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Sample records for small shallow conductive

  1. Limnological evaluation of the fisheries potentials and productivity of a small shallow tropical African reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Moshood K

    2009-12-01

    Morphometrics and physico-chemical parameters of Oyun reservoir, Offa, Nigeria (a small shallow tropical African Reservoir) were used to estimate the potential fish yield of the reservoir according to the morpho-edaphic index (MEI). Physico-chemical characteristics of the water body were sampled monthly from three stations between January 2002 and December 2003 with standard methods. Estimates of the potential fish yield were obtained using the physico-chemical characteristics of the reservoir and the relationship Y = 23.281 MEI(0.447), where Y is the potential fish yield in kg/ha, MEI is the morpho-edaphic index (given in microS/cm and estimated by dividing the mean conductivity by the mean depth). The reservoir mean depth and conductivity values were 2.6m and 113.10 microS/cm respectively, while its potential fish yield was estimated at 125.72 kg/ha. This estimate was higher than other small shallower and larger African reservoirs. The reservoir high ionic content, high nutrient and dissolved oxygen levels, good pH, low level of pollution and shallow depth were responsible for the high estimate of the fish yield. In order to realize this high potential fish yield and sustainable exploration of the fisheries, effective management of the reservoir to curb eutrophication should be adopted, while other management practices such as stocking and conservation of desirable and indigenous fish species, implementation of fishing regulations and adoption of best management practices should be implemented.

  2. Phytoplankton assemblage of a small, shallow, tropical African reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Moshood K

    2009-12-01

    I measured physico-chemical properties and phytoplankton in the small, shallow tropical reservoir of Oyun (Offa, Nigeria) between January 2002 and December 2003. I identified 25 phytoplankton genera in three sampling stations. Bacillariophyceae dominated (75.3%), followed by Chlorophyceae (12.2%), Cyanobacteria (11.1%) and Desmidiaceae (0.73%). The high amount of nutrients (e.g. nitrate, phosphate, sulphate and silica) explain phytoplankton heterogeneity (p<0.05). Phytoplankton was abundant during the rainy season, but the transition period had the richest assemblage and abundance. Fluctuations in phytoplankton density were a result of seasonal changes in concentration of nutrients, grazing pressure and reservoir hydrology. The reservoir is eutrophic with excellent water quality and a diverse phytoplankton assemblage: fish production would be high. These conditions resulted from strategies such as watershed best management practices (BMPs) to control eutrophication and sedimentation, and priorities for water usage established through legislation. Additional measures are recommended to prevent oligotrophy, hypereutrophy, excessive phytoplankton bloom, toxic cyanobacteria, and run-off of organic waste and salts.

  3. Phytoplankton assemblage of a small, shallow, tropical African reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshood K Mustapha

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available I measured physico-chemical properties and phytoplankton in the small, shallow tropical reservoir of Oyun (Offa, Nigeria between January 2002 and December 2003. I identified 25 phytoplankton genera in three sampling stations. Bacillariophyceae dominated (75.3%, followed by Chlorophyceae (12.2%, Cyanobacteria (11.1% and Desmidiaceae (0.73%. The high amount of nutrients (e.g. nitrate, phosphate, sulphate and silica explain phytoplankton heterogeneity (pInvestigué las propiedades físico-químicas y el fitoplancton del pequeño embalse tropical Oyun (Offa, Nigeria entre enero de 2002 y diciembre de 2003, para determinar el efecto de las propiedades físico-químicas en el fitoplancton y la producción de peces. En las tres estaciones estudiadas identifiqué 25 géneros de fitoplancton pertenecientes a cuatro clases. Bacillariophyceae dominó (75.3%, seguida de Chlorophyceae (12.2%, Desmidiaceae (11.1% y Cianobacteria (0.73%. La gran cantidad de nutrientes (e.g. nitrato, fosfato, sulfato y sílice explica la heterogeneidad del fitoplancton (p<0.05, el cual fue abundante durante la época de lluvias. La zona de transición de la reserva tuvo el conjunto más rico y abundante. Las fluctuaciones en la densidad del fitoplancton fueron resultado de la concentración estacional de los nutrientes, la presión del forrajeo y la hidrología. El embalse es eutrófico con agua excelente y fitoplancton diverso, y por tanto su producción pesquera sería alta. Estas condiciones son consecuencia de estrategias como mejores prácticas de gestión de cuencas (BPM para controlar la eutroficación y la sedimentación, y el establecimiento de prioridades legales para un buen uso del agua. Recomiendo medidas adicionales contra la oligotrofía, la hipereutrofia, el exceso de fitoplancton, las cianobacterias tóxicas, las escorrentías de residuos orgánicos y el exceso de sales disueltas.

  4. SMALL ROV MARINE BOAT FOR BATHYMETRY SURVEYS OF SHALLOW WATERS – POTENTIAL IMPLEMENTATION IN MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. T. Suhari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Current practices in bathymetry survey (available method are indeed having some limitations. New technologies for bathymetry survey such as using unmanned boat has becoming popular in developed countries - filled in and served those limitations of existing survey methods. Malaysia as one of tropical country has it own river/water body characteristics and suitable approaches in conducting bathymetry survey. Thus, a study on this emerging technology should be conducted using enhanced version of small ROV boat with Malaysian rivers and best approaches so that the surveyors get benefits from the innovative surveying product. Among the available ROV boat for bathymetry surveying in the market, an Indonesian product called SHUMOO is among the promising products – economically and practically proven using a few sample areas in Indonesia. The boat was equipped and integrated with systems of remote sensing technology, GNSS, echo sounder and navigational engine. It was designed for riverbed surveys on shallow area such as small /medium river, lakes, reservoirs, oxidation/detention pond and other water bodies. This paper tries to highlight the needs and enhancement offered to Malaysian’ bathymetry surveyors/practitioners on the new ROV boat which make their task easier, faster, safer, economically effective and better riverbed modelling results. The discussion continues with a sample of Indonesia river (data collection and modelling since it is mostly similar to Malaysia’s river characteristics and suggests some improvement for Malaysia best practice.

  5. Small Rov Marine Boat for Bathymetry Surveys of Shallow Waters - Potential Implementation in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhari, K. T.; Karim, H.; Gunawan, P. H.; Purwanto, H.

    2017-10-01

    Current practices in bathymetry survey (available method) are indeed having some limitations. New technologies for bathymetry survey such as using unmanned boat has becoming popular in developed countries - filled in and served those limitations of existing survey methods. Malaysia as one of tropical country has it own river/water body characteristics and suitable approaches in conducting bathymetry survey. Thus, a study on this emerging technology should be conducted using enhanced version of small ROV boat with Malaysian rivers and best approaches so that the surveyors get benefits from the innovative surveying product. Among the available ROV boat for bathymetry surveying in the market, an Indonesian product called SHUMOO is among the promising products - economically and practically proven using a few sample areas in Indonesia. The boat was equipped and integrated with systems of remote sensing technology, GNSS, echo sounder and navigational engine. It was designed for riverbed surveys on shallow area such as small /medium river, lakes, reservoirs, oxidation/detention pond and other water bodies. This paper tries to highlight the needs and enhancement offered to Malaysian' bathymetry surveyors/practitioners on the new ROV boat which make their task easier, faster, safer, economically effective and better riverbed modelling results. The discussion continues with a sample of Indonesia river (data collection and modelling) since it is mostly similar to Malaysia's river characteristics and suggests some improvement for Malaysia best practice.

  6. Predominant constitutive CFTR conductance in small airways

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    Lytle Christian

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathological hallmarks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are inflammation of the small airways (bronchiolitis and destruction of lung parenchyma (emphysema. These forms of disease arise from chronic prolonged infections, which are usually never present in the normal lung. Despite the fact that primary hygiene and defense of the airways presumably requires a well controlled fluid environment on the surface of the bronchiolar airway, very little is known of the fluid and electrolyte transport properties of airways of less than a few mm diameter. Methods We introduce a novel approach to examine some of these properties in a preparation of minimally traumatized porcine bronchioles of about 1 mm diameter by microperfusing the intact bronchiole. Results In bilateral isotonic NaCl Ringer solutions, the spontaneous transepithelial potential (TEP; lumen to bath of the bronchiole was small (mean ± sem: -3 ± 1 mV; n = 25, but when gluconate replaced luminal Cl-, the bionic Cl- diffusion potentials (-58 ± 3 mV; n = 25 were as large as -90 mV. TEP diffusion potentials from 2:1 NaCl dilution showed that epithelial Cl- permeability was at least 5 times greater than Na+ permeability. The anion selectivity sequence was similar to that of CFTR. The bionic TEP became more electronegative with stimulation by luminal forskolin (5 μM+IBMX (100 μM, ATP (100 μM, or adenosine (100 μM, but not by ionomycin. The TEP was partially inhibited by NPPB (100 μM, GlyH-101* (5–50 μM, and CFTRInh-172* (5 μM. RT-PCR gave identifying products for CFTR, α-, β-, and γ-ENaC and NKCC1. Antibodies to CFTR localized specifically to the epithelial cells lining the lumen of the small airways. Conclusion These results indicate that the small airway of the pig is characterized by a constitutively active Cl- conductance that is most likely due to CFTR.

  7. Investigation on shallow groundwater in a small basin using natural radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Hiromasa; Komae, Takami

    1996-01-01

    The authors conducted an investigation on shallow groundwater using natural radioisotopes as indicators in the small basin of the Hinuma River, Kasama City, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan. 3 H concentrations in the groundwater showed that it originated from precipitation in the 1960's. Since 222 Rn concentrations decreased as groundwater flowed downstream, they were influenced by infiltration of surface water. Especially, during the irrigation period, the decrease of 222 Rn concentrations was remarkable in the lowland. From the distribution of 222 Rn concentrations in surface water, the sections where groundwater seeped into a river were found, and a quantitative analysis of groundwater seepage in the two sections was conducted on the basis of 222 Rn concentrations in groundwater and in surface water. The ratios of groundwater seepage to the flow at the upstream station for the two sections were about 5% and 10%, respectively. The water movement within the basin, i.e., the actual manner in which surface water infiltrated underground and groundwater seeped into a river, was clarified by analyzing the variations of natural radioisotope concentrations in water and the water balance of the basin. (author)

  8. Vertical Hydraulic Conductivity of Unsaturated Zone by Infiltrometer Analysis of Shallow Groundwater Regime (KUISG

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    Arkan Radhi Ali

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A hydrogeologic model was developed and carried out in Taleaa district of 67km2 . The study adopted a determination of KUISG depends upon the double rings infiltrometer model. The tests were carried out in a part of Mesopotamian  Zone which is covered with quaternary deposits  . In general the groundwater levels are about one meter below ground surface.  Theoretically, the inclination angle of the saturated water phase plays an important role in the determination of KUISG. The experimental results prove that the angle of inclination of the saturated phase is identical to the angle of internal friction of the soil. This conclusion is supported by the comparison of the results that obtained from falling head test and infiltrometer measurements for estimating the hydraulic conductivitiy values for ten locations within the study area. The determination of vertical hydraulic conductivity by current infiltrometer model is constrained to only the shallow groundwater regime.7

  9. Root reinforcement and its implications in shallow landsliding susceptibility on a small alpine catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, M. C.; Farabegoli, E.; Onorevoli, G.

    2012-04-01

    Roots shear resistance offers a considerable contribution to hill-slope stability on vegetated terrains. Through the pseudo-cohesion of shrubs, trees and turf's roots, the geomechanical properties of soils can be drastically increased, exerting a positive influence on the hillslope stability. We analysed the shallow landsliding susceptibility of a small alpine catchment (Duron valley, Central Dolomites, Italy) that we consider representative of a wide altitude belt of the Dolomites (1800 - 2400 m a.s.l). The catchment is mostly mantled by grass (Nardetum strictae s.l.), with clustered shrubs (Rhododendron hirsutum and Juniperus nana), and trees (Pinus cembra, Larix decidua and Picea abies). The soil depth, investigated with direct and indirect methods, ranges from 0 to 180 cm, with its peak at the hollow axes. Locally, the bedrock, made of Triassic volcanic rocks, is deeply incised by the Holocene drainage network. Intensive grazing of cows and horses pervades the catchment area and cattle-trails occupy ca 20% of the grass cover. We used laboratory and field tests to characterize the geotechnical properties of these alpine soils; moreover we designed and tested an experimental device that measures, in situ, the shear strengths of the grass mantle. In the study area we mapped 18 shallow landslides, mostly related to road cuts and periodically reactivated as retrogressive landslides. The triggering mechanisms of these shallow landslides were qualitatively analysed at large scale and modelled at smaller scale. We used SHALSTAB to model the shallow landsliding susceptibility of the catchment at the basin scale and SLIDE (RocScience) to compute the Safety Factor at the versant scale. Qualitative management solutions are provided, in order to reduce the shallow landsliding susceptibility risk in this alpine context.

  10. Complex communities of small protists and unexpected occurrence of typical marine lineages in shallow freshwater systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Marianne; Jardillier, Ludwig; Deschamps, Philippe; Moreira, David; Restoux, Gwendal; Bertolino, Paola; López-García, Purificación

    2015-10-01

    Although inland water bodies are more heterogeneous and sensitive to environmental variation than oceans, the diversity of small protists in these ecosystems is much less well known. Some molecular surveys of lakes exist, but little information is available from smaller, shallower and often ephemeral freshwater systems, despite their global distribution and ecological importance. We carried out a comparative study based on massive pyrosequencing of amplified 18S rRNA gene fragments of protists in the 0.2-5 μm size range in one brook and four shallow ponds located in the Natural Regional Park of the Chevreuse Valley, France. Our study revealed a wide diversity of small protists, with 812 stringently defined operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to the recognized eukaryotic supergroups (SAR--Stramenopiles, Alveolata, Rhizaria--Archaeplastida, Excavata, Amoebozoa, Opisthokonta) and to groups of unresolved phylogenetic position (Cryptophyta, Haptophyta, Centrohelida, Katablepharida, Telonemida, Apusozoa). Some OTUs represented deep-branching lineages (Cryptomycota, Aphelida, Colpodellida, Tremulida, clade-10 Cercozoa, HAP-1 Haptophyta). We identified several lineages previously thought to be marine including, in addition to MAST-2 and MAST-12, already detected in freshwater, MAST-3 and possibly MAST-6. Protist community structures were different in the five ecosystems. These differences did not correlate with geographical distances, but seemed to be influenced by environmental parameters. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Analytical solutions for the surface response to small amplitude perturbations in boundary data in the shallow-ice-stream approximation

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    G. H. Gudmundsson

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available New analytical solutions describing the effects of small-amplitude perturbations in boundary data on flow in the shallow-ice-stream approximation are presented. These solutions are valid for a non-linear Weertman-type sliding law and for Newtonian ice rheology. Comparison is made with corresponding solutions of the shallow-ice-sheet approximation, and with solutions of the full Stokes equations. The shallow-ice-stream approximation is commonly used to describe large-scale ice stream flow over a weak bed, while the shallow-ice-sheet approximation forms the basis of most current large-scale ice sheet models. It is found that the shallow-ice-stream approximation overestimates the effects of bed topography perturbations on surface profile for wavelengths less than about 5 to 10 ice thicknesses, the exact number depending on values of surface slope and slip ratio. For high slip ratios, the shallow-ice-stream approximation gives a very simple description of the relationship between bed and surface topography, with the corresponding transfer amplitudes being close to unity for any given wavelength. The shallow-ice-stream estimates for the timescales that govern the transient response of ice streams to external perturbations are considerably more accurate than those based on the shallow-ice-sheet approximation. In particular, in contrast to the shallow-ice-sheet approximation, the shallow-ice-stream approximation correctly reproduces the short-wavelength limit of the kinematic phase speed given by solving a linearised version of the full Stokes system. In accordance with the full Stokes solutions, the shallow-ice-sheet approximation predicts surface fields to react weakly to spatial variations in basal slipperiness with wavelengths less than about 10 to 20 ice thicknesses.

  12. Spatial and temporal variability of greenhouse gas emissions from a small and shallow temperate lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praetzel, Leandra; Schmiedeskamp, Marcel; Broder, Tanja; Hüttemann, Caroline; Jansen, Laura; Metzelder, Ulrike; Wallis, Ronya; Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Blodau, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Small inland waters (spots" and "hot moments" that could contribute significantly to total emissions. To address this knowledge gap, we determined CO2 and CH4 emissions and dynamics to identify their controlling environmental factors in a polymictic small (1.4 ha) and shallow (max. depth approx. 1.5 m) crater lake ("Windsborn") in the Eifel uplands in south-west Germany. As Lake Windsborn has a small catchment area (8 ha) and no surficial inflows, it serves well as a model system for the identification of factors and processes controlling emissions. In 2015, 2016 and 2017 we measured CO2 and CH4 gas fluxes with different techniques across the sediment/water and water/atmosphere interface. Atmospheric exchange was measured using mini-chambers equipped with CO2 sensors and with an infra-red greenhouse gas analyzer for high temporal resolution flux measurements. Ebullition of CH4 was quantified with funnel traps. Sediment properties were examined using pore-water peepers. All measurements were carried out along a transect covering both littoral and central parts of the lake. Moreover, a weather station on a floating platform in the center of the lake recorded meteorological data as well as CO2 concentration in different depths of the water column. So far, Lake Windsborn seems to be a source for both CO2 and CH4 on an annual scale. CO2 emissions generally increased from spring to summer. Even though CO2 uptake could be observed during some periods in spring and fall, CO2 emissions in the summer exceeded the uptake. CO2 and CH4 emissions also appeared to be spatially variable between littoral areas and the inner lake. Shallow areas turned out to be "hot spots" of CO2 emissions whereas CH4 emissions were - against our expectations - highest in the center of the lake. Moreover, CH4 ebullition contributed substantially to total CH4 emissions. Our results show the importance of spatially and temporally highly resolved long-term measurements of greenhouse gas emissions and

  13. Transient shallow reservoirs beneath small eruptive centres: Constraints from Mg-Fe interdiffusion in olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, E.; Parada, M. A.; Morgan, D. J.; Gutiérrez, F.; Castruccio, A.; Contreras, C.

    2017-11-01

    Small eruptive centres commonly have more primitive lavas than those associated with stratovolcanoes, an observation that has been taken to indicate a short magma residence in the crust relative to those reservoirs below stratovolcanoes. The Caburgua cones of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone from a basaltic small eruptive centre where this can be tested. Here, we use MELTS simulations, and the available thermobarometry data to determine the conditions of olivine crystal rim formation and the Mg-Fe diffusion modelling to determine the magma residence times of those rims in the crust. Results yield timescales varying from a few days to dozens of days, and if freezing is to be avoided, can only be explained by some form of storage or slow transport through at least one shallow magma body. The longest durations of magma residence seen in the olivine rim zones are up to 471 days. These timescales are shorter than those estimated (decadal) from the nearby, more-differentiated, and well-established stratovolcano, Villarrica, which has a dominantly basaltic andesite composition. For Caburgua cones, we propose the existence of a transient reservoir, in contrast to a long-lived reservoir such as that inferred beneath the adjacent Villarrica stratovolcano.

  14. Theorizing Small Children’s Conduct of Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røn Larsen, Maja; Stanek, Anja Hvidtfeldt

    The aim of this paper is to relate the concept conduct of everyday life to small children (ages 0 to 3 years). The paper will contribute to the understanding of small children’s common and shared lives in day care or public nursery, as well as their developmental and social learning processes......, 2011). We thus approach the empirical and theoretical challenge related to the study of small children’s every day life through analysis of the dialectic relation of the small child as a subject with agency, participating in societal contexts in which the child develops and learns. Accordingly, we...... argue that children develop their conduct of everyday life though play and learning in interconnected social practices among peers, parents and professionals. These activities take place in- and across various societal settings, such as home and institutional arrangements, e.g. nursery or day care. We...

  15. Small-scale distribution and diel vertical migration of zooplankton in a shallow lake (Lake Naardermeer, the Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerbin, S.; Balayla, D.; Van de Bund, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    Small scale distribution and diurnal migration of zooplankton were investigated in lake Naardermeer, a shallow lake largely covered by uniform Chara beds. For sampling, pattern samplers with a number of inverted funnels facing towards the lake bottom and held in a frame were used. Samplers were

  16. Small habitat size and isolation can promote species richness: second-order effects on biodiversity in shallow lakes and ponds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, M.; Van Geest, G.J.; Zimmer, K.; Jeppesen, E.; Søndergaard, M.; Butler, M.G.; Hanson, M.A.; Declerck, S.A.J.; De Meester, L.

    2006-01-01

    Contemporary ecological landscape planning is often based on the assumption that small isolated habitat patches sustain relatively few species. Here, we suggest that for shallow lakes and ponds, the opposite can be true for some groups of organisms. Fish communities tend to be poor or even absent in

  17. Characteristics and Propagation of Airgun Pulses in Shallow Water with Implications for Effects on Small Marine Mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Line Hermannsen

    Full Text Available Airguns used in seismic surveys are among the most prevalent and powerful anthropogenic noise sources in marine habitats. They are designed to produce most energy below 100 Hz, but the pulses have also been reported to contain medium-to-high frequency components with the potential to affect small marine mammals, which have their best hearing sensitivity at higher frequencies. In shallow water environments, inhabited by many of such species, the impact of airgun noise may be particularly challenging to assess due to complex propagation conditions. To alleviate the current lack of knowledge on the characteristics and propagation of airgun pulses in shallow water with implications for effects on small marine mammals, we recorded pulses from a single airgun with three operating volumes (10 in3, 25 in3 and 40 in3 at six ranges (6, 120, 200, 400, 800 and 1300 m in a uniform shallow water habitat using two calibrated Reson 4014 hydrophones and four DSG-Ocean acoustic data recorders. We show that airgun pulses in this shallow habitat propagated out to 1300 meters in a way that can be approximated by a 18log(r geometric transmission loss model, but with a high pass filter effect from the shallow water depth. Source levels were back-calculated to 192 dB re µPa2s (sound exposure level and 200 dB re 1 µPa dB Leq-fast (rms over 125 ms duration, and the pulses contained substantial energy up to 10 kHz, even at the furthest recording station at 1300 meters. We conclude that the risk of causing hearing damage when using single airguns in shallow waters is small for both pinnipeds and porpoises. However, there is substantial potential for significant behavioral responses out to several km from the airgun, well beyond the commonly used shut-down zone of 500 meters.

  18. Characteristics and Propagation of Airgun Pulses in Shallow Water with Implications for Effects on Small Marine Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermannsen, Line; Tougaard, Jakob; Beedholm, Kristian; Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2015-01-01

    Airguns used in seismic surveys are among the most prevalent and powerful anthropogenic noise sources in marine habitats. They are designed to produce most energy below 100 Hz, but the pulses have also been reported to contain medium-to-high frequency components with the potential to affect small marine mammals, which have their best hearing sensitivity at higher frequencies. In shallow water environments, inhabited by many of such species, the impact of airgun noise may be particularly challenging to assess due to complex propagation conditions. To alleviate the current lack of knowledge on the characteristics and propagation of airgun pulses in shallow water with implications for effects on small marine mammals, we recorded pulses from a single airgun with three operating volumes (10 in3, 25 in3 and 40 in3) at six ranges (6, 120, 200, 400, 800 and 1300 m) in a uniform shallow water habitat using two calibrated Reson 4014 hydrophones and four DSG-Ocean acoustic data recorders. We show that airgun pulses in this shallow habitat propagated out to 1300 meters in a way that can be approximated by a 18log(r) geometric transmission loss model, but with a high pass filter effect from the shallow water depth. Source levels were back-calculated to 192 dB re µPa2s (sound exposure level) and 200 dB re 1 µPa dB Leq-fast (rms over 125 ms duration), and the pulses contained substantial energy up to 10 kHz, even at the furthest recording station at 1300 meters. We conclude that the risk of causing hearing damage when using single airguns in shallow waters is small for both pinnipeds and porpoises. However, there is substantial potential for significant behavioral responses out to several km from the airgun, well beyond the commonly used shut-down zone of 500 meters.

  19. Deep vs shallow nature of oxygen vacancies and consequent n -type carrier concentrations in transparent conducting oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckeridge, J.; Catlow, C. R. A.; Farrow, M. R.; Logsdail, A. J.; Scanlon, D. O.; Keal, T. W.; Sherwood, P.; Woodley, S. M.; Sokol, A. A.; Walsh, A.

    2018-05-01

    The source of n -type conductivity in undoped transparent conducting oxides has been a topic of debate for several decades. The point defect of most interest in this respect is the oxygen vacancy, but there are many conflicting reports on the shallow versus deep nature of its related electronic states. Here, using a hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical embedded cluster approach, we have computed formation and ionization energies of oxygen vacancies in three representative transparent conducting oxides: In2O3 ,SnO2, and ZnO. We find that, in all three systems, oxygen vacancies form well-localized, compact donors. We demonstrate, however, that such compactness does not preclude the possibility of these states being shallow in nature, by considering the energetic balance between the vacancy binding electrons that are in localized orbitals or in effective-mass-like diffuse orbitals. Our results show that, thermodynamically, oxygen vacancies in bulk In2O3 introduce states above the conduction band minimum that contribute significantly to the observed conductivity properties of undoped samples. For ZnO and SnO2, the states are deep, and our calculated ionization energies agree well with thermochemical and optical experiments. Our computed equilibrium defect and carrier concentrations, however, demonstrate that these deep states may nevertheless lead to significant intrinsic n -type conductivity under reducing conditions at elevated temperatures. Our study indicates the importance of oxygen vacancies in relation to intrinsic carrier concentrations not only in In2O3 , but also in SnO2 and ZnO.

  20. Slope instability caused by small variations in hydraulic conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M.E.

    1997-01-01

    Variations in hydraulic conductivity can greatly modify hillslope ground-water flow fields, effective-stress fields, and slope stability. In materials with uniform texture, hydraulic conductivities can vary over one to two orders of magnitude, yet small variations can be difficult to determine. The destabilizing effects caused by small (one order of magnitude or less) hydraulic conductivity variations using ground-water flow modeling, finite-element deformation analysis, and limit-equilibrium analysis are examined here. Low hydraulic conductivity materials that impede downslope ground-water flow can create unstable areas with locally elevated pore-water pressures. The destabilizing effects of small hydraulic heterogeneities can be as great as those induced by typical variations in the frictional strength (approximately 4??-8??) of texturally similar materials. Common "worst-case" assumptions about ground-water flow, such as a completely saturated "hydrostatic" pore-pressure distribution, do not account for locally elevated pore-water pressures and may not provide a conservative slope stability analysis. In site characterization, special attention should be paid to any materials that might impede downslope ground-water flow and create unstable regions.

  1. Endothelial Small- and Intermediate-Conductance KCa Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Heike; Köhler, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT:: Most cardiovascular researchers are familiar with intermediate-conductance KCa3.1 and small-conductance KCa2.3 channels because of their contribution to endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH). However, to immunologists and neuroscientists these channels are primarily known...... for their role in lymphocyte activation and neuronal excitability. KCa3.1 is involved in the proliferation and migration of T cells, B cell, mast cells, macrophages, fibroblasts and dedifferentiated vascular smooth muscle cells and is, therefore, being pursued as a potential target for use in asthma...

  2. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Hawaiian Archipelago in 2013 (NCEI Accession 0161327)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  3. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Hawaiian Archipelago since 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  4. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Mariana Archipelago in 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  5. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across American Samoa in 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  6. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Pacific Remote Island Areas since 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  7. Method for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Small Samples Having Very Low Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria a.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a hot plate method capable of using air as a standard reference material for the steady-state measurement of the thermal conductivity of very small test samples having thermal conductivity on the order of air. As with other approaches, care is taken to ensure that the heat flow through the test sample is essentially one-dimensional. However, unlike other approaches, no attempt is made to use heated guards to block the flow of heat from the hot plate to the surroundings. It is argued that since large correction factors must be applied to account for guard imperfections when sample dimensions are small, it may be preferable to simply measure and correct for the heat that flows from the heater disc to directions other than into the sample. Experimental measurements taken in a prototype apparatus, combined with extensive computational modeling of the heat transfer in the apparatus, show that sufficiently accurate measurements can be obtained to allow determination of the thermal conductivity of low thermal conductivity materials. Suggestions are made for further improvements in the method based on results from regression analyses of the generated data.

  8. Bottom friction models for shallow water equations: Manning’s roughness coefficient and small-scale bottom heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyakonova, Tatyana; Khoperskov, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    The correct description of the surface water dynamics in the model of shallow water requires accounting for friction. To simulate a channel flow in the Chezy model the constant Manning roughness coefficient is frequently used. The Manning coefficient nM is an integral parameter which accounts for a large number of physical factors determining the flow braking. We used computational simulations in a shallow water model to determine the relationship between the Manning coefficient and the parameters of small-scale perturbations of a bottom in a long channel. Comparing the transverse water velocity profiles in the channel obtained in the models with a perturbed bottom without bottom friction and with bottom friction on a smooth bottom, we constructed the dependence of nM on the amplitude and spatial scale of perturbation of the bottom relief.

  9. Small polaron conduction in lead modified lanthanum ferrite ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhargav, K.K.; Ram, S.; Majumder, S.B., E-mail: subhasish@matsc.iitkgp.ernet.in

    2015-07-25

    Highlights: • La{sub 0.8}Pb{sub 0.2}FeO{sub 3} (ε{sub r} ∼ 30,000) shows higher dielectric constant than LaFeO{sub 3} (∼14,000). • Lower A-site dopant content, the dielectric maxima shift to higher temperature. • The frequency dependence of ε{sub r} and tan δ vs. temperature exhibit CDC like behavior. • R{sub g} and R{sub gb} of Pb modified LaFeO{sub 3} follow small polaron hopping conduction model. - Abstract: In the present work we have illustrated the physics of the electrical characteristics of nanocrystalline La{sub 1−x}Pb{sub x}FeO{sub 3,} (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.2) powder prepared using auto-combustion synthesis. The effect of lead doping on the dielectric, impedance and ac conductivity characteristics of lanthanum ferrite has systematically been investigated. The synthesized powders were phase pure and crystallized into centro-symmetric Pnma space group. As compared to pure LaFeO{sub 3} ceramics (dielectric constant ∼ 14,000), the dielectric constant is grossly increased (∼30,000) in Pb doped LaFeO{sub 3}. The temperature dependence of dielectric constant of 10.0 at.% Pb doped LaFeO{sub 3} exhibits dielectric maxima similar to that observed in ferroelectric ceramics with non-centrosymmetric point group. For La{sub 0.8}Pb{sub 0.2}FeO{sub 3} ceramics, the frequency dependence of the dielectric constant and loss tangent at various temperatures (300–450 K) exhibit typical colossal dielectric constant (CDC) like behavior. From the impedance spectroscopy we have estimated the grain and grain boundary resistance and capacitance of Pb doped LaFeO{sub 3} that follow a small polaron hopping conduction model. Long range movement of the charge carriers govern the CDC behavior.

  10. Spatial and temporal small-scale variation in groundwater quality of a shallow sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1992-01-01

    The groundwater quality of a shallow unconfined sandy aquifer has been characterized for pH, alkalinity, chloride, nitrate, sulfate, calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium in terms of vertical and horizontal variations (350 groundwater samples). The test area is located within a farmland lot....... The geology of the area described on the basis of 31 sediment cores appears relatively homogeneous. Large vertical and horizontal variations were observed. The vertical variations are strongly affected by the deviating composition of the agricultural infiltration water. The horizontal variations show very...

  11. Challenge to the model of lake charr evolution: Shallow- and deep-water morphs exist within a small postglacial lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarie, Louise; Muir, Andrew M.; Zimmerman, Mara S.; Baillie, Shauna M.; Hansen, Michael J.; Nate, Nancy A.; Yule, Daniel L.; Middel, Trevor; Bentzen, Paul; Krueger, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    All examples of lake charr (Salvelinus namaycush) diversity occur within the largest, deepest lakes of North America (i.e. > 2000 km2). We report here Rush Lake (1.3 km2) as the first example of a small lake with two lake charr morphs (lean and huronicus). Morphology, diet, life history, and genetics were examined to demonstrate the existence of morphs and determine the potential influence of evolutionary processes that led to their formation or maintenance. Results showed that the huronicus morph, caught in deep-water, had a deeper body, smaller head and jaws, higher eye position, greater buoyancy, and deeper peduncle than the shallow-water lean morph. Huronicus grew slower to a smaller adult size, and had an older mean age than the lean morph. Genetic comparisons showed low genetic divergence between morphs, indicating incomplete reproductive isolation. Phenotypic plasticity and differences in habitat use between deep and shallow waters associated with variation in foraging opportunities seems to have been sufficient to maintain the two morphs, demonstrating their important roles in resource polymorphism. Rush Lake expands previous explanations for lake charr intraspecific diversity, from large to small lakes and from reproductive isolation to the presence of gene flow associated with strong ecological drivers.

  12. Investigation of Temperature Dynamics in Small and Shallow Reservoirs, Case Study: Lake Binaba, Upper East Region of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abbasi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An unsteady fully three-dimensional model of Lake Binaba (a shallow small reservoir in semi-arid Upper East Region of Ghana has been developed to simulate its temperature dynamics. The model developed is built on the Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS equations, utilizing the Boussinesq approach. As the results of the model are significantly affected by the physical conditions on the boundaries, allocating appropriate boundary conditions, particularly over a water surface, is essential in simulating the lake’s thermal structure. The thermal effects of incoming short-wave radiation implemented as a heat source term in the temperature equation, while the heat fluxes at the free water surface, which depend on wind speed, air temperature, and atmospheric stability conditions are considered as temperature boundary condition. The model equations were solved using OpenFOAM CFD toolbox. As the flow is completely turbulent, which is affected by the complex boundary conditions, a new heat transfer solver and turbulence model were developed to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of temperature in small and shallow inland water bodies using improved time-dependent boundary conditions. The computed temperature values were compared with four days of observed field data. Simulated and observed temperature profiles show reasonable agreement where the root mean square error (RMSE over the simulation period ranges from 0.11 to 0.44 °C in temporal temperature profiles with an average value of 0.33 °C. Results indicate that the model is able to simulate the flow variables and the temperature distribution in small inland water bodies with complex bathymetry.

  13. Does processing a shallow and a deep orthography produce different brain activity patterns? An ERP study conducted in Hebrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Kochva, Irit

    2011-01-01

    Orthographies range from shallow orthographies with transparent grapheme-phoneme relations, to deep orthographies, in which these relations are opaque. Two forms of script transcribe the Hebrew language: the shallow pointed script (with diacritics) and the deep unpointed script (without diacritics). This study was set out to examine whether the reading of these scripts evokes distinct brain activity. Preliminary results indicate distinct Event-related-potentials (ERPs). As an equivalent finding was absent when ERPs of non-orthographic stimuli with and without meaningless diacritics were compared, the results imply that print-specific aspects of processing account for the distinct activity elicited by the pointed and unpointed scripts.

  14. A New Small Drifter for Shallow Water Basins: Application to the Study of Surface Currents in the Muggia Bay (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Nasello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new small drifter prototype for measuring current immediately below the free surface in a water basin is proposed in this paper. The drifter dimensions make it useful for shallow water applications. The drifter transmits its GPS location via GSM phone network. The drifter was used to study the trajectory of the surface current in the Muggia bay, the latter containing the industrial harbor of the city of Trieste (Italy. The analysis has been carried out under a wide variety of wind conditions. As regards the behavior of the drifter, the analysis has shown that it is well suited to detect the water current since its motion is marginally affected by the wind. The study has allowed detecting the main features of the surface circulation within the Muggia bay under different meteorological conditions. Also, the study has shown that the trajectory of the surface current within the bay is weakly affected by the Coriolis force.

  15. Contrasting magmatic structures between small plutons and batholiths emplaced at shallow crustal level (Sierras de Córdoba, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinotti, Lucio P.; D'Eramo, Fernando J.; Weinberg, Roberto F.; Demartis, Manuel; Tubía, José María; Coniglio, Jorge E.; Radice, Stefania; Maffini, M. Natalia; Aragón, Eugenio

    2016-11-01

    Processes like injection, magma flow and differentiation and influence of the regional strain field are here described and contrasted to shed light on their role in the formation of small plutons and large batholiths their magmatic structures. The final geometric and compositional arrangement of magma bodies are a complex record of their construction and internal flow history. Magma injection, flow and differentiation, as well as regional stresses, all control the internal nature of magma bodies. Large magma bodies emplaced at shallow crustal levels result from the intrusion of multiple magma batches that interact in a variety of ways, depending on internal and external dynamics, and where the early magmatic, growth-related structures are commonly overprinted by subsequent history. In contrast, small plutons emplaced in the brittle-ductile transition more likely preserve growth-related structures, having a relatively simple cooling history and limited internal magma flow. Outcrop-scale magmatic structures in both cases record a rich set of complementary information that can help elucidate their evolution. Large and small granitic bodies of the Sierra Pampeanas preserve excellent exposures of magmatic structures that formed as magmas stepped through different rheological states during pluton growth and solidification. These structures reveal not only the flow pattern inside magma chambers, but also the rheological evolution of magmas in response to temperature evolution.

  16. Conducting Research from Small University Observatories: Investigating Exoplanet Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, Kimberly D.

    2018-01-01

    Kepler has to date discovered 4,496 exoplanet candidates, but only half are confirmed, and only a handful are thought to be Earth sized and in the habitable zone. Planet verification often involves extensive follow-up observations, which are both time and resource intensive. The data set collected by Kepler is massive and will be studied for decades. University/small observatories, such as the one at Texas State University, are in a good position to assist with the exoplanet candidate verification process. By preforming extended monitoring campaigns, which are otherwise cost ineffective for larger observatories, students gain valuable research experience and contribute valuable data and results to the scientific community.

  17. Seismic Response of Tunnel Lining for Shallow-Bias Tunnel with a Small Clear Distance under Wenchuan Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Hui

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the internal force characteristics of shallow-bias tunnel with a small clear distance in earthquake, a large-scale shaking table slope model test was designed, and the geometric scale was 1 : 10. In the model test, the Wenchuan (WC seismic wave was used as the excitation wave. Then, the three-dimensional numerical model was established by using MIDAS-NX, and the reliability of the numerical model was verified by comparing the acceleration of the test results. The axial force, bending moment, and shear force of the tunnel cross section and longitudinal direction were calculated by the numerical model under different excitation directions included the horizontal direction (X, the vertical direction (Z, and the horizontal and vertical direction (XZ. The results show the following. (1 The internal force of right arch foot of left hole and the left arch foot of right hole is larger than other part of the tunnels because the distance between the two tunnels is smaller and they interact with each other. (2 The loading direction of single direction loading method is different and the variation trend of tunnel force are different, so the loading direction of seismic wave has a significant influence on the seismic force response of the tunnel. (3 All of the internal force values of tunnel lining under the seismic wave action in bidirection are larger than those in single direction. The value is not a simple superposition of two directions and has some coupling effect. The influence of the vertical seismic wave cannot be ignored in dynamic response research. These results improve the understanding of the rock slope with small spacing tunnel under seismic action.

  18. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands from 2015-07-31 to 2015-08-19 (NCEI Accession 0161170)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  19. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Hawaiian Archipelago from 2016-09-01 to 2016-09-27 (NCEI Accession 0161171)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  20. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Mariana Archipelago from 2014-03-24 to 2014-05-05 (NCEI Accession 0161168)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  1. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Pacific Remote Island Areas from 2015-01-26 to 2015-04-28 (NCEI Accession 0162247)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  2. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across Wake Island from 2014-03-16 to 2014-03-19 (NCEI Accession 0162248)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  3. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across Jarvis Island from 2016-05-19 to 2016-05-23 (NCEI Accession 0162245)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  4. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across American Samoa from 2015-02-15 to 2015-03-28 (NCEI Accession 0161169)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  5. The impact of small benthic passive suspension feeders in shallow marine ecosystems: the hydroids as an example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gili, J.-M.; Alvà, V.; Coma, R.; Orejas, C.; Pagès, F.; Ribes, M.; Zabala, M.; Arntz, W.; Bouillon, J.; Boero, F.; Hughes, R.G.

    1998-01-01

    Benthic suspension feeders are abundant in littoral and shallow sub-littoral ecosystems, where they feed on the plankton and on organic matter suspended in the water column. Recent studies indicate that active suspension feeders with powerful water filtration mechanisms (e.g., bivalve molluscs) may

  6. Fabrication and analysis of small-scale thermal energy storage with conductivity enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thapa, Suvhashis; Chukwu, Sam; Khaliq, Abdul; Weiss, Leland

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Useful thermal conductivity envelope established for small scale TES. • Paraffin conductivity enhanced from .5 to 3.8 W/m K via low-cost copper insert. • Conductivity increase beyond 5 W/m K shows diminished returns. • Storage with increased conductivity lengthened thermoelectric output up to 247 s. - Abstract: The operation and useful operating parameters of a small-scale Thermal Energy Storage (TES) device that collects and stores heat in a Phase Change Material (PCM) is explored. The PCM utilized is an icosane wax. A physical device is constructed on the millimeter scale to examine specific effects of low-cost thermal conductivity enhancements that include copper foams and other metallic inserts. Numerical methods are utilized to establish useful operating range of small-scale TES devices in general, and the limits of thermal conductivity enhancement on thermoelectric operation specifically. Specific attention is paid to the manufacturability of the various constructs as well as the resulting thermal conductivity enhancement. A maximum thermal conductivity of 3.8 W/m K is achieved in experimental testing via copper foam enhancement. A simplified copper matrix achieves conductivity of 3.7 W/m K and allows significantly reduced fabrication effort. These results compare favorably to baseline wax conductivity of .5 W/m K. Power absorption is recorded of about 900 W/m 2 . Modeling reveals diminishing returns beyond 4–6 W/m K for devices on this scale. Results show the system capable of extending thermoelectric operation several minutes through the use of thermal energy storage techniques within the effective conductivity ranges

  7. 5-HT1A receptors modulate small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Jespersen, Thomas; Perrier, Jean-François

    2004-01-01

    Small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK) are responsible for the medium afterhyperpolarisation (mAHP) following action potentials in neurons. Here we tested the ability of serotonin (5-HT) to modulate the activity of SK channels by coexpressing 5-HT1A receptors with different...

  8. Inhibition of small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels terminates and protects against atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diness, Jonas Goldin; Sørensen, Ulrik S; Nissen, Jakob Dahl

    2010-01-01

    Recently, evidence has emerged that small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK) channels are predominantly expressed in the atria in a number of species including human. In rat, guinea pig, and rabbit ex vivo and in vivo models of atrial fibrillation (AF), we used 3 different SK channel inhibito...

  9. Thermal conductivities and diffusivities of rocks in four shallow ONKALO holes and drillholes OL-KR46 and OL-KR56

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korpisalo, A.; Suppala, I.; Kukkonen, I.; Koskinen, T.

    2013-11-01

    The thermal drillhole device (76 mm drillholes) used in this study for determining thermal properties of rocks in situ was developed and constructed under TERO projects in Geological Survey of Finland with Posiva in early 2000's. After the renovation of the device in 2010, the new TERO76 device has now been taken into the productive use. In addition to the numerical inversion technique a rapid interpretation tool makes it possible to calculate the first estimates of thermal properties of the measurements already in the field. The thermal properties of the measurements are estimated by using both a numerical optimization and a simple solution of infinite line model. Because of the unique measurement geometry only the thermal conductivities can directly be estimated accurately (5 %) using the late times of heating periods. The methods can't directly give the thermal diffusivities or heat capacities at a necessary accuracy. However, thermal diffusivities can be estimated by using the specific heat capacities and densities of the known rock types or the laboratory results on diffusivity-conductivity relationship of different Olkiluoto rock types. The latter technique is applied in this study. Thermal properties were measured in four shallow ONKALO drillholes (ONK-PP379, ONK-PP380, ONK-PP381, ONK-PP382) in the Demonstration tunnel 2 (ONK-TDT-4399-30) at +420 m level and in deep drillholes OL-KR46 and OL-KR56 from the surface. In the drillholes in tunnel, the average numerical values fall within 3.31 and 4.19 Wm - 1 K- 1 for the conductivities and 1.75-2.26 x 10 -6 m 2 s -1 for the diffusivities. The corresponding analytical values are within 3.19-3.99 Wm -1 K -1 and 1.68-2.15 x 10 -6 m 2 s -1 . In drillholes OL-KR46 and OL-KR56, the average numerical values fall within 3.42-4.06 and 3.30-3.77 Wm -1 K -1 for the conductivities and 1.81-2.18 and 1.75-2.02 x 10 -6 m 2 s -1 for the diffusivities. The corresponding average analytical conductivities fall within 3.22-3.81 and

  10. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Small, Highly Insulating Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A (Inventor); Kuczmarski, Maria A (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the measurement of thermal conductivity combines the following capabilities: 1) measurements of very small specimens; 2) measurements of specimens with thermal conductivity on the same order of that as air; and, 3) the ability to use air as a reference material. Care is taken to ensure that the heat flow through the test specimen is essentially one-dimensional. No attempt is made to use heated guards to minimize the flow of heat from the hot plate to the surroundings. Results indicate that since large correction factors must be applied to account for guard imperfections when specimen dimensions are small, simply measuring and correcting for heat from the heater disc that does not flow into the specimen is preferable.

  11. Morphology determination of small particles by electron microscopy and electrical conduction measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robrieux, B.; Desrousseaux, G.; Renou, A.; Gillet, M.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we show that it is possible to deduce the actual morphology of small particle condensed onto an insulator by combining the granularity analysis from electron micrographs and the electrical sheet conductance of the deposit on its substrate. Assuming the particles are truncated ellipsoids, we determine the excentricity and the contact angle with the substrate for Au on amorphous carbon and MgO substrates. (orig.)

  12. Immunolocalization and expression of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in human myometrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Sofia T; Svalø, Julie; Nielsen, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK3) channels have been detected in human myometrium and we have previously shown a functional role of SK channels in human myometrium in vitro. The aims of this study were to identify the precise localization of SK3 channels and to quantify SK3 m....... This is the first report to provide evidence for a possible role of SK3 channels in human uterine telocytes....

  13. Appearance of small polaron hopping conduction in iron modified cobalt lithium bismuth borate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahiya, M. S.; Khasa, S., E-mail: skhasa@yahoo.com; Yadav, Arti [Physics Department, Deenbandhu Chhotu Ram University of Science and Technology, Murthal, India-131039 (India); Agarwal, A. [Applied Physics Department, Guru Jambheshwara University of Science and Technology, Hisar, India-125001 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Lithium bismuth borate glasses containing different amounts of cobalt and iron oxides having chemical composition xFe{sub 2}O{sub 3}•(20-x)CoO•30Li{sub 2}O•10Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}•40B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (x = 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 mol% abbreviated as CFLBB1-5 respectively) prepared via melt quench technique have been investigated for their dc electrical conductivity. The amorphous nature of prepared glasses has been confirmed through X-ray diffraction measurements. The dc electrical conductivity has been analyzed by applying Mott’s small polaron hopping model. Activation energies corresponding to lower and higher temperature region have been evaluated. The iron ion concentration (N), mean spacing between iron ions (R) and polaron radius (R{sub p}) has been evaluated using the values of phonon radius (R{sub ph}) and Debye temperature (θ{sub D}). The glass sample without iron (CFLBB1) shows ionic conductivity but the incorporation of iron in the glass matrix results in the appearance of electronic conductivity.

  14. Shallow velocity structure of Stromboli Volcano, Italy, derived from small-aperture array measurements of Strombolian tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouet, B.; De Luca, G.; Milana, G.; Dawson, P.; Martini, M.; Scarpa, R.

    1998-01-01

    The properties of the tremor wave field at Stromboli are analyzed using data from small-aperture arrays of short-period seismometers deployed on the north flank of the volcano. The seismometers are configued in two semi-circular arrays with radii of 60 and 150 m and a linear array with length of 600 m. The data are analyzed using a spatiotemporal correlation technique specifically designed for the study of the stationary stochastic wave field of Rayleigh and Love waves generated by volcanic activity and by scattering sources distributed within the island. The correlation coefficients derived as a function of frequency for the three components of motion clearly define the dispersion characteristics for both Rayleigh and Love waves. Love and Rayleigh waves contribute 70% and 30%, respectively, of the surface-wave power. The phase velocities of Rayleigh waves range from 1000 m/sec at 2 Hz to 350 m/sec at 9 Hz, and those for Love waves range from 700 to 400 m/sec over the same frequency band. These velocities are similar to those measured near Puu Oo on the east rift of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, although the dispersion characteristics of Rayleigh waves at Stromboli show a stronger dependence on frequency. Such low velocities are consistent with values expected for densely cracked solidified basalt. The dispersion curves are inverted for a velocity model beneath the arrays, assuming those dispersions represent the fundamental modes of Rayleigh and Love waves.

  15. Anomalous size effect in conductivity of Bi films of small thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anopchenko, A.S.; Kashirin, V.Yu.; Komnik, Yu.F.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental data are obtained at helium temperature, which describe the kinetic properties (conductivity, magnetoresistance and Hall coefficient) of Bi films whose thicknesses are within 100-500 A. The small-thickness Bi films display an anomalous size effect- the growing conductivity at decreasing thickness, and pronounced quantum interference effects - weak electron localization and enhancing electron-electron interaction in a disordered system. The information derived on the kinetic properties of the films is used to identify the character of the changes in the electron and hole concentrations and mobilities with a decreasing thickness. The isotropy of the properties in the films plane due to the axial texture has permitted us to use the equations for a conductor with two types of charge carriers. The used kinetic characteristics correctly take into account the contribution of the quantum corrections related to quantum interference. It is found that the concentration of the charge carries increases appreciably (by about two orders of magnitude) as the film thickness decreases to 100 A, which determines the anomalous size effect in the conductivity of the films

  16. A small-plane heat source method for measuring the thermal conductivities of anisotropic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liang; Yue, Kai; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xinxin

    2017-07-01

    A new small-plane heat source method was proposed in this study to simultaneously measure the in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities of anisotropic insulating materials. In this method the size of the heat source element is smaller than the sample size and the boundary condition is thermal insulation due to no heat flux at the edge of the sample during the experiment. A three-dimensional model in a rectangular coordinate system was established to exactly describe the heat transfer process of the measurement system. Using the Laplace transform, variable separation, and Laplace inverse transform methods, the analytical solution of the temperature rise of the sample was derived. The temperature rises calculated by the analytical solution agree well with the results of numerical calculation. The result of the sensitivity analysis shows that the sensitivity coefficients of the estimated thermal conductivities are high and uncorrelated to each other. At room temperature and in a high-temperature environment, experimental measurements of anisotropic silica aerogel were carried out using the traditional one-dimensional plane heat source method and the proposed method, respectively. The results demonstrate that the measurement method developed in this study is effective and feasible for simultaneously obtaining the in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities of the anisotropic materials.

  17. A passive guard for low thermal conductivity measurement of small samples by the hot plate method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jannot, Yves; Godefroy, Justine; Degiovanni, Alain; Grigorova-Moutiers, Veneta

    2017-01-01

    Hot plate methods under steady state conditions are based on a 1D model to estimate the thermal conductivity, using measurements of the temperatures T 0 and T 1 of the two sides of the sample and of the heat flux crossing it. To be consistent with the hypothesis of the 1D heat flux, either a hot plate guarded apparatus is used, or the temperature is measured at the centre of the sample. On one hand the latter method can be used only if the ratio thickness/width of the sample is sufficiently low and on the other hand the guarded hot plate method requires large width samples (typical cross section of 0.6  ×  0.6 m 2 ). That is why both methods cannot be used for low width samples. The method presented in this paper is based on an optimal choice of the temperatures T 0 and T 1 compared to the ambient temperature T a , enabling the estimation of the thermal conductivity with a centered hot plate method, by applying the 1D heat flux model. It will be shown that these optimal values do not depend on the size or on the thermal conductivity of samples (in the range 0.015–0.2 W m −1 K −1 ), but only on T a . The experimental results obtained validate the method for several reference samples for values of the ratio thickness/width up to 0.3, thus enabling the measurement of the thermal conductivity of samples having a small cross-section, down to 0.045  ×  0.045 m 2 . (paper)

  18. Rapid shallow breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachypnea; Breathing - rapid and shallow; Fast shallow breathing; Respiratory rate - rapid and shallow ... Shallow, rapid breathing has many possible medical causes, including: Asthma Blood clot in an artery in the ...

  19. Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) characterization of electrically conducting polyaniline nanofiber/polyimide nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, Alan R., E-mail: alan.r.hopkins@aero.org [Aerospace Corporation, Space Materials Lab, Micro/Nano Technology Dept, Polymers Section, M2/242, Los Angeles, CA 90009-2957 (United States); Tomczak, Sandra J. [AFRL/RZSM Materials Application Branch, Space and Missile Propulsion Division 10 East Saturn Blvd., Bldg. 8451, Edwards Air Force Base, CA 93524 (United States); Vij, Vandana [ERC. Inc., AFRL/PRSM, Edwards AFB, CA (United States); Jackson, Andrew J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 6102, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6102 (United States)

    2011-12-30

    Nanocomposites of polyaniline nanofibers and polyimide were fabricated and studied using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The immiscible nature of the conformationally dissimilar polyaniline nanofiber and polyimide host is established by a series of experiments involving neutron scattering. Based on these techniques, we conclude that the crystal structure of the polyimides is not disrupted, and that there is no mixing between the two components on a molecular level. The morphology of the conducting salt component was analyzed by SANS data and was treated by two common models: Debye-Bueche (D-B) and inverse power law (IPL). Due to deviations in the linear curve fitting over a large scattering range, neither the D-B nor the IPL model could be used to characterize the size and shape of all PANI-0.5-CSA (polyaniline camphor sulfonic acid doped polymer)/polyimide blend systems. At 1 and 2% concentration, the D-B model suggested salt domains between 20 and 70 A with fractal geometries implied by the IPL model. As salt concentrations increased to 5%, the structures were observed to change, but there is no simple structural model that provides a suitable basis for comparison.

  20. Function and expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator after small intestinal transplantation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penghong Song

    Full Text Available The secretion function of intestinal graft is one of the most important factors for successful intestinal transplantation. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR mediates HCO3(- and Cl(- secretions in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, we made investigation on the expression and function of CFTR in an experimental model of murine small intestinal transplantation. Heterotopic intestinal transplantations were performed in syngeneic mice. The mRNA and protein expressions of CFTR were analyzed by real time PCR and western blot. Murine intestinal mucosal HCO3(- and Cl(- secretions were examined in vitro in Ussing chambers by the pH stat and short circuit current (I(sc techniques. The results showed that forskolin, an activator of CFTR, stimulated jejunal mucosal epithelial HCO3(- and Cl(- secretions in mice, but forskolin-stimulated HCO3(- and Cl(- secretions in donor and recipient jejunal mucosae of mice after heterotopic jejunal transplantation were markedly decreased, compared with controls (P<0.001. The mRNA and protein expression levels of CFTR in donor and recipient jejunal mucosae of mice were also markedly lower than those in controls (P<0.001, and the mRNA and protein expression levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα were markedly increased in donor jejunal mucosae of mice (P<0.001, compared with controls. Further experiments showed that TNFα down-regulated the expression of CFTR mRNA in murine jejunal mucosa. In conclusion, after intestinal transplantation, the function of CFTR was impaired, and its mRNA and protein expressions were down-regulated, which may be induced by TNFα.

  1. A Strategy to Conduct an Analysis of the Long-Term Performance of Low-Activity Waste Glass in a Shallow Subsurface Disposal System at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeway, James J.; Pierce, Eric M.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-08-04

    The federal facilities located on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State have been used extensively by the U.S. government to produce nuclear materials for the U.S. strategic defense arsenal. Currently, the Hanford Site is under the stewardship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste resulting from the production of nuclear materials has accumulated, mainly in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks located in the central plateau of the Hanford Site (Mann et al., 2001). The DOE-EM Office of River Protection (ORP) is proceeding with plans to immobilize and permanently dispose of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction onsite in a shallow subsurface disposal facility (the Integrated Disposal Facility [IDF]). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was contracted to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the IDF (the source term) as part of an immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass testing program to support future IDF performance assessments (PAs).

  2. Tailoring highly conductive graphene nanoribbons from small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: a computational study

    KAUST Repository

    Bilić, A; Sanvito, S

    2013-01-01

    transmission with a continuum of conducting channels. In contrast, for the armchair nanoribbons a slow exponential attenuation of the conductance with the length has been found, due to their semiconducting nature. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  3. Seismic imaging of small horizontal scale structures of the shallow thermocline on the western Brittany continental shelf (North-East Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piete, H.; Marié, L.; Marsset, B.; Gutscher, M.

    2012-12-01

    The recent development of the seismic oceanography technique has made possible the imaging of a variety of deep oceanographic structures (Holbrook et al., 2003); however, until now this method has remained ill suited for the study of shallow (environment) and 2- spectral contents offering high vertical resolutions (relevant to the mapping of small vertical wavelength structures). In this study we defined and tested a new experimental seismic acquisition system capable of imaging the ~10 m thick seasonal thermocline on the western Brittany continental shelf. To accomplish this task, we pursued two complementary approaches: 1. Analysis of legacy seismic data (multi-channel seismic reflection profiles acquired on the East-Corsican margin, Bahamas Plateau and Gulf of Cadiz in various oceanographic environments) featuring reflectors at depths between 25 and 150 m, in order to identify and quantify the influence of acquisition parameters (seismic trace length, offsets, emission level and frequency content). 2. Incorporation of new oceanographic data acquired during the FROMVAR cruise (July 28th to August 10th 2010) on the western Brittany shelf in thermally stratified waters for use in the simulation of the seismic acquisition, in order to further define the optimal parameters for the system. Finally a 3D seismic system has emerged and was tested during the ASPEX scientific cruise led from June 17th to 19th 2012 across the western Brittany shelf. The device featured: i- four seismic streamers, each consisting of 6 traces at a spacing of 1.80 m; ii- a 1000 J SIG Sparker producing a 400 Hz signal with a 220 dB re 1μPa @1m level of emission, towed at a 8 m distance of the first seismic trace. This survey provided high lateral resolution images of the seasonal thermocline located at a 30 m depth with vertical displacements induced by internal waves. References Holbrook, W.S., Paramo, P., Pearse, S. and Schmitt, R.W., 2003. Thermohaline Fine Structure in an Oceanographic

  4. Water-dispersible small monodisperse electrically conducting antimony doped tin oxide nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peters, K.; Zeller, P.; Štefanić, G.; Skoromets, Volodymyr; Němec, Hynek; Kužel, Petr; Fattakhova-Rohlfing, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 3 (2015), 1090-1099 ISSN 0897-4756 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-12386S Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101218 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : conducting nanoparticles * electrical conductivity * charge transport Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 9.407, year: 2015

  5. A Strategy to Conduct an Analysis of the Long-Term Performance of Low-Activity Waste Glass in a Shallow Subsurface Disposal System at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BP McGrail, WL Ebert, DH Bacon, DM Strachan

    1998-02-18

    Privatized services are being procured to vitrify low-activity tank wastes for eventual disposal in a shallow subsurface facility at the Hanford Site. Over 500,000 metric tons of low-activity waste glass will be generated, which is among the largest volumes of waste within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex and is one of the largest inventories of long-lived radionuclides planned for disposal in a low-level waste facility. Before immobilized waste can be disposed, DOE must approve a "performance assessment," which is a document that describes the impacts of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. Because the release rate of radionuclides from the glass waste form is a key factor determining these impacts, a sound scientific basis for determining their long-term release rates must be developed if this disposal action is to be accepted by regulatory agencies, stakeholders, and the public. In part, the scientific basis is determined from a sound testing strategy. The foundation of the proposed testing strategy is a well accepted mechanistic model that is being used to calculate the glass corrosion behavior over the geologic time scales required for performance assessment. This model requires that six parameters be determined, and the testing program is defined by an appropriate set of laboratory experiments to determine these parameters, and is combined with a set of field experiments to validate the model as a whole. Three general classes of laboratory tests are proposed in this strategy: 1) characterization, 2) accelerated, and 3) service condition. Characterization tests isolate and provide specific information about processes or parameters in theoretical models. Accelerated tests investigate corrosion behavior that will be important over the regulated service life of a disposal system within a laboratory time frame of a few years or less. Service condition tests verify that the techniques used in accelerated tests do not change

  6. Small polaron hopping conduction mechanism in LiFePO4 glass and crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, Azeem; Murugavel, Sevi

    2017-01-01

    The optimization of a cathode material is the most important criterion of lithium ion battery technology, which decides the power density. In order to improve the rate capability, a cathode material must possess high electronic and ionic conductivities. Therefore, it is important to understand the charge transport mechanism in such an advanced cathode material in its intrinsic state before modifying it by various means. In this work, we report the thermal, structural, and electrical conductivity studies on lithium iron phosphate, LiFePO4, both in its polycrystalline (LFPC) and glassy (LFPG) counterpart states. The vibrational spectroscopic measurements reveal the characteristic vibrational modes, which are the intrinsic part of LFPC, whereas in LFPG, the phonon modes become broader and overlap with each other due to the lattice disorder. The electrical conductivity measurements reveal that LFPG exhibits a higher polaronic conductivity of 1.6 orders than the LFPC sample. The temperature dependent dc conductivity has been analyzed with the Mott model of polarons and reveals the origin of enhanced polaronic conductivity in LFPG. Based on the analysis, the enhanced polaronic conductivity in LFPG has been attributed to the combined effect of reduced hopping length, decreased activation energy, and enhanced polaron concentration.

  7. NON-INVASIVE EVALUATION OF NERVE CONDUCTION IN SMALL DIAMETER FIBERS IN THE RAT

    OpenAIRE

    Zotova, Elena G.; Arezzo, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    A novel non-invasive technique was applied to measure velocity within slow conducting axons in the distal extreme of the sciatic nerve (i.e., digital nerve) in a rat model. The technique is based on the extraction of rectified multiple unit activity (MUA) from in vivo whole nerve compound responses. This method reliably identifies compound action potentials in thinly myelinated fibers conducting at a range of 9-18 m/s (Aδ axons), as well as in a subgroup of unmylinated C fibers conducting at ...

  8. Noninvasive Evaluation of Nerve Conduction in Small Diameter Fibers in the Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Elena G. Zotova; Joseph C. Arezzo

    2013-01-01

    A novel noninvasive technique was applied to measure velocity within slow conducting axons in the distal extreme of the sciatic nerve (i.e., digital nerve) in a rat model. The technique is based on the extraction of rectified multiple unit activity (MUA) from in vivo whole nerve compound responses. This method reliably identifies compound action potentials in thinly myelinated fibers conducting at a range of 9–18 m/s ( axons), as well as in a subgroup of unmyelinated C fibers conducting at ap...

  9. Characteristics of Conducting the Multi-Component Seismic Prospecting in the Transition Zone in Conditions of Very Shallow Water of Arctic Seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Matveev

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Transition zones of transition from land to sea are the areas where it is extremely difficult to conduct geophysical works with conventional methods. In the Arctic seas of Russia, there are additional difficulties associated with the short field season, unfavorable hydrometeorological conditions, and severe restrictions imposed on the methodology and acquisition techniques by requirements of the environmental nature protection legislation. To obtain high-quality seismic data it is extremely important to select the most suitable equipment for data acquisition, optimal shooting geometry and data acquisition methodology, and the most advanced data processing and quality control software. The purpose of this article is to show developed at JSC MAGE 4-component 2D seismic technology based on use of the autonomous bottom stations. It allows conducting the seismic regional 2D survey in the transit area with registration of converted (PS waves at higher efficiency level.

  10. NON-INVASIVE EVALUATION OF NERVE CONDUCTION IN SMALL DIAMETER FIBERS IN THE RAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotova, Elena G; Arezzo, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    A novel non-invasive technique was applied to measure velocity within slow conducting axons in the distal extreme of the sciatic nerve (i.e., digital nerve) in a rat model. The technique is based on the extraction of rectified multiple unit activity (MUA) from in vivo whole nerve compound responses. This method reliably identifies compound action potentials in thinly myelinated fibers conducting at a range of 9-18 m/s (Aδ axons), as well as in a subgroup of unmylinated C fibers conducting at approximately 1-2 m/s. The sensitivity of the method to C-fiber conduction was confirmed by the progressive decrement of the responses in the 1-2 m/s range over a 20-day period following the topical application of capsaicin (ANOVA p <0.03). Increasing the frequency of applied repetitive stimulation over a range of 0.75 Hz to 6.0 Hz produced slowing of conduction and a significant decrease in the magnitude of the compound C-fiber response (ANOVA p <0.01). This technique offers a unique opportunity for the non-invasive, repeatable, and quantitative assessment of velocity in the subsets of Aδ and C fibers in parallel with evaluation of fast nerve conduction.

  11. Termination of Vernakalant-Resistant Atrial Fibrillation by Inhibition of Small-Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels in Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diness, Jonas Goldin; Skibsbye, Lasse; Simó-Vicens, Rafel

    2017-01-01

    Background Evidence has emerged that small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels constitute a new target for treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). SK channels are predominantly expressed in the atria as compared with the ventricles. Various marketed antiarrhythmic drugs are limited by vent...

  12. Small-Scale Flat Plate Collectors for Solar Thermal Scavenging in Low Conductivity Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Ogbonnaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is great opportunity to develop power supplies for autonomous application on the small scale. For example, remote environmental sensors may be powered through the harvesting of ambient thermal energy and heating of a thermoelectric generator. This work investigates a small-scale (centimeters solar thermal collector designed for this application. The absorber is coated with a unique selective coating and then studied in a low pressure environment to increase performance. A numerical model that is used to predict the performance of the collector plate is developed. This is validated based on benchtop testing of a fabricated collector plate in a low-pressure enclosure. Model results indicate that simulated solar input of about 800 W/m2 results in a collector plate temperature of 298 K in ambient conditions and up to 388 K in vacuum. The model also predicts the various losses in W/m2 K from the plate to the surroundings. Plate temperature is validated through the experimental work showing that the model is useful to the future design of these small-scale solar thermal energy collectors.

  13. Small Children’s Development of a Conduct of Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røn Larsen, Maja; Stanek, Anja Hvidtfeldt

    years) development of a personal conduct of everyday life through participation in social practices among peers, parents and professionals - especially focussing on the children’s life in day care or nursery. We present an on-going two-year ethnographic study during which, we do participatory...

  14. Tailoring highly conductive graphene nanoribbons from small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilić, A; Sanvito, S

    2013-07-10

    Pyrene, the smallest two-dimensional mesh of aromatic rings, with various terminal thiol substitutions, has been considered as a potential molecular interconnect. Charge transport through two terminal devices has been modeled using density functional theory (with and without self interaction correction) and the non-equilibrium Green's function method. A tetra-substituted pyrene, with dual thiol terminal groups at opposite ends, has been identified as an excellent candidate, owing to its high conductance, virtually independent of bias voltage. The two possible extensions of its motif generate two series of graphene nanoribbons, with zigzag and armchair edges and with semimetallic and semiconducting electron band structure, respectively. The effects related to the wire length and the bias voltage on the charge transport have been investigated for both sets. The conductance of the nanoribbons with a zigzag edge does not show either length or voltage dependence, owing to an almost perfect electron transmission with a continuum of conducting channels. In contrast, for the armchair nanoribbons a slow exponential attenuation of the conductance with the length has been found, due to their semiconducting nature.

  15. Tailoring highly conductive graphene nanoribbons from small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: a computational study

    KAUST Repository

    Bilić, A

    2013-06-14

    Pyrene, the smallest two-dimensional mesh of aromatic rings, with various terminal thiol substitutions, has been considered as a potential molecular interconnect. Charge transport through two terminal devices has been modeled using density functional theory (with and without self interaction correction) and the non-equilibrium Green\\'s function method. A tetra-substituted pyrene, with dual thiol terminal groups at opposite ends, has been identified as an excellent candidate, owing to its high conductance, virtually independent of bias voltage. The two possible extensions of its motif generate two series of graphene nanoribbons, with zigzag and armchair edges and with semimetallic and semiconducting electron band structure, respectively. The effects related to the wire length and the bias voltage on the charge transport have been investigated for both sets. The conductance of the nanoribbons with a zigzag edge does not show either length or voltage dependence, owing to an almost perfect electron transmission with a continuum of conducting channels. In contrast, for the armchair nanoribbons a slow exponential attenuation of the conductance with the length has been found, due to their semiconducting nature. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  16. Solute transport dynamics in small, shallow groundwater-dominated agricultural catchments: insights from a high-frequency, multisolute 10 yr-long monitoring study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Aubert

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency, long-term and multisolute measurements are required to assess the impact of human pressures on water quality due to (i the high temporal and spatial variability of climate and human activity and (ii the fact that chemical solutes combine short- and long-term dynamics. Such data series are scarce. This study, based on an original and unpublished time series from the Kervidy-Naizin headwater catchment (Brittany, France, aims to determine solute transfer processes and dynamics that characterise this strongly human-impacted catchment. The Kervidy-Naizin catchment is a temperate, intensive agricultural catchment, hydrologically controlled by shallow groundwater. Over 10 yr, five solutes (nitrate, sulphate, chloride, and dissolved organic and inorganic carbon were monitored daily at the catchment outlet and roughly every four months in the shallow groundwater. The concentrations of all five solutes showed seasonal variations but the patterns of the variations differed from one solute to another. Nitrate and chloride exhibit rather smooth variations. In contrast, sulphate as well as organic and inorganic carbon is dominated by flood flushes. The observed nitrate and chloride patterns are typical of an intensive agricultural catchment hydrologically controlled by shallow groundwater. Nitrate and chloride originating mainly from organic fertilisers accumulated over several years in the shallow groundwater. They are seasonally exported when upland groundwater connects with the stream during the wet season. Conversely, sulphate as well as organic and inorganic carbon patterns are not specific to agricultural catchments. These solutes do not come from fertilisers and do not accumulate in soil or shallow groundwater; instead, they are biogeochemically produced in the catchment. The results allowed development of a generic classification system based on the specific temporal patterns and source locations of each solute. It also considers the

  17. Development of a small-sized generator of ozonated water using an electro-conductive diamond electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekido, Kota; Kitaori, Noriyuki

    2008-12-01

    A small-sized generator of ozonated water was developed using an electro-conductive diamond. We studied the optimum conditions for producing ozonated water. As a result, we developed a small-sized generator of ozonated water driven by a dry-cell for use in the average household. This generator was easily able to produce ozonated water with an ozone concentration (over 4 mg/L) sufficient for disinfection. In addition, we verified the high disinfecting performance of the water produced in an actual hospital.

  18. Small Scale Spatial Variability of Apparent Electrical Conductivity within a Paddy Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aimrun, W.; Amin, M.S.M.; Ezrin, M.H.; Amin, M.S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Quick variability description is an important component for zone management practices. Precision farming requires topping up of only the nutrients that are lacking in the soil to attain the highest yield with the least input. The apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) sensor is a useful tool in mapping to identify areas of contrasting soil properties. In non saline soils, ECa is a substitute measurement for soil texture. It is directly related to both water holding capacity and Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC), which are key ingredients of productivity. This sensor measures the ECa across a field quickly and gives detailed soil features (one-second interval) with few operators. Hence, a dense sampling is possible and therefore a high-resolution ECa map can be produced. This study aims to characterize the variability of soil ECa within a Malaysian paddy field with respect to the spatial and seasonal variability. The study was conducted at Block C, Sawah Sempadan, Selangor, Malaysia, for three continuous seasons. Soil ECa was collected after harvesting period. The results showed that deep ECa visualized the pattern of the former river routes clearly as continuous lines (about 45 m width) at the northern and central regions of the study area. This exploration has shown different maps with higher contrast as compared to the existing soil series map for the study area. Seasonal variability test showed that the ECa that was acquired during rainy season (collected after harvest in December to January) has the highest value as compared to another season.

  19. Heat-Wave Effects on Oxygen, Nutrients, and Phytoplankton Can Alter Global Warming Potential of Gases Emitted from a Small Shallow Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosiewicz, Maciej; Laurion, Isabelle; Clayer, François; Maranger, Roxane

    2016-06-21

    Increasing air temperatures may result in stronger lake stratification, potentially altering nutrient and biogenic gas cycling. We assessed the impact of climate forcing by comparing the influence of stratification on oxygen, nutrients, and global-warming potential (GWP) of greenhouse gases (the sum of CH4, CO2, and N2O in CO2 equivalents) emitted from a shallow productive lake during an average versus a heat-wave year. Strong stratification during the heat wave was accompanied by an algal bloom and chemically enhanced carbon uptake. Solar energy trapped at the surface created a colder, isolated hypolimnion, resulting in lower ebullition and overall lower GWP during the hotter-than-average year. Furthermore, the dominant CH4 emission pathway shifted from ebullition to diffusion, with CH4 being produced at surprisingly high rates from sediments (1.2-4.1 mmol m(-2) d(-1)). Accumulated gases trapped in the hypolimnion during the heat wave resulted in a peak efflux to the atmosphere during fall overturn when 70% of total emissions were released, with littoral zones acting as a hot spot. The impact of climate warming on the GWP of shallow lakes is a more complex interplay of phytoplankton dynamics, emission pathways, thermal structure, and chemical conditions, as well as seasonal and spatial variability, than previously reported.

  20. Shallow End Response from ATEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrov, A.

    2014-12-01

    Different geological, hydrological, environmental and engineering targets are located shallow underground. The information collected with ATEM systems might be very useful for their study; although there are many deeper targets that the ATEM systems are traditionally used for. The idea to raise magnetic moment output and get deeper penetration response was one of the goals of ATEM systems development during the last decade. The shallow geology response was a trade for such systems, which sometimes were almost blind in the first hundred meter under surface. The possibility to achieve shallow end response from ATEM systems has become significant subject in last years. Several airborne TDEM systems got second higher frequency and lower magnetic moment signal to pick up shallow response together with deep one. Having a potential advantage such implementation raises complication and cost of the system. There's no need to receive 500 meter deep response when exploring shallow geology. P-THEM system having a compact size transmitter and relatively light weight is working on one base frequency at a time, but this frequency can be preset before a flight considering survey goals. A study of shallow geology response of the P-THEM system working on different base frequency has been conducted in 2014 in Ontario. The Alliston test area located in Southern Ontario has been flown with the P-THEM system working on base frequencies 30Hz and 90Hz. Results of the observations will be discussed in the presentation. The shallow end data can be used for mineral exploration applications and also for hydrological and environmental studies.

  1. Carbon stable isotope composition of charophyte organic matter in a small and shallow Spanish water body as a baseline for future trophic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Antonia Rodrigo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative descriptions of foodweb structure based on isotope niche space require knowledge of producers’ isotopic signatures. In freshwater ecosystems charophytes are one of the main components of submerged vegetation and the feeding base for many herbivorous consumers, but knowledge about their organic carbon isotopic signatures is sparse. In this study, the δ13C organic values (and organic %C and %N of the four species of submerged macrophytes (three charophytes - Chara hispida, Nitella hyalina and Tolypella glomerata - and one angiosperm, Myriophyllum spicatum growing in a newly created shallow pond were measured monthly over a period of one year, to discern if i all charophyte species susceptible to being food for consumers and growing in the same waterbody have the same C isotopic composition; ii the δ13C values of a charophyte species change on a seasonal and spatial scale; iii the different parts (apical nodes, internodes, rhizoids, reproductive organs, oospores of a charophyte species have the same isotopic composition. The δ13C, %C and %N values of organic matter in the sediments where the plants were rooted were also measured as well as several limnological variables. The δ13C values for the angiosperm (-13.7±0.7‰ indicated 13C-enrichment, whereas the N. hyalina δ13C values were the most negative (-22.4±0.7‰. The mean δ13C value for C. hispida was -19.0±1.0‰ and -20.7±0.8‰ for T. glomerata. C. hispida δ13C values had a significant seasonal variation with 13C-poor values in the cold season, and slight spatial differences. Statistically significant differences were found between charophyte rhizoids (13C-enriched and the other parts of the thalli. The δ13C values in the sediments varied throughout time (-13‰ to -26‰. The C content was lower in the charophytes than in the angiosperm and there were no large differences among the charophytes. Charophyte fructifications were enriched in organic C compared to the

  2. CATHARE 2 analysis of the small break LOCA experiment SP-SB-03, conducted in SPES facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meloni, P.

    1995-01-01

    SPES integral test facility is a scale model of a commercial three-loop PWR plant, making the simulation of a wide range of accident scenarios possible. A Small Break Loss of Coolant test was carried out in this facility in 1991 to serve as a counterpart of tests conducted on BETHSY (France), LSTF (Japan) and LOBI (EC) facilities. A post-test analysis of this test, performed with CATHARE 2 code was realized by ENEA in the framework of the co-operation ENEA-CEA on advanced reactors. This paper presents a survey of the results of the post-test calculation. (author). 5 refs, 11 figs, 3 tabs

  3. New Jersey shallow shelf

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Expedition 313 Scientists; Bjerrum, Christian J.

    2009-01-01

    to key horizons in wells drilled into the adjacent coastal plain suggest the clinoform structures investigated during Expedition 313 were deposited during times of oscillations in global sea level; however, this needs to be determined with much greater certainty. The age, lithofacies, and core-log......Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 313 to the New Jersey Shallow Shelf off the east coast of the United States is the third IODP expedition to use a mission-specific platform. It was conducted by the European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling (ECORD) Science Operator (ESO......) between 30 April and 17 July 2009, with additional support from the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP). There were three objectives: (1) date late Paleogene–Neogene depositional sequences and compare ages of unconformable surfaces that divide these sequences with times of sea...

  4. The acoustic radiation force on a small thermoviscous or thermoelastic particle suspended in a viscous and heat-conducting fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Jonas; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-11-01

    We present a theoretical analysis (arxiv.org/abs/1507.01043) of the acoustic radiation force on a single small particle, either a thermoviscous fluid droplet or a thermoelastic solid particle, suspended in a viscous and heat-conducting fluid. Our analysis places no restrictions on the viscous and thermal boundary layer thicknesses relative to the particle radius, but it assumes the particle to be small in comparison to the acoustic wavelength. This is the limit relevant to scattering of ultrasound waves from sub-micrometer particles. For particle sizes smaller than the boundary layer widths, our theory leads to profound consequences for the acoustic radiation force. For example, for liquid droplets and solid particles suspended in gasses we predict forces orders of magnitude larger than expected from ideal-fluid theory. Moreover, for certain relevant choices of materials, we find a sign change in the acoustic radiation force on different-sized but otherwise identical particles. These findings lead to the concept of a particle-size-dependent acoustophoretic contrast factor, highly relevant to applications in acoustic levitation or separation of micro-particles in gases, as well as to handling of μm- and nm-sized particles such as bacteria and vira in lab-on-a-chip systems.

  5. Identification of the functional binding pocket for compounds targeting small-conductance Ca²⁺-activated potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Pascal, John M; Schumann, Marcel; Armen, Roger S; Zhang, Ji-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Small- and intermediate-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channels, activated by Ca(2+)-bound calmodulin, have an important role in regulating membrane excitability. These channels are also linked to clinical abnormalities. A tremendous amount of effort has been devoted to developing small molecule compounds targeting these channels. However, these compounds often suffer from low potency and lack of selectivity, hindering their potential for clinical use. A key contributing factor is the lack of knowledge of the binding site(s) for these compounds. Here we demonstrate by X-ray crystallography that the binding pocket for the compounds of the 1-ethyl-2-benzimidazolinone (1-EBIO) class is located at the calmodulin-channel interface. We show that, based on structure data and molecular docking, mutations of the channel can effectively change the potency of these compounds. Our results provide insight into the molecular nature of the binding pocket and its contribution to the potency and selectivity of the compounds of the 1-EBIO class.

  6. Identification of the functional binding pocket for compounds targeting small-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Pascal, John M.; Schumann, Marcel; Armen, Roger S.; Zhang, Ji-fang

    2012-01-01

    Small- and intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels, activated by Ca2+-bound calmodulin, play an important role in regulating membrane excitability. These channels are also linked to clinical abnormalities. A tremendous amount of effort has been devoted to developing small molecule compounds targeting these channels. However, these compounds often suffer from low potency and lack of selectivity, hindering their potentials for clinical use. A key contributing factor is the lack of knowledge of the binding site(s) for these compounds. Here we demonstrate by X-ray crystallography that the binding pocket for the compounds of the 1-EBIO class is located at the calmodulin-channel interface. We show that, based on structure data and molecular docking, mutations of the channel can effectively change the potency of these compounds. Our results provide insight into the molecular nature of the binding pocket and its contribution to the potency and selectivity of the compounds of the 1-EBIO class. PMID:22929778

  7. The history of re-connection and the concept of the solar wind plasma with relatively small electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertkov, A. D.

    1995-01-01

    Petschek's 're-connection' model, aspiring to be universal, treated as a boundary problem meets unresolvable difficulties connected with impossibility to specify correctly boundary and initial conditions. This problem was incorrectly formulated. Hence, ineradicable logarithmic singularities occurred on the boundary surfaces. Attempts to eliminate them by incorporating the finite electrical conductivity are incorrect. This should lead to the change in the equation type, boundary condition type and in consequence to the change in solutions. Besides, the slow mode shocks cannot be driven by small internal source. As an alternative a new plasma concept is suggested. The state of fully ionized plasma in space depends completely on the entropy of the plasma heating source and on the process in which plasma is involved. The presumptive source of the solar wind creation - the induction electric field of the solar origin - has very low entropy. The state of plasma should be very far from the thermodynamic equilibrium. Debye's screening is not complete. The excitation of the powerful resonant self-consistent electric fields in plasma provides low electric conductivity. The MHD problems should be treated in frameworks of dissipative theories.

  8. Distribution, expression and functional effects of small conductance Ca-activated potassium (SK) channels in rat myometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Karen; Floyd, Rachel; Shmygol, Andre; Shmygol, Anatoly; Mobasheri, A; Wray, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Calcium-activated potassium channels are important in a variety of smooth muscles, contributing to excitability and contractility. In the myometrium previous work has focussed on the large conductance channels (BK), and the role of small conductance channels (SK) has received scant attention, despite the finding that over-expression of an SK channel isoform (SK3) results in uterine dysfunction and delayed parturition. This study therefore characterises the expression of the three SK channel isoforms (SK1-3) in rat myometrium throughout pregnancy and investigates their effect on cytosolic [Ca] and force and compares this with that of BK channels. Consistent expression of all SK isoform transcripts and clear immunostaining of SK1-3 was found. Inhibition of SK1-3 channels (apamin, scyllatoxin) significantly inhibited outward current, caused membrane depolarisation and elicited action potentials in previously quiescent cells. Apamin or scyllatoxin increased the amplitude of [Ca] and force in spontaneously contracting myometrial strips throughout gestation. The functional effect of SK inhibition was larger than that of BK channel inhibition. Thus we show for the first time that SK1-3 channels are expressed and translated throughout pregnancy and contribute to outward current, regulate membrane potential and hence Ca signals in pregnant rat myometrium. They contribute more to quiescence that BK channels. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Shallow Land Burial Technology - Humid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, E.C.; Spalding, B.P.; Lee, S.Y.

    1983-01-01

    The Shallow Land Burial Technology - Humid Project is being conducted for the Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Management Program with the objective of identifying and demonstrating improved technology for disposing of low-level solid waste in humid environments. Two improved disposal techniques are currently being evaluated using nine demonstration trenches at the Engineered Test Facility (ETF). The first is use of a cement-bentonite grout applied as a waste backfill material prior to trench closure and covering. The second is complete hydrologic isolation of waste by emplacement in a trench that is lined on all four sides, top and bottom using synthetic impermeable lining material. An economic analysis of the trench grouting and lining demonstration favored the trench lining operation ($1055/demonstration trench) over trench grouting ($1585/demonstration trench), with the cost differential becoming even greater (as much as a factor of 6 in favor of lining for typical ORNL trenches) as trench dimensions increase and trench volumes exceed those of the demonstration trenches. In addition to the evaluation of trench grouting and lining, major effort has centered on characterization of the ETF site. Though only a part of the overall study, characterization is an extremely important component of the site selection process; it is during these activities that potential problems, which may obviate the site from further consideration, are found. Characterization of the ETF has included studies of regional and site-specific geology, the physical and chemical properties of the soils in which the demonstration trenches are located, and hydrology of the small watershed of which the ETF is a part. 12 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  10. Community-specific hydraulic conductance potential of soil water decomposed for two Alpine grasslands by small-scale lysimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenck, Georg; Leitinger, Georg; Obojes, Nikolaus; Hofmann, Magdalena; Newesely, Christian; Deutschmann, Mario; Tappeiner, Ulrike; Tasser, Erich

    2018-02-01

    For central Europe in addition to rising temperatures an increasing variability in precipitation is predicted. This will increase the probability of drought periods in the Alps, where water supply has been sufficient in most areas so far. For Alpine grasslands, community-specific imprints on drought responses are poorly analyzed so far due to the sufficient natural water supply. In a replicated mesocosm experiment we compared evapotranspiration (ET) and biomass productivity of two differently drought-adapted Alpine grassland communities during two artificial drought periods divided by extreme precipitation events using high-precision small lysimeters. The drought-adapted vegetation type showed a high potential to utilize even scarce water resources. This is combined with a low potential to translate atmospheric deficits into higher water conductance and a lower biomass production as those measured for the non-drought-adapted type. The non-drought-adapted type, in contrast, showed high water conductance potential and a strong increase in ET rates when environmental conditions became less constraining. With high rates even at dry conditions, this community appears not to be optimized to save water and might experience drought effects earlier and probably more strongly. As a result, the water use efficiency of the drought-adapted plant community is with 2.6 gDW kg-1 of water much higher than that of the non-drought-adapted plant community (0.16 gDW kg-1). In summary, the vegetation's reaction to two covarying gradients of potential evapotranspiration and soil water content revealed a clear difference in vegetation development and between water-saving and water-spending strategies regarding evapotranspiration.

  11. MiRNA-135a regulates the expression of small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK3) channels in epilepsy-like conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honrath, Birgit; Norwood, Braxton; Tanrioever, Gaye; Kuter, Katarzyna; Henshall, David C; Aksel-Aksoy, Ayla; Schratt, Gerhard; Pasterkamp, Jeroen; Dencher, Norbert A.; Nieweg, Katja; Culmsee, Carsten; Dolga, Amalia Mihalea

    2017-01-01

    Background Excessive and hypersynchronous neuronal discharges are key characteristics in the pathophysiology of neurological disorders such as epilepsy. Owing to their ability of regulating neuronal excitability, small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels have been implicated in

  12. KCNN Genes that Encode Small-Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels Influence Alcohol and Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Audrey E; Griffin, William C; Lopez, Marcelo F; Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Cannady, Reginald; McGuier, Natalie S; Chesler, Elissa J; Miles, Michael F; Williams, Robert W; Randall, Patrick K; Woodward, John J; Becker, Howard C; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2015-07-01

    Small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (KCa2) channels control neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity, and have been implicated in substance abuse. However, it is unknown if genes that encode KCa2 channels (KCNN1-3) influence alcohol and drug addiction. In the present study, an integrative functional genomics approach shows that genetic datasets for alcohol, nicotine, and illicit drugs contain the family of KCNN genes. Alcohol preference and dependence QTLs contain KCNN2 and KCNN3, and Kcnn3 transcript levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of genetically diverse BXD strains of mice predicted voluntary alcohol consumption. Transcript levels of Kcnn3 in the NAc negatively correlated with alcohol intake levels in BXD strains, and alcohol dependence enhanced the strength of this association. Microinjections of the KCa2 channel inhibitor apamin into the NAc increased alcohol intake in control C57BL/6J mice, while spontaneous seizures developed in alcohol-dependent mice following apamin injection. Consistent with this finding, alcohol dependence enhanced the intrinsic excitability of medium spiny neurons in the NAc core and reduced the function and protein expression of KCa2 channels in the NAc. Altogether, these data implicate the family of KCNN genes in alcohol, nicotine, and drug addiction, and identify KCNN3 as a mediator of voluntary and excessive alcohol consumption. KCa2.3 channels represent a promising novel target in the pharmacogenetic treatment of alcohol and drug addiction.

  13. Conformal Pad-Printing Electrically Conductive Composites onto Thermoplastic Hemispheres: Toward Sustainable Fabrication of 3-Cents Volumetric Electrically Small Antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haoyi; Chiang, Sum Wai; Yang, Cheng; Lin, Ziyin; Liu, Jingping; Moon, Kyoung-Sik; Kang, Feiyu; Li, Bo; Wong, Ching Ping

    2015-01-01

    Electrically small antennas (ESAs) are becoming one of the key components in the compact wireless devices for telecommunications, defence, and aerospace systems, especially for the spherical one whose geometric layout is more closely approaching Chu's limit, thus yielding significant bandwidth improvements relative to the linear and planar counterparts. Yet broad applications of the volumetric ESAs are still hindered since the low cost fabrication has remained a tremendous challenge. Here we report a state-of-the-art technology to transfer electrically conductive composites (ECCs) from a planar mould to a volumetric thermoplastic substrate by using pad-printing technology without pattern distortion, benefit from the excellent properties of the ECCs as well as the printing-calibration method that we developed. The antenna samples prepared in this way meet the stringent requirement of an ESA (ka is as low as 0.32 and the antenna efficiency is as high as 57%), suggesting that volumetric electronic components i.e. the antennas can be produced in such a simple, green, and cost-effective way. This work can be of interest for the development of studies on green and high performance wireless communication devices.

  14. Electrostatically Tunable Nanomechanical Shallow Arches

    KAUST Repository

    Kazmi, Syed N. R.

    2017-11-03

    We report an analytical and experimental study on the tunability of in-plane doubly-clamped nanomechanical arches under varied DC bias conditions at room temperature. For this purpose, silicon based shallow arches are fabricated using standard e-beam lithography and surface nanomachining of a highly conductive device layer on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. The experimental results show good agreement with the analytical results with a maximum tunability of 108.14% for 180 nm thick arch with a transduction gap of 1 μm between the beam and the driving/sensing electrodes. The high tunability of shallow arches paves the ways for highly tunable band pass filtering applications in high frequency range.

  15. Shallow disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    A review and evaluation of computer codes capable of simulating the various processes that are instrumental in determining the dose rate to individuals resulting from the shallow disposal of radioactive waste was conducted. Possible pathways of contamination, as well as the mechanisms controlling radionuclide movement along these pathways have been identified. Potential transport pathways include the unsaturated and saturated ground water systems, surface water bodies, atmospheric transport and movement (and accumulation) in the food chain. Contributions to dose may occur as a result of ingestion of contaminated water and food, inhalation of contaminated air and immersion in contaminated air/water. Specific recommendations were developed regarding the selection and modification of a model to meet the needs associated with the prediction of dose rates to individuals as a consequence of shallow radioactive waste disposal. Specific technical requirements with regards to risk, sensitivity and uncertainty analyses have been addressed

  16. Shallow moonquakes - How they compare with earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Y.

    1980-01-01

    Of three types of moonquakes strong enough to be detectable at large distances - deep moonquakes, meteoroid impacts and shallow moonquakes - only shallow moonquakes are similar in nature to earthquakes. A comparison of various characteristics of moonquakes with those of earthquakes indeed shows a remarkable similarity between shallow moonquakes and intraplate earthquakes: (1) their occurrences are not controlled by tides; (2) they appear to occur in locations where there is evidence of structural weaknesses; (3) the relative abundances of small and large quakes (b-values) are similar, suggesting similar mechanisms; and (4) even the levels of activity may be close. The shallow moonquakes may be quite comparable in nature to intraplate earthquakes, and they may be of similar origin.

  17. Vertical distribution of soil saturated hydraulic conductivity and its influencing factors in a small karst catchment in Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tonggang; Chen, Hongsong; Zhang, Wei; Nie, Yunpeng; Wang, Kelin

    2015-03-01

    Saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) is one of the most important soil hydraulic parameters influencing hydrological processes. This paper aims to investigate the vertical distribution of Ks and to analyze its influencing factors in a small karst catchment in Southwest China. Ks was measured in 23 soil profiles for six soil horizons using a constant head method. These profiles were chosen in different topographical locations (upslope, downslope, and depression) and different land-use types (forestland, shrubland, shrub-grassland, and farmland). The influencing factors of Ks, including rock fragment content (RC), bulk density (BD), capillary porosity (CP), non-capillary porosity (NCP), and soil organic carbon (SOC), were analyzed by partial correlation analysis. The mean Ks value was higher in the entire profile in the upslope and downslope, but lower value, acting as a water-resisting layer, was found in the 10-20 cm soil depth in the depression. Higher mean Ks values were found in the soil profiles in the forestland, shrubland, and shrub-grassland, but lower in the farmland. These results indicated that saturation-excess runoff could occur primarily in the hillslopes but infiltration-excess runoff in the depression. Compared with other land-use types, surface runoff is more likely to occur in the farmlands. RC had higher correlation coefficients with Ks in all categories concerned except in the forestland and farmland with little or no rock fragments, indicating that RC was the dominant influencing factor of Ks. These results suggested that the vertical distributions of Ks and RC should be considered for hydrological modeling in karst areas.

  18. Small-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium type 2 channels regulate the formation of contextual fear memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravana R K Murthy

    Full Text Available Small-conductance, Ca2+ activated K+ channels (SK channels are expressed at high levels in brain regions responsible for learning and memory. In the current study we characterized the contribution of SK2 channels to synaptic plasticity and to different phases of hippocampal memory formation. Selective SK2 antisense-treatment facilitated basal synaptic transmission and theta-burst induced LTP in hippocampal brain slices. Using the selective SK2 antagonist Lei-Dab7 or SK2 antisense probes, we found that hippocampal SK2 channels are critical during two different time windows: 1 blockade of SK2 channels before the training impaired fear memory, whereas, 2 blockade of SK2 channels immediately after the training enhanced contextual fear memory. We provided the evidence that the post-training cleavage of the SK2 channels was responsible for the observed bidirectional effect of SK2 channel blockade on memory consolidation. Thus, Lei-Dab7-injection before training impaired the C-terminal cleavage of SK2 channels, while Lei-Dab7 given immediately after training facilitated the C-terminal cleavage. Application of the synthetic peptide comprising a leucine-zipper domain of the C-terminal fragment to Jurkat cells impaired SK2 channel-mediated currents, indicating that the endogenously cleaved fragment might exert its effects on memory formation by blocking SK2 channel-mediated currents. Our present findings suggest that SK2 channel proteins contribute to synaptic plasticity and memory not only as ion channels but also by additionally generating a SK2 C-terminal fragment, involved in both processes. The modulation of fear memory by down-regulating SK2 C-terminal cleavage might have applicability in the treatment of anxiety disorders in which fear conditioning is enhanced.

  19. Caribbean shallow water Corallimorpharia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, J.C.den

    1980-01-01

    The present paper comprises a review of the Caribbean shallow water Corallimorpharia. Six species, belonging to four genera and three families are treated, including Pseudocorynactis caribbeorum gen. nov. spec. nov., a species with tentacular acrospheres containing the largest spirocysts ever

  20. Role of calcium-activated potassium channels with small conductance in bradykinin-induced vasodilation of porcine retinal arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Thomas; Kroigaard, Christel; Bek, Toke

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Endothelial dysfunction and impaired vasodilation may be involved in the pathogenesis of retinal vascular diseases. In the present study, the mechanisms underlying bradykinin vasodilation were examined and whether calcium-activated potassium channels of small (SK(Ca)) and intermediate (IK...

  1. Shallow land burial handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinton, L.H.

    1983-01-01

    The facility development phases (preliminary analysis, site selection, facility design and construction, facility operation, and facility closure/post-closure) are systematically integrated into a logical plan for developing near surface disposal plans. The Shallow Land Burial Handbook provides initial guidance and concepts for understanding the magnitude and the complexity of developing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

  2. Small and intermediate conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels confer distinctive patterns of distribution in human tissues and differential cellular localisation in the colon and corpus cavernosum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Mao Xiang; Gorman, Shelby A.; Benson, Bill; Singh, Kuljit; Hieble, J. Paul; Michel, Martin C.; Tate, Simon N.; Trezise, Derek J.

    2004-01-01

    The SK/IK family of small and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channels contains four members, SK1, SK2, SK3 and IK1, and is important for the regulation of a variety of neuronal and non-neuronal functions. In this study we have analysed the distribution of these channels in

  3. Antiarrhythmic effect of either negative modulation or blockade of small conductance Ca2+ activated K+ channels on ventricular fibrillation in guinea pig Langendorff perfused heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diness, Jonas Goldin; Kirchhoff, Jeppe Egedal; Sheykhzade, Majid

    2015-01-01

    During recent years small conductance Ca activated K (SK) channels have been reported to play a role in cardiac electrophysiology. SK channels seem to be expressed in atria and ventricles but from a functional perspective atrial activity is predominant. A general notion seems to be that cardiac S...

  4. The empirical relationship between the managerial conduct and internal control activities in South African small, medium and micro enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Juan-Pierre Bruwer; Philna Coetzee; Jacolize Meiring

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although South African small, medium and micro enterprises (SMMEs) play an imperative role in the stimulation of the national economy, previous research studies show that these business entities have severe sustainability problems as approximately 75% of them fail after being in operation for only 3 years. The latter dispensation is pinned on the belief that South African SMMEs make use of inadequate and ineffective internal control systems. Aim: Since a system of internal cont...

  5. The empirical relationship between the managerial conduct and internal control activities in South African small, medium and micro enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Pierre Bruwer

    2017-07-01

    Aim: Since a system of internal control comprises five inter-related elements, while also taking into consideration that management is ultimately responsible for the internal control in their respective business entities, which is greatly influenced by their managerial conduct, this research study placed focus on determining the relationship which exist between the managerial conduct and the internal control activities evident in South African SMMEs. Setting: This study was conducted in the Cape Metropole, South Africa by obtaining responses from 240 stakeholders of SMMEs: 120 members of management and 120 employees. Methods: In order to achieve the latter, quantitative data were collected through a questionnaire and analysed accordingly through both descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. Results: From the results, a very weak negative statistically significant relationship was identified between the managerial conduct and the internal control activities evident in South African SMMEs. Conclusion: Essentially, management and employees should revisit the internal control activities evident in their respective SMMEs through placing emphasis on those internal control activities which can be built on their control environment.

  6. Highly tunable NEMS shallow arches

    KAUST Repository

    Kazmi, Syed N. R.

    2017-11-30

    We report highly tunable nanoelectromechanical systems NEMS shallow arches under dc excitation voltages. Silicon based in-plane doubly clamped bridges, slightly curved as shallow arches, are fabricated using standard electron beam lithography and surface nanomachining of a highly conductive device layer on a silicon-on-insulator wafer. By designing the structures to have gap to thickness ratio of more than four, the mid-plane stretching of the nano arches is maximized such that an increase in the dc bias voltage will result into continuous increase in the resonance frequency of the resonators to wide ranges. This is confirmed analytically based on a nonlinear beam model. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with that of the results from developed analytical model. A maximum tunability of 108.14% for a 180 nm thick arch with an initially designed gap of 1 μm between the beam and the driving/sensing electrodes is achieved. Furthermore, a tunable narrow bandpass filter is demonstrated, which opens up opportunities for designing such structures as filtering elements in high frequency ranges.

  7. Practical Soil-Shallow Foundation Model for Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussa Leblouba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil-shallow foundation interaction models that are incorporated into most structural analysis programs generally lack accuracy and efficiency or neglect some aspects of foundation behavior. For instance, soil-shallow foundation systems have been observed to show both small and large loops under increasing amplitude load reversals. This paper presents a practical macroelement model for soil-shallow foundation system and its stability under simultaneous horizontal and vertical loads. The model comprises three spring elements: nonlinear horizontal, nonlinear rotational, and linear vertical springs. The proposed macroelement model was verified using experimental test results from large-scale model foundations subjected to small and large cyclic loading cases.

  8. Comparative analysis among the small RNA populations of source, sink and conductive tissues in two different plant-virus pathosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, Mari Carmen; Navarro, Jose Antonio; Sommen, Evelien; Pallas, Vicente

    2015-02-22

    In plants, RNA silencing plays a fundamental role as defence mechanism against viruses. During last years deep-sequencing technology has allowed to analyze the sRNA profile of a large variety of virus-infected tissues. Nevertheless, the majority of these studies have been restricted to a unique tissue and no comparative analysis between phloem and source/sink tissues has been conducted. In the present work, we compared the sRNA populations of source, sink and conductive (phloem) tissues in two different plant virus pathosystems. We chose two cucurbit species infected with two viruses very different in genome organization and replication strategy; Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) and Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV). Our findings showed, in both systems, an increase of the 21-nt total sRNAs together with a decrease of those with a size of 24-nt in all the infected tissues, except for the phloem where the ratio of 21/24-nt sRNA species remained constant. Comparing the vsRNAs, both PNRSV- and MNSV-infected plants share the same vsRNA size distribution in all the analyzed tissues. Similar accumulation levels of sense and antisense vsRNAs were observed in both systems except for roots that showed a prevalence of (+) vsRNAs in both pathosystems. Additionally, the presence of overrepresented discrete sites along the viral genome, hot spots, were identified and validated by stem-loop RT-PCR. Despite that in PNRSV-infected plants the presence of vsRNAs was scarce both viruses modulated the host sRNA profile. We compare for the first time the sRNA profile of four different tissues, including source, sink and conductive (phloem) tissues, in two plant-virus pathosystems. Our results indicate that antiviral silencing machinery in melon and cucumber acts mainly through DCL4. Upon infection, the total sRNA pattern in phloem remains unchanged in contrast to the rest of the analyzed tissues indicating a certain tissue-tropism to this polulation. Independently of the

  9. Conducting Creativity Brainstorming Sessions in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises Using Computer-Mediated Communication Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Uday S.

    A variety of Web-based low cost computer-mediated communication (CMC) tools are now available for use by small and medium-sized enterprises (SME). These tools invariably incorporate chat systems that facilitate simultaneous input in synchronous electronic meeting environments, allowing what is referred to as “electronic brainstorming.” Although prior research in information systems (IS) has established that electronic brainstorming can be superior to face-to-face brainstorming, there is a lack of detailed guidance regarding how CMC tools should be optimally configured to foster creativity in SMEs. This paper discusses factors to be considered in using CMC tools for creativity brainstorming and proposes recommendations for optimally configuring CMC tools to enhance creativity in SMEs. The recommendations are based on lessons learned from several recent experimental studies on the use of CMC tools for rich brainstorming tasks that require participants to invoke domain-specific knowledge. Based on a consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of the various configuration options, the recommendations provided can form the basis for selecting a CMC tool for creativity brainstorming or for creating an in-house CMC tool for the purpose.

  10. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-19

    LE O CEAN RAPHIC I TITUTI Appli d Oc:ean Physics and E11gi1i,ering Depar1111,11t vember 9, 2017 Dr. Robert Headrick ffice of Naval Resear h, ode...UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department...2015). [3] J.F. Lynch and A.E. Newhall, "Shallow water acoustics", book chapter in "Practical Underwater Acoustics," L. Bjorno, T. Neighbors, and D

  11. Enhanced K+-channel-mediated endothelium-dependent local and conducted dilation of small mesenteric arteries from ApoE−/− mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beleznai, Timea; Takano, Hiromichi; Hamill, Claire; Yarova, Polina; Douglas, Gillian; Channon, Keith; Dora, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Aims Agonists that evoke smooth muscle cell hyperpolarization have the potential to stimulate both local and conducted dilation. We investigated whether the endothelium-dependent vasodilators acetylcholine (ACh) and SLIGRL stimulated conducted dilation and whether this was altered by deficiency in apolipoprotein E (ApoE−/−). Methods and results Isolated mesenteric arteries were cannulated, pressurized, and precontracted with phenylephrine. Agonists were either added to the bath to study local dilation or were restricted to one end of arteries to study conducted dilation. An enhanced sensitivity to both ACh and SLIGRL was observed in mesenteric arteries from ApoE−/− mice compared with wild-type controls. Inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthase blocked ACh responses, but had no effect on maximum dilation to SLIGRL. SLIGRL increased endothelial cell Ca2+, hyperpolarized smooth muscle cells, and fully dilated arteries. The NO-independent dilation to SLIGRL was blocked with high [KCl] or Ca2+-activated K+-channel blockers. The hyperpolarization and dilation to SLIGRL passed through the artery to at least 2.5 mm upstream. The conducted dilation was not affected by a deficit in ApoE and could also be stimulated by ACh, suggesting NO itself could stimulate conducted dilation. Conclusion In small mesenteric arteries of ApoE−/− mice, NO-independent dilation is enhanced. Since both NO-dependent and -independent pathways can stimulate local and conducted dilation, the potential for reducing vascular resistance is improved in these vessels. PMID:21690174

  12. Small polaron hopping conduction in samples of ceramic La1.4Sr1.6Mn2O7.06

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsugawa, H.; Iguchi, E.; Jung, W.H.; Munakata, F.

    1999-01-01

    The ceramic sample of La 1.4 Sr 1.6 Mn 2 O 7.06 exhibits the metal-insulator transition and a negative magnetoresistance in the vicinity of the Curie temperature (T C ∼ 100 K). The dc magnetic susceptibility between 100 K and 280 K is nearly constant and decreases gradually with increasing temperature above 280 K. The measurements of dc resistivity and the thermoelectric power indicate that small polaron hopping conduction takes place at T > 280 K. The spin ordering due to the two-dimensional d x 2 -y 2 state occurring at T > 280 K is directly related to the hopping conduction above 280 K, although the spin ordering due to the one-dimensional d 3z 2 -r 2 state takes place at T > T C . The two-dimensional d x 2 -y 2 state extending within the MnO 2 sheets starts to narrow and leads to the carrier localisation at 280 K. The effective number of holes in this sample estimated from the thermoelectric power is considerably smaller than the nominal value. This indicates that the small polaron hopping conduction takes place predominantly within the in-plane MnO 2 sheets. A discussion is given of the experimental results of the ceramic sample of La 2/3 Ca 1/3 MnO 2.98 . Copyright (1999) CSIRO Australia

  13. Limitations of shallow nets approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shao-Bo

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we aim at analyzing the approximation abilities of shallow networks in reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces (RKHSs). We prove that there is a probability measure such that the achievable lower bound for approximating by shallow nets can be realized for all functions in balls of reproducing kernel Hilbert space with high probability, which is different with the classical minimax approximation error estimates. This result together with the existing approximation results for deep nets shows the limitations for shallow nets and provides a theoretical explanation on why deep nets perform better than shallow nets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of correlations on the non-ohmic behavior of the small-polaron hopping conductivity in 1D and 3D disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimakogianni, M; Triberis, G P

    2010-01-01

    According to percolation theory the investigation of charge transport in disordered systems is equivalent to the study of the possibility of the passage of the carriers through a random network of impedances which interconnect the different lattice sites. When the site energies are not the same, the energy of a site affects the incoming as well as the outgoing impedances connected to the given site and this gives rise to correlations between neighboring impedances. This new condition characterizes the transport process and imposes the evaluation of the average number of sites accessible by a bond from a given site for all possible configurations of sites that satisfy the percolation condition. The generalized molecular crystal model, appropriate for the study of small-polaron hopping transport in disordered systems, and the Kubo formula permit the evaluation of these impedances. Taking correlations into account, theoretical percolation considerations applicable to one-dimensional and three-dimensional disordered systems, lead to analytical expressions for the temperature and electric field dependence of the DC conductivity at high (multi-phonon-assisted hopping) and low (few-phonon-assisted hopping) temperatures. The theoretical analysis reveals the effect of correlations on the non-ohmic behavior of the small-polaron hopping conductivity and permits the evaluation of the maximum hopping distance. Quantitative estimates of this effect are presented comparing the theoretical results, including correlations with those ignoring them, previously reported, applying them to recent experimental data for a wide temperature range and from low up to moderate electric fields.

  15. Fundamentals of Shallow Water Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Katsnelson, Boris; Lynch, James

    2012-01-01

    Shallow water acoustics (SWA), the study of how low and medium frequency sound propagates and scatters on the continental shelves of the world's oceans, has both technical interest and a large number of practical applications. Technically, shallow water poses an interesting medium for the study of acoustic scattering, inverse theory, and propagation physics in a complicated oceanic waveguide. Practically, shallow water acoustics has interest for geophysical exploration, marine mammal studies, and naval applications. Additionally, one notes the very interdisciplinary nature of shallow water acoustics, including acoustical physics, physical oceanography, marine geology, and marine biology. In this specialized volume, the authors, all of whom have extensive at-sea experience in U.S. and Russian research efforts, have tried to summarize the main experimental, theoretical, and computational results in shallow water acoustics, with an emphasis on providing physical insight into the topics presented.

  16. Aeromagnetic and aerial photographic survey in the South Shetland Islands,Antarctica, conducted by a small unmanned aerial vehicle (Ant-Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Funaki

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Two small unmanned aerial vehicles, Ant-Plane 6 and Ant-Plane 3, were assembled using parts and technologies developed for model airplanes. The aerial vehicles were scheduled to conduct aero magnetic and photographic surveys of the Brans?eld Basin, from a takeoff runway at Marsh Air?eld on the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica, during January 2011. However, the scheduled surveys were not conducted on account of poor weather. Research was later conducted on a glacier, using a takeoff runway at St. Kliment Ohridski Base, Livingston Island, during December 2011. A ?ight from St. Kliment Ohridski Base to Deception Island yielded satisfactory results; the total distance of 302.4 km was traversed in 3 h 7 min (3:07. On this ?ight, aeromagnetic and aerial photographic data were obtained from an altitude of 780 m for a 9×18 km area on the northern half of Deception Island. Aerial photographs of Deception Island and South Bay showed the distributions of glaciers and their crevasses. The Ant-Plane ?ew over the Antarctic horizon and surveyed above Deception Island. That was the successful venture of this kind, demonstrating that airborne surveys by Ant-Planes are useful for Antarctic research investigations. Airborne surveys provide a safe and economical approach to data acquisition as compared with manned aerial operations.

  17. Water quality assessment in a shallow lake used for tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dembowska Ewa A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The routine evaluation of water quality is limited to lakes with the largest area. In Poland, only lakes with an area exceeding 50 hectares are monitored by the State Environmental Monitoring System. For many local communities, however, small lakes are more important. This applies mainly to areas with a small number of lakes, where even the smallest lakes are used for various purposes. This paper presents the results of phytoplankton analysis in a small and shallow lake used for recreation. The study was conducted at three sites located in different parts of the lake. A total of 122 algae taxa were identified in the phytoplankton, mainly diatoms and green algae. The most constant taxa in the lake were: Stephanodiscus hantzschii, Desmodesmus communis, Pediastrum tetras and Crucigenia tetrapedia. The average phytoplankton biomass was 37 mg l−1. The maximum biomass, almost 140 mg dm−3, was recorded in late July at the site located near the beach. At that time, there was a massive cyanobacterial bloom composed of Microcystis wesenbergii and Aphanizomenon issatschenkoi. Based on these studies, the lake should be classified as hypertrophic with bad ecological status. This lake should not be used for recreational purposes in the current state.

  18. Contribution of small conductance K+ channels to sinoatrial node pacemaker activity: insights from atrial-specific Na+ /Ca2+ exchange knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrente, Angelo G; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Heidi; Zaini, Audrey; Kim, Brian; Yue, Xin; Philipson, Kenneth D; Goldhaber, Joshua I

    2017-06-15

    Repolarizing currents through K + channels are essential for proper sinoatrial node (SAN) pacemaking, but the influence of intracellular Ca 2+ on repolarization in the SAN is uncertain. We identified all three isoforms of Ca 2+ -activated small conductance K + (SK) channels in the murine SAN. SK channel blockade slows repolarization and subsequent depolarization of SAN cells. In the atrial-specific Na + /Ca 2+ exchanger (NCX) knockout mouse, cellular Ca 2+ accumulation during spontaneous SAN pacemaker activity produces intermittent hyperactivation of SK channels, leading to arrhythmic pauses alternating with bursts of pacing. These findings suggest that Ca 2+ -sensitive SK channels can translate changes in cellular Ca 2+ into a repolarizing current capable of modulating pacemaking. SK channels are a potential pharmacological target for modulating SAN rate or treating SAN dysfunction, particularly under conditions characterized by abnormal increases in diastolic Ca 2+ . Small conductance K + (SK) channels have been implicated as modulators of spontaneous depolarization and electrical conduction that may be involved in cardiac arrhythmia. However, neither their presence nor their contribution to sinoatrial node (SAN) pacemaker activity has been investigated. Using quantitative PCR (q-PCR), immunostaining and patch clamp recordings of membrane current and voltage, we identified all three SK isoforms (SK1, SK2 and SK3) in mouse SAN. Inhibition of SK channels with the specific blocker apamin prolonged action potentials (APs) in isolated SAN cells. Apamin also slowed diastolic depolarization and reduced pacemaker rate in isolated SAN cells and intact tissue. We investigated whether the Ca 2+ -sensitive nature of SK channels could explain arrhythmic SAN pacemaker activity in the atrial-specific Na + /Ca 2+ exchange (NCX) knockout (KO) mouse, a model of cellular Ca 2+ overload. SAN cells isolated from the NCX KO exhibited higher SK current than wildtype (WT) and apamin

  19. Shallow-Water Mud Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Shallow-Water Mud Acoustics William L. Siegmann...models and methods that explain observed material and acoustic properties of different physical types of shallow-ocean mud sediments. Other goals...are to assess prior data relating to the acoustic properties of mud and to provide guidance in the development and interpretation of experiments. A

  20. Shallow layer modelling of dense gas clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, S.; Nielsen, M.

    1996-11-01

    The motivation for making shallow layer models is that they can deal with the dynamics of gravity driven flow in complex terrain at a modest computational cost compared to 3d codes. The main disadvantage is that the air-cloud interactions still have to be added `by hand`, where 3d models inherit the correct dynamics from the fundamental equations. The properties of the inviscid shallow water equations are discussed, focusing on existence and uniqueness of solutions. It is demonstrated that breaking waves and fronts pose severe problems, that can only be overcome if the hydrostatic approximation is given up and internal friction is added to the model. A set of layer integrated equations is derived starting from the Navier-Stokes equations. The various steps in the derivation are accompanied by plausibility arguments. These form the scientific basis of the model. The principle of least action is introduced as a means of generating consistent models, and as a tool for making discrete equations for numerical models, which automatically obey conservation laws. A numerical model called SLAM (Shallow LAyer Model) is presented. SLAM has some distinct features compared to other shallow layer models: A Lagrangian, moving grid; Explicit account for the turbulent kinetic energy budget; The entrainment rate is estimated on the basis of the local turbulent kinetic energy; Non-hydrostatic pressure; and Numerical methods respect conservation laws even for coarse grids. Thorney Island trial 8 is used as a reference case model tuning. The model reproduces the doughnut shape of the cloud and yield concentrations in reasonable agreement with observations, even when a small number of cells (e.g. 16) is used. It is concluded that lateral exchange of matter within the cloud caused by shear is important, and that the model should be improved on this point. (au) 16 ills., 38 refs.

  1. Auto-Thermal Reforming Using Mixed Ion-Electronic Conducting Ceramic Membranes for a Small-Scale H2 Production Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Spallina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The integration of mixed ionic electronic conducting (MIEC membranes for air separation in a small-to-medium scale unit for H2 production (in the range of 650–850 Nm3/h via auto-thermal reforming of methane has been investigated in the present study. Membranes based on mixed ionic electronic conducting oxides such as Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ (BSCF give sufficiently high oxygen fluxes at temperatures above 800 °C with high purity (higher than 99%. Experimental results of membrane permeation tests are presented and used for the reactor design with a detailed reactor model. The assessment of the H2 plant has been carried out for different operating conditions and reactor geometry and an energy analysis has been carried out with the flowsheeting software Aspen Plus, including also the turbomachines required for a proper thermal integration. A micro-gas turbine is integrated in the system in order to supply part of the electricity required in the system. The analysis of the system shows that the reforming efficiency is in the range of 62%–70% in the case where the temperature at the auto-thermal reforming membrane reactor (ATR-MR is equal to 900 °C. When the electric consumption and the thermal export are included the efficiency of the plant approaches 74%–78%. The design of the reactor has been carried out using a reactor model linked to the Aspen flowsheet and the results show that with a larger reactor volume the performance of the system can be improved, especially because of the reduced electric consumption. From this analysis it has been found that for a production of about 790 Nm3/h pure H2, a reactor with a diameter of 1 m and length of 1.8 m with about 1500 membranes of 2 cm diameter is required.

  2. Fabrication of transparent, tough, and conductive shape-memory polyurethane films by incorporating a small amount of high-quality graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong Chae; Kim, Jin Hee; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Terrones, Mauricio; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2012-04-23

    We report a mechanically strong, electrically and thermally conductive, and optically transparent shape-memory polyurethane composite which was fabricated by introducing a small amount (0.1 wt%) of high-quality graphene as a filler. Geometrically large (≈4.6 μm(2)), but highly crystallized few-layer graphenes, verified by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, were prepared by the sonication of expandable graphite in an organic solvent. Oxygen- containing functional groups at the edge plane of graphene were crucial for an effective stress transfer from the graphene to polyurethane. Homogeneously dispersed few-layered graphene enabled polyurethane to have a high shape recovery force of 1.8 MPa cm(-3). Graphene, which is intrinsically stretchable up to 10%, will enable high-performance composites to be fabricated at relatively low cost and we thus envisage that such composites may replace carbon nanotubes for various applications in the near future. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Shallow Horizontal GCHP Effectiveness in Arid Climate Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Timothy James

    Ground coupled heat pumps (GCHPs) have been used successfully in many environments to improve the heating and cooling efficiency of both small and large scale buildings. In arid climate regions, such as the Phoenix, Arizona metropolitan area, where the air condi-tioning load is dominated by cooling in the summer, GCHPs are difficult to install and operate. This is because the nature of soils in arid climate regions, in that they are both dry and hot, renders them particularly ineffective at dissipating heat. The first part of this thesis addresses applying the SVHeat finite element modeling soft-ware to create a model of a GCHP system. Using real-world data from a prototype solar-water heating system coupled with a ground-source heat exchanger installed in Menlo Park, California, a relatively accurate model was created to represent a novel GCHP panel system installed in a shallow vertical trench. A sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the accuracy of the calibrated model. The second part of the thesis involved adapting the calibrated model to represent an ap-proximation of soil conditions in arid climate regions, using a range of thermal properties for dry soils. The effectiveness of the GCHP in the arid climate region model was then evaluated by comparing the thermal flux from the panel into the subsurface profile to that of the prototype GCHP. It was shown that soils in arid climate regions are particularly inefficient at heat dissipation, but that it is highly dependent on the thermal conductivity inputted into the model. This demonstrates the importance of proper site characterization in arid climate regions. Finally, several soil improvement methods were researched to evaluate their potential for use in improving the effectiveness of shallow horizontal GCHP systems in arid climate regions.

  4. Small and intermediate conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels confer distinctive patterns of distribution in human tissues and differential cellular localisation in the colon and corpus cavernosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mao Xiang; Gorman, Shelby A; Benson, Bill; Singh, Kuljit; Hieble, J Paul; Michel, Martin C; Tate, Simon N; Trezise, Derek J

    2004-06-01

    The SK/IK family of small and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channels contains four members, SK1, SK2, SK3 and IK1, and is important for the regulation of a variety of neuronal and non-neuronal functions. In this study we have analysed the distribution of these channels in human tissues and their cellular localisation in samples of colon and corpus cavernosum. SK1 mRNA was detected almost exclusively in neuronal tissues. SK2 mRNA distribution was restricted but more widespread than SK1, and was detected in adrenal gland, brain, prostate, bladder, liver and heart. SK3 mRNA was detected in almost every tissue examined. It was highly expressed in brain and in smooth muscle-rich tissues including the clitoris and the corpus cavernosum, and expression in the corpus cavernosum was upregulated up to 5-fold in patients undergoing sex-change operations. IK1 mRNA was present in surface-rich, secretory and inflammatory cell-rich tissues, highest in the trachea, prostate, placenta and salivary glands. In detailed immunohistochemical studies of the colon and the corpus cavernosum, SK1-like immunoreactivity was observed in the enteric neurons. SK3-like immunoreactivity was observed strongly in smooth muscle and vascular endothelium. IK1-like immunoreactivity was mainly observed in inflammatory cells and enteric neurons of the colon, but absent in corpus cavernosum. These distinctive patterns of distribution suggest that these channels are likely to have different biological functions and could be specifically targeted for a number of human diseases, such as irritable bowel syndrome, hypertension and erectile dysfunction.

  5. Deep and shallow water effects on developing preschoolers' aquatic skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Aldo M; Marinho, Daniel A; Rocha, Helena; Silva, António J; Barbosa, Tiago M; Ferreira, Sandra S; Martins, Marta

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the study was to assess deep and shallow water teaching methods in swimming lessons for preschool children and identify variations in the basic aquatic skills acquired. The study sample included 32 swimming instructors (16 from deep water programs and 16 from shallow water programs) and 98 preschool children (50 from deep water swimming pool and 48 from shallow water swimming pool). The children were also studied regarding their previous experience in swimming (6, 12 and 18 months or practice). Chi-Square test and Fisher's exact test were used to compare the teaching methodology. A discriminant analysis was conducted with Λ wilk's method to predict under what conditions students are better or worse (aquatic competence). Results suggest that regardless of the non-significant variations found in teaching methods, the water depth can affect aquatic skill acquisition - shallow water lessons seem to impose greater water competence particularly after 6 months of practice. The discriminant function revealed a significant association between groups and all predictors for 6 months of swimming practice (pdeep and shallow water programs for preschoolers is not significantly different. However, shallow water lessons could be preferable for the development of basic aquatic skills.

  6. Shallow flows with bottom topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijst, van G.J.F.; Kamp, L.P.J.; Theunissen, R.; Rodi, W.; Uhlmann, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of dipolar vortex flows in a shallow fluid layer with bottom topography. Two cases are considered: a step topography and a linearly sloping bottom. It is found that viscous effects – i.e., no-slip conditions at the non-horizontal

  7. Memory-Based Shallow Parsing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjong Kim Sang, E.F.

    2002-01-01

    We present memory-based learning approaches to shallow parsing and apply these to five tasks: base noun phrase identification, arbitrary base phrase recognition, clause detection, noun phrase parsing and full parsing. We use feature selection techniques and system combination methods for improving

  8. Yield response and economics of shallow subsurface drip irrigation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field tests were conducted using shallow subsurface drip irrigation (S3DI) on cotton (Gossypium hirsutum, L.), corn (Zea mays, L.), and peanut (Arachis hypogeae, L.) in rotation to investigate yield potential and economic sustainability of this irrigation system technique over a six year period. Dri...

  9. 2010 Hudson River Shallow Water Sediment Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hudson River Shallow Water Mapping project characterizes the bottom of the Hudson River Estuary in shallow water (<3 m). The characterization includes...

  10. 3D seismic surveys for shallow targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, D.C.; Stewart, R.R.; Bertram, M.B. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Geoscience, Consortium for Research in Elastic Wave Exploration Seismology

    2008-07-01

    Although 3D seismic surveys are generally used to map deep hydrocarbon plays, this study demonstrated that they can be useful for characterizing shallow targets, such as oilsands deposits. A high-resolution 3D seismic survey was undertaken to map shallow stratigraphy near Calgary, Alberta. The project demonstrated the efficacy of reflection seismic surveys for shallow targets ranging from 100 to 500 metres. The purpose of the program was to map shallow stratigraphy and structure to depths of up to 500m, and to investigate shallow aquifers in the study area. The results of the survey illustrated the opportunity that 3D seismic surveys provide for mapping shallow reflectors and the acquisition geometry needed to image them. Applications include mapping the distribution of shallow aquifers, delineating shallow coals and investigating oilsands deposits. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Angular dependence of shallow dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical response of a detector is discussed and compared to measurements of shallow dose with tissue and phantom response detectors. A definite energy dependent angular response of dose and measurement was observed which could not be explained by simple trigonometric arguments. The response is back scatter dependent and must be considered in detector design and dose measurements. It is not possible for standard detectors to follow this response

  12. Memory-Based Shallow Parsing

    OpenAIRE

    Sang, Erik F. Tjong Kim

    2002-01-01

    We present memory-based learning approaches to shallow parsing and apply these to five tasks: base noun phrase identification, arbitrary base phrase recognition, clause detection, noun phrase parsing and full parsing. We use feature selection techniques and system combination methods for improving the performance of the memory-based learner. Our approach is evaluated on standard data sets and the results are compared with that of other systems. This reveals that our approach works well for ba...

  13. Imaging subsurface migration of dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer using 3-D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auken, Esben; Doetsch, Joseph; Fiandaca, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater by leaking CO2 is a potential risk of carbon sequestration. With the help of a field experiment in western Denmark, we investigate to what extent surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can detect and image dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer. For this purpose...... the injection start. During these 120days, the CO2 migrates about 25m in the expected groundwater flow direction. Water electrical conductivity (EC) sampling using small screens in 29 wells allows for very good verification of the ERT results. Water EC and ERT results generally agree very well, with the water...

  14. Comparison of Shallow Survey 2012 Multibeam Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of the Shallow Survey common dataset is a comparison of the different technologies utilized for data acquisition in the shallow survey marine environment. The common dataset consists of a series of surveys conducted over a common area of seabed using a variety of systems. It provides equipment manufacturers the opportunity to showcase their latest systems while giving hydrographic researchers and scientists a chance to test their latest algorithms on the dataset so that rigorous comparisons can be made. Five companies collected data for the Common Dataset in the Wellington Harbor area in New Zealand between May 2010 and May 2011; including Kongsberg, Reson, R2Sonic, GeoAcoustics, and Applied Acoustics. The Wellington harbor and surrounding coastal area was selected since it has a number of well-defined features, including the HMNZS South Seas and HMNZS Wellington wrecks, an armored seawall constructed of Tetrapods and Akmons, aquifers, wharves and marinas. The seabed inside the harbor basin is largely fine-grained sediment, with gravel and reefs around the coast. The area outside the harbor on the southern coast is an active environment, with moving sand and exposed reefs. A marine reserve is also in this area. For consistency between datasets, the coastal research vessel R/V Ikatere and crew were used for all surveys conducted for the common dataset. Using Triton's Perspective processing software multibeam datasets collected for the Shallow Survey were processed for detail analysis. Datasets from each sonar manufacturer were processed using the CUBE algorithm developed by the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping/Joint Hydrographic Center (CCOM/JHC). Each dataset was gridded at 0.5 and 1.0 meter resolutions for cross comparison and compliance with International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) requirements. Detailed comparisons were made of equipment specifications (transmit frequency, number of beams, beam width), data density, total uncertainty, and

  15. Proposal for a dual-gate spin field effect transistor: A device with very small switching voltage and a large ON to OFF conductance ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, J.; Cahay, M.; Bandyopadhyay, S.

    2008-06-01

    We propose a new dual gate spin field effect transistor (SpinFET) consisting of a quasi one-dimensional semiconductor channel sandwiched between two half-metallic contacts. The gate voltage aligns and de-aligns the incident electron energy with Ramsauer resonance levels in the channel, thereby modulating the source-to-drain conductance. The device can be switched from ON to OFF with a few mV change in the gate voltage, resulting in exceedingly low dynamic power dissipation during switching. The conductance ON/OFF ratio stays fairly large ( ∼60) up to a temperature of 10 K. This conductance ratio is comparable to that achievable with carbon nanotube transistors.

  16. Seismic modelling of shallow coalfields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, D.C. (University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics.)

    1987-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to determine whether reflection seismic surveys can be used to map stratigraphic and structural detail of shallow Plains-type coal deposits. Two coalfields in central Alberta were used to examine and determine optimum acquisition parameters for reflection seismic surveys in such settings. The study was based on 1-D and 2-D numerical seismic modelling using sonic and density well logs to formulate a layered earth model. Additional objectives were to interpret the reflection seismic data in terms of geologic features in the study area, and to investigate the relationship between vertical resolution and field acquisition geometry. 27 refs., 41 figs.

  17. Pharmacologic inhibition of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels by NS8593 reveals atrial antiarrhythmic potential in horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Maria Mathilde; Hesselkilde, Eva Zander; Pehrson, Steen Michael

    2015-01-01

    and ventricular cardiomyocytes and contribute to atrial repolarization. Inhibition by NS8593 terminates pacing-induced AF of short duration and decreases AF duration and vulnerability without affecting ventricular conduction and repolarization. Thus, inhibition by NS8593 demonstrates clear atrial antiarrhythmic...

  18. Electric field control of the small-polaron hopping conduction in spatial confined Pr0.7(Ca0.6Sr0.40.3MnO3/PMN-PT heterostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Kuang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The electric field dependent high-temperature small-polaron hopping conduction was investigated in patterned Pr0.7(Ca0.6Sr0.40.3MnO3 strips. The small-polaronic activation energy EA and the carrier localization were found to decrease with the reduction of the strip size. Meanwhile, a similar dependence on the strip size was also obtained for the calculated small-polaron coupling constants, which could be related to the strain relaxation in strips. These results indicate that the spatial confinement prefers to delocalize the carrier and reduce the electron-phonon interaction. Furthermore, opposite variation trends of EA under negative and positive electric field were found in the strips with small size, which could be attributed to the enhancement of polarization effect induced by the reduction of strip size.

  19. Rogue waves in shallow water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomere, T.

    2010-07-01

    Most of the processes resulting in the formation of unexpectedly high surface waves in deep water (such as dispersive and geometrical focusing, interactions with currents and internal waves, reflection from caustic areas, etc.) are active also in shallow areas. Only the mechanism of modulational instability is not active in finite depth conditions. Instead, wave amplification along certain coastal profiles and the drastic dependence of the run-up height on the incident wave shape may substantially contribute to the formation of rogue waves in the nearshore. A unique source of long-living rogue waves (that has no analogues in the deep ocean) is the nonlinear interaction of obliquely propagating solitary shallow-water waves and an equivalent mechanism of Mach reflection of waves from the coast. The characteristic features of these processes are (i) extreme amplification of the steepness of the wave fronts, (ii) change in the orientation of the largest wave crests compared with that of the counterparts and (iii) rapid displacement of the location of the extreme wave humps along the crests of the interacting waves. The presence of coasts raises a number of related questions such as the possibility of conversion of rogue waves into sneaker waves with extremely high run-up. Also, the reaction of bottom sediments and the entire coastal zone to the rogue waves may be drastic.

  20. The measurement of gas–liquid two-phase flows in a small diameter pipe using a dual-sensor multi-electrode conductance probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Lu-Sheng; Bian, Peng; Han, Yun-Feng; Gao, Zhong-Ke; Jin, Ning-De

    2016-01-01

    We design a dual-sensor multi-electrode conductance probe to measure the flow parameters of gas–liquid two-phase flows in a vertical pipe with an inner diameter of 20 mm. The designed conductance probe consists of a phase volume fraction sensor (PVFS) and a cross-correlation velocity sensor (CCVS). Through inserting an insulated flow deflector in the central part of the pipe, the gas–liquid two-phase flows are forced to pass through an annual space. The multiple electrodes of the PVFS and the CCVS are flush-mounted on the inside of the pipe wall and the outside of the flow deflector, respectively. The geometry dimension of the PVFS is optimized based on the distribution characteristics of the sensor sensitivity field. In the flow loop test of vertical upward gas–liquid two-phase flows, the output signals from the dual-sensor multi-electrode conductance probe are collected by a data acquisition device from the National Instruments (NI) Corporation. The information transferring characteristics of local flow structures in the annular space are investigated using the transfer entropy theory. Additionally, the kinematic wave velocity is measured based on the drift velocity model to investigate the propagation behavior of the stable kinematic wave in the annular space. Finally, according to the motion characteristics of the gas–liquid two-phase flows, the drift velocity model based on the flow patterns is constructed to measure the individual phase flow rate with higher accuracy. (paper)

  1. Acoustic MIMO communications in a very shallow water channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuehai; Cao, Xiuling; Tong, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Underwater acoustic channels pose significant difficulty for the development of high speed communication due to highly limited band-width as well as hostile multipath interference. Enlightened by rapid progress of multiple input multiple output (MIMO) technologies in wireless communication scenarios, MIMO systems offer a potential solution by enabling multiple spatially parallel communication channels to improve communication performance as well as capacity. For MIMO acoustic communications, deep sea channels offer substantial spatial diversity among multiple channels that can be exploited to address simultaneous multipath and co-channel interference. At the same time, there are increasing requirements for high speed underwater communication in very shallow water area (for example, a depth less than 10 m). In this paper, a space-time multichannel adaptive receiver consisting of multiple decision feedback equalizers (DFE) is adopted as the receiver for a very shallow water MIMO acoustic communication system. The performance of multichannel DFE receivers with relatively small number of receiving elements are analyzed and compared with that of the multichannel time reversal receiver to evaluate the impact of limited spatial diversity on multi-channel equalization and time reversal processing. The results of sea trials in a very shallow water channel are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of very shallow water MIMO acoustic communication.

  2. Steady flow in shallow channel bends

    OpenAIRE

    De Vriend, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    Making use of a mathematical model solving the complete NavierStokes equations for steady flow in coiled rectangular pipes, fully-developed laminar flow in shallow curved channels is analysed physically and mathematically. Transverse convection of momentum by the secondary flow is shown to cause important deformations of the main velocity distribution. The model is also used to investigate simplified computation methods for shallow channels. The usual 'shallow water approximation' is shown to...

  3. Investigation on H-containing shallow trap of hydrogenated TiO2 with in situ Fourier transform infrared diffuse reflection spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Hang Hu, Yun

    2017-07-28

    A novel technique, high temperature high pressure in situ Fourier transform infrared diffuse reflection spectroscopy, was successfully used to investigate the formation and stability of shallow trap states in P25 TiO 2 nanoparticles. Two types of shallow traps (with and without H atoms) were identified. The H-containing shallow trap can be easily generated by heating in H 2 atmosphere. However, the trap is unstable in vacuum at 600 °C. In contrast, the H-free shallow trap, which can be formed by heating in vacuum, is stable even at 600 °C. The energy gaps between shallow trap states and the conduction band are 0.09 eV for H-containing shallow trap and 0.13 eV for H-free shallow trap, indicating that the H-containing shallow trap state is closer to the conduction band than that without H.

  4. Temporal variation in the biomass and nutrient status of Azolla filiculoides Lam. (Salviniaceae in a small shallow dystrophic lake Variação temporal de biomassa e estado nutricional de Azolla filiculoides Lam (Salviniaceae em um pequeno lago raso distrófico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Rossano Trindade Trindade

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study determined the temporal variation of the biomass and the concentrations of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in Azolla filiculoides Lam. in a small (0.5 ha shallow dystrophic lake located in the city of Rio Grande (Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. METHOD: Sampling was conducted monthly between November 2000 and October 2001. The macrophytes were collected randomly in three replicates with a circular collector 0.3 m in diameter and subsequently washed with tap water and oven-dried at 60 ºC for determination of the dry weight and the nutrient status (i.e., carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus. Primary productivity was estimated by the variation in biomass among successive samples. RESULTS: A. filiculoides was present in the lake throughout the year and occupied between 50 and 80% of the surface area. The biomass values ranged from 34.2 g DW.m-2, recorded in May (autumn, to 170.9 g DW.m-2 in January (summer. The highest rate of primary productivity was 3.3 g DW.m-2.d-1, observed in June. The concentrations of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in the plant ranged between 403 and 551 g.kg-1, 13.4 and 25.7 g.kg-1 and 0.5 and 1.9 g.kg-1, respectively. The water N:P ratio ranged between 19:1 and 368:1. CONCLUSION: The coverage of the surface of the lake by A. filiculoides throughout the study period and the nutritional status of the plant demonstrate the importance of the cycling of nutrients by macrophytes in this aquatic environment. The higher N:P ratio in the water column, compared with other neighboring environments without macrophytes, shows that the enrichment of the lake may result from the biological N-fixation activity produced by A. filiculoides.OBJETIVO: Este estudo determinou a variação temporal da biomassa e as concentrações de carbono, nitrogênio e fósforo de Azolla filiculoides Lam., em um pequeno lago raso distrófico situado no município do Rio Grande (Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. MÉTODO: As amostragens foram realizadas

  5. Shallow-land-burial handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boegly, W.J. Jr.; Davis, E.C.

    1981-01-01

    The initial draft of the Shallow-Land Burial Handbook has been prepared and submitted to the DOE Low-Level Waste Management Program for review and comment. The Handbook informs the reader of the current way in which low-level wastes are being handled, outlines the legal and institutional problems that would be involved in developing and licensing such a facility, and describes in some detail the considerations and data needs for siting, designing, operating, and closing such a facility. The initial draft is not a Handbook that provides answers to all questions, nor insures that following the steps detailed in the Handbook guarantees that the facility will be licensed. It does illustrate the types of actions that must be considered and the types of information required to achieve successful operations

  6. Improvement of 2D ERT measurements conducted along a small earth-filled dyke using 3D topographic data and 3D computation of geometric factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bièvre, Grégory; Oxarango, Laurent; Günther, Thomas; Goutaland, David; Massardi, Michael

    2018-06-01

    In the framework of earth-filled dykes characterization and monitoring, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) turns out to be a commonly used method. 2D sections are generally acquired along the dyke crest thus putting forward the question of 3D artefacts in the inversion process. This paper proposes a methodology based on 3D direct numerical simulations of the ERT acquisition using a realistic topography of the study site. It allows computing ad hoc geometrical factors which can be used for the inversion of experimental ERT data. The method is first evaluated on a set of synthetic dyke configurations. Then, it is applied to experimental static and time-lapse ERT data set acquired before and after repair works carried out on a leaking zone of an earth-filled canal dyke in the centre of France. The computed geometric factors are lower than the analytic geometric factors in a range between -8% and - 18% for measurements conducted on the crest of the dyke. They exhibit a maximum under-estimation for intermediate electrode spacings in the Wenner and Schlumberger configurations. In the same way, for measurements conducted on the mid-slope of the dyke, the computed geometric factors are higher for short electrode spacings (+18%) and lower for lower for large electrode spacings (-8%). The 2D inversion of the synthetic data with these computed geometric factors provides a significant improvement of the agreement with the original resistivity. Two experimental profiles conducted on the same portion of the dyke but at different elevations also reveal a better agreement using this methodology. The comparison with apparent resistivity from EM31 profiling along the stretch of the dyke also supports this evidence. In the same way, some spurious effects which affected the time-lapse data were removed and improved the global readability of the time-lapse resistivity sections. The benefit on the structural interpretation of ERT images remains moderate but allows a better

  7. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Guam; Cruise: HA1101_LEGIII, Data Date Range: 20110504-20110507. (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  8. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Maui, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: OES0810, Data Date Range: 20081017-20081103 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  9. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Guam; Cruise: HI0902, Data Date Range: 20090404-20090408 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  10. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Guam; Cruise: HI0702, Data Date Range: 20070511-20070515 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  11. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Maui, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: OES0502, Data Date Range: 20050225-20050225 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  12. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Maui, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HI0505, Data Date Range: 20050804-20050805 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  13. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Tutuila, American Samoa; Cruise: HI0602, Data Date Range: 20060218-20060226 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  14. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Tutuila, American Samoa; Cruise: OES0402, Data Date Range: 20040219-20040225 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  15. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Guam; Cruise: OES0512, Data Date Range: 20051003-20051008 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  16. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Swains Island, American Samoa; Cruise: OES0402, Data Date Range: 20040215-20040218 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  17. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Tutuila, American Samoa; Cruise: HA1201_LEGI, Data Date Range: 20120325-20120326 (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  18. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Oahu, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HI0610, Data Date Range: 20060727-20060728 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  19. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Guam; Cruise: OES0307, Data Date Range: 20030922-20030925 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  20. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Rose Atoll, American Samoa; Cruise: OES0402, Data Date Range: 20040209-20040211 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  1. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Oahu, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HA1008, Data Date Range: 20101024-20101102 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  2. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Molokai, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HI0610, Data Date Range: 20060730-20060815 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  3. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Molokai, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HA1008, Data Date Range: 20101023-20101104 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  4. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Maui, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HI0610, Data Date Range: 20060730-20060820 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  5. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Oahu, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: OES0810, Data Date Range: 20081112-20081113 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  6. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Niihau, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HA1008, Data Date Range: 20101029-20101101 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  7. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Maui, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HA1008, Data Date Range: 20101015-20101020 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  8. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Molokai, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HI0505, Data Date Range: 20050801-20050802 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  9. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Oahu, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HI0505, Data Date Range: 20050715-20050724 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  10. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Rose Atoll, American Samoa; Cruise: HI0602, Data Date Range: 20060305-20060309 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  11. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Rose Atoll, American Samoa; Cruise: HI0802, Data Date Range: 20080313-20080314 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  12. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Niihau, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HI0610, Data Date Range: 20060809-20060811 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  13. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Molokai, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: OES0810, Data Date Range: 20081021-20081025 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  14. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Niihau, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: OES0810, Data Date Range: 20081109-20081111 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  15. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Tutuila, American Samoa; Cruise: HI0802, Data Date Range: 20080218-20080223 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  16. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Swains Island, American Samoa; Cruise: HI0802, Data Date Range: 20080317-20080318 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  17. ODMR of shallow donors in Zn-doped LEC-grown InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trombetta, J.M.; Kennedy, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    ODMR spectra observed while monitoring the shallow donor-shallow acceptor pair emission in Zn-doped LEC-grown InP display strong features in the region near the conduction electron value of g = 1.20. In addition to a previously observed narrow line, the authors observe a much broader resonance which dominates at low photoexcitation intensity. This broader line is interpreted as the unresolved exchange split resonances of electrons bound to residual shallow donors. The exchange broadening arises from interaction with nearby paramagnetic centers. Both resonances result in a decrease in the shallow-donor-to shallow-acceptor radiative recombination and give evidence for pair recombination processes which compete with this emission

  18. Shallow groundwater investigations at Weldon Spring, Missouri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    The Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geology and Land Survey (MDNR-DGLS) conducted investigations of the upper aquifer in the vicinity of the abandoned Weldon Spring Chemical Plant in southwest St. Charles County, Missouri. The objective of the investigation was to better define the relationships between precipitation, surface runoff, groundwater recharge and shallow groundwater discharge within the study area, thereby assisting the Department of Energy in designing an appropriate groundwater monitoring plan for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project. The results of the investigations indicate that the upper aquifer has been affected by karst development but that well developed karst does not exist on or around the site. Dye traces conducted during the study have shown that surface water which leaves the site enters the subsurface in losing streams around the site and travels rapidly to one or more local springs. Upper aquifer recharge areas, constructed from dye trace and potentiometric data, generally follow surface water drainage patterns on the south side of the site, but cross surface-water drainage divides north of the site. Nine springs may receive recharge from site runoff, depending upon the amount of runoff. In addition to these springs, one perennial spring and two intermittent springs to the southwest of the site may receive recharge from site infiltration. 25 refs., 13 figs

  19. Novel phenolic inhibitors of small/intermediate-conductance Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ channels, KCa3.1 and KCa2.3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Oliván-Viguera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: KCa3.1 channels are calcium/calmodulin-regulated voltage-independent K(+ channels that produce membrane hyperpolarization and shape Ca(2+-signaling and thereby physiological functions in epithelia, blood vessels, and white and red blood cells. Up-regulation of KCa3.1 is evident in fibrotic and inflamed tissues and some tumors rendering the channel a potential drug target. In the present study, we searched for novel potent small molecule inhibitors of KCa3.1 by testing a series of 20 selected natural and synthetic (polyphenols, synthetic benzoic acids, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, with known cytoprotective, anti-inflammatory, and/or cytostatic activities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In electrophysiological experiments, we identified the natural phenols, caffeic acid (EC50 1.3 µM and resveratrol (EC50 10 µM as KCa3.1 inhibitors with moderate potency. The phenols, vanillic acid, gallic acid, and hydroxytyrosol had weak or no blocking effects. Out of the NSAIDs, flufenamic acid was moderately potent (EC50 1.6 µM, followed by mesalamine (EC50≥10 µM. The synthetic fluoro-trivanillic ester, 13b ([3,5-bis[(3-fluoro-4-hydroxy-benzoyloxymethyl]phenyl]methyl 3-fluoro-4-hydroxy-benzoate, was identified as a potent mixed KCa2/3 channel inhibitor with an EC50 of 19 nM for KCa3.1 and 360 pM for KCa2.3, which affected KCa1.1 and Kv channels only at micromolar concentrations. The KCa3.1/KCa2-activator SKA-31 antagonized the 13b-blockade. In proliferation assays, 13b was not cytotoxic and reduced proliferation of 3T3 fibroblasts as well as caffeic acid. In isometric vessel myography, 13b increased contractions of porcine coronary arteries to serotonin and antagonized endothelium-derived hyperpolarization-mediated vasorelaxation to pharmacological KCa3.1/KCa2.3 activation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified the natural phenols, caffeic acid and resveratrol, the NSAID, flufenamic acid, and the polyphenol 13b as novel

  20. Spatial Relation of Apparent Soil Electrical Conductivity with Crop Yields and Soil Properties at Different Topographic Positions in a Small Agricultural Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurbir Singh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Use of electromagnetic induction (EMI sensors along with geospatial modeling provide a better opportunity for understanding spatial distribution of soil properties and crop yields on a landscape level and to map site-specific management zones. The first objective of this research was to evaluate the relationship of crop yields, soil properties and apparent electrical conductivity (ECa at different topographic positions (shoulder, backslope, and deposition slope. The second objective was to examine whether the correlation of ECa with soil properties and crop yields on a watershed scale can be improved by considering topography in modeling ECa and soil properties compared to a whole field scale with no topographic separation. This study was conducted in two headwater agricultural watersheds in southern Illinois, USA. The experimental design consisted of three basins per watershed and each basin was divided into three topographic positions (shoulder, backslope and deposition using the Slope Position Classification model in ESRI ArcMap. A combine harvester equipped with a GPS-based recording system was used for yield monitoring and mapping from 2012 to 2015. Soil samples were taken at depths from 0–15 cm and 15–30 cm from 54 locations in the two watersheds in fall 2015 and analyzed for physical and chemical properties. The ECa was measured using EMI device, EM38-MK2, which provides four dipole readings ECa-H-0.5, ECa-H-1, ECa-V-0.5, and ECa-V-1. Soybean and corn yields at depositional position were 38% and 62% lower than the shoulder position in 2014 and 2015, respectively. Soil pH, total carbon (TC, total nitrogen (TN, Mehlich-3 Phosphorus (P, Bray-1 P and ECa at depositional positions were significantly higher compared to shoulder positions. Corn and soybeans yields were weakly to moderately (<±0.75 correlated with ECa. At the deposition position at the 0–15 cm depth ECa-H-0.5 was weakly correlated (r < ±0.50 with soil pH and was

  1. Law of Strata Pressure Behavior in Shallow Coal Seam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Liu, Leibin; Zheng, Zhiyang

    2018-02-01

    The law of strata pressure behavior in shallow coal seam is analyzed, according to the load data of Jinjie Coal Mine 31109 working face hydraulic supports. The first weighting distance of main roof is 80 m, and the periodic weighting distance of main roof is about 20 m. And according to the load data in the middle and both ends of the working face, the working resistance of hydraulic supports and the setting load are a bit small, so they couldn’t meet the needs of supporting roof. Then, the front abutment pressure of working face is analyzed by numerical simulation. It does not only explain the reason that the load is too big, but also explains the reason that the strata pressure behavior in shallow coal seam is serious. The length of undamaged main roof rock beam verifies the correctness of the periodic weighting distance.

  2. Shallow Carbon Sequestration Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendergrass, Gary; Fraley, David; Alter, William; Bodenhamer, Steven

    2013-09-30

    The potential for carbon sequestration at relatively shallow depths was investigated at four power plant sites in Missouri. Exploratory boreholes were cored through the Davis Shale confining layer into the St. Francois aquifer (Lamotte Sandstone and Bonneterre Formation). Precambrian basement contact ranged from 654.4 meters at the John Twitty Energy Center in Southwest Missouri to over 1100 meters near the Sioux Power Plant in St. Charles County. Investigations at the John Twitty Energy Center included 3D seismic reflection surveys, downhole geophysical logging and pressure testing, and laboratory analysis of rock core and water samples. Plans to perform injectivity tests at the John Twitty Energy Center, using food grade CO{sub 2}, had to be abandoned when the isolated aquifer was found to have very low dissolved solids content. Investigations at the Sioux Plant and Thomas Hill Energy Center in Randolph County found suitably saline conditions in the St. Francois. A fourth borehole in Platte County was discontinued before reaching the aquifer. Laboratory analyses of rock core and water samples indicate that the St. Charles and Randolph County sites could have storage potentials worthy of further study. The report suggests additional Missouri areas for further investigation as well.

  3. Geomorphological mapping of shallow landslides using UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Federica; Giordan, Daniele; Dutto, Furio; Rossi, Mauro; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2015-04-01

    The mapping of event shallow landslides is a critical activity, due to the large number of phenomena, mostly with small dimension, affecting extensive areas. This is commonly done through aerial photo-interpretation or through field surveys. Nowadays, landslide maps can be realized exploiting other methods/technologies: (i) airborne LiDARs, (ii) stereoscopic satellite images, and (iii) unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). In addition to the landslide maps, these methods/technologies allow the generation of updated Digital Terrain Models (DTM). In December 2013, in the Collazzone area (Umbria, Central Italy), an intense rainfall event triggered a large number of shallow landslides. To map the landslides occurred in the area, we exploited data and images obtained through (A) an airborne LiDAR survey, (B) a remote controlled optocopter (equipped with a Canon EOS M) survey, and (C) a stereoscopic satellite WorldView II MS. To evaluate the mapping accuracy of these methods, we select two landslides and we mapped them using a GPS RTK instrumentation. We consider the GPS survey as the benchmark being the most accurate system. The results of the comparison allow to highlight pros and cons of the methods/technologies used. LiDAR can be considered the most accurate system and in addition it allows the extraction and the classification of the digital surface models from the surveyed point cloud. Conversely, LiDAR requires additional time for the flight planning, and specific data analysis user capabilities. The analysis of the satellite WorldView II MS images facilitates the landslide mapping over large areas, but at the expenses of a minor resolution to detect the smaller landslides and their boundaries. UAVs can be considered the cheapest and fastest solution for the acquisition of high resolution ortho-photographs on limited areas, and the best solution for a multi-temporal analysis of specific landslide phenomena. Limitations are due to (i) the needs of optimal climatic

  4. Migration of radionuclides following shallow land burial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlet, J.; Golchert, N.W.

    1980-01-01

    A study of radionuclide migration was conducted at a facility used from 1944 to 1949 for the shallow land burial of radwaste produced during operations with two reactors and related nuclear research. It is situated in glacial drift 45 m thick. Underlying the drift is a generally level Silurian dolomite bedrock 60 m thick. The thickness of the drift decreases as the surface slopes downhill (north) until the dolomite reaches the surface and forms the bed of a river, 700 m to the north. This study was begun after tritiated water was detected in two picnic wells north of the facility, between the burial plot and the river. Surface and subsurface measurements indicate that tritium is migrating out of the burial site, but no other radionuclides have left the plot. The tritium concentrations decrease with distance from the plot. Tritium was found in the subsoil at all depths sampled, so the ground beneath and immediately around the plot contains tritium down to the dolomite aquifer. Time of travel of water from the burial plot to the nearest well is estimated to be 54 months. This would imply the peak concentration would reach the dolomite in about 35 years. By this time, 86% of the tritium would have disappeared by radioactive decay. The cyclical nature of the tritium content in the two wells implies that tritiated water is carried from the burial site by the spring rains when they recharge the groundwater supply

  5. Shallow land burial technology - ARID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abeele, W.V.; DePoorter, G.L.; Hakonson, T.E.; Nyhan, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Scope of the tasks being performed by Los Alamos will be identified. Emphasis will be placed upon the geotechnical work. Important geotechnical properties of a low-level waste disposal site include hydraulic conductivity consolidation, and shear strength of the applicable medium. The hydraulic conductivity of crushed Bandelier tuff has been assessed using the instantaneous profile method. The best fit of hydraulic conductivity as a function of water content was found to be a power function. The coefficient of consolidation was difficult to measure because of the relatively high hydraulic conductivity. The repose angle for crushed tuff is higher than the normally expected range. This is probably because of a higher than average angularity and surface roughness. The high coefficient of consolidation and high internal friction angle make finely crushed tuff a material with ideal mechanical characteristics. The drawback is that a high coefficient of consolidation is linked to a high hydraulic conductivity

  6. Conducting Polymers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    would exhibit electronic conductivity, their conductivities (of compressed pellets) were indeed measured by others, and were found to be .... Polyaniline. Polyphenylene. Polypheny lene- vinylene. Table 1. G!NeRAl I ARTICl! structure. Maximum conductivity Stem Stability. Processability. ~. 1.5 x 105. Reacts with Film not n air.

  7. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF FRAME STRUCTURE ON SHALLOW FOUNDATION WITH EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE (EPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Waluyohadi

    2015-08-01

    test results. A series of parametric study is conducted including the interface element and the variations of size of EPS. The use of EPS underneath shallow foundation do not show the correlation with the seismic response of structure if there is no interface element constructed. Variation of EPS size used were contributed to the acceleration and displacement of  structure with shallow foundation. As the larger size of EPS applied, the larger reduction of seismic responses will be obtained.

  8. Shallow land burial technology: humid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, E.C.; Yeh, G.T.

    1984-01-01

    Applying engineered modifications to present shallow land burial (SLB) practices is one method of ensuring safe operation and improving overall disposal-site performance. Two such engineered modifications, trench lining and grouting, are being demonstrated and evaluated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Engineered Test Facility (ETF), using nine 28-m 3 experimental trenches containing compacted low-level waste (LLW). Concurrent to this field demonstration experiment, two finite-element hydrologic models have been developed to model water movement and solute transport at a waste disposal site. This paper covers progress made in these two areas during FY 1984. Though the economic analysis of the two trench treatments favored Hypalon lining (lining costs were 33% lower at this demonstration scale), results of field experiments examining waste hydrologic isolation favored the cement-bentonite grout treatment. Data from water pump-out and water pump-in tests, combined with observed intratrench water-level fluctuations, suggest that the original goal of constructing watertight liners in three experimental trenches was not achieved. In addition, trench-cover subsidence of approx. 2% of the total trench depth has been measured over two of the three lined trenches but has not occurred over any of the three grouted or three control (untreated) trenches. The evaluation of the two trench treatments is continuing. However, results indicate that the cement-bentonite treatment, implemented at a cost of $160/m 3 of grout, provides a degree of waste isolation not afforded by the lined and control trenches and should be considered for use at SLB sites with water-related problems. 11 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  9. Shallow Water Optical Water Quality Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostater, Charles

    1998-01-01

    This NASA grant was funded as a result of an unsolicited proposal submission to Kennedy Space Center. The proposal proposed the development and testing of a shallow water optical water quality buoy. The buoy is meant to work in shallow aquatic systems (ponds, rivers, lagoons, and semi-enclosed water areas where strong wind wave action is not a major environmental During the project period of three years, a demonstration of the buoy was conducted. The last demonstration during the project period was held in November, 1996 when the buoy was demonstrated as being totally operational with no tethered communications line. During the last year of the project the buoy was made to be solar operated by large gel cell batteries. Fund limitations did not permit the batteries in metal enclosures as hoped for higher wind conditions, however the system used to date has worked continuously for in- situ operation of over 18 months continuous deployment. The system needs to have maintenance and somewhat continuous operational attention since various components have limited lifetime ages. For example, within the last six months the onboard computer has had to be repaired as it did approximately 6 months after deployment. The spectrograph had to be repaired and costs for repairs was covered by KB Science since no ftmds were available for this purpose after the grant expired. Most recently the computer web page server failed and it is currently being repaired by KB Science. In addition, the cell phone operation is currently being ftmded by Dr. Bostater in order to maintain the system's operation. The above points need to be made to allow NASA to understand that like any sophisticated measuring system in a lab or in the field, necessary funding and maintenance is needed to insure the system's operational state and to obtain quality factor. The proposal stated that the project was based upon the integration of a proprietary and confidential sensor and probe design that was developed by

  10. Development of a Methodology to Conduct Usability Evaluation for Hand Tools that May Reduce the Amount of Small Parts that are Dropped During Installation while Processing Space Flight Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Darcy

    2000-01-01

    Foreign object debris (FOD) is an important concern while processing space flight hardware. FOD can be defined as "The debris that is left in or around flight hardware, where it could cause damage to that flight hardware," (United Space Alliance, 2000). Just one small screw left unintentionally in the wrong place could delay a launch schedule while it is retrieved, increase the cost of processing, or cause a potentially fatal accident. At this time, there is not a single solution to help reduce the number of dropped parts such as screws, bolts, nuts, and washers during installation. Most of the effort is currently focused on training employees and on capturing the parts once they are dropped. Advances in ergonomics and hand tool design suggest that a solution may be possible, in the form of specialty hand tools, which secure the small parts while they are being handled. To assist in the development of these new advances, a test methodology was developed to conduct a usability evaluation of hand tools, while performing tasks with risk of creating FOD. The methodology also includes hardware in the form of a testing board and the small parts that can be installed onto the board during a test. The usability of new hand tools was determined based on efficiency and the number of dropped parts. To validate the methodology, participants were tested while performing a task that is representative of the type of work that may be done when processing space flight hardware. Test participants installed small parts using their hands and two commercially available tools. The participants were from three groups: (1) students, (2) engineers / managers and (3) technicians. The test was conducted to evaluate the differences in performance when using the three installation methods, as well as the difference in performance of the three participant groups.

  11. Transparent conducting oxide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivov, Yahya; Singh, Vivek; Ding, Yuchen; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-09-01

    Thin film or porous membranes made of hollow, transparent, conducting oxide (TCO) nanotubes, with high chemical stability, functionalized surfaces and large surface areas, can provide an excellent platform for a wide variety of nanostructured photovoltaic, photodetector, photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic devices. While large-bandgap oxide semiconductors offer transparency for incident light (below their nominal bandgap), their low carrier concentration and poor conductivity makes them unsuitable for charge conduction. Moreover, materials with high conductivity have nominally low bandgaps and hence poor light transmittance. Here, we demonstrate thin films and membranes made from TiO2 nanotubes heavily-doped with shallow Niobium (Nb) donors (up to 10%, without phase segregation), using a modified electrochemical anodization process, to fabricate transparent conducting hollow nanotubes. Temperature dependent current-voltage characteristics revealed that TiO2 TCO nanotubes, doped with 10% Nb, show metal-like behavior with resistivity decreasing from 6.5 × 10-4 Ωcm at T = 300 K (compared to 6.5 × 10-1 Ωcm for nominally undoped nanotubes) to 2.2 × 10-4 Ωcm at T = 20 K. Optical properties, studied by reflectance measurements, showed light transmittance up to 90%, within wavelength range 400 nm-1000 nm. Nb doping also improves the field emission properties of TCO nanotubes demonstrating an order of magnitude increase in field-emitter current, compared to undoped samples.

  12. Spatial scaling of bacterial community diversity at shallow hydrothermal vents: a global comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop Ristova, P.; Hassenrueck, C.; Molari, M.; Fink, A.; Bühring, S. I.

    2016-02-01

    Marine shallow hydrothermal vents are extreme environments, often characterized by discharge of fluids with e.g. high temperatures, low pH, and laden with elements toxic to higher organisms. They occur at continental margins around the world's oceans, but represent fragmented, isolated habitats of locally small areal coverage. Microorganisms contribute the main biomass at shallow hydrothermal vent ecosystems and build the basis of the food chain by autotrophic fixation of carbon both via chemosynthesis and photosynthesis, occurring simultaneously. Despite their importance and unique capacity to adapt to these extreme environments, little is known about the spatial scales on which the alpha- and beta-diversity of microbial communities vary at shallow vents, and how the geochemical habitat heterogeneity influences shallow vent biodiversity. Here for the first time we investigated the spatial scaling of microbial biodiversity patterns and their interconnectivity at geochemically diverse shallow vents on a global scale. This study presents data on the comparison of bacterial community structures on large (> 1000 km) and small (0.1 - 100 m) spatial scales as derived from ARISA and Illumina sequencing. Despite the fragmented global distribution of shallow hydrothermal vents, similarity of vent bacterial communities decreased with geographic distance, confirming the ubiquity of distance-decay relationship. Moreover, at all investigated vents, pH was the main factor locally structuring these communities, while temperature influenced both the alpha- and beta-diversity.

  13. Electron spin exchange of shallow donor muonium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senba, Masayoshi

    2005-01-01

    Shallow donor muonium states with small hyperfine frequencies, recently observed in II-VI semiconductor compounds, have a number of unique features that present both opportunities and challenges in understanding muon spin dynamics in the presence of Heisenberg spin exchange. First, the shallow muonium state in CdSe with hyperfine frequency ω 0 /2π ∼ 0.1 MHz is already in the high field regime even in the earth's magnetic field, where only two precession frequencies are observable by the muon spin rotation (μSR) technique. Second, unlike in the case of more conventional muonium species with a larger hyperfine frequency, the μSR signal of shallow muonium states can be observed even in the transition region, between the slow spin-flip regime and the fast spin-flip regime, where the spin-flip rate and the hyperfine frequency are comparable. The muon spin dynamics in the transition region has not been theoretically explored previously, mainly because normal muonium in vacuum gives no observable signal in this region. Third, in the case of shallow muonium states, the incoherent process defined to be those spin-flip collisions that cause changes in muon spin precession frequencies, becomes crucially important in the transition region, where the incoherent process is entirely negligible in more conventional muonium species. By taking incoherent multiple collisions into account, an analytical expression for the time evolution of the muon spin polarization in Mu is derived, where Mu undergoes repeated spin-flip collisions. Comparisons with Monte Carlo calculations show that the analytical expression obtained in this work can reliably be used to analyse experimental data for shallow donor states not only in the slow spin-flip regime, but also in the transition region up to the onset of the fast regime. The present work confirms a recent experimental finding that, in the transition region, the initial phases of the two precession components of shallow donor states

  14. Shallow-water vortex equilibria and their stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotka, H; Dritschel, D G, E-mail: hanna@mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk, E-mail: dgd@mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-22

    We first describe the equilibrium form and stability of steadily-rotating simply-connected vortex patches in the single-layer quasi-geostrophic model of geophysical fluid dynamics. This model, valid for rotating shallow-water flow in the limit of small Rossby and Froude numbers, has an intrinsic length scale L{sub D} called the 'Rossby deformation length' relating the strength of stratification to that of the background rotation rate. Specifically, L{sub D} = c/f where c={radical}gH is a characteristic gravity-wave speed, g is gravity (or 'reduced' gravity in a two-layer context where one layer is infinitely deep), H is the mean active layer depth, and f is the Coriolis frequency (here constant). We next introduce ageostrophic effects by using the full shallow-water model to generate what we call 'quasi-equilibria'. These equilibria are not strictly steady, but radiate such weak gravity waves that they are steady for all practical purposes. Through an artificial ramping procedure, we ramp up the potential vorticity anomaly of the fluid particles in our quasi-geostrophic equilibria to obtain shallow-water quasi-equilibria at finite Rossby number. We show a few examples of these states in this paper.

  15. Transient Localization in Shallow Water Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brune, Joachim

    1998-01-01

    .... A full-wave PE model is used to produce broadband replicas. Both model-generated synthetic signals, which provide baseline results, and measured pulses in a shallow water environment are analyzed...

  16. Hydrogeological Characteristics of Groundwater Yield in Shallow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrogeological Characteristics of Groundwater Yield in Shallow Wells of the ... of Water Resources and Lower Niger River Basin Development Authority in Ilorin. ... moment correlation, multiple and stepwise multiple regression analysis.

  17. Is evaporative colling important for shallow clouds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentine, P.; Park, S. B.; Davini, P.; D'Andrea, F.

    2017-12-01

    We here investigate and test using large-eddy simulations the hypothesis that evaporative cooling might not be crucial for shallow clouds. Results from various Shallow convection and stratocumulus LES experiments show that the influence of evaporative cooling is secondary compared to turbulent mixing, which dominates the buoyancy reversal. In shallow cumulus subising shells are not due to evaporative cooling but rather reflect a vortical structure, with a postive buoyancy anomaly in the core due to condensation. Disabling evaporative cooling has negligible impact on this vortical structure and on buoyancy reversal. Similarly in non-precipitating stratocumuli evaporative cooling is negeligible copmared to other factors, especially turbulent mixing and pressure effects. These results emphasize that it may not be critical to icnlude evaporative cooling in parameterizations of shallow clouds and that it does not alter entrainment.

  18. Some problematic shallow-marine structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manten, A.A.

    The lowermost Devonian beds in Gotland (Sweden) were deposited in a very shallow marine environment, close to the coast. In these beds three structures were observed, whose mode of formation cannot be explained by the author.

  19. Conducting everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Pernille

    , they are involved in preventive interventions. I conducted participatory observations with the children in their everyday life. Overall, the study stresses that even small children must be perceived as active participants who act upon and struggle with different conditions and meaning making processes across......In the paper I discuss how small children (0-4 year) develop through ‘conducting everyday life’ across contexts (Holzkamp 2013). I discuss how this process of conducting everyday life is essential when discussing the ‘good life for children’ from a child perspective. These issues are addressed...... contexts (home, day care, part-time foster family) and in relation to other co-participants....

  20. Justification of Shallow-Water Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostapenko, V. V.

    2018-01-01

    The basic conservation laws of shallow-water theory are derived from multidimensional mass and momentum integral conservation laws describing the plane-parallel flow of an ideal incompressible fluid above the horizontal bottom. This conclusion is based on the concept of hydrostatic approximation, which generalizes the concept of long-wavelength approximation and is used for justifying the applicability of the shallow-water theory in the simulation of wave flows of fluid with hydraulic bores.

  1. DTMs Assessment to the Definition of Shallow Landslides Prone Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Tiago D.; Oka-Fiori, Chisato; Carvalho Vieira, Bianca; Montgomery, David R.

    2017-04-01

    Predictive methods have been developed, especially since the 1990s, to identify landslide prone areas. One of the examples it is the physically based model SHALSTAB (Shallow Landsliding Stability Model), that calculate the potential instability for shallow landslides based on topography and physical soil properties. Normally, in such applications in Brazil, the Digital Terrain Model (DTM), is obtained mainly from conventional contour lines. However, recently the LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) system has been largely used in Brazil. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate different DTM's, generated from conventional data and LiDAR, and their influence in generating susceptibility maps to shallow landslides using SHALSTAB model. For that were analyzed the physical properties of soil, the response of the model when applying conventional topographical data and LiDAR's in the generation of DTM, and the shallow landslides susceptibility maps based on different topographical data. The selected area is in the urban perimeter of the municipality of Antonina (PR), affected by widespread landslides in March 2011. Among the results, it was evaluated different LiDAR data interpolation, using GIS tools, wherein the Triangulation/Natural Neighbor presented the best performance. It was also found that in one of evaluation indexes (Scars Concentration), the LiDAR derived DTM presented the best performance when compared with the one originated from contour lines, however, the Landslide Potential index, has presented a small increase. Consequently, it was possible to assess the DTM's, and the one derived from LiDAR improved very little the certitude percentage. It is also noted a gap in researches carried out in Brazil on the use of products generated from LiDAR data on geomorphological analysis.

  2. High-resolution geophysical characterization of shallow-water wetlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansoor, N; Slater, L; Artigas, F

    2006-01-01

    , with data-acquisition rates exceeding10 km of line 12 000 data points per 8-hr field day.We applied this procedure to an urban wetland that is affectedby point and nonpoint sources of pollution.We used aone-dimensional, laterally constrained inversion algorithmto invert the apparent-conductivity data set......We describe a procedure for rapid characterization ofshallow-water, contaminated wetlands. Terrain-conductivityTC, vertical-magnetic-gradiometry, and surface-waterchemistrydata were obtained from a shallow-draft paddleboatoperable in as little as 0.3 m of water. Measurementswere taken every 2 s...... obtained from theTC survey and to create a pseudo-2D image of sediment conductivity.The continuously recorded surface-water depthand conductivity values were input as a priori information inthe inversion.We used soil chemistry determined for 28 sedimentsamples collected from the site, as well...

  3. Highly tunable NEMS shallow arches

    KAUST Repository

    Kazmi, Syed N. R.; Hajjaj, Amal Z.; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2017-01-01

    and surface nanomachining of a highly conductive device layer on a silicon-on-insulator wafer. By designing the structures to have gap to thickness ratio of more than four, the mid-plane stretching of the nano arches is maximized such that an increase

  4. Electrostatically Tunable Nanomechanical Shallow Arches

    KAUST Repository

    Kazmi, Syed N. R.; Hajjaj, Amal Z.; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2017-01-01

    -beam lithography and surface nanomachining of a highly conductive device layer on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. The experimental results show good agreement with the analytical results with a maximum tunability of 108.14% for 180 nm thick arch with a

  5. Theoretical Model of Acoustic Wave Propagation in Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozaczka Eugeniusz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the propagation of low frequency waves in a shallow sea. As a source of acoustic waves, underwater disturbances generated by ships were adopted. A specific feature of the propagation of acoustic waves in shallow water is the proximity of boundaries of the limiting media characterised by different impedance properties, which affects the acoustic field coming from a source situated in the water layer “deformed” by different phenomena. The acoustic field distribution in the real shallow sea is affected not only by multiple reflections, but also by stochastic changes in the free surface shape, and statistical changes in the seabed shape and impedance. The paper discusses fundamental problems of modal sound propagation in the water layer over different types of bottom sediments. The basic task in this case was to determine the acoustic pressure level as a function of distance and depth. The results of the conducted investigation can be useful in indirect determination of the type of bottom.

  6. SWIM: A Semi-Analytical Ocean Color Inversion Algorithm for Optically Shallow Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinna, Lachlan I. W.; Werdell, P. Jeremy; Fearns, Peter R. C. S.; Weeks, Scarla J.; Reichstetter, Martina; Franz, Bryan A.; Bailey, Sean W.; Shea, Donald M.; Feldman, Gene C.

    2014-01-01

    In clear shallow waters, light that is transmitted downward through the water column can reflect off the sea floor and thereby influence the water-leaving radiance signal. This effect can confound contemporary ocean color algorithms designed for deep waters where the seafloor has little or no effect on the water-leaving radiance. Thus, inappropriate use of deep water ocean color algorithms in optically shallow regions can lead to inaccurate retrievals of inherent optical properties (IOPs) and therefore have a detrimental impact on IOP-based estimates of marine parameters, including chlorophyll-a and the diffuse attenuation coefficient. In order to improve IOP retrievals in optically shallow regions, a semi-analytical inversion algorithm, the Shallow Water Inversion Model (SWIM), has been developed. Unlike established ocean color algorithms, SWIM considers both the water column depth and the benthic albedo. A radiative transfer study was conducted that demonstrated how SWIM and two contemporary ocean color algorithms, the Generalized Inherent Optical Properties algorithm (GIOP) and Quasi-Analytical Algorithm (QAA), performed in optically deep and shallow scenarios. The results showed that SWIM performed well, whilst both GIOP and QAA showed distinct positive bias in IOP retrievals in optically shallow waters. The SWIM algorithm was also applied to a test region: the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Using a single test scene and time series data collected by NASA's MODIS-Aqua sensor (2002-2013), a comparison of IOPs retrieved by SWIM, GIOP and QAA was conducted.

  7. Heat conduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigull, U.; Sandner, H.

    1984-01-01

    Included are discussions of rates of heat transfer by conduction, the effects of varying and changing properties, thermal explosions, distributed heat sources, moving heat sources, and non-steady three-dimensional conduction processes. Throughout, the importance of thinking both numerically and symbolically is stressed, as this is essential to the development of the intuitive understanding of numerical values needed for successful designing. Extensive tables of thermophysical properties, including thermal conductivity and diffusivity, are presented. Also included are exact and approximate solutions to many of the problems that arise in practical situations

  8. Electrical Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, David R.; Sand, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Explains how electrical conductivity (EC) can be used to measure ion concentration in solutions. Describes instrumentation for the measurement, temperature dependence and EC, and the EC of common substances. (PR)

  9. Conduct Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... objections runs away from home often truant from school Children who exhibit these behaviors should receive a comprehensive evaluation by an experience mental health professional. Many children with a conduct disorder may ...

  10. Inertia–gravity wave radiation from the elliptical vortex in the f -plane shallow water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko, E-mail: nori@phys-h.keio.ac.jp [Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Department of Physics, Keio University, 4-1-1 Hiyoshi, Kouhoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Inertia–gravity wave (IGW) radiation from the elliptical vortex is investigated in the f -plane shallow water system. The far field of IGW is analytically derived for the case of an almost circular Kirchhoff vortex with a small aspect ratio. Cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry appears at finite values of the Rossby number (Ro) caused by the source originating in the Coriolis acceleration. While the intensity of IGWs from the cyclone monotonically decreases as f increases, that from the anticyclone increases as f increases for relatively smaller f and has a local maximum at intermediate f . A numerical experiment is conducted on a model using a spectral method in an unbounded domain. The numerical results agree quite well with the analytical ones for elliptical vortices with small aspect ratios, implying that the derived analytical forms are useful for the verification of the numerical model. For elliptical vortices with larger aspect ratios, however, significant deviation from the analytical estimates appears. The intensity of IGWs radiated in the numerical simulation is larger than that estimated analytically. The reason is that the source of IGWs is amplified during the time evolution because the shape of the vortex changes from ideal ellipse to elongated with filaments. Nevertheless, cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry similar to the analytical estimate appears in all the range of aspect ratios, suggesting that this asymmetry is a robust feature. (paper)

  11. Fine-scale heat flow, shallow heat sources, and decoupled circulation systems at two sea-floor hydrothermal sites, Middle Valley, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, J. S.; Fisher, A. T.; Langseth, M.; Jin, W.; Iturrino, G.; Davis, E.

    1998-12-01

    Fine-scale heat-flow patterns at two areas of active venting in Middle Valley, a sedimented rift on the northern Juan de Fuca Ridge, provide thermal evidence of shallow hydrothermal reservoirs beneath the vent fields. The extreme variability of heat flow is explained by conductive heating immediately adjacent to vents and shallow circulation within sediments above the reservoir. This secondary circulation is hydrologically separated from the deeper system feeding the vents by a shallow conductive lid within the sediments. A similar separation of shallow and deep circulation may also occur at sediment-free ridge-crest hydrothermal environments.

  12. Conduct disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitelaar, J.K.; Smeets, K.C.; Herpers, P.; Scheepers, F.; Glennon, J.; Rommelse, N.N.J.

    2013-01-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is a frequently occurring psychiatric disorder characterized by a persistent pattern of aggressive and non-aggressive rule breaking antisocial behaviours that lead to considerable burden for the patients themselves, their family and society. This review paper updates diagnostic

  13. Computational modeling of shallow geothermal systems

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khoury, Rafid

    2011-01-01

    A Step-by-step Guide to Developing Innovative Computational Tools for Shallow Geothermal Systems Geothermal heat is a viable source of energy and its environmental impact in terms of CO2 emissions is significantly lower than conventional fossil fuels. Shallow geothermal systems are increasingly utilized for heating and cooling of buildings and greenhouses. However, their utilization is inconsistent with the enormous amount of energy available underneath the surface of the earth. Projects of this nature are not getting the public support they deserve because of the uncertainties associated with

  14. Distribution of metals in fauna, flora and sediments of wet detention ponds and natural shallow lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephansen, D.A.; Nielsen, A.H.; Hvitved-Jacobsen, T.

    2014-01-01

    Fauna, flora, and sediment were collected from 9 wet detention ponds receiving stormwater runoff and 11 small natural shallow lakes. The fauna and flora samples were sorted into species or groups of species and, together with sediments, analyzed for aluminum, copper, iron, zinc, arsenic, cadmium,...

  15. SHALLOW HABITATS IN TWO RHODE ISLAND SYSTEMS: II. PATTERNS OF SIZE, STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONAL GROUPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are examining habitats in small estuarine coves that may be important for the development of ecological indicators of integrity. We sampled nekton in Coggeshall Cove (shallow estuarine cove) in summer 1999 and 2000 and Ninigret Pond (coastal lagoon) in summer 2000. Coggeshall ...

  16. Definition of a protocol for conducting energy audits in cattle facilities: implementation in small and medium farms; Definicion de un protocolo para la realizacion de auditorias energeticas en instalaciones ganaderas: aplicacion en pequenas y medianas explotaciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navas, Luis M; Hernandez, Pablo; Guimaraes, Adriana C; Sanzi, Juan F; Gonzalez, Fernando; Ruiz, Gonzalo [Universidad de Valladolid (UVa), Palencia (Spain). Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenierias Agrarias. Dept. de Ingenieria Agricola y Forestal; Baptista, Fatima; Cruz, Vasco F. da , [Universidade de Evora (UEv), Evora (Portugal). Dept. de Engenharia Rural

    2010-07-01

    The present task shows the results of a project developed in Spain under the sponsorship of the Instituto para la Diversificacion y Ahorro de la Energia (IDAE), Ente Regional de la Energia de Castilla y Leon (EREN) and the Union de Pequenos Agricultores (UPA) which was implemented in the region of Castilla y Leon, an area with a predominantly agricultural and livestock production that aimed the establishment of a protocol for conducting energy audits in livestock facilities, focusing mainly those of small and medium size. The purpose of the protocol was to develop a methodology for the systematic characterization and formulation of proposals for improvement of the following elements: Construction features, power supplies, lighting, electric motors, heating, cooling and ventilation, renewable energies, energy utilization facilities of livestock waste and measuring and control equipment. The protocol was validated by conducting energy audits in 15 farms: 5 dairy cows, 5 sheep milk, 3 fattening pigs and 2 broilers. The results obtained showed that the proposed energy efficiency measures, which are characterized by their simple and usually cost effective deployment results an average energy savings consumption of 18%, which is manifested in a average cost reduction of 24.28%. (author)

  17. Habitat use by a large population of Pinna nobilis in shallow waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Prado

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the habitat use and size structure of the fan mussel, Pinna nobilis L. in the Alfacs Bay (Ebro Delta, Spain, NW Mediterranean. Shore-parallel transects were conducted to assess the abundance, size, and orientation of individuals and to record habitat features along the Banya Sandspit, at depths of 20 to 130 cm. Results showed two distinctive areas in terms of population density, marked by the end of local salt pan dikes that we named Good Habitat (GH and Bad Habitat (BH. To extrapolate these results to the full area of BH and GH, perpendicular transects were conducted to determine the local bathymetry. Then, the underestimation of individuals due to the effects of distance, depth and seagrass cover (Distance 6 computer package was added to raw abundances to obtain a corrected population of 90303 individuals (12085 in the BH and 782018 in the GH, the largest so far reported at such low depths. Most recorded individuals were adults (40 to 60 cm shell length, with no occurrence of sizes < 20 cm, and with a strong association with Cymodocea nodosa seagrass beds. Given the shallow distribution of the population, the absence of small sizes during the study period, and the presence of human activities that may damage P. nobilis and its habitat, the development of a management plan appears imperative for the conservation of the species.

  18. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Maro Reef, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: TC0207, Data Date Range: 20021002-20021003 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  19. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Pagan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0903, Data Date Range: 20090422-20090424 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  20. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Kaua'i, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HI0505, Data Date Range: 20050715-20050722 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  1. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Alamagan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0703, Data Date Range: 20070527-20070528 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  2. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Midway Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: OES0306, Data Date Range: 20030729-20030808 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  3. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Tinian, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0902, Data Date Range: 20090411-20090413 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  4. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Asuncion Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HA1101_LEGII, Data Date Range: 20110414-20110414. (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  5. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Pagan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: OES0307, Data Date Range: 20030825-20030908 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  6. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Rose Atoll, American Samoa; Cruise: HA1201_LEGII&III, Data Date Range: 20120419-20120422 (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  7. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Rota, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: OES0511, Data Date Range: 20050929-20050930 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  8. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Ta'u, American Samoa; Cruise: HI0802, Data Date Range: 20080301-20080303 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  9. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Ta'u, American Samoa; Cruise: TC0201_LEGII, Data Date Range: 20020211-20020213 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  10. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Tutuila, American Samoa; Cruise: HA1201_LEGII&III, Data Date Range: 20120401-20120406 (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  11. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; French Frigate Shoals, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0809, Data Date Range: 20080916-20080917 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  12. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Swains Island, American Samoa; Cruise: HI1001_LEGII, Data Date Range: 20100316-20100318 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  13. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Laysan Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0809, Data Date Range: 20080920-20080920 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  14. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI1001_LEGI, Data Date Range: 20100203-20100205 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  15. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Laysan Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0611, Data Date Range: 20060911-20060911 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  16. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0401, Data Date Range: 20040926-20040930 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  17. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Gardner Pinnacle, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0401, Data Date Range: 20040920-20040920 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  18. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HA1101_LEGIII, Data Date Range: 20110430-20110430. (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  19. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; French Frigate Shoals, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0401, Data Date Range: 20040917-20040919 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  20. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Maug, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: OES0307, Data Date Range: 20030901-20030904 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  1. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: OES0306, Data Date Range: 20030730-20030802 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  2. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Sarigan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0903, Data Date Range: 20090420-20090421 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  3. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Rota, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0702, Data Date Range: 20070515-20070517 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  4. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Anatahan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: OES0511, Data Date Range: 20050922-20050923 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  5. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Guguan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0903, Data Date Range: 20090504-20090505 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  6. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: OES0401, Data Date Range: 20040124-20040125 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  7. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0903, Data Date Range: 20090414-20090420 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  8. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Ofu and Olosega Islands, American Samoa; Cruise: HI0802, Data Date Range: 20080229-20080229 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  9. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: OES0404, Data Date Range: 20040403-20040404 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  10. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HA1201_LEGI, Data Date Range: 20120302-20120304 (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  11. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Ta'u, American Samoa; Cruise: OES0402, Data Date Range: 20040204-20040205 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  12. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Hawai'i (Big Island), Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HI0610, Data Date Range: 20060802-20060818 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  13. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI0801, Data Date Range: 20080206-20080207 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  14. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Agrihan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HA1101_LEGII, Data Date Range: 20110420-20110422. (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  15. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI0604, Data Date Range: 20060321-20060323 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  16. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Midway Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0809, Data Date Range: 20080928-20080929 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  17. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Pagan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: OES0307, Data Date Range: 20030912-20030912 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  18. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Farallon de Pajaros, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: OES0307, Data Date Range: 20030830-20030830 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  19. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI1001_LEGI, Data Date Range: 20100207-20100208 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  20. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Ofu and Olosega Islands, American Samoa; Cruise: OES0402, Data Date Range: 20040206-20040213 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  1. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Lisianski Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HA1007, Data Date Range: 20100923-20100924 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  2. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Guguan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: OES0307, Data Date Range: 20030910-20030911 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  3. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HA1101_LEGII, Data Date Range: 20110407-20110426. (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  4. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Asuncion Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0703, Data Date Range: 20070603-20070604 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  5. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Kure Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0401, Data Date Range: 20041006-20041007 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  6. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Tinian, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: OES0307, Data Date Range: 20030822-20030823 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  7. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Ta'u, American Samoa; Cruise: HI0602, Data Date Range: 20060302-20060304 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  8. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; French Frigate Shoals, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: OES0306, Data Date Range: 20030716-20030719 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  9. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: TC0101, Data Date Range: 20010207-20010209 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  10. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Agrihan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0903, Data Date Range: 20090501-20090502 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  11. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Laysan Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: TC0207, Data Date Range: 20020916-20020916 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  12. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: TC0001, Data Date Range: 20000326-20000326 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  13. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0702, Data Date Range: 20070519-20070521 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  14. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Agrihan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0703, Data Date Range: 20070528-20070529 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  15. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Sarigan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0703, Data Date Range: 20070525-20070526 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  16. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Anatahan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0703, Data Date Range: 20070527-20070527 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  17. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI0601, Data Date Range: 20060119-20060121 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  18. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: OES0404, Data Date Range: 20040329-20040401 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  19. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Rota, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HA1101_LEGIII, Data Date Range: 20110501-20110502. (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  20. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; French Frigate Shoals, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: TC0207, Data Date Range: 20020913-20020914 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  1. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI0601, Data Date Range: 20060122-20060123 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  2. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: TC0207, Data Date Range: 20020917-20020920 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  3. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: TC0101, Data Date Range: 20010210-20010211 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  4. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: TC0101, Data Date Range: 20010220-20010221 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  5. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Niihau - Kaula Rock, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HI0610, Data Date Range: 20060810-20060811 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  6. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI0803, Data Date Range: 20080406-20080406 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  7. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Ta'u, American Samoa; Cruise: HA1201_LEGII&III, Data Date Range: 20120422-20120423 (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  8. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Maro Reef, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0809, Data Date Range: 20080919-20080920 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  9. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Kure Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: OES0306, Data Date Range: 20030804-20030805 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  10. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI1001_LEGIII, Data Date Range: 20100402-20100405 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  11. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI0803, Data Date Range: 20080406-20080407 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  12. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Kure Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0611, Data Date Range: 20060919-20060919 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  13. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; French Frigate Shoals, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HA1007, Data Date Range: 20100908-20100910 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  14. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Gardner Pinnacle, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: OES0306, Data Date Range: 20030719-20030720 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  15. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Kaua'i, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HI0610, Data Date Range: 20060728-20060814 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  16. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0611, Data Date Range: 20060913-20060923 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  17. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Wake Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: OES0513, Data Date Range: 20051017-20051020 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  18. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Midway Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0611, Data Date Range: 20060921-20060922 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  19. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Lisianski Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: OES0306, Data Date Range: 20030726-20030726 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  20. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HA1007, Data Date Range: 20100914-20100916 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  1. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Maro Reef, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0611, Data Date Range: 20060907-20060909 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  2. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI0604, Data Date Range: 20060330-20060403 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  3. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Maro Reef, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: OES0306, Data Date Range: 20030720-20030723 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  4. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: OES0401, Data Date Range: 20040122-20040122 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  5. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Kure Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: TC0207, Data Date Range: 20020922-20020924 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  6. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0809, Data Date Range: 20080922-20081004 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  7. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Maui - Molokini, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HI0505, Data Date Range: 20050806-20050806 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  8. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Wake Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI0701, Data Date Range: 20070429-20070501 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  9. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Midway Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0401, Data Date Range: 20041001-20041004 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  10. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Lisianski Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0401, Data Date Range: 20041009-20041011 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  11. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Necker Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0501, Data Date Range: 20050410-20050410 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  12. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Kaua'i, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HA1008, Data Date Range: 20101030-20101031 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  13. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Niihau - Kaula Rock, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: OES0810, Data Date Range: 20081111-20081111 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  14. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HA1201_LEGIV, Data Date Range: 20120503-20120505 (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  15. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Lana'i, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HA1008, Data Date Range: 20101021-20101023 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  16. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Laysan Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: OES0306, Data Date Range: 20030723-20030724 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  17. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Kure Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HA1007, Data Date Range: 20100919-20100920 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  18. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Maro Reef, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0401, Data Date Range: 20040921-20040923 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  19. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HA1201_LEGI, Data Date Range: 20120311-20120313 (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  20. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Wake Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HA1101_LEGI, Data Date Range: 20110322-20110325. (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  1. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI0601, Data Date Range: 20060131-20060201 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  2. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI0803, Data Date Range: 20080330-20080404 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  3. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Midway Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: TC0207, Data Date Range: 20020925-20020926 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  4. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Lana'i, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: OES0810, Data Date Range: 20081019-20081020 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  5. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI0801, Data Date Range: 20080209-20080209 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  6. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Farallon de Pajaros, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0903, Data Date Range: 20090427-20090428 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  7. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Alamagan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0903, Data Date Range: 20090503-20090504 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  8. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Pagan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: OES0511, Data Date Range: 20050906-20050908 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  9. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Ofu and Olosega Islands, American Samoa; Cruise: HI0602, Data Date Range: 20060226-20060228 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  10. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: OES0401, Data Date Range: 20040112-20040115 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  11. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Pagan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0703, Data Date Range: 20070604-20070606 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  12. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Lana'i, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HI0505, Data Date Range: 20050802-20050804 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  13. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI1001_LEGIII, Data Date Range: 20100407-20100412 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  14. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Anatahan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0903, Data Date Range: 20090506-20090506 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  15. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; French Frigate Shoals, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0611, Data Date Range: 20060930-20061001 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  16. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: OES0511, Data Date Range: 20050903-20050922 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  17. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI1001_LEGI, Data Date Range: 20100125-20100129 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  18. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Laysan Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0401, Data Date Range: 20040924-20040924 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  19. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Asuncion Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: OES0307, Data Date Range: 20030904-20030905 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  20. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Rota, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: OES0307, Data Date Range: 20030918-20030920 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  1. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Asuncion Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0903, Data Date Range: 20090424-20090426 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  2. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Lisianski Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0809, Data Date Range: 20081005-20081006 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  3. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Agrihan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: OES0307, Data Date Range: 20030826-20030906 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  4. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: OES0404, Data Date Range: 20040327-20040328 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  5. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Farallon de Pajaros, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: OES0511, Data Date Range: 20050909-20050910 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  6. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Alamagan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: OES0511, Data Date Range: 20050915-20050916 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  7. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI0801, Data Date Range: 20080128-20080202 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  8. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Maug, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0703, Data Date Range: 20070529-20070531 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  9. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI0803, Data Date Range: 20080328-20080329 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  10. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Sarigan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: OES0511, Data Date Range: 20050917-20050918 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  11. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Ta'u, American Samoa; Cruise: HI1001_LEGII, Data Date Range: 20100312-20100320 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  12. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Ofu and Olosega Islands, American Samoa; Cruise: TC0201_LEGII, Data Date Range: 20020213-20020215 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  13. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: TC0101, Data Date Range: 20010217-20010218 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  14. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Pagan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HA1101_LEGII, Data Date Range: 20110411-20110413. (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  15. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Maug, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HA1101_LEGII, Data Date Range: 20110418-20110420. (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  16. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: TC0201_LEGIII, Data Date Range: 20020310-20020311 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  17. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Lisianski Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument); Cruise: HI0611, Data Date Range: 20060926-20060926 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  18. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Aguijan (Goat Is.), Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: OES0307, Data Date Range: 20030917-20030917 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  19. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Aguijan (Goat Is.), Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0702, Data Date Range: 20070517-20070518 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  20. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Aguijan (Goat Is.), Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0902, Data Date Range: 20090410-20090410 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  1. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Aguijan (Goat Is.), Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: OES0511, Data Date Range: 20050927-20050928 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  2. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Hawai'i (Big Island), Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: OES0502, Data Date Range: 20050227-20050305 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  3. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Hawai'i (Big Island), Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HA1008, Data Date Range: 20101008-20101014 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  4. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Hawai'i (Big Island), Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: OES0810, Data Date Range: 20081026-20081102 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  5. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Ofu and Olosega Islands, American Samoa; Cruise: HI1001_LEGII, Data Date Range: 20100310-20100320 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  6. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Lana'i, Main Hawaiian Islands; Cruise: HI0610, Data Date Range: 20060804-20060806 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  7. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Rota, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HI0902, Data Date Range: 20090409-20090410 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  8. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Anatahan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: OES0307, Data Date Range: 20030909-20030910 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  9. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HA1201_LEGI, Data Date Range: 20120315-20120317 (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  10. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Tinian, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Cruise: HA1101_LEGIII, Data Date Range: 20110502-20110503. (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  11. Sediment dynamics in a large shallow lake characterized by seasonal flood pulse in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siev, Sokly; Yang, Heejun; Sok, Ty; Uk, Sovannara; Song, Layheang; Kodikara, Dilini; Oeurng, Chantha; Hul, Seingheng; Yoshimura, Chihiro

    2018-08-01

    Most of studies on sediment dynamics in stable shallow lakes focused on the resuspension process as it is the dominant process. However, understanding of sediment dynamics in a shallow lake influenced by flood pulse is unclear. We tested a hypothesis that floodplain vegetation plays as a significant role in lessening the intensity of resuspension process in a shallow lake characterized by the flood pulse system. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate sediment dynamics in this type of shallow lake. The target was Tonle Sap Lake (TSL), which is a large shallow lake influenced by a flood pulse system of Mekong River located in Southeast Asia. An extensive and seasonal sampling survey was conducted to measure total suspended solid (TSS) concentrations, sedimentation and resuspension rates in TSL and its 4 floodplain areas. The study revealed that sedimentation process was dominant (TSS ranged: 3-126mgL -1 ) in the high water period (September-December) while resuspension process was dominant (TSS ranged: 4-652mgL -1 ) only in the low water period (March-June). In addition, floodplain vegetation reduced the resuspension of sediment (up to 26.3%) in water. The implication of the study showed that resuspension is a seasonally dominant process in shallow lake influenced by the flood pulse system at least for the case of TSL. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Seasonal use of shallow water habitat in the Lower Snake River reservoirs by juvenile fall Chinook salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Connor, William P.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) is preparing a long term management plan for sediments that affect the authorized project purposes of the Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and Ice Harbor reservoirs (hereafter, the lower Snake River reservoirs), and the area from the mouth of the Snake River to Ice Harbor Dam. We conducted a study from spring 2010 through winter 2011 to describe the habitat use by juvenile Chinook salmon within a selected group of shallow water habitat complexes (spoils to create shallow water habitat, (2) provide evidence for shallow water habitat use by natural subyearlings, (3) provide evidence against large-scale use of shallow water habitat by reservoir-type juveniles, (4) suggest that the depth criterion for defining shallow water habitat (i.e., food web, and intra-specific competition would help to better inform the long-term management plan.

  13. Closure of shallow underground injection wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veil, J.A.; Grunewald, B.

    1993-01-01

    Shallow injection wells have long been used for disposing liquid wastes. Some of these wells have received hazardous or radioactive wastes. According to US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations, Class IV wells are those injection wells through which hazardous or radioactive wastes are injected into or above an underground source of drinking water (USDW). These wells must be closed. Generally Class V wells are injection wells through which fluids that do not contain hazardous or radioactive wastes are injected into or above a USDW. Class V wells that are responsible for violations of drinking water regulations or that pose a threat to human health must also be closed. Although EPA regulations require closure of certain types of shallow injection wells, they do not provide specific details on the closure process. This paper describes the regulatory background, DOE requirements, and the steps in a shallow injection well closure process: Identification of wells needing closure; monitoring and disposal of accumulated substances; filling and sealing of wells; and remediation. In addition, the paper describes a major national EPA shallow injection well enforcement initiative, including closure plan guidance for wells used to dispose of wastes from service station operations

  14. Shallow ground disposal - calculation of dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    The ability of an existing shallow land burial systems model to meet AECB user requirements has been evaluated. The deficiencies of the program are identified and activities necessary to modify the code to fulfill the user requirements are outlined. Implementation plans for a number of likely scenarios have been constructed and possible cost-cutting measures have been recommended

  15. Steady flow in shallow channel bends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vriend, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    Making use of a mathematical model solving the complete NavierStokes equations for steady flow in coiled rectangular pipes, fully-developed laminar flow in shallow curved channels is analysed physically and mathematically. Transverse convection of momentum by the secondary flow is shown to cause

  16. Shallow geothermal energy from a Danish standpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    Shallow geothermal energy is sadly undeveloped in Denmark compared to the neighbouring countries. However, the general need for transformation to sustainable energy sources combined with what appears to be an increased willingness from the authorities to actively support ground source heating, may...

  17. Grain transport mechanics in shallow flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    A physical model based on continuum multiphase flow is described to represent saltating transport of grains in shallow overland flows. The two-phase continuum flow of water and sediment considers coupled St.Venant type equations. The interactive cumulative effect of grains is incorporated by a dispe...

  18. Grain transport mechanics in shallow overland flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    A physical model based on continuum multiphase flow is described to represent saltating transport of grains in shallow overland flow. The two phase continuum flow of water and sediment considers coupled St.Venant type equations. The interactive cumulative effect of grains is incorporated by a disper...

  19. Floating offshore wind turbines for shallow waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulder, B.H.; Henderson, A.; Huijsmans, R.H.M.; Peeringa, J.M.; Pierik, J.T.G.; Snijders, E.J.B.; Hees, M.Th. van; Wijnants, G.H.; Wolf, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Bottom mounted Offshore wind turbines seem to have a promising future but they are restricted to shallow waters of Northern Europe. Many projects are planned or are in the phase of construction on the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. All projects that are planned have a water depth up to approximately

  20. Deformation analysis of shallow penetration in clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagaseta, C.; Whittle, A. J.; Santagata, M.

    1997-10-01

    A new method of analysis is described for estimating the deformations and strains caused by shallow undrained penetration of piles and caissons in clay. The formulation combines previous analyses for steady, deep penetration, with methods used to compute soil deformations due to near-surface ground loss, and is referred to as the Shallow Strain Path Method (SSPM). Complete analytical solutions for the velocity and strain rates are given for a planar wall, an axisymmetric, closed-ended pile and unplugged, open-ended pile geometries. In these examples, the analyses consider a single source penetrating through the soil at a constant rate, generating a family of penetrometers with rounded tips, referred to as simple wall, pile and tube geometries. Soil deformations and strains are obtained by integrating the velocity and strain rates along the particle paths.The transition from shallow to deep penetration is analysed in detail. Shallow penetration causes heave at the ground surface, while settlements occur only in a thin veneer of material adjacent to the shaft and in a bulb-shaped region around the tip. The size of this region increases with the embedment depth. Deformations inside an open-ended pile/caisson are affected significantly by details of the simple tube wall geometry.

  1. Vibrations of Thin Piezoelectric Shallow Shells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper we consider the eigenvalue problem for piezoelectric shallow shells and we show that, as the thickness of the shell goes to zero, the eigensolutions of the three-dimensional piezoelectric shells converge to the eigensolutions of a two-dimensional eigenvalue problem.

  2. Shallow foundation model tests in Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feda, Jaroslav; Simonini, P.; Arslan, U.; Georgiodis, M.; Laue, J.; Pinto, I.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (1999), s. 447-475 ISSN 1436-6517. [Int. Conf. on Soil - Structure Interaction in Urban Civ. Engineering. Darmstadt, 08.10.1999-09.10.1999] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC C7.10 Keywords : shallow foundations * model tests * sandy subsoil * bearing capacity * settlement Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering

  3. Planning for shallow high resolution seismic surveys

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fourie, CJS

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available of the input wave. This information can be used in conjunction with this spreadsheet to aid the geophysicist in designing shallow high resolution seismic surveys to achieve maximum resolution and penetration. This Excel spreadsheet is available free from...

  4. FECAL COLIFORM BACTERIA AND FACTORS RELATED TO ITS GROWTH AT THE SEKOTONG SHALLOW WELLS, WEST NUSA TENGGARA, INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Doni Marisi Sinaga; Mark Gregory Robson; Beatrix Trikurnia Gasong; Adonia Getse Halel; Dian Pertiwi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The poor sanitation and small numbers of households who own toilet in Sekotong regency may relate to the diarrheal events due to the fecal coliform contamination in drinking water. Aim: This paper aims to provide the concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria in shallow well waters and the factors associated to its growth. Method: Fifteen groundwater samples were collected from 5 shallow wells to provide the concentrations of total fecal coliform bacteria (FC), mercury conce...

  5. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. The shallow water equations in Lagrangian coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mead, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in the collection of Lagrangian data from the ocean and results about the well-posedness of the primitive equations have led to a renewed interest in solving flow equations in Lagrangian coordinates. We do not take the view that solving in Lagrangian coordinates equates to solving on a moving grid that can become twisted or distorted. Rather, the grid in Lagrangian coordinates represents the initial position of particles, and it does not change with time. We apply numerical methods traditionally used to solve differential equations in Eulerian coordinates, to solve the shallow water equations in Lagrangian coordinates. The difficulty with solving in Lagrangian coordinates is that the transformation from Eulerian coordinates results in solving a highly nonlinear partial differential equation. The non-linearity is mainly due to the Jacobian of the coordinate transformation, which is a precise record of how the particles are rotated and stretched. The inverse Jacobian must be calculated, thus Lagrangian coordinates cannot be used in instances where the Jacobian vanishes. For linear (spatial) flows we give an explicit formula for the Jacobian and describe the two situations where the Lagrangian shallow water equations cannot be used because either the Jacobian vanishes or the shallow water assumption is violated. We also prove that linear (in space) steady state solutions of the Lagrangian shallow water equations have Jacobian equal to one. In the situations where the shallow water equations can be solved in Lagrangian coordinates, accurate numerical solutions are found with finite differences, the Chebyshev pseudospectral method, and the fourth order Runge-Kutta method. The numerical results shown here emphasize the need for high order temporal approximations for long time integrations

  7. Three Dimensional Seismic Tomography of the Shallow Subsurface Structure Under the Meihua Lake in Ilan, Northeastern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, R.

    2008-12-01

    The island of Taiwan is located at an ongoing collision boundary between two plates. The Philippine Sea plate and the Eurasian plate collided at the Longitudinal Valley of eastern Taiwan, and the Philippine Sea plate subducted northward beneath the Eurasian plate along the Ryukyu trench in eastern Taiwan at the Hualien area. Further northward in the island, the opening Okinawa trough ended at the Ilan area in northeastern Taiwan. The Ilan area is over populated and potentially able to produce large earthquake; however, since that are is densely covered with forests, due to lack of geologic and geomorphologic evidences, known active faults are still unclear. Recently, a series of topographic offsets of several meters distributed in a zone were found by using the LiDAR DTM data, indicating active normal faulting was activated in the past. Besides, several small sag ponds were mapped to support the active normal faulting activities. Later on, core borings in one of the small ponds (the Meihua Lake, diameter of about 700m) were conducted and the records showed obvious difference of depths in the adjacent boreholes at a very short distance. In order to realize the variation of the distribution of sediments under the Meihua Lake, we conducted a 3d seismic tomography survey at the lake, hopefully to help to verify the faults. In this paper, we will show results of using a 120-channel shallow seismic recording system for mapping the shallow subsurface structure of sediments under the Meihua Lake. During the experiment, we deployed the geophone groups of three geophones at every 6m along the bank of the lake and fired the shots at every 80m around the lake. An impactor of energy 2200 joule per shot was used as a seismic source. We stacked the energy at each shot point around 60 times for receiving clear signals. Since the total extension of recording system is 720m, about one third of the perimeter around the lake, 2,200m, we moved the geophone deployments 3 times to

  8. Shallow gas in Cenozoic sediments of the Southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trampe, Anna F.; Lutz, Rüdiger; Franke, Dieter; Thöle, Hauke; Arfai, Jashar

    2013-04-01

    Shallow petroleum systems in the southern North Sea are known for several decades but they were not actively explored for a long time. In recent years these unconventional shallow petroleum systems are studied in greater detail and one shallow gas field (A-12) is in production in the Netherlands. Additionally, oil was encountered in Miocene sandstones in the southern Danish North Sea (Lille John well) just north of the Danish-German border. Seismic amplitude anomalies are an indication for hydrocarbons in sediments. Therefore we have mapped the occurrence of seismic amplitude anomalies in the German North Sea based on more than 25.000 km of 2D seismic data and around 4.000 km2 of 3D seismic data. Amplitude anomalies are ubiquitous phenomena in the study area. These anomalies are not only caused by hydrocarbons but also by changing lithologies e.g. peat or fluid migration. Therefore several classes of seismic anomalies, e.g. bright spots, chimneys, blanking areas and velocity pull-down were mapped. Examples for these classes were studied with AVO (amplitude variation with offset) analyses to verify the existence or non-existence of gas in the sediments. Shallow gas can be produced and transported through the dense pipeline grid of the southern and central North Sea or it could be burned offshore close to wind parks in small power plants and the electric energy then transported through the existing power connections of the wind parks. Thus enabling a continuous energy supply during calm wind periods. This study is carried out within the framework of the project "Geoscientific Potential of the German North Sea (GPDN)" in which the Cenozoic sedimentary system was mapped in great detail. A detailed model of delta evolution (Baltic river system) was developed which serves as a structural framework. The studied interval is time equivalent to the Utsira formation which is used offshore Norway for sequestration of CO2. These different possibilities of using or exploiting

  9. Reproductive biology of the deep brooding coral Seriatopora hystrix: Implications for shallow reef recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetia, Rian; Sinniger, Frederic; Hashizume, Kaito; Harii, Saki

    2017-01-01

    Mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs, between 30 and 150 m depth) are hypothesized to contribute to the recovery of degraded shallow reefs through sexually produced larvae (referred to as Deep Reef Refuge Hypothesis). In Okinawa, Japan, the brooder coral Seriatopora hystrix was reported to be locally extinct in a shallow reef while it was found abundant at a MCE nearby. In this context, S. hystrix represents a key model to test the Deep Reef Refuge Hypothesis and to understand the potential contribution of mesophotic corals to shallow coral reef recovery. However, the reproductive biology of mesophotic S. hystrix and its potential to recolonize shallow reefs is currently unknown. This study reports for the first time, different temporal scales of reproductive periodicity and larval settlement of S. hystrix from an upper mesophotic reef (40 m depth) in Okinawa. We examined reproductive seasonality, lunar, and circadian periodicity (based on polyp dissection, histology, and ex situ planula release observations) and larval settlement rates in the laboratory. Mesophotic S. hystrix reproduced mainly in July and early August, with a small number of planulae being released at the end of May, June and August. Compared to shallow colonies in the same region, mesophotic S. hystrix has a 4-month shorter reproductive season, similar circadian periodicity, and smaller planula size. In addition, most of the planulae settled rapidly, limiting larval dispersal potential. The shorter reproductive season and smaller planula size may result from limited energy available for reproduction at deeper depths, while the similar circadian periodicity suggests that this reproductive aspect is not affected by environmental conditions differing with depth. Overall, contribution of mesophotic S. hystrix to shallow reef rapid recovery appears limited, although they may recruit to shallow reefs through a multistep process over a few generations or through random extreme mixing such as typhoons.

  10. Guidance Index for Shallow Landslide Hazard Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheila Avalon Cullen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall-induced shallow landslides are one of the most frequent hazards on slanted terrains. Intense storms with high-intensity and long-duration rainfall have high potential to trigger rapidly moving soil masses due to changes in pore water pressure and seepage forces. Nevertheless, regardless of the intensity and/or duration of the rainfall, shallow landslides are influenced by antecedent soil moisture conditions. As of this day, no system exists that dynamically interrelates these two factors on large scales. This work introduces a Shallow Landslide Index (SLI as the first implementation of antecedent soil moisture conditions for the hazard analysis of shallow rainfall-induced landslides. The proposed mathematical algorithm is built using a logistic regression method that systematically learns from a comprehensive landslide inventory. Initially, root-soil moisture and rainfall measurements modeled from AMSR-E and TRMM respectively, are used as proxies to develop the index. The input dataset is randomly divided into training and verification sets using the Hold-Out method. Validation results indicate that the best-fit model predicts the highest number of cases correctly at 93.2% accuracy. Consecutively, as AMSR-E and TRMM stopped working in October 2011 and April 2015 respectively, root-soil moisture and rainfall measurements modeled by SMAP and GPM are used to develop models that calculate the SLI for 10, 7, and 3 days. The resulting models indicate a strong relationship (78.7%, 79.6%, and 76.8% respectively between the predictors and the predicted value. The results also highlight important remaining challenges such as adequate information for algorithm functionality and satellite based data reliability. Nevertheless, the experimental system can potentially be used as a dynamic indicator of the total amount of antecedent moisture and rainfall (for a given duration of time needed to trigger a shallow landslide in a susceptible area. It is

  11. Evaluating shallow-flow rock structures as scour countermeasures at bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    A study to determine whether or not shallow-flow rock structures could reliably be used at bridge abutments in place of riprap. Research was conducted in a two-phase effort beginning with numerical modeling and ending with field verification of model...

  12. Shallow cumuli ensemble statistics for development of a stochastic parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakradzija, Mirjana; Seifert, Axel; Heus, Thijs

    2014-05-01

    According to a conventional deterministic approach to the parameterization of moist convection in numerical atmospheric models, a given large scale forcing produces an unique response from the unresolved convective processes. This representation leaves out the small-scale variability of convection, as it is known from the empirical studies of deep and shallow convective cloud ensembles, there is a whole distribution of sub-grid states corresponding to the given large scale forcing. Moreover, this distribution gets broader with the increasing model resolution. This behavior is also consistent with our theoretical understanding of a coarse-grained nonlinear system. We propose an approach to represent the variability of the unresolved shallow-convective states, including the dependence of the sub-grid states distribution spread and shape on the model horizontal resolution. Starting from the Gibbs canonical ensemble theory, Craig and Cohen (2006) developed a theory for the fluctuations in a deep convective ensemble. The micro-states of a deep convective cloud ensemble are characterized by the cloud-base mass flux, which, according to the theory, is exponentially distributed (Boltzmann distribution). Following their work, we study the shallow cumulus ensemble statistics and the distribution of the cloud-base mass flux. We employ a Large-Eddy Simulation model (LES) and a cloud tracking algorithm, followed by a conditional sampling of clouds at the cloud base level, to retrieve the information about the individual cloud life cycles and the cloud ensemble as a whole. In the case of shallow cumulus cloud ensemble, the distribution of micro-states is a generalized exponential distribution. Based on the empirical and theoretical findings, a stochastic model has been developed to simulate the shallow convective cloud ensemble and to test the convective ensemble theory. Stochastic model simulates a compound random process, with the number of convective elements drawn from a

  13. Conduct disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitelaar, Jan K; Smeets, Kirsten C; Herpers, Pierre; Scheepers, Floor; Glennon, Jeffrey; Rommelse, Nanda N J

    2013-02-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is a frequently occurring psychiatric disorder characterized by a persistent pattern of aggressive and non-aggressive rule breaking antisocial behaviours that lead to considerable burden for the patients themselves, their family and society. This review paper updates diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to CD in the light of the forthcoming DSM-5 definition. The diagnostic criteria for CD will remain unchanged in DSM-5, but the introduction of a specifier of CD with a callous-unemotional (CU) presentation is new. Linked to this, we discuss the pros and cons of various other ways to subtype aggression/CD symptoms. Existing guidelines for CD are, with few exceptions, already of a relatively older date and emphasize that clinical assessment should be systematic and comprehensive and based on a multi-informant approach. Non-medical psychosocial interventions are recommended as the first option for the treatment of CD. There is a role for medication in the treatment of comorbid syndromes and/or in case of insufficient response to psychosocial interventions and severe and dangerous aggressive and violent behaviours.

  14. Terrain And Laboratory Conductivity Studies Of Flood Plains Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A shallow electromagnetic study (electrical conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements) and laboratory conductivity sampling of the flood plains of Oluwatuyi/Oshinle area of Akure have been undertaken. This is with the aim of correlating the terrain conductivity mapping with laboratory measurements to establish ...

  15. Secondary production in shallow marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1976-01-01

    Recommendations are discussed with regard to population ecology, microbial food webs, marine ecosystems, improved instrumentation, and effects of land and sea on shallow marine systems. The control of secondary production is discussed with regard to present status of knowledge; research needs for studies on dominant secondary producers, food webs that lead to commercial species, and significant features of the trophic structure of shallow water marine communities. Secondary production at the land-water interface is discussed with regard to present status of knowledge; importance of macrophytes to secondary production; export to secondary consumers; utilization of macrophyte primary production; and correlations between secondary production and river discharge. The role of microorganisms in secondary production is also discussed

  16. Shallow ground disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This guidebook outlines the factors to be considered in site selection, design, operation, shut-down and surveillance as well as the regulatory requirements of repositories for safe disposal of radioactive waste in shallow ground. No attempt is made to summarize the existing voluminous literature on the many facets of radioactive waste disposal. In the context of this guidebook, shallow ground disposal refers to the emplacement of radioactive waste, with or without engineered barriers, above or below the ground surface, where the final protective covering is of the order of a few metres thick. Deep geological disposal and other underground disposal methods, management of mill tailings and disposal into the sea have been or will be considered in other IAEA publications. These guidelines have been made sufficiently general to cover a broad variety of climatic, hydrogeological and biological conditions. They may need to be interpreted or modified to reflect local conditions and national regulations

  17. Construction of shallow land simulation apparatuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Tadatoshi; Ohtsuka, Yoshiro; Takebe, Shinichi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Ogawa, Hiromichi; Harada, Yoshikane; Saitoh, Kazuaki; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1984-07-01

    Shallow land simulation apparatuses in which natural soil can be used as testing soil have been constructed to investigate the migration characteristics of radionuclides in a disposal site. These apparatuses consist of aerated zone apparatus and aquifer zone one. In the aerated zone apparatus, aerated soil upon ground water level is contained in the soil column (d: 30cm x h: 120cm). In the aquifer zone apparatus, aquifer soil laying ground water level is contained in the soil vessel (b: 90cm x l: 270cm x h: 45cm). This report describes the outline of shallow land simulation apparatuses : function of apparatuses and specification of devices, analysis of obstructions, safety rules, analysis of accidents and operation manual. (author)

  18. Shallow land disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The application of basic radiation protection concepts and objectives to the disposal of radioactive wastes requires the development of specific reference levels or criteria for the radiological acceptance of each type of waste in each disposal option. This report suggests a methodology for the establishment of acceptance criteria for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste containing long-lived radionuclides in shallow land burial facilities

  19. Limitations of Shallow Networks Representing Finite Mappings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kůrková, Věra

    submitted 5.1. (2018) ISSN 0941-0643 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-18108S Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : shallow and deep networks * sparsity * variational norms * functions on large finite domains * concentration of measure * pseudo-noise sequences * perceptron networks Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 2.505, year: 2016

  20. Dynamics of a shallow fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsimring, Lev S. [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0402 (United States); Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna [School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067, (India); Sherman, Philip [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0402 (United States)

    1999-12-01

    The results of the experimental study of the dynamics of a shallow fluidized bed are reported. The behavior of granular material is controlled by the interplay of two factors--levitation due to the upward airflow, and sliding back due to gravity. Near the threshold of instability, the system shows critical behavior with remarkably long transient dynamics. The experimental observations are compared with a simple cellular automata model. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  1. Assessing Tsunami Vulnerabilities of Geographies with Shallow Water Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2012-01-01

    Tsunami preparedness is crucial for saving human lives in case of disasters that involve massive water movement. In this work, we develop a framework for visual assessment of tsunami preparedness of geographies. Shallow water equations (also called Saint Venant equations) are a set of hyperbolic partial differential equations that are derived by depth-integrating the Navier-Stokes equations and provide a great abstraction of water masses that have lower depths compared to their free surface area. Our specific contribution in this study is to use Microsoft's XNA Game Studio to import underwater and shore line geographies, create different tsunami scenarios, and visualize the propagation of the waves and their impact on the shore line geography. Most importantly, we utilized the computational power of graphical processing units (GPUs) as HLSL based shader files and delegated all of the heavy computations to the GPU. Finally, we also conducted a validation study, in which we have tested our model against a controlled shallow water experiment. We believe that such a framework with an easy to use interface that is based on readily available software libraries, which are widely available and easily distributable, would encourage not only researchers, but also educators to showcase ideas.

  2. Shallow Aquifer Vulnerability From Subsurface Fluid Injection at a Proposed Shale Gas Hydraulic Fracturing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M. P.; Worrall, F.; Davies, R. J.; Hart, A.

    2017-11-01

    Groundwater flow resulting from a proposed hydraulic fracturing (fracking) operation was numerically modeled using 91 scenarios. Scenarios were chosen to be a combination of hydrogeological factors that a priori would control the long-term migration of fracking fluids to the shallow subsurface. These factors were induced fracture extent, cross-basin groundwater flow, deep low hydraulic conductivity strata, deep high hydraulic conductivity strata, fault hydraulic conductivity, and overpressure. The study considered the Bowland Basin, northwest England, with fracking of the Bowland Shale at ˜2,000 m depth and the shallow aquifer being the Sherwood Sandstone at ˜300-500 m depth. Of the 91 scenarios, 73 scenarios resulted in tracked particles not reaching the shallow aquifer within 10,000 years and 18 resulted in travel times less than 10,000 years. Four factors proved to have a statistically significant impact on reducing travel time to the aquifer: increased induced fracture extent, absence of deep high hydraulic conductivity strata, relatively low fault hydraulic conductivity, and magnitude of overpressure. Modeling suggests that high hydraulic conductivity formations can be more effective barriers to vertical flow than low hydraulic conductivity formations. Furthermore, low hydraulic conductivity faults can result in subsurface pressure compartmentalization, reducing horizontal groundwater flow, and encouraging vertical fluid migration. The modeled worst-case scenario, using unlikely geology and induced fracture lengths, maximum values for strata hydraulic conductivity and with conservative tracer behavior had a particle travel time of 130 years to the base of the shallow aquifer. This study has identified hydrogeological factors which lead to aquifer vulnerability from shale exploitation.

  3. Channel Shallowing as Mitigation of Coastal Flooding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M. Orton

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we demonstrate that reductions in the depth of inlets or estuary channels can be used to reduce or prevent coastal flooding. A validated hydrodynamic model of Jamaica Bay, New York City (NYC, is used to test nature-based adaptation measures in ameliorating flooding for NYC's two largest historical coastal flood events. In addition to control runs with modern bathymetry, three altered landscape scenarios are tested: (1 increasing the area of wetlands to their 1879 footprint and bathymetry, but leaving deep shipping channels unaltered; (2 shallowing all areas deeper than 2 m in the bay to be 2 m below Mean Low Water; (3 shallowing only the narrowest part of the inlet to the bay. These three scenarios are deliberately extreme and designed to evaluate the leverage each approach exerts on water levels. They result in peak water level reductions of 0.3%, 15%, and 6.8% for Hurricane Sandy, and 2.4%, 46% and 30% for the Category-3 hurricane of 1821, respectively (bay-wide averages. These results suggest that shallowing can provide greater flood protection than wetland restoration, and it is particularly effective at reducing "fast-pulse" storm surges that rise and fall quickly over several hours, like that of the 1821 storm. Nonetheless, the goal of flood mitigation must be weighed against economic, navigation, and ecological needs, and practical concerns such as the availability of sediment.

  4. Reusable Reinforcement Learning via Shallow Trails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Chen, Shi-Yong; Da, Qing; Zhou, Zhi-Hua

    2018-06-01

    Reinforcement learning has shown great success in helping learning agents accomplish tasks autonomously from environment interactions. Meanwhile in many real-world applications, an agent needs to accomplish not only a fixed task but also a range of tasks. For this goal, an agent can learn a metapolicy over a set of training tasks that are drawn from an underlying distribution. By maximizing the total reward summed over all the training tasks, the metapolicy can then be reused in accomplishing test tasks from the same distribution. However, in practice, we face two major obstacles to train and reuse metapolicies well. First, how to identify tasks that are unrelated or even opposite with each other, in order to avoid their mutual interference in the training. Second, how to characterize task features, according to which a metapolicy can be reused. In this paper, we propose the MetA-Policy LEarning (MAPLE) approach that overcomes the two difficulties by introducing the shallow trail. It probes a task by running a roughly trained policy. Using the rewards of the shallow trail, MAPLE automatically groups similar tasks. Moreover, when the task parameters are unknown, the rewards of the shallow trail also serve as task features. Empirical studies on several controlling tasks verify that MAPLE can train metapolicies well and receives high reward on test tasks.

  5. A memory-based shallow parser for spoken Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canisius, S.V.M.; van den Bosch, A.; Decadt, B.; Hoste, V.; De Pauw, G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the development of a Dutch memory-based shallow parser. The availability of large treebanks for Dutch, such as the one provided by the Spoken Dutch Corpus, allows memory-based learners to be trained on examples of shallow parsing taken from the treebank, and act as a shallow parser after

  6. Polychaete functional diversity in shallow habitats: Shelter from the storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Julia M.; Gusmao, Joao B.; Mattos, Gustavo; Lana, Paulo

    2018-05-01

    Innovative approaches are needed to help understanding how species diversity is related to the latitudinal gradient at large or small scales. We have applied a novel approach, by combining morphological and biological traits, to assess the relative importance of the large scale latitudinal gradient and regional morphodynamic drivers in shaping the functional diversity of polychaete assemblages in shallow water habitats, from exposed to estuarine sandy beaches. We used literature data on polychaetes from beaches along the southern and southeastern Brazilian coast together with data on beach types, slope, grain size, temperature, salinity, and chlorophyll a concentration. Generalized linear models on the FDis index for functional diversity calculated for each site and a combined RLQ and fourth-corner analysis were used to investigate relationships between functional traits and environmental variables. Functional diversity was not related to the latitudinal gradient but negatively correlated with grain size and beach slope. Functional diversity was highest in flat beaches with small grain size, little wave exposure and enhanced primary production, indicating that small scale morphodynamic conditions are the primary drivers of polychaete functional diversity.

  7. Site characterization and construction of a controlled shallow test site in central Mexico for archaeological and engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado-Fuentes, A.; Arango-Galvan, C.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Hernández-Quintero, J. E.; Mendo-Perez, G.

    2017-12-01

    A controlled shallow test site (CSTS) has been constructed at the UNAM Geomagnetic Observatory in Teoloyucan, central Mexico. The objective of the CSTS is to have a controlled place to test new developments and arrays that can be used for archaeological and engineering exploration, as well as to calibrate instruments, train students and for future research. The CSTS was built far enough not to influence the geomagnetic sensors and not be affected by noise sources. Special attention was given to the distribution and geometry of buried materials as well as the instruments used. Before the CSTS was built, a combination of near-surface, non-invasive geophysical techniques was performed to characterize the area of 20 by 32 meters. The methods include magnetometry, electromagnetic induction, ground penetrating radar (GPR), electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and seismic refraction tomography (SRT). The GPR, SRT and ERT results show relatively flat interfaces. In general, the vertical gradient of the total magnetic field and the electric conductivity have very small variations, showing only one strong magnetic dipole associated to a shallow anomaly. These results indicate that the area is ideal for the construction of the test site. The CSTS consists on buried structures made with different materials and geometries (cubes, cylinders and tubes) commonly used as construction materials in Mexico since Pre-Hispanic times. These materials include concrete, reinforced concrete, wood, brick, adobe, basalt, tezontle and also empty space for controlling responses. The CSTS is versatile enough to be reshaped considering new geometries or materials and to conduct further investigations.

  8. Combined effects of climate change and bank stabilization on shallow water habitats of chinook salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Jeffrey C; McClure, Michelle M; Sheer, Mindi B; Munn, Nancy L

    2013-12-01

    Significant challenges remain in the ability to estimate habitat change under the combined effects of natural variability, climate change, and human activity. We examined anticipated effects on shallow water over low-sloped beaches to these combined effects in the lower Willamette River, Oregon, an area highly altered by development. A proposal to stabilize some shoreline with large rocks (riprap) would alter shallow water areas, an important habitat for threatened Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), and would be subject to U.S. Endangered Species Act-mandated oversight. In the mainstem, subyearling Chinook salmon appear to preferentially occupy these areas, which fluctuate with river stages. We estimated effects with a geospatial model and projections of future river flows. Recent (1999-2009) median river stages during peak subyearling occupancy (April-June) maximized beach shallow water area in the lower mainstem. Upstream shallow water area was maximized at lower river stages than have occurred recently. Higher river stages in April-June, resulting from increased flows predicted for the 2080s, decreased beach shallow water area 17-32%. On the basis of projected 2080s flows, more than 15% of beach shallow water area was displaced by the riprap. Beach shallow water area lost to riprap represented up to 1.6% of the total from the mouth to 12.9 km upstream. Reductions in shallow water area could restrict salmon feeding, resting, and refuge from predators and potentially reduce opportunities for the expression of the full range of life-history strategies. Although climate change analyses provided useful information, detailed analyses are prohibitive at the project scale for the multitude of small projects reviewed annually. The benefits of our approach to resource managers include a wider geographic context for reviewing similar small projects in concert with climate change, an approach to analyze cumulative effects of similar actions, and estimation of the

  9. Subsidence and settlement and their effect on shallow land burial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abeele, W.V.

    1985-01-01

    Subsidence and settlement are phenomena that are much more destructive than generally thought. In shallow land burials they may lead to cracking of the overburden and eventual exposure and escape of waste material. The primary causes are consolidation and cave-ins. Laboratory studies performed at Los Alamos permit us to predict settlement caused by consolidation or natural compaction of the crushed tuff overburden. Examples of expected settlement and subsidence are calculated based on the known geotechnical characteristics of crushed tuff. The same thing is done for bentonite/tuff mixes because some field experiments were performed using this additive (bentonite) to reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the crushed tuff. Remedial actions, i.e., means to limit the amount of settlement, are discussed. Finally, we briefly comment on our current field experiment, which studies the influence of subsidence on layered systems in general and on biobarriers in particular

  10. Scanning spreading resistance microscopy of shallow doping profiles in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchodolskis, A.; Hallen, A.; Gran, J.; Hansen, T.-E.; Karlsson, U.O.

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of scanning spreading resistance microscopy (SSRM) for characterization of shallow highly-conductive layers formed by boron implantation of lowly doped n-type silicon substrate followed by a post-implantation annealing. The electrically active dopant concentration versus depth was obtained from a cross-section of freshly cleaved samples where the Si-surface could be clearly distinguished by depositing a SiO 2 -layer before cleavage. To quantify free carrier concentration we calibrated our data against samples with implanted/annealed boron profiles established by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). A good fit of SSRM and SIMS data is possible for free carrier concentrations lower than 10 20 cm -3 , but for higher concentrations there is a discrepancy indicating an incomplete activation of the boron

  11. Subsidence and settlement and their effect on shallow land burial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abeele, W.V.

    1985-01-01

    Subsidence and settlement are phenomena that are much more destructive than generally thought. In shallow land burials they may lead to cracking of the overburden and eventual exposure and escape of waste material. The primary causes are consolidation and cave-ins. Laboratory studies performed at Los Alamos permit us to predict settlement caused by consolidation or natural compaction of the crushed tuff overburden. Examples of expected settlement and subsidence are calculated based on the known geotechnical characteristics of crushed tuff. The same thing is done for bentonite/tuff mixes because some field experiments were performed using this additive (bentonite) to reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the crushed tuff. Remedial actions, i.e., means to limit the amount of settlement, are discussed. Finally, we briefly comment on our current field experiment, which studies the influence of subsidence on layered systems, in general, and on biobarriers, in particular. 16 references, 7 figures, 5 tables

  12. Shallow Aquifer Methane Gas Source Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffin, R. B.; Murgulet, D.; Rose, P. S.; Hay, R.

    2014-12-01

    Shale gas can contribute significantly to the world's energy demand. Hydraulic fracturing (fracking) on horizontal drill lines developed over the last 15 years makes formerly inaccessible hydrocarbons economically available. From 2000 to 2035 shale gas is predicted to rise from 1% to 46% of the total natural gas for the US. A vast energy resource is available in the United States. While there is a strong financial advantage to the application of fracking there is emerging concern about environmental impacts to groundwater and air quality from improper shale fracking operations. Elevated methane (CH4) concentrations have been observed in drinking water throughout the United States where there is active horizontal drilling. Horizontal drilling and hydraulic-fracturing can increase CH4 transport to aquifers, soil and the vadose zone. Seepage can also result from casing failure in older wells. However, there is strong evidence that elevated CH4 concentrations can be associated with topographic and hydrogeologic features, rather than shale-gas extraction processes. Carbon isotope geochemistry can be applied to study CH4source(s) in shallow vadose zone and groundwater systems. A preliminary TAMU-CC isotope data set from samples taken at different locations in southern Texas shows a wide range of CH4 signatures suggesting multiple sources of methane and carbon dioxide. These data are interpreted to distinguish regions with methane contributions from deep-sourced horizontal drilling versus shallow system microbial production. Development of a thorough environmental assessment using light isotope analysis can provide understanding of shallow anthropogenic versus natural CH4sources and assist in identifying regions that require remedial actions.

  13. Conceptual design of shallow ground repository (SGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehl, J.L.; Franzen, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    A conceptual design to guide the development of the preliminary and final designs of a shallow ground waste disposal site for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes, complying with the Brazilian necessities, interpreted by Brazilian CNEN, is discussed. The general and specific criteria for the design of such installations, considering the reposing period, the isolation of personnel and environment, the operational activities, the characteristics of the site and of the subsoil and the set of necessary installations and services, are presented. An aboveground landfill, with concrete monoliths and concrete packages arranged in stacks disposed on an impermeable soil layer, is proposed. The disposed elements are covered by another impermeable soil stratum. (Author) [pt

  14. Shallow hydrogen-related donors in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartung, J.; Weber, J.

    1993-01-01

    Photothermal ionization spectroscopy on neutron-irradiated and subsequently hydrogen-plasma-treated silicon reveals the existence of new shallow donors. The binding energies of the observed effective-mass-like donors are between 34 and 53 meV. The optical dipole transitions of the different donors are shifted towards higher energies by ΔE=0.1--0.2 cm -1 , when deuterium is used in the plasma instead of hydrogen. This isotope shift of the optical dipole transitions between the electronic levels of the defects is direct proof of the incorporation of hydrogen in these defects

  15. Shallow land burial - why or why not

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, W.T.; Ledbetter, J.O.; Rohlich, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper summarizes a master's thesis on the state-of-the-art for shallow land burial of solid low-level radioactive wastes. The coverage of the thesis, which is condensed for this paper, ranges from site selection to problem case histories. Inherent in such coverage is the assessment of risk, the discussion of operational and management problems and the real significance of off-site migration. This topic is discussed in light of the stands taken that the migration is a serious problem and that it is not. Emphasis is on the engineering parameters of importance in site selection, and what pretreatment, if any, is needed

  16. Flow and coherent structures around circular cylinders in shallow water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jie; Constantinescu, George

    2017-06-01

    Eddy-resolving numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the dynamics of the large-scale coherent structures around a circular cylinder in an open channel under very shallow flow conditions where the bed friction significantly affects the wake structure. Results are reported for three test cases, for which the ratio between the cylinder diameter, D, and the channel depth, H, is D/H = 10, 25, and 50, respectively. Simulation results show that a horseshoe vortex system forms in all test cases and the dynamics of the necklace vortices is similar to that during the breakaway sub-regime observed for cases when a laminar horseshoe vortex forms around the base of the cylinder. Given the shallow conditions and turbulence in the incoming channel flow, the necklace vortices occupy a large fraction of the flow depth (they penetrate until the free surface in the shallower cases with D/H = 25 and 50). The oscillations of the necklace vortices become less regular with increasing polar angle magnitude and can induce strong amplification of the bed shear stress beneath their cores. Strong interactions are observed between the legs of the necklace vortices and the eddies shed in the separated shear layers in the cases with D/H = 25 and 50. In these two cases, a vortex-street type wake is formed and strong three-dimensional effects are observed in the near-wake flow. A secondary instability in the form of arrays of co-rotating parallel horizontal vortices develops. Once the roller vortices get away from the cylinder, the horizontal vortices in the array orient themselves along the streamwise direction. This instability is not present for moderately shallow conditions (e.g., D/H ≈ 1) nor for very shallow cases when the wake changes to an unsteady bubble type (e.g., D/H = 50). For cases when this secondary instability is present, the horizontal vortices extend vertically over a large fraction of the flow depth and play an important role in the vertical mixing of fluid

  17. Effect of substrate on periphyton communities and relationships among food web components in shallow hypertrophic lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Mieczan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the role of natural (common reed and artificial substrata (bamboo in structuring the abundance and taxonomic composition of periphyton assemblages. Investigations were conducted in a shallow, hypertrophic lake situated in the area of Polesie Lubelskie (Eastern Poland. Periphyton communities (algae, ciliates, small metazoa and chironomids on both types of substratum were sampled monthly, from May to November of 2007. Water samples for chemical analysis were collected together with biological samples. We selected the group of ten environmental variables which are the most important in determining the habitat conditions in highly eutrophic lakes: temperature, Secchi disc visibility, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, periphytic chlorophyll-a, N-NO3, N-NH4, TP, P-PO4 and total organic carbon (TOC. The abundances of periphytic algae, ciliates, metazoa and chironomids were significantly affected by season and substrate. On natural substrata, in all studied months, periphyton communities showed higher abundances. The results of PCA analysis confirmed the distinction between periphyton communities on natural and artificial substrata. The Monte Carlo permutation test showed that the periphyton communities on common reed were the most significantly affected by temperature, N-NO3, Secchi disc visibility and TOC. The communities on artificial substrata were significantly influenced by temperature, P-PO4 and TOC. On natural substrata biomass of periphytic algae was significantly negatively correlated with abundances of all groups of potential grazers (ciliates, metazoa, chironomids. On artificial substrata the relations between components of periphytic food web were stronger; correlation coefficients between algae, protists and chironomids were significant at P<0.01. The results of analysis indicate that periphytic algae can play an important role as food source for higher trophic levels. These interactions are less significant on natural (reed

  18. Hydrologic Triggering of Shallow Landslides in a Field-scale Flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M. E.; Iverson, R. M.; Iverson, N. R.; Brien, D. L.; Lahusen, R. G.; Logan, M.

    2006-12-01

    Hydrologic Triggering of Shallow Landslides in a Field-scale Flume Mark E. Reid, Richard M. Iverson, Neal R. Iverson, Dianne L. Brien, Richard G. LaHusen, and Mathew Logan Shallow landslides are often triggered by pore-water pressure increases driven by 1) groundwater inflow from underlying bedrock or soil, 2) prolonged moderate-intensity rainfall or snowmelt, or 3) bursts of high-intensity rainfall. These shallow failures are difficult to capture in the field, limiting our understanding of how different water pathways control failure style or timing. We used the field-scale, USGS debris-flow flume for 7 controlled landslide initiation experiments designed to examine the influence of different hydrologic triggers and the role of soil density, relative to critical state, on failure style and timing. Using sprinklers and/or groundwater injectors, we induced failure in a 0.65m thick, 2m wide, 6m3 prism of loamy sand on a 31° slope, placed behind a retaining wall. We monitored ~50 sensors to measure soil deformation (tiltmeters & extensometers), pore pressure (tensiometers and transducers), and soil moisture (TDR probes). We also extracted soil samples for laboratory estimates of porosity, shear strength, saturated hydraulic conductivity at differing porosities, unsaturated moisture retention characteristics, and compressibility. Experiments with loose soil all resulted in abrupt failure along the concrete flume bed with rapid mobilization into a debris flow. Each of the 3 water pathways, however, resulted in slightly different pore-pressure fields at failure and different times to failure. For example, groundwater injection at the flume bed led to a saturated zone that advanced upward, wetting over half the soil prism before pressures at the bed were sufficient to provoke collapse. With moderate-intensity surface sprinkling, an unsaturated wetting front propagated downward until reaching the bed, then a saturated zone built upward, with the highest pressures at the

  19. Remote sensing estimation of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in optically shallow waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiwei; Yu, Qian; Tian, Yong Q.; Becker, Brian L.

    2017-06-01

    It is not well understood how bottom reflectance of optically shallow waters affects the algorithm performance of colored dissolved organic matters (CDOM) retrieval. This study proposes a new algorithm that considers bottom reflectance in estimating CDOM absorption from optically shallow inland or coastal waters. The field sampling was conducted during four research cruises within the Saginaw River, Kawkawlin River and Saginaw Bay of Lake Huron. A stratified field sampling campaign collected water samples, determined the depth at each sampling location and measured optical properties. The sampled CDOM absorption at 440 nm broadly ranged from 0.12 to 8.46 m-1. Field sample analysis revealed that bottom reflectance does significantly change water apparent optical properties. We developed a CDOM retrieval algorithm (Shallow water Bio-Optical Properties algorithm, SBOP) that effectively reduces uncertainty by considering bottom reflectance in shallow waters. By incorporating the bottom contribution in upwelling radiances, the SBOP algorithm was able to explain 74% of the variance of CDOM values (RMSE = 0.22 and R2 = 0.74). The bottom effect index (BEI) was introduced to efficiently separate optically shallow and optically deep waters. Based on the BEI, an adaptive approach was proposed that references the amount of bottom effect in order to identify the most suitable algorithm (optically shallow water algorithm [SBOP] or optically deep water algorithm [QAA-CDOM]) to improve CDOM estimation (RMSE = 0.22 and R2 = 0.81). Our results potentially help to advance the capability of remote sensing in monitoring carbon pools at the land-water interface.

  20. A multidisciplinary methodological approach for slope stability assessment of an area prone to shallow landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoni, Massimiliano; Meisina, Claudia; Valentino, Roberto; Bittelli, Marco; Battista Bischetti, Gian; Vercesi, Alberto; Chersich, Silvia; Giuseppina Persichillo, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall-induced shallow landslides are widespread slope instabilities phenomena in several hilly and mountainous contexts all over the world. Due to their high density of diffusion also in small areas, they can provoke important damages to terrains, infrastructures, buildings, and, sometimes, loss of human lives. Shallow landslides affect superficial soils of limited thickness (generally lower than 2 m), located above weathered or not bedrock levels. Their triggering mechanism is strictly linked to the hydrological response of the soils to rainfall events. Thus, it becomes fundamental a comprehensive analysis of the soil properties which can influence the susceptibility of a slope to shallow landslides. In this study, a multidisciplinary approach was followed for the characterization of the soils and the individuation of the triggering conditions in an area particularly prone to shallow failures, for slope stability assessment. This area corresponded to the hilly sector of North-Eastern Oltrepò Pavese (Lombardy Region, Northern Italy), where the density of shallow landslides is really high, reaching more than 36 landslides per km2. The soils of the study area were analyzed through a multidisciplinary characterization, which took into account for the main geotechnical, mechanical and mineralogical parameters and also for the main pedological features of the materials. This approach allowed for identifying the main features and the horizons which could influence the soil behavior in relation to the conditions that are preparatory to shallow landslides development. In a test-site slope, representative of the main geomorphological, geological and landslides distribution characteristics typical of the study area, a continuous in time monitoring of meteorological (rainfall amount, air temperature, air humidity, atmospheric pressure, net solar radiation, wind speed and direction) and hydrological (soil water content, pore water pressure) parameters was implemented. In

  1. Electrically conductive anodized aluminum coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwitt, Robert S. (Inventor); Liu, Yanming (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing anodized aluminum with enhanced electrical conductivity, comprising anodic oxidation of aluminum alloy substrate, electrolytic deposition of a small amount of metal into the pores of the anodized aluminum, and electrolytic anodic deposition of an electrically conductive oxide, including manganese dioxide, into the pores containing the metal deposit; and the product produced by the process.

  2. Experimental investigation of snap-through motion of in-plane MEMS shallow arches under electrostatic excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Ramini, Abdallah

    2015-12-11

    We present an experimental investigation for the nonlinear dynamic behaviors of clamped–clamped in-plane MEMS shallow arches when excited by harmonic electrostatic forces. Frequency sweeps are conducted to study the dynamic behaviors in the neighborhoods of the first and third resonance frequencies as well as the super-harmonic resonances. Experimental results show local softening behavior of small oscillations around the first resonance frequency and hardening behavior at the third resonance frequency for small dc and ac loads. Interesting dynamic snap-through cross-well motions are observed experimentally at high voltages for the first time in the micro-scale world. In addition to the dynamic snap-through motion, the MEMS arch exhibits large oscillations of a continuous band of snap-through motion between the super-harmonic resonance regime and the first primary resonance regime. This continuous band is unprecedented experimentally in the micro/macro world, and is promising for a variety of sensing, actuation and communications applications.

  3. Experimental investigation of snap-through motion of in-plane MEMS shallow arches under electrostatic excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Ramini, Abdallah; Bellaredj, Mohammed L F; Al Hafiz, Md Abdullah; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental investigation for the nonlinear dynamic behaviors of clamped–clamped in-plane MEMS shallow arches when excited by harmonic electrostatic forces. Frequency sweeps are conducted to study the dynamic behaviors in the neighborhoods of the first and third resonance frequencies as well as the super-harmonic resonances. Experimental results show local softening behavior of small oscillations around the first resonance frequency and hardening behavior at the third resonance frequency for small dc and ac loads. Interesting dynamic snap-through cross-well motions are observed experimentally at high voltages for the first time in the micro-scale world. In addition to the dynamic snap-through motion, the MEMS arch exhibits large oscillations of a continuous band of snap-through motion between the super-harmonic resonance regime and the first primary resonance regime. This continuous band is unprecedented experimentally in the micro/macro world, and is promising for a variety of sensing, actuation and communications applications.

  4. Susceptibility of Shallow Landslide in Fraser Hill Catchment, Pahang Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Nor Azmin Sulaiman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In tropical areas especially during monsoon seasons intense precipitation is the main caused that trigger the natural shallow landslide phenomena. This phenomenon can be disastrous and widespread in occurrence even in undisturbed forested catchment. In this paper, an attempt has been made to evaluate the susceptibility of natural hill slopes to failure for a popular hill resort area, the Fraser Hill Catchment under different rainfall regimes and soil thickness. A Digital Elevation Model (DEM was prepared for the 8.2 km2 catchment. A GIS based deterministic model was then applied to predict the spatial landslide occurrence within catchment. Model input parameters include bulk density, friction angle, cohesion and hydraulic conductivity were gathered through in situ and lab analysis as well as from previous soil analysis records. Landslides locations were recorded using GPS as well as previous air photos and satellite imagery to establish landslide source areas inventory. The landslide susceptibility map was produced under different precipitation event’s simulation to see the effects of precipitation to stability of the hill slopes of the catchment. The results were categorized into naturally unstable (Defended, Upper Threshold, Lower Threshold, marginal instability (Quasi Stable and stable area (Moderately Stable and Stable. Results of the simulation indicated notable change in precipitation effect on Defended area is between 10mm to 40mm range in a single storm event. However, when storm event is exceeded 120mm, the result on Defended area produced by the model tends to be constant further on. For area categorized as naturally unstable (Factor of Safety, SF<1, with 110 mm of precipitation in a single storm event and soil depth at 2 meters and 4 meters could affect 69.51% and 69.88% respectively of the catchment area fall under that class. In addition, the model was able to detect 4% more of the landslide inventory under shallower soil depth of

  5. Shallow Crustal Thermal Structures of Central Taiwan Foothills Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Kai Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Crustal thermal structures are closely related to metamorphism, rock rheology, exhumation processes, hydrocarbon maturation levels, frictional faulting and other processes. Drilling is the most direct way to access the temperature fields in the shallow crust. However, a regional drilling program for geological investigation is usually very expensive. Recently, a large-scale in-situ investigation program in the Western Foothills of Central Taiwan was carried out, providing a rare opportunity to conduct heat flow measurements in this region where there are debates as to whether previous measured heat flows are representative of the thermal state in this region. We successfully collected 28 geothermal gradients from these wells and converted them into heat flows. The new heat flow dataset is consistent with previous heat flows, which shows that the thermal structures of Central Taiwan are different from that of other subduction accretionary prisms. We then combine all the available heat flow information to analyze the frictional parameters of the Chelungpu fault zone that ruptured during the 1999, Chi-Chi, Taiwan, earthquake. The heat flow dataset gave consistent results compared with the frictional parameters derived from another independent study that used cores recovered from the Chelungpu fault zone at depth. This study also shows that it is suitable for using heat-flow data obtained from shallow subsurface to constrain thrusting faulting parameters, similar to what had been done for the strike-slip San Andreas Fault in California. Additional fieldworks are planned to study heat flows in other mountainous regions of Taiwan for more advanced geodynamic modeling efforts.

  6. Shallow rainwater lenses in deltaic areas with saline seepage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. B. de Louw

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In deltaic areas with saline seepage, freshwater availability is often limited to shallow rainwater lenses lying on top of saline groundwater. Here we describe the characteristics and spatial variability of such lenses in areas with saline seepage and the mechanisms that control their occurrence and size. Our findings are based on different types of field measurements and detailed numerical groundwater models applied in the south-western delta of the Netherlands. By combining the applied techniques we could extrapolate measurements at point scale (groundwater sampling, temperature and electrical soil conductivity (TEC-probe measurements, electrical cone penetration tests (ECPT to field scale (continuous vertical electrical soundings (CVES, electromagnetic survey with EM31, and even to regional scale using helicopter-borne electromagnetic measurements (HEM. The measurements show a gradual mixing zone between infiltrating fresh rainwater and upward flowing saline groundwater. The mixing zone is best characterized by the depth of the centre of the mixing zone Dmix, where the salinity is half that of seepage water, and the bottom of the mixing zone Bmix, with a salinity equal to that of the seepage water (Cl-conc. 10 to 16 g l−1. Dmix is found at very shallow depth in the confining top layer, on average at 1.7 m below ground level (b.g.l., while Bmix lies about 2.5 m b.g.l. The model results show that the constantly alternating upward and downward flow at low velocities in the confining layer is the main mechanism of mixing between rainwater and saline seepage and determines the position and extent of the mixing zone (Dmix and Bmix. Recharge, seepage flux, and drainage depth are the controlling factors.

  7. An integrated architecture for shallow and deep processing

    OpenAIRE

    Crysmann, Berthold; Frank, Anette; Kiefer, Bernd; Müller, Stefan; Neumann, Günter; Piskorski, Jakub; Schäfer, Ulrich; Siegel, Melanie; Uszkoreit, Hans; Xu, Feiyu; Becker, Markus; Krieger, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    We present an architecture for the integration of shallow and deep NLP components which is aimed at flexible combination of different language technologies for a range of practical current and future applications. In particular, we describe the integration of a high-level HPSG parsing system with different high-performance shallow components, ranging from named entity recognition to chunk parsing and shallow clause recognition. The NLP components enrich a representation of natural language te...

  8. Optimal ship forms for minimum total resistance in shallow water

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Lian-en

    1984-01-01

    Optimal ship forms for minimum total resistance in shallow water Optimal ship forms for minimum total resistance in shallow water: An attempt is made to obtain shallow-water optimal ship forms for total resistance by means of "tent" function representation under the constraints that the main dimensions of the ship and the water-line area were kept constant. The objective function in the quadratic programming is the sum of wave-making resistance calculated by Sretenski's formula and viscou...

  9. Investigation of the shallow depth explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamegai, M.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation of the nuclear explosions at shallow depth is made. A combination of an explosion code and an effects code proves to be an excellent tool for this study. A numerical simulation of ''Johnie Boy'' shows that the energy coupling to the air takes place in two stages; first by a rising mound, and then by a vented source. The thermal effects are examined for a 1 kt source at three depths of burial. The ''mushroom effect'' leaves a hot radiative plasma in the upper level and cold materials in the lower region of the debris. The temperature and the energy density of the debris can give an upper limit on the thermal output

  10. Tree-root control of shallow landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Denis; Schwarz, Massimiliano

    2017-08-01

    Tree roots have long been recognized to increase slope stability by reinforcing the strength of soils. Slope stability models usually include the effects of roots by adding an apparent cohesion to the soil to simulate root strength. No model includes the combined effects of root distribution heterogeneity, stress-strain behavior of root reinforcement, or root strength in compression. Recent field observations, however, indicate that shallow landslide triggering mechanisms are characterized by differential deformation that indicates localized activation of zones in tension, compression, and shear in the soil. Here we describe a new model for slope stability that specifically considers these effects. The model is a strain-step discrete element model that reproduces the self-organized redistribution of forces on a slope during rainfall-triggered shallow landslides. We use a conceptual sigmoidal-shaped hillslope with a clearing in its center to explore the effects of tree size, spacing, weak zones, maximum root-size diameter, and different root strength configurations. Simulation results indicate that tree roots can stabilize slopes that would otherwise fail without them and, in general, higher root density with higher root reinforcement results in a more stable slope. The variation in root stiffness with diameter can, in some cases, invert this relationship. Root tension provides more resistance to failure than root compression but roots with both tension and compression offer the best resistance to failure. Lateral (slope-parallel) tension can be important in cases when the magnitude of this force is comparable to the slope-perpendicular tensile force. In this case, lateral forces can bring to failure tree-covered areas with high root reinforcement. Slope failure occurs when downslope soil compression reaches the soil maximum strength. When this occurs depends on the amount of root tension upslope in both the slope-perpendicular and slope-parallel directions. Roots

  11. Tree-root control of shallow landslides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cohen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Tree roots have long been recognized to increase slope stability by reinforcing the strength of soils. Slope stability models usually include the effects of roots by adding an apparent cohesion to the soil to simulate root strength. No model includes the combined effects of root distribution heterogeneity, stress-strain behavior of root reinforcement, or root strength in compression. Recent field observations, however, indicate that shallow landslide triggering mechanisms are characterized by differential deformation that indicates localized activation of zones in tension, compression, and shear in the soil. Here we describe a new model for slope stability that specifically considers these effects. The model is a strain-step discrete element model that reproduces the self-organized redistribution of forces on a slope during rainfall-triggered shallow landslides. We use a conceptual sigmoidal-shaped hillslope with a clearing in its center to explore the effects of tree size, spacing, weak zones, maximum root-size diameter, and different root strength configurations. Simulation results indicate that tree roots can stabilize slopes that would otherwise fail without them and, in general, higher root density with higher root reinforcement results in a more stable slope. The variation in root stiffness with diameter can, in some cases, invert this relationship. Root tension provides more resistance to failure than root compression but roots with both tension and compression offer the best resistance to failure. Lateral (slope-parallel tension can be important in cases when the magnitude of this force is comparable to the slope-perpendicular tensile force. In this case, lateral forces can bring to failure tree-covered areas with high root reinforcement. Slope failure occurs when downslope soil compression reaches the soil maximum strength. When this occurs depends on the amount of root tension upslope in both the slope-perpendicular and slope

  12. Shallow surface depth profiling with atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi, J.; Dastoor, P.C.; King, B.V.; O'Connor, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    It is possible to derive atomic layer-by-layer composition depth profiles from popular electron spectroscopic techniques, such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) or Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). When ion sputtering assisted AES or XPS is used, the changes that occur during the establishment of the steady state in the sputtering process make these techniques increasingly inaccurate for depths less than 3nm. Therefore non-destructive techniques of angle-resolved XPS (ARXPS) or AES (ARAES) have to be used in this case. In this paper several data processing algorithms have been used to extract the atomic resolved depth profiles of a shallow surface (down to 1nm) from ARXPS and ARAES data

  13. Shallow Lunar Seismic Activity and the Current Stress State of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Thomas R.; Weber, Renee C.; Collins, Geoffrey C.; Johnson, Catherine L.

    2017-01-01

    A vast, global network of more than 3200 lobate thrust fault scarps has been revealed in high resolution Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) images. The fault scarps are very young, less than 50 Ma, based on their small scale and crisp appearance, crosscutting relations with small-diameter impact craters, and rates of infilling of associated small, shallow graben and may be actively forming today. The population of young thrust fault scarps provides a window into the recent stress state of the Moon and offers insight into the origin of global lunar stresses. The distribution of orientations of the fault scarps is non-random, inconsistent with isotropic stresses from late-stage global contraction as the sole source of stress. Modeling shows that tidal stresses contribute significantly to the current stress state of the lunar crust. Tidal stresses (orbital recession and diurnal tides) superimposed on stresses from global contraction result in non-isotropic compressional stress and may produce thrust faults consistent with lobate scarp orientations. At any particular point on the lunar surface, peak compressive stress will be reached at a certain time in the diurnal cycle. Coseismic slip events on currently active thrust faults are expected to be triggered when peak stresses are reached. Analysis of the timing of the 28 the shallow moonquakes recorded by the Apollo seismic network shows that 19 indeed occur when the Moon is closer to apogee, while only 9 shallow events occur when the Moon is closer to perigee. Here we report efforts to refine the model for the current stress state of the Moon by investigating the contribution of polar wander. Progress on relocating the epicentral locations of the shallow moonquakes using an algorithm designed for sparse networks is also reported.

  14. CALIBRATION OF DISTRIBUTED SHALLOW LANDSLIDE MODELS IN FORESTED LANDSCAPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Battista Bischetti

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In mountainous-forested soil mantled landscapes all around the world, rainfall-induced shallow landslides are one of the most common hydro-geomorphic hazards, which frequently impact the environment and human lives and properties. In order to produce shallow landslide susceptibility maps, several models have been proposed in the last decade, combining simplified steady state topography- based hydrological models with the infinite slope scheme, in a GIS framework. In the present paper, two of the still open issues are investigated: the assessment of the validity of slope stability models and the inclusion of root cohesion values. In such a perspective the “Stability INdex MAPping” has been applied to a small forested pre-Alpine catchment, adopting different calibrating approaches and target indexes. The Single and the Multiple Calibration Regions modality and three quantitative target indexes – the common Success Rate (SR, the Modified Success Rate (MSR, and a Weighted Modified Success Rate (WMSR herein introduced – are considered. The results obtained show that the target index can 34 003_Bischetti(569_23 1-12-2010 9:48 Pagina 34 significantly affect the values of a model’s parameters and lead to different proportions of stable/unstable areas, both for the Single and the Multiple Calibration Regions approach. The use of SR as the target index leads to an over-prediction of the unstable areas, whereas the use of MSR and WMSR, seems to allow a better discrimination between stable and unstable areas. The Multiple Calibration Regions approach should be preferred, using information on space distribution of vegetation to define the Regions. The use of field-based estimation of root cohesion and sliding depth allows the implementation of slope stability models (SINMAP in our case also without the data needed for calibration. To maximize the inclusion of such parameters into SINMAP, however, the assumption of a uniform distribution of

  15. Assumed Probability Density Functions for Shallow and Deep Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven K Krueger

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The assumed joint probability density function (PDF between vertical velocity and conserved temperature and total water scalars has been suggested to be a relatively computationally inexpensive and unified subgrid-scale (SGS parameterization for boundary layer clouds and turbulent moments. This paper analyzes the performance of five families of PDFs using large-eddy simulations of deep convection, shallow convection, and a transition from stratocumulus to trade wind cumulus. Three of the PDF families are based on the double Gaussian form and the remaining two are the single Gaussian and a Double Delta Function (analogous to a mass flux model. The assumed PDF method is tested for grid sizes as small as 0.4 km to as large as 204.8 km. In addition, studies are performed for PDF sensitivity to errors in the input moments and for how well the PDFs diagnose some higher-order moments. In general, the double Gaussian PDFs more accurately represent SGS cloud structure and turbulence moments in the boundary layer compared to the single Gaussian and Double Delta Function PDFs for the range of grid sizes tested. This is especially true for small SGS cloud fractions. While the most complex PDF, Lewellen-Yoh, better represents shallow convective cloud properties (cloud fraction and liquid water mixing ratio compared to the less complex Analytic Double Gaussian 1 PDF, there appears to be no advantage in implementing Lewellen-Yoh for deep convection. However, the Analytic Double Gaussian 1 PDF better represents the liquid water flux, is less sensitive to errors in the input moments, and diagnoses higher order moments more accurately. Between the Lewellen-Yoh and Analytic Double Gaussian 1 PDFs, it appears that neither family is distinctly better at representing cloudy layers. However, due to the reduced computational cost and fairly robust results, it appears that the Analytic Double Gaussian 1 PDF could be an ideal family for SGS cloud and turbulence

  16. Heavy crude production from shallow formations: long horizontal wells versus horizontal fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valko, P.; Economides, M. J. [Texas A and M Univ., TX (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The feasibility of producing heavy oil from shallow formations using either horizontal wells or short horizontal wells fractured horizontally is demonstrated. The problem of optimum proppant placement is solved in two steps. In step one, the finite productivity performance is considered in general terms showing that the performance is a function of two dimensionless parameters. Following derivation of optimum conditions, the solution is applied to the horizontal fracture consideration. The limiting factor is that to create an effective finite conductivity fracture, the dimensionless fracture conductivity must be on the order of unity, a fracture that is difficult to realize in higher permeability formations. The best candidates for the suggested configuration are shallow or moderate formations, or formations otherwise proven to accept horizontal fractures, and formations with low permeability/viscosity ratio. 7 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs., 2 appendices.

  17. Small cetacean aerial survey conducted in Alaskan waters by Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Mammal Laboratory from 1997-05-08 to 1999-07-04 (NCEI Accession 0131991)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aerial surveys were conducted to produce abundance estimates for the three Alaska stocks of harbor porpoise. Surveys occurred from May to July 1997 for the Southeast...

  18. High Thermal Conductivity Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Shinde, Subhash L

    2006-01-01

    Thermal management has become a ‘hot’ field in recent years due to a need to obtain high performance levels in many devices used in such diverse areas as space science, mainframe and desktop computers, optoelectronics and even Formula One racing cars! Thermal solutions require not just taking care of very high thermal flux, but also ‘hot spots’, where the flux densities can exceed 200 W/cm2. High thermal conductivity materials play an important role in addressing thermal management issues. This volume provides readers a basic understanding of the thermal conduction mechanisms in these materials and discusses how the thermal conductivity may be related to their crystal structures as well as microstructures developed as a result of their processing history. The techniques for accurate measurement of these properties on large as well as small scales have been reviewed. Detailed information on the thermal conductivity of diverse materials including aluminum nitride (AlN), silicon carbide (SiC), diamond, a...

  19. Nutrient Enrichment in Estuaries from Discharge of Shallow Ground Water, Mt. Desert Island, Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, Charles W.; Huntington, Thomas G.; Caldwell, James M.

    2007-01-01

    Nutrient enrichment from atmospheric deposition, agricultural activities, wildlife, and domestic sources is a concern at Acadia National Park because of the potential problem of water-quality degradation and eutrophication in its estuaries. Water-quality degradation has been observed at the Park?s Bass Harbor Marsh estuary but not in Northeast Creek estuary. Previous studies at Acadia National Park have estimated nutrient inputs to estuaries from atmospheric deposition and surface-water runoff, but the importance of shallow ground water that may contain nutrients derived from domestic or other sources is unknown. Northeast Creek and Bass Harbor Marsh estuaries were studied to (1) identify shallow ground-water seeps, (2) assess the chemistry of the water discharged from selected seeps, and (3) assess the chemistry of ground water in shallow ground-water hyporheic zones. The hyporheic zone is defined here as the region beneath and lateral to a stream bed, where there is mixing of shallow ground water and surface water. This study also provides baseline chemical data for ground water in selected bedrock monitoring wells and domestic wells on Mt. Desert Island. Water samples were analyzed for concentrations of nutrients, wastewater compounds, dissolved organic carbon, pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature and specific conductance. Samples from bedrock monitoring wells also were analyzed for alkalinity, major cations and anions, and trace metals. Shallow ground-water seeps to Northeast Creek and Bass Harbor Marsh estuaries at Acadia National Park were identified and georeferenced using aerial infrared digital imagery. Monitoring included the deployment of continuously recording temperature and specific conductance sensors in the seep discharge zone to access marine or freshwater signatures related to tidal flooding, gradient-driven shallow ground-water flow, or shallow subsurface flow related to precipitation events. Many potential shallow ground-water discharge zones were

  20. A generalized regression model of arsenic variations in the shallow groundwater of Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Richard G.; Chandler, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Localized studies of arsenic (As) in Bangladesh have reached disparate conclusions regarding the impact of irrigation‐induced recharge on As concentrations in shallow (≤50 m below ground level) groundwater. We construct generalized regression models (GRMs) to describe observed spatial variations in As concentrations in shallow groundwater both (i) nationally, and (ii) regionally within Holocene deposits where As concentrations in groundwater are generally high (>10 μg L−1). At these scales, the GRMs reveal statistically significant inverse associations between observed As concentrations and two covariates: (1) hydraulic conductivity of the shallow aquifer and (2) net increase in mean recharge between predeveloped and developed groundwater‐fed irrigation periods. Further, the GRMs show that the spatial variation of groundwater As concentrations is well explained by not only surface geology but also statistical interactions (i.e., combined effects) between surface geology and mean groundwater recharge, thickness of surficial silt and clay, and well depth. Net increases in recharge result from intensive groundwater abstraction for irrigation, which induces additional recharge where it is enabled by a permeable surface geology. Collectively, these statistical associations indicate that irrigation‐induced recharge serves to flush mobile As from shallow groundwater. PMID:27524841

  1. Large-scale field testing on flexible shallow landslide barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugnion, Louis; Volkwein, Axel; Wendeler, Corinna; Roth, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    Open shallow landslides occur regularly in a wide range of natural terrains. Generally, they are difficult to predict and result in damages to properties and disruption of transportation systems. In order to improve the knowledge about the physical process itself and to develop new protection measures, large-scale field experiments were conducted in Veltheim, Switzerland. Material was released down a 30° inclined test slope into a flexible barrier. The flow as well as the impact into the barrier was monitored using various measurement techniques. Laser devices recording flow heights, a special force plate measuring normal and shear basal forces as well as load cells for impact pressures were installed along the test slope. In addition, load cells were built in the support and retaining cables of the barrier to provide data for detailed back-calculation of load distribution during impact. For the last test series an additional guiding wall in flow direction on both sides of the barrier was installed to achieve higher impact pressures in the middle of the barrier. With these guiding walls the flow is not able to spread out before hitting the barrier. A special constructed release mechanism simulating the sudden failure of the slope was designed such that about 50 m3 of mixed earth and gravel saturated with water can be released in an instant. Analysis of cable forces combined with impact pressures and velocity measurements during a test series allow us now to develop a load model for the barrier design. First numerical simulations with the software tool FARO, originally developed for rockfall barriers and afterwards calibrated for debris flow impacts, lead already to structural improvements on barrier design. Decisive for the barrier design is the first dynamic impact pressure depending on the flow velocity and afterwards the hydrostatic pressure of the complete retained material behind the barrier. Therefore volume estimation of open shallow landslides by assessing

  2. On the effective mass theory for shallow donors in many valley semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, S.; Tomak, M.

    1984-07-01

    The extensions to the conventional effective-mass theory for shallow donors in Si, proposed by Altarelli and Hsu on the one hand and Resta and Resca on the other, are examined in detail. A variational expression for the donor ground state energy is given including the effect of a band nearer to the conduction band minimum. The different contributions to the donor ground state in Si are discussed. (author)

  3. Combination of statistical and physically based methods to assess shallow slide susceptibility at the basin scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Sérgio C.; Zêzere, José L.; Lajas, Sara; Melo, Raquel

    2017-07-01

    Approaches used to assess shallow slide susceptibility at the basin scale are conceptually different depending on the use of statistical or physically based methods. The former are based on the assumption that the same causes are more likely to produce the same effects, whereas the latter are based on the comparison between forces which tend to promote movement along the slope and the counteracting forces that are resistant to motion. Within this general framework, this work tests two hypotheses: (i) although conceptually and methodologically distinct, the statistical and deterministic methods generate similar shallow slide susceptibility results regarding the model's predictive capacity and spatial agreement; and (ii) the combination of shallow slide susceptibility maps obtained with statistical and physically based methods, for the same study area, generate a more reliable susceptibility model for shallow slide occurrence. These hypotheses were tested at a small test site (13.9 km2) located north of Lisbon (Portugal), using a statistical method (the information value method, IV) and a physically based method (the infinite slope method, IS). The landslide susceptibility maps produced with the statistical and deterministic methods were combined into a new landslide susceptibility map. The latter was based on a set of integration rules defined by the cross tabulation of the susceptibility classes of both maps and analysis of the corresponding contingency tables. The results demonstrate a higher predictive capacity of the new shallow slide susceptibility map, which combines the independent results obtained with statistical and physically based models. Moreover, the combination of the two models allowed the identification of areas where the results of the information value and the infinite slope methods are contradictory. Thus, these areas were classified as uncertain and deserve additional investigation at a more detailed scale.

  4. Groundwater penetrating radar and high resolution seismic for locating shallow faults in unconsolidated sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyatt, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    Faults in shallow, unconsolidated sediments, particularly in coastal plain settings, are very difficult to discern during subsurface exploration yet have critical impact to groundwater flow, contaminant transport and geotechnical evaluations. This paper presents a case study using cross-over geophysical technologies in an area where shallow faulting is probable and known contamination exists. A comparison is made between Wenner and dipole-dipole resistivity data, ground penetrating radar, and high resolution seismic data. Data from these methods were verified with a cone penetrometer investigation for subsurface lithology and compared to existing monitoring well data. Interpretations from these techniques are compared with actual and theoretical shallow faulting found in the literature. The results of this study suggests that (1) the CPT study, combined with the monitoring well data may suggest that discontinuities in correlatable zones may indicate that faulting is present (2) the addition of the Wenner and dipole-dipole data may further suggest that offset zones exist in the shallow subsurface but not allow specific fault planes or fault stranding to be mapped (3) the high resolution seismic data will image faults to within a few feet of the surface but does not have the resolution to identify the faulting on the scale of our models, however it will suggest locations for upward continuation of faulted zones (4) offset 100 MHz and 200 MHz CMP GPR will image zones and features that may be fault planes and strands similar to our models (5) 300 MHz GPR will image higher resolution features that may suggest the presence of deeper faults and strands, and (6) the combination of all of the tools in this study, particularly the GPR and seismic may allow for the mapping of small scale, shallow faulting in unconsolidated sediments

  5. Evaporite deposition in a shallow perennial lake, Qaidam basin, western China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubel, K.A.; Lowenstein, T.K. (SUNY, Binghampton, NY (United States)); Spencer, R.J. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Pengxi, Z. (Institute of Salt Lakes, Xining (China))

    1991-03-01

    Evaporites accumulate in ephemeral saline-pans, shallow perennial lakes or lagoons, and deep perennial systems. Continuous brine trench exposures of Holocene evaporites from the Qaidam basin provide criteria for the recognition of shallow perennial lake sediments. Based on Landsat photographs, lateral extent of beds (at least 7 km), and sequence thicknesses (maximum 2.5 m), the paleolake is interpreted to have been less than 2.5 m deep and at least 120 km{sup 2} in area. Sediments consist of laminated siliciclastic mud overlain by mud-halite couplets (mm- to cm-scale layers), which represent one vertical shallowing- and concentrating-upwards sequence. The basal laminite marks the onset of deposition in this shallow perennial paleolake. Syndepositional halite textures and fabrics in the overlying mud-halite couplets include cumulates, rafts, and chevrons, draped by mud laminae, and halite layers truncated by horizontal dissolution surfaces (increasing in frequency upwards). Paleolake brines, determined from fluid inclusion melting temperatures, are Na-Mg-Cl-rich and evolve from 0.84 m Mg{sup 2} to 1.52 m Mg{sup 2+} (near the surface). Combinations of the following criteria may be used for the recognition of shallow, nonstratified, perennial lake sediments: lateral continuity of layers; muds undisrupted by subaerial exposure; vertical bottom-growth of halite; halite layers conformably overlain by mud; halite layers truncated by nonuniformly spaced horizontal dissolution surfaces; erosional scours and channels filled with cross-laminated gypsum, halite, and siliciclastic sand and mud; and salinity fluctuations over small stratigraphic intervals within an overall concentrating-upwards sequence.

  6. Systematic study of shallow junction formation on germanium substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellings, Geert; Rosseel, Erik; Clarysse, Trudo

    2011-01-01

    Published results on Ge junctions are benchmarked systematically using RS–XJ plots. The electrical activation level required to meet the ITRS targets is calculated. Additionally, new results are presented on shallow furnace-annealed B junctions and shallow laser-annealed As junctions. Co-implanting...

  7. Analysis of the Numerical Solution of the Shallow Water Equations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hamrick, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    .... The two schemes are finite difference method (FDM) and the finite element method (FEM). After presenting the shallow water equations in several formulations, some examples will be presented. The use of the Fourier transform to find the solution of a semidiscrete analog of the shallow water equations is also demonstrated.

  8. Shallow Miocene basaltic magma reservoirs in the Bahia de Los Angeles basin, Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Argote, Luis A.; García-Abdeslem, Juan

    1999-01-01

    The basement in the Bahía de Los Angeles basin consists of Paleozoic metamorphic rocks and Cretaceous granitoids. The Neogene stratigraphy overlying the basement is formed, from the base to the top, by andesitic lava flows and plugs, sandstone and conglomeratic horizons, and Miocene pyroclastic flow units and basaltic flows. Basaltic dikes also intrude the whole section. To further define its structure, a detailed gravimetric survey was conducted across the basin about 1 km north of the Sierra Las Flores. In spite of the rough and lineal topography along the foothills of the Sierra La Libertad, we found no evidence for large-scale faulting. Gravity data indicates that the basin has a maximum depth of 120 m in the Valle Las Tinajas and averages 75 m along the gravimetric profile. High density bodies below the northern part of the Sierra Las Flores and Valle Las Tinajas are interpreted to be part of basaltic dikes. The intrusive body located north of the Sierra Las Flores is 2.5 km wide and its top is about 500 m deep. The lava flows of the top of the Sierra Las Flores, together with the distribution of basaltic activity north of this sierra, suggests that this intrusive body continues for 20 km along a NNW-trending strike. Between the sierras Las Flores and Las Animas, a 0.5-km-wide, 300-m-thick intrusive body is interpreted at a depth of about 100 m. This dike could be part of the basaltic activity of the Cerro Las Tinajas and the small mounds along the foothills of western Sierra Las Animas. The observed local normal faulting in the basin is inferred to be mostly associated with the emplacement of the shallow magma reservoirs below Las Flores and Las Tinajas.

  9. Effect of dissolution on the load–settlement behavior of shallow foundations

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Minsu

    2016-03-10

    Mineral dissolution and solid-liquid phase change may cause settlement or affect the bearing capacity of shallow foundations. The effect of gradual grain dissolution on small-scale shallow foundation behavior is investigated using the discrete element method. Results show that dissolution is most detrimental during early stages, as initially contacting particles shrink and force chains must reform throughout the medium. Porosity tends to increase during dissolution and force chains evolve into strong localized forces with a honeycomb topology. Higher settlements are required to mobilize bearing resistance in postdissolution sediments than in pre-dissolution ones. Subsurface mineral dissolution beneath a footing under load is the worst condition; in fact, settlements in such cases are higher than when a foundation load is applied on a sediment that has already experienced dissolution. © the author(s) or their institution(s).

  10. Effect of dissolution on the load–settlement behavior of shallow foundations

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Minsu; Santamarina, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Mineral dissolution and solid-liquid phase change may cause settlement or affect the bearing capacity of shallow foundations. The effect of gradual grain dissolution on small-scale shallow foundation behavior is investigated using the discrete element method. Results show that dissolution is most detrimental during early stages, as initially contacting particles shrink and force chains must reform throughout the medium. Porosity tends to increase during dissolution and force chains evolve into strong localized forces with a honeycomb topology. Higher settlements are required to mobilize bearing resistance in postdissolution sediments than in pre-dissolution ones. Subsurface mineral dissolution beneath a footing under load is the worst condition; in fact, settlements in such cases are higher than when a foundation load is applied on a sediment that has already experienced dissolution. © the author(s) or their institution(s).

  11. Nitrogen and organic carbon cycling processes in tidal marshes and shallow estuarine habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, B. A.; Downing, B. D.; Pellerin, B. A.; Kraus, T. E. C.; Fleck, J.; Fujii, R.

    2016-02-01

    Tidal wetlands and shallow water habitats can be sites of high aquatic productivity, and they have the potential of exchanging this newly produced organic carbon with adjacent deeper habitats. Indeed, export of organic carbon from wetlands and shallow water habitats to pelagic food webs is one of the primary ecosystem functions targeted in tidal wetland restorations. Alternatively, wetlands and shallow water habitats can function as retention areas for nutrients due to the nutrient demand of emergent macrophytes and denitrification in anoxic zones. They can also remove phytoplankton and non-algal particles from the aquatic food webs because the shallower waters can result in higher rates of benthic grazing and higher settling due to lower water velocities. We conducted studies in wetland and channel sites in the San Francisco estuary (USA) to investigate the dynamics of nutrients and carbon production at a variety of temporal scales. We collected continuous time series of nutrients, oxygen, chlorophyll and pH in conjunction with continuous acoustic measurement of water velocity and discharge to provide mass controls and used simple biogeochemical models to assess rates. We found a high degree of temporal variability in individual systems, corresponding to, for example, changes in nutrient supply, water level, light level, wind, wind direction, and other physical factors. There was also large variability among the different systems, probably due to differences in flows and geomorphic features. We compare the aquatic productivity of theses environments and speculate as to the formative elements of each. Our findings demonstrate the complex interaction between physical, chemical, and biological factors that determine the type of production and degree of export from tidal wetlands and shallow water habitats, suggesting that a clearer picture of these processes is important for guiding future large scale restoration efforts.

  12. Fracture assessment of shallow-flaw cruciform beams tested under uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Williams, P.T.; Pennell, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    A technology to determine shallow-flaw fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is being developed for application to the safety assessment of RPVs containing postulated shallow surface flaws. Matrices of cruciform beam tests were developed to investigate and quantify the effects of temperature, biaxial loading, and specimen size on fracture initiation toughness of two-dimensional (constant depth), shallow, surface flaws. The cruciform beam specimens were developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to introduce a far-field, out-of-plane biaxial stress component in the test section that approximates the nonlinear stresses resulting from pressurized-thermal-shock or pressure-temperature loading of an RPV. Tests were conducted under biaxial load ratios ranging from uniaxial to equibiaxial. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for an RPV material. The cruciform fracture toughness data were used to evaluate fracture methodologies for predicting the observed effects of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Initial emphasis was placed on assessment of stress-based methodologies, namely, the J-Q formulation, the Dodds-Anderson toughness scaling model, and the Weibull approach. Applications of these methodologies based on the hydrostatic stress fracture criterion indicated an effect of loading-biaxiality on fracture toughness; the conventional maximum principal stress criterion indicated no effect. A three-parameter Weibull model based on the hydrostatic stress criterion is shown to correlate with the experimentally observed biaxial effect on cleavage fracture toughness by providing a scaling mechanism between uniaxial and biaxial loading states. (orig.)

  13. On the modelling of shallow turbidity flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liapidevskii, Valery Yu.; Dutykh, Denys; Gisclon, Marguerite

    2018-03-01

    In this study we investigate shallow turbidity density currents and underflows from mechanical point of view. We propose a simple hyperbolic model for such flows. On one hand, our model is based on very basic conservation principles. On the other hand, the turbulent nature of the flow is also taken into account through the energy dissipation mechanism. Moreover, the mixing with the pure water along with sediments entrainment and deposition processes are considered, which makes the problem dynamically interesting. One of the main advantages of our model is that it requires the specification of only two modeling parameters - the rate of turbulent dissipation and the rate of the pure water entrainment. Consequently, the resulting model turns out to be very simple and self-consistent. This model is validated against several experimental data and several special classes of solutions (such as travelling, self-similar and steady) are constructed. Unsteady simulations show that some special solutions are realized as asymptotic long time states of dynamic trajectories.

  14. Seismic Wave Velocity in Earth's Shallow Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrakis, C.; Eaton, D. W.

    2008-12-01

    Studies of the outer core indicate that it is composed of liquid Fe and Ni alloyed with a ~10% fraction of light elements such as O, S or Si. Recently, unusual features, such as sediment accumulation, immiscible fluid layers or stagnant convection, have been predicted in the shallow core region. Secular cooling and compositional buoyancy drive vigorous convection that sustains the geodynamo, although critical details of light-element composition and thermal regime remain uncertain. Seismic velocity models can provide important constraints on the light element composition, however global reference models, such as Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM), IASP91 and AK135 vary significantly in the 200 km below the core-mantle boundary. Past studies of the outermost core velocity structure have been hampered by traveltime uncertainties due to lowermost mantle heterogeneities. The recently published Empirical Transfer Function (ETF) method has been shown to reduce the uncertainty using a waveform stacking approach to improve global observations of SmKS teleseismic waves. Here, we apply the ETF method to achieve a precise top-of-core velocity measurement of 8.05 ± 0.03 km/s. This new model accords well with PREM. Since PREM is based on the adiabatic form of the Adams-Williamson equation, it assumes a well mixed (i.e. homogeneous) composition. This result suggests a lack of heterogeneity in the outermost core due to layering or stagnant convection.

  15. Shallow land burial of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, D.G.; Rose, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    The authors discuss low-level, solid radioactive wastes buried in the ground since the startup of nuclear operations by the Manhattan Engineer District in the early 1940's. These operations were originally intended to be temporary so the primary consideration in locating land burial sites was their accessibility from the source of waste production. Early land-burial facilities were located on large reservations owned by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and operated by their prime contractors. Shallow land burial consists of excavating a trench or vault, emplacing the waste, minimizing void space within the disposal unit, and covering the waste with earth to control access to the waste. Problems encountered in the land-burial of radioactive wastes are classified into areas which relate to the environmental characteristics of the sites, waste characteristics, operational practices and control, and predictive capability. The most serious environmentally related problems involve water management. Water provides primary vehicle for both erosional processes, which affect the structural integrity of the waste trenches, and for the migration of radionuclides. Although there is consensus that the current level of off-site movement of radionuclides from operating burial grounds does not constitute an immediate health hazard, there is less certainty with respect to the ability of the facilities to provide long-term containment and isolation

  16. Unconfined aquifer response to infiltration basins and shallow pump tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostendorf, David W.; DeGroot, Don J.; Hinlein, Erich S.

    2007-05-01

    SummaryWe measure and model the unsteady, axisymmetric response of an unconfined aquifer to delayed, arbitrary recharge. Water table drainage follows the initial elastic aquifer response, as modeled for uniform, instantaneous recharge by Zlotnik and Ledder [Zlotnik, V., Ledder, G., 1992. Groundwater flow in a compressible unconfined aquifer with uniform circular recharge. Water Resources Research 28(6), 1619-1630] and delayed drainage by Moench [Moench, A.F., 1995. Combining the Neuman and Boulton models for flow to a well in an unconfined aquifer. Ground Water 33(3), 378-384]. We extend their analyses with a convolution integral that models the delayed response of an aquifer to infiltration from a circular infiltration basin. The basin routes the hydrograph to the water table with a decay constant dependent on a Brooks and Corey [Brooks, R.H., Corey, A.T., 1966. Properties of porous media affecting fluid flow. Journal of the Irrigation and Drainage Division ASCE 92(2), 61-88] unsaturated permeability exponent. The resulting closed form model approaches Neuman's [Neuman, S.P., 1972. Theory of flow in unconfined aquifers considering delayed response of the water table. Water Resources Research 8(4), 1031-1045] partially penetrating pump test equation for a small source radius, instantaneous, uniform drainage and a shallow screen section. Irrigation pump data at a well characterized part of the Plymouth-Carver Aquifer in southeastern Massachusetts calibrate the small source model, while infiltration data from the closed drainage system of State Route 25 calibrate the infiltration basin model. The calibrated permeability, elasticity, specific yield, and permeability exponent are plausible and consistent for the pump and infiltration data sets.

  17. Formation Conditions and Sedimentary Characteristics of a Triassic Shallow Water Braided Delta in the Yanchang Formation, Southwest Ordos Basin, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziliang Liu

    Full Text Available A large, shallow braided river delta sedimentary system developed in the Yanchang Formation during the Triassic in the southwest of the Ordos basin. In this braided delta system, abundant oil and gas resources have been observed, and the area is a hotspot for oil and gas resource exploration. Through extensive field work on outcrops and cores and analyses of geophysical data, it was determined that developments in the Late Triassic produced favorable geological conditions for the development of shallow water braided river deltas. Such conditions included a large basin, flat terrain, and wide and shallow water areas; wet and dry cyclical climate changes; ancient water turbulence; dramatic depth cycle changes; ancient uplift development; strong weathering of parent rock; and abundant supply. The shallow water braided river delta showed grain sediment granularity, plastic debris, and sediment with mature composition and structure that reflected the strong hydrodynamic environment of large tabular cross-bedding, wedge cross-bedding, and multiple positive rhythms superimposed to form a thick sand body layer. The branch river bifurcation developed underwater, and the thickness of the sand body increased further, indicating that the slope was slow and located in shallow water. The seismic responses of the braided river delta reflected strong shallow water performance, indicated by a progradation seismic reflection phase axis that was relatively flat; in addition, the seismic reflection amplitude was strong and continuous with a low angle and extended over considerable distances (up to 50 km. The sedimentary center was close to the provenance, the width of the river was large, and a shallow sedimentary structure and a sedimentary rhythm were developed. The development of the delta was primarily controlled by tectonic activity and changes in the lake level; as a result, the river delta sedimentary system eventually presented a "small plain, big front

  18. Formation Conditions and Sedimentary Characteristics of a Triassic Shallow Water Braided Delta in the Yanchang Formation, Southwest Ordos Basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziliang; Shen, Fang; Zhu, Xiaomin; Li, Fengjie; Tan, Mengqi

    2015-01-01

    A large, shallow braided river delta sedimentary system developed in the Yanchang Formation during the Triassic in the southwest of the Ordos basin. In this braided delta system, abundant oil and gas resources have been observed, and the area is a hotspot for oil and gas resource exploration. Through extensive field work on outcrops and cores and analyses of geophysical data, it was determined that developments in the Late Triassic produced favorable geological conditions for the development of shallow water braided river deltas. Such conditions included a large basin, flat terrain, and wide and shallow water areas; wet and dry cyclical climate changes; ancient water turbulence; dramatic depth cycle changes; ancient uplift development; strong weathering of parent rock; and abundant supply. The shallow water braided river delta showed grain sediment granularity, plastic debris, and sediment with mature composition and structure that reflected the strong hydrodynamic environment of large tabular cross-bedding, wedge cross-bedding, and multiple positive rhythms superimposed to form a thick sand body layer. The branch river bifurcation developed underwater, and the thickness of the sand body increased further, indicating that the slope was slow and located in shallow water. The seismic responses of the braided river delta reflected strong shallow water performance, indicated by a progradation seismic reflection phase axis that was relatively flat; in addition, the seismic reflection amplitude was strong and continuous with a low angle and extended over considerable distances (up to 50 km). The sedimentary center was close to the provenance, the width of the river was large, and a shallow sedimentary structure and a sedimentary rhythm were developed. The development of the delta was primarily controlled by tectonic activity and changes in the lake level; as a result, the river delta sedimentary system eventually presented a "small plain, big front" character.

  19. Calculations of Asteroid Impacts into Deep and Shallow Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisler, Galen; Weaver, Robert; Gittings, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Contrary to received opinion, ocean impacts of small (dangerous features of ocean impacts, just as for land impacts, are the atmospheric effects. We present illustrative hydrodynamic calculations of impacts into both deep and shallow seas, and draw conclusions from a parameter study in which the size of the impactor and the depth of the sea are varied independently. For vertical impacts at 20 km/s, craters in the seafloor are produced when the water depth is less than about 5-7 times the asteroid diameter. Both the depth and the diameter of the transient crater scale with the asteroid diameter, so the volume of water excavated scales with the asteroid volume. About a third of the crater volume is vaporised, because the kinetic energy per unit mass of the asteroid is much larger than the latent heat of vaporisation of water. The vaporised water carries away a considerable fraction of the impact energy in an explosively expanding blast wave which is responsible for devastating local effects and may affect worldwide climate. Of the remaining energy, a substantial portion is used in the crown splash and the rebound jet that forms as the transient crater collapses. The collapse and rebound cycle leads to a propagating wave with a wavelength considerably shorter than classical tsunamis, being only about twice the diameter of the transient crater. Propagation of this wave is hindered somewhat because its amplitude is so large that it breaks in deep water and is strongly affected by the blast wave's perturbation of the atmosphere. Even if propagation were perfect, however, the volume of water delivered per metre of shoreline is less than was delivered by the Boxing Day 2004 tsunami for any impactor smaller than 500 m diameter in an ocean of 5 km depth or less. Near-field effects are dangerous for impactors of diameter 200 m or greater; hurricane-force winds can extend tens of kilometers from the impact point, and fallout from the initial splash can be extremely violent

  20. Shallow dopants in nanostructered and in isotopically engineered silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegner, Andre Rainer

    2011-01-15

    This work addressed two major topics. The first part was dedicated to the investigation of the doping properties of Si nanostructures. There, we have reported our results on Si nanoparticles with particular focus on questions concerning the atomic incorporation efficiency of dopants, their compensation by surface defects, and the change of their localization due to confinement effects. In the second part of this thesis, we have addressed several open questions concerning the spin properties of shallow acceptor states in bulk Si crystals with different isotope compositions. As far as the first part is concerned, ESR and SIMS have been used to quantitatively investigate the P doping efficiency and the interrelationship of Si-db states and P doping in freestanding Si-NCs over a wide range of diameters. Two types of Si-db defect states, the P{sub b} center and the D center, were identified, where the P{sub b} centers are found at concentrations comparable to bulk Si/SiO{sub 2} interfaces. Moreover, the incorporation of P donors and B acceptors in amorphous Si nanoparticles was demonstrated via ESR. Employing EDMR, we investigated the spin-dependent transport through Si-NC networks. The selectivity and the high sensitivity of EDMR enabled the observation of isolated neutral donor states, which exhibit a characteristic hyperfine splitting in samples with very small diameters. This opened up a possibility for the direct study of the properties of the donor wave function in Si-NCs. To this end, we have used the hyperfine splitting as a spectroscopic measure to monitor the localization of donor wave functions when going from the bulk to the nanoscale. As far as the spin properties of shallow acceptors in Si are concerned, we have addressed a number of fundamental questions concerning the line shape, the magnitude of the residual broadening and the substructure of the boron resonances observed in low-temperature EPR experiments. Performing EPR measurements on different

  1. An Experimental Investigation of the Dynamic Behavior of an In-Plane MEMS Shallow Arch Under Electrostatic Excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Ramini, Abdallah

    2016-01-20

    We present experimental investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of a clamped-clamped in-plane MEMS shallow arch when excited by an electrostatic force. We explore the dynamic behaviors of the in-plane motion of the shallow arches via frequency sweeps in the neighborhood of the first resonance frequency. The shallow arch response is video microscopy recorded and analyzed by means of digital imaging. The experimental data show local softening behavior for small DC and AC loads. For high voltages, the experimental investigation reveals interesting dynamics, where the arch exhibits a dynamic snap-Through behavior. These attractive experimental results verify the previously reported complex behavior of in-plane MEMS arches and show promising results to implement these structures for variety of sensing and actuation applications. © Copyright 2015 by ASME.

  2. Conductivity in transparent oxide semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, P D C; Veal, T D

    2011-08-24

    Despite an extensive research effort for over 60 years, an understanding of the origins of conductivity in wide band gap transparent conducting oxide (TCO) semiconductors remains elusive. While TCOs have already found widespread use in device applications requiring a transparent contact, there are currently enormous efforts to (i) increase the conductivity of existing materials, (ii) identify suitable alternatives, and (iii) attempt to gain semiconductor-engineering levels of control over their carrier density, essential for the incorporation of TCOs into a new generation of multifunctional transparent electronic devices. These efforts, however, are dependent on a microscopic identification of the defects and impurities leading to the high unintentional carrier densities present in these materials. Here, we review recent developments towards such an understanding. While oxygen vacancies are commonly assumed to be the source of the conductivity, there is increasing evidence that this is not a sufficient mechanism to explain the total measured carrier concentrations. In fact, many studies suggest that oxygen vacancies are deep, rather than shallow, donors, and their abundance in as-grown material is also debated. We discuss other potential contributions to the conductivity in TCOs, including other native defects, their complexes, and in particular hydrogen impurities. Convincing theoretical and experimental evidence is presented for the donor nature of hydrogen across a range of TCO materials, and while its stability and the role of interstitial versus substitutional species are still somewhat open questions, it is one of the leading contenders for yielding unintentional conductivity in TCOs. We also review recent work indicating that the surfaces of TCOs can support very high carrier densities, opposite to the case for conventional semiconductors. In thin-film materials/devices and, in particular, nanostructures, the surface can have a large impact on the total

  3. Explicit Modeling of Solid Ocean Floor in Shallow Underwater Explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Walters

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Current practices for modeling the ocean floor in underwater explosion simulations call for application of an inviscid fluid with soil properties. A method for modeling the ocean floor as a Lagrangian solid, vice an Eulerian fluid, was developed in order to determine its effects on underwater explosions in shallow water using the DYSMAS solver. The Lagrangian solid bottom model utilized transmitting boundary segments, exterior nodal forces acting as constraints, and the application of prestress to minimize any distortions into the fluid domain. For simplicity, elastic materials were used in this current effort, though multiple constitutive soil models can be applied to improve the overall accuracy of the model. Even though this method is unable to account for soil cratering effects, it does however provide the distinct advantage of modeling contoured ocean floors such as dredged channels and sloped bottoms absent in Eulerian formulations. The study conducted here showed significant differences among the initial bottom reflections for the different solid bottom contours that were modeled. The most important bottom contour effect was the distortion to the gas bubble and its associated first pulse timing. In addition to its utility in bottom modeling, implementation of the non-reflecting boundary along with realistic material models can be used to drastically reduce the size of current fluid domains.

  4. Universal mesoscopic conductance fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evangelou, S.N.

    1992-01-01

    The theory of conductance fluctuations in disordered metallic systems with size large compared to the mean free path of the electron but small compared to localization length is considered. It is demonstrates that fluctuations have an universal character and are due to repulsion between levels and spectral rigidity. The basic fluctuation measures for the energy spectrum in the mesoscopic regime of disordered systems are consistent with the Gaussian random matrix ensemble predictions. Although our disordered electron random matrix ensemble does not belong to the Gaussian ensemble the two ensembles turn out to be essentially similar. The level repulsion and the spectral rigidity found in nuclear spectra should also be observed in the metallic regime of Anderson localization. 7 refs. (orig.)

  5. Thermal properties variations in unconsolidated material for very shallow geothermal application (ITER project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipio, Eloisa Di; Bertermann, David

    2018-04-01

    In engineering, agricultural and meteorological project design, sediment thermal properties are highly important parameters, and thermal conductivity plays a fundamental role when dimensioning ground heat exchangers, especially in very shallow geothermal systems. Herein, the first 2 m of depth from surface is of critical importance. However, the heat transfer determination in unconsolidated material is difficult to estimate, as it depends on several factors, including particle size, bulk density, water content, mineralogy composition and ground temperature. The performance of a very shallow geothermal system, as a horizontal collector or heat basket, is strongly correlated to the type of sediment at disposal and rapidly decreases in the case of dry-unsaturated conditions. The available experimental data are often scattered, incomplete and do not fully support thermo-active ground structure modeling. The ITER project, funded by the European Union, contributes to a better knowledge of the relationship between thermal conductivity and water content, required for understanding the very shallow geothermal systems behaviour in saturated and unsaturated conditions. So as to enhance the performance of horizontal geothermal heat exchangers, thermally enhanced backfilling material were tested in the laboratory, and an overview of physical-thermal properties variations under several moisture and load conditions for different mixtures of natural material was here presented.

  6. HF Radar Sea-echo from Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh Kohut

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available HF radar systems are widely and routinely used for the measurement of ocean surface currents and waves. Analysis methods presently in use are based on the assumption of infinite water depth, and may therefore be inadequate close to shore where the radar echo is strongest. In this paper, we treat the situation when the radar echo is returned from ocean waves that interact with the ocean floor. Simulations are described which demonstrate the effect of shallow water on radar sea-echo. These are used to investigate limits on the existing theory and to define water depths at which shallow-water effects become significant. The second-order spectral energy increases relative to the first-order as the water depth decreases, resulting in spectral saturation when the waveheight exceeds a limit defined by the radar transmit frequency. This effect is particularly marked for lower radar transmit frequencies. The saturation limit on waveheight is less for shallow water. Shallow water affects second-order spectra (which gives wave information far more than first-order (which gives information on current velocities, the latter being significantly affected only for the lowest radar transmit frequencies for extremely shallow water. We describe analysis of radar echo from shallow water measured by a Rutgers University HF radar system to give ocean wave spectral estimates. Radar-derived wave height, period and direction are compared with simultaneous shallow-water in-situ measurements.

  7. CO2/Brine transport into shallow aquifers along fault zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Elizabeth H; Newell, Dennis L; Viswanathan, Hari; Carey, J W; Zyvoloski, G; Pawar, Rajesh

    2013-01-02

    Unintended release of CO(2) from carbon sequestration reservoirs poses a well-recognized risk to groundwater quality. Research has largely focused on in situ CO(2)-induced pH depression and subsequent trace metal mobilization. In this paper we focus on a second mechanism: upward intrusion of displaced brine or brackish-water into a shallow aquifer as a result of CO(2) injection. Studies of two natural analog sites provide insights into physical and chemical mechanisms controlling both brackish water and CO(2) intrusion into shallow aquifers along fault zones. At the Chimayó, New Mexico site, shallow groundwater near the fault is enriched in CO(2) and, in some places, salinity is significantly elevated. In contrast, at the Springerville, Arizona site CO(2) is leaking upward through brine aquifers but does not appear to be increasing salinity in the shallow aquifer. Using multiphase transport simulations we show conditions under which significant CO(2) can be transported through deep brine aquifers into shallow layers. Only a subset of these conditions favor entrainment of salinity into the shallow aquifer: high aspect-ratio leakage pathways and viscous coupling between the fluid phases. Recognition of the conditions under which salinity is favored to be cotransported with CO(2) into shallow aquifers will be important in environmental risk assessments.

  8. Temporal-spatial variations and influencing factors of nitrogen in the shallow groundwater of the nearshore vegetable field of Erhai Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Anqiang; Lei, Baokun; Hu, Wanli; Wang, Hongyuan; Zhai, Limei; Mao, Yanting; Fu, Bin; Zhang, Dan

    2018-02-01

    Nitrogen export from the nearshore vegetable field of Erhai Lake seriously threatens the water quality of Erhai Lake, which is the second largest highland freshwater lake in Yunnan Province, China. Among the nitrogen flows into Erhai Lake, shallow groundwater migration is a major pathway. The nitrogen variation and influencing factors in the shallow groundwater of the nearshore vegetable field of Erhai Lake are not well documented. A 2-year field experiment was conducted to determine the concentrations of nitrogen species in the shallow groundwater and their influencing factors in the nearshore vegetable field of Erhai Lake. The results showed that concentrations of TN, NO 3 - -N, and NO 2 - -N gradually increased with increasing elevation and distance from Erhai Lake, but the opposite was observed for NH 4 + -N in the shallow groundwater. The concentrations of nitrogen species in the rainy season were greater than those in the dry season. NO 3 - -N accounted for more than 79% of total nitrogen in shallow groundwater. Redundancy analysis showed that more than 70% of the temporal and spatial variations of nitrogen concentrations in the shallow groundwater were explained by shallow groundwater depth, and only approximately 10% of variation was explained by the factors of soil porosity, silt clay content of soil, and NH 4 + -N and NO 3 - -N concentrations of soil (p shallow groundwater depth had more notable effects on nitrogen concentrations in the shallow groundwater than other factors. This result will strongly support the need for further research regarding the management practices for reducing nitrogen concentrations in shallow groundwater.

  9. Contributions to a shallow aquifer study by reprocessed seismic sections from petroleum exploration surveys, eastern Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, D.

    1994-01-01

    The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Drilling Company of Abu Dhabi, is conducting a 4-year study of the fresh and slightly saline groundwater resources of the eastern Abu Dhabi Emirate. Most of this water occurs in a shallow aquifer, generally less than 150 m deep, in the Al Ain area. A critical part of the Al Ain area coincides with a former petroleum concession area where about 2780 km of vibroseis data were collected along 94 seismic lines during 1981-1983. Field methods, acquistion parameters, and section processing were originally designed to enhance reflections expected at depths ranging from 5000 to 6000 m, and subsurface features directly associated with the shallow aquifer system were deleted from the original seismic sections. The original field tapes from the vibroseis survey were reprocessed in an attempt to extract shallow subsurface information (depths less than 550 m) for investigating the shallow aquifer. A unique sequence of reproccessing parameters was established after reviewing the results from many experimental tests. Many enhancements to the resolution of shallow seismic reflections resulted from: (1) application of a 20-Hz, low-cut filter; (2) recomputation of static corrections to a datum nearer the land surface; (3) intensive velocity analyses; and (4) near-trace muting analyses. The number, resolution, and lateral continuity of shallow reflections were greatly enhanced on the reprocessed sections, as was the delineation of shallow, major faults. Reflections on a synthetic seismogram, created from a borehole drilled to a depth of 786 m on seismic line IQS-11, matcheddprecisely with shallow reflections on the reprocessed section. The 33 reprocessed sections were instrumental in preparing a map showing the major structural features that affect the shallow aquifer system. Analysis of the map provides a better understanding of the effect of these shallow features on the regional occurrence, movement, and quality of

  10. Effect and safety of deep needling and shallow needling for functional constipation: a multicenter, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiani; Liu, Baoyan; Li, Ning; Sun, Jianhua; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Liping; Cai, Yuying; Ye, Yongming; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yang; Liu, Zhishun

    2014-12-01

    Aupuncture is widely used for functional constipation. Effect of acupuncture might be related to the depth of needling; however, the evidence is limited. This trial aimed to evaluate the effect and safety of deep needling and shallow needling for functional constipation, and to assess if the deep needling and shallow needling are superior to lactulose. We conducted a prospective, superiority-design, 5-center, 3-arm randomized controlled trial. A total of 475 patients with functional constipation were randomized to the deep needling group (237), shallow needling group (119), and lactulose-controlled group (119) in a ratio of 2:1:1. Sessions lasted 30 minutes each time and took place 5 times a week for 4 weeks in 2 acupuncture groups. Participants in the lactulose group took lactulose orally for 16 continuous weeks. The primary outcome was the change from baseline of mean weekly spontaneous bowel movements (SBMs) during week 1 to 4 (changes from the baselines of the weekly SBMs at week 8 and week 16 in follow-up period were also assessed simultaneously). Secondary outcomes were the weekly SBMs of each assessing week, the mean score change from the baseline of constipation-related symptoms over week 1 to 4, and the time to the first SBM. Emergency drug usage and adverse effects were monitored throughout the study.SBMs and constipation-related symptoms were all improved in the 3 groups compared with baseline at each time frame (Pdeep needling group, 2 (1.75) in the shallow needling group, and 2 (2) in the lactulose group (P>0.05, both compared with the lactulose group). The changes of mean weekly SBMs at week 8 and week 16 in the follow-up period were 2 (2), 2 (2.5) in the deep needling group, 2 (3), 1.5 (2.5) in the shallow needling group, and 1 (2), 1 (2) in the lactulose group (Pdeep or shallow needling group. Deep and shallow needling at Tianshu (ST25) can improve intestinal function remarkably and safely. Therapeutic effects of deep and shallow needling are not

  11. Soil inertia and shallow basement envelope impact on cellar internal temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naima Sakami

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with a three dimensional numerical study of heat transfer by conduction between the soil and the shallow basement in the city of Marrakech (Morocco. The heat transfer equation is solved by the finite difference method using the implicit alternative direction (ADI. The internal temperature of the cellar is computed by using energy balance equation in the cellar. The objective of this work is to evaluate the effects of the nature of the soil, the nature of the walls, the thickness of the walls of the cellar and the distance L far from the cellar on the internal temperature and the heat exchanged between the soil and the shallow basement

  12. The Effect of Rainfall Patterns on the Mechanisms of Shallow Slope Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Suradi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines how rainfall patterns affect the mechanisms of shallow slope failure. Numerical modelling, utilising the commercial software SVFlux and SVSlope, was carried out for a coupled analysis of rainfall-induced slope seepage and instability, with reference to a shallow landslide took place in Jabiru, Northern Territory (NT Australia in 2007. Rainfall events were varied in terms of pattern in this analysis. The results revealed that slopes are sensitive to rainfall pattern when the rainfall intensity has a high degree of fluctuation at around the same value as that of saturated hydraulic conductivity. Average rainfall intensity at the beginning of a rainfall period plays a primary role in determining the rate of decrease in initial factor of safety (Fi towards minimum factor of safety (Fmin. The effect of rainfall events on the slope instability is attributed to the amount of rainwater infiltration into slope associated with rainfall pattern.

  13. Even Shallower Exploration with Airborne Electromagnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auken, E.; Christiansen, A. V.; Kirkegaard, C.; Nyboe, N. S.; Sørensen, K.

    2015-12-01

    Airborne electromagnetics (EM) is in many ways undergoing the same type rapid technological development as seen in the telecommunication industry. These developments are driven by a steadily increasing demand for exploration of minerals, groundwater and geotechnical targets. The latter two areas demand shallow and accurate resolution of the near surface geology in terms of both resistivity and spatial delineation of the sedimentary layers. Airborne EM systems measure the grounds electromagnetic response when subject to either a continuous discrete sinusoidal transmitter signal (frequency domain) or by measuring the decay of currents induced in the ground by rapid transmission of transient pulses (time domain). In the last decade almost all new developments of both instrument hardware and data processing techniques has focused around time domain systems. Here we present a concept for measuring the time domain response even before the transient transmitter current has been turned off. Our approach relies on a combination of new instrument hardware and novel modeling algorithms. The newly developed hardware allows for measuring the instruments complete transfer function which is convolved with the synthetic earth response in the inversion algorithm. The effect is that earth response data measured while the transmitter current is turned off can be included in the inversion, significantly increasing the amount of available information. We demonstrate the technique using both synthetic and field data. The synthetic examples provide insight on the physics during the turn off process and the field examples document the robustness of the method. Geological near surface structures can now be resolved to a degree that is unprecedented to the best of our knowledge, making airborne EM even more attractive and cost-effective for exploration of water and minerals that are crucial for the function of our societies.

  14. Shallow-water loading tides in Japan from superconducting gravimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Hoyer, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    energetic constituents in the tide gauge observations are also seen in the gravity observations due to their loading effects on the deformation of the Earth. Even though the shallow-water tides at the Japanese east coast have an amplitude of only a few millimetres. they are still able to Generate a loading...... signal at gravity sites located several hundred kilometres inland. In particular, the S-3, S-4 and S-5 solar tides occur in both gravity and tide gauge observations. It is indicated that in other shelf regions with large shallow water tides, the shallow water loading signals account for a significant...

  15. Experimental Modeling of Dynamic Shallow Dip-Slip Faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uenishi, K.

    2010-12-01

    In our earlier study (AGU 2005, SSJ 2005, JPGU 2006), using a finite difference technique, we have conducted some numerical simulations related to the source dynamics of shallow dip-slip earthquakes, and suggested the possibility of the existence of corner waves, i.e., shear waves that carry concentrated kinematic energy and generate extremely strong particle motions on the hanging wall of a nonvertical fault. In the numerical models, a dip-slip fault is located in a two-dimensional, monolithic linear elastic half space, and the fault plane dips either vertically or 45 degrees. We have investigated the seismic wave field radiated by crack-like rupture of this straight fault. If the fault rupture, initiated at depth, arrests just below or reaches the free surface, four Rayleigh-type pulses are generated: two propagating along the free surface into the opposite directions to the far field, the other two moving back along the ruptured fault surface (interface) downwards into depth. These downward interface pulses may largely control the stopping phase of the dynamic rupture, and in the case the fault plane is inclined, on the hanging wall the interface pulse and the outward-moving Rayleigh surface pulse interact with each other and the corner wave is induced. On the footwall, the ground motion is dominated simply by the weaker Rayleigh pulse propagating along the free surface because of much smaller interaction between this Rayleigh and the interface pulse. The generation of the downward interface pulses and corner wave may play a crucial role in understanding the effects of the geometrical asymmetry on the strong motion induced by shallow dip-slip faulting, but it has not been well recognized so far, partly because those waves are not expected for a fault that is located and ruptures only at depth. However, the seismological recordings of the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, the 2004 Niigata-ken Chuetsu, Japan, earthquakes as well as a more recent one in Iwate-Miyagi Inland

  16. The geometrical acoustic method for calculating the echo of targets submerged in a shallow water waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yan; TANG Weilin; FAN Wei; FAN Jun

    2012-01-01

    A geometrical acoustic method based on image-source method and physicM acoustic method was developed to calculate the echo of targets submerged in the shallow water waveguide. The incident rays and the scattering rays are reflected by two boundaries for many times, and then the back rays become countless. The total backscattering field is obtained through summing up the scattering field produced by each combination of incident rays and back rays. The echo of the 10m-radius pressure release sphere in Pekeris waveguide with the range is calculated by the geometrical acoustic method. Compared with the results calculated by the wave acoustic method in the available literature, it shows that both are in accordance on average value and descend trend. The following results indicate that the difference between Effective Target Strength (ETS) in shallow water and the Target Strength (TS) in free space for spheres and certain other rounded objects is small. However, the ETS of some targets such as cone-shaped is quite different from TS in free space, which can lead to large errors in estimating a target's scattering property using traditional sonar equation. Compared with the method of wave acoustics, the geometrical acoustic method not only has the definite physical meaning but also can calculate the echo of complex objects in shallow water waveguide.

  17. Upper Silurian reef mounds on a shallowing carbonate ramp, Devon Island, Arctic Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, O A [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada); Graf, G C [Chevron Canada Resources, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1992-03-01

    Near Gascoyne Inlet, the topmost Douro and lowermost Barlow Inlet formations record overall upward shallowing from ramp to shallow shelf conditions. This transitional sequence contains bioherms of various sizes, from small isolated reef mounds 1-2 m across to larger, compound reef mounds over 50 m thick and 60 m across, as well as distictive inter- and pre-reef mound facies. The larger reef mounds show stages intermediate in character between those in sponge-dominated reef mounds of the Douro Formation and in larger stromatoporoid-crinoid dominated reefs in the Barlow Inlet Formation. Three principal reef mounds developed in turn. An initial partly lithified lime mudstone, containing scattered corals and apparently relict sponge-cryptomicrobial fabrics, developed on sheets of oncolitic storm debris in mainly low energy conditions between storm and fairweather wave bases. With gradual shallowing and progressively higher energy conditions above fairweather wave base, a middle facies of coral- and crinoid-rich mudstone developed. An abrupt deepening restored conditions of low energy, and the ensuing upper facies of the reef mounds is more varied, comprising sparsely fossiliferous and locally fenestral lime mudstones, patchy coral bafflestone and bindstone, coarse encrinites and substantially culminating stromatoporoid bindstone. 36 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Extreme diel dissolved oxygen and carbon cycles in shallow vegetated lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Mikkel R; Kragh, Theis; Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    2017-09-13

    A common perception in limnology is that shallow lakes are homogeneously mixed owing to their small water volume. However, this perception is largely gained by downscaling knowledge from large lakes to their smaller counterparts. Here we show that shallow vegetated lakes (less than 0.6 m), in fact, undergo recurring daytime stratification and nocturnal mixing accompanied by extreme chemical variations during summer. Dense submerged vegetation effectively attenuates light and turbulence generating separation between warm surface waters and much colder bottom waters. Photosynthesis in surface waters produces oxygen accumulation and CO 2 depletion, whereas respiration in dark bottom waters causes anoxia and CO 2 accumulation. High daytime pH in surface waters promotes precipitation of CaCO 3 which is re-dissolved in bottom waters. Nocturnal convective mixing re-introduces oxygen into bottom waters for aerobic respiration and regenerated inorganic carbon into surface waters, which supports intense photosynthesis. Our results reconfigure the basic understanding of local environmental gradients in shallow lakes, one of the most abundant freshwater habitats globally. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. Evaluation of constraint methodologies applied to a shallow-flaw cruciform bend specimen tested under biaxial loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Williams, P.T.; Pennell, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    A technology to determine shallow-flaw fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is being developed for application to the safety assessment of RPVs containing postulated shallow surface flaws. Matrices of cruciform beam tests were developed to investigate and quantify the effects of temperature, biaxial loading, and specimen size on fracture initiation toughness of two-dimensional (constant depth), shallow surface flaws. The cruciform beam specimens were developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to introduce a prototypic, far-field. out-of-plane biaxial stress component in the test section that approximates the nonlinear stresses resulting from pressurized-thermal-shock or pressure-temperature loading of an RPV. Tests were conducted under biaxial load ratios ranging from uniaxial to equibiaxial. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for RPV materials. The cruciform fracture toughness data were used to evaluate fracture methodologies for predicting the observed effects of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Initial emphasis was placed on assessment of stress-based methodologies. namely, the J-Q formulation, the Dodds-Anderson toughness scaling model, and the Weibull approach. Applications of these methodologies based on the hydrostatic stress fracture criterion indicated an effect of loading-biaxiality on fracture toughness, the conventional maximum principal stress criterion indicated no effect

  20. Uncertainty on shallow landslide hazard assessment: from field data to hazard mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefolini, Emanuele; Tolo, Silvia; Patelli, Eduardo; Broggi, Matteo; Disperati, Leonardo; Le Tuan, Hai

    2015-04-01

    Shallow landsliding that involve Hillslope Deposits (HD), the surficial soil that cover the bedrock, is an important process of erosion, transport and deposition of sediment along hillslopes. Despite Shallow landslides generally mobilize relatively small volume of material, they represent the most hazardous factor in mountain regions due to their high velocity and the common absence of warning signs. Moreover, increasing urbanization and likely climate change make shallow landslides a source of widespread risk, therefore the interest of scientific community about this process grown in the last three decades. One of the main aims of research projects involved on this topic, is to perform robust shallow landslides hazard assessment for wide areas (regional assessment), in order to support sustainable spatial planning. Currently, three main methodologies may be implemented to assess regional shallow landslides hazard: expert evaluation, probabilistic (or data mining) methods and physical models based methods. The aim of this work is evaluate the uncertainty of shallow landslides hazard assessment based on physical models taking into account spatial variables such as: geotechnical and hydrogeologic parameters as well as hillslope morphometry. To achieve this goal a wide dataset of geotechnical properties (shear strength, permeability, depth and unit weight) of HD was gathered by integrating field survey, in situ and laboratory tests. This spatial database was collected from a study area of about 350 km2 including different bedrock lithotypes and geomorphological features. The uncertainty associated to each step of the hazard assessment process (e.g. field data collection, regionalization of site specific information and numerical modelling of hillslope stability) was carefully characterized. The most appropriate probability density function (PDF) was chosen for each numerical variable and we assessed the uncertainty propagation on HD strength parameters obtained by

  1. Proceedings. NETEC workshop on shallow land disposal technology, 1997. 10. 20 - 10. 21, Taejon, Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This proceedings cover the design and operational experience of shallow land disposal facility, and safety assessment and licensing issues of shallow land disposal facility. Ten articles are submitted

  2. Proceedings. NETEC workshop on shallow land disposal technology, 1997. 10. 20 - 10. 21, Taejon, Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This proceedings cover the design and operational experience of shallow land disposal facility, and safety assessment and licensing issues of shallow land disposal facility. Ten articles are submitted.

  3. An exactly soluble model of a shallow double well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz-Vega, R., E-mail: rodrigo.munoz@uacm.edu.mx [Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México, Centro Histórico, Fray Servando Teresa de Mier 92, Col. Centro, Del. Cuauhtémoc, México DF, CP 06080 (Mexico); López-Chávez, E., E-mail: elopezc@hotmail.com [Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México, Centro Histórico, Fray Servando Teresa de Mier 92, Col. Centro, Del. Cuauhtémoc, México DF, CP 06080 (Mexico); Salinas-Hernández, E., E-mail: esalinas@ipn.mx [ESCOM-IPN, Av Juan de Dios Bátiz s/n, Unidad Profesional Adolfo López Mateos, Col Lindavista, Del G A Madero, México DF, CP 07738 (Mexico); Flores-Godoy, J.-J., E-mail: job.flores@ibero.mx [Departamento de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Iberoamericana, Prol. Paseo de la Reforma 880, Col Lomas de Santa Fe, Del A Obregón, México DF, CP 01219 (Mexico); Fernández-Anaya, G., E-mail: guillermo.fernandez@ibero.com [Departamento de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Iberoamericana, Prol. Paseo de la Reforma 880, Col Lomas de Santa Fe, Del A Obregón, México DF, CP 01219 (Mexico)

    2014-06-13

    Shallow one-dimensional double-well potentials appear in atomic and molecular physics and other fields. Unlike the “deep” wells of macroscopic quantum coherent systems, shallow double wells need not present low-lying two-level systems. We argue that this feature, the absence of a low-lying two-level system in certain shallow double wells, may allow the finding of new test grounds for quantum mechanics in mesoscopic systems. We illustrate the above ideas with a family of shallow double wells obtained from reflectionless potentials through the Darboux–Bäcklund transform. - Highlights: • We present double wells not conforming to the low-lying two-state system model. • Models similar to ours appear in atomic and molecular physics. • Here there is no classically prohibited region between wells. • The ground probability is peaked at the position of classical unstable equilibrium in this models.

  4. Shallow-water Benthic Habitats in Jobos Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shallow-water (<30m) benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico were mapped and characterized using visual interpretation...

  5. Modeling shallow water flows using the discontinuous Galerkin method

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Abdul A

    2014-01-01

    Replacing the Traditional Physical Model Approach Computational models offer promise in improving the modeling of shallow water flows. As new techniques are considered, the process continues to change and evolve. Modeling Shallow Water Flows Using the Discontinuous Galerkin Method examines a technique that focuses on hyperbolic conservation laws and includes one-dimensional and two-dimensional shallow water flows and pollutant transports. Combines the Advantages of Finite Volume and Finite Element Methods This book explores the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method, also known as the discontinuous finite element method, in depth. It introduces the DG method and its application to shallow water flows, as well as background information for implementing and applying this method for natural rivers. It considers dam-break problems, shock wave problems, and flows in different regimes (subcritical, supercritical, and transcritical). Readily Adaptable to the Real World While the DG method has been widely used in the fie...

  6. The impacts of groundwater heat pumps on urban shallow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR TONUKARI NYEROVWO

    2011-07-25

    Jul 25, 2011 ... In order to assess the impacts of groundwater heat pumps on urban shallow groundwater ... thermal transfer systems that use the ground water as a ... Abbreviations: GWHPs, Groundwater heat pumps; GHGs, ... Areas (Mm2).

  7. Early arrival waveform inversion of shallow seismic land data

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.; Yu, Han

    2013-01-01

    , compared to traveltime tomography, EWI can generate a highly resolved velocity tomogram from shallow seismic data. The more accurate EWI tomogram can make an economically important difference in assessing the storage potential of this wadi; in this case we

  8. Shallow waters: social science research in South Africa's marine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shallow waters: social science research in South Africa's marine ... certain issues and social interactions in the marine environment but this work is limited ... Keywords: coastal development, economics, governance, human dimensions, society

  9. Shallow Melt Apparatus for Semicontinuous Czochralski Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Ciszek, T. F.

    2006-01-10

    In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt crucible (20) to eliminate the necessity supplying a large quantity of feed stock materials that had to be preloaded in a deep crucible to grow a large ingot, comprising a gas tight container a crucible with a deepened periphery (25) to prevent snapping of a shallow melt and reduce turbulent melt convection; source supply means for adding source material to the semiconductor melt; a double barrier (23) to minimize heat transfer between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow melt in the growth compartment; offset holes (24) in the double barrier (23) to increase melt travel length between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow growth compartment; and the interface heater/heat sink (22) to control the interface shape and crystal growth rate.

  10. Characterizing Groundwater Level and Flow Pattern in a Shallow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    This study characterize groundwater yield and flow pattern on a shallow ... simple process of weathering, fractured fissure systems, networks of joints and ..... lowest yield in wells that are deeper than the mean well depth in the study area.

  11. Shallow-Water Benthic Habitats of Southwest Puerto Rico

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shallow-water (<30m) benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of two areas in Southwest Puerto Rico (PR), including the Guanica Bay/La Parguera...

  12. Ecological status of species on grazing gradients on the shallow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ecological status of species on grazing gradients on the shallow soils of the western ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... Vegetation data were gathered in such a way that those of different successional stages could be identified.

  13. Use of reinforced soil foundation (RSF) to support shallow foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    The main objective of this research study is to investigate potential benefits of using the reinforced soil foundations to improve the bearing capacity and to reduce the settlement of shallow foundations on soils. This includes examining influences o...

  14. Diffusive Wave Approximation to the Shallow Water Equations: Computational Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Collier, Nathan; Radwan, Hany; Dalcin, Lisandro; Calo, Victor M.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the use of time adaptivity applied to the one dimensional diffusive wave approximation to the shallow water equations. A simple and computationally economical error estimator is discussed which enables time-step size adaptivity

  15. Design and construction of a resistivity meter for shallow investigation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design and construction of a resistivity meter for shallow investigation. ... Nigerian Journal of Physics. Journal Home ... Consequently many institutions that need this equipment for teaching and research purposes cannot afford the price.

  16. Challenges in hardening technologies using shallow-trench isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Dodd, P.E.; Draper, B.L.; Flores, R.S.

    1998-02-01

    Challenges related to radiation hardening CMOS technologies with shallow-trench isolation are explored. Results show that trench hardening can be more difficult than simply replacing the trench isolation oxide with a hardened field oxide

  17. Small-Engine Research Laboratory (SERL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Small-Engine Research Laboratory (SERL) is a facility designed to conduct experimental small-scale propulsion and power generation systems research....

  18. Ionic conductivity in irradiated KCL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignolo Rubio, J.

    1979-01-01

    The ionic conductivity of X and gamma irradiated KCl single crystals has been studied between room temperature and 600 deg C. The radiation induced damage resulting in a decrease of the conductivity heals by thermal annealing in two steps which are at about 350 and 550 deg C respectively. It has been found that the radiation induced colour centres are not involved in the observed decrease of the ionic conductivity. Howewer, it has been observed that the effects of quenching and plastic deformation on the conductivity of the samples are very similar to the effect induced by irradiation. It is suggested that small radiation induced dislocation loops might cause the ionic conductivity decrease observed in irradiated samples. (auth)

  19. A copper-relates shallow acceptor in quenched germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiura, Yoichi; Hashimoto, Fumio; Sugiyama, Hazime; Yoneyama, Shin-ichiro

    1982-01-01

    The temperature variation of hole density was measured in the range 5-200 K after successive annealings at 320sup(o)C. It was found that a shallow acceptor at Esub(v) + 9 meV disappears on annealing, being replaced by a just equal additional density of substitutional copper. This provides experimental proof that the shallow acceptor is a defect complex containing at least one copper atom. (author)

  20. Simulating deep convection with a shallow convection scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hohenegger

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Convective processes profoundly affect the global water and energy balance of our planet but remain a challenge for global climate modeling. Here we develop and investigate the suitability of a unified convection scheme, capable of handling both shallow and deep convection, to simulate cases of tropical oceanic convection, mid-latitude continental convection, and maritime shallow convection. To that aim, we employ large-eddy simulations (LES as a benchmark to test and refine a unified convection scheme implemented in the Single-column Community Atmosphere Model (SCAM. Our approach is motivated by previous cloud-resolving modeling studies, which have documented the gradual transition between shallow and deep convection and its possible importance for the simulated precipitation diurnal cycle.

    Analysis of the LES reveals that differences between shallow and deep convection, regarding cloud-base properties as well as entrainment/detrainment rates, can be related to the evaporation of precipitation. Parameterizing such effects and accordingly modifying the University of Washington shallow convection scheme, it is found that the new unified scheme can represent both shallow and deep convection as well as tropical and mid-latitude continental convection. Compared to the default SCAM version, the new scheme especially improves relative humidity, cloud cover and mass flux profiles. The new unified scheme also removes the well-known too early onset and peak of convective precipitation over mid-latitude continental areas.