution in momentum and position over almost the entire solid angle subtended by the production point. In addition, good final state particle identification must be available so that separation of the many kinematically-overlapping final states can be achieved. Precise analyses of the individual reaction channels require high statistics, so that the spectrometer must be capable of high data-taking rates in order that such samples can be acquired in a reasonable running time. Finally, the spectrometer must be complemented by a sophisticated off-line analysis package which efficiently finds tracks, recognizes and fits event topologies and correctly associates the available particle identification information. This, together with complicated programs which perform specific analysis tasks such as partial wave analysis, requires a great deal of software effort allied to a very large computing capacity. This paper describes the construction and performance of the LASS spectrometer, which is an attempt to realize the features just discussed. The configuration of the spectrometer corresponds to the data-taking on K + and K - interactions in hydrogen at 11 GeV/c which took place in 1981 and 1982. This constitutes a major upgrade of the configuration used to acquire lower statistics data on 11 GeV/c K - p interactions during 1977 and 1978, which is also described briefly

  19. The LASS (Larger Aperture Superconducting Solenoid) spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Barnett, B.; Bienz, T.; Bierce, R.; Bird, F.; Bird, L.; Blockus, D.; Carnegie, R.K.; Chien, C.Y.

    1986-04-01

    LASS is the acronym for the Large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid spectrometer which is located in an rf-separated hadron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This spectrometer was constructed in order to perform high statistics studies of multiparticle final states produced in hadron reactions. Such reactions are frequently characterized by events having complicated topologies and/or relatively high particle multiplicity. Their detailed study requires a spectrometer which can provide good resolution in momentum and position over almost the entire solid angle subtended by the production point. In addition, good final state particle identification must be available so that separation of the many kinematically-overlapping final states can be achieved. Precise analyses of the individual reaction channels require high statistics, so that the spectrometer must be capable of high data-taking rates in order that such samples can be acquired in a reasonable running time. Finally, the spectrometer must be complemented by a sophisticated off-line analysis package which efficiently finds tracks, recognizes and fits event topologies and correctly associates the available particle identification information. This, together with complicated programs which perform specific analysis tasks such as partial wave analysis, requires a great deal of software effort allied to a very large computing capacity. This paper describes the construction and performance of the LASS spectrometer, which is an attempt to realize the features just discussed. The configuration of the spectrometer corresponds to the data-taking on K and K interactions in hydrogen at 11 GeV/c which took place in 1981 and 1982. This constitutes a major upgrade of the configuration used to acquire lower statistics data on 11 GeV/c K p interactions during 1977 and 1978, which is also described briefly.

  20. Magnetization reversal of a Nd-Cu-infiltrated Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet observed with small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kotaro; Ono, Kanta; Ueno, Tetsuro; Yano, Masao; Shoji, Tetsuya; Sakuma, Noritsugu; Manabe, Akira; Kato, Akira; Harada, Masashi; Keiderling, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    The magnetization reversal process of Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnets infiltrated with Nd-Cu alloy was examined using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The magnetic-field dependence of SANS intensity revealed a qualitative difference between Nd-Cu-infiltrated samples and as-deformed samples. Insufficient magnetic isolation along the direction perpendicular to the nominal c-axis is expected from comparable SANS intensities for different ranges of q values along this direction. For small q values near the coercivity field, Nd-Cu-infiltrated samples show a noticeable reduction in SANS intensity along the nominal c-axis, which is parallel to the external magnetic field. This indicates less spatial fluctuation of magnetic moments in Nd-Cu-infiltrated samples, owing to magnetically isolated Nd 2 Fe 14 B grains

  1. Magnetization reversal of a Nd-Cu-infiltrated Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet observed with small-angle neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Kotaro, E-mail: kotaro.saito@kek.jp; Ono, Kanta [Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, 305-0803 Tsukuba (Japan); Ueno, Tetsuro [Elements Strategy Initiative Center for Magnetic Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, 305-0047 Tsukuba (Japan); Yano, Masao; Shoji, Tetsuya; Sakuma, Noritsugu; Manabe, Akira; Kato, Akira [Toyota Motor Corporation, Toyota, Aichi 471-8571 (Japan); Harada, Masashi [Toyota Central R and D Labs, Inc., Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Keiderling, Uwe [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien and Energie, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-05-07

    The magnetization reversal process of Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnets infiltrated with Nd-Cu alloy was examined using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The magnetic-field dependence of SANS intensity revealed a qualitative difference between Nd-Cu-infiltrated samples and as-deformed samples. Insufficient magnetic isolation along the direction perpendicular to the nominal c-axis is expected from comparable SANS intensities for different ranges of q values along this direction. For small q values near the coercivity field, Nd-Cu-infiltrated samples show a noticeable reduction in SANS intensity along the nominal c-axis, which is parallel to the external magnetic field. This indicates less spatial fluctuation of magnetic moments in Nd-Cu-infiltrated samples, owing to magnetically isolated Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains.

  2. Structure of magnetic particles studied by small angle neutron scattering. [Magnetic colloid particles in stable liquid dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebula, D J; Charles, S W; Popplewell, J

    1981-03-01

    The purpose of this note is to show how the use of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) can provide fundamental information on the structure of magnetic colloid particles in stable liquid dispersion. A more detailed account elaborating the use of the technique to provide fundamental information on interactions will appear later. This contribution contains some principal results on particle structure. The technique of SANS provides a very sensitive means of measuring particle size by measuring the scattered neutron intensity, I(Q), as a function of scattered wave vector, Q.

  3. Characteristics and Geoeffectiveness of Small-scale Magnetic Flux Ropes in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong Joon; Park, Kyung Sun; Lee, Dae-Young; Choi, Cheong-Rim; Kim, Rok Soon; Cho, Kyungsuk; Choi, Kyu-Cheol; Kim, Jaehun

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic flux ropes, often observed during intervals of interplanetary coronal mass ejections, have long been recognized to be critical in space weather. In this work, we focus on magnetic flux rope structure but on a much smaller scale, and not necessarily related to interplanetary coronal mass ejections. Using near-Earth solar wind advanced composition explorer (ACE) observations from 1998 to 2016, we identified a total of 309 small-scale magnetic flux ropes (SMFRs). We compared the characteristics of identified SMFR events with those of normal magnetic cloud (MC) events available from the existing literature. First, most of the MCs and SMFRs have similar values of accompanying solar wind speed and proton densities. However, the average magnetic field intensity of SMFRs is weaker ( 7.4 nT) than that of MCs ( 10.6 nT). Also, the average duration time and expansion speed of SMFRs are 2.5 hr and 2.6 km/s, respectively, both of which are smaller by a factor of 10 than those of MCs. In addition, we examined the geoeffectiveness of SMFR events by checking their correlation with magnetic storms and substorms. Based on the criteria Sym-H database than used in previous studies, all these previously known features are now firmly confirmed by the current work. Accordingly, the results emphasize the significance of SMFRs from the viewpoint of possible triggering of substorms.

  4. Magnetism, structure and chemical order in small CoPd clusters: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb, E-mail: Junais.Mokkath@kaust.edu.sa

    2014-01-15

    The structural, electronic and magnetic properties of small Co{sub m}Pd{sub n}(N=m+n=8,m=0−N) nanoalloy clusters are studied in the framework of a generalized-gradient approximation to density-functional theory. The optimized cluster structures have a clear tendency to maximize the number of nearest-neighbor CoCo pairs. The magnetic order is found to be ferromagnetic-like (FM) for all the ground-state structures. Antiferromagnetic-like spin arrangements were found in some low-lying isomers. The average magnetic moment per atom μ{sup ¯}{sub N} increases approximately linearly with Co content. A remarkable enhancement of the local Co moments is observed as a result of Pd doping. This is a consequence of the increase in the number of Co d holes, due to CoPd charge transfer, combined with the reduced local coordination. The influence of spin–orbit interactions on the cluster properties is also discussed. - Highlights: • This work analyses the structural and magnetic properties of CoPd nanoclusters. • The magnetic order is found to be ferromagnetic-like for all the ground-state structures. • The average magnetic moment per atom increases approximately linearly with Co content. • The influence of spin–orbit interactions on the cluster properties is discussed.

  5. Current leads for superconducting solenoids in a transportable Dewar flask for currents up to 1kA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirshov, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    A simple design of the current lead for currents up to 1 kA into a transportable helium dewar with 22 mm neck diameter is described. The lead characteristics have been studied at various conditions. Examples of pulse superconducting solenoid usage, parmitting to achieve the magnetic field up to 3.3 T are given. The 1% field homogeneity has been obtained on a length of 90 mm [ru

  6. Structural analysis of a superconducting central solenoid for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, T.G.; Heim, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) concept design uses superconducting coils to accomplish magnetic confinement. The central solenoid (CS) magnet is divided vertically into 8 equal segments which are powered independently. The eddy current heating from the pulsed operation is too high for a case type construction; therefore, a open-quotes no caseclose quotes design has been chosen. This open-quotes no caseclose quotes design uses the conductor conduit as the primary structure and the electrical insulation as a structural adhesive. This electrical insulation is the open-quotes weak linkclose quotes in the coil winding pack structure and needs to be modeled in detail. A global finite element model with smeared winding pack properties was used to study the CS magnet structural behavior. The structural analysis results and peak stresses will be presented

  7. A 4.7 tesla metre solenoid for a partial Siberian snake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratner, L.; Leonhardt, W.; Otter, A.; Ellstrom, L.

    1993-11-01

    We describe the engineering design of a 4.7 T-m solenoid magnet which will be installed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS for a partial Siberian Snake Experiment which is an interlaboratory collaboration. The magnet has an overall length of 2.5 m, a clear bore of 15 cm and operates at a peak field of 2 T. It is pulsed at 3 second intervals with a peak current of 9500 A dc driven from a 150 V power supply. The construction uses conventional hollow copper coils but the return flux yokes are made from 1/8 inch plates bolted together. On assembly the flux yokes and endplates are clamped tightly to the coil to prevent any movement during the current pulse. The fabrication experience and test data will be presented. The magnet was installed in the summer of 1993. (author). 3 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  8. A 4.7 tesla metre solenoid for a partial Siberian snake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratner, L; Leonhardt, W [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Otter, A; Ellstrom, L

    1993-11-01

    We describe the engineering design of a 4.7 T-m solenoid magnet which will be installed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS for a partial Siberian Snake Experiment which is an interlaboratory collaboration. The magnet has an overall length of 2.5 m, a clear bore of 15 cm and operates at a peak field of 2 T. It is pulsed at 3 second intervals with a peak current of 9500 A dc driven from a 150 V power supply. The construction uses conventional hollow copper coils but the return flux yokes are made from 1/8 inch plates bolted together. On assembly the flux yokes and endplates are clamped tightly to the coil to prevent any movement during the current pulse. The fabrication experience and test data will be presented. The magnet was installed in the summer of 1993. (author). 3 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  9. Investigation of coercivity mechanism in hot deformed Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets by small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, M.; Manabe, A.; Shoji, T.; Kato, A.; Ono, K.; Harada, M.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic reversal behaviors of single domain sized Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets, with and without isolation between the Nd 2 Fe 14 B grains, was clarified using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The SANS patterns obtained arose from changes in the magnetic domains and were analyzed using the Teubner–Stray model, a phenomenological correlation length model, to quantify the periodicity and morphology of the magnetic domains. The results indicated that the magnetic reversal evolved with the magnetic domains that had similar sized grains. The grain isolation enabled us to realize the reversals of single domains

  10. Structure requirements for magnetic energy storage devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyssa, Y.M.; Huang, X.

    1993-01-01

    Large variety of large and small magnetic energy storage systems have been designed and analyzed in the last 20 years. Cryoresistive and superconductive energy storage (SMES) magnets have been considered for applications such as load leveling for electric utilities, pulsed storage for electromagnetic launchers and accelerator devices, and space borne superconductive energy storage systems. Large SMES are supported by a combination of cold and warm structure while small SMES are supported only by cold structure. In this article we provide analytical and numerical tools to estimate the structure requirements as function of the stored energy and configuration. Large and small solenoidal and toroidal geometries are used. Considerations for both warm and cold structure are discussed. Latest design concepts for both large and small units are included. (orig.)

  11. The Role of Quench-back in the Passive Quench Protection of Long Solenoids with Coil Sub-division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Guo, XingLong; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes how a passive quench protection system can be applied to long superconducting solenoid magnets. When a solenoid coil is long compared to its thickness, the magnet quench process will be dominated by the time needed for uench propagation along the magnet length. Quench-back will permit a long magnet to quench more rapidly in a passive way. Quenchback from a conductive (low resistivity) mandrel is essential for spreading the quench along the length of a magnet. The andrel must be inductively coupled to the magnet circuit that is being quenched. Current induced in the mandrel by di/dt in the magnet produces heat in the mandrel, which in turn causes the superconducting coil wound on the mandrel to quench. Sub-divisions often employed to reduce the voltages to ground within the coil. This paper explores when it is possible for quench-back to be employed for passive quench protection. The role of sub-division of the coil is discussed for long magnets.

  12. Diffusion of test particles in stochastic magnetic fields for small Kubo numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuer, Marcus; Spatschek, Karl H.

    2006-01-01

    Motion of charged particles in a collisional plasma with stochastic magnetic field lines is investigated on the basis of the so-called A-Langevin equation. Compared to the previously used V-Langevin model, here finite Larmor radius effects are taken into account. The A-Langevin equation is solved under the assumption that the Lagrangian correlation function for the magnetic field fluctuations is related to the Eulerian correlation function (in Gaussian form) via the Corrsin approximation. The latter is justified for small Kubo numbers. The velocity correlation function, being averaged with respect to the stochastic variables including collisions, leads to an implicit differential equation for the mean square displacement. From the latter, different transport regimes, including the well-known Rechester-Rosenbluth diffusion coefficient, are derived. Finite Larmor radius contributions show a decrease of the diffusion coefficient compared to the guiding center limit. The case of small (or vanishing) mean fields is also discussed

  13. Experimental study of a laser-heated solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, H.L.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the interaction of an intense CO 2 laser beam with a column of initially uv-ionized hydrogen immersed in a steady magnetic field of up to 100 kG. Under the intense laser radiation, the gas becomes ionized and heated to temperatures as high as 150 eV (1.6 x 10 6 0 K). The primary purpose of the investigation was to determine the properties of the dense, hot plasma formed in this manner. Time and space resolved measurements of the plasma electron density were made using holographic interferometry along the axis and Mach--Zehnder interferometry across the column. The temperature was determined by measuring the decay rate of a line from CV in the quartz uv. These measurements were supplemented by streak photography to provide data on the development of the luminosity of the plasma column, radially and axially, as a function of time. From these various diagnostic techniques, it was possible to determine that a density minimum is formed on-axis within a few tens of nanoseconds after initiation of the laser pulse. This effectively produces a light pipe which traps the beam, and suggests that long columns can be formed by laser irradiation. The beam energy was efficiently absorbed and plasma loss rates appeared to be those expected from classical MHD modelling. While a completely unambiguous answer as to the mode of laser discharge propagation occurring in the experiment was not obtained, the bulk of the evidence suggests a ''bleaching wave'' rather than a laser driven detonator. In summary, the experiment was successful in demonstrating the creation of dense, slender columns by laser breakdown, in support of the ''laser-heated solenoid'' fusion concept

  14. Experimental investigation of a small-sized betatron with superposed magnetization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kas'yanov, V.A.; Rychkov, M.V.; Filimonov, A.A.; Furman, Eh.G.; Chakhlov, V.L.; Chertov, A.S.; Shtejn, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to study possibilities of small-sized betatrons (SSB) with direct current superposed magnetization (DSM). It is shown that DSM permits to decrease the SSB weight and cost of the electromagnet and capacitor storage and to shape the prolonged beam dump. It is noted that the DSM realization has the most expediency in SSB operating in a short-time mode [ru

  15. A Magnetic Set-Up to Help Teach Newton's Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panijpan, Bhinyo; Sujarittham, Thanida; Arayathanitkul, Kwan; Tanamatayarat, Jintawat; Nopparatjamjomras, Suchai

    2009-01-01

    A set-up comprising a magnetic disc, a solenoid and a mechanical balance was used to teach first-year physics students Newton's third law with the help of a free body diagram. The image of a floating magnet immobilized by the solenoid's repulsive force should help dispel a common misconception of students as regards the first law: that stationary…

  16. Small amplitude two dimensional electrostatic excitations in a magnetized dusty plasma with q-distributed electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahab Ullah; Adnan, Muhammad; Qamar, Anisa; Mahmood, Shahzad

    2016-07-01

    The propagation of linear and nonlinear electrostatic waves is investigated in magnetized dusty plasma with stationary negatively or positively charged dust, cold mobile ions and non-extensive electrons. Two normal modes are predicted in the linear regime, whose characteristics are investigated parametrically, focusing on the effect of electrons non-extensivity, dust charge polarity, concentration of dust and magnetic field strength. Using the reductive perturbation technique, a Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) type equation is derived which governs the dynamics of small-amplitude solitary waves in magnetized dusty plasma. The properties of the solitary wave structures are analyzed numerically with the system parameters i.e. electrons non-extensivity, concentration of dust, polarity of dust and magnetic field strength. Following Allen and Rowlands (J. Plasma Phys. 53:63, 1995), we have shown that the pulse soliton solution of the ZK equation is unstable, and have analytically traced the dependence of the instability growth rate on the nonextensive parameter q for electrons, dust charge polarity and magnetic field strength. The results should be useful for understanding the nonlinear propagation of DIA solitary waves in laboratory and space plasmas.

  17. SU-D-304-02: Magnetically Focused Proton Irradiation of Small Field Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAuley, GA; Slater, JM; Slater, JD; Wroe, AJ

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of magnetic focusing for small field proton irradiations. It is hypothesized that magnetic focusing will provide significant dose distribution benefits over standard collimated beams for fields less than 10 mm diameter. Methods: Magnets consisting of 24 segments of radiation hard samarium-cobalt adhered into hollow cylinders were designed and manufactured. Two focusing magnets were placed on a positioning track on our Gantry 1 treatment table. Proton beams with energies of 127 and 157 MeV, 15 and 30 mm modulation, and 8 mm initial diameters were delivered to a water tank using single-stage scattering. Depth dose distributions were measured using a PTW PR60020 diode detector and transverse profiles were measured with Gafchromic EBT3 film. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed - both for comparison with experimental data and to further explore the potential of magnetic focusing in silica. For example, beam spot areas (based on the 90% dose contour) were matched at Bragg depth between simulated 100 MeV collimated beams and simulated beams focused by two 400 T/m gradient magnets. Results: Preliminary experimental results show 23% higher peak to entrance dose ratios and flatter spread out Bragg peak plateaus for 8 mm focused beams compared with uncollimated beams. Monte Carlo simulations showed 21% larger peak to entrance ratios and a ∼9 fold more efficient dose to target delivery compared to spot-sized matched collimated beams. Our latest results will be presented. Conclusion: Our results suggest that rare earth focusing magnet assemblies could reduce skin dose and beam number while delivering dose to nominally spherical radiosurgery targets over a much shorter time compared to unfocused beams. Immediate clinical applications include those associated with proton radiosurgery and functional radiosurgery of the brain and spine, however expanded treatment sites can be also envisaged

  18. SU-D-304-02: Magnetically Focused Proton Irradiation of Small Field Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAuley, GA; Slater, JM [Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Slater, JD; Wroe, AJ [Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of magnetic focusing for small field proton irradiations. It is hypothesized that magnetic focusing will provide significant dose distribution benefits over standard collimated beams for fields less than 10 mm diameter. Methods: Magnets consisting of 24 segments of radiation hard samarium-cobalt adhered into hollow cylinders were designed and manufactured. Two focusing magnets were placed on a positioning track on our Gantry 1 treatment table. Proton beams with energies of 127 and 157 MeV, 15 and 30 mm modulation, and 8 mm initial diameters were delivered to a water tank using single-stage scattering. Depth dose distributions were measured using a PTW PR60020 diode detector and transverse profiles were measured with Gafchromic EBT3 film. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed - both for comparison with experimental data and to further explore the potential of magnetic focusing in silica. For example, beam spot areas (based on the 90% dose contour) were matched at Bragg depth between simulated 100 MeV collimated beams and simulated beams focused by two 400 T/m gradient magnets. Results: Preliminary experimental results show 23% higher peak to entrance dose ratios and flatter spread out Bragg peak plateaus for 8 mm focused beams compared with uncollimated beams. Monte Carlo simulations showed 21% larger peak to entrance ratios and a ∼9 fold more efficient dose to target delivery compared to spot-sized matched collimated beams. Our latest results will be presented. Conclusion: Our results suggest that rare earth focusing magnet assemblies could reduce skin dose and beam number while delivering dose to nominally spherical radiosurgery targets over a much shorter time compared to unfocused beams. Immediate clinical applications include those associated with proton radiosurgery and functional radiosurgery of the brain and spine, however expanded treatment sites can be also envisaged.

  19. Non-Solenoidal Startup Research Directions on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonck, R. J.; Bongard, M. W.; Lewicki, B. T.; Reusch, J. A.; Winz, G. R.

    2017-10-01

    The Pegasus research program has been focused on developing a physical understanding and predictive models for non-solenoidal tokamak plasma startup using Local Helicity Injection (LHI). LHI employs strong localized electron currents injected along magnetic field lines in the plasma edge that relax through magnetic turbulence to form a tokamak-like plasma. Pending approval, the Pegasus program will address a broader, more comprehensive examination of non-solenoidal tokamak startup techniques. New capabilities may include: increasing the toroidal field to 0.6 T to support critical scaling tests to near-NSTX-U field levels; deploying internal plasma diagnostics; installing a coaxial helicity injection (CHI) capability in the upper divertor region; and deploying a modest (200-400 kW) electron cyclotron RF capability. These efforts will address scaling of relevant physics to higher BT, separate and comparative studies of helicity injection techniques, efficiency of handoff to consequent current sustainment techniques, and the use of ECH to synergistically improve the target plasma for consequent bootstrap and neutral beam current drive sustainment. This has an ultimate goal of validating techniques to produce a 1 MA target plasma in NSTX-U and beyond. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  20. Effects of structure parameters on the static electromagnetic characteristics of solenoid valve for an electronic unit pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zuo-Yu; Li, Guo-Xiu; Wang, Lan; Wang, Wei-Hong; Gao, Qing-Xiu; Wang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The static electromagnetic characteristics of solenoid valve were numerically studied. • The effects of driving current were considered. • The effects of solenoid valve’s eight essential structure parameters were considered. - Abstract: In the present paper, the effects of driving current and solenoid valve’s structure parameters (including iron-core’s length, magnetic pole’s cross-sectional area, coil turn, coil’s position, armature’s thickness, damping hole’s position, damping hole’s size, and width of working air–gap) on the static electromagnetic characteristics have been numerically investigated. From the results, it can be known that the electromagnetic energy conversion will be seriously influenced by driving current for its effects on magnetic field strength and magnetic saturation phenomenon, an excessive increase of current will weak electromagnetic energy conversion for the accelerating power losses. The capacity of electromagnetic energy conversion is also relative to each solenoid valve’s parameter albeit it is not very sensitive to each parameters. The generated electromagnetic force will be enhanced by rising iron-core’s length, equalizing the cross-sectional areas of major and vice poles, increasing coil turn within a moderate range, closing the coil’s position towards armature’s centre, enlarging armature’s thickness, pushing the damping holes’ positions away from armature’s centre, reducing the sizes of damping holes, and reducing the width of working air–gap; but such enhancements won’t be realized once the driving current is excessively higher.

  1. [Microsurgery assisted by intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and neuronavigation for small lesions in deep brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhi-jun; Chen, Xiao-lei; Xu, Bai-nan; Sun, Zheng-hui; Sun, Guo-chen; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Fei; Wang, Yu-bo; Zhou, Ding-biao

    2012-01-03

    To explore the practicability of resecting small lesions in deep brain by intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) and neuronavigator-assisted microsurgery and its clinical efficacies. A total of 42 cases with small lesions in deep brain underwent intraoperative MRI and neuronavigator-assisted microsurgery. The drifting of neuronavigation was corrected by images acquired from intraoperative MR rescanning. All lesions were successfully identified and 40 cases totally removed without mortality. Only 3 cases developed new neurological deficits post-operatively while 2 of them returned to normal neurological functions after a follow-up duration of 3 months to 2 years. The application of intraoperative MRI can effectively correct the drifting of neuronavigation and enhance the accuracy of microsurgical neuronavigation for small lesions in deep brain.

  2. Silicon subsystem mechanical engineering work for the solenoidal detector collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.O.; Barney, M.; Byrd, D.; Christensen, R.W.; Dransfield, G.; Elder, M.; Gamble, M.; Crastataro, C.; Hanlon, J.; Jones, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    The silicon tracking system (STS) for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) represented an order of magnitude increase in size over any silicon system that had been previously built or even planned. In order to meet its performance requirements, it could not simply be a linear scaling of earlier systems, but instead required completely new concepts. The small size of the early systems made it possible to simply move the support hardware and services largely outside the active volume of the system. For a system five meters long, that simply is not an option. The design of the STS for the SDC experiment was the result of numerous compromises between the capabilities required to do the physics and the limitations imposed by cost, material properties, and silicon strip detector characteristics. From the point of view of the physics, the silicon system should start as close to the interaction point as possible. In addition, the detectors should measure the position of particles passing through them with no errors, and should not deflect or interact with the particles in any way. However, cost, radiation damage, and other factors limiting detector performance dictated, other, more realistic values. Radiation damage limited the inner radius of the silicon detectors to about 9 cm, whereas cost limited the outer radius of the detectors to about 50 cm. Cost also limits the half length of the system to about 250 cm. To control the effects of radiation damage on the detectors required operating the system at a temperature of 0 degrees C or below, and maintaining that temperature throughout life of the system. To summarize, the physics and properties of the silicon strip detectors requires that the detectors be operated at or below 0 degrees C, be positioned very accurately during assembly and remain positionally stable throughout their operation, and that all materials used be radiation hard and have a large thickness for one radiation length

  3. Silicon subsystem mechanical engineering work for the solenoidal detector collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.O.; Barney, M.; Byrd, D.; Christensen, R.W.; Dransfield, G.; Elder, M.; Gamble, M.; Crastataro, C.; Hanlon, J.; Jones, D.C. [and others

    1995-02-01

    The silicon tracking system (STS) for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) represented an order of magnitude increase in size over any silicon system that had been previously built or even planned. In order to meet its performance requirements, it could not simply be a linear scaling of earlier systems, but instead required completely new concepts. The small size of the early systems made it possible to simply move the support hardware and services largely outside the active volume of the system. For a system five meters long, that simply is not an option. The design of the STS for the SDC experiment was the result of numerous compromises between the capabilities required to do the physics and the limitations imposed by cost, material properties, and silicon strip detector characteristics. From the point of view of the physics, the silicon system should start as close to the interaction point as possible. In addition, the detectors should measure the position of particles passing through them with no errors, and should not deflect or interact with the particles in any way. However, cost, radiation damage, and other factors limiting detector performance dictated, other, more realistic values. Radiation damage limited the inner radius of the silicon detectors to about 9 cm, whereas cost limited the outer radius of the detectors to about 50 cm. Cost also limits the half length of the system to about 250 cm. To control the effects of radiation damage on the detectors required operating the system at a temperature of 0{degrees}C or below, and maintaining that temperature throughout life of the system. To summarize, the physics and properties of the silicon strip detectors requires that the detectors be operated at or below 0{degrees}C, be positioned very accurately during assembly and remain positionally stable throughout their operation, and that all materials used be radiation hard and have a large thickness for one radiation length.

  4. Dispersion in a bent-solenoid channel with symmetric focusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chun-xi [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2001-08-21

    Longitudinal ionization cooling of a muon beam is essential for muon colliders and will be useful for neutrino factories. Bent-solenoid channels with symmetric focusing has been considered for beam focusing and for generating the required dispersion in the ``emittance exchange'' scheme of longitudinal cooling. In this paper, we derive the Hamiltonian that governs the linear beam dynamics of a bent-solenoid channel, solve the single-particle dynamics, and give equations for determining the lattice functions, in particular, the dispersion functions.

  5. Operating experience feedback report - Solenoid-operated valve problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornstein, H.L.

    1991-02-01

    This report highlights significant operating events involving observed or potential common-mode failures of solenoid-operated valves (SOVs) in US plants. These events resulted in degradation or malfunction of multiple trains of safety systems as well as of multiple safety systems. On the basis of the evaluation of these events, the Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concludes that the problems with solenoid-operated valves are an important issue that needs additional NRC and industry attention. This report also provides AEOD's recommendations for actions to reduce the occurrence of SOV common-mode failures. 115 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  6. The Compact Muon Solenoid Heavy Ion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yepes, Pablo

    2005-01-01

    The Pb-Pb center of mass energy at the LHC will exceed that of Au-Au collisions at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) by nearly a factor of 30, providing exciting opportunities for addressing unique physics issues in a completely new energy domain. The interest of the Heavy Ion (HI) Physics at LHC is discussed in more detail in the LHC-USA white paper and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Heavy Ion proposal. A few highlights are presented in this document. Heavy ion collisions at LHC energies will explore regions of energy and particle density significantly beyond those reachable at RHIC. The energy density of the thermalized matter created at the LHC is estimated to be 20 times higher than at RHIC, implying an initial temperature, which is greater than at RHIC by more than a factor of two. The higher density of produced partons also allows a faster thermalization. As a consequence, the ratio of the quark-gluon plasma lifetime to the thermalization time increases by a factor of 10 over RHIC. Thus the hot, dense systems created in HI collisions at the LHC spend most of the time in a purely partonic state. The longer lifetime of the quark-gluon plasma state widens significantly the time window available to probe it experimentally. RHIC experiments have reported evidence for jet production in HI collisions and for suppression of high p T particle production. Those results open a new field of exploration of hot and dense nuclear matter. Even though RHIC has already broken ground, the production rates for jets with p T > 30 GeV are several orders of magnitude larger at the LHC than at RHIC, allowing for systematic studies with high statistics in a clean kinematic region. High p T quark and gluon jets can be used to study the hot hadronic medium produced in HI interactions. The larger Q 2 causes jets to materialize very soon after the collision. They are thus embedded in and propagate through the dense environment as it forms and evolves. Through their interactions

  7. High-frequency Oscillations in Small Magnetic Elements Observed with Sunrise/SuFI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafarzadeh, S.; Solanki, S. K.; Cameron, R. H.; Danilovic, S.; Stangalini, M.; Steiner, O.

    2017-01-01

    We characterize waves in small magnetic elements and investigate their propagation in the lower solar atmosphere from observations at high spatial and temporal resolution. We use the wavelet transform to analyze oscillations of both horizontal displacement and intensity in magnetic bright points found in the 300 nm and the Ca ii H 396.8 nm passbands of the filter imager on board the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. Phase differences between the oscillations at the two atmospheric layers corresponding to the two passbands reveal upward propagating waves at high frequencies (up to 30 mHz). Weak signatures of standing as well as downward propagating waves are also obtained. Both compressible and incompressible (kink) waves are found in the small-scale magnetic features. The two types of waves have different, though overlapping, period distributions. Two independent estimates give a height difference of approximately 450 ± 100 km between the two atmospheric layers sampled by the employed spectral bands. This value, together with the determined short travel times of the transverse and longitudinal waves provide us with phase speeds of 29 ± 2 km s −1 and 31 ± 2 km s −1 , respectively. We speculate that these phase speeds may not reflect the true propagation speeds of the waves. Thus, effects such as the refraction of fast longitudinal waves may contribute to an overestimate of the phase speed.

  8. Thermal analysis of the cold mass of the 2T solenoid for the PANDA detector at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Rolando, G; Dudarev, A; Pais Da Silva, H; Vodopyanov, A; Schmitt, L

    2015-01-01

    The superconducting solenoid of the PANDA experiment at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt (Germany) is designed to provide a magnetic field of 2 T over a length of about 4 m in a bore of 1.9 m. To allow a warm target feed pipe oriented transversely to the solenoid axis and penetrating through the cryostat and solenoid cold mass, the magnet is split into 3 inter-connected coils fitted in a common support cylinder. During normal operation, cooling of the cold mass to the working temperature of 4.5 K will be achieved through the circulation by natural convection of two-phase helium in cooling pipes attached to the Al-alloy support cylinder. Pure aluminium strips acting as heat drains and glued to the inner surface of the three coils and thermally bonded to the cooling pipes allow minimizing the temperature gradient across the 6-layers coils. In this paper the thermal design of the cold mass during normal operation and current ramps up and down is validated using an analytical appro...

  9. Persistent detwinning of EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} by small magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiwald, Jannis; Stingl, Christian; Bach, Nora; Jeevan, H.S.; Gegenwart, Philipp [Experimentalphysik VI, Universitaet Augsburg (Germany); Zapf, Sina; Jiang, Shuai; Neubauer, David; Loehle, Anja; Clauss, Conrad; Dressel, Martin [1. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Post, Kirk; Basov, Dimitri [Department of Physics, UC San Diego (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The formation of twin domains in the orthorhombic phase of high-temperature superconductors is impeding the investigation of the in-plane anisotropy of these materials. Recently, we have shown how the brief application of a small magnetic field of ∝ 1 Tesla in the EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} iron pnictide leads to a substantial detwinning of the system, which is persistent up to the structural transition at ∝ 190 K even after the magnetic field has been switched off. This offers researchers the opportunity to investigate the detwinned iron arsenide without the application of any external symmetry breaking force, like the pressure of a mechanical clamp, or a magnetic field present during measurement. We will present angular dependent magnetoresistance, magnetostriction, thermal expansion and thermoelectric power measurements on the EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} parent compound as well as on various doped variants in order to shed further light on the mechanism behind the field induced detwinning, i.e. the interplay of the involved magnetic moments stemming form the Eu and Fe atoms in these compounds.

  10. Magnetic properties of atmospheric PMx in a small settlement during heating and non-heating season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovsky, E.; Kotlik, B.; Zboril, R.; Kapicka, A.; Grison, H.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic properties of environmental samples can serve as fast and relatively cheap proxy method to investigate occurrence of iron oxides. These methods are very sensitive in detecting strongly magnetic compounds such as magnetite and maghemite and can reveal concentration and assess grain-size distribution of these minerals. This information can be significant in estimating e.g. the source of pollutants, monitoring pollution load, or investigating seasonal and climatic effects. We studied magnetic properties of PM1, PM2.5 and PM10, collected over 32-48 hours in a small settlement in south Bohemia during heating and non-heating season. The site is rather remote, with negligible traffic and industrial contributions to air pollution. Thus, the suggested seasonal effect should be dominantly due to local (domestic) heating, burning wood or coal. In our contribution we show typical differences in PMx concentration, which is much higher in the winter (heating) sample, accompanied by SEM analyses and magnetic data oriented on concentration and grain-size distribution of magnetite/maghemite particles. While concentration of Fe-oxides does not vary that much, significant seasonal differences were observed in composition and grain-size distribution, reflecting different sources of the dust particles.

  11. Fabrication of 3D solenoid microcoils in silica glass by femtosecond laser wet etch and microsolidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangwei; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Shan, Chao; Liu, Keyin; Li, Yanyang; Bian, Hao; Du, Guangqing; Hou, Xun

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports a flexible fabrication method for 3D solenoid microcoils in silica glass. The method consists of femtosecond laser wet etching (FLWE) and microsolidics process. The 3D microchannel with high aspect ratio is fabricated by an improved FLWE method. In the microsolidics process, an alloy was chosen as the conductive metal. The microwires are achieved by injecting liquid alloy into the microchannel, and allowing the alloy to cool and solidify. The alloy microwires with high melting point can overcome the limitation of working temperature and improve the electrical property. The geometry, the height and diameter of microcoils were flexibly fabricated by the pre-designed laser writing path, the laser power and etching time. The 3D microcoils can provide uniform magnetic field and be widely integrated in many magnetic microsystems.

  12. In Vitro Capture of Small Ferrous Particles with a Magnetic Filtration Device Designed for Intravascular Use with Intraarterial Chemotherapy: Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabray, Marc C; Lillaney, Prasheel; Sze, Chia-Hung; Losey, Aaron D; Yang, Jeffrey; Kondapavulur, Sravani; Liu, Derek; Saeed, Maythem; Patel, Anand; Cooke, Daniel; Jun, Young-Wook; El-Sayed, Ivan; Wilson, Mark; Hetts, Steven W

    2016-03-01

    To establish that a magnetic device designed for intravascular use can bind small iron particles in physiologic flow models. Uncoated iron oxide particles 50-100 nm and 1-5 µm in size were tested in a water flow chamber over a period of 10 minutes without a magnet (ie, control) and with large and small prototype magnets. These same particles and 1-µm carboxylic acid-coated iron oxide beads were likewise tested in a serum flow chamber model without a magnet (ie, control) and with the small prototype magnet. Particles were successfully captured from solution. Particle concentrations in solution decreased in all experiments (P particles in water with a large magnet), 97% (50-100-nm particles in water with a small magnet), 99% (1-5-µm particles in water with a large magnet), 99% (1-5-µm particles in water with a small magnet), 95% (50-100-nm particles in serum with a small magnet), 92% (1-5-µm particles in serum with a small magnet), and 75% (1-µm coated beads in serum with a small magnet) lower compared with matched control runs. This study demonstrates the concept of magnetic capture of small iron oxide particles in physiologic flow models by using a small wire-mounted magnetic filter designed for intravascular use. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Competition of electron-cyclotron maser and free-electron laser modes with combined solenoidal and longitudinal wiggler fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, A.T.; Lin, C.

    1986-01-01

    A relativistic electron beam with a finite transverse dc momentum (β/sub perpendicular/ = 1/γ 0 ) passing through a region of combined uniform solenoidal and longitudinal wiggler magnetic fields is observed to convert 25% of its kinetic energy into coherent radiation at frequency ω = γ 2 0 (k/sub w/V 0 +Ω/sub c//γ 0 ) if the phase velocity of the generated wave is slightly above the speed of light. In this situation, the bunchings of the slow electron-cyclotron mode and free-electron laser modes with combined solenoidal and longitudinal wiggler fields (lowbitron) are observed to compensate each other, which gives rise to a finite threshold for lowbitron operation. In order to attain high efficiency, the wiggler strength of a lowbitron must substantially exceed the threshold

  14. Demonstration of Focusing Wolter Mirrors for Neutron Phase and Magnetic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S. Hussey

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Image-forming focusing mirrors were employed to demonstrate their applicability to two different modalities of neutron imaging, phase imaging with a far-field interferometer, and magnetic-field imaging through the manipulation of the neutron beam polarization. For the magnetic imaging, the rotation of the neutron polarization in the magnetic field was measured by placing a solenoid at the focus of the mirrors. The beam was polarized upstream of the solenoid, while the spin analyzer was situated between the solenoid and the mirrors. Such a polarized neutron microscope provides a path toward considerably improved spatial resolution in neutron imaging of magnetic materials. For the phase imaging, we show that the focusing mirrors preserve the beam coherence and the path-length differences that give rise to the far-field moiré pattern. We demonstrated that the visibility of the moiré pattern is modified by small angle scattering from a highly porous foam. This experiment demonstrates the feasibility of using Wolter optics to significantly improve the spatial resolution of the far-field interferometer.

  15. Electrically Small Magnetic Dipole Antennas With Quality Factors Approaching the Chu Lower Bound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav; Yaghjian, Arthur D.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the quality factor Q for electrically small current distributions and practical antenna designs radiating the TE10 magnetic dipole field. The current distributions and the antenna designs employ electric currents on a spherical surface enclosing a magneto-dielectric material...... numerically. It is found that for a given antenna size and permittivity there is an optimum permeability that ensures the lowest possible Q, and this optimum permeability is inversely proportional to the square of the antenna electrical radius. When the relative permittivity is equal to 1, the optimum...... permeability yields the quality factor Q that constitutes the lower bound for a magnetic dipole antenna with a magneto-dielectric core. Furthermore, the smaller the antenna the closer its quality factor Q can approach the Chu lower bound. Simulated results for the TE10-mode multiarm spherical helix antenna...

  16. The Effect of Magnetic Field on HTS Leads What Happens when thePower Fails at RAL?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Michael A.

    2007-02-14

    The key to being able to operate the MICE superconducting solenoids on small coolers is the use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) leads between the first stage of the cooler and the magnet, which operates at around 4.2 K. Because MICE magnets are not shielded, all of the MICE magnets have a stray magnetic field in the region where the coolers and the HTS leads are located. The behavior of the HTS leads in a magnetic field depends strongly on the HTS material used for the leads and the temperature of the cooler first stage temperature. The HTS leads can be specified to operate at the maximum current for the magnet. This report shows how the HTS leads can be specified for use the MICE magnets. MICE magnets take from 1.3 hours (the tracker solenoids) to 3.7 hours (the coupling magnet) to charge to the highest projected operating currents. If the power fails, the cooler and the upper ends of the HTS leads warm up. The question is how one can discharge the magnet to protect the HTS leads without quenching the MICE magnets. This report describes a method that one can use to protect the HTS leads in the event of a power failure at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL).

  17. Statistical evolution of quiet-Sun small-scale magnetic features using Sunrise observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusha, L. S.; Solanki, S. K.; Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.

    2017-02-01

    The evolution of small magnetic features in quiet regions of the Sun provides a unique window for probing solar magneto-convection. Here we analyze small-scale magnetic features in the quiet Sun, using the high resolution, seeing-free observations from the Sunrise balloon borne solar observatory. Our aim is to understand the contribution of different physical processes, such as splitting, merging, emergence and cancellation of magnetic fields to the rearrangement, addition and removal of magnetic flux in the photosphere. We have employed a statistical approach for the analysis and the evolution studies are carried out using a feature-tracking technique. In this paper we provide a detailed description of the feature-tracking algorithm that we have newly developed and we present the results of a statistical study of several physical quantities. The results on the fractions of the flux in the emergence, appearance, splitting, merging, disappearance and cancellation qualitatively agrees with other recent studies. To summarize, the total flux gained in unipolar appearance is an order of magnitude larger than the total flux gained in emergence. On the other hand, the bipolar cancellation contributes nearly an equal amount to the loss of magnetic flux as unipolar disappearance. The total flux lost in cancellation is nearly six to eight times larger than the total flux gained in emergence. One big difference between our study and previous similar studies is that, thanks to the higher spatial resolution of Sunrise, we can track features with fluxes as low as 9 × 1014 Mx. This flux is nearly an order of magnitude lower than the smallest fluxes of the features tracked in the highest resolution previous studies based on Hinode data. The area and flux of the magnetic features follow power-law type distribution, while the lifetimes show either power-law or exponential type distribution depending on the exact definitions used to define various birth and death events. We have

  18. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) hadron calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagopian, Vasken

    1999-01-01

    The Hadron Calorimeter of the CMS detector for the CERN LHC accelerator is designed to measure hadron jets as well as single hadrons. It has six segments. The central barrel made of brass and scintillators covers the vertical bar η vertical bar range of about 0 to 1.3. Two End Caps, also made of brass and scintillators extends the vertical bar η vertical bar range to 3.0. Two Forward calorimeters made of iron and quartz fibers cover the range 3.0 to 5.0. Since the barrel portion of the calorimeter is only 6.5 interaction lengths, the outer barrel will sample, by scintillators, outside the magnet coil and cryostat. Progress has been made on all subsystems and prototypes have been built. We now have a better understanding of magnetic field effects on calorimeters

  19. Modeling plasma flow in straight and curved solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boercker, D.B.; Sanders, D.M.; Storer, J.; Falabella, S.

    1991-01-01

    The ''flux-tube'' model originated by Morozov is a very simple and numerically efficient method for simulating ion motion in plasma filters. In order to test its utility as a design tool, we compare the predictions of the model to recent experimental measurements of plasma flow in both straight and curved solenoids

  20. Low-energy nuclear reactions with double-solenoid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The University of Notre Dame, USA (Becchetti et al, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Res. A505, 377 (2003)) and later the University of São Paulo, Brazil (Lichtenthaler et al, Eur. Phys. J. A25, S-01, 733 (2005)) adopted a system based on superconducting solenoids to produce low-energy radioactive nuclear beams. In these systems ...

  1. Design of 9 tesla superconducting solenoid for VECC RIB facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Chiranjib; Ghosh, Siddhartha; Fatma, Tabassum; Dey, Malay Kanti; Bhunia, Uttam; Bandyopadhyay, Arup; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2013-01-01

    An ISOL post-accelerator type of RIB facility is being developed at our centre. The post acceleration scheme of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) followed by five IH LINAC cavities will provide energy of about 1.05 MeV/u. For further accelerating up to 2 MeV/u Superconducting Quarter Wave Resonators (SCQWR) will be used. The radial defocusing of the beam bunch during the acceleration using SCQWRs will be taken care of by a Superconducting Solenoid (SCS) within the same cryostat. In this report the electromagnetic design of an SCS will be discussed. A 9 T SCS having effective length of 340 mm has been designed with the special requirement that the fringing field should fall sharply to a value less than 100 mT at the surfaces of the adjacent superconducting cavities. The designed solenoid comprise of two co-axial split solenoid conductors surrounded by iron shields and a pair of bucking coils. Optimizations have been carried out for the total current sharing of the main coils and the bucking coils as well as for the relative orientation and dimension of each component of the solenoid. (author)

  2. Design of 9 tesla superconducting solenoid for VECC RIB facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Chiranjib; Ghosh, Siddhartha; Fatma, Tabassum; Dey, Malay Kanti; Bhunia, Uttam; Bandyopadhyay, Arup; Chakrabarti, Alok [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata (India)

    2013-07-01

    An ISOL post-accelerator type of RIB facility is being developed at our centre. The post acceleration scheme of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) followed by five IH LINAC cavities will provide energy of about 1.05 MeV/u. For further accelerating up to 2 MeV/u Superconducting Quarter Wave Resonators (SCQWR) will be used. The radial defocusing of the beam bunch during the acceleration using SCQWRs will be taken care of by a Superconducting Solenoid (SCS) within the same cryostat. In this report the electromagnetic design of an SCS will be discussed. A 9 T SCS having effective length of 340 mm has been designed with the special requirement that the fringing field should fall sharply to a value less than 100 mT at the surfaces of the adjacent superconducting cavities. The designed solenoid comprise of two co-axial split solenoid conductors surrounded by iron shields and a pair of bucking coils. Optimizations have been carried out for the total current sharing of the main coils and the bucking coils as well as for the relative orientation and dimension of each component of the solenoid. (author)

  3. A small scale remote cooling system for a superconducting cyclotron magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, F.; Berkowitz Zamorra, D.; Michels, M.; Gomez Bosch, R.; Schmid, J.; Striebel, A.; Krueger, A.; Diez, M.; Jakob, M.; Keh, M.; Herberger, W.; Oesterle, D.

    2017-02-01

    Through a technology transfer program CERN is involved in the R&D of a compact superconducting cyclotron for future clinical radioisotope production, a project led by the Spanish research institute CIEMAT. For the remote cooling of the LTc superconducting magnet operating at 4.5 K, CERN has designed a small scale refrigeration system, the Cryogenic Supply System (CSS). This refrigeration system consists of a commercial two-stage 1.5 W @ 4.2 K GM cryocooler and a separate forced flow circuit. The forced flow circuit extracts the cooling power of the first and the second stage cold tips, respectively. Both units are installed in a common vacuum vessel and, at the final configuration, a low loss transfer line will provide the link to the magnet cryostat for the cooling of the thermal shield with helium at 40 K and the two superconducting coils with two-phase helium at 4.5 K. Currently the CSS is in the testing phase at CERN in stand-alone mode without the magnet and the transfer line. We have added a “validation unit” housed in the vacuum vessel of the CSS representing the thermo-hydraulic part of the cyclotron magnet. It is equipped with electrical heaters which allow the simulation of the thermal loads of the magnet cryostat. A cooling power of 1.4 W at 4.5 K and 25 W at the thermal shield temperature level has been measured. The data produced confirm the design principle of the CSS which could be validated.

  4. Static and quasi-elastic small angle neutron scattering on biocompatible ionic ferrofluids: magnetic and hydrodynamic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Gazeau, F; Dubois, E; Perzynski, R

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the structure and dynamics of ionic magnetic fluids (MFs), based on ferrite nanoparticles, dispersed at pH approx 7 either in H sub 2 O or in D sub 2 O. Polarized and non-polarized static small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments in zero magnetic field allow us to study both the magnetic and the nuclear contributions to the neutron scattering. The magnetic interparticle attraction is probed separately from the global thermodynamic repulsion and compares well to direct magnetic susceptibility measurements. The magnetic interparticle correlation is in these fluid samples independent of the probed spatial scale. In contrast, a spatial dependence of the interparticle correlation is evidenced at large PHI by the nuclear structure factor. A model of magnetic interaction quantitatively explains the under-field anisotropy of the SANS nuclear contribution. In a quasi-elastic neutron spin-echo experiment, we probe the Brownian dynamics of translation of the nanoparticles in the range 1.3 sup<=...

  5. The Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider The Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Delepine

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider will study protonproton collisions at unprecedented energies and luminosities. In this article we providefi rst a brief general introduction to particle physics. We then explain what CERN is. Thenwe describe the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the most powerful particle acceleratorever built. Finally we describe the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment, its physics goals,construction details, and current status.El experimento Compact Muon Solenoid en el Large Hadron Collider del CERN estudiarácolisiones protón protón a energías y luminosidades sin precedente. En este artículo presentamos primero una breve introducción general a la física de partículas. Despuésexplicamos lo que es el CERN. Luego describimos el Large Hadron Collider, el más potente acelerador de partículas construido por el hombre, en el CERN. Finalmente describimos el experimento Compact Muon Solenoid, sus objetivos en física, los detalles de su construcción,y su situación presente.

  6. SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC ISLANDS IN THE SOLAR WIND AND THEIR ROLE IN PARTICLE ACCELERATION. I. DYNAMICS OF MAGNETIC ISLANDS NEAR THE HELIOSPHERIC CURRENT SHEET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khabarova, O. [Heliophysical Laboratory, Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radiowave Propagation RAS (IZMIRAN), Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Zank, G. P.; Li, G.; Roux, J. A. le; Webb, G. M.; Dosch, A. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Malandraki, O. E. [IAASARS, National Observatory of Athens, GR-15236 Penteli (Greece)

    2015-08-01

    Increases of ion fluxes in the keV–MeV range are sometimes observed near the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) during periods when other sources are absent. These resemble solar energetic particle events, but the events are weaker and apparently local. Conventional explanations based on either shock acceleration of charged particles or particle acceleration due to magnetic reconnection at interplanetary current sheets (CSs) are not persuasive. We suggest instead that recurrent magnetic reconnection occurs at the HCS and smaller CSs in the solar wind, a consequence of which is particle energization by the dynamically evolving secondary CSs and magnetic islands. The effectiveness of the trapping and acceleration process associated with magnetic islands depends in part on the topology of the HCS. We show that the HCS possesses ripples superimposed on the large-scale flat or wavy structure. We conjecture that the ripples can efficiently confine plasma and provide tokamak-like conditions that are favorable for the appearance of small-scale magnetic islands that merge and/or contract. Particles trapped in the vicinity of merging islands and experiencing multiple small-scale reconnection events are accelerated by the induced electric field and experience first-order Fermi acceleration in contracting magnetic islands according to the transport theory of Zank et al. We present multi-spacecraft observations of magnetic island merging and particle energization in the absence of other sources, providing support for theory and simulations that show particle energization by reconnection related processes of magnetic island merging and contraction.

  7. A method of producing small grain Ru intermediate layers for perpendicular magnetic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Hua; Qin Yueling; Laughlin, David E.

    2008-01-01

    NiAl + SiO 2 thin films were used as a grain size reducing seedlayer for cobalt alloy granular perpendicular magnetic recording media. The effect of this NiAl + SiO 2 seedlayer on the microstructure and crystalline orientation of Ru intermediate layer has been investigated. By co-sputtering the composite NiAl + SiO 2 seedlayer, the smallest average grain diameter of NiAl was significantly reduced to about 2.5 nm. The grain size of the subsequent Ru intermediate layer was reduced to about 4 nm. X-ray diffraction results indicate an epitaxial orientation relationship of NiAl (110) // Ru (0002) between the two layers. Moreover, significant improvement of this epitaxial relationship was developed, which produced narrow c-axis distribution of the Ru intermediate layer with small grain size. The addition of the NiAl + SiO 2 seedlayer is a very promising approach to reduce the Ru intermediate layer grain size and eventually the magnetic layer grain size for perpendicular magnetic recording media without deterioration of other properties of thin films

  8. An orbit determination algorithm for small satellites based on the magnitude of the earth magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagorski, P.; Gallina, A.; Rachucki, J.; Moczala, B.; Zietek, S.; Uhl, T.

    2018-06-01

    Autonomous attitude determination systems based on simple measurements of vector quantities such as magnetic field and the Sun direction are commonly used in very small satellites. However, those systems always require knowledge of the satellite position. This information can be either propagated from orbital elements periodically uplinked from the ground station or measured onboard by dedicated global positioning system (GPS) receiver. The former solution sacrifices satellite autonomy while the latter requires additional sensors which may represent a significant part of mass, volume, and power budget in case of pico- or nanosatellites. Hence, it is thought that a system for onboard satellite position determination without resorting to GPS receivers would be useful. In this paper, a novel algorithm for determining the satellite orbit semimajor-axis is presented. The methods exploit only the magnitude of the Earth magnetic field recorded onboard by magnetometers. This represents the first step toward an extended algorithm that can determine all orbital elements of the satellite. The method is validated by numerical analysis and real magnetic field measurements.

  9. Magnetism, structure and chemical order in small CoPd clusters: A first-principles study

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2014-01-01

    The structural, electronic and magnetic properties of small ComPdn (N=m+n=8,m=0-N) nanoalloy clusters are studied in the framework of a generalized-gradient approximation to density-functional theory. The optimized cluster structures have a clear tendency to maximize the number of nearest-neighbor CoCo pairs. The magnetic order is found to be ferromagnetic-like (FM) for all the ground-state structures. Antiferromagnetic-like spin arrangements were found in some low-lying isomers. The average magnetic moment per atom μ̄N increases approximately linearly with Co content. A remarkable enhancement of the local Co moments is observed as a result of Pd doping. This is a consequence of the increase in the number of Co d holes, due to CoPd charge transfer, combined with the reduced local coordination. The influence of spin-orbit interactions on the cluster properties is also discussed. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Construction of a stable and homogeneous magnetic field at 10 milligauss for neutron electric dipole moment measurements: preparatory phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravador, E.; Yoshiki, Hajime; Feizeng, H. [Ibaraki Univ., Mito (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    A superthermal UCN edm measuring machine is currently under construction at KEK. It utilizes a magnetically shielded superconducting solenoid at liquid helium temperature to generate a stable and homogeneous magnetic field at 10 milligauss. The design of the magnetic shield and solenoid and preliminary evaluation of shielding effectiveness is presented. (author)

  11. Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel: Comparison of Different Oral Contrast Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbach, P.; Breitwieser, C.; Diederichs, G.; Eisele, S.; Kivelitz, D.; Taupitz, M.; Zeitz, M.; Hamm, B.; Klessen, C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate several substances regarding small bowel distension and contrast on balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) cine magnetic resonance (MR) images. Material and Methods: Luminal contrast was evaluated in 24 volunteers after oral application of two different contrast agent groups leading to either bright lumen (pineapple, blueberry juice) or dark lumen (tap water, orange juice) on T1-weighted images. Bowel distension was evaluated in 30 patients ingesting either methylcellulose or mannitol solution for limiting intestinal absorption. Fifteen patients with duodeno-jejunal intubation served as the control. Quantitative evaluation included measurement of luminal signal intensities and diameters of four bowel segments, qualitative evaluation assessed luminal contrast and distension on a five-point scale. Results: Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the four contrast agents revealed no significant differences regarding luminal contrast on bSSFP images. Quantitative evaluation revealed significantly lower (P<0.05) small bowel distension for three out of four segments (qualitative evaluation: two out of four segments) for methylcellulose in comparison to the control. Mannitol was found to be equal to the control. Conclusion: Oral ingestion of tap water or orange juice in combination with mannitol is recommended for cine MR imaging of the small bowel regarding luminal contrast and small bowel distension on bSSFP sequences

  12. Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel: Comparison of Different Oral Contrast Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asbach, P.; Breitwieser, C.; Diederichs, G.; Eisele, S.; Kivelitz, D.; Taupitz, M.; Zeitz, M.; Hamm, B.; Klessen, C. [Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Charite Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate several substances regarding small bowel distension and contrast on balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) cine magnetic resonance (MR) images. Material and Methods: Luminal contrast was evaluated in 24 volunteers after oral application of two different contrast agent groups leading to either bright lumen (pineapple, blueberry juice) or dark lumen (tap water, orange juice) on T1-weighted images. Bowel distension was evaluated in 30 patients ingesting either methylcellulose or mannitol solution for limiting intestinal absorption. Fifteen patients with duodeno-jejunal intubation served as the control. Quantitative evaluation included measurement of luminal signal intensities and diameters of four bowel segments, qualitative evaluation assessed luminal contrast and distension on a five-point scale. Results: Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the four contrast agents revealed no significant differences regarding luminal contrast on bSSFP images. Quantitative evaluation revealed significantly lower (P<0.05) small bowel distension for three out of four segments (qualitative evaluation: two out of four segments) for methylcellulose in comparison to the control. Mannitol was found to be equal to the control. Conclusion: Oral ingestion of tap water or orange juice in combination with mannitol is recommended for cine MR imaging of the small bowel regarding luminal contrast and small bowel distension on bSSFP sequences.

  13. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of small bimetallic zirconium–palladium clusters: Ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezi Javan, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Electronic and magnetic properties of small Zr n Pd m (n + m ⩽ 5) have been investigated. • Binding energies of the Zr n clusters are significantly higher than Pd n clusters. • Binding energy of the Pd n clusters increase with substituting one or more Zr atom. • HOMO–LUMO gap of the Zr n Pd m clusters increase in comparison with pure states. - Abstract: Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of small bimetallic zirconium–palladium clusters, Zr n Pd m (n + m ⩽ 5), have been investigated using density functional theory with considering generalized gradient approximation and PBE functional. We have determined the ground state conformations of the bimetallic zirconium–palladium clusters by substitution of Zr and Pd atoms in the optimized lowest energy structures of pure zirconium and palladium clusters. Results reveal that binding energies of the pure Zr n clusters are significantly higher than Pd n clusters with the same number of atoms. Also it is found that binding energy of the Zr n and Pd n clusters increase with growth of the number of consisting atoms in the clusters. Results indicate that, for both Zr n and Pd n clusters the binding energy of planar forms is lower than three-dimensional structures. We have also found that the binding energy of the Pd n clusters increase with substituting one or more Zr atoms in these clusters. We have also studied the HOMO–LUMO energy gap and magnetic moment of the pure and combined Zr and Pd clusters. The energy gap analysis of the pure and combined Pd and Zr clusters show that in generally the HOMO–LUMO gap of the bimetallic Zr n Pd m clusters increase in comparison with their corresponding pure clusters with the same number of atoms. According to the spin polarization DFT calculations all of the Zr n Pd m (n + m ⩽ 5) have net magnetic moments as instance the Zr 2 , Pd 2 and ZrPd clusters show a total magnetic moment value of 2 μ B . Some more discussions around charge population

  14. The Solenoidal Detector Collaboration silicon detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziock, H.J.; Gamble, M.T.; Miller, W.O.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Thompson, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    Silicon tracking systems will be fundamental components of the tracking systems for both planned major SSC experiments. Despite its seemingly small size, it occupies a volume of more than 5 meters in length and 1 meter in diameter and is an order of magnitude larger than any silicon detector system previously built. This report discusses its design and operation

  15. New ALPHA-2 magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    On 21 June, members of the ALPHA collaboration celebrated the handover of the first solenoid designed for the ALPHA-2 experiment. The magnet has since been successfully installed and is working well.   Khalid Mansoor, Sumera Yamin and Jeffrey Hangst in front of the new ALPHA-2 solenoid. “This was the first of three identical solenoids that will be installed between now and September, as the rest of the ALPHA-2 device is installed and commissioned,” explains ALPHA spokesperson Jeffrey Hangst. “These magnets are designed to allow us to transfer particles - antiprotons, electrons and positrons - between various parts of the new ALPHA-2 device by controlling the transverse size of the particle bunch that is being transferred.” Sumera Yamin and Khalid Mansoor, two Pakistani scientists from the National Centre for Physics in Islamabad, came to CERN in February specifically to design and manufacture these magnets. “We had the chance to work on act...

  16. SCR-1: Design and construction of a small modular stellarator for magnetic confinement of plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barillas, L; Vargas, V I; Alpizar, A; Asenjo, J; Carranza, J M; Cerdas, F; Gutiérrez, R; Monge, J I; Mora, J; Morera, J; Peraza, H; Rojas, C; Rozen, D; Saenz, F; Sánchez, G; Sandoval, M; Trimiño, H; Umaña, J; Villegas, L F; Queral, V

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes briefly the design and construction of a small modular stellarator for magnetic confinement of plasma, called Stellarator of Costa Rica 1, or SCR-1; developed by the Plasma Physics Group of the Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica, PlasmaTEC. The SCR-1 is based on the small Spanish stellarator UST 1 , created by the engineer Vicente Queral. The SCR-1 will employ stainless steel torus-shaped vacuum vessel with a major radius of 460.33 mm and a cross section radius of 110.25 mm. A typical SCR-1 plasma will have an average radius 42.2 mm and a volume of 8 liters (0.01 m 3 ), and an aspect ratio of 5.7. The magnetic resonant field will be 0.0878 T, and a period of 2 (m=2) with a rotational transform of 0.3. The magnetic field will be provided by 12 modular coils, with 8 turns each, with an electrical current of 8704 A per coil (1088 A per turn of each coil). This current will be fed by a bank of cell batteries. The plasma will be heated by ECRH with magnetrons of a total power of 5 kW, in the first harmonic at 2.45 GHz. The expected electron temperature and density are 15 eV and 10 17 m −3 respectively with an estimated confinement time of 7.30 x 10 −4 ms. The initial diagnostics on the SCR-1 will consist of a Langmuir probe, a heterodyne microwave interferometer, and a field mapping system. The first plasma of the SCR-1 is expected at the end of 2011.

  17. High-frequency Oscillations in Small Magnetic Elements Observed with Sunrise/SuFI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafarzadeh, S. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Solanki, S. K.; Cameron, R. H.; Danilovic, S. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Stangalini, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (RM) (Italy); Steiner, O., E-mail: shahin.jafarzadeh@astro.uio.no [Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik, Schöneckstr. 6, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    We characterize waves in small magnetic elements and investigate their propagation in the lower solar atmosphere from observations at high spatial and temporal resolution. We use the wavelet transform to analyze oscillations of both horizontal displacement and intensity in magnetic bright points found in the 300 nm and the Ca ii H 396.8 nm passbands of the filter imager on board the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. Phase differences between the oscillations at the two atmospheric layers corresponding to the two passbands reveal upward propagating waves at high frequencies (up to 30 mHz). Weak signatures of standing as well as downward propagating waves are also obtained. Both compressible and incompressible (kink) waves are found in the small-scale magnetic features. The two types of waves have different, though overlapping, period distributions. Two independent estimates give a height difference of approximately 450 ± 100 km between the two atmospheric layers sampled by the employed spectral bands. This value, together with the determined short travel times of the transverse and longitudinal waves provide us with phase speeds of 29 ± 2 km s{sup −1} and 31 ± 2 km s{sup −1}, respectively. We speculate that these phase speeds may not reflect the true propagation speeds of the waves. Thus, effects such as the refraction of fast longitudinal waves may contribute to an overestimate of the phase speed.

  18. Design report for a cryostable 3m diameter superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab Collider Detector Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, R.; Grimson, J.; Kephart, R.; Leung, E.; Mruzek, M.; Theriot, D.; Wands, R.; Yamada, R.

    1981-10-01

    The Fermilab Collider Detector Facility (CDF) is a large detector system designed td study anti pp collisions at very high center of mass energies. The central detector for the CDF employs a large axial magnetic field volume instrumented with a central tracking chamber composed of multiple layers of cylindrical drift chambers and a pair of intermediate tracking chambers. The purpose of this system is to determine the trajectories, sign of electric charge, and momenta of charged particles produced with polar angles between 10 and 170 degrees. The magnetic field volume required for tracking is approximately 4 m long and 3 m in diameter. To provide the desired Δp/sub T//p/sub T/ less than or equal to 15% at 50 GeV/c using drift chambers with approx. 200μ resolution the field inside this volume should be 1.5 T. This field should be as uniform as is practical to simplify both track finding and the reconstruction of particle trajectories with the drift chambers. Such a field can be produced by a cylindrical current sheet solenoid with a uniform current density of 1.2 x 10 6 A/m (1200 A/mm) surrounded by an iron return yoke. For practical coils and return yokes, both central electromagnetic and central hadronic calorimetry must be located outside the coil of the magnet. This geometry requires that the coil and cryostat be thin both in physical thickness and in radiation and absorption lengths. This dual requirement of high linear current density and minimal coil thickness can only be satisfied using superconducting technology. In this report we describe a design for a cryostable superconducting solenoid intended to meet the requirements of the Fermilab ies TDF

  19. Magnetic field measurements of the superEBIS superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herschcovitch, A.; Kponou, A.; Clipperton, R.; Hensel, W.; Usack, F.

    1994-01-01

    SuperEBIS was designed to have a solenoidal magnetic field of a 5 Tesla strength with a 120 cm long bore. The field was specified to be straight within 1 part in 10000 within the bore, and uniform to within 1 part in 1000 within the central 90 cm. Magnetic field measurements were performed with a computerized magnetic field measuring setup that was borrowed from W. Sampson's group. A preliminary test was made of a scheme to determine if the magnetic and mechanical axes of the solenoid coincided, and, if not, by how much

  20. Magneto-structural properties and magnetic anisotropy of small transition-metal clusters: a first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blonski, Piotr; Hafner, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    Ab initio density-functional calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC) have been performed for Ni and Pd clusters with three to six atoms and for 13-atom clusters of Ni, Pd, and Pt, extending earlier calculations for Pt clusters with up to six atoms (2011 J. Chem. Phys. 134 034107). The geometric and magnetic structures have been optimized for different orientations of the magnetization with respect to the crystallographic axes of the cluster. The magnetic anisotropy energies (MAE) and the anisotropies of spin and orbital moments have been determined. Particular attention has been paid to the correlation between the geometric and magnetic structures. The magnetic point group symmetry of the clusters varies with the direction of the magnetization. Even for a 3d metal such as Ni, the change in the magnetic symmetry leads to small geometric distortions of the cluster structure, which are even more pronounced for the 4d metal Pd. For a 5d metal the SOC is strong enough to change the energetic ordering of the structural isomers. SOC leads to a mixing of the spin states corresponding to the low-energy spin isomers identified in the scalar-relativistic calculations. Spin moments are isotropic only for Ni clusters, but anisotropic for Pd and Pt clusters, orbital moments are anisotropic for the clusters of all three elements. The magnetic anisotropy energies have been calculated. The comparison between MAE and orbital anisotropy invalidates a perturbation analysis of magnetic anisotropy for these small clusters.

  1. Reply to Comment on 'Measurement of the magnetic field of small magnets with a smartphone: a very economical laboratory practice for introductory physics courses'

    OpenAIRE

    Arribas Garde, Enrique; Escobar García, Isabel; Suárez, Carmen P.; Nájera López, Alberto; Beléndez Vázquez, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    This is a reply to the comment by Iqbal and Anwar on our recently published work. First of all, the authors of ‘Measurement of the magnetic field of small magnets with a smartphone: a very economical laboratory practice for introductory physics courses’ greatly appreciate the comments of Iqbal and Anwar. One of us (AB) is very grateful to the Vicerectorship of Information Technologies of the University of Alicante (Spain) the help of GITE-09006-UA and to the Generalitat Valenciana (Spain),...

  2. Investigation on Electromagnetic Models of High-Speed Solenoid Valve for Common Rail Injector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel formula easily applied with high precision is proposed in this paper to fit the B-H curve of soft magnetic materials, and it is validated by comparison with predicted and experimental results. It can accurately describe the nonlinear magnetization process and magnetic saturation characteristics of soft magnetic materials. Based on the electromagnetic transient coupling principle, an electromagnetic mathematical model of a high-speed solenoid valve (HSV is developed in Fortran language that takes the saturation phenomena of the electromagnetic force into consideration. The accuracy of the model is validated by the comparison of the simulated and experimental static electromagnetic forces. Through experiment, it is concluded that the increase of the drive current is conducive to improving the electromagnetic energy conversion efficiency of the HSV at a low drive current, but it has little effect at a high drive current. Through simulation, it is discovered that the electromagnetic energy conversion characteristics of the HSV are affected by the drive current and the total reluctance, consisting of the gap reluctance and the reluctance of the iron core and armature soft magnetic materials. These two influence factors, within the scope of the different drive currents, have different contribution rates to the electromagnetic energy conversion efficiency.

  3. The large superconducting solenoids for the g-2 muon storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunce, G.; Cullen, J.; Danby, G.

    1994-01-01

    The g-2 muon storage ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory consists of four large superconducting solenoids. The two outer solenoids, which are 15.1 meters in diameter, share a common cryostat. The two inner solenoids, which are 13.4 meters in diameter, are in separate cryostats. The two 24 turn inner solenoids are operated at an opposite polarity from the two 24 turn outer solenoids. This generates a dipole field between the inner and outer solenoids. The flux between the solenoids is returned through a C shaped iron return yoke that also shapes the dipole field. The integrated field around the 14 meter diameter storage ring must be good to about 1 part in one million over the 90 mm dia. circular cross section where the muons are stored, averaged over the azimuth. When the four solenoids carry their 5300 A design current, the field in the 18 centimeter gap between the poles is 1.45 T. When the solenoid operates at its design current 5.5 MJ is stored between the poles. The solenoids were wound on site at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The cryostats were built around the solenoid windings which are indirectly cooled using two-phase helium

  4. IE Information Notice No. 85-17, Supplement 1: Possible sticking of ASCO solenoid valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, E.L.

    1992-01-01

    This notice is to inform recipients of the results of follow up investigations regarding the reasons for sticking of Automatic Switch Company (ASCO) solenoid valves used to shut main steam isolation valves (MSIVs) under accident conditions. GE has recommend that the licensee replace the potentially contaminated MSIV solenoid valves and institute a periodic examination and cleaning of the MSIV solenoid valves. Grand Gulf has replaced the eight MSIV HTX832320V dual solenoid valves with fully environmentally qualified ASCO Model NP 8323A20E dual solenoid valves. The environmentally qualified valve Model NP 8323A20E was included in a control sample placed in the test ovens with the solenoid valves that stuck at Grand Gulf. The environmentally qualified model did not stick under the test conditions that cause sticking in the other solenoid valves

  5. Design of High Field Solenoids made of High Temperature Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartalesi, Antonio; /Pisa U.

    2010-12-01

    This thesis starts from the analytical mechanical analysis of a superconducting solenoid, loaded by self generated Lorentz forces. Also, a finite element model is proposed and verified with the analytical results. To study the anisotropic behavior of a coil made by layers of superconductor and insulation, a finite element meso-mechanic model is proposed and designed. The resulting material properties are then used in the main solenoid analysis. In parallel, design work is performed as well: an existing Insert Test Facility (ITF) is adapted and structurally verified to support a coil made of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, a High Temperature Superconductor (HTS). Finally, a technological winding process was proposed and the required tooling is designed.

  6. Transverse emittance measurement at REGAE via a solenoid scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachmann, Max

    2012-12-15

    The linear accelerator REGAE at DESY produces short and low charged electron bunches, on the one hand to resolve the excitation transitions of atoms temporally by pump probe electron diffraction experiments and on the other hand to investigate principal mechanisms of laser plasma acceleration. For both cases a high quality electron beam is required. A quantity to rate the beam quality is the beam emittance. In the course of this thesis transverse emittance measurements by a solenoid scan could be realized and beyond that an improved theoretical description of a solenoid was successful. The foundation of emittance measurements are constituted by theoretical models which describe the envelope of a beam. Two different models were derived. The first is an often used model to determine the transverse beam emittance without considering space charge effects. More interesting and challenging was the development of an envelope model taking space charge effects into account. It is introduced and cross checked with measurements and simulations.

  7. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN FLUID VORTICITY, KINETIC HELICITY, AND MAGNETIC FIELD ON SMALL-SCALES (QUIET-NETWORK) ON THE SUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangeetha, C. R.; Rajaguru, S. P., E-mail: crsangeetha@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore-34 (India)

    2016-06-20

    We derive horizontal fluid motions on the solar surface over large areas covering the quiet-Sun magnetic network from local correlation tracking of convective granules imaged in continuum intensity and Doppler velocity by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory . From these we calculate the horizontal divergence, the vertical component of vorticity, and the kinetic helicity of fluid motions. We study the correlations between fluid divergence and vorticity, and between vorticity (kinetic helicity) and the magnetic field. We find that the vorticity (kinetic helicity) around small-scale fields exhibits a hemispherical pattern (in sign) similar to that followed by the magnetic helicity of large-scale active regions (containing sunspots). We identify this pattern to be a result of the Coriolis force acting on supergranular-scale flows (both the outflows and inflows), consistent with earlier studies using local helioseismology. Furthermore, we show that the magnetic fields cause transfer of vorticity from supergranular inflow regions to outflow regions, and that they tend to suppress the vortical motions around them when magnetic flux densities exceed about 300 G (from HMI). We also show that such an action of the magnetic fields leads to marked changes in the correlations between fluid divergence and vorticity. These results are speculated to be of importance to local dynamo action (if present) and to the dynamical evolution of magnetic helicity at the small-scale.

  8. Extensive characterisation of advanced manufacturing solutions for the ITER Central Solenoid pre-compression system

    CERN Document Server

    Langeslag, S.A.E.; Libeyre, P.; Marcinek, D.J.; Zhang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The ITER Central Solenoid (CS), positioned in the center of the ITER tokamak, will provide a magnetic field, contributing to the confinement of the plasma. The 13 m high CS consists of a vertical stack of 6 independently driven modules, dynamically activated. Resulting opposing currents can lead to high separation forces. A pre-compression structure is implemented to counteract these opposing forces, by realising a continuous 180 MN coil-to-coil contact loading. Preload is applied by mechanical fastening via 9 subunits, positioned along the coil stack, each consisting of 2 outer and 1 inner tie plate. The tie plates therefore need to feature outstanding mechanical behaviour in a large temperature range. High strength, Nitronic®-50 type F XM-19 austenitic stainless steel is selected as candidate material. The linearised stress distribution reaches approximately 250 MPa, leading to a required yield strength of 380 MPa at room temperature. Two different manufacturing methods are being studied for the procuremen...

  9. Design of high-energy high-current linac with focusing by superconducting solenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batskikh, G.I.; Belugin, V.M.; Bondarev, B.I. [Moscow Radiotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The advancement of MRTI design for 1.5 GeV and 250 mA ion CW linac was presented in a previous report. In this new linac version all the way from input to output the ions are focused by magnetic fields of superconducting solenoids. The ion limit current is far beyond the needed value. The linac focusing channel offers major advantages over the more conventional ones. The acceptance is 1.7 times as large for such focusing channel as for quadrupole one. Concurrently, a random perturbation sensitivity for such channel is one order of magnitude smaller than in quadrupole channel. These focusing channel features allow to decrease beam matched radius and increase a linac radiation purity without aperture growth. {open_quotes}Regotron{close_quotes} is used as high power generator in linac main part. But D&W cavities need not be divided into sections connected by RF-bridges which denuded them of high coupling factor.

  10. Measurement of the magnetic field of small magnets with a smartphone: a very economical laboratory practice for introductory physics courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arribas, Enrique; Escobar, Isabel; Suarez, Carmen P; Najera, Alberto; Beléndez, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we propose an inexpensive laboratory practice for an introductory physics course laboratory for any grade of science and engineering study. This practice was very well received by our students, where a smartphone (iOS, Android, or Windows) is used together with mini magnets (similar to those used on refrigerator doors), a 20 cm long school rule, a paper, and a free application (app) that needs to be downloaded and installed that measures magnetic fields using the smartphone’s magnetic field sensor or magnetometer. The apps we have used are: Magnetometer (iOS), Magnetometer Metal Detector, and Physics Toolbox Magnetometer (Android). Nothing else is needed. Cost of this practice: free. The main purpose of the practice is that students determine the dependence of the component x of the magnetic field produced by different magnets (including ring magnets and sphere magnets). We obtained that the dependency of the magnetic field with the distance is of the form x –3 , in total agreement with the theoretical analysis. The secondary objective is to apply the technique of least squares fit to obtain this exponent and the magnetic moment of the magnets, with the corresponding absolute error. (paper)

  11. Measurement of the magnetic field of small magnets with a smartphone: a very economical laboratory practice for introductory physics courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas, Enrique; Escobar, Isabel; Suarez, Carmen P.; Najera, Alberto; Beléndez, Augusto

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we propose an inexpensive laboratory practice for an introductory physics course laboratory for any grade of science and engineering study. This practice was very well received by our students, where a smartphone (iOS, Android, or Windows) is used together with mini magnets (similar to those used on refrigerator doors), a 20 cm long school rule, a paper, and a free application (app) that needs to be downloaded and installed that measures magnetic fields using the smartphone’s magnetic field sensor or magnetometer. The apps we have used are: Magnetometer (iOS), Magnetometer Metal Detector, and Physics Toolbox Magnetometer (Android). Nothing else is needed. Cost of this practice: free. The main purpose of the practice is that students determine the dependence of the component x of the magnetic field produced by different magnets (including ring magnets and sphere magnets). We obtained that the dependency of the magnetic field with the distance is of the form x-3, in total agreement with the theoretical analysis. The secondary objective is to apply the technique of least squares fit to obtain this exponent and the magnetic moment of the magnets, with the corresponding absolute error.

  12. Worchester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    2000-01-01

    These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) to prevent MCO vent drain to either reduce air in-leakage or loss of He. The valves have couplings for transverse actuator mounting

  13. System of cylindrical drift chambers in a superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilleri, L.; Blumenfeld, B.J.; Dimcovski, Z.

    1978-01-01

    A superconducting solenoid at the CERN ISR was equipped with a system of high accuracy cylindrical drift chambers. This detector consists of eight layers of field shaped drift cells with a delay line opposite each sense wire to provide coupled two dimensional readout. The design, construction, and operation of this system are discussed. The resolution and performance of the delay lines and sense wires under ISR running conditions are shown

  14. HIE-ISOLDE CRYO-MODULE Assembly - Superconducting Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Leclercq, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Assembly of the cryo-module components in SM18 cleanroom. The superconducting solenoid (housed inside its helium vessel) is cleaned, prepared then installed on the supporting frame of the cryo-module and connected to the helium tank, prior to the assembly of the RF cavities on the structure. The completed first 2 cryo-modules installed inside the HIE-ISOLDE-LINAC ready for beam operation is also shown.

  15. Synchrotron oscillation effects on an rf-solenoid spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benati, P.; Chiladze, D.; Dietrich, J.; Gaisser, M.; Gebel, R.; Guidoboni, G.; Hejny, V.; Kacharava, A.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kulessa, P.; Lehrach, A.; Lenisa, P.; Lorentz, B.; Maier, R.; Mchedlishvili, D.; Morse, W. M.; Öllers, D.; Pesce, A.; Polyanskiy, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Rathmann, F.; Semertzidis, Y. K.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stockhorst, H.; Ströher, H.; Talman, R.; Valdau, Yu.; Weidemann, Ch.; Wüstner, P.

    2012-12-01

    New measurements are reported for the time dependence of the vertical polarization of a 0.97GeV/c deuteron beam circulating in a storage ring and perturbed by an rf solenoid. The storage ring is the cooler synchrotron (COSY) located at the Forschungszentrum Jülich. The beam polarization was measured continuously using a 1.5 cm thick carbon target located at the edge of the circulating deuteron beam and the scintillators of the EDDA detector. An rf solenoid mounted on the ring was used to generate fields at and near the frequency of the 1-Gγ spin resonance. Measurements were made of the vertical beam polarization as a function of time with the operation of the rf solenoid in either fixed or continuously variable frequency mode. Using rf-solenoid strengths as large as 2.66×10-5revolutions/turn, slow oscillations (˜1Hz) were observed in the vertical beam polarization. When the circulating beam was continuously electron cooled, these oscillations completely reversed the polarization and showed no sign of diminishing in amplitude. But for the uncooled beam, the oscillation amplitude was damped to nearly zero within a few seconds. A simple spin-tracking model without the details of the COSY ring lattice was successful in reproducing these oscillations and demonstrating the sensitivity of the damping to the magnitude of the synchrotron motion of the beam particles. The model demonstrates that the characteristic features of measurements made in the presence of large synchrotron oscillations are distinct from the features of such measurements when made off resonance. These data were collected in preparation for a study of the spin coherence time, a beam property that needs to become long to enable a search for an electric dipole moment using a storage ring.

  16. Sprag solenoid brake. [development and operations of electrically controlled brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, D. H. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The development and characteristics of an electrically operated brake are discussed. The action of the brake depends on energizing a solenoid which causes internally spaced sprockets to contact the inner surface of the housing. A spring forces the control member to move to the braking position when the electrical function is interrupted. A diagram of the device is provided and detailed operating principles are explained.

  17. Electron Beam Size Measurements in a Cooling Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Kroc, Thomas K; Burov, Alexey; Seletsky, Sergey; Shemyakin, Alexander V

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires a straight trajectory and constant beam size to provide effective cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler. A measurement system was developed using movable appertures and steering bumps to measure the beam size in a 20 m long, nearly continuous, solenoid. This paper discusses the required beam parameters, the implimentation of the measurement system and results for our application.

  18. Worcester Solenoid-Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    2000-01-01

    These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as Integral parts of the actuator that are used in different process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) for MCO isolation to either reduce air in leakage or loss of He. All valves have coupling for transverse actuator mounting

  19. ORPUS 1: a pulsed superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwall, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    A recent series of reference designs for Tokamak Experimental Power Reactors (EPR's) has indicated that superconducting poloidal field (PF) coils will be necessary for successful operation of these devices. It would also be desirable to use superconducting PF coils in earlier tokamak fusion devices if such coils could be developed quickly enough. The PF coil performance requirements are briefly reviewed and some implications for the coil design are developed. A small coil (stored energy 14 kJ) has been built using construction techniques similar to those which could be employed for PF coils. The coil has been charged at rates up to 2 T/sec. Both maximum field and charging rate were limited by available power supplies. Loss measurements were carried out during pulsed operation and data for hysteretic and eddy current loss are presented. The loss measurement system used allows considerable insight into the effects of conductor motion and training

  20. Dynamics of small dust clouds trapped in a magnetized anodic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilch, Iris; Piel, Alexander; Trottenberg, Thomas; Koepke, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    Small dust clouds, which are confined in an anodic plasma, are studied with respect to their structure and their response to modulation of the anode bias. The dust cloud is displaced from the center of the discharge by a process similar to the void mechanism in radio-frequency discharges under microgravity. The top layers of the dust cloud are in a crystalline state and the cloud performs a slow rotation about the magnetic field direction. For modulation frequencies below 15 Hz, a sloshing and stretching motion in the confining potential well is found. Spontaneously excited dust density waves are observed when the dust cloud exceeds a minimum size. The waves are characterized by sickle-shaped wave fronts. No standing waves were found. The wave dispersion shows an influence of the boundedness of the system in terms of a frequency cutoff

  1. Fast magnetic reconnection supported by sporadic small-scale Petschek-type shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibayama, Takuya; Nakabou, Takashi; Kusano, Kanya; Miyoshi, Takahiro; Vekstein, Grigory

    2015-01-01

    Standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory predicts reconnection rate that is far too slow to account for a wide variety of reconnection events observed in space and laboratory plasmas. Therefore, it was commonly accepted that some non-MHD (kinetic) effects play a crucial role in fast reconnection. A recently renewed interest in simple MHD models is associated with the so-called plasmoid instability of reconnecting current sheets. Although it is now evident that this effect can significantly enhance the rate of reconnection, many details of the underlying multiple-plasmoid process still remain controversial. Here, we report results of a high-resolution computer simulation which demonstrate that fast albeit intermittent magnetic reconnection is sustained by numerous small-scale Petschek-type shocks spontaneously formed in the current sheet due to its plasmoid instability

  2. The Bragg Reflection Polarimeter On the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allured, Ryan; Griffiths, S.; Daly, R.; Prieskorn, Z.; Marlowe, H.; Kaaret, P.; GEMS Team

    2011-09-01

    The strong gravity associated with black holes warps the spacetime outside of the event horizon, and it is predicted that this will leave characteristic signatures on the polarization of X-ray emission originating in the accretion disk. The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) mission will be the first observatory with the capability to make polarization measurements with enough sensitivity to quantitatively test this prediction. Students at the University of Iowa are currently working on the development of the Bragg Reflection Polarimeter (BRP), a soft X-ray polarimeter sensitive at 500 eV, that is the student experiment on GEMS. The BRP will complement the main experiment by making a polarization measurement from accreting black holes below the main energy band (2-10 keV). This measurement will constrain the inclination of the accretion disk and tighten measurements of black hole spin.

  3. Hall effect upon small wavelength kink instabilities near an elliptic magnetic stagnation line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spies, G.O.; Faghihi, M.

    1985-12-01

    To explore the question whether the Hall effect removes the unphysical feature of ideal magnetohydrodynamics of predicting unstable small wavelenght kinks near any elliptic magnetic stagnation line, a spectral analysis is performed of the motion of an incompressible plasma about cylindrical Z-pinch equilibria with circular sections. The eigenvalue loci in the complex frequency plane are derived for the equilibrium with constant current density. These show that every particular mode becomes stable as the Hall parameter exceeds a critical value. However, this critical value is a decreasing function of the ideal growth rate and has a pole at the origin, implying that there always remains an infinite reservoir of slowly growing instabilities. Correspondingly, for equilibiria with arbitrary current distributions, the stability criterion is unaffected by the Hall term. (author)

  4. Fast magnetic reconnection supported by sporadic small-scale Petschek-type shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibayama, Takuya, E-mail: shibayama@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Nakabou, Takashi [Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Kusano, Kanya [Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 236-0001 (Japan); Miyoshi, Takahiro [Department of Physical Science, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Vekstein, Grigory [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory predicts reconnection rate that is far too slow to account for a wide variety of reconnection events observed in space and laboratory plasmas. Therefore, it was commonly accepted that some non-MHD (kinetic) effects play a crucial role in fast reconnection. A recently renewed interest in simple MHD models is associated with the so-called plasmoid instability of reconnecting current sheets. Although it is now evident that this effect can significantly enhance the rate of reconnection, many details of the underlying multiple-plasmoid process still remain controversial. Here, we report results of a high-resolution computer simulation which demonstrate that fast albeit intermittent magnetic reconnection is sustained by numerous small-scale Petschek-type shocks spontaneously formed in the current sheet due to its plasmoid instability.

  5. A combination of small bowel imaging methods: conventional enteroclysis with complementary magnetic resonance enteroclysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akman, C. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Korman, U. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: ugurk9@istanbul.edu.tr; Oguet, G. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Kurugoglu, S. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Urger, E. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Ulus, S. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Esen, G. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Tasci, I. [Department of Surgery, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2005-07-01

    AIM: The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the overall findings of conventional enteroclysis (CE) with complementary magnetic resonance enteroclysis (MRE) in small bowel disease. METHODS: The study included 32 patients referred from various clinical departments, with known or suspected small bowel disease and abnormalities on CE. Immediately after CE, true fast imaging with steady-state precession (true FISP), and unenhanced and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequences with fat saturation were obtained. Mucosal, mural and luminal changes of the small bowel were evaluated by each technique. In addition, bowel wall thickening, bowel wall enhancement and perienteric changes were assessed by MRE. The radiological findings obtained were evaluated together as a combination, and the role of MRE in the determination of the activity and complications of the small bowel disease was assessed. Radiological findings were correlated with clinical evaluation and follow-up in all cases, including endoscopy in 14 cases and surgery in 5 cases. RESULTS: MRE provided important supplementary mural and extramural information, including degree of pathological wall thickness, mural enhancement pattern associated with disease activity, perivisceral collection, abscess formation, mesenteric fibrofatty proliferation, lymphadenopathy and increase in perienteric vascularity. Short strictures were not revealed on MRE; however, for patients with a history of abdominal malignancy, MRE helped characterize the level of any obstruction and the extent of the disease. CONCLUSION: We recommend MRE for patients who have findings of advanced inflammatory bowel disease or neoplasm on CE examination. The combination of these two techniques can provide important information on the degree and extent of the disorder.

  6. SU-F-T-211: Evaluation of a Dual Focusing Magnet System for the Treatment of Small Proton Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, TT; McAuley, GA; Heczko, S; Slater, J [Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Wroe, A [Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate magnetic focusing for small volume proton targets using a doublet combination of quadrupole rare earth permanent magnet Halbach cylinder assemblies Methods: Monte Carlo computer simulations were performed using the Geant4 toolkit to compare dose depositions of proton beams transported through two focusing magnets or in their absence. Proton beams with energies of 127 MeV and initial diameters of 5, 8 and 10 mm were delivered through two identical focusing magnets similar to those currently in experimental use at Loma Linda University Medical Center. Analogous experiments used optimized configurations based on the simulation results. Dose was measured by a diode detector and Gafchromic EBT3 film and compared to simulation data. Based on results from the experimental data, an additional set of simulations was performed with an initial beam diameter of 18 mm and a two differing length magnets (40mm & 68mm). Results: Experimental data matched well with Monte Carlo simulations. However, under conditions necessary to produce circular beam spots at target depth, magnetically focused beams using two identical 40 mm length magnets did not meet all of our performance criteria of circular beam spots, improved peak to entrance (P/E) dose ratios and dose delivery efficiencies. The simulations using the longer 68 mm 2nd magnet yielded better results with 34% better P/E dose ratio and 20–50% better dose delivery efficiencies when compared to unfocused 10 mm beams. Conclusion: While magnetic focusing using two magnets with identical focusing power did not yield desired results, ongoing Monte Carlo simulations suggest that increasing the length of the 2nd magnet to 68 mm could improve P/E dose ratios and dose efficiencies. Future work includes additional experimental validation of the longer 2nd magnet setup as well as experiments with triplet magnet systems. This project was sponsored with funding from the Department of Defense (DOD# W81XWH-BAA-10-1).

  7. First-principles calculation of monitoring spin states of small magnetic nanostructures with IR spectrum of CO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C; Lefkidis, G; Huebner, W

    2010-01-01

    A fully ab initio controlled ultrafast magnetooptical switching mechanism in small magnetic clusters is achieved through exploiting spin-orbit-coupling enabled Λ processes. The idea is that in the magnetic molecules a fast transition between two almost degenerate states with different spins can be triggered by a laser pulse, which leads to an electron excitation from one of the degenerate states to a highly spin-mixed state and a deexcitation to the state of opposite spin. In this paper a CO molecule is attached to one magnetic center of the clusters, which serves as an experimental marker to map the laser-induced spin manipulation to the IR spectrum of CO. The predicted spin-state-dependent CO frequencies can facilitate experimental monitoring of the processes. We show that spin flip in magnetic atoms can be achieved in structurally optimized magnetic clusters in a subpicosecond regime with linearly polarized light.

  8. SAFE AND FAST QUENCH RECOVERY OF LARGE SUPERCONDUCTING SOLENOIDS COOLED BY FORCED TWO-PHASE HELIUM FLOW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, L.X.

    1999-01-01

    The cryogenic characteristics in energy extraction of the four fifteen-meter-diameter superconducting solenoids of the g-2 magnet are reported in this paper. The energy extraction tests at full-current and half-current of its operating value were deliberately carried out for the quench analyses and evaluation of the cryogenic system. The temperature profiles of each coil mandrel and pressure profiles in its helium cooling tube during the energy extraction are discussed. The low peak temperature and pressure as well as the short recovery time indicated the desirable characteristics of the cryogenic system

  9. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thoralf eNiendorf

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g. by supporting MR microscopy and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g. by reducing measuring time; both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (biomedical imaging, molecular medicine and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (pathophysiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular and renal disease will be discussed.

  10. SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC ISLANDS IN THE SOLAR WIND AND THEIR ROLE IN PARTICLE ACCELERATION. II. PARTICLE ENERGIZATION INSIDE MAGNETICALLY CONFINED CAVITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khabarova, Olga V.; Zank, Gary P.; Li, Gang; Le Roux, Jakobus A.; Webb, Gary M.; Malandraki, Olga E.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the role of heliospheric magnetic field configurations and conditions that favor the generation and confinement of small-scale magnetic islands associated with atypical energetic particle events (AEPEs) in the solar wind. Some AEPEs do not align with standard particle acceleration mechanisms, such as flare-related or simple diffusive shock acceleration processes related to interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIRs). As we have shown recently, energetic particle flux enhancements may well originate locally and can be explained by particle acceleration in regions filled with small-scale magnetic islands with a typical width of ∼0.01 au or less, which is often observed near the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). The particle energization is a consequence of magnetic reconnection-related processes in islands experiencing either merging or contraction, observed, for example, in HCS ripples. Here we provide more observations that support the idea and the theory of particle energization produced by small-scale-flux-rope dynamics (Zank et al. and Le Roux et al.). If the particles are pre-accelerated to keV energies via classical mechanisms, they may be additionally accelerated up to 1–1.5 MeV inside magnetically confined cavities of various origins. The magnetic cavities, formed by current sheets, may occur at the interface of different streams such as CIRs and ICMEs or ICMEs and coronal hole flows. They may also form during the HCS interaction with interplanetary shocks (ISs) or CIRs/ICMEs. Particle acceleration inside magnetic cavities may explain puzzling AEPEs occurring far beyond ISs, within ICMEs, before approaching CIRs as well as between CIRs.

  11. Application of permanent magnet BaFe12O19 and NdFeB on small scale low speed permanent magnet generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudji Irasari; Novrita Idayanti

    2009-01-01

    Designing and manufacturing of low speed permanent magnet generator (PMG) for small scale electric power plant have been conducted. In this paper, the characteristics of generator using permanent magnet of barium ferrite (BaFe 12 O 19 ) and neodymium iron boron (NdFeB) were compared. Surface mounted type is selected as the rotor structure as all flux faces to stator winding and take a role in energy conversion. The experiment result demonstrates that at nominal speed, generator with BaFe 12 O 19 magnet can only generate power of 8.87 W while generator with NdFeB magnet can generate power of 1,988.93 W. (author)

  12. Open-source, small-animal magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, Megan E; Chaplin, Vandiver L; Wilkens, Ken; Dockery, Mary D; Giorgio, Todd D; Grissom, William A; Caskey, Charles F

    2016-01-01

    MR-guided focused ultrasound or high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgFUS/MRgHIFU) is a non-invasive therapeutic modality with many potential applications in areas such as cancer therapy, drug delivery, and blood-brain barrier opening. However, the large financial costs involved in developing preclinical MRgFUS systems represent a barrier to research groups interested in developing new techniques and applications. We aim to mitigate these challenges by detailing a validated, open-source preclinical MRgFUS system capable of delivering thermal and mechanical FUS in a quantifiable and repeatable manner under real-time MRI guidance. A hardware and software package was developed that includes closed-loop feedback controlled thermometry code and CAD drawings for a therapy table designed for a preclinical MRI scanner. For thermal treatments, the modular software uses a proportional integral derivative controller to maintain a precise focal temperature rise in the target given input from MR phase images obtained concurrently. The software computes the required voltage output and transmits it to a FUS transducer that is embedded in the delivery table within the magnet bore. The delivery table holds the FUS transducer, a small animal and its monitoring equipment, and a transmit/receive RF coil. The transducer is coupled to the animal via a water bath and is translatable in two dimensions from outside the magnet. The transducer is driven by a waveform generator and amplifier controlled by real-time software in Matlab. MR acoustic radiation force imaging is also implemented to confirm the position of the focus for mechanical and thermal treatments. The system was validated in tissue-mimicking phantoms and in vivo during murine tumor hyperthermia treatments. Sonications were successfully controlled over a range of temperatures and thermal doses for up to 20 min with minimal temperature overshoot. MR thermometry was validated with an optical temperature probe, and focus

  13. The levitation characteristics of the magnetic substances using trapped HTS bulk annuli with various magnetic field distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.B.; Ikegami, T.; Matsunaga, J.; Fujii, Y.; Onodera, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The spherical solenoid magnet can make a various magnetic field distributions. •We generated a large magnetic gradient at inner space of HTS bulks. •The levitation height of samples was improved by the reapplied field method. •The levitation height depends on the variation rate of magnetic field gradient. -- Abstract: We have been investigating the levitation system without any mechanical contact which is composed of a field-cooled ring-shaped high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulks [1]. In this proposed levitation system, the trapped magnetic field distributions of stacked HTS bulk are very important. In this paper, the spherical solenoid magnet composed of seven solenoid coils with different inner and outer diameters was designed and fabricated as a new magnetic source. The fabricated spherical solenoid magnet can easily make a homogeneous and various magnetic field distributions in inner space of stacked HTS bulk annuli by controlling the emerging currents of each coil. By using this spherical solenoid magnet, we tried to make a large magnetic field gradient in inner space of HTS bulk annuli, and it is very important on the levitation of magnetic substances. In order to improve the levitation properties of magnetic substances with various sizes, the external fields were reapplied to the initially trapped HTS bulk magnets. We could generate a large magnetic field gradient along the axial direction in inner space of HTS bulk annuli, and obtain the improved levitation height of samples by the proposed reapplied field method

  14. Controlling magnetic field profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, J.R.

    1979-04-01

    A method for designing solenoid magnets with controlled field profiles is discussed. The method, originated by D.B. Montgomery, minimizes both the field errors and the power consumption. An NOS time-sharing computer program for the CDC-6600, entitled MAGCOR, was constructed to provide an interactive magnet design capability. Results obtained during the design of magnets for a radial line electron accelerator are presented. 9 figures

  15. Simple analysis of off-axis solenoid fields using the scalar magnetostatic potential: application to a Zeeman-slower for cold atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Muniz, Sérgio R.; Bhattacharya, M.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2010-01-01

    In a region free of currents, magnetostatics can be described by the Laplace equation of a scalar magnetic potential, and one can apply the same methods commonly used in electrostatics. Here we show how to calculate the general vector field inside a real (finite) solenoid, using only the magnitude of the field along the symmetry axis. Our method does not require integration or knowledge of the current distribution, and is presented through practical examples, including a non-uniform finite so...

  16. Deciphering solar magnetic activity. I. On the relationship between the sunspot cycle and the evolution of small magnetic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Wang, Xin; Markel, Robert S.; Thompson, Michael J. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Leamon, Robert J.; Malanushenko, Anna V. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Davey, Alisdair R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Howe, Rachel [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Krista, Larisza D. [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80205 (United States); Cirtain, Jonathan W. [Marshall Space Flight Center, Code ZP13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Gurman, Joseph B.; Pesnell, William D., E-mail: mscott@ucar.edu [Solar Physics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Sunspots are a canonical marker of the Sun's internal magnetic field which flips polarity every ∼22 yr. The principal variation of sunspots, an ∼11 yr variation, modulates the amount of the magnetic field that pierces the solar surface and drives significant variations in our star's radiative, particulate, and eruptive output over that period. This paper presents observations from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and Solar Dynamics Observatory indicating that the 11 yr sunspot variation is intrinsically tied to the spatio-temporal overlap of the activity bands belonging to the 22 yr magnetic activity cycle. Using a systematic analysis of ubiquitous coronal brightpoints and the magnetic scale on which they appear to form, we show that the landmarks of sunspot cycle 23 can be explained by considering the evolution and interaction of the overlapping activity bands of the longer-scale variability.

  17. D0 Central Tracking Solenoid Energization, Controls, Interlocks and Quench Protection Operating Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hance, R.

    1998-01-01

    This procedure is used when it is necessary to operate the solenoid energization, controls, interlocks and quench detection system. Note that a separate procedure exists for operating the solenoid 'cryogenic' systems. Only D0 Control Room Operators or the Project Electrical Engineer are qualified to execute these procedures or operate the solenoid system. This procedure assumes that the operator is familiar with using the Distributed Manufacturing Automation and Control Software (DMACS).

  18. A simple formula for emittance growth due to spherical aberration in a solenoid lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.; Phadte, D.; Patidar, C.B.

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the beam dynamics in a solenoid without the paraxial approximation, including up to the fifth order term in the radial displacement. We use this analysis to derive expressions for the coefficients of spherical aberration in terms of the on-axis field profile of the solenoid. Under the thin lens approximation, a simple formula is derived for the growth of rms emittance resulting due to spherical aberration in a solenoid. (author)

  19. Effects of Slip Planes on Stresses in MICE Coupling Solenoid Coil Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, XingLong; Cheng, Y.; Green, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The MICE superconducting coupling solenoid magnet is made from copper matrix Nb-Ti conductors with inner radius of 750 mm, length of 285 mm and thickness of 110.4 mm at room temperature. The coil is to be wound on a mandrel made of aluminum. The peak magnetic field on the conductor is about 7.3 T when fully charged at 210 A. High magnetic field and large size make the stress inside the coupling coil assembly relatively high during cool down and full energizing. The shear stress between coil winding and aluminum casing may cause premature quench. To avoid quench potential induced by stress, slip planes were designed for the coil assembly. In this paper, FE models with and without slip planes for it have been developed to simulate the stresses during the process including winding, cooling down and charging. The stress distribution in the coil assembly with and without slip planes was investigated. The results show that slip planes with low friction coefficients can improve the stress condition in the coil, especially reduce the shear stress largely so that improve the stability.

  20. A double-helix and cross-patterned solenoid used as a wirelessly powered receiver for medical implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shitong; Wang, Hao; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sun, Mingui

    2018-05-01

    Many medical implants need to be designed in the shape of a cylinder (rod), a cuboid or a capsule in order to adapt to a specific site within the human body or facilitate the implantation procedure. In order to wirelessly power these types of implants, a pair of coils, one is located inside the human body and one is outside, is often used. Since most organs such as major muscles, blood vessels, and nerve bundles are anatomically parallel to the body surface, the most desired wireless power transfer (WPT) direction is from the external power transmission pad (a planar coil) to the lateral surface of the implant. However, to obtain optimal coupling, the currently used solenoid coil requires being positioned perpendicular to the body surface, which is often medically or anatomically unacceptable. In this research, a concentric double-helix (DH) coil with an air core is presented for use in implantable devices. Two helical coils are tilted at opposite angles (±45 degrees) to form a cross pattern. The WPT system is designed using the magnetic resonance concept for wireless power transfer (MR-WPT). The power transfer efficiency (PTE) relies on the near-field magnetic coupling which is closely related to the location and orientation of the DH coil. We explain how the novel structure of the DH solenoid magnifies the mutual inductance with the widely adopted circular planner coil and how the PTE is improved in comparison to the case of the conventional solenoid coil. We also study an important case where the double-helix power reception coil is laterally and angularly misaligned with the transmitter. Finally, our computational study using the finite element method and experimental study with actually constructed prototypes are presented which have proven our new double-helix coil design.

  1. A double-helix and cross-patterned solenoid used as a wirelessly powered receiver for medical implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shitong Mao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Many medical implants need to be designed in the shape of a cylinder (rod, a cuboid or a capsule in order to adapt to a specific site within the human body or facilitate the implantation procedure. In order to wirelessly power these types of implants, a pair of coils, one is located inside the human body and one is outside, is often used. Since most organs such as major muscles, blood vessels, and nerve bundles are anatomically parallel to the body surface, the most desired wireless power transfer (WPT direction is from the external power transmission pad (a planar coil to the lateral surface of the implant. However, to obtain optimal coupling, the currently used solenoid coil requires being positioned perpendicular to the body surface, which is often medically or anatomically unacceptable. In this research, a concentric double-helix (DH coil with an air core is presented for use in implantable devices. Two helical coils are tilted at opposite angles (±45 degrees to form a cross pattern. The WPT system is designed using the magnetic resonance concept for wireless power transfer (MR-WPT. The power transfer efficiency (PTE relies on the near-field magnetic coupling which is closely related to the location and orientation of the DH coil. We explain how the novel structure of the DH solenoid magnifies the mutual inductance with the widely adopted circular planner coil and how the PTE is improved in comparison to the case of the conventional solenoid coil. We also study an important case where the double-helix power reception coil is laterally and angularly misaligned with the transmitter. Finally, our computational study using the finite element method and experimental study with actually constructed prototypes are presented which have proven our new double-helix coil design.

  2. Design and fabrication of the PDX poloidal field solenoid utilizing fiberglass reinforced epoxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, K.S.C.

    1975-11-01

    This paper discusses the basic design of the Poloidal Field Solenoid Coil. It will be mainly concerned with the more unique features of the Solenoid such as the copper coil windings and the design of the epoxy-glass structural support mandrels. The center solenoid coil of the PDX machine consists of five different coil systems (OH No. 8, No. 9; NF No. 11; DF No. 7; EF Solenoid and CF No. 9). Three concentric fiberglass reinforced epoxy cylinders fabricated in-house will act as mandrels to support and to house the coils that will result as an integral unit

  3. Beam dynamics of the interaction region solenoid in a linear collider due to a crossing angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tenenbaum

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Future linear colliders may require a nonzero crossing angle between the two beams at the interaction point (IP. This requirement in turn implies that the beams will pass through the strong interaction region solenoid with an angle, and thus that the component of the solenoidal field perpendicular to the beam trajectory is nonzero. The interaction of the beam and the solenoidal field in the presence of a crossing angle will cause optical effects not observed for beams passing through the solenoid on axis; these effects include dispersion, deflection of the beam, and synchrotron radiation effects. For a purely solenoidal field, the optical effects which are relevant to luminosity exactly cancel at the IP when the influence of the solenoid’s fringe field is taken into account. Beam size growth due to synchrotron radiation in the solenoid is proportional to the fifth power of the product of the solenoidal field, the length of the solenoid, and the crossing angle. Examples based on proposed linear collider detector solenoid configurations are presented.

  4. Detection circuit of solenoid valve operation and control rod drive mechanism utilizing the circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Takehiko.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To detect the operation of a plunger and detect opening and closing operations of a solenoid valve driving device due to change in impedance of a coil for driving the solenoid valve to judge normality and abnormality of the solenoid valve, thereby increasing reliance and safety of drive and control apparatus of control rods. Structure: An arrangement comprises a drive and operation detector section wherein the operation of a solenoid driving device for controlling power supply to a coil for driving the solenoid valve to control opening and closing of the solenoid valve, and a plunger operation detector section for detecting change in impedance of the drive coil to detect that the plunger of the solenoid valve is either in the opening direction or closing direction, whereby a predetermined low voltage such as not to activate the solenoid valve even when the solenoid valve is open or closed is applied to detect a current flowing into the coil at that time, thus detecting an operating state of the plunger. (Yoshino, Y.)

  5. Analysis of electromagnetic field of direct action solenoid valve with current changing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qianfeng; Bo Hanliang; Qin Benke

    2009-01-01

    Control rod hydraulic drive mechanism(CRHDM) is a newly invented patent of Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University. The direct action solenoid valve is the key part of this technology, so the performance of the solenoid valve directly affects the function of the CRHDM. With the current and the air gap changing,the electromagnetic field of the direct action solenoid valve was analyzed using the ANSYS software,which was validated by the experiment. The result shows that the electromagnetic force of the solenoid valve increases with the current increasing or the gap between the two armatures decreasing. Further more, the working current was confirmed. (authors)

  6. Gas-mixing system for drift chambers using solenoid valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.E.; Sugano, K.; Trentlage, D.B.

    1983-04-01

    We describe an inexpensive system for mixing argon and ethane drift chamber gas which is used for the E-605 experiment at Fermilab. This system is based on the idea of intermittent mixing of gases with fixed mixing flow rates. A dual-action pressure switch senses the pressure in a mixed gas reservoir tank and operates solenoid valves to control mixing action and regulate reservoir pressure. This system has the advantages that simple controls accurately regulate the mixing ratio and that the mixing ratio is nearly flow rate independent. We also report the results of the gas analysis of various samplings, and the reliability of the system in long-term running

  7. An earthworm-like actuator using segmented solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Bu Hyun; Choi, Seung-Wook; Lee, Seung-Yop; Bang, Young-Bong

    2011-01-01

    A biomimetic actuator is developed using four segmented solenoids mimicking earthworm locomotion. The proposed actuator not only has a simple structure composed of cores and coils, but also enables bi-directional actuation and high speed locomotion regardless of friction conditions. We have implemented theoretical analysis to design the optimal profiles of input current signal for maximum speed and predict the output force and stroke. Experiments using a prototype show that the earthworm-like actuator travels with a speed above 60 mm s −1 regardless of friction conditions

  8. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and small angle neutron scattering studies of thiol capped gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de la Venta, J.; Bouzas, V.; Pucci, A.; Laguna-Marco, M.A.; Haskel, D.; te Velthuis, S.G.E; Hoffmann, A.; Lal, J.; Bleuel, M.; Ruggeri, G.; de Julian Fernandez, C.; Garcia, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) measurements were performed on thiol capped Au nanoparticles (NPs) embedded into polyethylene. An XMCD signal of 0.8 · 10 -4 was found at the Au L 3 edge of thiol capped Au NPs embedded in a polyethylene matrix for which Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometry yielded a saturation magnetization, M s , of 0.06 emu/g Au . SANS measurements showed that the 3.2 nm average-diameter nanoparticles are 28% polydispersed, but no detectable SANS magnetic signal was found with the resolution and sensitivity accessible with the neutron experiment. A comparison with previous experiments carried out on Au NPs and multilayers, yield to different values between XMCD signals and magnetization measured by SQUID magnetometer. We discuss the origin of those differences

  9. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and small angle neutron scattering studies of thiol capped gold nanoparticles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de la Venta, J.; Bouzas, V.; Pucci, A.; Laguna-Marco, M. A.; Haskel, D.; te Velthuis, S. G. E; Hoffmann, A.; Lal, J.; Bleuel, M.; Ruggeri, G.; de Julian Fernandez, C.; Garcia, M. A.; Univ.Complutense de Madrid; Inst. de Magnetismo Aplicado; Univ. of Pisa; Lab. di Magnetismo Molecolare

    2009-01-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) measurements were performed on thiol capped Au nanoparticles (NPs) embedded into polyethylene. An XMCD signal of 0.8 {center_dot} 10{sup -4} was found at the Au L{sub 3} edge of thiol capped Au NPs embedded in a polyethylene matrix for which Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometry yielded a saturation magnetization, M{sub s}, of 0.06 emu/g{sub Au}. SANS measurements showed that the 3.2 nm average-diameter nanoparticles are 28% polydispersed, but no detectable SANS magnetic signal was found with the resolution and sensitivity accessible with the neutron experiment. A comparison with previous experiments carried out on Au NPs and multilayers, yield to different values between XMCD signals and magnetization measured by SQUID magnetometer. We discuss the origin of those differences.

  10. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and small angle neutron scattering study of thiol capped gold nanoparticles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de la Venta, J.; Bouzas, V.; Pucci, A.; Laguna-Marco, M. A.; Haskel, D.; Pinel, E. F.; te Velthuis, S. G. E.; Hoffmann, A.; Lal, J.; Bleuel, M.; Ruggeri, G.; de Julian, C.; Garcia, M. A.; Univ. Complutense de Madrid; Inst. de Magnetismo Aplicado UCM; Univ. Pisa; Univ. di Padova

    2009-11-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) measurements were performed on thiol capped Au nanoparticles (NPs) embedded into polyethylene. An XMCD signal of 0.8 {center_dot} 10{sup -4} was found at the Au L{sub 3} edge of thiol capped Au NPs embedded in a polyethylene matrix for which Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometry yielded a saturation magnetization, M{sub s}, of 0.06 emu/g{sub Au}. SANS measurements showed that the 3.2 nm average-diameter nanoparticles are 28% polydispersed, but no detectable SANS magnetic signal was found with the resolution and sensitivity accessible with the neutron experiment. A comparison with previous experiments carried out on Au NPs and multilayers, yield to different values between XMCD signals and magnetization measured by SQUID magnetometer. We discuss the origin of those differences.

  11. Peristalsis gap sign at cine magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing strangulated small bowel obstruction. Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahara, Taro; Kwee, T.C.; Haradome, Hiroki

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosing strangulated small bowel obstruction (SBO). This study included 38 patients with clinically confirmed SBO who had undergone cine MRI. Cine MRI scans were evaluated regarding the presence of the 'peristalsis gap sign' (referring to an akinetic or severely hypokinetic closed loop), indicating strangulation. Computed tomography (CT) was performed in 34 of 38 patients with (n=25) or without (n=9) contrast enhancement. CT images were evaluated using a combination of criteria (presence of hyperattenuation, poor contrast enhancement, mesenteric edema, wall thickening, massive ascites) indicating strangulation. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of cine MRI and CT for the diagnosis of strangulation were calculated and compared using surgical findings and the clinical course as the reference standard. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of cine MRI were 100%, 92.9%, 83.3%, and 100%, respectively; and those of CT (of which 26.5% was performed without contrast enhancement) were 66.7%, 92.0%, 75.0%, and 88.5%, respectively. There was no significant difference in diagnostic accuracy between the two methods (P=0.375). Cine MRI is a feasible and promising technique for diagnosing strangulation. (author)

  12. Performance verification of the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small explorer (GEMS) x-ray polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Black, J. Kevin; Kitaguchi, Takao; Hayato, Asami; Hill, Joanne E.; Jahoda, Keith; Tamagawa, Toru; Kaneko, Kenta; Takeuchi, Yoko; Yoshikawa, Akifumi; Marlowe, Hannah; Griffiths, Scott; Kaaret, Philip E.; Kenward, David; Khalid, Syed

    2014-07-01

    Polarimetry is a powerful tool for astrophysical observations that has yet to be exploited in the X-ray band. For satellite-borne and sounding rocket experiments, we have developed a photoelectric gas polarimeter to measure X-ray polarization in the 2-10 keV range utilizing a time projection chamber (TPC) and advanced micro-pattern gas electron multiplier (GEM) techniques. We carried out performance verification of a flight equivalent unit (1/4 model) which was planned to be launched on the NASA Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) satellite. The test was performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) facility in April 2013. The polarimeter was irradiated with linearly-polarized monochromatic X-rays between 2.3 and 10.0 keV and scanned with a collimated beam at 5 different detector positions. After a systematic investigation of the detector response, a modulation factor >=35% above 4 keV was obtained with the expected polarization angle. At energies below 4 keV where the photoelectron track becomes short, diffusion in the region between the GEM and readout strips leaves an asymmetric photoelectron image. A correction method retrieves an expected modulation angle, and the expected modulation factor, ~20% at 2.7 keV. Folding the measured values of modulation through an instrument model gives sensitivity, parameterized by minimum detectable polarization (MDP), nearly identical to that assumed at the preliminary design review (PDR).

  13. Ultra-small superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide in magnetic resonance imaging of cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stirrat CG

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Colin G Stirrat,1 Alex T Vesey,1 Olivia MB McBride,1 Jennifer MJ Robson,1 Shirjel R Alam,1 William A Wallace,2 Scott I Semple,1,3 Peter A Henriksen,1 David E Newby1 1British Heart Foundation Centre for Cardiovascular Science, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; 2Department of Pathology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; 3Clinical Research Imaging Centre, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK Abstract: Ultra-small superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide (USPIO are iron-oxide based contrast agents that enhance and complement in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI by shortening T1, T2, and T2* relaxation times. USPIO can be employed to provide immediate blood pool contrast, or to act as subsequent markers of cellular inflammation through uptake by inflammatory cells. They can also be targeted to specific cell-surface markers using antibody or ligand labeling. This review will discuss the application of USPIO contrast in MRI studies of cardiovascular disease. Keywords: cardiac, aortic, MRI, USPIO, carotid, vascular, molecular imaging

  14. Equilibrium geometries, electronic and magnetic properties of small AunNi- (n = 1-9) clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cui-Ming; Chen, Xiao-Xu; Yang, Xiang-Dong

    2014-05-01

    Geometrical, electronic and magnetic properties of small AunNi- (n = 1-9) clusters have been investigated based on density functional theory (DFT) at PW91P86 level. An extensive structural search shows that the relative stable structures of AunNi- (n = 1-9) clusters adopt 2D structure for n = 1-5, 7 and 3D structure for n = 6, 8-9. And the substitution of a Ni atom for an Au atom in the Au-n+1 cluster obviously changes the structure of the host cluster. Moreover, an odd-even alternation phenomenon has been found for HOMO-LUMO energy gaps, indicating that the relative stable structures of the AunNi- clusters with odd-numbered gold atoms have a higher relative stability. Finally, the natural population analysis (NPA) and the vertical detachment energies (VDE) are studied, respectively. The theoretical values of VDE are reported for the first time to our best knowledge.

  15. Effects of small magnetic fields on the critical current of thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passos, Wagner de Assis Cangussu; Lisboa-Filho, Paulo Noronha; Ortiz, Wilson Aires; Kang, W.N.; Choi, Eun-Mi; Hyeong-Jin, Kim; Lee, Sung-Ik Lee

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic fields applied perpendicularly to superconducting thin films may produce dendritic patterns, where penetrated and Meissner regions coexist, as observed in Nb, YBaCuO and MgB 2 [1]. A temperature-dependent limiting-field, Hd(T), separates the dendritic mode from a critical-state-like penetration regime. Due to large demagnetizing factors in the perpendicular geometry, small fields may be enough to drive portions of the sample into the mixed state. Lack of symmetry and local defects might then permeate the dendritic mode. Hd(T) is related[2] to the bulk lower critical field, Hc1, which depends on the in-plane current density, J. Not surprisingly, Hd is depressed by J[3]. The dendritic mode can be detected by the AC-susceptibility: penetrated fingers act as intergranular material, and the imaginary component peaks at Tc-inter(J). Films of 0.2-0.4 microns, with millimeter lateral sizes, develop dendrites when submitted to Earth's field[2], what limits the critical current, J c . This contribution studies how J c is affected by field-induced granularity in thin films. 1. C. A. Duran et al., PRB 52 (1995) 75; P. Leiderer et al., PRL. 71 (1993) 2646; T.H. Johansen et al., Supercond. Sci. Technol. 14 (2001) 1. 2. W. A. Ortiz et al., Physica C 361 (2001) 267. 3. A. V. Bobyl et al., cond-mat/0201260, submitted to APL

  16. Performance Verification of the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer GEMS X-Ray Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Black, J. Kevin; Kitaguchi, Takao; Hayato, Asami; Hill, Joanne E.; Jahoda, Keith; Tamagawa, Toru; Kanako, Kenta; Takeuchi, Yoko; Yoshikawa, Akifumi; hide

    2014-01-01

    olarimetry is a powerful tool for astrophysical observations that has yet to be exploited in the X-ray band. For satellite-borne and sounding rocket experiments, we have developed a photoelectric gas polarimeter to measure X-ray polarization in the 2-10 keV range utilizing a time projection chamber (TPC) and advanced micro-pattern gas electron multiplier (GEM) techniques. We carried out performance verification of a flight equivalent unit (1/4 model) which was planned to be launched on the NASA Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) satellite. The test was performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) facility in April 2013. The polarimeter was irradiated with linearly-polarized monochromatic X-rays between 2.3 and 10.0 keV and scanned with a collimated beam at 5 different detector positions. After a systematic investigation of the detector response, a modulation factor greater than or equal to 35% above 4 keV was obtained with the expected polarization angle. At energies below 4 keV where the photoelectron track becomes short, diffusion in the region between the GEM and readout strips leaves an asymmetric photoelectron image. A correction method retrieves an expected modulation angle, and the expected modulation factor, approximately 20% at 2.7 keV. Folding the measured values of modulation through an instrument model gives sensitivity, parameterized by minimum detectable polarization (MDP), nearly identical to that assumed at the preliminary design review (PDR).

  17. TU-H-CAMPUS-TeP1-03: Magnetically Focused Proton Irradiation of Small Volume Radiosurgery Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAuley, GA; Slater, JM [Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Wroe, AJ [Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of magnetic focusing for small volume proton radiosurgery targets using a triplet combination of quadrupole rare earth permanent magnet Halbach cylinder assemblies Methods: Fourteen quadrupole magnets consisting of 24 segments of radiation hard samarium-cobalt adhered into k=3 Halbach cylinders with various field gradients (100 to 250 T/m) were designed and manufactured. Triplet combinations of the magnets were placed on a positioning track on our Gantry 1 treatment table. Unmodulated 127 MeV proton beams with initial diameters of 3 to 20 mm were delivered to a water tank using single-stage scattering. Depth and transverse dose distributions were measured using a PTW PR60020 diode detector and EBT3 film, respectively. This data was compared with unfocused passively collimated beams. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed - both for comparison with experimental data and to further investigate the potential of triplet magnetic focusing. Results: Experimental results using 150 T/m gradient magnets and 15 to 20 mm initial diameter beams show peak to entrance dose ratios that are ∼ 43 to 48 % larger compared with spot size matched 8 mm collimated beams (ie, transverse profile full-widths at 90% maximum dose match within 0.5 mm of focused beams). In addition, the focusing beams were ∼ 3 to 4.4 times more efficient per MU in dose to target delivery. Additional results using different magnet combinations will also be presented. Conclusion: Our results suggest that triplet magnetic focusing could reduce entrance dose and beam number while delivering dose to small (∼≤ 10 mm diameter) radiosurgery targets in less time compared to unfocused beams. Immediate clinical applications include those associated with proton radiosurgery and functional radiosurgery of the brain and spine, however other treatment sites can be also envisioned. This project was sponsored with funding from the Department of Defense (DOD# W81XWH-BAA-10-1).

  18. Use of a magnetic force exciter to vibrate a piezocomposite generating element in a small-scale windmill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luong, Hung Truyen; Goo, Nam Seo

    2012-01-01

    A piezocomposite generating element (PCGE) can be used to convert ambient vibrations into electrical energy that can be stored and used to power other devices. This paper introduces a design of a magnetic force exciter for a small-scale windmill that vibrates a PCGE to convert wind energy into electrical energy. A small-scale windmill was designed to be sensitive to low-speed wind in urban regions for the purpose of collecting wind energy. The magnetic force exciter consists of exciting magnets attached to the device’s input rotor and a secondary magnet fixed at the tip of the PCGE. The PCGE is fixed to a clamp that can be adjusted to slide on the windmill’s frame in order to change the gap between exciting and secondary magnets. Under an applied wind force, the input rotor rotates to create a magnetic force interaction that excites the PCGE. The deformation of the PCGE enables it to generate electric power. Experiments were performed with different numbers of exciting magnets and different gaps between the exciting and secondary magnets to determine the optimal configuration for generating the peak voltage and harvesting the maximum wind energy for the same range of wind speeds. In a battery-charging test, the charging time for a 40 mA h battery was approximately 3 h for natural wind in an urban region. The experimental results show that the prototype can harvest energy in urban regions with low wind speeds and convert the wasted wind energy into electricity for city use. (paper)

  19. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  20. Production of achromatic spots with a beam transport system consisting only of quadrupoles and/or solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbach, K.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of some unfinished work that may have a bearing on the problem of producing a small beam spot on a target for heavy ion fusion. One of the important results obtained so far is an existence proof that shows that it is possible, at least in principle, to design systems, containing only quadrupoles and/or solenoids, with vanishing first and second derivatives of the spotsize with respect to momentum both at the target and at the exit of the last lens