WorldWideScience

Sample records for small reactor power

  1. Small and medium power reactors 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    This TECDOC follows the publication of TECDOC-347 Small and Medium Power Reactors Project Initiation Study - Phase I published in 1985 and TECDOC-376 Small and Medium Power Reactors 1985 published in 1986. It is mainly intended for decision makers in Developing Member States interested in embarking on a nuclear power programme. It consists of two parts: 1) Guidelines for the Introduction of Small and Medium Power Reactors in Developing Countries. These Guidelines were established during the Advisory Group Meeting held in Vienna from 11 to 15 May 1987. Their purpose is to review key aspects relating to the introduction of Small and Medium Power Reactors in developing countries; 2) Up-dated Information on SMPR Concepts Contributed by Supplier Industries. According to the recommendations of the Second Technical Committee Meeting on SMPRs held in Vienna in March 1985, this part contains the up-dated information formerly published in Annex I of the above mentioned TECDOC-347. Figs

  2. Small and medium power reactors 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    This TECDOC follows the publication of TECDOC-347: Small and Medium Power Reactors (SMPR) Project Initiation Study, Phase 1, published in 1985 and TECDOC-376: Small and Medium Power Reactors 1985 published in 1986. It is mainly intended for decision makers in Developing Member States interested in embarking on a nuclear power program. It consists of two parts: (1) guidelines for the introduction of small and medium power reactors in developing countries. These Guidelines were established during the Advisory Group Meeting held in Vienna from 11 to 15 May 1987. Their purpose is to review key aspects relating to the introduction of small and medium power reactors in developing countries; (2) up-dated information on SMPR Concepts Contributed by Supplier Industries. According to the recommendations of the Second Technical Committee Meeting on SMPRs held in Vienna in March 1985, this part contains the up-dated information formerly published in Annex 1 of the above mentioned TECDOC-347.

  3. Small and medium power reactors 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    This report is intended for designers and planners concerned with Small and Medium Power Reactors. It provides a record of the presentations during the meetings held on this subject at the Agency's General Conference in September 1985. This information should be useful as it indicates the principal findings and main conclusions and recommendations resulting from these meetings. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 10 presentations in this report

  4. Design and construction of small power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachi, Yasuo

    1992-01-01

    Small size reactors are considered to have many advantages over large-sized reactors. But at the same time, small size reactors show eventual disadvantages in economy. In this paper one of the possibilities to improve its basic disadvantage will be discussed from a manufacturer's point of view. The stress will be placed on the possibility and possible effects of adoption of Computer Aided Engineering. (author). 2 figs

  5. Low power modular power generating reactors or Small Modular Reactors (SMR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenais, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Electronuclear reactors were small reactors at the beginning, and then tend to be always bigger and more powerful, but since some recent times, several countries specialized in reactor design and fabrication (USA, Russia, China, and South Korea) have been developing Small Modular Reactors (SMR) of less than 300 MW. As France has already produced feasibility studies and is about to launch a SMR development programme, the author comments some specific aspects of this new architecture of reactors, characterises the targeted markets, gives an overview of the various more or less advanced existing concepts: a floating barge in Russia, the SMART 100 MW project in South Korea, several concepts in the USA (the mPower 125 MW, the NuScale 45 MW, the Westinghouse 225 MW, and the HI-SMUR 160 MW projects), the ACP 100 MW in China, the CAREM 27 MW in Argentina. French projects developed by the CEA, EDF, Areva and DCNS are then presented

  6. Safety and licensing for small and medium power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauger, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed new concepts for small and medium power reactors differ substantially from traditional Light Water Reactors (LWRs). Although designers have a large base of experience in safety and licensing, much of it is not relevant to new concepts. It can be a disadvantage if regulators apply LWR rules directly. A fresh start is appropriate. The extensive interactions between industry, regulators, and the public complicates but may enhance safety. It is basic to recognize the features that distinguish nuclear energy safety from that for other industries. These features include: nuclear reactivity, fission product radiation, and radioactive decay heat. Small and medium power reactors offer potential advantages over LWRs, particularly for reactivity and decay heat

  7. Small size modular fast reactors in large scale nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zrodnikov, A.V.; Toshinsky, G.I.; Komlev, O.G.; Dragunov, U.G.; Stepanov, V.S.; Klimov, N.N.; Kopytov, I.I.; Krushelnitsky, V.N.

    2005-01-01

    The report presents an innovative nuclear power technology (NPT) based on usage of modular type fast reactors (FR) (SVBR-75/100) with heavy liquid metal coolant (HLMC) i. e. eutectic lead-bismuth alloy mastered for Russian nuclear submarines' (NS) reactors. Use of this NPT makes it possible to eliminate a conflict between safety and economic requirements peculiar to the traditional reactors. Physical features of FRs, an integral design of the reactor and its small power (100 MWe), as well as natural properties of lead-bismuth coolant assured realization of the inherent safety properties. This made it possible to eliminate a lot of safety systems necessary for the reactor installations (RI) of operating NPPs and to design the modular NPP which technical and economical parameters are competitive not only with those of the NPP based on light water reactors (LWR) but with those of the steam-gas electric power plant. Multipurpose usage of transportable reactor modules SVBR-75/100 of entirely factory manufacture assures their production in large quantities that reduces their fabrication costs. The proposed NPT provides economically expedient change over to the closed nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). When the uranium-plutonium fuel is used, the breeding ratio is over one. Use of proposed NPT makes it possible to considerably increase the investment attractiveness of nuclear power (NP) with fast neutron reactors even today at low costs of natural uranium. (authors)

  8. Small reactor power systems for manned planetary surface bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1987-12-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the potential application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to manned planetary surface base missions was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology, performance, and safety issues associated with integration of reactor power systems with an evolutionary manned planetary surface exploration scenario. The requirements and characteristics of a variety of human-rated modular reactor power system configurations selected for a range of power levels from 25 kWe to hundreds of kilowatts is described. Trade-off analyses for reactor power systems utilizing both man-made and indigenous shielding materials are provided to examine performance, installation and operational safety feasibility issues. The results of this study have confirmed the preliminary feasibility of a wide variety of small reactor power plant configurations for growth oriented manned planetary surface exploration missions. The capability for power level growth with increasing manned presence, while maintaining safe radiation levels, was favorably assessed for nominal 25 to 100 kWe modular configurations. No feasibility limitations or technical barriers were identified and the use of both distance and indigenous planetary soil material for human rated radiation shielding were shown to be viable and attractive options.

  9. Small reactor power systems for manned planetary surface bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1987-12-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the potential application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to manned planetary surface base missions was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology, performance, and safety issues associated with integration of reactor power systems with an evolutionary manned planetary surface exploration scenario. The requirements and characteristics of a variety of human-rated modular reactor power system configurations selected for a range of power levels from 25 kWe to hundreds of kilowatts is described. Trade-off analyses for reactor power systems utilizing both man-made and indigenous shielding materials are provided to examine performance, installation and operational safety feasibility issues. The results of this study have confirmed the preliminary feasibility of a wide variety of small reactor power plant configurations for growth oriented manned planetary surface exploration missions. The capability for power level growth with increasing manned presence, while maintaining safe radiation levels, was favorably assessed for nominal 25 to 100 kWe modular configurations. No feasibility limitations or technical barriers were identified and the use of both distance and indigenous planetary soil material for human rated radiation shielding were shown to be viable and attractive options

  10. Problems and prospects of small and medium power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matin, A.

    1977-01-01

    Prior to 1973 it was generally believed that small and medium power reactors (SMPRs) had a potentially large market and only their high capital costs prevented their large scale commercial application. In December, 1973, crude oil price rose from US $2.50 per barrel to more than US $11 per barrel. This changed the economic position of SMPRs so much so that even 100-200 MWe nuclear reactors were considered economic compared to oil-fired plants. A Market Survey by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 1974 showed that the potential market for reactors ranging from 150 to 400 MWe during 1980-1990 amounted to 140 units with a total installed capacity of 38,000 MWe. This potential market did not, however, generate the desired interest among the reactor manufacturers. So far only three manufacturers based in Europe have shown interest in SMPRs and at present small reactors are being built commercially only in India. Among developing countries, Bangladesh, Jamaica and Kuwait are seriously looking for reactors in sizes of 100-200 MWe. The paper analyses the historic background of SMPRs and problems related to their commercial application and suggests the following actions: i) The British 100 MWe SGHWR is considered proven and suitable for small grids and hence deserves financial support by British/International Financing Agencies. ii) Any re-engineered or slightly re-designed version of operating small light water reactors will find wider acceptability than available new adaptions of marine reactors. Manufacturers of operating small LWRs may be encouraged through international financial assistance to make such designs commercially available. iii) Small CANDU reactors may be suitable for most developing countries and need technical and economic support from Canada for their export. iv) The Agency must continue their effort more vigorously for making SMPRs commercially available to small developing countries

  11. Safety and licensing for small and medium power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauger, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed new concepts for small and medium power reactors differ substantially from traditional Light Water Reactors (LWRs). Although designers have a large base of experience in safety and licensing, much of it is not relevant to new concepts. It can be a disadvantage if regulators apply LWR rules directly. A fresh start is appropriate. The extensive interactions between industry, regulators, and the public complicate but may enhance safety. It is basic to recognize the features that distinguish nuclear energy safety from that for other industries. These features include: Nuclear reactivity, fission product radiation, and radioactive decay heat. Small and medium power reactors offer potential advantages over LWRs, particularly for reactivity and decay heat. (orig.)

  12. Evaluation of plate type fuel options for small power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrzejewski, Claudio de Sa

    2005-01-01

    Plate type fuels are generally used in research reactor. The utilization of this kind of configuration improves significantly the overall performance fuel. The conception of new fuels for small power reactors based in plate-type configuration needs a complete review of the safety criteria originally used to conduce power and research reactor projects. In this work, a group of safety criteria is established for the utilization of plate-type fuels in small power reactors taking into consideration the characteristics of power and research reactors. The performance characteristics of fuel elements are strongly supported by its materials properties and the adopted configuration for its fissile particles. The present work makes an orientated bibliographic investigation searching the best material properties (structural materials and fuel compounds) related to the performance fuel. Looking for good parafermionic characteristics and manufacturing exequibility associated to existing facilities in national research centres, this work proposes several alternatives of plate type fuels, considering its utilization in small power reactors: dispersions of UO 2 in stainless steel, of UO 2 in zircaloy, and of U-Mo alloy in zircaloy, and monolithic plates of U-Mo cladded with zircaloy. Given the strong dependency of radiation damage with temperature increase, the safety criteria related to heat transfer were verified for all the alternatives, namely the DNBR; coolant temperature lower than saturation temperature; peak meat temperature to avoid swelling; peak fuel temperature to avoid meat-matrix reaction. It was found that all alternatives meet the safety criteria including the 0.5 mm monolithic U-Mo plate cladded with zircaloy. (author)

  13. Problems and prospects of small and medium power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matin, A.

    1977-01-01

    Prior to 1973 it was generally believed that small and medium power reactors (SMPRs) had a potentially large market and only their high capital costs prevented their large-scale commercial application. The increase in the price of crude oil in December 1973 changed the economic position of SMPRs so much that even 100-200MW(e) nuclear reactors were considered economic compared with oil-fired plants. The IAEA 1974 market survey showed a potential for 154 units from 150-500MW(e) during 1980-1989 with a total installed capacity of 45000MW(e). This did not generate the desired interest among reactor manufacturers. So far only three European-based manufacturers have shown interest in SMPRs and at present small reactors are being built commercially mostly in India. The reported capital costs of a 215MW(e) Indian CANDU reactor compare favourably with those for European-built reactors. Bangladesh, Jamaica and Kuwait are seriously looking for reactors of 50-150MW(e). The paper analyses the historical background of SMPRs and their commercial application and suggests the following action: (1) A realistic reappraisal of the changed market potential for SMPRs and a critical analysis of the Indian and European figures, possibly carried out by the IAEA; (2) a Special Nuclear Fund be created by contributions from Member States to provide financial support to selected reactor manufacturers willing to make SMPRs commercially available; (3) the proposed Special Nuclear Fund may also provide credit on soft terms to developing countries interested in building SMPRs; (4) the IAEA should expand the scope of its activities and take up the responsibility of collecting and administering such a Special Nuclear Fund. (author)

  14. Small and medium power reactors: the past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.G.G.

    1987-01-01

    The history of small and medium power reactors (SMPRs) is reviewed. Although the power range goes up to plants with an electricity output of 600MWe, the focus is on plants of 250-300 MWe. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in promoting their use for electrical energy production for developing countries is examined. It can be shown that there is a considerable potential market for SMPRs which will increase later this century and into the next. There are, however, a number of problems to be overcome. These are not in the technical aspects but problems of costs and financing. Thus efforts should be made to reduce capital costs, shorten construction time and find potential customers who are acceptable borrowers to the international banking world. Various types of reactor are examined. (U.K.)

  15. New advanced small and medium nuclear power reactors: possible nuclear power plants for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dussol, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years interest has increased in small and medium sized nuclear power reactors for generating electricity and process heat. This interest has been driven by a desire to reduce capital costs, construction times and interest during construction, service remote sites and ease integration into small grids. The IAEA has recommended that the term 'small' be applied to reactors with a net electrical output less than 300 MWe and the term 'medium' to 300-700 MWe. A large amount of experience has been gained over 50 years in the design, construction and operation of small and medium nuclear power reactors. Historically, 100% of commercial reactors were in these categories in 1951-1960, reducing to 21% in 1991-2000. The technologies involved include pressurised water reactors, boiling water reactors, high temperature gas-cooled reactors, liquid metal reactors and molten salt reactors. Details will be provided of two of the most promising new designs, the South African Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) of about 110 MWe, and the IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) reactor of about 335 MWe. Their construction costs are estimated to be about US$l,000/kWe with a generating cost for the PBMR of about US1.6c/kWh. These costs are lower than estimated for the latest designs of large reactors such as the European Pressurised Reactor (EPR) designed for 1,600 MWe for use in Europe in the next decade. It is concluded that a small or medium nuclear power reactor system built in modules to follow an increasing demand could be attractive for generating low cost electricity in many Australian states and reduce problems arising from air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from burning fossil fuels

  16. Safety aspect of long-life small safe power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaki, S.; Sekimoto, H.

    1995-01-01

    Safety aspects of several design options of long-life small safe fast power reactors using nitride fuel and lead-bismuth as coolant are discussed. In the present study hypothetical accidents are simulated for these reactors, i.e., unprotected simultaneous ULOF (total loss of primary pumping system) and UTOP (rod run out transient over power) accidents, caused by the simultaneous withdrawal of all control rods. The proposed designs have some important safety characteristics as low reactivity swing (only 0.2-0.25$), and negative coolant void coefficient over whole burnup period. Effectively negative value of all components of reactivity during an accident is observed. The safety performances of the balance, pancake, and tall slender type of core, each of them satisfy reactivity and negative coolant void coefficient constraint, against the above accident are compared. The simulation results show that all of the design options can survive the above accidents without the help of reactor scram and without the need of operator actions. (author)

  17. Activities in the field of small nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranaev, Yu.D.; Dolgov, V.V.; Sergeev, Yu.A. [Physics and Power Eng. Inst., Obninsk (Russian Federation). State Res. Centre

    1997-10-01

    Considerable efforts have been undertaken for development, design, construction and operation of small nuclear power plants (SNPP) in Russia. Systematic work in this area was started in the mid-1950s. The driving force for this activity was the awareness that the use of nuclear fuel would practically solve the problem of fuel transportation. As far as the remote northern regions are concerned, this provides the key advantage of nuclear over conventional energy sources. The activity in the field of SNPP has included pre-design analytical feasibility studies and experimental research including large-scale experiments on critical assemblies, thermal and hydraulic test facilities, research and development work, construction and operation of pilot and demonstration SNPPs, and finally, construction and more than 20 years of operation of the commercial SNPP, namely Bilibino nuclear co-generation plant (NCGP) located in Chukotka autonomous district, which is one of the most remote regions in the far north-east of Russia. In recent years, studies have been carried out on the development of several new SNPP designs using advanced reactors of the new generation. Among these are the second stage of Bilibino NCGP, floating NCGP VOLNOLOM-3, designated for siting in the Arctic sea coast area, and a nuclear district heating plant for the town of Apatity, in the Murmansk region. In this paper, the background and current status of the SNPPs are given, and the problems as well as prospects of small nuclear reactors development and implementation are considered. (orig.) 20 refs.

  18. Preapplication safety evaluation report for the Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donoghue, J.E.; Donohew, J.N.; Golub, G.R.; Kenneally, R.M.; Moore, P.B.; Sands, S.P.; Throm, E.D.; Wetzel, B.A.

    1994-02-01

    This preapplication safety evaluation report (PSER) presents the results of the preapplication desip review for die Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Project No. 674. The PRISM conceptual desip was submitted by the US Department of Energy in accordance with the NRC's ''Statement of Policy for the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants'' (51 Federal Register 24643). This policy provides for the early Commission review and interaction with designers and licensees. The PRISM reactor desip is a small, modular, pool-type, liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor. The standard plant design consists of dim identical power blocks with a total electrical output rating of 1395 MWe- Each power block comprises three reactor modules, each with a thermal rating of 471 MWt. Each module is located in its own below-grade silo and is co to its own intermediate heat transport system and steam generator system. The reactors utilize a metallic-type fuel, a ternary alloy of U-Pu-Zr. The design includes passive reactor shutdown and passive decay heat removal features. The PSER is the NRC's preliminary evaluation of the safety features in the PRISM design, including the projected research and development programs required to support the design and the proposed testing needs. Because the NRC review was based on a conceptual design, the PSER did not result in an approval of the design. Instead it identified certain key safety issues, provided some guidance on applicable licensing criteria, assessed the adequacy of the preapplicant's research and development programs, and concluded that no obvious impediments to licensing the PRISM design had been identified

  19. Conference SFEN about small and medium power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giger, F.

    2001-01-01

    The main assets of low and medium power reactors (RPMP) are: a better implement in the existing power production network, less impact to the environment, a better profitability of the capital invested because of a shorter building time and a financing easier to find because less investment is required. Shorter building time and a lower power increment than that of a classical nuclear power plant reduce the risk of anticipation and the duration of possible over-equipment. (A.C.)

  20. Small and medium power reactors: project initiation study, Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    In conformity with the Agency's promotional role in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, IAEA has provided, over the past 20 years, assistance to Member States, particularly developing countries, in planning for the introduction of nuclear power plants in the Small and Medium range (SMPR). However these efforts did not produce any significant results in the market introduction of these reactors, due to various factors. In 1983 the Agency launched a new SMPR Project Initiation Study with the objective of surveying the available designs, examining the major factors influencing the decision-making processes in Developing Countries and thereby arriving at an estimate of the potential market. Two questionnaires were used to obtain information from possible suppliers and prospective buyers. The Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD assisted in making a study of the potential market in industrialized countries. The information gained during the study and discussed during a Technical Committee Meeting on SMPRs held in Vienna in March 1985, along with the contribution by OECD-NEA is embodied in the present report

  1. Small space reactor power systems for unmanned solar system exploration missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1987-12-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to the Mariner Mark II Cassini spacecraft/mission was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology and performance issues associated with the reactor power system/spacecraft/mission integration. The Cassini mission was selected because study of the Saturn system was identified as a high priority outer planet exploration objective. Reactor power systems applied to this mission were evaluated for two different uses. First, a very small 1 kWe reactor power system was used as an RTG replacement for the nominal spacecraft mission science payload power requirements while still retaining the spacecraft's usual bipropellant chemical propulsion system. The second use of reactor power involved the additional replacement of the chemical propulsion system with a small reactor power system and an electric propulsion system. The study also provides an examination of potential applications for the additional power available for scientific data collection. The reactor power system characteristics utilized in the study were based on a parametric mass model that was developed specifically for these low power applications. The model was generated following a neutronic safety and operational feasibility assessment of six small reactor concepts solicited from U.S. industry. This assessment provided the validation of reactor safety for all mission phases and generatad the reactor mass and dimensional data needed for the system mass model

  2. Small nuclear power reactor emergency electric power supply system reliability comparative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonfietti, Gerson

    2003-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of the reliability of the emergency power supply system, of a small size nuclear power reactor. Three different configurations are investigated and their reliability analyzed. The fault tree method is used as the main tool of analysis. The work includes a bibliographic review of emergency diesel generator reliability and a discussion of the design requirements applicable to emergency electrical systems. The influence of common cause failure influences is considered using the beta factor model. The operator action is considered using human failure probabilities. A parametric analysis shows the strong dependence between the reactor safety and the loss of offsite electric power supply. It is also shown that common cause failures can be a major contributor to the system reliability. (author)

  3. Development of small and medium reactors for power and heat production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becka, J.

    1978-01-01

    Data are given on the current state of development of small and medium-power reactors designed mainly for electric power production in small power grids, for heat production for small- and medium-power desalination plants with possible electric power generation, for process steam production and heat development for district heating systems, again combined with electric power generation, and for propelling big and fast passenger ships. A diagram is shown of the primary system of an integrated PWR derived from the Otto Hahn reactor. The family is listed of the standard sizes of the integral INTERATOM company pressurized water reactors. Also listed are the specifications and design of CAS 2CG and AS 3G type reactors used mainly for long-distance heating systems. (J.B.)

  4. Wishful thinking and real problems: Small modular reactors, planning constraints, and nuclear power in Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramana, M.V.; Ahmad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Jordan plans to import two conventional gigawatt scale nuclear reactors from Russia that are expensive and too large for Jordan's current electricity grid. Jordan efforts to establish nuclear power might become easier in some ways if the country were to construct Small Modular Reactors, which might be better suited to Jordan's financial capabilities and its smaller electrical grid capacity. But, the SMR option raises new problems, including locating sites for multiple reactors, finding water to cool these reactors, and the higher cost of electricity generation. Jordan's decision has important implications for its energy planning as well as for the market for SMRs. - Highlights: •Jordan is planning to purchase two large reactors from Russia. •Large reactors would be inappropriate to Jordan's small electricity grid. •Small modular reactors would be more appropriate to Jordan's grid, but have problems. •The market for small modular reactors will be smaller than often projected. •Jordan should consider the financial impact of building a large nuclear reactor.

  5. Supply of appropriate nuclear technology for the developing world: small power reactors for electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heising-Goodman, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews the supply of small nuclear power plants (200 to 500 MWe electrical generating capacity) available on today's market, including the pre-fabricated designs of the United Kingdom's Rolls Royce Ltd and the French Alsthom-Atlantique Company. Also, the Russian VVER-440 conventionally built light-water reactor design is reviewed, including information on the Soviet Union's plans for expansion of its reactor-building capacity. A section of the paper also explores the characteristics of LDC electricity grids, reviewing methods available for incorporating larger plants into smaller grids as the Israelis are planning. Future trends in reactor supply and effects on proliferation rates are also discussed, reviewing the potential of the Indian 220 MWe pressurised heavy-water reactor, South Korean and Jananese potential for reactor exports in the Far East, and the Argentine-Brazilian nuclear programme in Latin America. This study suggests that small reactor designs for electrical power production and other applications, such as seawater desalination, can be made economical relative to diesel technology if traditional scaling laws can be altered by adopting and standardising a pre-fabricated nuclear power plant design. Also, economy can be gained if sufficient attention is concentrated on the design, construction and operating experience of suitably sized conventionally built reactor systems. (author)

  6. Market potential of small and medium power reactors in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamis, I.; Hainoun, A.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of the Syrian energy demand and forecasting was briefly introduced. The need to install an average of 500 MW annually the year 2003 was established. Moreover, short introduction of the main energy resources in the country was made. A primitive criteria for the selection of SMPR was emphasized. An emphasis for the process of introducing the first nuclear power in the country was also recognized. (author)

  7. Preapplication safety evaluation report for the Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-metal reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoghue, J.E.; Donohew, J.N.; Golub, G.R.; Kenneally, R.M.; Moore, P.B.; Sands, S.P.; Throm, E.D.; Wetzel, B.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Associate Directorate for Advanced Reactors and License Renewal

    1994-02-01

    This preapplication safety evaluation report (PSER) presents the results of the preapplication desip review for die Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Project No. 674. The PRISM conceptual desip was submitted by the US Department of Energy in accordance with the NRC`s ``Statement of Policy for the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants`` (51 Federal Register 24643). This policy provides for the early Commission review and interaction with designers and licensees. The PRISM reactor desip is a small, modular, pool-type, liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor. The standard plant design consists of dim identical power blocks with a total electrical output rating of 1395 MWe- Each power block comprises three reactor modules, each with a thermal rating of 471 MWt. Each module is located in its own below-grade silo and is co to its own intermediate heat transport system and steam generator system. The reactors utilize a metallic-type fuel, a ternary alloy of U-Pu-Zr. The design includes passive reactor shutdown and passive decay heat removal features. The PSER is the NRC`s preliminary evaluation of the safety features in the PRISM design, including the projected research and development programs required to support the design and the proposed testing needs. Because the NRC review was based on a conceptual design, the PSER did not result in an approval of the design. Instead it identified certain key safety issues, provided some guidance on applicable licensing criteria, assessed the adequacy of the preapplicant`s research and development programs, and concluded that no obvious impediments to licensing the PRISM design had been identified.

  8. Time dependent analysis of Xenon spatial oscillations in small power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decco, Claudia Cristina Ghirardello

    1997-01-01

    This work presents time dependent analysis of xenon spatial oscillations studying the influence of the power density distribution, type of reactivity perturbation, power level and core size, using the one-dimensional and three-dimensional analysis with the MID2 and citation codes, respectively. It is concluded that small pressurized water reactors with height smaller than 1.5 m are stable and do not have xenon spatial oscillations. (author)

  9. Development of public acceptance and market success with very small nuclear power reactors (VSR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, P

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a case for public acceptance of very small nuclear reactors (VSR) as a socially welcomed, locally produced source of energy. It is argued that the subconscious associations and emotional responses that the public makes with size and appearance will often outweigh technical or economic advantages as the determining factor in their ultimate acceptance or rejection of a new power plant. The unique technical features of VSR effectively refute the three most commonly cited reasons for opposing nuclear power: cost, safety, and waste management. VSR also address the demands of environmentalists for small-scale, clean distributed energy production. (author)

  10. Nuclear-Mechanical Coupling: Small Amplitude Mechanical Vibrations and High Amplitude Power Oscillations in Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2008-11-01

    The cores of nuclear reactors, including its structural parts and cooling fluids, are complex mechanical systems able to vibrate in a set of normal modes and frequencies, if suitable perturbed. The cyclic variations in the strain state of the core materials may produce changes in density. Changes in density modify the reactivity. Changes in reactivity modify thermal power. Modifications in thermal power produce variations in temperature fields. Variations in temperature produce variations in strain due to thermal-elastic effects. If the variation of the temperature field is fast enough and if the Doppler Effect and other stabilizing prompt effects in the fuel are weak enough, a fast oscillatory instability could be produced, coupled with mechanical vibrations of small amplitude. A recently constructed, simple mathematical model of nuclear reactor kinetics, that improves the one due to A.S. Thompson, is reviewed. It was constructed in order to study, in a first approximation, the stability of the reactor: a nonlinear nuclear-thermal oscillator (that corresponds to reactor point kinetics with thermal-elastic feedback and with frozen delayed neutron effects) is coupled nonlinearly with a linear mechanical-thermal oscillator (that corresponds to the first normal mode of mechanical vibrations excited by thermo-elastic effects). This mathematical model is studied here from the standpoint of mechanical vibrations. It is shown how, under certain conditions, a suitable mechanical perturbation could elicit fast and growing oscillatory instabilities in the reactor power. Applying the asymptotic method due to Krylov, Bogoliubov and Mitropolsky, analytical formulae that may be used in the calculation of the time varying amplitude and phase of the mechanical oscillations are given, as functions of the mechanical, thermal and nuclear parameters of the reactor. The consequences for the mechanical integrity of the reactor are assessed. Some conditions, mainly, but not exclusively

  11. Small reactor operating mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, V.G.

    1997-01-01

    There is a potential need for small reactors in the future for applications such as district heating, electricity production at remote sites, and desalination. Nuclear power can provide these at low cost and with insignificant pollution. The economies required by the small scale application, and/or the remote location, require a review of the size and location of the operating staff. Current concepts range all the way from reactors which are fully automatic, and need no local attention for days or weeks, to those with reduced local staff. In general the less dependent a reactor is on local human intervention, the greater its dependence on intrinsic safety features such as passive decay heat removal, low-stored energy and limited reactivity speed and depth in the control systems. A case study of the design and licensing of the SLOWPOKE Energy System heating reactor is presented. (author)

  12. Mars, the Moon, and the Ends of the Earth: Autonomy for Small Reactor Power Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Richard Thomas

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been considering deep space missions that utilize a small-reactor power system (SRPS) to provide energy for propulsion and spacecraft power. Additionally, application of SRPS modules as a planetary power source is being investigated to enable a continuous human presence for nonpolar lunar sites and on Mars. A SRPS can supply high-sustained power for space and surface applications that is both reliable and mass efficient. The use of small nuclear reactors for deep space or planetary missions presents some unique challenges regarding the operations and control of the power system. Current-generation terrestrial nuclear reactors employ varying degrees of human control and decision-making for operations and benefit from periodic human interaction for maintenance. In contrast, the control system of a SRPS employed for deep space missions must be able to accommodate unattended operations due to communications delays and periods of planetary occlusion while adapting to evolving or degraded conditions with no opportunity for repair or refurbishment. While surface power systems for planetary outposts face less extreme delays and periods of isolation and may benefit from limited maintenance capabilities, considerations such as human safety, resource limitations and usage priorities, and economics favor minimizing direct, continuous human interaction with the SRPS for online, dedicated power system management. Thus, a SRPS control system for space or planetary missions must provide capabilities for operational autonomy. For terrestrial reactors, large-scale power plants remain the preferred near-term option for nuclear power generation. However, the desire to reduce reliance on carbon-emitting power sources in developing countries may lead to increased consideration of SRPS modules for local power generation in remote regions that are characterized by emerging, less established infrastructures

  13. Design Study of Modular Nuclear Power Plant with Small Long Life Gas Cooled Fast Reactors Utilizing MOX Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilham, Muhammad; Su'ud, Zaki

    2017-01-01

    Growing energy needed due to increasing of the world’s population encourages development of technology and science of nuclear power plant in its safety and security. In this research, it will be explained about design study of modular fast reactor with helium gas cooling (GCFR) small long life reactor, which can be operated over 20 years. It had been conducted about neutronic design GCFR with Mixed Oxide (UO2-PuO2) fuel in range of 100-200 MWth NPPs of power and 50-60% of fuel fraction variation with cylindrical pin cell and cylindrical balance of reactor core geometry. Calculation method used SRAC-CITATION code. The obtained results are the effective multiplication factor and density value of core reactor power (with geometry optimalization) to obtain optimum design core reactor power, whereas the obtained of optimum core reactor power is 200 MWth with 55% of fuel fraction and 9-13% of percentages.

  14. The assessment of technological and safety aspects of small power reactor SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antariksawan, A.R.; Ekariansyah, Andi S.; Sony, D.T.; Suharno; Hastowo, Hudi

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the technology and safety of small nuclear power plant SMART. The reactor SMART produces 300 MWth of power is cooled and moderated with light water and integral PWR type developed by KAERI. At present, the development activities had reached the end of basic design stage. The concept design of reactor SMART is based on safety enhancement, economic competitiveness and high performance. The fuel is uranium oxide with approximately 5% w/o enrichment. The safety characteristics of the core are shown with low power density around 62.6 W/cc, high negative reactivity coefficient, and high shutdown and thermal margin. Besides the inherent safety characteristics, SMART is equipped with engineered safety features and severe accident management system which are in compliance with the IAEA recommendations. The application of SMART for dual-purpose produces 90 Mwe and 40,000 to fresh water a day. Based on the technology and core characteristics of the reactor SMART, it is very interesting to be deeply assessed

  15. Small modulator reactors (SMRs) - the key to increased social acceptance of nuclear power?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sam-Aggrey, H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) have been touted as having the potential to spearhead a nuclear renaissance. Proponents of this view cite the relative advantages of SMRs over larger nuclear plants as reason for their optimism. Some of these merits include potential economies of mass production deriving from modular factory production, enhanced safety features, the ability to locate reactors in remote areas, and reduced requirements for technical workforces to install and maintain SMRs. Despite the optimism surrounding SMRs, nuclear power is still a contentious issue for many Canadians. The growth of nuclear power remains adversely affected by concerns over issues such as: the health and safety consequences of nuclear power generation, environmental impacts, proliferation of nuclear materials, terrorism, and radioactive waste disposal. Personal values, past nuclear accidents, and lack of trust in the industry are other factors influencing attitudes toward nuclear energy. Given that public support is pivotal to the growth of the nuclear power sector, the issues surrounding the social acceptance of SMRs should be given serious consideration. Drawing on previously published data, this paper analyses the purported qualities of SMRs with a view of determining whether these characteristics have the potential of changing public attitudes toward greater acceptance of nuclear power. (author)

  16. Small modulator reactors (SMRs) - the key to increased social acceptance of nuclear power?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sam-Aggrey, H.

    2014-01-01

    Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) have been touted as having the potential to spearhead a nuclear renaissance. Proponents of this view cite the relative advantages of SMRs over larger nuclear plants as reason for their optimism. Some of these merits include potential economies of mass production deriving from modular factory production, enhanced safety features, the ability to locate reactors in remote areas, and reduced requirements for technical workforces to install and maintain SMRs. Despite the optimism surrounding SMRs, nuclear power is still a contentious issue for many Canadians. The growth of nuclear power remains adversely affected by concerns over issues such as: the health and safety consequences of nuclear power generation, environmental impacts, proliferation of nuclear materials, terrorism, and radioactive waste disposal. Personal values, past nuclear accidents, and lack of trust in the industry are other factors influencing attitudes toward nuclear energy. Given that public support is pivotal to the growth of the nuclear power sector, the issues surrounding the social acceptance of SMRs should be given serious consideration. Drawing on previously published data, this paper analyses the purported qualities of SMRs with a view of determining whether these characteristics have the potential of changing public attitudes toward greater acceptance of nuclear power. (author)

  17. ORNL R and D on advanced small and medium power reactors: selected topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.D.; Trauger, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    From 1984-1985, ORNL studied several innovative small and medium power nuclear concepts with respect to viability. Criteria for assessment of market attractiveness were developed and are described here. Using these criteria and descriptions of selected advanced reactor concepts, an assessment of their projected market viability in the time period 2000-2010 was made. All of these selected concepts could be considered as having the potential for meeting the criteria but, in most cases, considerable R and D would be required to reduce uncertainties. This work and later studies of safety and licensing of advanced, passively safe reactor concepts by ORNL are described. The results of these studies are taken into account in most of the current (FY 1989) work at ORNL on advanced reactors. A brief outline of this current work is given. One of the current R and D efforts at ORNL which addresses the operability and safety of advanced reactors is the Advanced Controls Program. Selected topics from this Program are described

  18. ORNL R and D on advanced small and medium power reactors: Selected topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.D.; Trauger, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    From 1984-1985, ORNL studied several innovative small and medium power nuclear concepts with respect to viability. Criteria for assessment of market attractiveness were developed and are described here. Using these criteria and descriptions of selected advanced reactor concepts, and assessment of their projected market viability in the time period 2000-2010 was made. All of these selected concepts could be considered as having the potential for meeting the criteria but, in most cases, considerable RandD would be required to reduce uncertainties. This work and later studies of safety and licensing of advanced, passively safe reactor concepts by ORNL are described. The results of these studies are taken into account in most of the current (FY 1989) work at ORNL on advanced reactors. A brief outline of this current work is given. One of the current RandD efforts at ORNL which addresses the operability and safety of advanced reactors is the Advanced Controls Program. Selected topics from this Program are described. 13 refs., 1 fig

  19. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  20. Xenon-induced power oscillations in a generic small modular reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitcher, Evans Damenortey

    As world demand for energy continues to grow at unprecedented rates, the world energy portfolio of the future will inevitably include a nuclear energy contribution. It has been suggested that the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) could play a significant role in the spread of civilian nuclear technology to nations previously without nuclear energy. As part of the design process, the SMR design must be assessed for the threat to operations posed by xenon-induced power oscillations. In this research, a generic SMR design was analyzed with respect to just such a threat. In order to do so, a multi-physics coupling routine was developed with MCNP/MCNPX as the neutronics solver. Thermal hydraulic assessments were performed using a single channel analysis tool developed in Python. Fuel and coolant temperature profiles were implemented in the form of temperature dependent fuel cross sections generated using the SIGACE code and reactor core coolant densities. The Power Axial Offset (PAO) and Xenon Axial Offset (XAO) parameters were chosen to quantify any oscillatory behavior observed. The methodology was benchmarked against results from literature of startup tests performed at a four-loop PWR in Korea. The developed benchmark model replicated the pertinent features of the reactor within ten percent of the literature values. The results of the benchmark demonstrated that the developed methodology captured the desired phenomena accurately. Subsequently, a high fidelity SMR core model was developed and assessed. Results of the analysis revealed an inherently stable SMR design at beginning of core life and end of core life under full-power and half-power conditions. The effect of axial discretization, stochastic noise and convergence of the Monte Carlo tallies in the calculations of the PAO and XAO parameters was investigated. All were found to be quite small and the inherently stable nature of the core design with respect to xenon-induced power oscillations was confirmed. Finally, a

  1. Overview of the one-day meeting on Small Power Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.M.; Butland, A.T.D.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to provide an opportunity for various vendors of small power reactors (under 1MW) to present their ideas and designs, and to subsequently respond to comments and criticisms from an informed audience. Two contrasting papers were presented on the economics of small plant. The perceived view within Nuclear Electric of the economic targets for small PWR reactor designs within the United Kingdom was outlined. The designs under consideration are AP600 and SIR. The presentation concentrated on the various factors making up the overall generating cost, in particular the capital charges, stressing the need to account for the design and launch costs and additional risk of the first-of-a-kind plant. The main conclusion was that small plant were likely to be less economic than large, although utilities may be attracted by this option as a method of restarting a nuclear programme, and that the UK targets would be around Pound 1100/kW installed and 3-3.5 p/kW h. The SIR plant was then used to show how these goals could be achievable, taking series-order factors into account, even if the overnight installed cost for a single plant is more expensive compared with a large plant. In another paper the application of passive safety features within designs was considered given the present UK safety licensing framework regarding diversity, redundancy, the single failure criterion, and past precedent. Aspects suggested to require special attention were deliberate depressurization of the primary circuit, secureness of hot shutdown, and the adequacy of natural circulation for containment cooling. The rest of the papers dealt with various aspects of the AP600 and SIR designs. (author)

  2. Big ambitions for small reactors as investors size up power options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, John [nuclear24, Redditch (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-15

    Earlier this year, US nuclear developer NuScale Power completed a study for the UK's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) that supported the suitability of NuScale's small modular reactor (SMR) technology for the effective disposition of plutonium. The UK is a frontrunner to compete in the SMR marketplace, both in terms of technological capabilities, trade and political commitment. Industry observers are openly speculating whether SMR design and construction could start to move ahead faster than 'big and conventional' nuclear construction projects - not just in the UK but worldwide. Economies of scale could increase the attraction of SMRs to investors and the general public.

  3. The Perspective of Small and Medium Size Nuclear Power Reactors in the Brazilian Isolated Electricity Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moutinho dos Santos, E.

    1998-01-01

    As a consequence of the international crisis that has shaken the nuclear industry almost all over the world during the late 1980s, new academic contributions, which could settle a new basis for the nuclear energy in Brazil, have been scarce. This paper aims to partially fulfill this gap. We discuss some perspectives for the nuclear option to regain some prominence in the Brazilian energy matrix. Recent developments in the nuclear industry, including advances in plant design, have been opening interesting markets for small and medium nuclear power reactors (SMNPRs). We access the suitability and feasibility of such new technology in the Brazilian isolated electricity grids. We conclude by saying that, although the difficulties are still huge, SMNPRs may be a good strategy for Brazil to revitalize its nuclear policy. (author)

  4. Compact power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetch, J.R.; Dieckamp, H.M.; Wilson, L.A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector

  5. Project of SVBR-75/100 reactor plant with improved safety for nuclear sources of small and medium power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragunov, Yu. G.; Stepanov, V. S.; Klimov, N. N.; Dedul, A. V.; Bolvanchikov, S. N.; Zrodnikov, A. V.; Tolhinsky, G. I.; Komlev, O. G.

    2004-01-01

    As a result of the joint work performed recently by FSUE OKB Gidropress, SNC RF-IPPE and other organizations the technical feasibility is shown for creation and usage in nuclear power engineering of the unified reactor plant (RP) SVBR-75/100 with fast neutron reactor core and lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) in the primary circuit. Technical design of SVBR-75/100 reactor plant is based on the following: 50-year operation experience in development and operation of RP with LBC for nuclear submarines; experience in development and operation of fast reactor with sodium coolant; experience in optimization of LBC technology at nuclear submarines and ground-based test benches; conceptual design of SVBR-75 reactor plant (for renovation of Units 2, 3 and 4 of Novovoronezh NPP). Technical solutions laid down in the basis of SVBR-75/100 reactor plant design are oriented towards the industrial basis, structural materials existing in Russia, as well as the unique LBC technology with experimental and practical support. The concept of SVBR-75/100 reactor plant safety assurance is based on the following provisions: maximum usage of inherent safety supported by physical features of fast neutron reactor, chemically inert LBC in the primary circuit, integral layout and special design solutions; maximum possible combination of normal operation and safety functions in RP systems. Small power of SVBR-75/100 RP makes it possible to manufacture the complete set of RP main equipment at the factory and delivery it to NPP site as-finished practically using any transport including railway. Possible fields of application of SVBR-75/100 reactor plants: modular NPPs of different power; renovation of NPPs with light water reactors exhausted their service life; independent nuclear power sources for different applications (ground-based nuclear water-desalinating plants, etc. )(author)

  6. Atomic stations with advanced reactors of small and medium power - potential power supply for specific functions. An introductory statement from the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ch.-K.; )

    2015-01-01

    The introductory statement of the Director of the Nuclear Energy Department of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Department is devoted to the main issues and problems of the development of nuclear power plants with small-power reactors, their construction and operation in the world [ru

  7. Design characteristics for pressurized water small modular nuclear power reactors with focus on safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kani, Iraj Mahmoudzadeh [Tehran Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Civil Faculty; Zandieh, Mehdi [Tehran Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Civil Faculty; International Univ. of Imam Khomeini (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Architecture Faculty; Abadi, Saeed Kheirollahi Hossein [International Univ. of Imam Khomeini (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Architecture Faculty

    2016-05-15

    Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) are a technology, attracting attention. Light water SMR possess an upgraded design case and emphasize the significance of integral models. Beside of these advantages, SMRs has faced numerous challenges, e.g. licensing, cost/investment, safety and security observation, social and environmental issues in building new plants.

  8. Who needs a small reactor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Janet.

    1991-01-01

    The opportunities and problems facing small reactors were debated at the Delhi seminar. It was established that these were markets where small reactors, producing heat as well as electricity, might be of use. Small combined heat and power reactors would be more useful in district heating than would large reactors, as their optimum heat production is in line with current district heating schemes. Most process heat requirements are below 900 o C and so may be provided by small nuclear plants. Several areas in electricity supply where small and medium sized reactors could find a market were also identified. Despite good reasons for favouring nuclear plants in these markets, such as no production of carbon dioxide, no need to use expensive oil or other scarce fossil fuels and flexibility, these are, however, disincentives to potential buyers. While serial production would decrease plant costs, the lead plants would bear heavy financial risks. Currently too many options in plant design make it difficult to present the advantages of small reactor technology. Siting reactors near centres of population would be problematical. The disposal of spent fuel and radioactive wastes would create problems in developing or non-nuclear countries. Over and above all these problems, however, was that of public acceptance. Some ways of overcoming these disincentives were discussed. (author)

  9. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yoshihiko; Arita, Setsuo; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Fukazawa, Yukihisa; Ishii, Kazuhiko

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a reactor power control device capable of enhancing an operation efficiency while keeping high reliability and safety in a BWR type nuclear power plant. Namely, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a means for inputting a set value of a generator power and a set value of a reactor power, (2) a means for controlling the reactor power to either smaller one of the reactor power corresponding to the set value of the generator power and the set value of the reactor power. With such procedures, even if the nuclear power plant is set so as to operate it to make the reactor power 100%, when the generator power reaches the upper limit, the reactor power is controlled with a preference given to the upper limit value of the generator power. Accordingly, safety and reliability are not deteriorated. The operation efficiency of the plant can be improved. (I.S.)

  10. Increased SRP reactor power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacAfee, I.M.

    1983-01-01

    Major changes in the current reactor hydraulic systems could be made to achieve a total of about 1500 MW increase of reactor power for P, K, and C reactors. The changes would be to install new, larger heat exchangers in the reactor buildings to increase heat transfer area about 24%, to increase H 2 O flow about 30% per reactor, to increase D 2 O flow 15 to 18% per reactor, and increase reactor blanket gas pressure from 5 psig to 10 psig. The increased reactor power is possible because of reduced inlet temperature of reactor coolant, increased heat removal capacity, and increased operating pressure (larger margin from boiling). The 23% reactor power increase, after adjustment for increased off-line time for reactor reloading, will provide a 15% increase of production from P, K, and C reactors. Restart of L Reactor would increase SRP production 33%

  11. New concepts for small power reactors without on-site refuelling for non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, N.W.; Hasberger, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The report discusses the preliminary requirements and a technical approach for developing small reactors and the rationale for selecting them. It then discusses the four nuclear system technologies and how they might proceed to meet the requirements. Brief discussions are provided on the approaches to stimulating the appropriate international and industrial participation necessary to finance development of a design with improved proliferation resistance that is useful to the developing countries. (author)

  12. Guide to power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-07-15

    The IAEA's major first scientific publication is the Directory of Power Reactors now in operation or under construction in various parts of the world. The purpose of the directory is to present important details of various power projects in such a way as to provide a source of easy reference for anyone interested in the development of the peaceful uses of atomic energy, either at the technical or management level. Six pages have been devoted to each reactor the first of which contains general information, reactor physics data and information about the core. The second and third contain sketches of the fuel element or of the fuel element assembly, and of the horizontal and vertical sections of the reactor. On the fourth page information is grouped under the following heads: fuel element, core heat transfer, control, reactor vessel and over-all dimensions, and fluid flow. The fifth page shows a simplified flow diagram, while the sixth provides information on reflector and shielding, containment and turbo generator. Some information has also been given, when available, on cost estimates and operating staff requirements. Remarks and a bibliography constitute the last part of the description of each reactor. Reactor projects included in this directory are pressurized light water cooled power reactors. Boiling light water cooled power reactors, heavy water cooled power reactors, gas cooled power reactors, organic cooled power reactors liquid metal cooled power reactors and liquid metal cooled power reactors

  13. Power maximization method for land-transportable fully passive lead–bismuth cooled small modular reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jaehyun, E-mail: chojh@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1405 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yong-Hoon; Hwang, Il Soon [Seoul National University, Sillim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The power maximization method for LBE natural circulation cooled SMRs was developed. • The two powers in view of neutronics and thermal-hydraulics were considered. • The limitations for designing of LBE natural circulation cooled SMRs were summarized. • The necessary conditions for safety shutdown in accidents were developed. • The maximized power in the case study is 206 MW thermal. - Abstract: Although current pressurized water reactors (PWRs) have significantly contributed to global energy supply, PWR technology has not been considered a trustworthy energy solution owing to its problems of spent nuclear fuels (SNFs), nuclear safety, and nuclear economy. In order to overcome these problems, a lead–bismuth eutectic (LBE) fully passive cooling small modular reactor (SMR) system is suggested. This technology can not only provide the solution for the problems of SNFs through the transmutation feature of the LBE coolant, but also strengthen safety and economy through the concept of natural circulation cooling SMRs. It is necessary to maximize the advantages, namely safety and economy, of this type of nuclear power plants for broader applications in the future. Accordingly, the objective of this study is to maximize the reactor core power while satisfying the limitations of shipping size, materials endurance, and criticality of a long-burning core as well as safety under beyond design basis events. To achieve these objectives, the design limitations of natural circulating LBE-cooling SMRs are derived. Then, the power maximization method is developed based on obtaining the design limitations. The results of this study are expected to contribute to the effectiveness of the reactor design stage by providing insights to designers, as well as by formulating methods for the power maximization of other types of SMRs.

  14. Reactor power monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Shigehiro.

    1990-01-01

    Among a plurality of power monitoring programs in a reactor power monitoring device, rapid response is required for a scram judging program for the power judging processing of scram signals. Therefore, the scram judging program is stored independently from other power monitoring programs, applied with a priority order, and executed in parallel with other programs, to output scram signals when the detected data exceeds a predetermined value. As a result, the capacity required for the scram judging program is reduced and the processing can be conducted in a short period of time. In addition, since high priority is applied to the scram judging program which is divided into a small capacity, it is executed at higher frequency than other programs when they are executed in parallel. That is, since the entire processings for the power monitoring program are repeated in a short cycle, the response speed of the scram signals required for high responsivity can be increased. (N.H.)

  15. Reactor power measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Mikio; Sano, Yuji; Seki, Eiji; Yoshida, Toshifumi; Ito, Toshiaki.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention provides a self-powered long detector having a sensitivity over the entire length of a reactor core as an entire control rod withdrawal range of a BWR type reactor, and a reactor power measuring device using a gamma ray thermometer which scarcely causes sensitivity degradation. That is, a hollow protection pipe is disposed passing through the reactor core from the outside of a reactor pressure vessel. The self-powered long detectors and the gamma ray thermometers are inserted and installed in the protection pipe. An average reactor power in an axial direction of the reactor relative to a certain position in the horizontal cross section of the reactor core is determined based on the power of the self-powered long detector over the entire length of the reactor core. Since the response of the self-powered detector relative to a local power change is rapid, the output is used as an input signal to a safety protection device of the reactor core. Further, a gamma ray thermometer secured in the reactor and having scarce sensitivity degradation is used instead of an incore travelling neutron monitor used for relative calibration of an existent neutron monitor secured in the reactor. (I.S.)

  16. Small mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Schultz, K.R.; Smith, A.C. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Basic requirements for the pilot plants are that they produce a net product and that they have a potential for commercial upgrade. We have investigated a small standard mirror fusion-fission hybrid, a two-component tandem mirror hybrid, and two versions of a field-reversed mirror fusion reactor--one a steady state, single cell reactor with a neutral beam-sustained plasma, the other a moving ring field-reversed mirror where the plasma passes through a reaction chamber with no energy addition

  17. An extended conventional fuel cycle for the B and W mPower{sup TM} small modular nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarangella, M. J. [Babcock and Wilcox Company, 109 Ramsey Place, Lynchburg, VA 24502 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The B and W mPower{sup TM} reactor is a small pressurized water reactor (PWR) with an integral once-through steam generator and a thermal output of about 500 MW; it is intended to replace aging fossil power plants of similar output. The core is composed of 69 reduced-height PWR assemblies with the familiar 17 x 17 fuel rod array. The Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W) is offering a core loading and cycle management plan for a four-year cycle based on its presumed attractiveness to potential customers. This option is a once-through fuel cycle in which the entire core is discharged and replaced after four years. In addition, a conventional fuel utilization strategy, employing a periodic partial reload and shuffle, was developed as an alternative to the four-year once-through fuel cycle. This study, which was performed using the Studsvik core design code suite, is a typical multi-cycle projection analysis of the type performed by most fuel management organizations such as fuel vendors and utilities. In the industry, the results of such projections are used by the financial arms of these organizations to assist in making long-term decisions. In the case of the B and W mPower reactor, this analysis demonstrates flexibility for customers who consider the once-through fuel cycle unacceptable from a fuel utilization standpoint. As expected, when compared to the once-through concept, reloads of the B and W mPower reactor will achieve higher batch average discharge exposure, will have adequate shut-down margin, and will have a relatively flat hot excess reactivity trend at the expense of slightly increased peaking. (authors)

  18. Study The Effect Extension Of Fuel Element Life Time In The Core Small Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewita, E.; Rusli, A.; Tuka, V.

    1998-01-01

    Mini power reactor is a low power nuclear reactor which mostly are designed especially to supply energy demand in the remote areas, such as for electricity generation, industries, desalination and district heating.The goal of the operation cycle extension to 3 - 5 years is to maximize the use of the fuel in order to achieve much cheaper energy generated. From the stand point of fuel element, in order to maximize the fuel life time there is a need to see all possible effects of extended life time to the fuel behavior in the core. This study has been carried out in order to obtain the understanding on all influencing factors to the fuel element behaviors at extended operation cycle whose results are expected to be useful as the input to fuel design and fabrication. The study has show that the material selection for fuel and cladding materials are the essential factor in maximizing the fuel life time. Development of cladding and fuel materials has been done, and shown that the new zirconium alloy, zircaloy, having composition of Zr-1,0 Sn-0,27 Fe-0,16 Cr-0,1 Nb-0,01 Ni has higher corrosion resistance and mechanical characteristics better than that of the standard zircaloy-4. Adding the Nb content (0,005-0,2 wt %), decreasing the Sn content until 0,5 wt %, and decreasing the ratio of Fe/Cr from 0,6 to 0,5 can increase resistance to corrosion, while decreasing the ratio of Fe and Cr from 0,3 to 0,7 wt % can increase the mechanical characteristics. To enhance the resistance to nodular corrosion in the BWR system, adding the Nb-Mo, Nb-W and Nb-V at low Sn zircaloy-2 can be done. In improving the fuel element it has been shown that adding niobium (Nb 2 O 5 -0,3 wt %) can enlarge the particle size of fuel hence improving the fuel performance

  19. Reactor power monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogen, Ayumi; Ozawa, Michihiro.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To significantly improve the working efficiency of a nuclear reactor by reflecting the control rod history effect on thermal variants required for the monitoring of the reactor operation. Constitution: An incore power distribution calculation section reads the incore neutron fluxes detected by neutron detectors disposed in the reactor to calculate the incore power distribution. A burnup degree distribution calculation section calculates the burnup degree distribution in the reactor based on the thus calculated incore power distribution. A control rod history date store device supplied with the burnup degree distribution renews the stored control rod history data based on the present control rod pattern and the burnup degree distribution. Then, thermal variants of the nuclear reactor are calculated based on the thus renewed control rod history data. Since the control rod history effect is reflected on the thermal variants required for the monitoring of the reactor operation, the working efficiency of the nuclear reactor can be improved significantly. (Seki, T.)

  20. Market potential of small and medium-size nuclear reactors as combined heat and power plants in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoen, R.; Hansen, U.; Candeli, R.; Leuchs, D.; Garribba, S.F.; Lefevre, J.C.; Vivante, C.

    1987-01-01

    A Study has been launched and supported by the Commission of the European Communities to assess the potential market of small and medium size nuclear reactors through EC Countries and to identify those factors which may play a dominant role in this respect. In its first phase, the Study addresses to modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors that would be installed to produce low-temperature heat and power. Federal Republic of Germany, Italy and France are the countries for which the investigation has been either completed or is under way. The time span of interest is up to the year 2020. Referring to this horizon an appraisal has been made of the number of nuclear units which could come on line to cope with energy demand and their timing. Through the Study a distinction is made between technical potential, economic potential, and effective market potential. It is understood indeed that both economic competitiveness towards other energy sources and institutional or organizational factors may restrict the market which could be covered by this class of nuclear reactors. (author)

  1. Market potential of small and medium-size nuclear reactors as combined heat and power plants in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candeli, R.; Leuchs, D.; Garribba, S.F.; Hansen, U.; Lefevre, J.C.; Schoen, R.; Vivante, C.

    1988-01-01

    The preliminary results are presented concerning a study launched by the Commission of the European Communities to assess the potential market of small and medium-size nuclear reactors through EC member countries. The study was aimed at identifying those factors that may have a role in shaping the eventual deployment and diffusion of this class of nuclear reactors. In a first phase, attention focused on modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors that would be installed to produce low-temperature heat and power. Federal Republic of Germany, Italy and France are the countries for which the investigation has been completed. The time span of interest is up to the year 2020. Referring to this horizon, an appraisal has been made of the number of nuclear units which could come on line to cope with energy demand and their timing. Through the study a distinction is made between technical potential, economic potential, and effective market potential. It is understood indeed that both economic competitiveness towards other energy sources and also institutional or organizational factors may restrict the market which could become accessible and would be covered by the new nuclear plants. (orig.)

  2. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Kazuyori.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To automatically control the BWR type reactor power by simple and short-time searching the load pattern nearest to the required pattern at a nuclear power plant side. Constitution: The reactor power is automatically regulated by periodical modifying of coefficients fitting to a reactor core model, according as a required load pattern. When a load requirement pattern is given, a simulator estimates the total power change and the axial power distribution change from a xenon density change output calculated by a xenon dynamic characteristic estimating device, and a load pattern capable of being realized is searched. The amount to be recirculated is controlled on the basis of the load patteren thus searched, and the operation of the BWR type reactor is automatically controlled at the side of the nuclear power plant. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. Reactor power distribution monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoizumi, Atsushi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To grasp the margin for the limit value of the power distribution peaking factor inside the reactor under operation by using the reactor power distribution monitor. Constitution: The monitor is composed of the 'constant' file, (to store in-reactor power distributions obtained from analysis), TIP and thermocouple, lateral output distribution calibrating apparatus, axial output distribution synthesizer and peaking factor synthesizer. The lateral output distribution calibrating apparatus is used to make calibration by comparing the power distribution obtained from the thermocouples to the power distribution obtained from the TIP, and then to provide the power distribution lateral peaking factors. The axial output distribution synthesizer provides the power distribution axial peaking factors in accordance with the signals from the out-pile neutron flux detector. These axial and lateral power peaking factors are synthesized with high precision in the three-dimensional format and can be monitored at any time. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. Reactor power control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomisawa, Teruaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To restore reactor-power condition in a minimum time after a termination of turbine bypass by reducing the throttling of the reactor power at the time of load-failure as low as possible. Constitution: The transient change of the internal pressure of condenser is continuously monitored. When a turbine is bypassed, a speed-control-command signal for a coolant recirculating pump is generated according as the internal pressure of the condenser. When the signal relating to the internal pressure of the condenser indicates insufficient power, a reactor-control-rod-drive signal is generated. (J.P.N.)

  5. Power reactors operational diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dach, K.; Pecinka, L.

    1976-01-01

    The definition of reactor operational diagnostics is presented and the fundamental trends of research are determined. The possible sources of power reactor malfunctions, the methods of defect detection, the data evaluation and the analysis of the results are discussed in detail. In view of scarcity of a theoretical basis and of insufficient in-core instrumentation, operational diagnostics cannot be as yet incorporated in a computer-aided reactor control system. (author)

  6. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L.D.P.

    1959-09-01

    A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

  7. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Akira.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent misoperation in a control system for the adjustment of core coolant flow rate, and the increase in the neutron flux density caused from the misoperation in BWR type reactors. Constitution: In a reactor power control system adapted to control the reactor power by the adjustment of core flow rate, average neutron flux signals of a reactor core, entire core flow rate signals and operation state signals for coolant recycling system are inputted to a microcomputer. The outputs from the computer are sent to a recycling MG set speed controller to control the reactor core flow rate. The computer calculates the change ratio with time in the average neutron flux signals, correlation between the average neutron flux signals and the entire core flow rate signals, change ratio with time in the operation state signals for the coolant recycling system and the like and judges the abnormality in the coolant recycling system based on the calculated results. (Ikeda, J.)

  8. Special seminar on small and medium sized power reactors (as part of the Triest workshop)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.

    1986-01-01

    The seminar dealt with the most important aspects and recent developments in three portions: Experience with small plants - SMPR Definition; SMPR Programmes; economics; preparing for SMPR - designs; markets; decision making aspects; and exercise sessions - design evaluation; decision making

  9. Operating US power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    This update, which appears regularly in each issue of Nuclear Safety, surveys the operations of those power reactors in the US which have been issued operating licenses. Table 1 shows the number of such reactors and their net capacities as of September 30, 1987, the end of the three-month period covered in this report. Table 2 lists the unit capacity and forced outage rate for each licensed reactor for each of the three months (July, August, and September 1987) covered in this report and the cumulative values of these parameters since the beginning of commercial operation. In addition to the tabular data, this article discusses other significant occurrences and developments that affected licensed US power reactors during this reporting period. Status changes at Braidwood Unit 1, Nine Mile Point 2, and Beaver Valley 2 are discussed. Other occurrences discussed are: retraining of control-room operators at Peach Bottom; a request for 25% power for Shoreham, problems at Fermi 2 which delayed the request to go to 75% power; the results of a safety study of the N Reactor at Hanford; a proposed merger of Pacific Gas and Electric with Sacramento Municipal Utility District which would result in the decommissioning of Rancho Seco; the ordered shutdown of Oyster Creek; a minor radioactivity release caused by a steam generator tube rupture at North Anna 1; and 13 fines levied by the NRC on reactor licensees

  10. Future directions of small research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blotcky, A.J.; Rack, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    In prognosticating future perspectives, it is important to realize that the current number of small reactors throughout the world is not overly large and will undoubtedly decrease or at best remain constant in future generations. To survive and remain productive, small reactor facilities must concentrate on work that is unique and that cannot be performed as well by other instruments. Wherever possible, these facilities should develop some form of collaboration with universities and medical center investigators. Future development will continue and will flourish in neutron activation analysis and its applications for a diversity of fields. Fundamental research such as hot atom chemistry will continue to use neutrons from small research reactors. Finally, training of power reactor operators can be an important source of revenue for the small facility in addition to performing an important service to the nuclear power industry

  11. Status and potential of small and medium power reactors in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, P.; Ahmad, M.

    1998-01-01

    Pakistan's interest in nuclear technology dates back to the late 1950s, when Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) was established with the responsibility of promoting peaceful uses of nuclear technology for the development of national economy. A beginning was made in the field of nuclear power generation by commissioning the 137 MW Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (KANUPP) in 1971. In addition to KANUPP, the other activities during this period included studies for nuclear power and sea water desalination in the coastal areas. This was followed by a series of feasibility and long term planning studies (1969-1981) to study and firm up the prospects of nuclear power in the country, using the ever-improving analytical tools and data base. An Energy and Nuclear Power Planning Study for Pakistan has just been completed as a technical cooperation project of the IAEA to provide a sound basis for the formulation of the strategy for future development of nuclear power. The successful functioning of KANUPP and the 300 MW NPP (CHASNUPP) presently being built by China have given the country great confidence and a sense of direction to plan more nuclear units in future, in the S and MR range, in a manner that would progressively lead to a high degree of self-reliance. A large number of studies have been carried out in the past all over the world to investigate the possibility of using nuclear generated heat for the purpose of desalting seawater. It is now proposed that IAEA may initiate a programme to install an International Demonstration Nuclear Desalination Plant (IDNDP) in some developing country to provide hands on experience in this field. (author)

  12. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaruoka, Hiromitsu.

    1994-01-01

    A high pressure water injection recycling system comprising injection pipelines of a high pressure water injection system and a flow rate control means in communication with a pool of a pressure control chamber is disposed to a feedwater system of a BWR type reactor. In addition, the flow rate control means is controlled by a power control device comprising a scram impossible transient event judging section, a required injection flow rate calculation section for high pressure water injection system and a control signal calculation section. Feed water flow rate to be supplied to the reactor is controlled upon occurrence of a scram impossible transient event of the reactor. The scram impossible transient event is judged based on reactor output signals and scram operation demand signals and injection flow rate is calculated based on a predetermined reactor water level, and condensate storage tank water or pressure control chamber pool water is injected to the reactor. With such procedures, water level can be ensured and power can be suppressed. Further, condensate storage tank water of low enthalpy is introduced to the pressure suppression chamber pool to directly control elevation of water temperature and ensure integrity of the pressure vessel and the reactor container. (N.H.)

  13. Power reactor design trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Cascade and Pulse Star represent new trends in ICF power reactor design that have emerged in the last few years. The most recent embodiments of these two concepts, and that of the HYLIFE design with which they will compare them, are shown. All three reactors depend upon protecting structural elements from neutrons, x rays and debris by injecting massive amounts of shielding material inside the reaction chamber. However, Cascade and Pulse Star introduce new ideas to improve the economics, safety, and environmental impact of ICF reactors. They also pose different development issues and thus represent technological alternatives to HYLIFE

  14. Potential Markets for Small Reactors. Annex XI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-12-15

    The electricity cost of a small power generation plant is generally higher than that of a large scale power plant due to economies of scale. In order to survey the market for small nuclear power plants, the competitive object is not a large scale power plant but a small fossil fuel power generation plant. Large scale power generation plants are not required in all countries and regions of the world. There are many regions where the electricity cost is high because of the cost of fuel transport to remote places. Medium or small power generation plants could turn out to also be preferable from the viewpoints of electrical power demand and distribution cost. For example, the electricity costs in many small cities or towns of the Alaskan and Hawaiian Islands are higher than on the mainland. The electricity costs in the two peninsulas (Baja California and Yucatan) in Mexico are high because, owing to the limited power demand in these regions, small and medium sized fossil fuel power generation plants have been installed there, and the costs of fuel, fuel transport and power transmission appear to be relatively high. Owing to such situations, a market for small and medium sized nuclear reactors exists, and there are certain regions and areas in the world where such reactors can compete with the alternatives.

  15. Small power and heat generation systems on the basis of propulsion and innovative reactor technologies. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-09-01

    In the future for developing regions and remote areas one or two power reactors in the 50 MWe to 100 MWe range could be appropriately applied for electricity and heat generation. Introducing and managing such a small program with conventional reactor systems would require a mature supporting technological infrastructure and many skilled highly-trained staff at the site, which might be a problem in some countries. An increased number of small conventional reactors would increase the burden and expenditure for assuring security and non-proliferation. To this end, the time has come to develop an innovative small reactor concept which meets the following requirements: reliable, safe operation with a minimum maintenance and supporting infrastructure, economic competitiveness with alternative energy sources available to the candidate sites, and significant improvements in proliferation resistance relative to existing reactor systems. Successful resolution of such a problem requires a comprehensive system approach that considers all aspects of manufacturing, transportation, operation and ultimate disposal. Some elements of this approach have been used previously in the development of propulsion nuclear power systems, with consideration given to many diverse requirements such as highly autonomous operation for a long period of time, no planned maintenance, no on-site refueling and ultimate disposition. It is with this focus that the IAEA convened the Advisory Group on Propulsion Reactor technologies for Civilian Applications

  16. Small power and heat generation systems on the basis of propulsion and innovative reactor technologies. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    In the future for developing regions and remote areas one or two power reactors in the 50 MWe to 100 MWe range could be appropriately applied for electricity and heat generation. Introducing and managing such a small program with conventional reactor systems would require a mature supporting technological infrastructure and many skilled highly-trained staff at the site, which might be a problem in some countries. An increased number of small conventional reactors would increase the burden and expenditure for assuring security and non-proliferation. To this end, the time has come to develop an innovative small reactor concept which meets the following requirements: reliable, safe operation with a minimum maintenance and supporting infrastructure, economic competitiveness with alternative energy sources available to the candidate sites, and significant improvements in proliferation resistance relative to existing reactor systems. Successful resolution of such a problem requires a comprehensive system approach that considers all aspects of manufacturing, transportation, operation and ultimate disposal. Some elements of this approach have been used previously in the development of propulsion nuclear power systems, with consideration given to many diverse requirements such as highly autonomous operation for a long period of time, no planned maintenance, no on-site refueling and ultimate disposition. It is with this focus that the IAEA convened the Advisory Group on Propulsion Reactor technologies for Civilian Applications.

  17. Small power reactor projects in the United States of America and Canada. Information gathered as a result of invitations from Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    As part of its activities in connection with the development of nuclear power, and in response to the resolutions adopted by the General Conference, the Agency has been undertaking a continuing study of the technology and economics of small and medium sized power reactors, particularly with reference to the needs of the less-developed countries. This report summarizes the information gathered on the small power reactor projects in the United States of America and Canada, as a result of the opportunity afforded by these Member States to the Agency. It may be recalled that, at the third regular session of the General Conference, the United States Government offered to provide the Agency with relevant technical and economic data on several small power reactor projects of its Atomic Energy Commission. The Agency accepted the offer and since June 1960 it has sent one or two staff members at approximately six-monthly intervals to follow the development of nine power reactor projects in the United States which represent six different reactor systems. Last year, the Agency issued a report summarizing the information obtained through their visits and study of available published literature. The present document, which should be read in conjunction with that document, brings the information up to date and provides additional information on certain phases of the projects already discussed in the last report. Three more power reactor projects are also dealt with, namely the experimental gas-cooled reactor (EGCR), the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and the Hallam nuclear power facility (HNPF). Early in 1962, the Canadian Government expressed its willingness to make available to the Agency relevant information on the NPD and CANDU projects. The coverage of the NPD reactor is based upon the published information supplied by AECL of Canada and the visit by one of the staff members to the NPD site. The Agency wishes to acknowledge with thanks the co-operation extended

  18. Small nuclear reactors for desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, K.

    1978-01-01

    Small nuclear reactors are considered to have an output of not more than 400MW thermal. Since they can produce steam at much higher conditions than needed by the brine heater of a multi-flash desalination unit, it may be economically advantageous to use small reactors for a dual-purpose installation of appropriate size, producing both electricity and desalted water, rather than for a single-purpose desalination plant only. Different combinations of dual-purpose arrangements are possible depending principally on the ratio of electricity to water output required. The costs of the installation as well as of the products are critically dependent on this ratio. For minimum investment costs, the components of the dual-purpose installation should be of a standardised design based on normal commercial power plant practice. This then imposes some restrictions on the plant arrangement but, on the other hand, it facilitates selection of the components. Depending on the electricity to water ratio to be achieved, the conventional part of the installation - essentially the turbines - will form a combination of back-pressure and condensing machines. Each ratio will probably lead to an optimum combination. In the economic evaluation of this arrangement, a distinction must be made between single-purpose and dual-purpose installations. The relationship between output and unit costs of electricity and water will be different for the two cases, but the relation can be expressed in general terms to provide guidelines for selecting the best dimensions for the plant. (author)

  19. Low power unattended defense reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, W.L.; Meier, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    A small, low power, passive, nuclear reactor electric power supply has been designed for unattended defense applications. Through innovative utilization of existing proven technologies and components, a highly reliable, ''walk-away safe'' design has been obtained. Operating at a thermal power level of 200 kWt, the reactor uses low enrichment uranium fuel in a graphite block core to generate heat that is transferred through heat pipes to a thermoelectric (TE) converter. Waste heat is removed from the TEs by circulation of ambient air. Because such a power supply offers the promise of minimal operation and maintenance (OandM) costs as well as no fuel logistics, it is particularly attractive for remote, unattended applications such as the North Warning System

  20. Low power unattended defense reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, W.L.; Meier, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    A small, low power, passive, nuclear reactor electric power supply has been designed for unattended defense applications. Through innovative utilization of existing proven technologies and components, a highly reliable, walk-away safe design has been obtained. Operating at a thermal power level of 200 kWt, the reactor uses low enrichment uranium fuel in a graphite block core to generate heat that is transferred through heat pipes to a thermoelectric (TE) converter. Waste heat is removed from the TEs by circulation of ambient air. Because such a power supply offers the promise of minimal operation and maintenance (O and M) costs as well as no fuel logistics, it is particularly attractive for remote, unattended applications such as the North Warning System

  1. Time dependent analysis of Xenon spatial oscillations in small power reactors; Analise temporal das oscilacoes espaciais de Xenonio em reatores de pequeno porte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decco, Claudia Cristina Ghirardello

    1997-07-01

    This work presents time dependent analysis of xenon spatial oscillations studying the influence of the power density distribution, type of reactivity perturbation, power level and core size, using the one-dimensional and three-dimensional analysis with the MID2 and citation codes, respectively. It is concluded that small pressurized water reactors with height smaller than 1.5 m are stable and do not have xenon spatial oscillations. (author)

  2. Evaluation of plate type fuel options for small power reactors; Avaliacao de alternativas de combustivel tipo placa para reatores de pequeno porte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrzejewski, Claudio de Sa

    2005-07-01

    Plate type fuels are generally used in research reactor. The utilization of this kind of configuration improves significantly the overall performance fuel. The conception of new fuels for small power reactors based in plate-type configuration needs a complete review of the safety criteria originally used to conduce power and research reactor projects. In this work, a group of safety criteria is established for the utilization of plate-type fuels in small power reactors taking into consideration the characteristics of power and research reactors. The performance characteristics of fuel elements are strongly supported by its materials properties and the adopted configuration for its fissile particles. The present work makes an orientated bibliographic investigation searching the best material properties (structural materials and fuel compounds) related to the performance fuel. Looking for good parafermionic characteristics and manufacturing exequibility associated to existing facilities in national research centres, this work proposes several alternatives of plate type fuels, considering its utilization in small power reactors: dispersions of UO{sub 2} in stainless steel, of UO{sub 2} in zircaloy, and of U-Mo alloy in zircaloy, and monolithic plates of U-Mo cladded with zircaloy. Given the strong dependency of radiation damage with temperature increase, the safety criteria related to heat transfer were verified for all the alternatives, namely the DNBR; coolant temperature lower than saturation temperature; peak meat temperature to avoid swelling; peak fuel temperature to avoid meat-matrix reaction. It was found that all alternatives meet the safety criteria including the 0.5 mm monolithic U-Mo plate cladded with zircaloy. (author)

  3. Reactor power distribution monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimizu, Koichi

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the performance and secure the safety of a nuclear reactor by rapidly computing and display the power density in the nuclear reactor by using a plurality of processors. Constitution: Plant data for a nuclear reactor containing the measured values from a local power monitor LPRM are sent and recorded in a magnetic disc. They are also sent to a core performance computer in which burn-up degree distribution and the like are computed, and the results are sent and recorded in the magnetic disc. A central processors loads programs to each of the processors and applies data recorded in the magnetic disc to each of the processors. Each of the processors computes the corresponding power distribution in four fuel assemblies surrounding the LPRM string by the above information. The central processor compiles the computation results and displays them on a display. In this way, power distribution in the fuel assemblies can rapidly be computed to thereby secure the improvement of the performance and safety of the reactor. (Seki, T.)

  4. Nuclear power reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pon, G.A.

    1976-10-01

    This report is based on the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited submission to the Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning on the safety of CANDU reactors. It discusses normal operating conditions, postulated accident conditions, and safety systems. The release of radioactivity under normal and accident conditions is compared to the limits set by the Atomic Energy Control Regulations. (author)

  5. Small intrinsically safe reactor implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, Hiroaki

    1985-01-01

    Reviewing the history of nuclear power, it is found that peaceful uses of nuclear power are children of the war-like atom. Importance of special growth in a shielded environment is emphasized to exploit fully the advantages of nuclear power. Nuclear power reactors must be safe for their assimilation into society from the points of view of both technology and social psychology. ISR/ISER is identified as a missing link in the development of nuclear power reactors from this perspective and advocated for international development and utilization, being unleashed from the concerns of politicization, safety, and proliferation

  6. Studies of S-CO{sub 2} Power Plant Pipe Design for Small Modular Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Seok; Ahn, Yoon Han; Lee, Jeong Ik [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    If SFR can be developed into the economical small modular reactor (SMR) for an export from Korea, the expected value can be greater. However, current SFR design may face difficulty in public acceptance due to the potential hazard from sodium-water reaction (SWR) when the current conventional steam Rankine cycle is utilized as a power conversion system for a SFR. In order to eliminate SWR, the Supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) cycle has been proposed. Although there are many researches on S-CO{sub 2} cycle concept and turbomachinery, very few research works considered pipe selection criteria for the S-CO{sub 2} cycle. As one of the most important parts of the plant, this paper will discuss how to select a suitable pipe considering thermal expansion for the S-CO{sub 2} power plant and perform a conceptual design of SFR type SMR. The S-CO{sub 2} cycle can improve the safety of SFR as preventing the SWR by changing the working fluid. Additionally, not only the relatively high efficiency with 450-750 .deg. C turbine inlet temperature, but also the physically compact footprint are advantages of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle. However the pipe design is more complicated than existing power plant because it has high pressure and temperature conditions and needs high mass flow rate. By designing the piping system for a small modular -SFR, the compactness and simplicity of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle are re-confirmed. Moreover, in this paper, realistic and safe pipe design was conducted by considering thermal expansion in the high pressure and temperature conditions. Although total pipe pressure drop is somewhat high, the cycle thermal efficiency is still higher than the existing steam Rankine cycle. Additional study for a larger system such as 300MW class system in MIT report will be conducted in the future study. From the preliminary estimation when the S-CO{sub 2} system becomes large, the pipe diameter may exceed the current ASME standard. This means that more innovative approach

  7. Power reactor noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thie, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    This book concentrates on the different types of noise present in power reactors and how the analysis of this noise can be used as a tool for reactor monitoring and diagnostics. Noise analysis is a growing field that offers advantages such as simplicity, low cost, and natural multivariable interactions. A major advantage, continuous and undisturbed monitoring, supplies a means of obtaining early warnings of possible reactor malfunctions thus preventing further complications by alerting operators to a problem - and aiding in the diagnosis of that problem - before it demands major repairs. Following an introductory chapter, the theoretical basis for the various methods of noise analysis is explained, and full chapters are devoted to the fundamentals of statistics for time-domain analysis and Fourier series and related topics for frequency-domain analysis. General experimental techniques and associated theoretical considerations are reviewed, leading to discussion of practical applications in the latter half of the book. Besides chapters giving examples of neutron noise and acoustical noise, chapters are also devoted to extensive examples from pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor power plants

  8. Small Modular Reactors (468th Brookhaven Lecture)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, Robert

    2011-01-01

    With good reason, much more media attention has focused on nuclear power plants than solar farms, wind farms, or hydroelectric plants during the past month and a half. But as nations around the world demand more energy to power everything from cell phone batteries to drinking water pumps to foundries, nuclear plants are the only non-greenhouse-gas producing option that can be built to operate almost anywhere, and can continue to generate power during droughts, after the sun sets, and when winds die down. To supply this demand for power, designers around the world are competing to develop more affordable nuclear reactors of the future: small modular reactors. Brookhaven Lab is working with DOE to ensure that these reactors are designed to be safe for workers, members of surrounding communities, and the environment and to ensure that the radioactive materials and technology will only be used for peaceful purposes, not weapons. In his talk, Bari will discuss the advantages and challenges of small modular reactors and what drives both international and domestic interest in them. He will also explain how Brookhaven Lab and DOE are working to address the challenges and provide a framework for small modular reactors to be commercialized.

  9. New developments in small reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonnell, F.N.; Reed, A.

    1990-08-01

    During the fifty years since nuclear fission was discovered, nuclear energy has emerged to play an increasingly important role in meeting global energy needs. At the recent World Energy Conference in Montreal, 1989 September, experts agreed that nuclear power will continue to be an essential part of the future energy mix. The demand for economic and reliable energy sources is driven by the growth in the world's population and the essential role energy plays in industrial development. Global energy requirements, expected to double over the next 40 years, will seriously challenge suppliers in their ability to meet the demand. Ultimately, efficient energy utilization will become singularly important. Industrialization and economic development manifest themselves in urbanization. Urban dwellers consume significantly more energy per capita compared with their rural neighbours. Consequently, concentrated and environmentally acceptable energy sources, combined with efficient distribution systems, are now recognized as essential to meet urban energy demands. In considering the alternatives that will meet these requirements, nuclear energy qualifies as both a concentrated and environmentally benign source. Nuclear electricity generation is a mature technology that paves the way for other applications. If nuclear energy is to realize its full potential as a safe and cost-effective alternative to fossil fuels, applications beyond those that are currently being serviced by large, central nuclear power stations must be identified, and appropriately designed and sized reactors developed as an investment in the future. To meet this potential, new small reactor concepts are being developed to satisfy the expected energy demands, while also displaying characteristics that address current public concerns for providing minimal environmental impact. Concepts ranging in sized from 10 MW(t) to 1000 MW(t) are being pursued in a number of countries, including Canada, USA, UK, China, and

  10. Business Opportunities for Small Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Akio; Nishimura, Satoshi; Brown, Neil W.

    2007-01-01

    This report assesses the market potential and identifies a number of potential paths for developing the small nuclear reactor business. There are several potential opportunities identified and evaluated. Selecting a specific approach for the business development requires additional information related to a specific market and sources of capital to support the investment. If and how a market for small nuclear plants may develop is difficult to predict because of the complexity of the economic and institutional factors that will influence such development. Key factors are; economics, safety, proliferation resistance and investment risk. The economic and political interest of any of the identified markets is also dependent on successful demonstration of the safety and reliability of small nuclear reactor. Obtaining a US-NRC Standard Design approval would be an important development step toward establishing a market for small reactors. (authors)

  11. Nuclear power reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barjon, Robert

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to explain the physical working conditions of nuclear reactors for the benefit of non-specialized engineers and engineering students. One of the leading ideas of this course is to distinguish between two fundamentally different concepts: - a science which could be called neutrodynamics (as distinct from neutron physics which covers the knowledge of the neutron considered as an elementary particle and the study of its interactions with nuclei); the aim of this science is to study the interaction of the neutron gas with real material media; the introduction will however be restricted to its simplified expression, the theory and equation of diffusion; - a special application: reactor physics, which is introduced when the diffusing and absorbing material medium is also multiplying. For this reason the chapter on fission is used to introduce this section. In practice the section on reactor physics is much longer than that devoted to neutrodynamics and it is developed in what seemed to be the most relevant direction: nuclear power reactors. Every effort was made to meet the following three requirements: to define the physical bases of neutron interaction with different materials, to give a correct mathematical treatment within the limit of necessary simplifying hypotheses clearly explained; to propose, whenever possible, numerical applications in order to fix orders of magnitude [fr

  12. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Mitsutaka

    1997-01-01

    Hardware of an analog nuclear instrumentation system is reformed, a function generator is added to a setting calculation circuit of the nuclear instrumentation system, and each of setting lines of the nuclear instrumentation system is set in parallel with an upper limit curve in an operation region defined by a second order or third order equation. Upon transient change of abnormal power elevation during operation, scram signals are generated by power change in the same state as 100% rated operation due to elevation of reactor thermal power. Since the operation limit value relative to transient change due to power elevation can be made substantially equal with the same as that upon rated operation, the operation limit value for partial power operation state can be kept substantially the same level as that upon rated operation. When transition change caused by abnormal control rod withdrawal occurs during operation, a control rod withdrawal inhibition signal can ensure the power elevation width equal with that upon rated power operation, and since the withdrawal inhibition signal is generated in substantially the same withdrawing state, the operation limit value relative to a partial power operation state can be kept at the same level as that during rated operation. (N.H.)

  13. Activation analysis with small mobile reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, C.

    1990-01-01

    A small nuclear reactor (a low-power reactor without heat removal devices) usually has thermal power output under 100 W and an average in-core thermal neutron flux below 10 9 n/cm 2 s. Conventional activation analysis is restricted to determination of specific elements with large neutron capture cross sections in sizable samples. In-vivo prompt gamma activation analysis (IVPGAA) can be used for diagnosis of elemental composition of the human body, particularly the essential elements Ca, Cl, N, and P in the whole body, and toxic Cd and Hg in contaminated organs. In this chapter, activation analysis using an external neutron beam from the Tsing Hua Mobile Educational Reactor (THMER) for in vivo activation is described. Characteristics of the mobile reactor, in-vivo medical diagnosis, and radiation safety are emphasized. 17 refs, 12 figs, 3 tabs

  14. Status of advanced small pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Peipei; Zhou Yun

    2012-01-01

    In order to expand the nuclear power in energy and desalination, increase competitiveness in global nuclear power market, many developed countries with strong nuclear energy technology have realized the importance of Small Modular Reactor (SMR) and initiated heavy R and D programs in SMR. The Advanced Small Pressurized Water Reactor (ASPWR) is characterized by great advantages in safety and economy and can be used in remote power grid and replace mid/small size fossil plant economically. This paper reviews the history and current status of SMR and ASPWR, and also discusses the design concept, safety features and other advantages of ASPWR. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overall review of ASPWR technology in western countries, and to promote the R and D in ASPWR in China. (authors)

  15. Design study on small CANDLE reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimoto, H; Yan, M [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    A new reactor burnup strategy CANDLE was proposed, where shapes of neutron flux, nuclide densities and power density distributions remain constant but move to an axial direction. Here important points are that the solid fuel is fixed at each position and that any movable burnup reactivity control mechanisms such as control rods are not required. This burnup strategy can derive many merits. The change of excess reactivity along burnup is theoretically zero, and shim rods will not be required for this reactor. The reactor becomes free from accidents induced by unexpected control rods withdrawal. The core characteristics, such as power feedback coefficients and power peaking factor, are not changed along burnup. Therefore, the operation of the reactor becomes much easier than the conventional reactors especially for high burnup reactors. The transportation and storage of replacing fuels become easy and safe, since they are free from criticality accidents. In our previous works it is appeared that application of this burnup strategy to neutron rich fast reactors makes excellent performances. Only natural or depleted uranium is required for the replacing fuels. The average burnup of the spent fuel is about 40% that is equivalent to 40% utilization of the natural uranium without the reprocessing and enrichment. This reactor can be realized for large reactor, since the neutron leakage becomes small and its neutron economy becomes improved. In the present paper we try to design small CANDLE reactor whose performance is similar to the large reactor by increasing its fuel volume ration of the core, since its performance is strongly required for local area usage. Small long life reactor is required for some local areas. Such a characteristic that only natural uranium is required after second core is also strong merit for this case. The core with 1.0 m radius, 2.0 m length can realize CANDLE burn-up with nitride (enriched N-15) natural uranium as fresh fuel. Lead-Bismuth is

  16. Design study on small CANDLE reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, H.; Yan, M.

    2007-01-01

    A new reactor burnup strategy CANDLE was proposed, where shapes of neutron flux, nuclide densities and power density distributions remain constant but move to an axial direction. Here important points are that the solid fuel is fixed at each position and that any movable burnup reactivity control mechanisms such as control rods are not required. This burnup strategy can derive many merits. The change of excess reactivity along burnup is theoretically zero, and shim rods will not be required for this reactor. The reactor becomes free from accidents induced by unexpected control rods withdrawal. The core characteristics, such as power feedback coefficients and power peaking factor, are not changed along burnup. Therefore, the operation of the reactor becomes much easier than the conventional reactors especially for high burnup reactors. The transportation and storage of replacing fuels become easy and safe, since they are free from criticality accidents. In our previous works it is appeared that application of this burnup strategy to neutron rich fast reactors makes excellent performances. Only natural or depleted uranium is required for the replacing fuels. The average burnup of the spent fuel is about 40% that is equivalent to 40% utilization of the natural uranium without the reprocessing and enrichment. This reactor can be realized for large reactor, since the neutron leakage becomes small and its neutron economy becomes improved. In the present paper we try to design small CANDLE reactor whose performance is similar to the large reactor by increasing its fuel volume ration of the core, since its performance is strongly required for local area usage. Small long life reactor is required for some local areas. Such a characteristic that only natural uranium is required after second core is also strong merit for this case. The core with 1.0 m radius, 2.0 m length can realize CANDLE burn-up with nitride (enriched N-15) natural uranium as fresh fuel. Lead-Bismuth is

  17. Small reactors and the 'second nuclear era'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egan, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Predictions of the nuclear industry's demise are premature and distort both history and politics. The industry is reemerging in a form commensurate with the priorities of those people and nations controlling the global forces of production. The current lull in plant orders is due primarily to the world recession and to factors related specifically to reactor size. Traditional economies of scale for nuclear plants have been greatly exaggerated. Reactor vendors and governments in Great Britain, France, West Germany, Japan, the United States, Sweden, Canada, and the Soviet Union are developing small reactors for both domestic applications and export to the Third World. The prefabricated, factory-assembled plants under 500 MWe may alleviate many of the existing socioeconomic constraints on nuclear manufacturing, construction, and operation. In the industrialized world, small reactors could furnish a qualitatively new energy option for utilities. But developing nations hold the largest potential market for small reactors due to the modest size of their electrical systems. These units could double or triple the market potential for nuclear power in this century. Small reactors will both qualitatively and quantitatively change the nature of nuclear technology transfers, offering unique advantages and problems vis-a-vis conventional arrangements. (author)

  18. Adoption of nitrogen power conversion system for small scale ultra-long cycle fast reactor eliminating intermediate sodium loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Seok Bin; Seo, Han; Bang, In Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • N 2 power conversion system for both safety and thermal performance aspects. • Sensitivity studies of several controlled parameters on N 2 power conversion system. • The elimination of the intermediate loop increased the cycle thermal efficiency. • The elimination of the intermediate loop expects economic advantages. - Abstract: As one of SFRs, the ultra-long cycle fast reactor with a power rating of 100 MW e (UCFR-100) was introduced for a 60-year operation. As an alternative to the traditional steam Rankine cycle for the power conversion system, gas based Brayton cycle has been considered for UCFR-100. Among Supercritical CO 2 (S-CO 2 ), Helium (He), Nitrogen (N 2 ) as candidates for the power conversion system for UCFR-100, an N 2 power conversion system was chosen considering both safety and thermal performance aspects. The elimination of the intermediate sodium loop could be achieved due to the safety and stable characteristics of nitrogen working fluid. In this paper, sensitivity studies with respect to several controlled parameters on N 2 power conversion system were performed to optimize the system. Furthermore, the elimination of the intermediate loop was evaluated with respect to its impact on the thermodynamic performance and other aspects.

  19. Reactor technology: power conversion systems and reactor operation and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of advanced fuels permits the use of coolants (organic, high pressure helium) that result in power conversion systems with good thermal efficiency and relatively low cost. Water coolant would significantly reduce thermal efficiency, while lithium and salt coolants, which have been proposed for DT reactors, will have comparable power conversion efficiencies, but will probably be significantly more expensive. Helium cooled blankets with direct gas turbine power conversion cycles can also be used with DT reactors, but activation problems will be more severe, and the portion of blanket power in the metallic structure will probably not be available for the direct cycle, because of temperature limitations. A very important potential advantage of advanced fuel reactors over DT fusion reactors is the possibility of easier blanket maintenance and reduced down time for replacement. If unexpected leaks occur, in most cases the leaking circuit can be shut off and a redundant cooling curcuit will take over the thermal load. With the D-He 3 reactor, it appears practical to do this while the reactor is operating, as long as the leak is small enough not to shut down the reactor. Redundancy for Cat-D reactors has not been explored in detail, but appears feasible in principle. The idea of mobile units operating in the reactor chamber for service and maintenance of radioactive elements is explored

  20. Evaluation of the applicability of existing nuclear power plant regulatory requirements in the U.S. to advanced small modular reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wheeler, Timothy A.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Middleton, Bobby D.; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Duran, Felicia Angelica; Baum, Gregory A.

    2013-05-01

    The current wave of small modular reactor (SMR) designs all have the goal of reducing the cost of management and operations. By optimizing the system, the goal is to make these power plants safer, cheaper to operate and maintain, and more secure. In particular, the reduction in plant staffing can result in significant cost savings. The introduction of advanced reactor designs and increased use of advanced automation technologies in existing nuclear power plants will likely change the roles, responsibilities, composition, and size of the crews required to control plant operations. Similarly, certain security staffing requirements for traditional operational nuclear power plants may not be appropriate or necessary for SMRs due to the simpler, safer and more automated design characteristics of SMRs. As a first step in a process to identify where regulatory requirements may be met with reduced staffing and therefore lower cost, this report identifies the regulatory requirements and associated guidance utilized in the licensing of existing reactors. The potential applicability of these regulations to advanced SMR designs is identified taking into account the unique features of these types of reactors.

  1. Power reactor noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thie, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Noise analysis is a growing field that offers advantages such as simplicity, low cost, and natural multivariable interactions. A major advantage, continuous and undisturbed monitoring, supplies a means of obtaining early warnings of possible reactor malfunctions, thus preventing further complications by alerting opeators to a problem - and aiding in the diagnosis of that problem - before it demands major repairs. Dr. Thie hopes to further, through detailed explanations and over 70 illustrations, the acceptance of the use of noise analysis by the nuclear utility industry. Following an introductory chapter, the theoretical basis for the various methods of noise analysis is explained, and full chapters are devoted to the fundamentals of statistics for time-domain analysis and Fourier series and related topics for frequency-domain analysis. General experimental techniques and associated theoretical considerations are reviewed, leading to discussions of practical applications in the latter half of the book. Besides chapters giving examples of neutron noise and acoustical noise, chapters are also devoted to extensive examples from pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor power plants

  2. Nuclear reactor power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    The redundant signals from the sensor assemblies measuring the process parameters of a nuclear reactor power supply are transmitted each in its turn to a protection system which operates to actuate the protection apparatus for signals indicating off-process conditions. Each sensor assembly includes a number of like sensors measuring the same parameters. The sets of process signals derived from the sensor assemblies are each in its turn transmitted from the protection system to the control system which impresses control signals on the reactor or its components to counteract the tendency for conditions to drift off-normal status requiring operation of the protection system. A parameter signal selector is interposed between the protection system and the control system. This selector prevents a parameter signal of a set of signals, which differs from the other parameters signals of the set by more than twice the allowable variation of the sensors which produce the set, from passing to the control system. The selectors include a pair of signal selection units, one unit sending selected process signals to primary control channels and the other sending selected process signals to back-up control channels. Test signals are periodically impressed by a test unit on a selected pair of a selected unit and control channels. When test signals are so impressed the selected control channel is disabled from transmitting control signals to the reactor and/or its associated components. This arrangement eliminates the possibility that a single component failure which may be spurious will cause an inadvertent trip of the reactor during test

  3. Tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Brooks, J.N.

    1978-01-01

    A tokamak experimental power reactor has been designed that is capable of producing net electric power over a wide range of possible operating conditions. A net production of 81 MW of electricity is expected from the design reference conditions that assume a value of 0.07 for beta-toroidal, a maximum toroidal magnetic field of 9 T and a thermal conversion efficiency of 30%. Impurity control is achieved through the use of a low-Z first wall coating. This approach allows a burn time of 60 seconds without the incorporation of a divertor. The system is cooled by a dual pressurized water/steam system that could potentially provide thermal efficiencies as high as 39%. The first surface facing the plasma is a low-Z coated water cooled panel that is attached to a 20 cm thick blanket module. The vacuum boundary is removed a total of 22 cm from the plasma, thereby minimizing the amount of radiation damage in this vital component. Consideration is given in the design to the possible use of the EPR as a materials test reactor. It is estimated that the total system could be built for less than 550 million dollars

  4. The program of reactors and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, Carlos R.

    2001-01-01

    Into de framework of the program of research reactors and nuclear power plants, the operating Argentine reactors are described. The uses of the research reactors in Argentina are summarized. The reactors installed by Argentina in other countries (Peru, Algeria, Egypt) are briefly described. The CAREM project for the design and construction of an innovator small power reactor (27 MWe) is also described in some detail. The next biennial research and development program for reactor is briefly outlined

  5. Experience in Reviewing Small Modular Reactor Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Nabil Abdul Rahim; Alfred, S.L.; Phongsakorn, P.

    2015-01-01

    Malaysia is in the stage of conducting Preliminary Technical Feasibility Study for the Deployment of Small Modular Reactor (SMR). There are different types of SMR, some already under construction in Argentina (CAREM) and China (HTR-PM) - (light water reactor and high temperature reactor technologies), others with near-term deployment such as SMART in South Korea, ACP100 in China, mPower and NuScale in the US, and others with longer term deployment prospects (liquid-metal cooled reactor technologies). The study was mainly to get an overview of the technology available in the market. The SMR ranking in the study was done through listing out the most deployable technology in the market according to their types. As a new comer country, the proven technology with an excellent operation history will usually be the main consideration points. (author)

  6. The program of reactors and nuclear power plants; Programa de reactores y centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabrese, Carlos R [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Centro Atomico Constituyentes

    2001-07-01

    Into de framework of the program of research reactors and nuclear power plants, the operating Argentine reactors are described. The uses of the research reactors in Argentina are summarized. The reactors installed by Argentina in other countries (Peru, Algeria, Egypt) are briefly described. The CAREM project for the design and construction of an innovator small power reactor (27 MWe) is also described in some detail. The next biennial research and development program for reactor is briefly outlined.

  7. ATFSR: a small torsatron reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Lacatski, J.T.; Uckan, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    A small (average minor radius anti a approx. = 1 m), moderate-aspect-ratio torsatron reactor based on the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is proposed as a starting point for improved stellarator reactor designs. The major limitation of the compact size is the lack of space under the helical coils for the blanket and shield. Neoclassical confinement models for helically trapped particles show that a large electric potential (radial electric field) is necessary to achieve ignition in a device of this size, although high-Q operation is still attainable with more modest potentials

  8. Power reactors in member states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This is the first issue of a periodical computer-based listing of civilian nuclear power reactors in the Member States of the IAEA, presenting the situation as of 1 April 1975. It is intended as a replacement for the Agency's previous annual publication of ''Power and Research Reactors in Member States''. In the new format, the listing contains more information about power reactors in operation, under construction, planned and shut down. As far as possible all the basic design data relating to reactors in operation have been included. In future these data will be included also for other power reactors, so that the publication will serve to give a clear picture of the technical progress achieved. Test and research reactors and critical facilities are no longer listed. Of interest to nuclear power planners, nuclear system designers, nuclear plant operators and interested professional engineers and scientists

  9. Fast reactors in nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazachkovskii, O

    1981-02-01

    The possible applications are discussed of fast reactor nuclear power plants. Basic differences are explained in fast and thermal reactors, mainly with a view to nuclear fuel utilization. Discussed in more detail are the problems of nuclear fuel reproduction and the nost important technical problems of fast reactors. Flow charts are shown of heat transfer for fast reactors BN-350 (loop design) and BN-600 (integral coolant circuit design). Main specifications are given for demonstration and power fast reactors in operation, under construction and in project-stage.

  10. Tokamak reactor startup power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weldon, D.M.; Murray, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Tokamak startup with ohmic heating (OH)-induced voltages requires rather large voltages and power supplies. On present machines, with no radiofrequency (rf)-assist provisions, hundreds of volts have been specified for their designs. With the addition of electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) assist, the design requirements have been lowered. To obtain information on the cost and complexity associated with this ECRH-assisted, OH-pulsed startup voltage for ignition-type machines, a trade-off study was completed. The Fusion Engineering Device (FED) configuration was selected as a model because information was available on the structure. The data obtained are applicable to all tokamaks of this general size and complexity, such as the Engineering Test Reactor

  11. Calibration of RB reactor power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotic, O.; Markovic, H.; Ninkovic, M.; Strugar, P.; Dimitrijevic, Z.; Takac, S.; Stefanovic, D.; Kocic, A.; Vranic, S.

    1976-09-01

    The first and only calibration of RB reactor power was done in 1962, and the obtained calibration ratio was used irrespective of the lattice pitch and core configuration. Since the RB reactor is being prepared for operation at higher power levels it was indispensable to reexamine the calibration ratio, estimate its dependence on the lattice pitch, critical level of heavy water and thickness of the side reflector. It was necessary to verify the reliability of control and dosimetry instruments, and establish neutron and gamma dose dependence on reactor power. Two series of experiments were done in June 1976. First series was devoted to tests of control and dosimetry instrumentation and measurements of radiation in the RB reactor building dependent on reactor power. Second series covered measurement of thermal and epithermal neuron fluxes in the reactor core and calculation of reactor power. Four different reactor cores were chosen for these experiments. Reactor pitches were 8, 8√2, and 16 cm with 40, 52 and 82 fuel channels containing 2% enriched fuel. Obtained results and analysis of these results are presented in this document with conclusions related to reactor safe operation

  12. Tendencies in operating power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinckmann, H.F.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given about new tendencies in operating power reactors. In order to meet the high demands for control and monitoring of power reactors modern procedures are applicated such as the incore-neutron flux detection by means of electron emission detectors and multi-component activation probes, the noise diagnostics as well as high-efficient automation systems

  13. Is the stage set for small reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowley, J.H.; Marda, R.S.; Ritchey, N.F.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses the unexpected large increase in capital cost and time needed to build large conventional nuclear power plants, the slowdown in electric utility system load growth, and the financing constraints faced by the utility industry. The advantages and disadvantages of small reactor systems in solving some of these problems are assessed from the standpoint of institutional, capital cost, system planning, financing, and market potential considerations

  14. Tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Bertoncini, P.J.

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual design has been developed for a tokamak Experimental Power Reactor to operate at net electrical power conditions with a plant capacity factor of 50 percent for 10 yr. The EPR operates in a pulsed mode at a frequency of approximately 1/min, with approximately 75 percent duty cycle, is capable of producing approximately 72 MWe and requires 42 MWe. The annual tritium consumption is 16 kg. The EPR vacuum chamber is 6.25 m in major radius and 2.4 m in minor radius, is constructed of 2 cm thick stainless steel, and has 2 cm thick detachable, beryllium-coated coolant panels mounted on the interior. A 0.28 m stainless steel blanket and a shield ranging from 0.6 to 1.0 m surround the vacuum vessel. The coolant is H 2 O. Sixteen niobium-titanium superconducting toroidal field coils provide a field of 10 T at the coil and 4.47 T at the plasma. Superconducting ohmic heating and equilibrium field coils provide 135 V-s to drive the plasma current. Plasma heating is accomplished by 12 neutral beam injectors which provide 60 MW. The energy transfer and storage system consists of a central superconducting storage ring, a homopolar energy storage unit, and a variety of inductor-convertors

  15. The Power of Small

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 12. The Power of Small: Championing the Underdogs of Modern Medicine. Suvasini Ramaswamy Anirban Mitra. General Article Volume 20 Issue 12 December 2015 pp 1136-1153 ...

  16. Small hydroelectric power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgesen, Boerre

    2002-01-01

    Small hydroelectric power plants are power plants of 1 - 10 MW. For a supplier, this is an unnatural limit. A more natural limit involves compact engine design and simplified control system. The article discusses most of the engine and electrotechnical aspects in the development, construction and operation of such a plant

  17. Containment for small pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siler, W.C.; Marda, R.S.; Smith, W.R.

    1977-01-01

    Babcock and Wilcox Company has prepared studies under ERDA contract of small and intermediate size (313, 365 and 1200 MWt) PWR reactor plants, for industrial cogeneration or electric power generation. Studies and experience with nuclear plants in this size range indicate unfavorable economics. To offset this disadvantage, modular characteristics of an integral reactor and close-coupled vapor suppression containment have been exploited to shorten construction schedules and reduce construction costs. The resulting compact reactor/containment complex is illustrated. Economic studies to date indicate that the containment design and the innovative construction techniques developed to shorten erection schedules have been important factors in reducing estimated project costs, thus potentially making such smaller plants competetive with competing energy sources

  18. Gaseous fuel reactors for power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmick, H.H.; Schwenk, F.C.

    1978-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is participating in a NASA-sponsored program to demonstrate the feasibility of a gaseous uranium fueled reactor. The work is aimed at acquiring experimental and theoretical information for the design of a prototype plasma core reactor which will test heat removal by optical radiation. The basic goal of this work is for space applications, however, other NASA-sponsored work suggests several attractive applications to help meet earth-bound energy needs. Such potential benefits are small critical mass, on-site fuel processing, high fuel burnup, low fission fragment inventory in reactor core, high temperature for process heat, optical radiation for photochemistry and space power transmission, and high temperature for advanced propulsion systems. Low power reactor experiments using uranium hexafluoride gas as fuel demonstrated performance in accordance with reactor physics predictions. The final phase of experimental activity now in progress is the fabrication and testing of a buffer gas vortex confinement system

  19. Safety of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacPherson, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    Safety is the major public issue to be resolved or accommodated if nuclear power is to have a future. Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) of accidental releases of low-level radiation, the spread and activity of radiation in populated areas, and the impacts on public health from exposure evolved from the earlier Rasmussen Reactor Safety Study. Applications of the PRA technique have identified design peculiarities in specific reactors, thus increasing reactor safety and establishing a quide for evaluating reactor regulations. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission and reactor vendors must share with utilities the responsibility for reactor safety in the US and for providing reasonable assurance to the public. This entails persuasive public education and information that with safety a top priority, changes now being made in light water reactor hardware and operations will be adequate. 17 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  20. A nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrman, B.E.; Broden, P.; Lundin, N.

    1979-12-01

    The invention consists of shock absorbing support beams fastened to the underside of the reactor tank lid of a BWR type reactor, whose purpose is to provide support to the steam separator and dryer unit against accelerations due to earthquakes, without causing undue thermal stresses in the unit due to differential expansion. (J.I.W.)

  1. Preliminary Study of Potential Market for Small Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, A.; Brown, N. W.

    2008-01-01

    Small reactors are an energy supply for a specific purpose and oriented for a different market than large reactors. Small reactors will provide a local solution for developed and developing countries, such as, in remote areas, on small grids, or for non-electricity applications such as, district heating, seawater desalination and process heat. Single or medium sized power stations with small reactors should be compared with single fissile or renewable energy source and not be compared with large reactors. CRIEPI and LLNL have studied the business opportunities for small reactors. The small reactor concept is planned for initial use in small remote communities and in developing countries with small power distribution grid. Rapid installation and simple operation of the small plants is intended to support use in these communities without requiring development of a substantial nuclear technology infrastructure. In this study, two approaches were used in the assessment of the potential market. The first approach took a global look at the need for small nuclear plants. Then selected countries and sites were identified based on countries expressing interest in small reactors to the IAEA and consideration of sites in the US and Japan. (1) Tunisia, Mexico, Indonesia, Uruguay, Egypt and Argentina have demonstrated interest in nuclear power. Selecting one of these is dependent on political and socioeconomic factors, some of which have been identified, that require direct interaction with the countries to establish if they represent real opportunities. (2) The states of Hawaii and Alaska in the United States have high power cost and remote or island communities that may benefit from small nuclear plants. Alaska has shown greater interest in power alternatives including small than Hawaii and there is clearly less public resistance to nuclear power in Alaska. (3) The countries in Central America are actively expanding their power grids but have not demonstrated great interest

  2. Small nuclear reactor safety design requirements for autonomous operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozier, K.S.; Kupca, S.

    1997-01-01

    Small nuclear power reactors offer compelling safety advantages in terms of the limited consequences that can arise from major accident events and the enhanced ability to use reliable, passive means to eliminate their occurrence by design. Accordingly, for some small reactor designs featuring a high degree of safety autonomy, it may be-possible to delineate a ''safety envelope'' for a given set of reactor circumstances within which safe reactor operation can be guaranteed without outside intervention for time periods of practical significance (i.e., days or weeks). The capability to operate a small reactor without the need for highly skilled technical staff permanently present, but with continuous remote monitoring, would aid the economic case for small reactors, simplify their use in remote regions and enhance safety by limiting the potential for accidents initiated by inappropriate operator action. This paper considers some of the technical design options and issues associated with the use of small power reactors in an autonomous mode for limited periods. The focus is on systems that are suitable for a variety of applications, producing steam for electricity generation, district heating, water desalination and/or marine propulsion. Near-term prospects at low power levels favour the use of pressurized, light-water-cooled reactor designs, among which those having an integral core arrangement appear to offer cost and passive-safety advantages. Small integral pressurized water reactors have been studied in many countries, including the test operation of prototype systems. (author)

  3. An inherently safe power reactor module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salerno, L.N.

    1985-01-01

    General Electric's long participation in liquid metal reactor technology has led to a Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) concept supported by DOE contract DE-AC06-85NE37937. The reactor module is sized to maximize inherent safety features. The small size allows factory fabrication, reducing field construction and field QA/QC labor, and allows safety to be demonstrated in full scale, to support a pre-licensed standard commercial product. The module is small enough to be placed underground, and can be combined with steam and electrical generating equipment to provide a complete electrical power producing plant in the range of 400-1200 MWe. Initial assessments are that the concept has the potential to be economically competitive with existing methods of power production used by the utility industry

  4. Reactor theory and power reactors. 1. Calculational methods for reactors. 2. Reactor kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Various methods for calculation of neutron flux in power reactors are discussed. Some mathematical models used to describe transients in nuclear reactors and techniques for the reactor kinetics' relevant equations solution are also presented

  5. Small nuclear power reactor emergency electric power supply system reliability comparative analysis; Analise da confiabilidade do sistema de suprimento de energia eletrica de emergencia de um reator nuclear de pequeno porte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfietti, Gerson

    2003-07-01

    This work presents an analysis of the reliability of the emergency power supply system, of a small size nuclear power reactor. Three different configurations are investigated and their reliability analyzed. The fault tree method is used as the main tool of analysis. The work includes a bibliographic review of emergency diesel generator reliability and a discussion of the design requirements applicable to emergency electrical systems. The influence of common cause failure influences is considered using the beta factor model. The operator action is considered using human failure probabilities. A parametric analysis shows the strong dependence between the reactor safety and the loss of offsite electric power supply. It is also shown that common cause failures can be a major contributor to the system reliability. (author)

  6. Fractals in Power Reactor Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar Martinez, O.

    1994-01-01

    In this work the non- lineal dynamic problem of power reactor is analyzed using classic concepts of fractal analysis as: attractors, Hausdorff-Besikovics dimension, phase space, etc. A new non-linear problem is also analyzed: the discrimination of chaotic signals from random neutron noise signals and processing for diagnosis purposes. The advantages of a fractal analysis approach in the power reactor noise are commented in details

  7. Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a system model that can be used to analyze three advance small modular reactor (SMR) designs through their lifetime. Neutronics of these reactor designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX/6). The system models were developed in Matlab and Simulink. A major thrust of this research was the initial scoping analysis of Sandias concept of a long-life fast reactor (LLFR). The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional light water reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs (e.g. high temperature gas reactor (HTGR)). The system model has subroutines for lifetime reactor feedback and operation calculations, thermal hydraulic effects, load demand changes and a simplified SCO2 Brayton cycle for power conversion.

  8. Power reactors in Member States. 1978 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The computer-based reactor listing gives information on reactor core characteristics and plant systems for all power reactors in operation under construction and planned. The following two tables are included to give a general picture of the overall situation: Reactor types and net electrical power; Reactor units and net electrical power by country and cumulated by year

  9. Different types of power reactors and provenness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, E.I.

    1977-01-01

    The lecture guides the potential buyer in the selection of a reactor type. Recommended criteria regarding provenness, licensability, and contractual arrangements are defined and discussed. Tabular data summarizing operating experience and commercial availability of units are presented and discussed. The status of small and medium power reactors which are of interest to many developing countries is presented. It is stressed that each prospective buyer will have to establish his own criteria based on specific conditions which will be applied to reactor selection. In all cases it will be found that selection, either pre-selection of bidders or final selection of supplier, will be a fairly complex evaluation. (orig.) [de

  10. Power reactor information system (PRIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    Since the very beginning of commercial operation of nuclear power plants, the nuclear power industry worldwide has accumulated more than 5000 reactor years of experience. The IAEA has been collecting Operating Experience data for Nuclear Power Plants since 1970 which were computerized in 1980. The Agency has undertaken to make Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) available on-line to its Member States. The aim of this publication is to provide the users of PRIS from their terminals with description of data base and communication systems and to show the methods of accessing the data

  11. The status of development of small and medium sized reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinov, L.V; Kupitz, J.

    1987-01-01

    Several IAEA Member States have shown their interest in reactor design, having a smaller power rating (100-500 MW(e) range) than those generally available on the international market. These small and medium sized power reactors are of interest either for domestic applications or for export into countries with less developed infrastructure. There are different developments undertaken for these power reactors to be ready for offering in the nineties and beyond. The paper gives an overview about the status and different trends in IAEA Member States in the development of small and medium sized reactors for the 90's and provides an outlook for very new reactor designs as a long term option for nuclear power. (author)

  12. Power oscillations in BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa P, G.

    2002-01-01

    One of the main problems in the operation of BWR type reactors is the instability in power that these could present. One type of oscillations and that is the objective of this work is the named density wave, which is attributed to the thermohydraulic processes that take place in the reactor core. From the beginnings of the development of BWR reactors, the stability of these has been an important aspect in their design, due to its possible consequences on the fuel integrity. The reactor core operates in two phase flow conditions and it is observed that under certain power and flow conditions, power instabilities appear. Studying this type of phenomena is complex, due to that a reactor core is constituted approximately by 27,000 fuel bars with different distributions of power and flow. The phenomena that cause the instability in BWR reactors continue being matter of scientific study. In the literature mainly in nuclear subject, it can be observed that exist different methods and approximations for studying this type of phenomena, nevertheless, their results are focused to establish safety limits in the reactor operation, instead of studying in depth of the knowledge about. Also in this line sense of the reactor data analysis, the oscillations characteristic frequencies are obtained for trying to establish if the power is growing or decreasing. In addition to that before mentioned in this paper it is presented a rigorous study applying the volumetric average method, for obtaining the vacuum waves propagation velocities and its possible connection with the power oscillations. (Author)

  13. Assessment of nuclear reactor concepts for low power space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Andrew C.; Gedeon, Stephen R.; Morey, Dennis C.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a preliminary small reactor concepts feasibility and safety evaluation designed to provide a first order validation of the nuclear feasibility and safety of six small reactor concepts are given. These small reactor concepts have potential space applications for missions in the 1 to 20 kWe power output range. It was concluded that low power concepts are available from the U.S. nuclear industry that have the potential for meeting both the operational and launch safety space mission requirements. However, each design has its uncertainties, and further work is required. The reactor concepts must be mated to a power conversion technology that can offer safe and reliable operation.

  14. Public acceptance of small reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDougall, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    The success of any nuclear program requires acceptance by the local public and all levels of government involved in the decision to initiate a reactor program. Public acceptance of a nuclear energy source is a major challenge in successful initiation of a small reactor program. In AECL's experience, public acceptance will not be obtained until the public is convinced that the specific nuclear program is needed, safe and economic and environmental benefit to the community. The title of public acceptance is misleading. The objective of the program is a fully informed public. The program proponent cannot force public acceptance, which is beyond his control. He can, however, ensure that the public is informed. Once information has begun to flow to the public by various means as will be explained later, the proponent is responsible to ensure that the information that is provided by him and by others is accurate. Most importantly, and perhaps most difficult to accomplish, the proponent must develop a consultative process that allows the proponent and the public to agree on actions that are acceptable to the proponent and the community

  15. Investigation of small and modular-sized fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kenichi; Kawasaki, Nobuchika; Umetsu, Yoichiro; Akatsu, Minoru; Kasai, Shigeo; Konomura, Mamoru; Ichimiya, Masakazu

    2000-06-01

    In this paper, feasibility of the multipurpose small fast reactor, which could be used for requirements concerned with various utilization of electricity and energy and flexibility of power supply site, is discussed on the basis of examination of literatures of various small reactors. And also, a possibility of economic improvement by learning effect of fabrication cost is discussed for the modular-sized reactor which is expected to be a base load power supply system with lower initial investment. (1) Multipurpose small reactor (a) The small reactor with 10MWe-150MWe has a potential as a power source for large co-generation, a large island, a middle city, desalination and marine use. (b) Highly passive mechanism, long fuel exchange interval, and minimized maintenance activities are required for the multipurpose small reactor design. The reactor has a high potential for the long fuel exchange interval, since it is relatively easy for FR to obtain a long life core. (c) Current designs of small FRs in Japan and USA (NERI Project) are reviewed to obtain design requirements for the multipurpose small reactor. (2) Modular-sized reactor (a) In order that modular-sized reactor could be competitive to 3200MWe twin plant (two large monolithic reactor) with 200kyenWe, the target capital cost of FOAK is estimated to be 260kyen/yenWe for 800MWe modular, 280kyen/yenWe for 400MWe modular and 290kyen/yenWe for 200MWe by taking account of the leaning effect. (b) As the result of the review on the current designs of modular-sized FRs in Japan and USA (S-PRISM) from the viewpoint of economic improvement, since it only be necessary to make further effort for the target capital cost of FOAK, since the modular-sized FRs requires a large amount of material for shielding, vessels and heat exchangers essentially. (author)

  16. Power Reactor Information System (PRIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegelberg, R.

    1992-01-01

    The IAEA has been collecting Operating Experience data for Nuclear Power Plants of the IAEA Member States since 1970. In order to facilitate an analysis of nuclear power plant performance as well as to produce relevant publications, all previously collected data supplied from the questionnaires were computerized in 1980 and the Power Reactor Information System was implemented. PRIS currently contains production records for the years up to and including 1990 and about 98% of the reactors-years operating experience in the world is contained in PRIS. (orig.)

  17. Nuclear power reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Risoe National Laboratory was established more than twenty years ago with research and development of nuclear reactor technology as its main objective. The Laboratory has by now accumulated many years of experience in a number of areas vital to nuclear reactor technology. The work and experience of, and services offered by the Laboratory within the following fields are described: Health physics site supervision; Treatment of low and medium level radioactive waste; Core performance evaluation; Transient analysis; Accident analysis; Fuel management; Fuel element design, fabrication and performance evaluation; Non-destructive testing of nuclear fuel; Theoretical and experimental structural analysis; Reliability analysis; Site evaluation. Environmental risk and hazard calculation; Review and analysis of safety documentation. Risoe has already given much assistance to the authorities, utilities and industries in such fields, carrying out work on both light and heavy water reactors. The Laboratory now offers its services to others as a consultant, in education and training of staff, in planning, in qualitative and quantitative analysis, and for the development and specification of fabrication techniques. (author)

  18. Corrigendum to small power and heat generation systems on the basis of propulsion and innovative reactor technologies (IAEA-TECDOC-1172)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-09-01

    Full text: - Footnote 1 on page 4 should read: '' 1 The results of the feasibility studies were presented by BARC at the meeting, but no paper was provided for publication in these proceedings.'' - On page 5, footnote 2 should be added to the following paragraph: ''CEA and TECHNICATOM (France) have about 200 reactor-years of experience from propulsion and small experimental reactors. Special design features for a future small reactor are formulated as follows 2 :'' ('' 2 At the meeting, these features were presented by CEA, Cadarache, but no paper was provided for publication in these proceedings.'')

  19. Corrigendum to small power and heat generation systems on the basis of propulsion and innovative reactor technologies (IAEA-TECDOC-1172)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    Full text: - Footnote 1 on page 4 should read: ''{sup 1}The results of the feasibility studies were presented by BARC at the meeting, but no paper was provided for publication in these proceedings.'' - On page 5, footnote 2 should be added to the following paragraph: ''CEA and TECHNICATOM (France) have about 200 reactor-years of experience from propulsion and small experimental reactors. Special design features for a future small reactor are formulated as follows{sup 2}:'' (''{sup 2} At the meeting, these features were presented by CEA, Cadarache, but no paper was provided for publication in these proceedings.'')

  20. Small propulsion reactor design based on particle bed reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewig, H.; Lazareth, O.; Mughabghab, S.; Perkins, K.; Powell, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) designs are discussed which use 233 U and /sup 242m/Am as fissile materials. A constant total power of 100MW is assumed for all reactors in this study. Three broad aspects of these reactors is discussed. First, possible reactor designs are developed, second physics calculations are outlined and discussed and third mass estimates of the various candidates reactors are made. It is concluded that reactors with a specific mass of 1 kg/MW can be envisioned of 233 U is used and approximately a quarter of this value can be achieved if /sup 242m/Am is used. If this power level is increased by increasing the power density lower specific mass values are achievable. The limit will be determined by uncertainties in the thermal-hydraulic analysis. 5 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  1. Cascade ICF power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.J.; Pitts, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The double-cone-shaped Cascade reaction chamber rotates at 50 rpm to keep a blanket of ceramic granules in place against the wall as they slide from the poles to the exit slots at the equator. The 1 m-thick blanket consists of layers of carbon, beryllium oxide, and lithium aluminate granules about 1 mm in diameter. The x rays and debris are stopped in the carbon granules; the neutrons are multiplied and moderated in the BeO and breed tritium in the LiAlO 2 . The chamber wall is made up of SiO tiles held in compression by a network of composite SiC/Al tendons. Cascade operates at a 5 Hz pulse rate with 300 MJ in each pulse. The temperature in the blanket reaches 1600 K on the inner surface and 1350 K at the outer edge. The granules are automatically thrown into three separate vacuum heat exchangers where they give up their energy to high pressure helium. The helium is used in a Brayton cycle to obtain a thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency of 55%. Studies have been done on neutron activation, debris recovery, vaporization and recondensation of blanket material, tritium control and recovery, fire safety, and cost. These studies indicate that Cascade appears to be a promising ICF reactor candidate from all standpoints. At the 1000 MWe size, electricity could be made for about the same cost as in a future fission reactor

  2. Introducing small modular reactors into Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growing interest in smaller, simpler reactors for generating electricity and process heat. This is evidenced in the growing body of literature and the increasingly frequent meetings and conferences on the subject. The interest in Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) is driven to a large extent by the desire to reduce capital costs, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, to replace retiring fossil plants that do not meet today's environmental standards, and to provide power in locations away from large electrical grids. These drivers are as important in Canada as they are in the U.S., where the design and licensing of SMRs is being most vigorously pursued. They have led to a growing interest in Canada as a potentially significant market for SMRs, particularly in the Western Provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan and in the remote First Nations communities of Northern Canada. There is a growing body of literature addressing the regulation and licensing of Small Modular Reactors in the U.S. Issues being identified in there can generally be categorized as licensing framework issues, licensing application issues, and design and manufacturing issues. Many of these issues are embedded in the US regulatory framework and can only be resolved through changes in the regulations. For the most part these issues are equally applicable in Canada and will need to be addressed in introducing SMRs here. A significant difference, however, is that these issues can be addressed within the Canadian regulatory framework without requiring changes in the regulations. The CNSC has taken a very proactive stance regarding the licensing of small reactors in Canada. They have published two new Regulatory Documents stipulating the requirements for licensing small reactors. A key feature is that they allow the application of a 'graded approach' in which the stringency of the design measures and analyses applied are commensurate with the level of risk posed by

  3. Prospect of small modular reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huailin; Zhu Qingyuan; Wang Suli; Xia Haihong

    2014-01-01

    Small modular reactor has the advantages of modular construction, enhanced safety/robustness from simplified designs, better ecomonic, clean and carbon free, compatible with the needs of smaller utilities and diversified application. In this paper, the prospect of small modular reactor is discussed from technology development status, constraints, economic. (authors)

  4. Power Reactor Thoria Reprocessing Facility (PRTRF), Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhami, P.S; Yadav, J.S; Agarwal, K.

    2017-01-01

    Exploitation of the abundant thorium resources to meet sustained energy demand forms the basis of the Indian nuclear energy programme. To gain reprocessing experience in thorium fuel cycle, thoria was irradiated in research reactor CIRUS in early sixties. Later in eighties, thoria bundles were used for initial flux flattening in some of the pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). The research reactor irradiated thoria contained small content (∼ 2-3ppm) of "2"3"2U in "2"3"3U product, which did not pose any significant radiological problems during processing in Uranium Thorium Separation Facility (UTSF), Trombay. Thoria irradiated in PHWRs on discharge contained (∼ 0.5-1.5% "2"3"3U with significant "2"3"2U content (100-500 ppm) requiring special radiological attention. Based on the experience from UTSF, a new facility viz. Power Reactor Thoria Reprocessing Facility (PRTRF), Trombay was built which was hot commissioned in the year 2015

  5. Nuclear reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshi, Yuji; Sakata, Akira; Karatsu, Hiroyuki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To control abrupt changes in neutron fluxes by feeding back a correction signal obtained from a deviation between neutron fluxes and heat fluxes for changing the reactor core flow rate to a recycling flow rate control system upon abrupt power change of a nuclear reactor. Constitution: In addition to important systems, that is, a reactor pressure control system and a recycling control system in the power control device of a BWR type power plant, a control circuit for feeding back a deviation between neutron fluxes and heat fluxes to a recycling flow rate control system is disposed. In the suppression circuit, a deviation signal is prepared in an adder from neutron flux and heat flux signals obtained through a primary delay filter. The deviation signal is passed through a dead band and an advance/delay filter into a correction signal, which is adapted to be fed back to the recycling flow rate control system. As a result, the reactor power control can be conducted smoothly and it is possible to effectively suppress the abrupt change or over shoot of the neutron fluxes and abrupt power change. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Small radioisotope powered batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myatt, J.

    1975-06-01

    Various methods of converting the large amounts of energy stored in radioisotopes are described. These are based on:- (a) the Seebeck effect; (b) thermionic emission of electrons from a hot body; (c) the Stirling Cycle; and (d) radiovoltaic charge separation in 'p-n' junctions. Small generators in the range 0 to 100 W(e) developed using these effects are described and typical applications for each of these systems are given. These include data collection and transmission from remote sites, implantable medical devices, lighthouses, radio beacons, and space power supplies. (author)

  7. Power control system in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Yasuo.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To control the reactor power so that the power distribution can satisfy the limiting conditions, by regulating the reactor core flow rate while monitoring the power distribution in the reactor core of a BWR type reactor. Constitution: A power distribution monitor determines the power distribution for the entire reactor core based on the data for neutron flux, reactor core thermal power, reactor core flow rate and control rod pattern from the reactor and calculates the linear power density distribution. A power up ratio computing device computes the current linear power density increase ratio. An aimed power up ratio is determined by converting the electrical power up ratio transferred from a load demand input device into the reactor core thermal power up ratio. The present reactor core thermal power up ratio is subtracted from the limiting power up ratio and the difference is sent to an operation amount indicator and the reactor core flow rate is changed in a reactor core flow rate regulator, by which the reactor power is controlled. (Moriyama, K.)

  8. Experience in using a research reactor for the training of power reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blotcky, A.J.; Arsenaut, L.J.

    1972-01-01

    A research reactor facility such as the one at the Omaha Veterans Administration Hospital would have much to offer in the way of training reactor operators. Although most of the candidates for the course had either received previous training in the Westinghouse Reactor Operator Training Program, had operated nuclear submarine reactors or had operated power reactors, they were not offered the opportunity to perform the extensive manipulations of a reactor that a small research facility will allow. In addition the AEC recommends 10 research reactor startups per student as a prerequisite for a cold operator?s license and these can easily be obtained during the training period

  9. Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kam, F.B.K.; Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Regulatory and research evaluations of embrittlement predication models and of pressure vessel integrity can be greatly expedited by the use of a well-designed, computerized data base. The Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) is such a comprehensive collection of data for US commercial nuclear reactors. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has provided financial support, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has provided technical assistance in the quality assurance (QA) of the data to establish an industry-wide data base that will be maintained and updated on a long-term basis. Successful applications of the data base to several of NRC's evaluations have received favorable response and support for its continuation. The future direction of the data base has been designed to include the test reactor and other types of data of interest to the regulators and the researchers. 1 ref

  10. Power reactor core safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rim, C.S.; Kim, W.C.; Shon, D.S.; Kim, J.

    1981-01-01

    As a part of nuclear safety research program, a project was launched to develop a model to predict fuel failure, to produce the data required for the localizaton of fuel design and fabrication technology, to establish safety limits for regulation of nuclear power plants and to develop reactor operation method to minimize fuel failure through the study of fuel failure mechanisms. During 1980, the first year of this project, various fuel failure mechanisms were analyzed, an experimental method for out-of-pile tests to study the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of Zircaloy cladding underiodine environment was established, and characteristics of PWR and CANDU Zircaloy specimens were examined. Also developed during 1980 were the methods and correlations to evaluate fuel failures in the reactor core based on operating data from power reactors

  11. Experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The following five topics are discussed using figures and diagrams: (1) energy storage and transfer program, (2) thermomechanical analysis, (3) a steam dual-cycle power conversion system for the EPR, (4) EPR tritium facility scoping studies, and (5) vacuum systems

  12. Development of small simplified modular reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiki, Hideaki; Nakamaru, Mikihide

    2003-01-01

    The small simplified modular reactor, which is being development with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, will provide attractiveness for the energy market in the world due to its flexibility in energy demands as well as in site conditions, its high potential in reducing investment risk and its safety feature facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by small output of 300 MWe and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). The investment potential is expected from simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, internal upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and hull structure building concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps as well as needs for maintenance of such pumps. The internal CRDs shorten the height of the reactor vessel (RPV) and consequently shorten the primary containment vessel (PCV). The hull structure facilitates modular arrangement, design standardization and factory fabrication. The safety feature mainly consists of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive containment cooling system (PCCS), passive auto-catalytic recombiner and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in case of design base accidents including loss of coolant accidents. The PCCS suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without and AC power. The recombiner decreases hydrogen concentration in the PCV in case of a severe accident. The IVR could cool the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability. These innovative systems/components featured in the small simplified modular reactor will stimulate global energy market. (author)

  13. Conceptual design study of small lead-bismuth cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikazawa, Yoshitaka; Hori, Toru; Kida, Masanori; Konomura, Mamoru

    2004-11-01

    In phase 2 of the feasibility study of commercialized fast reactor cycle systems of JNC, we make a concept of a small sodium cooled reactor for a power source of a city with various requirements, such as, safety and economical competitiveness. various reactor concepts are surveyed and a tank type reactor whose intermediate heat exchanger and primary main pumps are arranged in series is selected. In this study, a compact long life core and a simple reactor structure designs are pursued. The core type is three regional Zr concentration with one Pu enrichment core, the reactor outlet temperature achieves 550degC and the reactor electric output increases from 150 MWe to 165 MWe. The construction cost is much higher than the economical goal in the case of FOAK. But the construction cost in the case of NOAK is estimated to be 85.6% achieving the economical goal. (author)

  14. Multipurposed small fast reactor SVBR-75/100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zrodnikov, A.V.; Grigoriev, O.G.; Chitaykin, V.I.; Dedoul, A.V.; Gromov, B.F.; Toshinsky, G.I.; Dragunov, Yu.G.; Stepanov, V.S.

    2001-01-01

    Currently the nuclear power (NP) development meets significant difficulties in many countries. First of all it relates to complicating and cost rising of nuclear power plants (NPP) due to essential enhancing the safety requirements. The possibility and expediency of developing the NP based on unified small power reactor modules SVBR-75/100 with fast neutron reactors cooled by lead-bismuth eutectic alloy is substantiated for the nearest decades in the paper. Based on those modules the following designs can be realized: renovating of the NPP units which operation term has been exhausted; regional nuclear heat power plants (NHPP) of 100-300 MW power which need near cities' location; large power modular NPPs (∼1000 MW) like US concept PRISM or Japanese concept 4S; nuclear power complexes for sea water desalinating in developing countries which meet nonproliferation requirements, reactors for Pu utilization and minor actinides transmutation. (author)

  15. Design of small centrifugal compressor test model for a supercritical CO2 compressor in the fast reactor power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, Y.; Ishizuka, T.; Aritomi, M.

    2008-01-01

    In order to clarify the CO 2 compressor performance in the vicinity of critical point, a research project has been started in Tokyo Institute of Technology based on Japanese government fund. This paper describes how fundamental parameters were selected and sizing of a small and high speed impeller of the test centrifugal compressor. The concept of canned type compressor structures provided with high speed electric motor and preliminary aerodynamic performance prediction are also given. (authors)

  16. Reactor power peaking information display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Book, T.L.; Kochendarfer, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a system for monitoring operating conditions within a nuclear reactor. The system consists of a method for measuring the operating parameters within the nuclear reactor, including the position of axial power shaping rods and regulating control rod. It also includes a method for determining from the operating parameters the operating limits before a power peaking condition exists within the nuclear reactor, and a method for displaying the operating limits which consists of a visual display permitting the continuous monitoring of the operating conditions within the nuclear reactor as a graph of the shaping rod position vs the regulating rod position having a permissible area and a restricted area. The permissible area is further divided into a recommended operating area for steady state operation and a cursor located on the graph to indicate the present operating condition of the nuclear reactor to allow an operator to view any need for corrective action based on the movement of the cursor out of the recommended operating area and to take any corrective transient action within the permissible area

  17. Reactor power region measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwa, Takao.

    1996-01-01

    The device of the present invention can rapidly detect abnormality of a local power region monitor (LPRM) even at a low power region caused such as upon start-up of a BWR type reactor. Namely, the present invention comprises (1) an LPRM detector for measuring neutron fluxes in the reactor, (2) a gamma thermo detector for calibrating the sensitivity of the LPRM detector, (3) a comparison circuit for comparing the detected values of the detectors (1) and (2), and (4) an alarm circuit for outputting an alarm when the comparative difference of the output of the circuit (3) exceeds a predetermined value. Signals of an alarm for a lower limit of the LPRM detector have been issued continuously upon start-up and shut down of the reactor since neutron fluxes in the reactor are reduced. However, the gamma thermo detector is always secured in the inside of the reactor different from a travelling-type incore probe monitor (TIP) disposed so far for the same purpose. Accordingly, the alarm generated upon usual start-up can be eliminated by comparing the detected values of the detector (2) and abnormality of the detector (1) can be rapidly detected by judging the abnormality of the comparative difference. (I.S.)

  18. Brighter for small power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haaland, Leif

    2003-01-01

    The article presents a small tunnel drilling machine aimed at using for the construction of small hydroelectric power plants and mentions briefly some advantages economically and environmentally of both the machine and the power production solution

  19. Argentinean integrated small reactor design and scale economy analysis of integrated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florido, P. C.; Bergallo, J. E.; Ishida, M. V.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the design of CAREM, which is Argentinean integrated small reactor project and the scale economy analysis results of integrated reactor. CAREM project consists on the development, design and construction of a small nuclear power plant. CAREM is an advanced reactor conceived with new generation design solutions and standing on the large experience accumulated in the safe operation of Light Water Reactors. The CAREM is an indirect cycle reactor with some distinctive and characteristic features that greatly simplify the reactor and also contribute to a highly level of safety: integrated primary cooling system, self pressurized, primary cooling by natural circulation and safety system relying on passive features. For a fully doupled economic evaluation of integrated reactors done by IREP (Integrated Reactor Evaluation Program) code transferred to IAEA, CAREM have been used as a reference point. The results shows that integrated reactors become competitive with power larger than 200MWe with Argentinean cheapest electricity option. Due to reactor pressure vessel construction limit, low pressure drop steam generator are used to reach power output of 200MWe for natural circulation. For forced circulation, 300MWe can be achieved. (author)

  20. Passive Safety Features for Small Modular Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    The rapid growth in the size and complexity of commercial nuclear power plants in the 1970s spawned an interest in smaller, simpler designs that are inherently or intrinsically safe through the use of passive design features. Several designs were developed, but none were ever built, although some of their passive safety features were incorporated into large commercial plant designs that are being planned or built today. In recent years, several reactor vendors are actively redeveloping small modular reactor (SMR) designs with even greater use of passive features. Several designs incorporate the ultimate in passive safety they completely eliminate specific accident initiators from the design. Other design features help to reduce the likelihood of an accident or help to mitigate the accidents consequences, should one occur. While some passive safety features are common to most SMR designs, irrespective of the coolant technology, other features are specific to water, gas, or liquid-metal cooled SMR designs. The extensive use of passive safety features in SMRs promise to make these plants highly robust, protecting both the general public and the owner/investor. Once demonstrated, these plants should allow nuclear power to be used confidently for a broader range of customers and applications than will be possible with large plants alone.

  1. Safety Analysis for Medium/Small Size Integral Reactor: Evaluation of Safety Characteristics for Small and Medium Integral Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hho jung; Seul, K W; Ahn, S K; Bang, Y S; Park, D G; Kim, B K; Kim, W S; Lee, J H; Kim, W K; Shim, T M; Choi, H S; Ahn, H J; Jung, D W; Kim, G I; Park, Y M; Lee, Y J [Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The Small and medium integral reactor is developed to be utilized for non-electric areas such as district heating and steam production for desalination and other industrial purposes, and then these applications may typically imply a closeness between the reactor and the user. It requires the reactor to be designed with the adoption of special functional and inherent safety features to ensure and promote a high level of safety and reliability, in comparison with the existing nuclear power plants. The objective of the present study is to establish the bases for the development of regulatory requirements and technical guides to address the special safety characteristics of the small and medium integral reactor. In addition, the study aims to identify and to propose resolutions to the possible safety concerns in the design of the small and medium integral reactor. 34 refs., 20 tabs. (author)

  2. Surveillance of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marini, J.

    1983-01-01

    Surveillance of nuclear power reactors is now a necessity imposed by such regulatory documents as USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.133. In addition to regulatory requirements, however, nuclear reactor surveillance offers plant operators significant economic advantages insofar as a single day's outage is very costly. The economic worth of a reactor surveillance system can be stated in terms of the improved plant availability provided through its capability to detect incidents before they occur and cause serious damage. Furthermore, the TMI accident has demonstrated the need for monitoring certain components to provide operators with clear information on their functional status. In response to the above considerations, Framatome has developed a line of products which includes: pressure vessel leakage detection systems, loose part detection systems, component vibration monitoring systems, and, crack detection and monitoring systems. Some of the surveillance systems developed by Framatome are described in this paper

  3. SIR - small is safe [in reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayns, M.

    1989-01-01

    A joint USA-UK venture has been initiated to design a small nuclear reactor which offers low capital cost, greater flexibility and a potentially lower environmental impact. Called Safe Integral Reactor (SIR), the lead unit could be built in the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority's (UKAEA's) Winfrith site if the design is accepted by the UK Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII). This article describes the 320 MWe reactor unit that is the basis of the design being developed. (author)

  4. Small Modular Reactors: Institutional Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Perkowski, Ph.D.

    2012-06-01

    ? Objectives include, among others, a description of the basic development status of “small modular reactors” (SMRs) focused primarily on domestic activity; investigation of the domestic market appeal of modular reactors from the viewpoints of both key energy sector customers and also key stakeholders in the financial community; and consideration of how to proceed further with a pro-active "core group" of stakeholders substantially interested in modular nuclear deployment in order to provide the basis to expedite design/construction activity and regulatory approval. ? Information gathering was via available resources, both published and personal communications with key individual stakeholders; published information is limited to that already in public domain (no confidentiality); viewpoints from interviews are incorporated within. Discussions at both government-hosted and private-hosted SMR meetings are reflected herein. INL itself maintains a neutral view on all issues described. Note: as per prior discussion between INL and CAP, individual and highly knowledgeable senior-level stakeholders provided the bulk of insights herein, and the results of those interviews are the main source of the observations of this report. ? Attachment A is the list of individual stakeholders consulted to date, including some who provided significant earlier assessments of SMR institutional feasibility. ? Attachments B, C, and D are included to provide substantial context on the international status of SMR development; they are not intended to be comprehensive and are individualized due to the separate nature of the source materials. Attachment E is a summary of the DOE requirements for winning teams regarding the current SMR solicitation. Attachment F deserves separate consideration due to the relative maturity of the SMART SMR program underway in Korea. Attachment G provides illustrative SMR design features and is intended for background. Attachment H is included for overview

  5. Financial feasibility analysis on small medium reactor nuclear power plant (SMR NPP) project in Indonesia under uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuryanti; Suparman; Mochamad Nasrullah; Elok Satiti Amitayani; Wiku Lulus Widodo

    2015-01-01

    NPP SMR is one alternative to overcome the Outside Java Bali region's dependence on diesel power plant. One crucial issue in the NPP project (including SMR) would be financing, associated with the capital-intensive nature of the project. In addition, the SMR NPP project also be vulnerable in occurrence of some uncertainties. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the financial feasibility of SMR NPP project by accommodating the possibility of the uncertainties. The methodology used is probabilistic analysis which was performed by Monte Carlo technique. This technique simulates the relationship between the uncertainty variables with financial feasibility indicators. The results showed that in probabilistic approach, SMR NPP project is considered feasible on the 'most probable value' of electricity selling price of 15 cents/kWh, indicated by positive average value of NPV (US$ 135,324,004) and the average value of both of IRRs are bigger than MARR (IRR project = 10.65 %, IRR Equity = 14.29 %, while MARR = 10 %). The probability of rejection of the SMR project was about 20 %. The three main variables that are most influential in the project were: selling price of electricity, investment cost and inflation rate. (author)

  6. Development of technologies for nuclear reactors of small and medium sized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-08-01

    This meeting include: countries presentations, themes and objectives of the training course, reactor types, design, EPR, APR1400, A P 1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER-1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER 1200, Boiling Water Reactor, A BWR, A BWR -II, ESBUR, Ke ren, AREVA, Heavy Water Reactor, Candu 6, Acr-1000, HWR, Bw, Iris, CAREM NuCcale, Smart, KLT-HOS, Westinghouse small modular Reactor, Gas Cooled Reactors, PBMR, React ores enfriados con metales liquidos, Hs, Prism,Terra Power, Hyper ion, appliance's no electric as de energia, Generation IV Reactors,VHTR, Gas Fast Reactor, Sodium Fast Reactor, Molten salt Reactor, Lfr, Water Cooled Reactor, Technology Assessment Process, Fukushima accident.

  7. Advanced Small Modular Reactor Economics Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2014-10-01

    This report describes the data collection work performed for an advanced small modular reactor (AdvSMR) economics analysis activity at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The methodology development and analytical results are described in separate, stand-alone documents as listed in the references. The economics analysis effort for the AdvSMR program combines the technical and fuel cycle aspects of advanced (non-light water reactor [LWR]) reactors with the market and production aspects of SMRs. This requires the collection, analysis, and synthesis of multiple unrelated and potentially high-uncertainty data sets from a wide range of data sources. Further, the nature of both economic and nuclear technology analysis requires at least a minor attempt at prediction and prognostication, and the far-term horizon for deployment of advanced nuclear systems introduces more uncertainty. Energy market uncertainty, especially the electricity market, is the result of the integration of commodity prices, demand fluctuation, and generation competition, as easily seen in deregulated markets. Depending on current or projected values for any of these factors, the economic attractiveness of any power plant construction project can change yearly or quarterly. For long-lead construction projects such as nuclear power plants, this uncertainty generates an implied and inherent risk for potential nuclear power plant owners and operators. The uncertainty in nuclear reactor and fuel cycle costs is in some respects better understood and quantified than the energy market uncertainty. The LWR-based fuel cycle has a long commercial history to use as its basis for cost estimation, and the current activities in LWR construction provide a reliable baseline for estimates for similar efforts. However, for advanced systems, the estimates and their associated uncertainties are based on forward-looking assumptions for performance after the system has been built and has achieved commercial operation

  8. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Programe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulyak, Nick

    2014-01-01

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (> 225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR) in which all primarycomponents associated with the nuclear steam supply system, including the steam generator and the pressurizer, are housed within the reactor vessel. The Westinghouse SMR utilizes passive safety systems and proven components from the AP1000 plant design with a compact containment that houses the integral reactor vessel and the passive safety systems. This paper describes the design and functionality of the Westinghouse SMR, the key drivers influencing the design of the Westinghouse SMR and the unique passive safety features of the Westinghouse SMR. Several critical motivators contributed to the development and integration of the Westinghouse SMR design. These design drivers include safety, economics, reactor expertise and experience, research and development requirements, functionality of systems and components, size of the systems and vessels, simplicity of design, and licensing requirements. The Westinghouse SMR safety system design is passive, is based largely on the passive safety systems used in the AP1000 reactor, and provides mitigation of all design basis accidents without the need for offsite AC electrical power for a period of seven days. The economics of the Westinghouse SMR challenges the established approach of large Light Water Reactors (LWR) that utilized the economies of scale to reach economic competiveness. To serve the market expectation of smaller capital investment and cost competitive energy, a modular design approach is implemented within the Westinghouse SMR. The Westinghouse SMR building layout integrates the three basic design constraints of modularization; transportation, handling and module-joining technology. The integral Westinghouse SMR design eliminates large loop piping, which significantly reduces the flow area of postulated loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs). The Westinghouse SMR containment is a high

  9. The decommissioning of a small nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neset, K.; Christensen, G.C.; Lundby, J.E.; Roenneberg, G.A.

    1990-02-01

    The JEEP II reactor at Kjeller, Norway has been used as a model for a study of the decommissioning of a small research reactor. A radiological survey is given and a plan for volume reducing, packaging, certifying, classifying and shipping of the radioactive waste is described. 23 refs., 4 figs

  10. Small modular reactors are 'crucial technology'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2018-03-01

    Small modular nuclear reactors (SMRs) offer a way for the UK to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation, while allowing the country to meet the expected increase in demand for electricity from electric vehicles and other uses.

  11. Significance assessment of small-medium sized reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, Minoru [Japan Atomic Power Co., Research and Development Dept., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Preliminary assessment for deployment of small-medium sized reactor (S and M reactor) as a future option has been conducted at the JAPCO (Japan Atomic Power Company) under the cooperation with the CRIERI (Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry). Significance of the S and M reactor introduction is listed as follows; lower investment cost, possible siting near demand side, enlarged freedom of siting, shorter transmission line, good compatibility with slow increase of demand and plain explanation of safety using simpler system such as integral type vessel without piping, natural convection core cooling and passive safety system. The deployment of simpler plant system, modular shop fabrication, ship-shell structured building and longer operation period can assure economics comparable with that of a large sized reactor, coping with scale-demerit. Also the S and M reactor is preferable in size for the nuclear heat utilization such as hydrogen production. (T. Tanaka)

  12. To question of NPP power reactor choice for Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyrbekov, G.A.; Makhanov, Y.M.; Reznikova, R.A.; Sidorenco, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    in the regions of Republic of Kazakhstan occurs. Southern and western regions import electric power and capacity because of undeveloped circuit of networks. Moreover, power intensity of an industrial-agrarian complex of the country is limited transmission capacity of lines is insufficient; plenty of small consumers are removed from power supply lines. Thus, nuclear stations of medium and low power are the most acceptable for construction in Kazakhstan. Recommendations for the choice of maximum safe, reliable and economically competitive reactors for Kazakhstan have been made in result of the carried out projects' comparison of the power reactors according to 15 criteria of safety and economic competitiveness, with respect to condition and perspectives of Kazakhstan power complex development: Recommended power reactors of medium capacity: - P-600 - passive PWR, developed of the Westinghouse company, USA; - CANDU-6, developed by Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL), Canada. - MS-600 - Mitsubishi Company, Japan. Recommended reactors of low power: - IRIS - reactor of IV generation developed by the international corporation of 13 organizations from 7 countries; - NPP 'UNITERM' - development NIKIET, Moscow, Russia; - MRX - the Project of sea reactor MRX for civil applications, is developed by the Japanese Research Institute of Atomic Energy (JAERI). The most important advantages of recommended medium and low power reactors are given

  13. To question of NPP power reactor choice for Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyrbekov, G.A.; Makhanov, Y.M.; Reznikova, R.A.; Sidorenco, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    regions of Republic of Kazakhstan occurs. Southern and western regions import electric power and capacity because of undeveloped circuit of networks. Moreover, power intensity of an industrial-agrarian complex of the country is limited transmission capacity of lines is insufficient; plenty of small consumers are removed from power supply lines. Thus, nuclear stations of medium and low power are the most acceptable for construction in Kazakhstan. Recommendations for the choice of maximum safe, reliable and economically competitive reactors for Kazakhstan have been made in result of the carried out projects' comparison of the power reactors according to 15 criteria of safety and economic competitiveness, with respect to condition and perspectives of Kazakhstan power complex development: Recommended power reactors of medium capacity: - P-600 - passive PWR, developed of the Westinghouse company, USA; - CANDU-6, developed by Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL), Canada. - MS-600 - Mitsubishi Company, Japan. Recommended reactors of low power: - IRIS - reactor of IV generation developed by the international corporation of 13 organizations from 7 countries; - NPP 'UNITERM' - development NIKIET, Moscow, Russia; - MRX - the Project of sea reactor MRX for civil applications, is developed by the Japanese Research Institute of Atomic Energy (JAERI). The most important advantages of recommended medium and low power reactors are given

  14. Power reactor pressure vessel benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahn, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    A review is given of the current status of experimental and calculational benchmarks for use in understanding the radiation embrittlement effects in the pressure vessels of operating light water power reactors. The requirements of such benchmarks for application to pressure vessel dosimetry are stated. Recent developments in active and passive neutron detectors sensitive in the ranges of importance to embrittlement studies are summarized and recommendations for improvements in the benchmark are made. (author)

  15. The Optimization of power reactor control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danupoyo, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    A power reactor is an important part in nuclear powered electrical plant systems. Success in controlling the power reactor will establish safety of the whole power plant systems. Until now, the power reactor has been controlled by a classical control system that was designed based on output feedback method. To meet the safety requirements that are now more restricted, the recently used power reactor control system should be modified. this paper describes a power reactor control system that is designed based on a state feedback method optimized with LQG (Linear-quadrature-gaussian) method and equipped with a state estimator. A pressurized-water type reactor has been used as the model. by using a point kinetics method with one group delayed neutrons. the result of simulation testing shows that the optimized control system can control the power reactor more effective and efficient than the classical control system

  16. International seminar on status and prospects for small and medium sized reactors. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    Small and medium sized reactors have been defined by IAEA in accordance with their net electrical power rating, or thermal equivalent power rating for reactors producing process heat. Within the global energy supply and demand the role of nuclear power, and specifically the role of small and medium sizes reactors, is reviewed. Some new design prospects of dual purpose power plants, namely for heat production and desalination, are presented. Some proposal for new concepts of small size power reactors are described. A special concern is devoted to economic and energy policy issues as well as to safety and non-proliferation matters

  17. Safety characteristics of small heat producing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1987-10-01

    The primary objectives of protection in nuclear power plants are the possibility to shut the reactor down in case of emergency and keep it subcritical in the long run, the existence of a heat sink for post-decay heat removal in order to avoid overheating, let alone core meltdown, and the containment of radioactivity within the barriers designed for this purpose, thus preventing significant activity release. In principle, these objectives can be met in various ways, namely by active, passive or inherent technical safeguards systems. In practice, a mixture of these approaches is employed in almost all cases. What matters in the end is the assessment of the overall concept, not of some outstanding feature. Inherent characteristics are easier to achieve in small reactors. However, also in this case, inherent safety does not mean absolute safety. If inherent safety characteristics were all encompassing, they would have to include self-healing effects. However, inanimate matter is incapable of such self-organization. Consequently, inherent characteristics in nuclear technology by definition should include the increased use of dissipative processes in the thermal part of the plant. (author)

  18. Economic targets for small PWR reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Board, J.

    1991-01-01

    Small reactors are likely to be less economic than large reactors, but the lower financial exposure with small reactors may be attractive to utilities contemplating a restart to a nuclear programme. New nuclear plant can be economic, but success will depend more on how the plant are built, rather than what type or size is built. A target for new plant for operation early in the next century should be a generation cost of 3p to 3.5 p/kWh. This corresponds to an overnight capital cost of Pound 1000/kWh to Pound 1100/kWh. (author)

  19. Power reactors in Member States. 1979 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This is the fifth issue of a periodic computer-based listing of nuclear power reactors, presenting the situation as of 1 May 1979. The basic design data for all reactors in operation, under construction, planned and shut down have been included. The following two tables are included to give a general picture of the overall situation: Table I: Reactor types and net electrical power. Table II: Reactor units and net electrical powered by country cummulated by year

  20. Computerized reactor power regulation with logarithmic controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossanyi, A.; Vegh, E.

    1982-11-01

    A computerized reactor control system has been operating at a 5 MW WWR-SM research reactor in the Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest, for some years. This paper describes the power controller used in the SPC operating mode of the system, which operates in a 5-decade wide power range with +-0.5% accuracy. The structure of the controller easily limits the minimal reactor period and produces a reactor transient with constant period if the power demand changes. (author)

  1. Small scale power production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muoniovaara, M [IVO International Ltd, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    IVO International is a major constructor of biomass power plants in Finland and abroad. As a subsidiary of Imatran Voima Oy, the largest power utility in Finland, it has designed and constructed ten power plants owned by IVO Group or others capable of burning biomasses. Sizes of the plants vary from the world`s largest condensing peat-fired power plant of 155 MWe to a 6 MWe combined heat and power producing unit. This article describes the biomass power plants designed and constructed by IVO Group 3 refs.

  2. Small scale power production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muoniovaara, M. [IVO International Ltd, Vantaa (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    IVO International is a major constructor of biomass power plants in Finland and abroad. As a subsidiary of Imatran Voima Oy, the largest power utility in Finland, it has designed and constructed ten power plants owned by IVO Group or others capable of burning biomasses. Sizes of the plants vary from the world`s largest condensing peat-fired power plant of 155 MWe to a 6 MWe combined heat and power producing unit. This article describes the biomass power plants designed and constructed by IVO Group 3 refs.

  3. TRIGA research reactors with higher power density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittemore, W.L.

    1994-01-01

    The recent trend in new or upgraded research reactors is to higher power densities (hence higher neutron flux levels) but not necessarily to higher power levels. The TRIGA LEU fuel with burnable poison is available in small diameter fuel rods capable of high power per rod (≅48 kW/rod) with acceptable peak fuel temperatures. The performance of a 10-MW research reactor with a compact core of hexagonal TRIGA fuel clusters has been calculated in detail. With its light water coolant, beryllium and D 2 O reflector regions, this reactor can provide in-core experiments with thermal fluxes in excess of 3 x 10 14 n/cm 2 ·s and fast fluxes (>0.1 MeV) of 2 x 10 14 n/cm 2 ·s. The core centerline thermal neutron flux in the D 2 O reflector is about 2 x 10 14 n/cm 2 ·s and the average core power density is about 230 kW/liter. Using other TRIGA fuel developed for 25-MW test reactors but arranged in hexagonal arrays, power densities in excess of 300 kW/liter are readily available. A core with TRIGA fuel operating at 15-MW and generating such a power density is capable of producing thermal neutron fluxes in a D 2 O reflector of 3 x 10 14 n/cm 2 ·s. A beryllium-filled central region of the core can further enhance the core leakage and hence the neutron flux in the reflector. (author)

  4. Technology selection for offshore underwater small modular reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shivan, Koroush; Ballinger, Ronald; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Forsberg, Charles; Kazimi, Mujid; Todreas, Neil

    2016-01-01

    This work examines the most viable nuclear technology options for future underwater designs that would meet high safety standards as well as good economic potential, for construction in the 2030-2040 time frame. The top five concepts selected from a survey of 13 nuclear technologies were compared to a small modular pressurized water reactor (PWR) designed with a conventional layout. In order of smallest to largest primary system size where the reactor and all safety systems are contained, the top five designs were: (1) a lead-bismuth fast reactor based on the Russian SVBR-100; (2) a novel organic cooled reactor; (3) an innovative superheated water reactor; (4) a boiling water reactor based on Toshiba's LSBWR; and (5) an integral PWR featuring compact steam generators. A similar study on potential attractive power cycles was also performed. A condensing and recompression supercritical CO 2 cycle and a compact steam Rankine cycle were designed. It was found that the hull size required by the reactor, safety systems and power cycle can be significantly reduced (50-80%) with the top five designs compared to the conventional PWR. Based on the qualitative economic consideration, the organic cooled reactor and boiling water reactor designs are expected to be the most cost effective options

  5. Technology selection for offshore underwater small modular reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shivan, Koroush; Ballinger, Ronald; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Forsberg, Charles; Kazimi, Mujid; Todreas, Neil [Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    2016-12-15

    This work examines the most viable nuclear technology options for future underwater designs that would meet high safety standards as well as good economic potential, for construction in the 2030-2040 time frame. The top five concepts selected from a survey of 13 nuclear technologies were compared to a small modular pressurized water reactor (PWR) designed with a conventional layout. In order of smallest to largest primary system size where the reactor and all safety systems are contained, the top five designs were: (1) a lead-bismuth fast reactor based on the Russian SVBR-100; (2) a novel organic cooled reactor; (3) an innovative superheated water reactor; (4) a boiling water reactor based on Toshiba's LSBWR; and (5) an integral PWR featuring compact steam generators. A similar study on potential attractive power cycles was also performed. A condensing and recompression supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle and a compact steam Rankine cycle were designed. It was found that the hull size required by the reactor, safety systems and power cycle can be significantly reduced (50-80%) with the top five designs compared to the conventional PWR. Based on the qualitative economic consideration, the organic cooled reactor and boiling water reactor designs are expected to be the most cost effective options.

  6. Technology Selection for Offshore Underwater Small Modular Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroush Shirvan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work examines the most viable nuclear technology options for future underwater designs that would meet high safety standards as well as good economic potential, for construction in the 2030–2040 timeframe. The top five concepts selected from a survey of 13 nuclear technologies were compared to a small modular pressurized water reactor (PWR designed with a conventional layout. In order of smallest to largest primary system size where the reactor and all safety systems are contained, the top five designs were: (1 a lead–bismuth fast reactor based on the Russian SVBR-100; (2 a novel organic cooled reactor; (3 an innovative superheated water reactor; (4 a boiling water reactor based on Toshiba's LSBWR; and (5 an integral PWR featuring compact steam generators. A similar study on potential attractive power cycles was also performed. A condensing and recompression supercritical CO2 cycle and a compact steam Rankine cycle were designed. It was found that the hull size required by the reactor, safety systems and power cycle can be significantly reduced (50–80% with the top five designs compared to the conventional PWR. Based on the qualitative economic consideration, the organic cooled reactor and boiling water reactor designs are expected to be the most cost effective options.

  7. Staffing requirements for future small and medium reactors based on projections in the Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonovsky, G.M.; Kodochigov, N.G.; Kurachenkov, A.V.; Novikov, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental Design Bureau of Mechanical Engineering (OKBM) specializes in the development of small and medium power reactors having different purposes. They include reactor plants for NPHPP, nuclear district heating power plants and propulsion plants. Small and medium power plants have simpler processes of electricity and heat production, less systems, simpler control algorithms and considerably enhanced inherent safety properties. These plants are mainly equipped with passive safety systems. These properties are especially characteristic for reactor plants of nuclear district heating power plants and HTG reactor plants. The designs of small and medium power plants actually provide a high degree of control automation which considerably reduces workload on the personnel in both normal and abnormal operation conditions. All this allows the reduction in personnel for small and medium power reactors if compared to high capacity reactor plants. But due to objective reasons the specific number of personnel (man/MW) for average and especially small capacity reactors considerably exceeds the value for high capacity reactor plants. At the same time one can propose a set of organization - technical measures allowing the increase in this value in future. Safety requirements imposed for small and average capacity reactors are the same or more strict than those for high capacity reactors. That's why the requirements to the training of personnel for such reactor plants are not allowed to be lowered if compared to the requirements imposed to the personnel of high capacity reactors. (author)

  8. Operational power reactor health physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    Operational Health Physics can be comprised of a multitude of organizations, both corporate and at the plant sites. The following discussion centers around Baltimore Gas and Electric's (BG and E) Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, located in Lusby, Maryland. Calvert Cliffs is a twin Combustion Engineering 825 MWe pressurized water reactor site with Unit I having a General electric turbine-generator and Unit II having a Westinghouse turbine-generator. Having just completed each Unit's ten-year Inservice Inspection and Refueling Outge, a total of 20 reactor years operating health physics experience have been accumulated at Calvert Cliffs. Because BG and E has only one nuclear site most health physics functions are performed at the plant site. This is also true for the other BG and E nuclear related organizations, such as Engineering and Quality Assurance. Utilities with multiple plant sites have corporate health physics entity usually providing oversight to the various plant programs

  9. The role of small and medium-sized reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupitz, J.; Mourogov, V.

    1999-01-01

    The second half of the twentieth century has seen nuclear power evolve from the research and development environment to an industry that supplies 17% of the world's electricity. The past decade, however, has seen stagnation in nuclear power plant construction in the Western industrialized world, slow nuclear power growth in Eastern Europe and expansion only in East Asia. But the turn of the century is potentially a turning-point for nuclear power because of: increasing world energy consumption, with nuclear power's contribution to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, nuclear fuel resources sustainability, and improvements in operation of current nuclear power plants; advanced reactor designs that will improve economics and availability, and further enhance safety; and continued strengthening of the nuclear power safeguards system. This paper looks at the role that small and medium-sized reactors can play in an increasingly competitive global energy market, particularly with regard to maintaining a sustainable mix of energy sources. (author)

  10. Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kam, F.B.K.; Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Regulatory and research evaluations of embrittlement prediction models and of vessel integrity under load can be greatly expedited by the use of a well designed, computerized embrittlement data base. The Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) is a comprehensive collection of data from surveillance reports and other published reports of commercial nuclear reactors. The uses of the data base require that as many different data as available are collected from as many sources as possible with complete references and that subsets of relevant data can be easily retrieved and processed. The objectives of this NRC-sponsored program are the following: (1) to compile and to verify the quality of the PR-EDB; (2) to provide user-friendly software to access and process the data; (3) to explore or confirm embrittlement prediction models; and (4) to interact with standards organizations to provide the technical bases for voluntary consensus standards that can be used in regulatory guides, standard review plans, and codes. To achieve these goals, the data base architecture was designed after much discussion and planning with prospective users, namely, material scientists and members of the research staff. The current compilation of the PR-EDB (Version 1) contains results from surveillance capsule reports of 78 reactors with 381 data points for 110 different irradiated base materials and 161 data points for 79 different welds. Results from heat-affected zone materials are also listed. The time and effort required to process and evaluate different types of data in the PR-EDB have been drastically reduced from previous data bases. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), reactor vendors, and utilities are in the process of providing back-up quality assurance checks of PR-EDB and will be supplementing the data base with additional data and documentation

  11. Reactor power reduction system and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, S.J.; Dunn, S.A.; Raber, M.

    1978-01-01

    A method of operating a nuclear power reactor is disclosed which enables an accelerated power reduction of the reactor without completely shutting the reactor down. The method includes monitoring the incidents which, upon their occurrence, would require an accelerated power reduction in order to maintain the reactor in a safe operation mode; calculating the power reduction required on the occurrence of such an incident; determining a control rod insertion sequence for the normal operation of the reactor, said sequence being chosen to optimize reactor power capability; selecting the number of control rods necessary to respond to the accelerated power reduction demand, said selection being made according to a priority determined by said control rod insertion sequence; and inserting said selected control rods into the reactor core. 11 claims, 13 figures

  12. Pioneering SUPER - Small Unit Passively-safe Enclosed Reactor - 15559

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhownik, P.K.; Gairola, A.; Shamim, J.A.; Suh, K.Y.; Suh, K.S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the basic features of the Small Unit Passively-safe Enclosed Reactor abbreviated as SUPER, a new reactor system that has been designed and proposed at the Seoul National University's Department of Energy Systems Engineering. SUPER is a small modular reactor system or SMR that is cooled by sub-cooled as well as supercritical water. As a new member of SMRs, SUPER is a small-scale nuclear plant that is designed to be factory-manufactured and shipped as modules to be assembled at a site. The concept offers promising answers to many questions about nuclear power including proliferation resistance, waste management, safety, and startup costs. SUPER is a customized paradigm of a supercritical water reactor or SCWR, a type sharing commonalities with the current fleet of light water reactors, or LWRs. SUPER has evolved from the System-integrated Modular Advance Reactor, or SMART, being developed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, or KAERI. SUPER enhanced the safety features for robustness, design/equipment simplification for natural convection, multi-purpose application for co-generation flexibilities, suitable for isolated or small electrical grids, just-in-time capacity addition, short construction time, and last, but not least, lower capital cost per unit. The primary objectives of SUPER is to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation SCWR, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate its technical feasibilities. (authors)

  13. Physical protection of power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darby, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Sandia Laboratories has applied a systematic approach to designing physical protection systems for nuclear facilities to commercial light-water reactor power plants. A number of candidate physical protection systems were developed and evaluated. Focus is placed on the design of access control subsystems at each of three plant layers: the protected area perimeter, building surfaces, and vital areas. Access control refers to barriers, detectors, and entry control devices and procedures used to keep unauthorized personnel and contraband out of the plant, and to control authorized entry into vital areas within the plant

  14. TU Electric reactor physics model verification: Power reactor benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willingham, C.E.; Killgore, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    Power reactor benchmark calculations using the advanced code package CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 have been performed for six cycles of Prairie Island Unit 1. The reload fuel designs for the selected cycles included gadolinia as a burnable absorber, natural uranium axial blankets and increased water-to-fuel ratio. The calculated results for both startup reactor physics tests (boron endpoints, control rod worths, and isothermal temperature coefficients) and full power depletion results were compared to measured plant data. These comparisons show that the TU Electric reactor physics models accurately predict important measured parameters for power reactors

  15. Application of Candle burnup to small fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, H.; Satoshi, T.

    2004-01-01

    A new reactor burnup strategy CANDLE (Constant Axial shape of Neutron flux, nuclide densities and power shape During Life of Energy producing reactor) was proposed, where shapes of neutron flux, nuclide densities and power density distributions remain constant but move to an axial direction. An equilibrium state was obtained for a large fast reactor (core radius is 2 m and reflector thickness is 0.5 m) successfully by using a newly developed direct analysis code. However, it is difficult to apply this burnup strategy to small reactors, since its neutron leakage becomes large and neutron economy becomes worse. Fuel enrichment should be increased in order to sustain the criticality. However, higher enrichment of fresh fuel makes the CANDLE burnup difficult. We try to find some small reactor designs, which can realize the CANDLE burnup. We have successfully find a design, which is not the CANDLE burnup in the strict meaning, but satisfies qualitatively its characteristics mentioned at the top of this abstract. In the final paper, the general description of CANDLE burnup and some results on the obtained small fast reactor design are presented.(author)

  16. Feasible reactor power cutback logic development for an integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Soon-Kyoo; Lee, Chung-Chan; Choi, Suhn; Kang, Han-Ok

    2013-01-01

    Major features of integral reactors that have been developed around the world recently are simplified operating systems and passive safety systems. Even though highly simplified control system and very reliable components are utilized in the integral reactor, the possibility of major component malfunction cannot be ruled out. So, feasible reactor power cutback logic is required to cope with the malfunction of components without inducing reactor trip. Simplified reactor power cutback logic has been developed on the basis of the real component data and operational parameters of plant in this study. Due to the relatively high rod worth of the integral reactor the control rod assembly drop method which had been adapted for large nuclear power plants was not desirable for reactor power cutback of the integral reactor. Instead another method, the control rod assembly control logic of reactor regulating system controls the control rod assembly movements, was chosen as an alternative. Sensitivity analyses and feasibility evaluations were performed for the selected method by varying the control rod assembly driving speed. In the results, sensitivity study showed that the performance goal of reactor power cutback system could be achieved with the limited range of control rod assembly driving speed. (orig.)

  17. Nuclear reactor power supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    The redundant signals from the sensor assemblies measuring the process parameters of a nuclear reactor power supply are transmitted each in its turn to a protection system which operates to actuate the protection apparatus for signals indicating off-process conditions. Each sensor assembly includes a number of like sensors measuring the same parameters. The sets of process signals derived from the sensor assemblies are each in its turn transmitted from the protection system to the control system which impresses control signals on the reactor or its components to counteract the tendency for conditions to drift off-normal status requiring operation of the protection system. A parameter signal selector prevents a parameter signal which differs from the other parameter signals of the set by more than twice the allowable variation from passing to the control system. Test signals are periodically impressed by a test unit on a selected pair of a selection unit and control channels. This arrangement eliminates the possibility that a single component failure which may be spurious will cause an inadvertent trip of the reactor during test. (author)

  18. Nuclear power plant with several reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishanin, E I; Ilyunin, V G; Kuznetsov, I A; Murogov, V M; Shmelev, A N

    1972-05-10

    A design of a nuclear power plant suggested involves several reactors consequently transmitting heat to a gaseous coolant in the joint thermodynamical circuit. In order to increase the power and the rate of fuel reproduction the low temperature section of the thermodynamical circuit involves a fast nuclear reactor, whereas a thermal nuclear reactor is employed in the high temperature section of the circuit for intermediate heating and for over-heating of the working body. Between the fast nuclear and the thermal nuclear reactors there is a turbine providing for the necessary ratio between pressures in the reactors. Each reactor may employ its own coolant.

  19. Nuclear reactor instrumentation power monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shigeru.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention concerns a nuclear reactor instrumentation power monitor that can be used in, for example, BWR type nuclear power plants. Signals from multi-channel detectors disposed on field units are converted respectively by LPRM signal circuits. Then, the converted signals are further converted by a multiplexer into digital signals and transmitted as serial data to a central monitor unit. The thus transmitted serial data are converted into parallel data in the signal processing section of the central monitor unit. Then, LPRM signals are taken out from each of channel detectors to conduct mathematical processing such as trip judgment or averaging. Accordingly, the field unit and the central monitor unit can be connected by way of only one data transmission cable thereby enabling to reduce the number of cables. Further, since the data are transmitted on digital form, it less undergoes effect of noises. (I.S.)

  20. Small and medium size nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mugrabi, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this appendix is to provide up-to-date technical information relevant to the deployment of small and medium reactors (SMRs). It summarizes the status of SMRs and discusses areas of relevance to their utilization, including seawater desalination; and in particular their simplicity, their flexibility for a variety of applications and the use of passive safety features as fundamental to most of these designs. In response to important commercial developments, the energy range of small and medium reactors is now taken as being up to around 700 MW(e). Detailed information on SMR designs can be found in the IAEA report on The Design and Development Status of Small and Medium Reactor Systems 1995. 5 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  1. Assessment of the world market for small and medium reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    In the past decades, the major focus for nuclear power has been the design and construction of nuclear plants of ever increasing size. This was appropriate for many industrialized countries, which could readily add generation capability to their electrical grids in large increments. However, recently there has been an increasing emphasis on the development of small and medium reactors especially to meet needs in developing countries where electrical grids cannot accept the additional capacity of a large nuclear plant. The paper presents an estimation of the world market for small and medium sized reactors giving the basic assumptions, criteria, scope, methods and important factors. (author)

  2. Small modular reactors: Simpler, safer, cheaper?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vujić, Jasmina; Bergmann, Ryan M.; Škoda, Radek; Miletić, Marija

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear energy can play a very significant long-term role for meeting the world’s increasing energy demands, while simultaneously addressing challenges associated with global climate and environmental impact. Many nations of the world, particularly the Asia/Pacific Rim countries, are actively engaged in a major expansion of their nuclear energy complex. The degree to which nuclear energy can address long-term energy needs, either globally or regionally, will be dictated by the pace and adequacy of technical and policy solutions for waste, safety, security, and non-proliferation issues, as well as the capital cost of construction. Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) could successfully address several of these issues. SMRs offer simpler, standardized, and safer modular design by being factory built, requiring smaller initial capital investment, and having shorter construction times. The SMRs could be small enough to be transportable, could be used in isolated locations without advanced infrastructure and without power grid, or could be clustered in a single site to provide a multi-module, large capacity power plant. This paper summarizes some of the basic features of SMRs for early deployment, several advanced SMR concepts, and points out the benefits and challenges in regulatory, economical, safety and security issues. -- Highlights: ► We held a summer forum on SMR technologies at UC Berkeley in July 2010. ► Advantages and disadvantages, technical and economic, of each design were discussed. ► Further literature searches were also done and this paper summarizes prominent designs. ► We conclude SMRs have no large problems preventing their introduction into the nuclear market.

  3. Preliminary Study of 20 MWth Experiment Power Reactor based on Pebble Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwanto, Dwi; Permana, Sidik; Pramuditya, Syeilendra

    2017-07-01

    In this study, preliminary design calculations for experimental small power reactor (20 MWt) based on Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) are performed. PBR technology chosen due to its advantages in neutronic and safety aspects. Several important parameters, such as fissile enrichment, number of fuel passes, burnup and effective multiplication factor are taken into account in the calculation to find neutronic characteristics of the present reactor design.

  4. Reactor power control method upon accidents of electrical power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Masao.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to continue the operation of a BWR type reactor by avoiding the scram while suppressing the reactor power, just after the external disturbance such as earth-trouble in power-transmission network. Method: Steep power drop of an electrical generator is to be detected not only by a current-type power-load-unbalance relay but also with a power-type power-load-unbalance-relay. If steep power-drop was detected by the latter relay, a previously selected control rod is rapidly inserted into the reactor. In this way, in the case where there is a possibility of the reactor scram, the scram can be avoided by suppressing the reactor power, thus the reactor operation can be continued. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. Small ex-core heat pipe thermionic reactor concept (SEHPTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacox, M.G.; Bennett, R.G.; Lundberg, L.B.; Miller, B.G.; Drexler, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has developed an innovative space nuclear power concept with unique features and significant advantages for both Defense and Civilian space missions. The Small Ex-core Heat Pipe Thermionic Reactor (SEHPTR) concept was developed in response to Air Force needs for space nuclear power in the range of 10 to 40 kilowatts. This paper describes the SEHPTR concept and discusses the key technical issues and advantages of such a system

  6. Gas, benefits and question marks. The Oklo reactors: 100 % natural. The Kyoto protocol: use it or lose it?. Small hydro power: a great leap forward. The energy mix of South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    This issue of Alternatives newsletter contains a main press-kit about natural gas economics worldwide and 4 articles dealing with the Oklo natural reactor, the Kyoto protocol, the small hydro-power in China, and the energy mix of South Korea: 1 - 'Gas benefits and question marks': The world's most widely distributed fossil fuel, natural gas is also the fastest-growing energy source of the past thirty years. Its position as the fuel of choice in the global energy mix is due in large part to its many domestic and industrial applications. 2 - 'The Oklo reactors: 100% natural': Another look at this extraordinary 2 billion year-old phenomenon in words and pictures: the nuclear fission reaction that created the natural reactors of Gabon. 3 - 'The Kyoto Protocol: use it or lose it?': Nearly eight years after its signature, the Kyoto Protocol is still hotly debated. Two experts give us their views: Spencer Abraham, former U.S. Secretary for Energy, and Jean-Charles Hourcade of CIRED, the international center for research on the environment and development. 4 - 'Small hydro power: a great leap forward': The Chinese government has responded to the need for rural electrification with an aid program for the country's poorest cantons. Enter the small hydro plant in northern Guangxi province. 5 - 'The energy mix of South Korea': Faced with continuing strong economic growth and energy demand, South Korea has multiplied its projects, from hydropower to tidal power to nuclear and even hydrogen in the longer term

  7. BN-1200 Reactor Power Unit Design Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilyev, B.A.; Shepelev, S.F.; Ashirmetov, M.R.; Poplavsky, V.M.

    2013-01-01

    Main goals of BN-1200 design: • Develop a reliable new generation reactor plant for the commercial power unit with fast reactor to implement the first-priority objectives in changing over to closed nuclear fuel cycle; • Improve technical and economic indices of BN reactor power unit to the level of those of Russian VVER of equal power; • Enhance the safety up to the level of the requirements for the 4th generation RP

  8. Small reactor technical and design characteristics proposed for Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurdin, M.

    1992-01-01

    A Team for Small Nuclear Electricity Reactor has been formed in Indonesia since June 1990. It is responsible for assessment and design of a small reactor for electricity and/or sea-water desalination. This concept may become a good alternative for power-plants for small islands and for isolated areas in Indonesia, the system should function economically and environmentally sound. In addition to existing concepts, this presentation deals with modifications proposed in improving reliability and safety of reactor operation. For the size of 200 MWth or more (80 MWe or more), the possibility of designing an internal auxiliary heat removal system is discussed, hence there are two separate heat sinks for the core. Future development works for this concept should be directed in expanding their spectrum of utilization and their contribution to the national energy needs. (author). 7 refs., 4 tabs

  9. Management system requirements for small reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.A., E-mail: kenneth.jones@cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    This abstract identifies the management system requirements for the life cycle of small reactors from initial conception through completion of decommissioning. For small reactors, the requirements for management systems remain the same as those for 'large' reactors regardless of the licensee' business model and objectives. The CSA N-Series of standards provides an interlinked set of requirements for the management of nuclear facilities. CSA N286 provides overall direction to management to develop and implement sound management practices and controls, while other CSA nuclear standards provide technical requirements and guidance that support the management system. CSA N286 is based on a set of principles. The principles are then supported by generic requirements that are applicable to the life cycle of nuclear facilities. CNSC regulatory documents provide further technical requirements and guidance. (author)

  10. Power reactor embrittlement data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kam, F.B.K.; Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Regulatory and research evaluations of embrittlement prediction models and of vessel integrity under load can be greatly expedited by the use of a well-designed, computerized embrittlement data base. The Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) is a comprehensive collection of data from surveillance reports and other published reports of commercial nuclear reactors. The uses of the data base require that as many different data as available are collected from as many sources as possible with complete references and that subsets of relevant data can be easily retrieved and processed. The objectives of this NRC-sponsored program are the following: to compile and to verify the quality of the PR-EDB; to provide user-friendly software to access and process the data; to explore or confirm embrittlement prediction models; and to interact with standards organizations to provide the technical bases for voluntary consensus standards that can be used in regulatory guides, standard review plans, and codes. 9 figs

  11. Small but powerful

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    Magnet size is crucial to an accelerator as it determines the final circumference and power. This spring, Fermilab unveiled a 10.4 Tesla magnet that is shorter than the 8 Tesla magnets currently installed in the LHC. These new magnets will be a valuable asset to the HL-LHC, the next step of the LHC machine.   Members of the CERN-Fermilab team wind the magnet coil. From left to right: M. Whitson, A. Zlobin, B. Auchmann, M. Karppinen, F. Nobrega and J. Alvarez. A. Zlobin (Fermilab) and M. Karppinen (CERN) are the technical heads of the 11 T Collaboration. The HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) represents the future of CERN's flagship accelerator. From around 2020, this major upgrade will allow a substantial increase in the rate of collisions compared to today. The project poses various technical challenges, some of which appear to be close to being resolved. The success of the HL-LHC hinges on two essential conditions: the installation of more powerful magnets to guide the beams, and the add...

  12. Performance indicators for power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillies, C.; White, M.

    1995-11-01

    A review of Canadian and worldwide performance indicator definitions and data was performed to identify a set of indicators that could be used for comparison of performance among nuclear power plants. The results of this review are to be used as input to an AECB team developing a consistent set of performance indicators for measuring Canadian power reactor safety performance. To support the identification of performance indicators, a set of criteria was developed to assess the effectiveness of each indicator for meaningful comparison of performance information. The project identified a recommended set of performance indicators that could be used by AECB staff to compare the performance of Canadian nuclear power plants among themselves, and with international performance. The basis for selection of the recommended set and exclusion of others is provided. This report provides definitions and calculation methods for each recommended performance indicator. In addition, a spreadsheet has been developed for comparison and trending for the recommended set of indicators. Example trend graphs are included to demonstrate the use of the spreadsheet. (author). 50 refs., 11 tabs., 3 figs

  13. Small modular reactor (SMR) development plan in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Yong-Hoon, E-mail: chaotics@snu.ac.kr; Park, Sangrok; Kim, Byong Sup; Choi, Swongho; Hwang, Il Soon [Nuclear Transmutation Energy Research Center, Seoul National University, Bldg.31-1, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-29

    Since the first nuclear power was engaged in Korean electricity grid in 1978, intensive research and development has been focused on localization and standardization of large pressurized water reactors (PWRs) aiming at providing Korean peninsula and beyond with economical and safe power source. With increased priority placed on the safety since Chernobyl accident, Korean nuclear power R and D activity has been diversified into advanced PWR, small modular PWR and generation IV reactors. After the outbreak of Fukushima accident, inherently safe small modular reactor (SMR) receives growing interest in Korea and Europe. In this paper, we will describe recent status of evolving designs of SMR, their advantages and challenges. In particular, the conceptual design of lead-bismuth cooled SMR in Korea, URANUS with 40∼70 MWe is examined in detail. This paper will cover a framework of the program and a strategy for the successful deployment of small modular reactor how the goals would entail and the approach to collaboration with other entities.

  14. Transmutation of actinides in power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergelson, B R; Gerasimov, A S; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Power reactors can be used for partial short-term transmutation of radwaste. This transmutation is beneficial in terms of subsequent storage conditions for spent fuel in long-term storage facilities. CANDU-type reactors can transmute the main minor actinides from two or three reactors of the VVER-1000 type. A VVER-1000-type reactor can operate in a self-service mode with transmutation of its own actinides.

  15. A trend to small nuclear power plants?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lameira, Fernando Soares

    2000-01-01

    The release of fossil fuel greenhouse gases and the depletion of cheap oil reserves outside the Persic Gulf suggest a promising scenario for the future of nuclear power. But the end of the Cold War, the crisis of the state, axiological questions and globalization may lead to a marked for small power plants. The purpose of this paper is to analyze these factors, since they are not always considered all together in the future scenarios for nuclear power. It is concluded that the current evolutionary trend of nuclear power projects toward big plants may become one of the main barriers for the introduction of new plants in the future. It is suggested that a combination of fission reactors with technologies unavailable in the 1950's, when the design characteristics of the current nuclear power plants were established, could be considered to overcome this barrier. (author)

  16. Power controlling method for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kenji.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable reactor operation exactly following after an aimed curve in the high power resuming and maintaining period without failures in cladding tubes. Method: Upon recovery of the reactor power to a high power level after changing the reactor power from the high power to the low power level, control rod is operated under such conditions that the linear power density after operation of the control rod does not exceed the PC envelope in the low power period, and the core flow rate is coordinated to the control rod operation. The linear power density can be suppressed within an allowable linear power density by the above operation during high power resuming and maintaining period and, as the result, PCI failures can be prevented. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. Development of technologies for nuclear reactors of small and medium sized; Desarrollo de Tecnologias para Reactores Nucleares de pequeno y medio tamano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-08-15

    This meeting include: countries presentations, themes and objectives of the training course, reactor types, design, EPR, APR1400, A P 1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER-1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER 1200, Boiling Water Reactor, A BWR, A BWR -II, ESBUR, Ke ren, AREVA, Heavy Water Reactor, Candu 6, Acr-1000, HWR, Bw, Iris, CAREM NuCcale, Smart, KLT-HOS, Westinghouse small modular Reactor, Gas Cooled Reactors, PBMR, React ores enfriados con metales liquidos, Hs, Prism,Terra Power, Hyper ion, appliance's no electric as de energia, Generation IV Reactors,VHTR, Gas Fast Reactor, Sodium Fast Reactor, Molten salt Reactor, Lfr, Water Cooled Reactor, Technology Assessment Process, Fukushima accident.

  18. Status of small reactor designs without on-site refuelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    There is an ongoing interest in member states in the development and application of small and medium sized reactors (SMRs). In the near term, most new NPPs are likely to be evolutionary designs building on proven systems while incorporating technological advances and often the economics of scale, resulting from the reactor outputs of up to 1600 MW(e). For the longer term, the focus is on innovative designs aiming to provide increased benefits in the areas of safety and security, non-proliferation, waste management, resource utilization and economy, as well as to offer a variety of energy products and flexibility in design, siting and fuel cycle options. Many innovative designs are reactors within the small-to-medium size range, having an equivalent electric power less than 700 MW(e) or even less than 300 MW(e). A distinct trend in design and technology development, accounting for about half of the SMR concepts developed worldwide, is represented by small reactors without on-site refuelling. Such reactors, also known as battery-type reactors, could operate without reloading and shuffling of fuel in the core over long periods, from 5 to 25 years and beyond. Upon the advice and with the support of IAEA member states, within its Programme 1 'Nuclear Power, Fuel Cycle, and Nuclear Science', the IAEA provides a forum for the exchange of information by experts and policy makers from industrialized and developing countries on the technical, economic, environmental, and social aspects of SMRs development and implementation in the 21st century, and makes this information available to all interested Member States by producing status reports and other publications dedicated to advances in SMR technology. The objective of this report is to provide Member States, including those just considering the initiation of nuclear power programmes and those already having practical experience in nuclear power, with a balanced and objective information on important development trends and

  19. Small Modular Reactors for Countries with Small to Medium Electric Grids - An Economically Sensible Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, P.

    2012-01-01

    There has recently been a renewed interest throughout the world in small nuclear units for generating electricity and for other applications. A report by the World Nuclear Association discussing the advantages of small modular nuclear reactors (SMRs) over traditional nuclear reactor designs, states that ''modern small reactors for power generation are expected to have greater simplicity of design, economy of mass production, and reduced siting costs. Many are also designed for a high level of passive or inherent safety in the event of malfunction.'' Since the inception of nuclear power, the size of reactor units has grown from under 100 MWe to more than 1600 MWe. Today, due partly to the high capital cost of large power reactors and partly to the need to service small electricity grids, there is a move to develop smaller units. These may be built individually or as modules in a larger plant. SMRs are a good fit in markets where anticipated electricity demand is projected to increase incrementally, because SMRs could be built in series as needed. SMRs might be particularly attractive in countries that currently rely on diesel generators for producing electricity. Small reactors could make economic sense because of the high cost of diesel generation compared to the low marginal cost of producing electricity from nuclear energy. (Keeping in mind the initial investment costs and the need to establish a national regulatory program.) Some SMR designs are fabricated in a factory and then delivered to the site. This could be a solution for markets that lack the qualified engineers and skilled craft workers needed to construct large reactors on site. This paper will provide an overview of the types and attributes of SMRs in use or under development worldwide, describe the similarities and important differences between designs, discuss potential applications for SMRs, including baseload electricity generation, electricity generation for remote locations and areas with

  20. Power generator in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kenji.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to perform stable and dynamic conditioning operation for nuclear fuels in BWR type reactors. Constitution: The conditioning operation for the nuclear fuels is performed by varying the reactor core thermal power in a predetermined pattern by changing the predetermined power changing pattern of generator power, the rising rate of the reactor core thermal power and the upper limit for the rising power of the reactor core thermal power are calculated and the power pattern for the generator is corrected by a power conditioning device such that the upper limit for the thermal power rising rate and the upper limit for the thermal power rising rate are at the predetermined levels. Thus, when the relation between the reactor core thermal power and the generator electrical power is fluctuated, the fluctuation is detected based on the variation in the thermal power rising rate and the limit value for the thermal power rising rate, and the correction is made to the generator power changing pattern so that these values take the predetermined values to thereby perform the stable conditioning operation for the nuclear fuels. (Moriyama, K.)

  1. Westinghouse small modular reactor design and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blinn, R.; Godfrey, M. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, Pennsilvania (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The AP1000 is currently under construction in both China and the US with the first one scheduled to come on line in late 2013. Nuclear power is a proven, safe, plentiful and clean source of power generation, and Westinghouse Electric Company, the pioneer and global leader in nuclear plant design and construction, is ready with the AP1000™ pressurized water reactor (PWR). The AP1000, based on the proven performance of Westinghouse-designed PWRs, is an advanced 1154 MWe nuclear power plant that uses the forces of nature and simplicity of design to enhance plant safety and operations and reduce construction costs.

  2. Plasma engineering analysis of a small torsatron reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacatski, J.T.; Houlberg, W.A.; Uckan, N.A.

    1985-10-01

    This study examines the plasma physics and reactor engineering feasibility of a small, medium aspect ratio, high-beta, l = 2, D-T torsatron power reactor, based on the magnetic configuration of the Advanced Toroidal Facility, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Plasma analyses are performed to assess whether confinement in a small, average radius plasma is sufficient to yield an ignited or high-Q driven device. Much of the physics assessment focuses on an evaluation of the radial electric field created by the nonambipolar particle flux. Detailed transport simulations are done with both fixed and self-consistent evolution of the radial electric field. Basic reactor engineering considerations taken into account are neutron wall loading, maximum magnetic field at the helical coils, coil shield thickness, and tritium breeding blanket-shield thickness

  3. Impacts on power reactor health physics programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    The impacts on power reactor health physics programs form implementing the revised 10 CFR Part 20 will be extensive and costly. Every policy, program, procedure and training lesson plan involving health physics will require changes and the subsequent retraining of personnel. At each power reactor facility, hundreds of procedures and thousands of people will be affected by these changes. Every area of a power reactor health physics program will be affected. These areas include; ALARA, Respiratory Protection, Exposure Control, Job Coverage, Dosimetry, Radwaste, Effluent Accountability, Emergency Planning and Radiation Worker Training. This paper presents how power reactor facilities will go about making these changes and gives possible examples of some of these changes and their impact on each area of power reactor health physics program

  4. Fast reactors: potential for power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    The subject is discussed as follows: basic facts about conventional and fast reactors; uranium economy; plutonium and fast reactors; cooling systems; sodium coolant; safety engineering; handling and recycling plutonium; safeguards; development of fast reactors in Britain and abroad; future progress. (U.K.)

  5. Design and development of small and medium integral reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, Sung Quun; Chang, M. H.; Lee, C. C.; Song, J. S.; Cho, B. O.; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, S. J.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, C. H.; Chun, T. H.; Oh, D. S.; In, W. K.; Kim, H. K.; Lee, C. B.; Kang, H. S.; Song, K. N.

    1997-07-01

    Recently, the role of small and medium size integral reactors is remarkable in the heat applications rather than the electrical generations. Such a range of possible applications requires extensive used of inherent safety features and passive safety systems. It also requires ultra-longer cycle operations for better plant economy. Innovative and evolutionary designs such as boron-free operations and related reactor control methods that are necessary for simple reactor system design are demanded for the small and medium reactor (SMR) design, which are harder for engineers to implement in the current large size nuclear power plants. The goals of this study are to establish preliminary design criteria, to perform the preliminary conceptual design and to develop core specific technology for the core design and analysis for System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor (SMART) of 330 MWt power. Based on the design criteria of the commercial PWR's, preliminary design criteria will be set up. Preliminary core design concept is going to be developed for the ultra-longer cycle and boron-free operation and core analysis code system is constructed for SMART. (author). 100 refs., 40 tabs., 92 figs

  6. Small and medium reactors: Development status and application aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupitz, J.

    2001-01-01

    During the 1960s and the early 1970s. the nuclear power plants entering service were dominated by plants with outputs falling into the small (less than 150 W e ) and medium (300 MWe to 700 MWe) reactor size ranges. During the late 1970s and 1980s, the balance shifted to large size plants (900 MWe to 1400 MWe), as nuclear power plants entered service, predominately, to serve the requirements of industrialized countries such as the US, Japan, Germany, and France. However, in the 1990s, the pendulum has swung back in the direction of small and medium sized reactors; currently 65% of the nuclear power plants under construction fall into the small and medium reactor size ranges. This shift has resulted from a sharp reduction in the number of nuclear power plants being built in the industrialized countries, in combination with the continued construction of small and medium sized nuclear power plants in developing countries such as India. China, Pakistan, and Slovakia. Developing countries are often characterized by limited capacity electrical grid systems. limited financial capability, and rapidly expanding energy demand requirements. In addition, most of the developing countries in which rapid increases in population and energy demand are occurring have few or very limited indigenous energy resources. These countries are therefore very interested in acquiring energy sources (for electricity production and process heat) that can serve the needs of their people and industries, and which do not overburden their financial capabilities (balance of payments, national debt load. etc.). It is therefore not surprising that many developing countries have, particularly during the late 1990s, expressed an interest in small and medium sized nuclear power plants (SMRs). The requirements for SMRs often cited by developing countries include low absolute capital cost, short construction schedule, favourable economic operation, and infrastructure requirements within the technical and

  7. High power density reactors based on direct cooled particle beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. R.; Horn, F. L.

    Reactors based on direct cooled High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) type particle fuel are described. The small diameter particle fuel is packed between concentric porous cylinders to make annular fuel elements, with the inlet coolant gas flowing inwards. Hot exit gas flows out along the central channel of each element. Because of the very large heat transfer area in the packed beds, power densities in particle bed reactors (PBRs) are extremely high resulting in compact, lightweight systems. Coolant exit temperatures are high, because of the ceramic fuel temperature capabilities, and the reactors can be ramped to full power and temperature very rapidly. PBR systems can generate very high burst power levels using open cycle hydrogen coolant, or high continuous powers using closed cycle helium coolant. PBR technology is described and development requirements assessed.

  8. Thermionic reactors for space nuclear power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homeyer, W. G.; Merrill, M. H.; Holland, J. W.; Fisher, C. R.; Allen, D. T.

    1985-01-01

    Thermionic reactor designs for a variety of space power applications spanning the range from 5 kWe to 3 MWe are described. In all of these reactors, nuclear heat is converted directly to electrical energy in thermionic fuel elements (TFEs). A circulating reactor coolant carries heat from the core of TFEs directly to a heat rejection radiator system. The recent design of a thermionic reactor to meet the SP-100 requirements is emphasized. Design studies of reactors at other power levels show that the same TFE can be used over a broad range in power, and that design modifications can extend the range to many megawatts. The design of the SP-100 TFE is similar to that of TFEs operated successfully in test reactors, but with design improvements to extend the operating lifetime to seven years.

  9. Method and device for controlling reactor power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oohashi, Masahisa; Masuda, Hiroyuki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable load following-up operation of a reactor adapted to perform power conditioning by the control of the liquid poison density in the core and by the control rods. Constitution: In a case where the reactor power is repeatedly changed in a reactor having a liquid poison density control device and control rods, the time period for the power control is divided depending on the magnitude of the change with time in the reactivity and the optimum values are set for the injection and removal amount of the liquid poison within the divided period. Then, most parts of the control required for the power change are alloted to the liquid poison that gives no effect on the power distribution while minimizing the movement of the control rods, whereby the power change in the reactor as in the case of the load following-up operation can be practiced with ease. (Kawakami, Y.)

  10. Nuclear power reactors of new generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Slesarev, I.S.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents discussions on the following topics: fuel supply for nuclear power; expansion of the sphere of nuclear power applications, such as district heating; comparative estimates of power reactor efficiencies; safety philosophy of advanced nuclear plants, including passive protection and inherent safety concepts; nuclear power unit of enhanced safety for the new generation of nuclear power plants. The emphasis is that designers of new generation reactors face a complicated but technically solvable task of developing highly safe, efficient, and economical nuclear power sources having a wide sphere of application

  11. Definition and conceptual design of a small fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate various mirror fusion reactor concepts that might result in small systems for the effective production of electrical power or stored energy (e.g., nuclear and chemical fuels). The basic two-year program goal is to select a particular concept and develop the conceptual design of a pilot plant that could provide a useful output from fusion. The pilot plant would be built and operated in the late 1980s

  12. An overview of future sustainable nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poullikkas, Andreas [Electricity Authority of Cyprus, P.O. Box 24506, 1399 Nicosia (Cyprus)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper an overview of the current and future nuclear power reactor technologies is carried out. In particular, the nuclear technology is described and the classification of the current and future nuclear reactors according to their generation is provided. The analysis has shown that generation II reactors currently in operation all around the world lack significantly in safety precautions and are prone to loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In contrast, generation III reactors, which are an evolution of generation II reactors, incorporate passive or inherent safety features that require no active controls or operational intervention to avoid accidents in the event of malfunction, and may rely on gravity, natural convection or resistance to high temperatures. Today, partly due to the high capital cost of large power reactors generating electricity and partly due to the consideration of public perception, there is a shift towards the development of smaller units. These may be built independently or as modules in a larger complex, with capacity added incrementally as required. Small reactors most importantly benefit from reduced capital costs, simpler units and the ability to produce power away from main grid systems. These factors combined with the ability of a nuclear power plant to use process heat for co-generation, make the small reactors an attractive option. Generally, modern small reactors for power generation are expected to have greater simplicity of design, economy of mass production and reduced installation costs. Many are also designed for a high level of passive or inherent safety in the event of malfunction. Generation III+ designs are generally extensions of the generation III concept, which include advanced passive safety features. These designs can maintain the safe state without the use of any active control components. Generation IV reactors, which are future designs that are currently under research and development, will tend to have closed

  13. Power supplyer for reactor coolant recycling pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nara, Hiroshi; Okinaka, Yo.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a variable voltage/variable frequency static power source (static power source) used as a power source for a coolants recycling pump motor of a nuclear power plant. That is, during lower power operation such as start up or shutdown in which stoppage of the power source gives less effect to a reactor core, power is supplied from a power system, a main power generator connected thereto or a high voltage bus in the plant or a common high voltage bus to the static power source. However, during rated power operation, power is supplied from the output of an axially power generator connected with a main power generator having an extremely great inertia moment to the static power device. With such a constitution, the static power device is not stopped by the lowering of the voltage due to a thunderbolt falling accident or the like to a power-distribution line suddenly occurred in the power system. Accordingly, reactor core flowrate is free from rapid decrease caused by the reduction of rotation speed of the recycling pump. Accordingly, disadvantgages upon operation control in the reactor core is not caused. (I.S.)

  14. Apparatus for power and breeding distribution measurements in breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, N.P.; Sun, K.H.

    1975-01-01

    A detection system is disclosed herein for the measurement of power and breeding distribution inside a breeder reactor. Small diameter BeO balls comprising oxides of 235 U and 238 U are inserted into the reactor for activation and withdrawn to be counted in a Ge(Li) counter. Measurements of the activated fission and 239 Np gamma rays yield the desired distributions. (Official Gazette)

  15. The Global Outlook for Small Reactors: Opportunities, Challenges and Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, A.

    2012-01-01

    The fascinating topic of small nuclear is becoming more prevalent on the nuclear agenda. The discussions are generally focused within the country of technical origin. In this presentation 'The global outlook for small reactors' Rolls-Royce along with energy business analysts Douglas-Westwood present their shared views on the global opportunities for Small Reactor deployment in the context of the wider energy market. The presentation will: provide a compressive overview of trends and dynamics relating to Small Reactors in the context of the current world energy market, identify specific Small Reactor opportunities and areas of interest, address the challenges and potential solutions for Small Reactor deployment and operation.(author).

  16. The Carem reactor: Bridging the gap to nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    An idea is presented as an alternative for the introduction of nuclear power in presently non-nuclear countries. This idea involves going through an intermediate step between the traditional research reactor and the first commercial nuclear power plant. This intermediate step would consist of a very small nuclear power plant, with the principal goal of gaining in experience in the country on all the processes involved in introducing commercial nuclear generation. (author)

  17. Multiple microprocessor based nuclear reactor power monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, P.S.; Ethridge, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    The reactor power monitor is a portable multiple-microprocessor controlled data acquisition device being built for the International Atomic Energy Association. Its function is to measure and record the hourly integrated operating thermal power level of a nuclear reactor for the purpose of detecting unannounced plutonium production. The monitor consists of a 3 He proportional neutron detector, a write-only cassette tape drive and control electronics based on two INTEL 8748 microprocessors. The reactor power monitor operates from house power supplied by the plant operator, but has eight hours of battery backup to cover power interruptions. Both the hourly power levels and any line power interruptions are recorded on tape and in memory. Intermediate dumps from the memory to a data terminal or strip chart recorder can be performed without interrupting data collection

  18. Power distribution forecasting device for reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukii, Makoto

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To save expensive calculations on the forecasting of reactor power distribution. Constitution: Core status (CSD) such as entire coolant flow rate, pressures in the reactor, temperatures at the outlet and inlet and positions for control rods are inputted into a power distribution calculation device to calculate the power distribution based on physical models intermittently. Further, present power distribution is calculated based on in-core neutron flux measured values and CSD in a process control computer. Further, the ratio of the calculation results of the latter to those of the former is calculated, stored and inputted into a correction device to correct the forecast power distribution obtained by the power distribution calculation device. This enables to forecast the power distribution with excellent responsivity in the reactor site. (Furukawa, Y.)

  19. Power distribution monitor in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Hitoshi

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable accurate monitoring for the reactor power distribution within a short time in a case where abnormality occurs in in-core neutron monitors or in a case where the reactor core state changes after the calibration for the neutron monitors. Constitution: The power distribution monitor comprises a power distribution calculator adapted to be inputted counted values from a reactor core present state data instruments and calculate the neutron flux distribution in the reactor core and the power distribution based on previously incorporated physical models, an RCF calculator adapted to be inputted with the counted values from the in-core neutron monitors and the neutron flux distribution and the power distribution calculated in the power distribution calculator and compensate the counted errors included in the counted values form the in-core neutron monitors and the calculation errors included in the power distribution calculated in the power distribution calculator to thereby calculate the power distribution within the reactor core, and an input/output device for the input of the data required for said power distribution calculator and the display for the calculation result calculated in the RCF calculator. (Ikeda, J.)

  20. Power conditioning system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashigawa, Yuichi; Joge, Toshio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a power conditioning system for a BWR type reactor which has a function to be automatically operated within a range that the relationship between the heat power of the reactor and the electric power of an electric generator does not lose the safety of fuel by eliminating the unnecessary fluctuation of the power of the reactor. Constitution: A load request error signal fed from a conventional turbine control system to recirculation flow regulator is eliminated, and a reactor power conditioning system is newly provided, to which an electric generator power signal, a reactor average power area monitor signal and a load request signal are inputted. Thus, the load request signal is compared directly with the electric power of the electric generator, the recirculation flow rate is controlled by the compared result, and whether the correlation between the heat power of the reqctor and the electric power of the generator satisfies the correlation determined to prove the safety of fuel or not is checked. If this correlation is satisfied, the recirculation flow rate is merely automatically controlled. (Yoshino, Y.)

  1. Nuclear power reactors: reactor safety and military and civil defence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hvinden, T.

    1976-01-01

    The formation of fission products and plutonium in reactors is briefly described, followed by a short general discussion of reactor safety. The interaction of reactor safety and radioactive release considerations with military and civil defence is thereafter discussed. Reactors and other nuclear plants are factors which must be taken into account in the defence of the district around the site, and as potential targets of both conventional and guerilla attacks and sabotage, requiring special defence. The radiological hazards arising from serious damage to a power reactor by conventional weapons are briefly discussed, and the benefits of underground siting evaluated. Finally the author discusses the significance of the IAEA safeguards work as a preventive factor. (JIW)

  2. Identification of fast power reactivity effect in nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efanov, A.I.; Kaminskas, V.A.; Lavrukhin, V.S.; Rimidis, A.P.; Yanitskene, D.Yu.

    1987-01-01

    A nuclear power reactor is an object of control with distributed parameters, characteristics of which vary during operation time. At the same time the reactor as the object of control has internal feedback circuits, which are formed as a result of the effects of fuel parameters and a coolant (pressure, temperature, steam content) on the reactor breeding properties. The problem of internal feedback circuit identification in a nuclear power reactor is considered. Conditions for a point reactor identification are obtained and algorithms of parametric identification are constructed. Examples of identification of fast power reactivity effect for the RBMK-1000 reactor are given. Results of experimental testing have shown that the developed method of fast power reactivity effect identification permits according to the data of normal operation to construct adaptive models for the point nuclear reactor, designed for its behaviour prediction in stationary and transition operational conditions. Therefore, the models considered can be used for creating control systems of nuclear power reactor thermal capacity (of RBMK type reactor, in particular) which can be adapted to the change in the internal feedback circuit characteristics

  3. Proliferation resistance of small modular reactors fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polidoro, F.; Parozzi, F. [RSE - Ricerca sul Sistema Energetico,Via Rubattino 54, 20134, Milano (Italy); Fassnacht, F.; Kuett, M.; Englert, M. [IANUS, Darmstadt University of Technology, Alexanderstr. 35, D-64283 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the proliferation resistance of different types of Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) has been examined and classified with criteria available in the literature. In the first part of the study, the level of proliferation attractiveness of traditional low-enriched UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels to be used in SMRs based on pressurized water technology has been analyzed. On the basis of numerical simulations both cores show significant proliferation risks. Although the MOX core is less proliferation prone in comparison to the UO{sub 2} core, it still can be highly attractive for diversion or undeclared production of nuclear material. In the second part of the paper, calculations to assess the proliferation attractiveness of fuel in typical small sodium cooled fast reactor show that proliferation risks from spent fuel cannot be neglected. The core contains a highly attractive plutonium composition during the whole life cycle. Despite some aspects of the design like the sealed core that enables easy detection of unauthorized withdrawal of fissile material and enhances proliferation resistance, in case of open Non-Proliferation Treaty break-out, weapon-grade plutonium in sufficient quantities could be extracted from the reactor core.

  4. MODERATOR ELEMENTS FOR UNIFORM POWER NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balent, R.

    1963-03-12

    This patent describes a method of obtaining a flatter flux and more uniform power generation across the core of a nuclear reactor. The method comprises using moderator elements having differing moderating strength. The elements have an increasing amount of the better moderating material as a function of radial and/or axial distance from the reactor core center. (AEC)

  5. A nuclear power reactor concept for Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefidvash, F.

    1980-01-01

    For the purpose of developing an independent national nuclear technology and effective manner of transferring such a technology, as well as developing a modern reactor, a new nuclear power reactor concept is proposed which is considered as a suitable and viable project for Brazil to support its development and finally construct its prototype as an indigeneous venture. (Author) [pt

  6. Self-operation type power control device for nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanbe, Mitsuru.

    1993-07-23

    The device of the present invention operates by sensing the temperature change of a reactor core in all of LMFBR type reactors irrespective of the scale of the reactor core power. That is, a region where liquid poison is filled is disposed at the upper portion and a region where sealed gases are filled is disposed at the lower portion of a pipe having both ends thereof being closed. When the pipe is inserted into the reactor core, the inner diameter of the pipe is determined smaller than a predetermined value so that the boundary between the liquid poison and the sealed gases in the pipe is maintained relative to an assumed maximum acceleration. The sealed gas region is disposed at the reactor core region. If the liquid poison is expanded by the elevation of the reactor core exit temperature, it is moved to the lower gas region, to control the reactor power. Since high reliability can be maintained over a long period of time by this method, it is suitable to FBR reactors disposed in such environments that maintenance can not easily be conducted, such as desserts, isolated islands and undeveloped countries. Further, it is also suitable to ultra small sized nuclear reactors disposed at environments that the direction and the magnitude of gravity are different from those on the ground. (I.S.).

  7. Self-operation type power control device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanbe, Mitsuru.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention operates by sensing the temperature change of a reactor core in all of LMFBR type reactors irrespective of the scale of the reactor core power. That is, a region where liquid poison is filled is disposed at the upper portion and a region where sealed gases are filled is disposed at the lower portion of a pipe having both ends thereof being closed. When the pipe is inserted into the reactor core, the inner diameter of the pipe is determined smaller than a predetermined value so that the boundary between the liquid poison and the sealed gases in the pipe is maintained relative to an assumed maximum acceleration. The sealed gas region is disposed at the reactor core region. If the liquid poison is expanded by the elevation of the reactor core exit temperature, it is moved to the lower gas region, to control the reactor power. Since high reliability can be maintained over a long period of time by this method, it is suitable to FBR reactors disposed in such environments that maintenance can not easily be conducted, such as desserts, isolated islands and undeveloped countries. Further, it is also suitable to ultra small sized nuclear reactors disposed at environments that the direction and the magnitude of gravity are different from those on the ground. (I.S.)

  8. SEISMIC DESIGN CRITERIA FOR NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, R. A.

    1963-10-15

    The nature of nuclear power reactors demands an exceptionally high degree of seismic integrity. Considerations involved in defining earthquake resistance requirements are discussed. Examples of seismic design criteria and applications of the spectrum technique are described. (auth)

  9. Reactor power control method and device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushimi, Atsushi; Ishii, Yoshihiko; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Kiyoharu, Norihiko; Aizawa, Yuko.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and a device suitable to rise the temperature and increase the pressure of the reactor to an aimed pressure in accordance with an aimed value for a reactor water temperature changing rate in the course of rising temperature and increasing pressure of the reactor upon start up of a BWR type power plant. Namely, neutron fluxes in the reactor and the temperature of reactor water are detected respectively. The maximum value among the detected values for the neutron fluxes is detected. The reactor water temperature changing rate is calculated based on the detected values of the reactor water temperature, from which the maximum value of the reactor water temperature changing rate is detected. An aimed value for the neutron flux is calculated in accordance with both detected maximum values and the aimed value of the reactor water temperature changing rate. The position of control rods is adjusted in accordance with the aimed value for the calculated neutron flux. Then, an aimed value for the neutron flux for realizing the aimed value for the reactor water temperature changing rate can be obtained accurately with no influence of the sensitivity of the detected values of the neutron fluxes and the time delay of the reactor water temperature changing rate. (I.S.)

  10. A Global Perspective on Small and Medium Reactor Designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, D.; Kupitz, J.

    2002-01-01

    In the beginning, nuclear power plants were designed for what are now considered small reactors. Then the size increased because of economy of scale, and eventually large reactors in the range of 700 to 1500 MWe size were designed and constructed. However, since the early 1990s the interest in many countries with small and medium electricity grids, mainly in Asia and Eastern Europe, has resulted in increased efforts on designing and developing small (less than 300 MWe) and medium (less than 700 MWe) sized reactors (SMRs). SMRs are also of interest for remote locations, for non-electric applications for desalination and district heating, and for hydrogen production in the future. In addition, globalisation of world economy, deregulation of electricity markets, privatisation of the electricity sector, the drive for energy independence and flexibility, increased concerns for the environment, non-proliferation and awareness of sustainable development have forced new work for innovative designs. This paper will discuss the status of innovative reactor developments in the world. (author)

  11. Station Blackout Analysis of HTGR-Type Experimental Power Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syarip; Zuhdi, Aliq; Falah, Sabilul

    2018-01-01

    The National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia has decided to build an experimental power reactor of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) type located at Puspiptek Complex. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate a small modular nuclear power plant that can be operated safely. One of the reactor safety characteristics is the reliability of the reactor to the station blackout (SBO) event. The event was observed due to relatively high disturbance frequency of electricity network in Indonesia. The PCTRAN-HTR functional simulator code was used to observe fuel and coolant temperature, and coolant pressure during the SBO event. The reactor simulated at 10 MW for 7200 s then the SBO occurred for 1-3 minutes. The analysis result shows that the reactor power decreases automatically as the temperature increase during SBO accident without operator’s active action. The fuel temperature increased by 36.57 °C every minute during SBO and the power decreased by 0.069 MW every °C fuel temperature rise at the condition of anticipated transient without reactor scram. Whilst, the maximum coolant (helium) temperature and pressure are 1004 °C and 9.2 MPa respectively. The maximum fuel temperature is 1282 °C, this value still far below the fuel temperature limiting condition i.e. 1600 °C, its mean that the HTGR has a very good inherent safety system.

  12. Recommendations for small water reactor development in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Peipei; Zhou Yun

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the history and features of Advanced Small Water Reactor (ASWR), and provides recommendations and strategies on ASWR research and development in China. The ASWR can be used in remote power grid and replaces mid/small size fossil plant economically, and thus can be an important part of energy saving and emission reduction policy. The safety and economy characteristics of ASWR are able to effectively expand nuclear energy market in emerging countries and developing countries. Therefore, ASWR should be considered as a critical part of China's nuclear technology and equipment export strategy. (authors)

  13. Preliminary reactor implications of compact tori: how small is compact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The application of simplified but realistic engineering constraints to the special class of wall-stabilized field-reversed theta pinch configurations leads to reactor systems that may be as small as approx. 30 m in length and generating a total thermal power of the order of 500 MWt. Decreased size and power for a given ntau/sub B/ will be accompanied by decreased performance indicators, as reflected in this study by I/sub w/ and the allowable ΔT. It should be noted that this analysis is based upon fixing the duty factor, f/sub l/ = tau/sub s//tau/sub I/

  14. Low power reactor for remote applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, K.L.; Palmer, R.G.; Kirchner, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    A compact, low power reactor is being designed to provide electric power for remote, unattended applications. Because of the high fuel and maintenance costs for conventional power sources such as diesel generators, a reactor power supply appears especially attractive for remote and inaccessible locations. Operating at a thermal power level of 135 kWt, the power supply achieves a gross electrical output of 25 kWe from an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) engine. By intentional selection of design features stressing inherent safety, operation in an unattended mode is possible with minimal risk to the environment. Reliability is achieved through the use of components representing existing, proven technology. Low enrichment uranium particle fuel, in graphite core blocks, cooled by heat pipes coupled to an ORC converter insures long-term, virtually maintenance free, operation of this reactor for remote applications. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  15. MIT research reactor. Power uprate and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Lin-Wen [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    The MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is a university research reactor located on MIT campus. and has a long history in supporting research and education. Recent accomplishments include a 20% power rate to 6 MW and expanding advanced materials fuel testing program. Another important ongoing initiative is the conversion to high density low enrichment uranium (LEU) monolithic U-Mo fuel, which will consist of a new fuel element design and power increase to 7 MW. (author)

  16. Feasibility study on small modular reactors for modern microgrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, R.; Gabbar, H.A., E-mail: hossam.gabbar@uoit.ca [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Microgrid is a solution of conventional power grid problem and offer sustainable decentralized power system. Microgrid with modern distributed energy resources (DER) could play an important role to alleviate dependency on the main electricity grid. Distributed energy resource comprises wind turbine, solar photovoltaic, diesel generator, gas engine, micro turbine, fuel cells, etc.Due to the gap between typical loads and supply within microgrid, larger scale energy generation could provide a possible solution to balance power demand and supply. Feasibility study of Small Nuclear Power Plant, such as Small Modular reactor (SMR), within microgrids could be achieved via different cases. To achieve the target, a comprehensive feasibility study is conducted on microgrid with SMR through electricity generation profiles, geographical and environmental assessment, as well as cost analysis using simulation practices and data analysis.Also potency of SMRs is analyzed. Parameters and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) could be analyzed to achieve feasible solution of microgrids with small modular reactor (SMR) to improve the overall microgrid performance.The study shows that SMR could be a feasible solution if microgrid parameters are selected properly. (author)

  17. Feasibility study on small modular reactors for modern microgrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, R.; Gabbar, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Microgrid is a solution of conventional power grid problem and offer sustainable decentralized power system. Microgrid with modern distributed energy resources (DER) could play an important role to alleviate dependency on the main electricity grid. Distributed energy resource comprises wind turbine, solar photovoltaic, diesel generator, gas engine, micro turbine, fuel cells, etc.Due to the gap between typical loads and supply within microgrid, larger scale energy generation could provide a possible solution to balance power demand and supply. Feasibility study of Small Nuclear Power Plant, such as Small Modular reactor (SMR), within microgrids could be achieved via different cases. To achieve the target, a comprehensive feasibility study is conducted on microgrid with SMR through electricity generation profiles, geographical and environmental assessment, as well as cost analysis using simulation practices and data analysis.Also potency of SMRs is analyzed. Parameters and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) could be analyzed to achieve feasible solution of microgrids with small modular reactor (SMR) to improve the overall microgrid performance.The study shows that SMR could be a feasible solution if microgrid parameters are selected properly. (author)

  18. reactor power control using fuzzy logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.E.E.

    2001-01-01

    power stabilization is a critical issue in nuclear reactors. convention pd- controller is currently used in egypt second testing research reactor (ETRR-2). two fuzzy controllers are proposed to control the reactor power of ETRR-2 reactor. the design of the first one is based on a set of linguistic rules that were adopted from the human operators experience. after off-line fuzzy computations, the controller is a lookup table, and thus, real time controller is achieved. comparing this f lc response with the pd-controller response, which already exists in the system, through studying the expected transients during the normal operation of ETRR-2 reactor, the simulation results show that, fl s has the better response, the second controller is adaptive fuzzy controller, which is proposed to deal with system non-linearity . The simulation results show that the proposed adaptive fuzzy controller gives a better integral square error (i se) index than the existing conventional od controller

  19. Reactor Power Meter type SG-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowacki, S W

    1981-01-01

    The report describes the principle and electronic circuits of the Reactor Power Meter type SG-8. The gamma radiation caused by the activity of the reactor first cooling circuit affectes the ionization chamber being the detector of the instrument. The output detector signal direct current is converted into the frequency of electric pulses by means of the current-to-frequency converter. The output converter frequency is measured by the digital frequency meter: the number of measured digits in time unit is proportional to the reactor power.

  20. High power density reactors based on direct cooled particle beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.; Horn, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Reactors based on direct cooled HTGR type particle fuel are described. The small diameter particle fuel is packed between concentric porous cylinders to make annular fuel elements, with the inlet coolant gas flowing inwards. Hot exit gas flows out long the central channel of each element. Because of the very large heat transfer area in the packed beds, power densities in particle bed reactors (PBR's) are extremely high resulting in compact, lightweight systems. Coolant exit temperatures are high, because of the ceramic fuel temperature capabilities, and the reactors can be ramped to full power and temperature very rapidly. PBR systems can generate very high burst power levels using open cycle hydrogen coolant, or high continuous powers using closed cycle helium coolant. PBR technology is described and development requirements assessed. 12 figs

  1. Preliminary Study for Conceptual Design of Advanced Long Life Small Modular Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tak, Taewoo; Choe, Jiwon; Jeong, Yongjin; Lee, Deokjung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, T. K. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne (United States)

    2015-05-15

    As one of the non-water coolant Small-Modular Reactor (SMR) core concepts for use in the mid- to long-term, ANL has proposed a 100 MWe Advanced sodium-cooled Fast Reactor core concept (AFR-100) targeting a small grid, transportable from pre-licensed factories to the remote plant site for affordable supply. Various breed-and-burn core concepts have been proposed to extend the reactor cycle length, which includes CANDLE with a cigar-type depletion strategy, TerraPower reactors with fuel shuffling for effective breeding, et al. UNIST has also proposed an ultra-long cycle fast reactor (UCFR) core concept having the power rating of 1000 MWe. By adopting the breed-and-burn strategies, the UCFR core can maintain criticality for a targeting reactor lifetime of 60 years without refueling. The objective of this project is to develop an advanced long-life SMR core concept by adopting both the small modular design features of the AFR-100 and the long-life breed-and-burn concept of the UCFR. A conceptual design of long life small modular fast reactor is under development by adopting both the small modular design features of the AFR-100 and the long-life breed-and-burn concept of the UCFR. The feasibility of the long-life fast reactor concepts was reviewed to obtain the core design guidelines and the reactor design requirements of long life small modular fast reactor were proposed in this study.

  2. New generation of reactors for space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudreau, J.E.; Buden, D.

    1982-01-01

    Space nuclear reactor power is expected to enable many new space missions that will require several times to several orders of magnitude anything flown in space to date. Power in the 100-kW range may be required in high earth orbit spacecraft and planetary exploration. The technology for this power system range is under development for the Department of Energy with the Los Alamos National Laboratory responsible for the critical components in the nuclear subsystem. The baseline design for this particular nuclear sybsystem technology is described in this paper; additionally, reactor technology is reviewed from previous space power programs, a preliminary assessment is made of technology candidates covering an extended power spectrum, and the status is given of other reactor technologies

  3. Compact reactor/ORC power source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, K.L.; Kirchner, W.L.; Willcutt, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    A compact power source that combines an organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) electric generator with a nuclear reactor heat source is being designed and fabricated. Incorporating existing ORC technology with proven reactor technology, the compact reactor/ORC power source offers high reliability while minimizing the need for component development. Thermal power at 125 kWt is removed from the coated particle fueled, graphite moderated reactor by heat pipes operating at 500 0 C. Outside the reactor vessel and connected to the heat pipes are vaporizers in which the toluene ORC working fluid is heated to 370 0 C. In the turbine-alternator-pump (TAP) combined-rotating unit, the thermal energy of the toluene is converted to 25 kWe of electric power. Lumped parameter systems analyses combined with a finite element thermal analysis have aided in the power source design. The analyses have provided assurance of reliable multiyear normal operation as well as full power operation with upset conditions, such as failed heat pipes and inoperative ORC vaporizers. Because of inherent high reliability, long life, and insensitivity to upset conditions, this power source is especially suited for use in remote, inaccessible locations where fuel delivery and maintenance costs are high. 10 refs

  4. A compact reactor/ORC power source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, K.L.; Kirchner, W.L.; Willcutt, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    A compact power source that combines an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) electric generator with a nuclear reactor heat source is being designed and fabricated. Incorporating existing ORC technology with proven reactor technology, the compact reactor/ORC power source offers high reliability while minimizing the need for componenet development. Thermal power at 125 kWt is removed from the coated particle fueled, graphite moderated reactor by heat pipes operating at 500 0 C. Outside the reactor vessel and connected to the heat pipes are vaporizers in which the toluene ORC working fluid is heated to 370 0 C. In the turbine-alternator-pump (TAP) combined-rotating unit, the thermal energy of the toluene is converted to 25 kWe of electric power. Lumped parameter systems analyses combined with a finite element thermal analyses combined with a finite element thermal analysis have aided in the power source design. The analysis have provided assurance of reliable multiyear normal operation as well as full power operation with upset conditions, such as failed heat pipes and inoperative ORC vaporizers. Because of inherent high reliability, long life, and insensitivity to upset conditions, this power source is especially suited for use in remote, inaccessible locations where fuel delivery and maintenance costs are high

  5. Human Reliability Analysis for Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman

    2012-06-01

    Because no human reliability analysis (HRA) method was specifically developed for small modular reactors (SMRs), the application of any current HRA method to SMRs represents tradeoffs. A first- generation HRA method like THERP provides clearly defined activity types, but these activity types do not map to the human-system interface or concept of operations confronting SMR operators. A second- generation HRA method like ATHEANA is flexible enough to be used for SMR applications, but there is currently insufficient guidance for the analyst, requiring considerably more first-of-a-kind analyses and extensive SMR expertise in order to complete a quality HRA. Although no current HRA method is optimized to SMRs, it is possible to use existing HRA methods to identify errors, incorporate them as human failure events in the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), and quantify them. In this paper, we provided preliminary guidance to assist the human reliability analyst and reviewer in understanding how to apply current HRA methods to the domain of SMRs. While it is possible to perform a satisfactory HRA using existing HRA methods, ultimately it is desirable to formally incorporate SMR considerations into the methods. This may require the development of new HRA methods. More practicably, existing methods need to be adapted to incorporate SMRs. Such adaptations may take the form of guidance on the complex mapping between conventional light water reactors and small modular reactors. While many behaviors and activities are shared between current plants and SMRs, the methods must adapt if they are to perform a valid and accurate analysis of plant personnel performance in SMRs.

  6. Thorium Fuel Utilization Analysis on Small Long Life Reactor for Different Coolant Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permana, Sidik

    2017-07-01

    A small power reactor and long operation which can be deployed for less population and remote area has been proposed by the IAEA as a small and medium reactor (SMR) program. Beside uranium utilization, it can be used also thorium fuel resources for SMR as a part of optimalization of nuclear fuel as a “partner” fuel with uranium fuel. A small long-life reactor based on thorium fuel cycle for several reactor coolant types and several power output has been evaluated in the present study for 10 years period of reactor operation. Several key parameters are used to evaluate its effect to the reactor performances such as reactor criticality, excess reactivity, reactor burnup achievement and power density profile. Water-cooled types give higher criticality than liquid metal coolants. Liquid metal coolant for fast reactor system gives less criticality especially at beginning of cycle (BOC), which shows liquid metal coolant system obtains almost stable criticality condition. Liquid metal coolants are relatively less excess reactivity to maintain longer reactor operation than water coolants. In addition, liquid metal coolant gives higher achievable burnup than water coolant types as well as higher power density for liquid metal coolants.

  7. System design study of small lead-bismuth cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikazawa, Yoshitaka; Hori, Toru; Konomura, Mamoru

    2003-07-01

    In phase II of the feasibility study of JNC, we will make a concept of a dispersion power source reactor with various requirements, such as economical competitiveness and safety. In the study of a small lead-bismuth cooled reactor, a concept whose features are long life core, inherent safety, natural convection of cooling system and steam generators in the reactor vessel has been designed since 2000. The investigations which have been done in 2002 are shown as follows; Safety analysis of UTOP considering uncertainty of reactivity. Possibility of reduction of number of control rods. Estimation of construction cost. Transient analyses of UTOP have been done in considering uncertainty of reactivity in order to show the inherent safety in the probabilistic method. And the inherent safety in UTOP is realized under the condition of considering uncertainty. Transient analyses of UTOP with various numbers of control rods have been done and it is suggested that there is possibility of reduction of the number of control rods considering accident managements. The method of cost estimation is a little modified. The cost of reactor vessel is estimated from that of medium sized lead-bismuth cooled reactor and the estimation of a purity control system is by coolant volume flow rate. The construction cost is estimated 850,000yen/kWe. (author)

  8. Natural Circulation Capability Assessments for a Small-medium Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Do

    2010-02-01

    Small-medium reactors have been highly evaluated to have more safe characteristics than those of large reactors. In addition, it could be used for a variety of purposes, such as small-scale power production in mountainous of island area, seawater desalination, regional heating system. For a higher safety, studies about a way of using natural circulation have being conducted around world. CAREM(Argentina), AST- 500(Russia), and NHR-200(china) etc. According to this tendency, REX- 10(Regional Energy rX-10) is designed in Korea for regional heating and small-scale power production. To investigate the thermal-hydraulic behavior of REX-10, we designed Rex-10 Test Facility (RTF), simulating REX-10, by using the scaling law. The scaling ratios of length, volume and power were set with 1/1, 1/50 and 1/50, respectively. The diameter and total length of RTF are 40 cm and approximately 6 m, respectively. The facility is composed of various components, which are a core in the bottom part, a heat exchanger in the middle part, a pressurizer and hot legs in the upper part, and chillers outside the facility. The test instrumentation is also designed to measure temperatures, flow rates, pressures, and pressure drop. The experiment parameters were adopted based on the 1-dimensional approach. There are a variety of parameters which influence natural circulation behavior such as heater power, overall flow resistance parameter, the distance between the center of the heat exchanger and the core. As the experimental geometries are fixed, it is found that the most important parameter is the heater power under the experimental conditions. In addition, to evaluate the effect of heater power, some experiments were conducted at varying heater power condition (from 70 kW to 170 kW) under constant primary pressure (2.0 MPa) and secondary flow rate (4.5 liter per minute). As the results of the experiments, the temperature and flow rate increase with increasing heater power. The flow rate is

  9. Thorium utilization in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraceno; Marcos.

    1978-10-01

    In this work the recent (prior to Aug, 1976) literature on thorium utilization is reviewed briefly and the available information is updated. After reviewing the nuclear properties relevant to the thorium fuel cycle we describe briefly the reactor systems that have been proposed using thorium as a fertile material. (author) [es

  10. Bottom reflector for power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elter, C.; Kissel, K.F.; Schoening, J.; Schwiers, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    In pebble bed reactors erosion and damage due fuel elements movement on the surface of the bottom reflector should be minimized. This can be achieved by chamfering and/or rounding the cover edges of the graphite blocks and the edges between the drilled holes and the surface of the graphite block. (orig.) [de

  11. Power supply with nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    Each parameter of the processes of a nuclear reactor and components operatively associated therewith is monitored by a set of four like sensors. A trip system normally operates on a 'two out of four' configuration; i.e., to trip the reactor it is necessary that at least two sensors of a set sense an off-normal parameter. This assumes that all sensors are in normal operating condition. However, when a sensor is in test or is subject to maintenance or is defective or disabled, the 'two out of four' configuration would be reduced to a 'one out of three' configuration because the affected sensor is taken out of service. This would expose the system to the possibility that a single sensor failure, which may be spurious, will cause a trip of the reactor. To prevent this, it is necessary that the affected sensor be bypassed. If only one sensor is bypassed, the system operates on a 'two out of three' configuration. With two sensors bypassed, the sensing of an off-normal parameter by a third sensor trips the reactor

  12. Small and medium sized reactors: Status and prospects. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-08-01

    During the early years of nuclear power deployment, the plants entering service were dominated by what are now considered small (less than 300 MW(e)) and medium (300 to 700 MW(e)) reactors. In the late 1970s, the balance shifted to larger size plants to serve the requirements of industrialized countries. However, since the early 1990s, the increased interest of developing countries in nuclear power, mainly in Asia, has resulted in intensified efforts in development of small and medium sized reactors (SMRs). Also, in industrialized countries, electricity market deregulation is calling for power generation flexibility that SMRs may offer. Apart from electricity generation, SMRs are of particular interest for non-electrical applications of nuclear energy, such as desalination of seawater and district heating. In recognition of the current global interest in small and medium sized reactors this seminar was convened to provide a forum for the exchange of information by experts and policy makers from industrialized and developing countries on the technical, economic, environmental, and social aspects of SMR development and implementation in the 21st century, and to make this information available to all interested IAEA Member States. Keynote addresses also provided information on global energy demand and supply and international trends impacting the development and introduction of SMRs. Two hundred forty seven attendees from 39 countries and 5 international organizations participated in the seminar. The majority of the participants were from developing countries. The seminar not only provided valuable up to date information on SMRs, it also highlighted the importance of continued international co-operation in the development and application of nuclear power for peaceful uses throughout the world.

  13. Small and medium sized reactors: Status and prospects. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    During the early years of nuclear power deployment, the plants entering service were dominated by what are now considered small (less than 300 MW(e)) and medium (300 to 700 MW(e)) reactors. In the late 1970s, the balance shifted to larger size plants to serve the requirements of industrialized countries. However, since the early 1990s, the increased interest of developing countries in nuclear power, mainly in Asia, has resulted in intensified efforts in development of small and medium sized reactors (SMRs). Also, in industrialized countries, electricity market deregulation is calling for power generation flexibility that SMRs may offer. Apart from electricity generation, SMRs are of particular interest for non-electrical applications of nuclear energy, such as desalination of seawater and district heating. In recognition of the current global interest in small and medium sized reactors this seminar was convened to provide a forum for the exchange of information by experts and policy makers from industrialized and developing countries on the technical, economic, environmental, and social aspects of SMR development and implementation in the 21st century, and to make this information available to all interested IAEA Member States. Keynote addresses also provided information on global energy demand and supply and international trends impacting the development and introduction of SMRs. Two hundred forty seven attendees from 39 countries and 5 international organizations participated in the seminar. The majority of the participants were from developing countries. The seminar not only provided valuable up to date information on SMRs, it also highlighted the importance of continued international co-operation in the development and application of nuclear power for peaceful uses throughout the world

  14. Introduction to the neutron kinetics of nuclear power reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Tyror, J G; Grant, P J

    2013-01-01

    An Introduction to the Neutron Kinetics of Nuclear Power Reactors introduces the reader to the neutron kinetics of nuclear power reactors. Topics covered include the neutron physics of reactor kinetics, feedback effects, water-moderated reactors, fast reactors, and methods of plant control. The reactor transients following faults are also discussed, along with the use of computers in the study of power reactor kinetics. This book is comprised of eight chapters and begins with an overview of the reactor physics characteristics of a nuclear power reactor and their influence on system design and

  15. Parliament votes against building fifth power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    After a heated three-day debate, Finland's parliament voted on September 24 to reject the proposal to build the country's fifth nuclear power reactor. As predicted, the vote was close: 107 voted against more nuclear power, 90 were in favor, two members of the 200-seat parliament were not present, and the speaker did not vote

  16. Nuclear reactors for space electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.

    1978-06-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is studying reactor power plants for space applications in the late 1980s and 1990s. The study is concentrating on high-temperature, compact, fast reactors that can be coupled with various radiation shielding systems and thermoelectric, dynamic, or thermionic electric power conversion systems, depending on the mission. Lifetimes of 7 to 10 yr at full power, at converter operating temperatures of 1275 to 1675 0 K, are being studied. The systems are being designed such that no single-failure modes exist that will cause a complete loss of power. In fact, to meet the long lifetimes, highly redundant design features are being emphasized. Questions have been raised about safety since the COSMOS 954 incident. ''Fail-safe'' means to prevent exposure of the population to radioactive material, meeting the environmental guidelines established by the U.S. Government have been and continue to be a necessary requirement for any space reactor program. The major safety feature to prevent prelaunch and launch radioactive material hazards is not operating the reactor before achieving the prescribed orbit. Design features in the reactor ensure that accidental criticality cannot occur. High orbits (above 400 to 500 nautical miles) have sufficient lifetimes to allow radioactive elements to decay to safe levels. The major proposed applications for satellites with reactors in Earth orbit are in geosynchronous orbit (19,400 nautical miles). In missions at geosynchronous orbit, where orbital lifetimes are practically indefinite, the safety considerations are negligible. Orbits below 400 to 500 nautical miles are the ones where a safety issue is involved in case of satellite malfunction. The potential missions, the question of why reactors are being considered as a prime power candidate, reactor features, and safety considerations will be discussed

  17. TerraPower, Bill Gates' reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidez, J.

    2016-01-01

    TerraPower is a traveling wave reactor, it means that the reactor gradually converts non fissile material into the fuel it needs and the active part of the core progressively moves through the core leaving spent fuel behind. The last design of the TerraPower shows that it will use depleted uranium as fuel and that its core will need reloading every 10 years. Re-arrangement of the nuclear fuel will have to be made every 18 months to keep the core reactive. Metallic nuclear fuels will be used as they allow the highest breeding rates. It appears that apart from the very specific configuration of the core, the TerraPower is a reactor very similar to sodium-cooled fast reactors. Neutron transport inside traveling wave reactor core is complex and simulations show that the piling-up of fission product tends to kill the chain reaction and a continuous neutron addition may be necessary to keep the reactor going. A large part of the TerraPower feasibility studies concerns neutron transport inside its core. (A.C.)

  18. Systems engineering and the licensing of Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulesa, T., E-mail: tkulesa@us.ibm.com [IBM, Philidelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Soderholm, K., E-mail: Kristiina.Soderholm@fortum.com [Fortum Power (Finland); Fechtelkotter, P., E-mail: pfech@us.ibm.com [IBM, Boston, Massacheusets (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Both global warming and the need for dependable sources of energy continue to make nuclear power generation an appealing option. But a history of cost overruns, project delays, and environmental disaster has pushed the industry to innovate and design a more flexible, scalable, and safe source of nuclear energy - the small modular reactor. Innovation in generation technology creates disruption in already complex licensing and regulatory processes. This paper discusses how the application of systems engineering and requirements management can help combat confusion, rework, and efficiency problems across the engineering and compliance life cycle. The paper is based on the PhD Dissertation 'Licensing Model Development for Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) - Focusing on Finnish Regulatory Framework', approved in 2013. The result of the study gives recommendations and tools to develop and optimize the licensing process for SMRs. The most important SMR-specific feature, in terms of licensing, is the modularity of the design. Here the modularity indicates multi-module SMR designs, which creates new challenges in the licensing process. Another feature impacting licensing feasibility is the plan to build many standardized power plants in series and use factory-fabricated modules to optimize the construction costs. SMR licensing challenges are under discussion in many international forums, such as World Nuclear Association Cooperation in Reactor Design Evaluation and Licensing Small Modular Reactor group (WNA CORDEL SMR) group and IAEA INPRO regulators' forum. This paper also presents an application of the new licensing process using Systems Engineering, Requirements Management, and Project Management practices and tools. (author)

  19. Systems engineering and the licensing of Small Modular Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulesa, T.; Soderholm, K.; Fechtelkotter, P.

    2014-01-01

    Both global warming and the need for dependable sources of energy continue to make nuclear power generation an appealing option. But a history of cost overruns, project delays, and environmental disaster has pushed the industry to innovate and design a more flexible, scalable, and safe source of nuclear energy - the small modular reactor. Innovation in generation technology creates disruption in already complex licensing and regulatory processes. This paper discusses how the application of systems engineering and requirements management can help combat confusion, rework, and efficiency problems across the engineering and compliance life cycle. The paper is based on the PhD Dissertation 'Licensing Model Development for Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) - Focusing on Finnish Regulatory Framework', approved in 2013. The result of the study gives recommendations and tools to develop and optimize the licensing process for SMRs. The most important SMR-specific feature, in terms of licensing, is the modularity of the design. Here the modularity indicates multi-module SMR designs, which creates new challenges in the licensing process. Another feature impacting licensing feasibility is the plan to build many standardized power plants in series and use factory-fabricated modules to optimize the construction costs. SMR licensing challenges are under discussion in many international forums, such as World Nuclear Association Cooperation in Reactor Design Evaluation and Licensing Small Modular Reactor group (WNA CORDEL SMR) group and IAEA INPRO regulators' forum. This paper also presents an application of the new licensing process using Systems Engineering, Requirements Management, and Project Management practices and tools. (author)

  20. Gaseous fuel reactors for power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, J. S.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Gaseous-fuel nuclear reactors have significant advantages as energy sources for closed-cycle power systems. The advantages arise from the removal of temperature limits associated with conventional reactor fuel elements, the wide variety of methods of extracting energy from fissioning gases, and inherent low fissile and fission product in-core inventory due to continuous fuel reprocessing. Example power cycles and their general performance characteristics are discussed. Efficiencies of gaseous fuel reactor systems are shown to be high with resulting minimal environmental effects. A technical overview of the NASA-funded research program in gaseous fuel reactors is described and results of recent tests of uranium hexafluoride (UF6)-fueled critical assemblies are presented.

  1. Fractional power operation of tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mau, T.K.; Vold, E.L.; Conn, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Methods to operate a tokamak fusion reactor at fractions of its rated power, identify the more effective control knobs and assess the impact of the requirements of fractional power operation on full power reactor design are explored. In particular, the role of burn control in maintaining the plasma at thermal equilibrium throughout these operations is studied. As a prerequisite to this task, the critical physics issues relevant to reactor performance predictions are examined and some insight into their impact on fractional power operation is offered. The basic tool of analysis consists of a zero-dimensional (0-D) time-dependent plasma power balance code which incorporates the most advanced data base and models in transport and burn plasma physics relevant to tokamaks. Because the plasma power balance is dominated by the transport loss and given the large uncertainty in the confinement model, the authors have studied the problem for a wide range of energy confinement scalings. The results of this analysis form the basis for studying the temporal behavior of the plasma under various thermal control mechanisms. Scenarios of thermally stable full and fractional power operations have been determined for a variety of transport models, with either passive or active feedback burn control. Important power control parameters, such as gas fueling rate, auxiliary power and other plasma quantities that affect transport losses, have also been identified. The results of these studies vary with the individual transport scaling used and, in particular, with respect to the effect of alpha heating power on confinement

  2. Fast reactors as a solution for future small-scale nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryavtseva, A.; Danilenko, K.; Dorofeev, K.

    2013-01-01

    Small nuclear power plants can provide a future platform for decentralized energy supply providing better levels of accessibility, safety and environmental friendliness. The optimal solution for SMR deployment is fast reactors with inherent safety. To compete alternative solutions SMRs must exhibit some evident advantages in: safety, technology, and economic. Small modular reactors with lead-bismuth coolant (SVBR-100) under development in Russia can be a prospective solution for future small and decentralized energy

  3. Power control device in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Kazuaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable smooth power changes in power conditioning systems by calculating forecast values for the neutron flux distribution and power distribution and by controlling the driving speed of control rods so as to correspond the forecast values with aimed values. Constitution: Control rod position is detected by a position detector and sent to a control computer as the position information. At the same time, the neutron flux distribution information is obtained by the neutron monitors, the power distribution information is obtained by a reactor power computer and they are outputted to the control computer. The control computer calculates the forecast values for the neutron flux distribution and the reactor power distribution from the information, and compares them with the aimed values from a setter and then outputs control signals so as to correspond the forecast values with the aimed values. The control rods can be inserted in appropriate velocity by the control signals. (Horiuchi, T.)

  4. The Swedish Zero Power Reactor R0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landergaard, Olof; Cavallin, Kaj; Jonsson, Georg

    1961-05-15

    The reactor R0 is a critical facility built for heavy water and natural uranium or fuel of low enrichment,, The first criticality was achieved September 25, 1959. During a first period of more than two years the R0 will be operated as a bare reactor in order to simplify interpretation of results. The reactor tank is 3. 2 m high and 2. 25 m in diameter. The fuel suspension system is quite flexible in order to facilitate fuel exchange and lattice variations. The temperature of the water can be varied between about 10 and 90 C by means of a heater and a cooler placed in the external circulating system. The instrumentation of the reactor has to meet the safety requirements not only during operation but also during rearrangements of the core in the shut-down state. Therefore, the shut-down state is always defined by a certain low 'safe' moderator level in the reactor tank. A number of safety rods are normally kept above the moderator ready for action. For manual or automatic control of the reactor power a specially designed piston pump is needed, by which the moderator level is varied. The pump speed is controlled from the reactor power error by means of a Ward-Leonard system. Moderator level measurement is made by means of a water gauge with an accuracy of {+-} 0. 1 mm.

  5. The Swedish Zero Power Reactor R0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landergaard, Olof; Cavallin, Kaj; Jonsson, Georg

    1961-05-01

    The reactor R0 is a critical facility built for heavy water and natural uranium or fuel of low enrichment,, The first criticality was achieved September 25, 1959. During a first period of more than two years the R0 will be operated as a bare reactor in order to simplify interpretation of results. The reactor tank is 3. 2 m high and 2. 25 m in diameter. The fuel suspension system is quite flexible in order to facilitate fuel exchange and lattice variations. The temperature of the water can be varied between about 10 and 90 C by means of a heater and a cooler placed in the external circulating system. The instrumentation of the reactor has to meet the safety requirements not only during operation but also during rearrangements of the core in the shut-down state. Therefore, the shut-down state is always defined by a certain low 'safe' moderator level in the reactor tank. A number of safety rods are normally kept above the moderator ready for action. For manual or automatic control of the reactor power a specially designed piston pump is needed, by which the moderator level is varied. The pump speed is controlled from the reactor power error by means of a Ward-Leonard system. Moderator level measurement is made by means of a water gauge with an accuracy of ± 0. 1 mm

  6. Advances in ICF power reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.J.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    Fifteen ICF power reactor design studies published since 1980 are reviewed to illuminate the design trends they represent. There is a clear, continuing trend toward making ICF reactors inherently safer and environmentally benign. Since this trend accentuates inherent advantages of ICF reactors, we expect it to be further emphasized in the future. An emphasis on economic competitiveness appears to be a somewhat newer trend. Lower cost of electricity, smaller initial size (and capital cost), and more affordable development paths are three of the issues being addressed with new studies

  7. Containment and surveillance techniques at power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    This session will provide participants with an understanding of the functions of safeguards equipment at power reactors, including equipment for fuel accounting, video and film surveillance, diversion monitoring, and containment and surveillance of irradiated fuel in storage. In addition, some appreciation of the impact that reactor safeguards have on the plant operator will be gained. From this, participants will be able to ensure that a reactor safeguards system meets their nation's international and national nonproliferation objectives with a minimum of interference to plant operations

  8. Safety of next generation power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This book is organized under the following headings: Future needs of utilities regulators, government, and other energy users, PRA and reliability, LMR concepts, LWR design, Advanced reactor technology, What the industry can deliver: advanced LWRs, High temperature gas-cooled reactors, LMR whole-core experiments, Advanced LWR concepts, LWR technology, Forum: public perceptions, What the industry can deliver: LMRs and HTGRs, Criteria and licensing, LMR modeling, Light water reactor thermal-hydraulics, LMR technology, Working together to revitalize nuclear power, Appendix A, luncheon address, Appendix B, banquet address

  9. Space nuclear reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Ranken, W.A.; Koenig, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements for electrical and propulsion power for space are expected to increase dramatically in the 1980s. Nuclear power is probably the only source for some deep space missions and a major competitor for many orbital missions, especially those at geosynchronous orbit. Because of the potential requirements, a technology program on space nuclear power plant components has been initiated by the Department of Energy. The missions that are foreseen, the current power plant concept, the technology program plan, and early key results are described

  10. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.; Norton, J.L.; Slack, J.

    2002-01-01

    MDS Nordion has been supplying cobalt-60 sources to industry for industrial and medical purposes since 1946. These cobalt-60 sources are used in many market and product segments, but are primarily used to sterilize single-use medical products including; surgical kits, gloves, gowns, drapes, and cotton swabs. Other applications include sanitization of cosmetics, microbial reduction of pharmaceutical raw materials, and food irradiation. The technology for producing the cobalt-60 isotope was developed by MDS Nordion and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) almost 55 years ago using research reactors at the AECL Chalk River Laboratories in Ontario, Canada. The first cobalt-60 source produced for medical applications was manufactured by MDS Nordion and used in cancer therapy. The benefits of cobalt-60 as applied to medical product manufacturing, were quickly realized and the demand for this radioisotope quickly grew. The same technology for producing cobalt-60 in research reactors was then designed and packaged such that it could be conveniently transferred to a utility/power reactor. In the early 1970's, in co-operation with Ontario Power Generation (formerly Ontario Hydro), bulk cobalt-60 production for industrial irradiation applications was initiated in the four Pickering A CANDU reactors. As the demand and acceptance of sterilization of medical products grew, MDS Nordion expanded its bulk supply by installing the proprietary Canadian technology for producing cobalt-60 in additional CANDU reactors. CANDU is unique among the power reactors of the world, being heavy water moderated and fuelled with natural uranium. They are also designed and supplied with stainless steel adjusters, the primary function of which is to shape the neutron flux to optimize reactor power and fuel bum-up, and to provide excess reactivity needed to overcome xenon-135 poisoning following a reduction of power. The reactor is designed to develop full power output with all of the adjuster

  11. Power Nuclear Reactors: technology and innovation for development in future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2009-01-01

    The conference is about some historicals task of the fission technology as well as many types of Nuclear Reactors. Enrichment of fuel, wastes, research reactors and power reactors, a brief advertisment about Uruguay electric siystem and power generation, energetic worldwide, proliferation, safety reactors, incidents, accidents, Three-Mile Island accident, Chernobil accident, damages, risks, classification and description of Power reactors steam generation, nuclear reactor cooling systems, future view

  12. Corrosion control in CANDU nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesurf, J.E.

    1974-01-01

    Corrosion control in CANDU reactors which use pressurized heavy water (PHW) and boiling light water (BLW) coolants is discussed. Discussions are included on pressure tubes, primary water chemistry, fuel sheath oxidation and hydriding, and crud transport. It is noted that corrosion has not been a significant problem in CANDU nuclear power reactors which is a tribute to design, material selection, and chemistry control. This is particularly notable at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station which will have four CANDU-PHW reactors of 540 MWe each. The net capacity factor for Pickering-I from first full power (May 1971) to March 1972 was 79.5 percent, and for Pickering II (first full power November 1971) to March 1972 was 83.5 percent. Pickering III has just reached full power operation (May 1972) and Pickering IV is still under construction. Gentilly CANDU-BLW reached full power operation in May 1972 after extensive commissioning tests at lower power levels with no major corrosion or chemistry problems appearing. Experience and operating data confirm that the value of careful attention to all aspects of corrosion control and augur well for future CANDU reactors. (U.S.)

  13. Reactors of different types in the world nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonov, K.V.

    1991-01-01

    The status of the world nuclear power is briefly reviewed. It is noted that PWR reactors have decisive significance in the world power. The second place is related to gas-cooled graphite-moderated reactors. Channel-type heavy water moderated reactors are relatively important. Nuclear power future is associated with fast liquid-metal cooled breeder reactors

  14. Market Potential Estimation of a Small and Medium Size Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, K. B.; Yang, M. H.; Lee, M. K.; Chung, W. S.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, S. S.; Lee, B. W.; Ryu, J. S.; Juhn, P. E.

    2004-12-01

    Technically, nuclear reactors which produce energy in the form of heat can supply energy products other than electricity, including district heat, process heat, potable water etc. Currently non-civil uses of nuclear energy are very limited civil applications except for a military nuclear powered ship and an energy usage in isolated areas. However, the future global environment and an energy resources scarcity could promote a significant usage of non-electrical applications on an industrial scale. Considering these situations, this report analyzed the following: (1) Worldwide non-electrical application of a small and medium sized nuclear reactor - survey the situation of the current technical applications, - survey the global market potential estimation for various applications (2) Technical cooperation potential in several countries - identify necessary conditions for nuclear cooperation, - select candidate countries: Morocco, UAE, Indonesia, Chile and Vietnam, - survey the energy and water situation, - survey the legal and international regime infrastructure

  15. An Overview of the Safety Case for Small Modular Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, Daniel T.

    2011-01-01

    Several small modular reactor (SMR) designs emerged in the late 1970s and early 1980s in response to lessons learned from the many technical and operational challenges of the large Generation II light-water reactors. After the accident at the Three Mile Island plant in 1979, an ensuing reactor redesign effort spawned the term inherently safe designs, which later evolved into passively safe terminology. Several new designs were engineered to be deliberately small in order to fully exploit the benefits of passive safety. Today, new SMR designs are emerging with a similar philosophy of offering highly robust and resilient designs with increased safety margins. Additionally, because these contemporary designs are being developed subsequent to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack, they incorporate a number of intrinsic design features to further strengthen their safety and security. Several SMR designs are being developed in the United States spanning the full spectrum of reactor technologies, including water-, gas-, and liquid-metal-cooled ones. Despite a number of design differences, most of these designs share a common set of design principles to enhance plant safety and robustness, such as eliminating plant design vulnerabilities where possible, reducing accident probabilities, and mitigating accident consequences. An important consequence of the added resilience provided by these design approaches is that the individual reactor units and the entire plant should be able to survive a broader range of extreme conditions. This will enable them to not only ensure the safety of the general public but also help protect the investment of the owner and continued availability of the power-generating asset. Examples of typical SMR design features and their implications for improved plant safety are given for specific SMR designs being developed in the United States.

  16. Power reactor events, May-June 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massaro, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    Power Reactor Events is a bi-monthly newsletter that compiles operating experience information about commercial nuclear power plants. This includes summaries of noteworthy events and listings and/or abstracts of USNRC and other documents that discuss safety-related or possible generic issues. It is intended to feed back some of the lessons learned from operational experience to the various plant personnel, i.e., managers, licensed reactor operators, training coordinators, and support personnel. Events at the following plants are reported: McGuire Unit 1; Susquehanna Units 1 and 2; Browns Ferry Units 1, 2, and 3; and River Bend Unit 1

  17. The role of a small teaching reactor in education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobek, L.M.; Mayer, J.A. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    It cannot be simply concluded that because an undergraduate nuclear engineering program has access to a higher power research reactor that the number of BS graduates will be proportionately larger than a program whose reactor operates at a much lower power level. What can be concluded is that although smaller in size and capability, low-power research reactors and the nuclear engineering programs they serve provide an important role in producing much-needed nuclear engineers and scientists at the undergraduate level. Designed and built by General Electric primarily as a teaching tool for nuclear engineering education, the nuclear reactor at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) first began operation in 1959. The reactor power level was upgraded from 1 to 10 kW in 1969, and its 20-yr operating license was renewed in 1983. With the support of DOE funds, the reactor was converted to low-enriched fuel in 1988. Under partial funding from the DOE University Reactor Instrumentation Program, the reactor control console will soon be replaced. Since a small research reactor is an ideal tool for providing basic and intermediate nuclear training, the incorporation of nuclear subjects into traditional disciplines will consequently enhance reactor facility usage. With its continued modernization, the WPI nuclear reactor facility will play a key role in meeting nuclear manpower needs while providing excellent and rewarding career opportunities for students in all disciplines for many years to come

  18. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.G.

    1979-11-01

    An updated compilation is presented of occupational radiation exposures at commercial nuclear power reactors for the years 1969 through 1978. Data received from the 64 light water cooled reactors (LWRs) that had completed at least one year of commercial operation as of December 31, 1978 are included. This represents an increase of seven reactors over the number contained in last year's report. The total number of personnel monitored at LWRs during 1978 increased by approximately 12% to 76,121. The number of workers that received measurable doses, however, increased only 8% to 45,978. The total collective dose for 1978 is estimated to be 31,806 man-rems, a small decrease from last year's value of 32,511, which results in the average dose per worker decreasing slightly to 0.69 rems. The average collective dose per reactor also decreased, by approximately 15%, to a value of 497 man-rems

  19. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor nuclear steam supply system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memmott, M. J.; Harkness, A. W.; Van Wyk, J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 600 Cranberry Woods Drive, Cranberry Twp. PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR), in which all of the components typically associated with the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) of a nuclear power plant are incorporated within a single reactor pressure vessel. This paper is the first in a series of four papers which describe the design and functionality of the Westinghouse SMR. Also described in this series are the key drivers influencing the design of the Westinghouse SMR and the unique passive safety features of the Westinghouse SMR. Several critical motivators contributed to the development and integration of the Westinghouse SMR design. These design driving motivators dictated the final configuration of the Westinghouse SMR to varying degrees, depending on the specific features under consideration. These design drivers include safety, economics, AP1000{sup R} reactor expertise and experience, research and development requirements, functionality of systems and components, size of the systems and vessels, simplicity of design, and licensing requirements. The Westinghouse SMR NSSS consists of an integral reactor vessel within a compact containment vessel. The core is located in the bottom of the reactor vessel and is composed of 89 modified Westinghouse 17x17 Robust Fuel Assemblies (RFA). These modified fuel assemblies have an active core length of only 2.4 m (8 ft) long, and the entirety of the core is encompassed by a radial reflector. The Westinghouse SMR core operates on a 24 month fuel cycle. The reactor vessel is approximately 24.4 m (80 ft) long and 3.7 m (12 ft) in diameter in order to facilitate standard rail shipping to the site. The reactor vessel houses hot and cold leg channels to facilitate coolant flow, control rod drive mechanisms (CRDM), instrumentation and cabling, an intermediate flange to separate flow and instrumentation and facilitate simpler refueling, a pressurizer, a straight tube, recirculating steam

  20. Time-optimal control of reactor power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Control laws that permit adjustments in reactor power to be made in minimum time and without overshoot have been formulated and demonstrated. These control laws which are derived from the standard and alternate dynamic period equations, are closed-form expressions of general applicability. These laws were deduced by noting that if a system is subject to one or more operating constraints, then the time-optimal response is to move the system along these constraints. Given that nuclear reactors are subject to limitations on the allowed reactor period, a time-optimal control law would step the period from infinity to the minimum allowed value, hold the period at that value for the duration of the transient, and then step the period back to infinity. The change in reactor would therefore be accomplished in minimum time. The resulting control laws are superior to other forms of time-optimal control because they are general-purpose, closed-form expressions that are both mathematically tractable and readily implanted. Moreover, these laws include provisions for the use of feedback. The results of simulation studies and actual experiments on the 5 MWt MIT Research Reactor in which these time-optimal control laws were used successfully to adjust the reactor power are presented

  1. Nuclear Power Reactor simulator - based training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahab, S.A.S.

    2009-01-01

    nuclear power stations will continue playing a major role as an energy source for electric generation and heat production in the world. in this paper, a nuclear power reactor simulator- based training program will be presented . this program is designed to aid in training of the reactor operators about the principles of operation of the plant. also it could help the researchers and the designers to analyze and to estimate the performance of the nuclear reactors and facilitate further studies for selection of the proper controller and its optimization process as it is difficult and time consuming to do all experiments in the real nuclear environment.this program is written in MATLAB code as MATLAB software provides sophisticated tools comparable to those in other software such as visual basic for the creation of graphical user interface (GUI). moreover MATLAB is available for all major operating systems. the used SIMULINK reactor model for the nuclear reactor can be used to model different types by adopting appropriate parameters. the model of each component of the reactor is based on physical laws rather than the use of look up tables or curve fitting.this simulation based training program will improve acquisition and retention knowledge also trainee will learn faster and will have better attitude

  2. Reactor power system deployment and startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetch, J.R.; Nelin, C.J.; Britt, E.J.; Klein, G.; Rasor Associates, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA; California Institute of Technology, Pasadena)

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses issues that should receive further examination in the near-term as concept selection for development of a U.S. space reactor power system is approached. The issues include: the economics, practicality and system reliability associated with transfer of nuclear spacecraft from low earth shuttle orbits to operational orbits, via chemical propulsion versus nuclear electric propulsion; possible astronaut supervised reactor and nuclear electric propulsion startup in low altitude Shuttle orbit; potential deployment methods for nuclear powered spacecraft from Shuttle; the general public safety of low altitude startup and nuclear safe and disposal orbits; the question of preferred reactor power level; and the question of frozen versus molten alkali metal coolant during launch and deployment. These issues must be considered now because they impact the SP-100 concept selection, power level selection, weight and size limits, use of deployable radiators, reliability requirements, and economics, as well as the degree of need for and the urgency of developing space reactor power systems. 5 references

  3. Power control device for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagawa, Tatsuo

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate for requirement of control rods and movable portions, as well as ensure the safety and reliability of the operation. Constitution: A plurality of control tubes are disposed within a reactor core instead of control rods. Tubes are connected from below the reactor core to the control tubes for supplying liquid poisons such as aqueous boric acid to the inside of the control tubes. Further, tubes are connected to the upper portion of the control tubes for guiding the liquid poisons from the reactor core to the outside. The tubes for supplying and discharging the liquid poisons are introduced externally through the flange disposed at the upper portion of a pressure vessel. At the outside of the pressure vessel, are disposed a liquid poison tank, a pressurizing source, a pressure control valve, a liquid level meter and the like. The control for the reactor power is conducted by controlling the level of the liquid poisons in the control tubes. (Ikeda, J.)

  4. Challenges and Considerations for Innovative Small and Medium Sized Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.

    2008-01-01

    There is an ongoing interest in Member States in the development and application of small and medium sized reactors (SMRs). In the near term, most new NPPs are likely to be evolutionary water cooled reactor designs building on proven systems while incorporating technological advances and often the economics of scale, resulting from the reactor outputs of up to 1600 MW(e). For a longer term, the focus is on innovative designs aiming to provide increased benefits in the areas of safety and security, non-proliferation, waste management, resource utilization and economy, as well as to offer a variety of energy products and flexibility in design, siting and fuel cycle options. Many innovative designs are reactors within the SMR range, having an equivalent electric power less than 700 MW(e) or even less than 300 MW(e). It is important that small or medium sized reactor does not necessarily mean small or medium sized nuclear power plant. The majority of innovative SMR concepts and designs provide for power station configurations with several units at a site or for NPP configurations with 2 or more reactor modules. In most cases, the units or modules could be added incrementally. Innovative SMRs are in many cases intended for markets different from those in which large nuclear power plants operate, i.e., markets that value more distributed electrical supplies, a better match between supply increments and investment capability or demand growth, more flexible siting or greater product variety. SMRs cannot compete with larger capacity plants on an economy of scale basis. However, they could be competitive via employing alternative design strategies, taking advantage of smaller reactor size resulting in a less complex design and operation and maintenance or in an increased overall energy conversion efficiency, and by relying on alternative deployment strategies, taking advantage of multiple unit factors and learning curve, and shorter construction schedule and 'exact' unit

  5. The near boiling reactor: design of a small nuclear reactor for extending the operational envelope of the Victoria Class Submarine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, C.; Bonin, H.

    2005-01-01

    A small, inherently safe nuclear reactor that will provide enough power to maintain the hotel load of the Victoria Class Submarine and extend her operational envelope, has been conceptually designed. The final reactor concept, named the Near Boiling (NB) Reactor, employs TRISO fuel particles in Zirconium cladded fuel rods. The reactor is light water moderated and cooled. The core life is specifically designed to coincide with the refit cycle of the Victoria Class Submarine. The reactor employs a simple and reliable control and shut down system that requires little intervention on the part of the submarine's crew. Also, a kinetic model is developed that demonstrates the inherent safety features of the reactor during several accident scenarios. (author)

  6. The near boiling reactor: design of a small nuclear reactor for extending the operational envelope of the Victoria Class Submarine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, C.; Bonin, H. [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: chris.cole@rmc.ca; bonin-h@rmc.ca

    2005-07-01

    A small, inherently safe nuclear reactor that will provide enough power to maintain the hotel load of the Victoria Class Submarine and extend her operational envelope, has been conceptually designed. The final reactor concept, named the Near Boiling (NB) Reactor, employs TRISO fuel particles in Zirconium cladded fuel rods. The reactor is light water moderated and cooled. The core life is specifically designed to coincide with the refit cycle of the Victoria Class Submarine. The reactor employs a simple and reliable control and shut down system that requires little intervention on the part of the submarine's crew. Also, a kinetic model is developed that demonstrates the inherent safety features of the reactor during several accident scenarios. (author)

  7. Specific power of liquid-metal-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobranich, D.

    1987-10-01

    Calculations of the core specific power for conceptual space-based liquid-metal-cooled reactors, based on heat transfer considerations, are presented for three different fuel types: (1) pin-type fuel; (2) cermet fuel; and (3) thermionic fuel. The calculations are based on simple models and are intended to provide preliminary comparative results. The specific power is of interest because it is a measure of the core mass required to produce a given amount of power. Potential problems concerning zero-g critical heat flux and loss-of-coolant accidents are also discussed because these concerns may limit the core specific power. Insufficient experimental data exists to accurately determine the critical heat flux of liquid-metal-cooled reactors in space; however, preliminary calculations indicate that it may be a concern. Results also indicate that the specific power of the pin-type fuels can be increased significantly if the gap between the fuel and the clad is eliminated. Cermet reactors offer the highest specific power because of the excellent thermal conductivity of the core matrix material. However, it may not be possible to take fuel advantage of this characteristic when loss-of-coolant accidents are considered in the final core design. The specific power of the thermionic fuels is dependent mainly on the emitter temperature. The small diameter thermionic fuels have specific powers comparable to those of pin-type fuels. 11 refs., 12 figs, 2 tabs

  8. Perspective on small and medium size reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahlkopf, K.E.; Braun, C.

    1985-01-01

    There has been renewed interests in the United States in small and medium size nuclear power plants (600 MWe or less). The reasons for this include: (1) there is a large uncertainty in load growth projections. Small to medium size nuclear power plants may be better suited to meet uncertain load growth projections. (2) It has been argued that a large economy of scale exists because of the nature of nuclear power installations. A recent examination of the French program shows that no economy of scale exists between the 900 MWe and 1300 MWe plants. Others have suggested that it is possible to reduce the economy of scale so it is not a prohibitive factor. (3) In the past in the United States, it has been customary for several smaller utilities to share the output of a large nuclear plant to take advantage of the perceived economy of scale. Difficulties have been encountered by some of these enterprises. (4) An examination of capacity factors for the United States shows that plants of smaller output appear to operate more reliably and economically than larger plants

  9. Radiation streaming in power reactors. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahti, G.P.; Lee, R.R.; Courtney, J.C. (eds.)

    1979-02-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the 14 papers given at a special session on Radiation Streaming in Power Reactors held on November 15 at the American Nuclear Society 1978 Winter Meeting in Washington, D.C. The papers describe the methods of calculation, the engineering of shields, and the measurement of radiation environments within the containments of light water power reactors. Comparisons of measured and calculated data are used to determine the accuracy of computer predictions of the radiation environment. Specific computational and measurement techniques are described and evaluated. Emphasis is on radiation streaming in the annular region between the reactor vesel and the primary shield and its resultant environment within the primary containment.

  10. Possible Future Role of Small and Medium Sized Reactors (SMRs) in Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alujevic, L.

    2016-01-01

    Small and Medium Sized Reactors (SMRs) could have enormous potential as options for enhancing the energy supply security, as well as providing a lower capital investment compared to conventional Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). The trend in SMR development has been towards design certification of small modular reactors, defined as advanced reactors that produce electric power up to 300 MW(e), designed to be built in factories and shipped to utilities for installation as demand arises. The factory-built small modular reactors aim to reduce lengthy construction times while simultaneously increasing quality, thereby minimizing the costs associated with the current time for construction that spans 5 to 8 years. SMR designs include water-cooled reactors, high temperature gas cooled reactors, as well as liquid metal cooled reactors with fast neutron spectrum. Also, many are designed to be emplaced below ground level, giving a high resistance to terrorist threats. The projected timelines of readiness for deployment of SMRs generally range from the present to 2025 - 2030. Currently there are more than 45 SMR designs under development for different application issues. This paper will try to elaborate the benefits and drawbacks of SMRs, as well as describe a couple of designs. Furthermore, some timelines and cost estimates will be provided, depending on the data currently available. Taking all that into account, the conclusion will try to ascertain the suitability of SMRs for Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids, namely Croatia. (author).

  11. Status of innovative small and medium sized reactor designs 2005. Reactors with conventional refuelling schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-03-01

    There is a renewed interest in Member States in the development and application of small and medium sized reactors (SMRs). In the near term, most new NPPs are likely to be evolutionary designs building on proven systems while incorporating technological advances and often the economics of scale, resulting from the reactor outputs of up to 1600 MW(e). For the longer term, the focus is on innovative designs aiming to provide increased benefits in the areas of safety and security, non-proliferation, waste management, resource utilization and economy, as well as to offer a variety of energy products and flexibility in design, siting and fuel cycle options. Many innovative designs are reactors within the small-to-medium size range, having an equivalent electric power less than 700 MW(e) or even less than 300 MW(e). The projected timelines of readiness for deployment are generally between 2010 and 2030. The objective of this report is to provide Member States, including those just considering the initiation of nuclear power programmes, and those already having practical experience in nuclear power, with a balanced and objective information on important development trends and objectives of innovative SMRs for a variety of uses, on the achieved state-of-the-art in design and technology development for such reactors and on their design and regulatory status. The report is intended for many categories of stakeholders, including regulators, electricity producers, designers, non-electrical producers and policy makers. The main chapters of this report, addressed to all abovementioned groups of stakeholders, provide a summary of major specifications, applications and user-related special features of innovative SMRs, outline the achieved design and regulatory status and its progress since previous IAEA publications, review targeted deployment dates, fuel cycle options, design approaches used to meet design objectives in specific subject areas, enabling technologies and current

  12. High Flux Isotope Reactor power upgrade status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothrock, R.B.; Hale, R.E.; Cheverton, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    A return to 100-MW operation is being planned for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Recent improvements in fuel element manufacturing procedures and inspection equipment will be exploited to reduce hot spot and hot streak factors sufficiently to permit the power upgrade without an increase in primary coolant pressure. Fresh fuel elements already fabricated for future use are being evaluated individually for power upgrade potential based on their measured coolant channel dimensions

  13. The IAEA power reactor information system - PRIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, H.J.; Qureshi, A.; Skjoeldebrand, R.; White, D.

    1983-01-01

    The IAEA Power Reactor Information System, PRIS, is based on a collection of basic design data and operating experience data which the IAEA started in 1970. PRIS is used for annual publications on 'Power Reactors in Member States', 'Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States', which gives annual operating information for individual plants, and a 'Performance Analysis Report' summarizing each year's and earlier experience. Since 1973 information has been collected in a systematic manner on significant plant outages (= more than 10 full power hours). There is now information on more than 10,000 outages in the system which permits some conclusions to be drawn both in regard to individual plants and to categories of plants on the significance of different outage reasons and different types of equipment failures. PRIS has not been intended to be a component reliability information system as an international data collection must stop short of the level of detail which would be needed for that purpose. The objectives of PRIS have been to provide a factual background for assumptions on parameters which are essential for economic evaluations and for systems operation planning (load factor and availability). The outage information does, however, lend itself to conclusions about generic problems in different categories of plants and it can be used by an individual operator to find other plants where information about particular problems can be obtained. It would also now be possible to use PRIS for setting availability goals based on experience and not only on theoretical design considerations. The paper demonstrates the conclusions which can be drawn from 662 reactor years of operation of light and heavy water pressurized reactors and 390 reactor years of boiling water reactors and, in particular, the role that the main heat removal system and its components have played in the equipment failure category

  14. State system experience with safeguarding power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehnsch, W.

    1982-01-01

    This session describes the development and operation of the State System of Accountancy and Control in the German Democratic Republic, and summarizes operating experience with safeguards at power reactor facilities. Overall organization and responsibilities, containment and surveillance measures, materials accounting, and inspection procedures will be outlined. Cooperation between the IAEA, State system, facility, and supplier authorities will also be addressed

  15. Modular Lead-Bismuth Fast Reactors in Nuclear Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Petrochenko

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the unique experience of operating reactors with heavy liquid metal coolant–eutectic lead-bismuth alloy in nuclear submarines, the concept of modular small fast reactors SVBR-100 for civilian nuclear power has been developed and validated. The features of this innovative technology are as follows: a monoblock (integral design of the reactor with fast neutron spectrum, which can operate using different types of fuel in various fuel cycles including MOX fuel in a self-providing mode. The reactor is distinct in that it has a high level of self-protection and passive safety, it is factory manufactured and the assembled reactor can be transported by railway. Multipurpose application of the reactor is presumed, primarily, it can be used for regional power to produce electricity, heat and for water desalination. The Project is being realized within the framework of state-private partnership with joint venture OJSC “AKME-Engineering” established on a parity basis by the State Atomic Energy Corporation “Rosatom” and the Limited Liability Company “EuroSibEnergo”.

  16. Correlations between power and test reactor data bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, G.L.; Simonen, E.P.

    1989-02-01

    Differences between power reactor and test reactor data bases have been evaluated. Charpy shift data has been assembled from specimens irradiated in both high-flux test reactors and low-flux power reactors. Preliminary tests for the existence of a bias between test and power reactor data bases indicate a possible bias between the weld data bases. The bias is nonconservative for power predictive purposes, using test reactor data. The lesser shift for test reactor data compared to power reactor data is interpreted primarily in terms of greater point defect recombination for test reactor fluxes compared to power reactor fluxes. The possibility of greater thermal aging effects during lower damage rates is also discussed. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Monitoring device for the reactor power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Hitoshi; Tsuiki, Makoto

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable accurate monitoring for the power distribution in a short time, as well as independent detection for in-core neutron flux detectors in abnormal operation due to failures or like other causes to thereby surely provide reliable substitute values. Constitution: Counted values are inputted from a reactor core present status data detector by a power distribution calculation device to calculate the in-core neutron flux density and the power distribution based on previously stored physical models. While on the other hand, counted value from the in-core neutron detectors and the neutron flux distribution and the power distribution calculated from the power distribution calculation device are inputted from a BCF calculation device to compensate the counting errors incorporated in the counted value from the in-core neutron flux detectors and the calculation errors incorporated in the power distribution calculated in the power distribution calculation device respectively and thereby calculate the power distribution in the reactor core. Further, necessary data are inputted to the power distribution calculation device by an input/output device and the results calculated in the BCF calculation device are displayed. (Aizawa, K.)

  18. Reactivity balance for a soluble boron-free small modular reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lezani van der Merwe

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Elimination of soluble boron from reactor design eliminates boron-induced reactivity accidents and leads to a more negative moderator temperature coefficient. However, a large negative moderator temperature coefficient can lead to large reactivity feedback that could allow the reactor to return to power when it cools down from hot full power to cold zero power. In soluble boron-free small modular reactor (SMR design, only control rods are available to control such rapid core transient.The purpose of this study is to investigate whether an SMR would have enough control rod worth to compensate for large reactivity feedback. The investigation begins with classification of reactivity and completes an analysis of the reactivity balance in each reactor state for the SMR model.The control rod worth requirement obtained from the reactivity balance is a minimum control rod worth to maintain the reactor critical during the whole cycle. The minimum available rod worth must be larger than the control rod worth requirement to manipulate the reactor safely in each reactor state. It is found that the SMR does have enough control rod worth available during rapid transient to maintain the SMR at subcritical below k-effectives of 0.99 for both hot zero power and cold zero power. Keywords: Control Rod Worth, Reactivity Balance, Reactivity Feedback, Small Modular Reactor, Soluble Boron Free

  19. Assessment of the thorium fuel cycle in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.; Homan, F.J.; Allen, E.J.

    1977-01-01

    A study was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to evaluate the role of thorium fuel cycles in power reactors. Three thermal reactor systems were considered: Light Water Reactors (LWRs); High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs); and Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs) of the Canadian Deuterium Uranium Reactor (CANDU) type; most of the effort was on these systems. A summary comparing thorium and uranium fuel cycles in Fast Breeder Reactors (FBRs) was also compiled

  20. Self-powered detectors for power reactors: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, Self-Powered Detectors (SPDs) for applications in nuclear power reactors have been reviewed. Based on their responses to radiation, these detectors can be divided into delayed response Self-Powered Neutron Detector (SPND), prompt response SPND and Self-Powered Gamma Detector (SPGD). The operational principles of these detectors are presented and their distinctive characteristics are examined accordingly. The analytical models and Monte Carlo method to calculate the responses of these detectors to neutron flux and external gamma rays are reviewed. The paper has also considered some related signal processing techniques, such as detector calibrations and detector signal compensations. Furthermore, a couple of failure modes have also been analyzed. Finally, applications of SPD in nuclear power reactors are summarized. (author)

  1. Self-powered detectors for power reactors: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J. [Univ. of Western Ontario, Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, London, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: jma64@uwo.ca

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, Self-Powered Detectors (SPDs) for applications in nuclear power reactors have been reviewed. Based on their responses to radiation, these detectors can be divided into delayed response Self-Powered Neutron Detector (SPND), prompt response SPND and Self-Powered Gamma Detector (SPGD). The operational principles of these detectors are presented and their distinctive characteristics are examined accordingly. The analytical models and Monte Carlo method to calculate the responses of these detectors to neutron flux and external gamma rays are reviewed. The paper has also considered some related signal processing techniques, such as detector calibrations and detector signal compensations. Furthermore, a couple of failure modes have also been analyzed. Finally, applications of SPD in nuclear power reactors are summarized. (author)

  2. Transients in reactors for power systems compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Hamid, Haziah

    This thesis describes new models and investigations into switching transient phenomena related to the shunt reactors and the Mechanically Switched Capacitor with Damping Network (MSCDN) operations used for reactive power control in the transmission system. Shunt reactors and MSCDN are similar in that they have reactors. A shunt reactor is connected parallel to the compensated lines to absorb the leading current, whereas the MSCDN is a version of a capacitor bank designed as a C-type filter for use in the harmonic-rich environment. In this work, models have been developed and transient overvoltages due to shunt reactor deenergisation were estimated analytically using MathCad, a mathematical program. Computer simulations used the ATP/EMTP program to reproduce both single-phase and three-phase shunt reactor switching at 275 kV operational substations. The effect of the reactor switching on the circuit breaker grading capacitor was also examined by considering various switching conditions.. The main original achievement of this thesis is the clarification of failure mechanisms occurring in the air-core filter reactor due to MSCDN switching operations. The simulation of the MSCDN energisation was conducted using the ATP/EMTP program in the presence of surge arresters. The outcome of this simulation shows that extremely fast transients were established across the air-core filter reactor. This identified transient event has led to the development of a detailed air-core reactor model, which accounts for the inter-turn RLC parameters as well as the stray capacitances-to-ground. These parameters are incorporated into the transient simulation circuit, from which the current and voltage distribution across the winding were derived using electric field and equivalent circuit modelling. Analysis of the results has revealed that there are substantial dielectric stresses imposed on the winding insulation that can be attributed to a combination of three factors. (i) First, the

  3. Small reactors in the Canadian context: opportunities and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, R.S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    This presentation discusses the opportunities and challenges for small reactors in Canada. It concludes by suggesting that the success of small reactors in Canada will depend on a number of factors including private sector investment, access to international markets, stable, equitable and adaptable regulatory regime, public trust and technology.

  4. Balance of plant design issues for small reactors in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvel, G.; Meneley, D.

    2014-01-01

    Internationally, several companies are exploring design and development of Small Modular Reactors (SMR) ranging in power from 10 MWe to 300 MWe. While the designs are proceeding, the main issue at hand is finding a site for deployment of the first unit. Connection to existing well established grids is currently not competitive in part due to First of a Kind (FOAK) costs. As such, many vendors are exploring unique and remote applications where FOAK costs are not as significant a concern. One of the major assumptions in the design process usually followed is that the major effort needs to concentrate on reactor core development. While the reactor core is important, costs associated with the balance of plant and operations of the unit are likely to play an important role in the final decision of purchase. In this work, a series of conceptual designs is performed for the support systems of a small modular reactor by successive teams of undergraduate students working over semester long periods during a 3 year period. The goal of this process is to determine to what extent current technology for the balance of plant supports the development of a cost effective SMR. Each system is given to a team with an open set of criteria for design. At the completion of the design exercise, an open discussion with the teams is held regarding the staffing requirements for an SMR. The results are preliminary and reflect the open nature of the exercise. That said, the results indicate that for an SMR to be truly competitive, significant innovation is required in addressing the supporting systems of the plant. (author)

  5. Balance of plant design issues for small reactors in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvel, G.; Meneley, D., E-mail: Glenn.Harvel@uoit.ca, E-mail: dan.meneley@sympatico.ca [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Tech.y, Oshawa, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Internationally, several companies are exploring design and development of Small Modular Reactors (SMR) ranging in power from 10 MWe to 300 MWe. While the designs are proceeding, the main issue at hand is finding a site for deployment of the first unit. Connection to existing well established grids is currently not competitive in part due to First of a Kind (FOAK) costs. As such, many vendors are exploring unique and remote applications where FOAK costs are not as significant a concern. One of the major assumptions in the design process usually followed is that the major effort needs to concentrate on reactor core development. While the reactor core is important, costs associated with the balance of plant and operations of the unit are likely to play an important role in the final decision of purchase. In this work, a series of conceptual designs is performed for the support systems of a small modular reactor by successive teams of undergraduate students working over semester long periods during a 3 year period. The goal of this process is to determine to what extent current technology for the balance of plant supports the development of a cost effective SMR. Each system is given to a team with an open set of criteria for design. At the completion of the design exercise, an open discussion with the teams is held regarding the staffing requirements for an SMR. The results are preliminary and reflect the open nature of the exercise. That said, the results indicate that for an SMR to be truly competitive, significant innovation is required in addressing the supporting systems of the plant. (author)

  6. Reactor Core Design and Analysis for a Micronuclear Power Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Sun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Underwater vehicle is designed to ensure the security of country sea boundary, providing harsh requirements for its power system design. Conventional power sources, such as battery and Stirling engine, are featured with low power and short lifetime. Micronuclear reactor power source featured with higher power density and longer lifetime would strongly meet the demands of unmanned underwater vehicle power system. In this paper, a 2.4 MWt lithium heat pipe cooled reactor core is designed for micronuclear power source, which can be applied for underwater vehicles. The core features with small volume, high power density, long lifetime, and low noise level. Uranium nitride fuel with 70% enrichment and lithium heat pipes are adopted in the core. The reactivity is controlled by six control drums with B4C neutron absorber. Monte Carlo code MCNP is used for calculating the power distribution, characteristics of reactivity feedback, and core criticality safety. A code MCORE coupling MCNP and ORIGEN is used to analyze the burnup characteristics of the designed core. The results show that the core life is 14 years, and the core parameters satisfy the safety requirements. This work provides reference to the design and application of the micronuclear power source.

  7. Method of estimating the reactor power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuta, Toru; Fukuzaki, Takaharu; Doi, Kazuyori; Kiguchi, Takashi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the calculation accuracy for the power distribution thereby improve the reliability of power distribution monitor. Constitution: In detector containing strings disposed within a reactor core, movable type neutron flux monitors are provided in addition to position fixed type neutron monitors conventionally disposed so far. Upon periodical monitoring, a power distribution X1 is calculated from a physical reactor core model. Then, a higher power position X2 is detected by position detectors and value X2 is sent to a neutron flux monitor driving device to displace the movable type monitors to a higher power position in each of the strings. After displacement, the value X1 is amended by an amending device using measured values from the movable type and fixed type monitors and the amended value is sent to a reactor core monitor device. Upon failure of the fixed type monitors, the position is sent to the monitor driving device and the movable monitors are displaced to that position for measurement. (Sekiya, K.)

  8. Reactor power distribution pattern judging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehara, Tadashi.

    1992-01-01

    The judging device of the present invention comprises a power distribution readout system for intaking a power value from a fuel segment, a neural network having an experience learning function for receiving a power distribution value as an input variant, mapping it into a desirable property and self-organizing the map, and a learning date base storing a plurality of learnt samples. The read power distribution is classified depending on the similarity thereof with any one of representative learnt power distribution, and the corresponding state of the reactor core is outputted as a result of the judgement. When an error is found in the classified judging operation, erroneous cases are additionally learnt by using the experience and learning function, thereby improving the accuracy of the reactor core characteristic estimation operation. Since the device is mainly based on the neural network having a self-learning function and a pattern classification and judging function, a judging device having a human's intuitive pattern recognition performance and a pattern experience and learning performance is obtainable, thereby enabling to judge the state of the reactor core accurately. (N.H.)

  9. Experimental development of power reactor intelligent control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.M.; Garcia, H.E.; Lee, K.Y.

    1992-01-01

    The US nuclear utility industry initiated an ambitious program to modernize the control systems at a minimum of ten existing nuclear power plants by the year 2000. That program addresses urgent needs to replace obsolete instrumentation and analog controls with highly reliable state-of-the-art computer-based digital systems. Large increases in functionality that could theoretically be achieved in a distributed digital control system are not an initial priority in the industry program but could be logically considered in later phases. This paper discusses the initial development of an experimental sequence for developing, testing, and verifying intelligent fault-accommodating control for commercial nuclear power plant application. The sequence includes an ultra-safe university research reactor (TRIGA) and a passively safe experimental power plant (Experimental Breeder Reactor 2)

  10. Tandem mirror reactor power balance studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorker, G.E.; Perkins, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    A tandem mirror reactor (TMR) power plant balance model has been developed and is now being used as a computer aid for performing parametric studies. End-cell power injection into the plasma and the physics thermal Q are used to determine the fusion power. About 80% of the fusion power is transferred by high-energy neutrons to the blanket modules and structures. The other 20% of the fusion power in the high-energy alpha particles is used to heat the deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma. Most of the plasma-ionized particles transfer their energy to the halo dumps and direct converters. The plant efficiency is calculated for three different system cycles: (1) the pressurized water/saturated steam cycle; (2) the superheated steam cycle; and (3) the more complex superheat/reheat cycle. There is a signficiant improvement in plant efficiency as the electrical power multiplication factor and steam cycle efficiency increases

  11. In core system mapping reactor power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoriyaz, H.; Moreira, J.M.L.

    1989-01-01

    Based on the signals of SPND'S (Self Powered Neutron Detectors) distributed inside of a core, the spatial power distribution is obtained using the MAP program, developed in this work. The methodology applied in MAP program uses a least mean square technique to calculate expansion coefficients that depend on the SPND'S signals. The final power or neutron flux distribution is obtained by a combination of certains functions or expansion modes that are provided from diffusion calculation with the CITATION code. The MAP program is written in PASCAL language and will be used in IEA-R1 reactor for assisting its operation. (author) [pt

  12. Feasibility study of self sustaining capability on water cooled thorium reactors for different power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, S.; Takaki, N.; Sekimoto, H.

    2007-01-01

    fertile and fissile nuclides with the contribution from intermediate nuclides such as 2 34U and 2 33Pa. The conversion ratio is evaluated by considering the conversion capability of the reactor to convert the fertile material into fissile material. The fissile accumulation capability for different conditions is investigated for estimating the fissile production capability during operation. The result shows the negative reactivity coefficient, and its feasibility of breeding for different MFR and burnup. The very tight lattice pin of MFR ≤ 0.3 is preferable for obtaining breeding condition for relatively higher burnup. The breeding capability of the reactor increases with increasing power output and decreasing power density. In relation to the self sustaining system, the large power output is easier to reach than the small power output

  13. Advanced Small Modular Reactor Economics Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2014-10-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) research and development activities focus on four key areas: Developing assessment methods for evaluating advanced SMR technologies and characteristics; and Developing and testing of materials, fuels and fabrication techniques; and Resolving key regulatory issues identified by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and industry; and Developing advanced instrumentation and controls and human-machine interfaces. This report focuses on development of assessment methods to evaluate advanced SMR technologies and characteristics. Specifically, this report describes the expansion and application of the economic modeling effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Analysis of the current modeling methods shows that one of the primary concerns for the modeling effort is the handling of uncertainty in cost estimates. Monte Carlo–based methods are commonly used to handle uncertainty, especially when implemented by a stand-alone script within a program such as Python or MATLAB. However, a script-based model requires each potential user to have access to a compiler and an executable capable of handling the script. Making the model accessible to multiple independent analysts is best accomplished by implementing the model in a common computing tool such as Microsoft Excel. Excel is readily available and accessible to most system analysts, but it is not designed for straightforward implementation of a Monte Carlo–based method. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm requires in-spreadsheet scripting and statistical analyses or the use of add-ons such as Crystal Ball. An alternative method uses propagation of error calculations in the existing Excel-based system to estimate system cost uncertainty. This method has the advantage of using Microsoft Excel as is, but it requires the use of simplifying assumptions. These assumptions do not necessarily bring into question the analytical results. In fact, the

  14. The Concept of the Use of the Marine Reactor Plant in Small Electric Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khlopkin, N.; Makarov, V.; Pologikh, B.

    2002-01-01

    In report some aspects of the using marine nuclear reactor are considered for provision of need small non-interconnected power systems, as well as separate settlements and the mining enterprises disposed in regions with a undeveloped infrastructure. Recently for these purposes it is offered to use the nuclear small modular power plants. The required plant power for small electric grids lies within from 1 to several tens of MWe. Module can be collected and tested on machine-building plant, and then delivered in ready type to the working place on some transport, for instance, a barge. Through determined time it's possible to transport a module to the repair shop and also to the point of storage after the end of operation. Marine nuclear reactors on their powers, compactness, mass and size are ideal prototypes for creation of such modules. For instance, building at present floating power unit, intended for functioning in region of the Russian North, based on using reactor plants of nuclear icebreakers. Reliability and safety of the ship reactor are confirmed by their trouble-free operation during approximately 180 reactors-years. Unlike big stationary nuclear plant, working in base mode, power unit with marine reactor wholly capable to work in mode of the loading following. In contrast with reactor of nuclear icebreaker, advisable to increase the core lifetime and to reduce the enrichment of the uranium. This requires more uranium capacity fuel compositions and design of the core. In particular, possible transition from traditional for ship reactor of the channel core to cassette design. Other directions of evolution of the ship reactors, not touching the basic constructive decisions verified by practice, but promoting development of properties of self-security of plant are possible. Among such directions is reduction volumetric power density of a core. (author)

  15. Baseline Concept Description of a Small Modular High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gougar, Hans D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a description of generic small modular high temperature reactors (herein denoted as an smHTR), summarize their distinguishing attributes, and lay out the research and development (R&D) required for commercialization. The generic concepts rely heavily on the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor designs developed in the 1980s which were never built but for which pre-licensing or certification activities were conducted. The concept matured more recently under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, specifically in the areas of fuel and material qualification, methods development, and licensing. As all vendor-specific designs proposed under NGNP were all both ‘small’ or medium-sized and ‘modular’ by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Department of Energy (DOE) standards, the technical attributes, challenges, and R&D needs identified, addressed, and documented under NGNP are valid and appropriate in the context of Small Modular Reactor (SMR) applications. Although the term High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is commonly used to denote graphite-moderated, thermal spectrum reactors with coolant temperatures in excess of 650oC at the core outlet, in this report the historical term High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) will be used to distinguish the gas-cooled technology described herein from its liquid salt-cooled cousin. Moreover, in this report it is to be understood that the outlet temperature of the helium in an HTGR has an upper limit of 950 degrees C which corresponds to the temperature to which certain alloys are currently being qualified under DOE’s ARC program. Although similar to the HTGR in just about every respect, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may have an outlet temperature in excess of 950 degrees C and is therefore farther from commercialization because of the challenges posed to materials exposed to these temperatures. The VHTR is the focus of R&D under the

  16. Baseline Concept Description of a Small Modular High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Gougar

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a description of generic small modular high temperature reactors (herein denoted as an smHTR), summarize their distinguishing attributes, and lay out the research and development (R&D) required for commercialization. The generic concepts rely heavily on the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor designs developed in the 1980s which were never built but for which pre-licensing or certification activities were conducted. The concept matured more recently under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, specifically in the areas of fuel and material qualification, methods development, and licensing. As all vendor-specific designs proposed under NGNP were all both ‘small’ or medium-sized and ‘modular’ by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Department of Energy (DOE) standards, the technical attributes, challenges, and R&D needs identified, addressed, and documented under NGNP are valid and appropriate in the context of Small Modular Reactor (SMR) applications. Although the term High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is commonly used to denote graphite-moderated, thermal spectrum reactors with coolant temperatures in excess of 650oC at the core outlet, in this report the historical term High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) will be used to distinguish the gas-cooled technology described herein from its liquid salt-cooled cousin. Moreover, in this report it is to be understood that the outlet temperature of the helium in an HTGR has an upper limit of 950 degrees C which corresponds to the temperature to which certain alloys are currently being qualified under DOE’s ARC program. Although similar to the HTGR in just about every respect, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may have an outlet temperature in excess of 950 degrees C and is therefore farther from commercialization because of the challenges posed to materials exposed to these temperatures. The VHTR is the focus of R&D under the

  17. Evolution of on-power fuelling machines on Canadian natural uranium power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaac, P.

    1984-10-01

    The evolution of the on-power fuel changing process and fuelling machines on CANDU heavy-water pressure tube power reactors from the first nuclear power demonstration plant, 22 MWe NPD, to the latest plants now in design and development is described. The high availability of CANDU's is largely dependent on on-power fuelling. The on-power fuelling performance record of the 16 operating CANDU reactors, covering a 22 year period since the first plant became operational, is given. This shows that on-power fuel changing with light (unshielded), highly mobile and readily maintainable fuelling machines has been a success. The fuelling machines have contributed very little to the incapabilities of the plants and have been a key factor in placing CANDUs in the top ten list of world performance. Although fuel handling technology has reached a degree of maturity, refinements are continuing. A new single-ended fuel changing concept for horizontal reactors under development is described. This has the potential for reducing capital and operating costs for small reactors and increasing the fuelling capability of possible large reactors of the future

  18. Site Suitability and Hazard Assessment Guide for Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne Moe

    2013-10-01

    Commercial nuclear reactor projects in the U.S. have traditionally employed large light water reactors (LWR) to generate regional supplies of electricity. Although large LWRs have consistently dominated commercial nuclear markets both domestically and abroad, the concept of small modular reactors (SMRs) capable of producing between 30 MW(t) and 900 MW(t) to generating steam for electricity is not new. Nor is the idea of locating small nuclear reactors in close proximity to and in physical connection with industrial processes to provide a long-term source of thermal energy. Growing problems associated continued use of fossil fuels and enhancements in efficiency and safety because of recent advancements in reactor technology suggest that the likelihood of near-term SMR technology(s) deployment at multiple locations within the United States is growing. Many different types of SMR technology are viable for siting in the domestic commercial energy market. However, the potential application of a particular proprietary SMR design will vary according to the target heat end-use application and the site upon which it is proposed to be located. Reactor heat applications most commonly referenced in connection with the SMR market include electric power production, district heating, desalinization, and the supply of thermal energy to various processes that require high temperature over long time periods, or a combination thereof. Indeed, the modular construction, reliability and long operational life purported to be associated with some SMR concepts now being discussed may offer flexibility and benefits no other technology can offer. Effective siting is one of the many early challenges that face a proposed SMR installation project. Site-specific factors dealing with support to facility construction and operation, risks to the plant and the surrounding area, and the consequences subsequent to those risks must be fully identified, analyzed, and possibly mitigated before a license

  19. Basic training of nuclear power reactor personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palabrica, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The basic training of nuclear power reactor personnel should be given very close attention since it constitutes the foundation of their knowledge of nuclear technology. Emphasis should be given on the thorough understanding of basic nuclear concepts in order to have reasonable assurance of successful assimilation by those personnel of more specialized and advanced concepts to which they will be later exposed. Basic training will also provide a means for screening to ensure that those will be sent for further spezialized training will perform well. Finally, it is during the basic training phase when nuclear reactor operators will start to acquire and develop attitudes regarding reactor operation and it is important that these be properly founded. (orig.)

  20. Safety Analysis for Power Reactor Protection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisawy, E.A.; Sallam, H.

    2012-01-01

    The main function of a Reactor Protection System (RPS) is to safely shutdown the reactor and prevents the release of radioactive materials. The purpose of this paper is to present a technique and its application for used in the analysis of safety system of the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). A more advanced technique has been presented to accurately study such problems as the plant availability assessments and Technical Specifications evaluations that are becoming increasingly important. The paper provides the Markov model for the Reactor Protection System of the NPP and presents results of model evaluations for two testing policies in technical specifications. The quantification of the Markov model provides the probability values that the system will occupy each of the possible states as a function of time.

  1. Approaches to Assess Competitiveness of Small and Medium Sized Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.; Barkatullah, N.

    2011-01-01

    There is continuing interest in Member States concerning the development and application of small and medium sized reactors (SMRs), i.e., reactors with the equivalent electric power of less than 700 MW. Currently, developed SMRs are in most cases intended for markets different than those in which large nuclear power plants operate. Such markets have essentially different investment requirements, siting flexibility, grid connections and infrastructure restrictions. Therefore, economic factors affecting the competitiveness or competition of SMRs in such markets would also be different from those observed in established markets for electricity production. For example, investment capability may be limited, which would favour capacity addition in smaller increments; grids may be small or weak, which would favour capacities exactly matching the demand; infrastructure and human resource may be insufficient, which would favour less complex operation and maintenance requirements; and non-electrical energy products, such as potable water, may be in demand, which would favour reasonably close plant location to the customer. In practice it is futile to compare a single SMR needs to a single larger capacity plant on an economy of scale basis because SMRs are suitable for those locations that might not be appropriate for larger plants. However, a series of SMRs could be considered comparable to fewer larger plants to achieve the same overall power station capacity. In this case, SMRs have a potential to be competitive by employing alternative design strategies, taking advantage of smaller reactor size, offering a less complex design and operation and maintenance, relying on deployment-in-series approaches, taking an advantage of the accelerated learning, multiple unit factors and shorter construction duration. Reflecting on developments in member states, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is finalizing the preparation of a report highlighting the economics and

  2. Source driven breeding thermal power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba

    1978-03-01

    The feasibility of fusion devices operating in the semi-catalyzed deuterium (SCD) mode and of high energy proton accelerators to provide the neutron sources for driving subcritical breeding light water power reactors is assessed. The assessment is done by studying the energy balance of the resulting source driven light water reactors (SDLWR) and comparing it with the energy balance of the reference light water hybrid reactors (LWHR) driven by a D-T neutron source (DT-LWHR). The conditions the non-DT neutron sources should satisfy in order to make the SDLWR viable power reactors are identified. It is found that in order for a SCD-LWHR to have the same overall efficiency as a DT-LWHR, the fusion energy gain of the SCD device should be at least one half that the DT device. The efficienct of ADLWRs using uranium targets is comparable with that of DT-LWHRs having a fusion energy gain of unity. Advantages and disadvantages of the DT-LWHR, SCD-LWHR and ADLWR are discussed. (aurthor)

  3. The role of small and medium reactors in the energy security of a country, IRIS example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavlina, N.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear options for electricity generations are assessed in this paper. Probabilistic (stochastic) method is used for economic comparison of nuclear power plants, wind plants and natural gas fired plants. Optimal nuclear power plant size is also discussed. IRIS is presented as a representative of small and medium reactors

  4. A series of lectures on operational physics of power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanakrishnan, P.; Rastogi, B.P.

    1982-01-01

    This report discusses certain aspects of operational physics of power reactors. These form a lecture series at the Winter College on Nuclear Physics and Reactors, Jan. - March 1980, conducted at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy. The topics covered are (a) the reactor physics aspects of fuel burnup (b) theoretical methods applied for burnup prediction in power reactors (c) interpretation of neutron detector readings in terms of adjacent fuel assembly powers (d) refuelling schemes used in power reactors. The reactor types chosen for the discussion are BWR, PWR and PHWR. (author)

  5. Source driven breeding thermal power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Schneider, A.; Misulovin, A.; Gilai, D.; Levin, P.; Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba

    1978-03-01

    Improvements in the performance of fission power reactors made possible by designing them subcritical driven by D-T neutron sources are investigated. Light-water thermal systems are found to be most promising, neutronically and energetically, for the source driven mode of operation. The range of performance characteristics expected from breeding Light Water Hybrid Reactors (LWHR) is defined. Several promising types of LWHR blankets are identified. Options opened for the nuclear energy strategy by four types of the LWHRs are examined, and the potential contribution of these LWHRs to the nuclear energy economy are discussed. The power systems based on these LWHRs are found to enable a high utilization of the energy content of the uranium resources in all forms available - including depleted uranium and spent fuel from LWRs, while being free from the need for uranium enrichment and plutonium separation capabilities. (author)

  6. Power conditioning for space nuclear reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Baruch

    1987-01-01

    This paper addresses the power conditioning subsystem for both Stirling and Brayton conversion of space nuclear reactor systems. Included are the requirements summary, trade results related to subsystem implementation, subsystem description, voltage level versus weight, efficiency and operational integrity, components selection, and shielding considerations. The discussion is supported by pertinent circuit and block diagrams. Summary conclusions and recommendations derived from the above studies are included.

  7. Compact approach to fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    The potential of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) for development into an efficient, compact, copper-coil fusion reactor has been quantified by comprehensive parametric tradeoff studies. These compact systems promise to be competitive in size, power density, and cost to alternative energy sources. Conceptual engineering designs that largely substantiate these promising results have since been completed. This 1000-MWe(net) design is described along with a detailed rationale and physics/technology assessment for the compact approach to fusion

  8. Leaching of nuclear power reactor wastes forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, L.S.; Villalobos, J.P.; Miyamoto, H.

    1986-01-01

    The leaching tests for power reactor wastes carried out at IPEN/CNEN-SP are described. These waste forms consist mainly of spent resins and boric acid concentrates solidified in ordinary Portland cement. All tests were conducted according to the ISO and IAEA recommendations. 3 years leaching results are reported, determining cesium and strontium diffusivity coefficients for boric acid waste form and ion-exchange resins. (Author) [pt

  9. A gas-cooled reactor surface power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, R.J.; Wright, S.A.; Lenard, R.X.; Harms, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  10. A gas-cooled reactor surface power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wright, Steven A.; Lenard, Roger X.; Harms, Gary A.

    1999-01-01

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars

  11. A Gas-Cooled Reactor Surface Power System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, G.A.; Lenard, R.X.; Lipinski, R.J.; Wright, S.A.

    1998-11-09

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life- cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitide clad in Nb 1 %Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-I 00 program The fiel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fbel and stabilizing the geometty against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality cannot occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars.

  12. Implications of small modular reactors for climate change mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, Gokul; Hultman, Nathan; Fetter, Steve; Kim, Son H.

    2014-01-01

    Achieving climate policy targets will require large-scale deployment of low-carbon energy technologies, including nuclear power. The small modular reactor (SMR) is viewed as a possible solution to the problems of energy security as well as climate change. In this paper, we use an integrated assessment model (IAM) to investigate the evolution of a global energy portfolio with SMRs under a stringent climate policy. Technology selection in the model is based on costs; we use results from previous expert elicitation studies of SMR costs. We find that the costs of achieving a 2 °C target are lower with SMRs than without. The costs are higher when large reactors do not compete for market share compared to a world in which they can compete freely. When both SMRs and large reactors compete for market share, reduction in mitigation cost is achieved only under advanced assumptions about SMR technology costs and future cost improvements. While the availability of SMRs could lower mitigation costs by a moderate amount, actual realization of these benefits would depend on the rapid up-scaling of SMRs in the near term. Such rapid deployment could be limited by several social, institutional and behavioral obstacles. - Highlights: • Costs of achieving a 2 °C target are lower with SMRs than without. • Costs are higher when large reactors do not compete for market share. • Under competition, cost is reduced only with advanced SMR technology. • Realization of benefits will depend on rapid near term up-scaling of SMRs

  13. Safety and international development of small modular reactors (SMR). A study of GRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, Sebastian; Kruessenberg, Anne; Schaffrath, Andreas [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Garching (Germany). Bereich Reaktorsicherheitsforschung

    2015-11-15

    The abbreviation SMR stands for Small Modular Reactor and describes reactors with low power output. One reactor module, composed of primary, secondary and, where necessary, intermediate circuit and auxiliary systems, may be transported to the construction site as a whole or in few parts only and can therefore be connected quickly to the grid. Various modules can form a larger nuclear power plant and additional modules may be added one by one, while the others are in operation. Designers develop SMR for the deployment mainly in remote, sparsely populated areas or near cities respectively. SMR may provide in both cases electricity, district heating and potable water.

  14. Critical Power Response to Power Oscillations in Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farawila, Yousef M.; Pruitt, Douglas W.

    2003-01-01

    The response of the critical power ratio to boiling water reactor (BWR) power oscillations is essential to the methods and practice of mitigating the effects of unstable density waves. Previous methods for calculating generic critical power response utilized direct time-domain simulations of unstable reactors. In this paper, advances in understanding the nature of the BWR oscillations and critical power phenomena are combined to develop a new method for calculating the critical power response. As the constraint of the reactor state - being at or slightly beyond the instability threshold - is removed, the new method allows the calculation of sensitivities to different operation and design parameters separately, and thus allows tighter safety margins to be used. The sensitivity to flow rate and the resulting oscillation frequency change are given special attention to evaluate the extension of the oscillation 'detect-and-suppress' methods to internal pump plants where the flow rate at natural circulation and oscillation frequency are much lower than jet pump plants

  15. Overview of the Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor building layout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronje, J. M. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Centurion (South Africa); Van Wyk, J. J.; Memmott, M. J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Township, PA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR), in which all of the components typically associated with the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) of a nuclear power plant are incorporated within a single reactor pressure vessel. This paper is the third in a series of four papers, which describe the design and functionality of the Westinghouse SMR. It focuses in particular upon the plant building layout and modular design of the Westinghouse SMR. In the development of small modular reactors, the building layout is an area where the safety of the plant can be improved by applying new design approaches. This paper will present an overview of the Westinghouse SMR building layout and indicate how the design features improve the safety and robustness of the plant. The Westinghouse SMR is designed with no shared systems between individual reactor units. The main buildings inside the security fence are the nuclear island, the rad-waste building, the annex building, and the turbine building. All safety related equipment is located in the nuclear island, which is a seismic class 1 building. To further enhance the safety and robustness of the design, the reactor, containment, and most of the safety related equipment are located below grade on the nuclear island. This reduces the possibility of severe damage from external threats or natural disasters. Two safety related ultimate heat sink (UHS) water tanks that are used for decay heat removal are located above grade, but are redundant and physically separated as far as possible for improved safety. The reactor and containment vessel are located below grade in the center of the nuclear island. The rad-waste and other radioactive systems are located on the bottom floors to limit the radiation exposure to personnel. The Westinghouse SMR safety trains are completely separated into four unconnected quadrants of the building, with access between quadrants only allowed

  16. Thermal analysis of the fuel of a power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casadei, Alberto Luiz

    1970-01-01

    This dissertation presents the main values of maximum temperature of the central fuel rod of a power reactor, numerically calculated considering one-dimensional and two-dimensional conduction. The maximum temperature obtained with two-dimensional conduction is slightly lesser than the obtained when considering one-dimensional regime. Also, there exist complementary information on the process convergence and the precision to be adopted when reaching a satisfactory solution. The dissertation also presents brief considerations on the economical effects when adopting small parameter variations of nuclear power plant. (author)

  17. Development of natural circulation small and medium sized boiling water reactor: HSBWR-600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Minoru; Horiuchi, Tetsuo; Yoshimoto, Yuichiro; Sumida, Isao; Murase, Michio; Akita, Minoru; Niino, Tsuyoshi

    1988-01-01

    In nuclear power generation, the development of large reactors has been promoted as the main energy source in Japan. However, world economy entered low growth age, and the growth of electric power demand slowed down. Accordingly, attention has been paid to the medium and small reactors that can cope with whatever needs by serializing their types in addition to the nuclear power plants of medium output matching to electric power demand. In order to cope with these new needs, the economical efficiency of medium and small reactors must be as close as possible to that of large reactors, and as the countermeasures to the demerits due to small size, those must be made into the plants having simplified systems and the safety easily acceptable to public. Hitachi Ltd. plans to develop the natural circulation type medium and small BWRs of 600 NWe output class, HSBWR-600, on the basis of the nuclear power plant technology based on the rich results of design and operation of BWRs obtained so far, and to rank them as one of the BWR series. The target of their development design, the circumstance of their development, the core design and the thermo-hydraulic characteristics, the reactor pressure vessel and in-core structures, the safety design, system design, building layout and the evaluation are reported. (Kako, I.)

  18. SP-100 space reactor power system readiness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josloff, A.T.; Matteo, D.N.; Bailey, H.S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System which is being developed by GE, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, to provide electrical power in the range of 10's to 100's of kW. The system represents an enabling technology for a wide variety of earth orbital and interplanetary science missions, nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) stages, and lunar/Mars surface power for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). The technology and design is now at a state of readiness to support the definition of early flight demonstration missions. Of particular importance is that SP-100 meets the demanding U.S. safety performance, reliability and life requirements. The system is scalable and flexible and can be configured to provide 10's to 100's of kWe without repeating development work and can meet DoD goals for an early, low-power demonstration flight in the 1996-1997 time frame

  19. Nuclear power reactors and hydrogen storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim Aly Mahmoud El Osery.

    1980-01-01

    Among conclusions and results come by, a nuclear-electric-hydrogen integrated power system was suggested as a way to prevent the energy crisis. It was shown that the hydrogen power system using nuclear power as a leading energy resource would hold an advantage in the current international situation as well as for the long-term future. Results reported provide designers of integrated nuclear-electric-hydrogen systems with computation models and routines which will allow them to explore the optimal solution in coupling power reactors to hydrogen producing systems, taking into account the specific characters of hydrogen storage systems. The models were meant for average computers of a type easily available in developing countries. (author)

  20. Design, fabrication, and test plan of a small centrifugal compressor test model for a supercritical CO2 compressor in the fast reactor power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, Yasushi; Ishizuka, Takao; Aritomi, Masanori

    2009-01-01

    To clarify the CO 2 compressor performance in the vicinity of the critical point, a research project has begun at Tokyo Institute of Technology based on Japanese government funding. This paper describes the design and fabrication results of a small and high-speed centrifugal test compressor. Drawings of compressor structures such as an impeller and a rotor are presented. Numerical analysis results confirm that a desirable fluid flow distribution and structural integrity with respect to both the vane strength and rotor vibration can be expected. (author)

  1. Analysis on small long life reactor using thorium fuel for water cooled and metal cooled reactor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik

    2009-01-01

    Long-life reactor operation can be adopted for some special purposes which have been proposed by IAEA as the small and medium reactor (SMR) program. Thermal reactor and fast reactor types can be used for SMR and in addition to that program the utilization of thorium fuel as one of the candidate as a 'partner' fuel with uranium fuel which can be considered for optimizing the nuclear fuel utilization as well as recycling spent fuel. Fissile U-233 as the main fissile material for thorium fuel shows higher eta-value for wider energy range compared with other fissile materials of U-235 and Pu-239. However, it less than Pu-239 for fast energy region, but it still shows high eta-value. This eta-value gives the reactor has higher capability for obtaining breeding condition or high conversion capability. In the present study, the comparative analysis on small long life reactor fueled by thorium for different reactor types (water cooled and metal cooled reactor types). Light water and heavy water have been used as representative of water-cooled reactor types, and for liquid metal-cooled reactor types, sodium-cooled and lead-bismuth-cooled have been adopted. Core blanket arrangement as general design configuration, has been adopted which consist of inner blanket region fueled by thorium oxide, and two core regions (inner and out regions) fueled by fissile U-233 and thorium oxide with different percentages of fissile content. SRAC-CITATION and JENDL-33 have been used as core optimization analysis and nuclear data library for this analysis. Reactor operation time can reaches more than 10 years operation without refueling and shuffling for different reactor types and several power outputs. As can be expected, liquid metal cooled reactor types can be used more effective for obtaining long life reactor with higher burnup, higher power density, higher breeding capability and lower excess reactivity compared with water-cooled reactors. Water cooled obtains long life core operation

  2. A comparative analysis of the domestic and foreign licensing processes for power and non-power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joe, J. C.; Youn, Y. K.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    The System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor (SMART), a small to medium sized integral type Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) has been developed in Korea. Now, SMART-P, a 1/5 scaled-down of the SMART, is being developed for the purpose of demonstrating the safety and performance of SMART design. The SMART-P is a first-of-a-kind reactor which is utilized for the research and development of a power reactor. Since the licensing process of such a reactor is not clearly specified in the current Atomic Energy Act, a comparative survey and analysis of domestic and foreign licensing processes for power and non-power reactors has been carried out to develop the rationale and technical basis for establishing the licensing process of such a reactor. The domestic and foreign licensing processes of power and non-power reactors have been surveyed and compared, including those of the U.S.A., Japan, France, U.K., Canada, and IAEA. The general trends in nuclear reactor classification, licensing procedures, regulatory technical requirements, and other licensing requirements and regulations have been investigated. The results of this study will be used as the rationale and technical basis for establishing the licensing process of reactors at development stage such as SMART-P

  3. Power reactor noise studies and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arzhanov, V

    2002-03-01

    The present thesis deals with the neutron noise arising in power reactor systems. Generally, it can be divided into two major parts: first, neutron noise diagnostics, or more specifically, novel methods and algorithms to monitor nuclear industrial reactors; and second, contributions to neutron noise theory as applied to power reactor systems. Neutron noise diagnostics is presented by two topics. The first one is a theoretical study on the possibility to use a newly proposed current-flux (C/F) detector in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR) for the localisation of anomalies. The second topic concerns various methods to detect guide tube impacting in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). The significance of these problems comes from the operational experience. The thesis describes a novel method to localise vibrating control rods in a PWR by using only one C/F detector. Another novel method, based on wavelet analysis, is put forward to detect impacting guide tubes in a BWR. Neutron noise theory is developed for both Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) and traditional reactors. By design the accelerator-driven systems would operate in a subcritical mode with a strong external source. This calls for a revision of many concepts and methods that have been developed for traditional reactors and also it poses a number of new problems. As for the latter, the thesis investigates the space-dependent neutron noise caused by a fluctuating source. It is shown that the frequency-dependent spatial behaviour exhibits some new properties that are different from those known in traditional critical systems. On the other hand, various reactor physics approximations (point kinetic, adiabatic etc.) have not been defined yet for the subcritical systems. In this respect the thesis presents a systematic formulation of the above mentioned approximations as well as investigations of their properties. Another important problem in neutron noise theory is the treatment of moving boundaries. In this case one

  4. Power reactor noise studies and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzhanov, V.

    2002-03-01

    The present thesis deals with the neutron noise arising in power reactor systems. Generally, it can be divided into two major parts: first, neutron noise diagnostics, or more specifically, novel methods and algorithms to monitor nuclear industrial reactors; and second, contributions to neutron noise theory as applied to power reactor systems. Neutron noise diagnostics is presented by two topics. The first one is a theoretical study on the possibility to use a newly proposed current-flux (C/F) detector in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR) for the localisation of anomalies. The second topic concerns various methods to detect guide tube impacting in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). The significance of these problems comes from the operational experience. The thesis describes a novel method to localise vibrating control rods in a PWR by using only one C/F detector. Another novel method, based on wavelet analysis, is put forward to detect impacting guide tubes in a BWR. Neutron noise theory is developed for both Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) and traditional reactors. By design the accelerator-driven systems would operate in a subcritical mode with a strong external source. This calls for a revision of many concepts and methods that have been developed for traditional reactors and also it poses a number of new problems. As for the latter, the thesis investigates the space-dependent neutron noise caused by a fluctuating source. It is shown that the frequency-dependent spatial behaviour exhibits some new properties that are different from those known in traditional critical systems. On the other hand, various reactor physics approximations (point kinetic, adiabatic etc.) have not been defined yet for the subcritical systems. In this respect the thesis presents a systematic formulation of the above mentioned approximations as well as investigations of their properties. Another important problem in neutron noise theory is the treatment of moving boundaries. In this case one

  5. Small Angle Neutron Scattering instrument at Malaysian TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohd, Shukri; Kassim, Razali; Mahmood, Zal Uyun [Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi, Kajang (Malaysia); Radiman, Shahidan

    1998-10-01

    The TRIGA MARK II Research reactor at the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Research (MINT) was commissioned in July 1982. Since then various works have been performed to utilise the neutrons produced from this steady state reactor. One of the project involved the Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS). (author)

  6. Power optimization in the STAR-LM modular natural convection reactor system. Topic 2.1 advanced reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.W.; Sienicki, J.J.; Farmer, M.T.

    2001-01-01

    The secure, transportable, autonomous reactor (STAR) project addresses the needs of developing countries and independent power producers for a small (300 MWt), multi-purpose energy system. The STAR-LM variant described here is a liquid metal cooled, fast spectrum reactor system. Previous development of a reference STAR-LM design resulted in a 300 MWt modular, pool- type reactor based on criteria for factory fabrication of modules, full transportability of modules (barge, rail, overland), fast construction and startup, and semi-autonomous operation. Earlier work on the reference 300 MWt concept focused first on addressing whether 100% natural circulation heat transport was achievable under the module size constraints for full transportability and under the coolant and cladding peak temperature limitations imposed by the existing Russian database for ferritic-martensitic core material with oxide-layer corrosion protection. Secondly, owing to uncertainties and limitations in the available Russian materials compatibility database, the objective of the reference design was to address how low the coolant and cladding peak temperatures could be commensurate with achieving 300 MWt power level with 100% natural circulation in a fully transportable module size. In the present work we have refocused the approach to attempt to maximize the power achievable in the reactor module based on preserving the criteria for full module transportability and remaining within the materials compatibility database limits. (author)

  7. Decommissioning of a small reactor (BR3 reactor, Belgium)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadoumont, J.; Massaut, V.; Klein, M.; Demeulemeester, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1989, SCK-CEN has been dismantling its PWR reactor BR3 (Belgian Reactor No. 3). After gaining a great deal of experience in remote dismantling of highly radioactive components during the actual dismantling of the two sets of internals, the BR3 team completed the cutting of its reactor pressure vessel (RPV). During the feasibility phase of the RPV dismantling, a decision was made to cut it under water in the refuelling pool of the plant, after having removed it from its cavity. The RPV was cut into segments using a milling cutter and a bandsaw machine. These mechanical techniques have shown their ability for this kind of operations. Prior to the segmentation, the thermal insulation situated around the RPV was remotely removed and disposed of. The paper will describe all these operations. The BR3 decommissioning activities also include the dismantling of contaminated loops and equipment. After a careful sorting of the pieces, optimized management routes are selected in order to minimize the final amount of radioactive waste to be disposed of. Some development of different methods of decontamination were carried out: abrasive blasting (or sand blasting), chemical decontamination (Oxidizing-Reducing process using Cerium). The main goal of the decontamination program is to recycle most of the metallic materials either in the nuclear world or in the industrial world by reaching the respective recycling or clearance level. Overall the decommissioning of the BR3 reactor has shown the feasibility of performing such a project in a safe and economical way. Moreover, BR3 has developed methodologies and decontamination processes to economically reduce the amount of radwaste produced. (author)

  8. Boiler systems for nuclear powered reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, R.K.; George, B.V.

    1979-01-01

    A power generating plant which comprises a heat source, at least one main steam turbine and at least one main boiler heated by heat from the heat source and providing the steam to drive the turbine, comprises additionally at least one further steam turbine, smaller than the main turbine, and at least one further boiler, of lower capacity than the main boiler, and heated from the same heat source and providing steam for the further turbine. Particularly advantageous in nuclear power stations, where the heat source is a nuclear reactor, the invention enables peak loads, above the normal continuous rating of the main generators driven by the main turbines, to be met by the further turbine(s) and one or more further generators driven thereby. This enables the main turbines to be freed from the thermal stresses of rapid load changes, which stresses are more easily accommodated by the smaller and thus more tolerant further turbine(s). Thus auxiliary diesel-driven or other independent power plant may be made partly or wholly unnecessary. Further, low-load running which would be inefficient if achieved by means of the main turbine(s), can be more efficiently effected by shutting them down and using the smaller further turbine(s) instead. These latter may also be used to provide independent power for servicing the generating plant during normal operation or during emergency or other shutdown, and in this latter case may also serve as a heat sink for the shutdown reactor

  9. Small heating reactors for local heating of communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1985-08-01

    The incentives to introduce relatively small heating reactors for local heating of communities are presented and the reasons why this vertically integrated energy system will meet the requirement of an emission - free substitution system are outlined. (author)

  10. Performance analysis of Brayton cycle system for space power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhi; Yang Xiaoyong; Zhao Gang; Wang Jie; Zhang Zuoyi

    2017-01-01

    The closed Brayton cycle system now is the potential choice as the power conversion system for High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors because of its high energy conversion efficiency and compact configuration. The helium is the best working fluid for the system for its chemical stability and small neutron absorption cross section. However, the Helium has small mole mass and big specific volume, which would lead to larger pipes and heat exchanger. What's more, the big compressor enthalpy rise of helium would also lead to an unacceptably large number of compressor's stage. For space use, it's more important to satisfy the limit of the system's volume and mass, instead of the requirement of the system's thermal capacity. So Noble-Gas binary mixture of helium and xenon is presented as the working fluid for space Brayton cycle. This paper makes a mathematical model for space Brayton cycle system by Fortran language, then analyzes the binary mixture of helium and xenon's properties and effects on power conversion units of the space power reactor, which would be helpful to understand and design the space power reactor. The results show that xenon would lead to a worse system's thermodynamic property, the cycle's efficiency and specific power decrease as xenon's mole fraction increasing. On the other hand, proper amount of xenon would decrease the enthalpy changes in turbomachines, which would be good for turbomachines' design. Another optimization method – the specific power optimization is also proposed to make a comparison. (author)

  11. Reactor power control device in BWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosawa, Tsuneo.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a device for controlling reactor power based on a start-up/shut down program in a BWR type reactor, as well as for detecting deviation, if occurs, of the power from the start-up/shut down program, to control a recycling flow rate control system or control rod drive mechanisms. Namely, a power instruction section successively executes the start-up/shut down program and controls the coolant recycling system and the control rod driving mechanisms to control the power. A current state monitoring and calculation section receives a process amount, calculates parameters showing the plant state, compares/monitors them with predetermined values, detecting the deviation, if occurs, of the plant state from the start-up/shut down program, and prevents output of a power increase control signal which leads to power increase. A forecasting and monitoring/calculation section forecasts and calculates the plant state when not yet executed steps of the start-up/shut down program are performed, stops the execution of the start-up/shut down program in the next step in a case of forecasting that the results of the calculation will deviate from the start-up/shut down program. (I.S.)

  12. Reactor power control systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Kazuo.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable power control by automatic control rod operation based on the calculated amounts of operation for the control rods determined depending on a power set value from reactor operators or on power variation amounts from other devices. Constitution: When an operator designates an automatic selection by way of a control rod operation panel, automatic signals are applied to a manual-automatic switching circuit and the mode judging circuit of a rod pattern control device. Then, mode signals such as for single operation, load setting, load following and the like produced by the operator are judged in a circuit, wherein a control rod pattern operation circuit calculates the designation for the control rods and the operation amounts for the control rods depending on the designated modes and automatic control is conducted for the control rods by a rod position control circuit, a rod drive control device and the like connected at a rod position monitor device. The reactor power is thus controlled automatically to reduce the operator's labours. The automatic power control can also be conducted in the same manner by the amount of power variations applied to the device from the external device. (Yoshino, Y.)

  13. Assessment of a small pressurized water reactor for industrial energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepper, O.H.; Fuller, L.C.; Myers, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    An evaluation of several recent ERDA/ORNL sponsored studies on the application of a small, 365 MW(t) pressurized water reactor for industrial energy is presented. Preliminary studies have investigated technical and reliability requirements; costs for nuclear and fossil based steam were compared, including consideration of economic inflation and financing methods. For base-load industrial steam production, small reactors appear economically attractive relative to coal fired boilers that use coal priced at $30/ton

  14. Interaction between users of large and small research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, R.M.

    1983-10-01

    An attitude of cooperation rather than competition should and does exist between large and small reactor centers with regard to neutron scattering. Two areas of clear mutual interest are the development of user communities and the development of improved instrumentation. The current situation in Europe and the United States is examined and contrasted for these two areas. A recommendation is advanced for increased cooperation in the US between large and small reactor centers in the education and training of neutron scattering users

  15. System for forecasting a reactor power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motoda, Hiroshi; Nishizawa, Yasuo.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To dispense with frequent running of detector in a BWR type reactor and permit calculation of the prevailing value and forecast value of power distribution in a specified region in an on-line basis. Constitution: The prevailing power distribution P sub(OZ) (where Z indicates a position in the axial direction) at a given position is estimated by prevailing power distribution estimating means, and the average prevailing power distribution Q sub(OZ) in the core is estimated while making correction of a primary neutron distribution model by core average characteristic measuring means. Then, the estimated core average power distribution Q sub(Z) after alteration of the core flow rate or alteration of Xe concentration is estimated by core average power distribution estimating means. At this time, a forecast power distribution P sub(Z) in a specified region after alteration of the flow rate or alteration of the Xe concentration is calculated on the basis of a relation P sub(Z) = (Q sub(Z)/Q sub(OZ)) by using P sub(OZ), Q sub(OZ) and Q sub(Z). The above calculations are carried out in a short period of time by using a process computer. (Ikeda, J.)

  16. Safety Analysis Of Actinide Recycled Fast Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taufik, Mohammad

    2001-01-01

    Simulation for safety analysis of actinide recycled fast power reactor has been performed. The objective is to know reactor response about ULOF and ULOF and UTOP simultaneous accident. From parameter result such reactivity feedback, power, temperature, and cooled flow rate can conclusion that reactor have inherent safety system, which can back to new Equilibrium State

  17. Power distribution monitor for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Yasuo; Kiguchi, Takashi.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To compare the measured local power region monitor (LPRM) index with the result of a primary calculation to correct the threshold condition for the primary calculation thereby to rapidly grasp and monitor the existing power distribution. Structure: The index of an LPRM disposed in a nuclear reactor is processed in a data processor to remove therefrom a noise, and transmitted to a threshold condition processor to be stored therein. The LPRM index measured by the threshold condition processor is compared with the calculated LPRM value transmitted from the primary processor, whereby the threshold condition is corrected and transmitted to the primary processor. After the completion of calculation, the traversing incore probe (TIP) indexing value is converted to a thermal output distribution or a linear output density distribution and transmitted to an output indicator or an output typewriter. The operator may monitor the existing power distribution by monitoring the output indicator. (Kamimura, M.)

  18. Power supply trip control for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hager, R.E.; Gutman, Jerzy.

    1987-01-01

    A control system for a trip coil in a switchgear mechanism controls the supply of electrical power to a process control device and ensures de-energization of the trip coil shortly after the trip coil is energized. The trip coil is energized not by an independent dc source as in prior art, but from rectified power from a step down transformer supplied from the switchgear output side. The transformer feeds a rectifier which is connected to the trip coil via a trip activation device. The output of the rectifier can be monitored using an optical converter to determine the ability of the control system to activate the trip coil and the condition of the power supplied to the process control device. The control device may be a rod positioner in a pressurised water nuclear reactor. (author)

  19. Advanced power reactors with improved safety characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkhofer, A.

    1994-01-01

    The primary objective of nuclear safety is the protection of individuals, society and environment against radiological hazards from accidental releases of radioactive materials contained in nuclear reactors. Hereto, these materials are enclosed by several successive barriers and the barriers protected against mishaps and accidents by a multi-level system of safety precautions. The evolution of reactor technology continuously improves this concept and its implementation. At a world-wide scale, several advanced reactor concepts are currently being considered, some of them already at a design stage. Essential safety objectives include both further strengthening the prevention of accidents and improving the containment of fission products should an accident occur. The proposed solutions differ considerably with regard to technical principles, plant size and time scales considered for industrial application. Two typical approaches can be distinguished: The first approach basically aims at an evolution of power reactors currently in use, taking into account the findings from safety research and from operation of current plants. This approach makes maximum use of proven technology and operating experience but may nevertheless include new safety features. The corresponding designs are often termed 'large evolutionary'. The second approach consists in more fundamental changes compared to present designs, often with strong emphasis on specific passive features protecting the fuel and fuel cladding barriers. Owing to the nature and capability of those passive features such 'innovative designs' are mostly smaller in power output. The paper describes the basic objectives of such developments and illustrates important technical concepts focusing on next generation plants, i.e. designs to be available for industrial application until the end of this decade. 1 tab. (author)

  20. Nuclear safety as applied to space power reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    Current space nuclear power reactor safety issues are discussed with respect to the unique characteristics of these reactors. An approach to achieving adequate safety and a perception of safety is outlined. This approach calls for a carefully conceived safety program which makes uses of lessons learned from previous terrestrial power reactor development programs. This approach includes use of risk analyses, passive safety design features, and analyses/experiments to understand and control off-design conditions. The point is made that some recent accidents concerning terrestrial power reactors do not imply that space power reactors cannot be operated safety

  1. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, J.; Norton, J.L.; Malkoske, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    therapy machines. Today the majority of the cancer therapy cobalt-60 sources used in the world are manufactured using material from the NRU reactor in Chalk River. The same technology that was used for producing cobalt-60 in a research reactor was then adapted and transferred for use in a CANDU power reactor. In the early 1970s, in co-operation with Ontario Power Generation (formerly Ontario Hydro), bulk cobalt-60 production was initiated in the four Pickering A CANDU reactors located east of Toronto. This was the first full scale production of millions of curies of cobalt-60 per year. As the demand and acceptance of sterilization of medical products grew, MDS Nordion expanded its bulk supply by installing the proprietary Canadian technology in additional CANDUs. Over the years MDS Nordion has partnered with CANDU reactor owners to produce cobalt-60 at various sites. CANDU reactors that have, or are still producing cobalt-60, include Pickering A, Pickering B, Gentilly 2, Embalse in Argentina, and Bruce B. In conclusion, the technology for cobalt-60 production in CANDU reactors, designed and developed by MDS Nordion and Atomic Energy of Canada, has been safely, economically and successfully employed in CANDU reactors with over 195 reactor years of production. Today over forty percent of the world's disposable medical supplies are made safer through sterilization using cobalt-60 sources from MDS Nordion. Over the past 40 years, MDS Nordion with its CANDU reactor owner partners, has safely and reliably shipped more than 500 million curies of cobalt-60 sources to customers around the world. MDS Nordion is presently adding three more CANDU power reactors to its supply chain. These three additional cobalt producing CANDU's will help supplement the ability of the health care industry to provide safe, sterile, medical disposable products to people around the world. As new applications for cobalt-60 are identified, and the demand for bulk cobalt-60 increases, MDS Nordion and AECL

  2. Nuclear power reactors in the world. April 1990 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This is the tenth edition of Reference Data Series No. 2, Nuclear Power Reactors in the World, which is published once per year, to present the most recent reactor data available to the Agency. It contains the following summarized information: General information as of the end of 1989 on power reactors operating or under construction, and shut down; Performance data on reactors operating in the Agency's Member States, as reported to the IAEA. The information is collected by the Agency by circulating questionnaires to the Member States through the designated national correspondents. The replies are used to maintain computerized files on general and design data of, and operating experience with, power reactors. The Agency's power reactor information system (PRIS) comprising the above files provides all the information and data previously published in the Agency's Power Reactors in Member States and currently published in the Agency's Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States

  3. Nuclear power reactors in the world. Apr 1991 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This is the eleventh edition of Reference Data Series No. 2, Nuclear Power Reactors in the World, which is published once per year, to present the most recent reactor data available to the Agency. It contains the following summarized information: General information as of the end of 1990, on power reactors operating or under construction, and shut down; performance data on reactors operating in the Agency's Member States, as reported to the IAEA. This information is collected by the Agency by circulating questionnaires to the Member States through the designated national correspondents. The replies are used to maintain computerized files on general and design data of, and operating experience with, power reactors. The Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) comprising the above files provides all the information and data previously published in the Agency's Power Reactors in Member States and currently published in the Agency's Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States. 5 figs, 19 tabs

  4. Closed Brayton cycle power conversion systems for nuclear reactors :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vernon, Milton E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sanchez, Travis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2006-04-01

    This report describes the results of a Sandia National Laboratories internally funded research program to study the coupling of nuclear reactors to gas dynamic Brayton power conversion systems. The research focused on developing integrated dynamic system models, fabricating a 10-30 kWe closed loop Brayton cycle, and validating these models by operating the Brayton test-loop. The work tasks were performed in three major areas. First, the system equations and dynamic models for reactors and Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems were developed and implemented in SIMULINKTM. Within this effort, both steady state and dynamic system models for all the components (turbines, compressors, reactors, ducting, alternators, heat exchangers, and space based radiators) were developed and assembled into complete systems for gas cooled reactors, liquid metal reactors, and electrically heated simulators. Various control modules that use proportional-integral-differential (PID) feedback loops for the reactor and the power-conversion shaft speed were also developed and implemented. The simulation code is called RPCSIM (Reactor Power and Control Simulator). In the second task an open cycle commercially available Capstone C30 micro-turbine power generator was modified to provide a small inexpensive closed Brayton cycle test loop called the Sandia Brayton test-Loop (SBL-30). The Capstone gas-turbine unit housing was modified to permit the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller to form a closed loop. The Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator were used without modification. The Capstone systems nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system also were reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled by adjusting the alternator load by using the electrical grid as the load bank. The SBL-30 test loop was operated at

  5. Competitive analysis of small hydroelectric power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assad, L.S.; Placido, R.

    1990-01-01

    The agreement between CPFL/UNICAMP/EFEI for developing energetic planning of Small Hydroelectric Power Plants construction is described. Some notions for showing the more economic alternative between decide by Small Hydroelectric Power Plants construction and continue supply the market by inter ligated system generation are shown in this stage of the agreement. (author)

  6. U.S. Nuclear Power Reactor Plant Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission — Demographic data on U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors, including: plant name/unit number, docket number, location, licensee, reactor/containment type, nuclear...

  7. Decommissioning of Swedish nuclear power reactors. Technology and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The main topics discussed are planning, technology and costs of decommissioning nuclear power reactors. Oskarshamn-3 (BWR) and Ringhals-4 (PWR) have been used as reference reactors. 29 refs, figs, tabs

  8. power system reliability in supplying nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gad, M.M.M.

    2007-01-01

    this thesis presents a simple technique for deducing minimal cut set (MCS) from the defined minimal path set (MPS) of generic distribution system and this technique have been used to evaluate the basic reliability indices of Egypt's second research reactor (ETRR-2) electrical distribution network. the alternative system configurations are then studied to evaluate their impact on service reliability. the proposed MCS approach considers both sustained and temporary outage. the temporary outage constitutes an important parameter in characterizing the system reliability indices for critical load point in distribution system. it is also consider the power quality impact on the reliability indices

  9. Leaching of nuclear power reactor waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, L.S.; Villalobos, J.P.; Miyamoto, H.

    1987-01-01

    The leaching tests for immobilized power reactor wastes carried out at IPEN are described. These wastes forms consist mainly of spent resins and boric acid concentrates solidified in ordinary Portland cement. All tests were conducted according to the ISO and IAEA recommendations. Three years leaching results are reported. The cesium diffuvity coefficients determined out of these results are about 1 x 10 -8 cm 2 /s for boric acid waste form and 9 x 10 -9 cm 2 /s for ion-exchange resin waste. Strontium diffusivity coefficients found are about 3 x 10 -11 cm 2 /s and 9 x 10 -11 cm 2 /s respectively. (Author) [pt

  10. Small and Medium Sized Reactors: Driving Forces and Technology Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowin, P.J.; Kupitz, J.

    2002-01-01

    There will be growing demands for energy in the coming decades. One aspect of particular importance is that prospects for nuclear energy will to a considerable extent be influenced by developing countries. Since population growth will occur primarily in developing countries nuclear energy cannot play a significant global role without being a viable option in these countries. Since new power plants to be built will have to be compatible with regional electricity grids, this may result in a greater focus on plants in the small and medium range, defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to produce up to 700 Megawatt of electrical power. This paper first examines the driving forces that could influence the development of nuclear energy in general and of Small and Medium Sized Reactors (SMRs) in particular in the next decades and identifies key factors in that process. Concerns over climate change may to a certain extent influence the discussion on future energy options. Other factors of equal importance for the future of nuclear are a continued emphasis on maintaining high safety standards, the implementation of acceptable solutions for spent fuel and radioactive waste disposal and a globally accepted non-proliferation regime, factors that may in turn have an impact on public acceptance. Economic competitiveness of nuclear energy is an additional important factor, and without being commercially viable, no energy source can in the long run represent a major and stable component in a competitive energy sector. The introduction of SMRs in developing countries poses additional challenges, such as investment limitations. Technology development plays an important role in keeping the nuclear option open for countries wishing to use nuclear reactors to meet their energy needs, and advances in reactor design will be important to enable a significant nuclear component in developing countries. This paper considers the contribution that nuclear science and

  11. Power spectral density measurements with 252Cf for a light water moderated research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, W.T.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1979-01-01

    A method of determining the reactivity of far subcritical systems from neutron noise power spectral density measurements with 252 Cf has previously been tested in fast reactor critical assemblies: a mockup of the Fast Flux Test Facility reactor and a uranium metal sphere. Calculations indicated that this measurement was feasible for a pressurized water reactor (PWR). In order to evaluate the ability to perform these measurements with moderated reactors which have long prompt neutron lifetimes, measurements were performed with a small plate-type research reactor whose neutron lifetime (57 microseconds) was about a factor of three longer than that of a PWR and approx. 50% longer than that of a boiling water reactor. The results of the first measurements of power spectral densities with 252 Cf for a water moderated reactor are presented

  12. Preliminary Analysis of Severe Accident Progression Initiated from Small Break LOCA of a SMART Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Young Ho; Park, Jong Hwa; Kim, Dong Ha; Cho, Seong Won

    2010-01-01

    SMART (System integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor), is under the development at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). SMART is an integral type pressurized water reactor which contains a pressurizer, 4 reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), and 8 steam generator cassettes(S/Gs) in a single reactor vessel. This reactor has substantially enhanced its safety with an integral layout of its major components, 4 trains of safety injection systems (SISs), and an adoption of 4 trains of passive residual heat removal systems (PRHRS) instead of an active auxiliary feedwater system . The thermal power is 330 MWth. During the conceptual design stage, a preliminary PSA was performed. PSA results identified that a small break loss of coolant accident (SLOCA) with all safety injections unavailable is one of important severe core damage sequences. Clear understanding of this sequence helps in the developing accident mitigation strategies. MIDAS/SMR computer code is used to simulate the severe accident progression initiated from a small break LOCA in SMART reactor. This code has capability to model a helical steam generator which is adopted in SMART reactor. The important accident progression results for SMART reactor are then compared with the typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) result

  13. Introduction to nuclear power reactors and their health physics systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brtis, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to: (1) the major systems of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR's) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR's), (2) the production and distribution of radiation sources in BWR's and PWR's, (3) the regulatory and functional requirements for nuclear power reactor design from a health physics standpoint, (4) the health physics systems provided to meet such requirements, and (5) a bibliography of documents germane to power reactor health physics design

  14. Cascade: a high-efficiency ICF power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Cascade attains a net power-plant efficiency of 49% and its cost is competitive with high-temperature gas-cooled reactor, pressurized-water reactor, and coal-fired power plants. The Cascade reactor and blanket are made of ceramic materials and activation is 6 times less than that of the MARS Tandem Mirror Reactor operating at comparable power. Hands-on maintenance of the heat exchangers is possible one day after shutdown. Essentially all tritium is recovered in the vacuum system, with the remainder recovered from the helium power conversion loop. Tritium leakage external to the vacuum system and power conversion loop is only 0.03 Ci/d

  15. Study on Reactor Performance of Online Power Monitoring in PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zareen Khan Abdul Jalil Khan; Ridzuan Abdul Mutalib; Mohd Sabri Minhat

    2014-01-01

    The Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) at Malaysia Nuclear Agency is a TRIGA Mark II type reactor and pool type cooled by natural circulation of light water. This paper describe on reactor performance of online power monitoring based on various parameter of reactor such as log power, linear power, period, Fuel and coolant temperature and reactivity parameter with using neutronic and other instrumentation system of reactor. Methodology of online power estimation and monitoring is to evaluate and analysis of reactor power which is important of reactor safety and control. Neutronic instrumentation system will use to estimate power measurement, differential of log and linear power and period during reactor operation .This study also focus on noise fluctuation from fission chamber during reactor operation .This work will present result of online power monitoring from RTP which indicated the safety parameter identification and initiate safety action on crossing the threshold set point trip. Conclude that optimization of online power monitoring will improved the reactor control and safety parameter of reactor during operation. (author)

  16. Netbooks: Small but Powerful Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descy, Don E.

    2009-01-01

    Netbooks, sometimes called "mini-notebooks," are lightweight, small, and low-priced computers. Some writers ridicule them by calling them "one of the hottest tech toys of the year" (Saltzman, 2008). Others enthusiastically embrace them as "my perfect new travel companion" (Grossman, 2009). Netbooks are not toys. They are honest-to-goodness real…

  17. Small and medium-sized nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.

    1986-01-01

    Small and medium-sized nuclear power plants have long been under discussion as possible applications of nuclear power in countries with small transmission grid systems, in threshold countries and developing countries, and under special local supply conditions. IAEA has condensed and promoted this interest and tried to establish the demand, and possibilities of meeting it, in special events and campaigns. In recent years, considerable interest was registered even in industrialized countries, but here specially for heating and process heat generation applications and for special purposes and, in medium-sized units, also for combined supplies of electricity and heat. This corresponds to special reactor and plant concepts, some of which have already been developed to a stage at which construction work could begin. The analysis presented deals with necessary preconditions on the sides of the users and the vendors, with problems of economy, infrastructure and financing and with the market prospects of small nuclear power plants. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Revision of the second basic plans of power reactor development in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Revision of the second basic plans concerning power reactor development in PNC (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation) is presented. (1) Fast breeder reactors: As for the experimental fast breeder reactor, after reaching the criticality, the power is raised to 50 MW thermal output within fiscal 1978. The prototype fast breeder reactor is intended for the electric output of 200 MW -- 300 MW, using mixed plutonium/uranium oxide fuel. Along the above lines, research and development will be carried out on reactor physics, sodium technology, machinery and parts, nuclear fuel, etc. (2) Advanced thermal reactor: The prototype advanced thermal reactor, with initial fuel primarily of slightly enriched uranium and heavy water moderation and boiling water cooling, of 165 MW electric output, is brought to its normal operation by the end of fiscal 1978. Along the above lines, research and development will be carried out on reactor physics, machinery and parts, nuclear fuel, etc. (Mori, K

  19. Nuclear reactor power for an electrically powered orbital transfer vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Fujita, T.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

    1987-01-01

    To help determine the systems requirements for a 300-kWe space nuclear reactor power system, a mission and spacecraft have been examined which utilize electric propulsion and this nuclear reactor power for multiple transfers of cargo between low earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO). A propulsion system employing ion thrusters and xenon propellant was selected. Propellant and thrusters are replaced after each sortie to GEO. The mass of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), empty and dry, is 11,000 kg; nominal propellant load is 5000 kg. The OTV operates between a circular orbit at 925 km altitude, 28.5 deg inclination, and GEO. Cargo is brought to the OTV by Shuttle and an Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV); the OTV then takes it to GEO. The OTV can also bring cargo back from GEO, for transfer by OMV to the Shuttle. OTV propellant is resupplied and the ion thrusters are replaced by the OMV before each trip to GEO. At the end of mission life, the OTV's electric propulsion is used to place it in a heliocentric orbit so that the reactor will not return to earth. The nominal cargo capability to GEO is 6000 kg with a transit time of 120 days; 1350 kg can be transferred in 90 days, and 14,300 kg in 240 days. These capabilities can be considerably increased by using separate Shuttle launches to bring up propellant and cargo, or by changing to mercury propellant.

  20. Nuclear reactor power for an electrically powered orbital transfer vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.

    1987-01-01

    To help determine the systems requirements for a 300-kWe space nuclear reactor power system, a mission and spacecraft have been examined which utilize electric propulsion and this nuclear reactor power for multiple transfers of cargo between low Earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). A propulsion system employing ion thrusters and xenon propellant was selected. Propellant and thrusters are replaced after each sortie to GEO. The mass of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), empty and dry, is 11,000 kg; nominal propellant load is 5000 kg. The OTV operates between a circular orbit at 925 km altitude, 28.5 deg inclination, and GEO. Cargo is brought to the OTV by Shuttle and an Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV); the OTV then takes it to GEO. The OTV can also bring cargo back from GEO, for transfer by OMV to the Shuttle. OTV propellant is resupplied and the ion thrusters are replaced by the OMV before each trip to GEO. At the end of mission life, the OTV's electric propulsion is used to place it in a heliocentric orbit so that the reactor will not return to Earth. The nominal cargo capability to GEO is 6000 kg with a transit time of 120 days; 1350 kg can be transferred in 90 days, and 14,300 kg in 240 days. These capabilities can be considerably increased by using separate Shuttle launches to bring up propellant and cargo, or by changing to mercury propellant

  1. ATMEA and medium power reactors. The ATMEA joint venture and the ATMEA1 medium power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathet, Eric; Castello, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    This Power Point presentation presents the ATMEA company (a joint venture of Areva and Mitsubishi), the main features of its medium power reactor (ATMEA1) and its building arrangement, indicates the general safety objectives. It outlines the features of its robust design which aim at protecting, cooling down and containing. It indicates the regulatory and safety frameworks, comments the review of the safety options by the ASN and the results of this assessment

  2. Neutron measurements at nuclear power reactors [55

    CERN Document Server

    Scherpelz, R I

    2002-01-01

    Staff from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (operated by Battelle Memorial Institute), have performed neutron measurements at a number of commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. Neutron radiation fields at light water reactor (LWR) power plants are typically characterized by low-energy distributions due to the presence of large amounts of scattering material such as water and concrete. These low-energy distributions make it difficult to accurately monitor personnel exposures, since most survey meters and dosimeters are calibrated to higher-energy fields such as those produced by bare or D sub 2 O-moderated sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf sources. Commercial plants typically use thermoluminescent dosimeters in an albedo configuration for personnel dosimetry and survey meters based on a thermal-neutron detector inside a cylindrical or spherical moderator for dose rate assessment, so their methods of routine monitoring are highly dependent on the energy of the neutron fields. Battelle has participate...

  3. The control of emissions from nuclear power reactors in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, D.J.; Neil, B.C.J.; Chatterjee, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power reactors in Canada are of the CANDU pressurised heavy water design. These are located in the provinces of Ontario, Quebec, and New Brunswick. Most of the nuclear generating capacity is in the province of Ontario which has 16 commissioned reactors with a total capacity of 11,500 MWe. There are four reactors under construction with an additional capacity of 3400 MWe. Nuclear power currently accounts for approximately 50% of the electrical power generation of Ontario. Regulation of the reactors is a Federal Government responsibility administered by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) which licenses the reactors and sets occupational and public dose limits

  4. Utilization of the research reactors for the power reactor control instrumentation development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchene, J.; Verdant, R.; Gilbert, J.

    1977-01-01

    Studies on characteristics and reliability of control instruments lead to testing with various radiations of various intensities and energy spectra. Osiris and Triton reactors present this great variety of radiations and a flexibility of use better than power reactors [fr

  5. Small Hybrid Solar Power System

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, El Hadj Malick; Larrain, Diego; Favrat, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel of mini-hybrid solar power plant integrating a field of solar concentrators, two superposed Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC) and a (bio)Diesel engine. Turbines for the organic Rankine Cycles are hermetic scroll expander-generators. Sun tracking solar collectors are composed of rows of flat mirror bands (CEP) arranged in a plane, which focus the solar energy onto a collector tube similar to those used in SEGS plant in California. The wast...

  6. Small Hybrid Solar Power System

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, El Hadj Malick; Favrat, Daniel; Larrain, Diego; Allani, Yassine

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel of mini-hybrid solar power plant integrating a field of solar concentrators, two superposed Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC) and a (bio)Diesel engine. Turbines for the organic Rankine Cycles are hermetic scroll expander-generators. Sun tracking solar collectors are composed of rows of flat mirror bands (CEP) arranged in a plane, which focus the solar energy onto a collector tube similar to those used in SEGS plant in California. The waste heat from both...

  7. UF6 breeder reactor power plants for electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, J.H.; Clement, J.D.; Hohl, F.

    1976-01-01

    The reactor concept analyzed is a 233 UF 6 core surrounded by a molten salt (Li 7 F, BeF 2 , ThF 4 ) blanket. Nuclear survey calculations were carried out for both spherical and cylindrical geometries. A maximum breeding ratio of 1.22 was found. Thermodynamic cycle calculations were performed for a variety of Rankine cycles. Optimization of a Rankine cycle for a gas core breeder reactor employing an intermediate heat exchanger gave a maximum efficiency of 37 percent. A conceptual design is presented along with a system layout for a 1000 MW stationary power plant. The advantages of the GCBR are as follows: (1) high efficiency, (2) simplified on-line reprocessing, (3) inherent safety considerations, (4) high breeding ratio, (5) possibility of burning all or most of the long-lived nuclear waste actinides, and (6) possibility of extrapolating the technology to higher temperatures and MHD direct conversion

  8. Design Status and Applications of Small reactors without On-site Refuelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.

    2006-01-01

    Small reactors without on-site refuelling are the reactors that can operate without reloading and shuffling of fuel for a reasonably long period, consistent with plant economy and considerations of energy security, with no fresh or spent fuel being stored at a site during reactor operation. Such reactors could simplify the implementation of safeguards and provide certain guarantees of sovereignty to those countries that would prefer to lease fuel from a foreign vendor or, perhaps, an international fuel cycle centre. About 30 concepts of such reactors are being analyzed or developed in 6 IAEA Member States. They cover all principle reactor lines: water cooled, fast gas cooled, sodium cooled, lead or lead bismuth cooled and molten salt cooled reactors. An increased refuelling interval could be achieved with reduced core power density, burnable absorbers, or high conversion ratio. The design goals for small reactors without on-site refuelling, inter alia, include: difficult unauthorized access to fuel; design provisions to facilitate the implementation of safeguards; capability to survive all postulated accident scenarios without requiring emergency response in the public domain; economic competitiveness for anticipated market conditions and applications; the capability to achieve higher manufacturing quality through factory mass production, design standardization and common basis for design certification; and a flexibility in siting and applications. Such reactors are often considered in conjunction with fuel or NPP leasing Small reactors without on-site refuelling have many common technology development issues related to the provision of lifetime core operation, economic competitiveness, high level of safety and proliferation resistance. Reestablishment of a practice of licensing by test and establishment of legal provisions and the insurance scheme for a transit of fuel loads or factory fabricated reactors through the territory of a third country are mentioned as

  9. Exploring the Deployment Potential of Small Modular Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Ahmed Y.

    This thesis reports the results of several investigations into the viability of an emergent technology. Due to the lack of data in such cases, and the sensitivity surrounding nuclear power, exploring the potential of small modular reactors (SMRs) proved challenging. Moreover, these reactors come in a wide range of sizes and can employ a number of technologies, which made investigating the category as a whole difficult. We started by looking at a subset of SMRs that were the most promising candidates for near to mid-term deployment: integral light water SMRs. We conducted a technically detailed elicitation of expert assessments of their capital costs and construction duration, focusing on five reactor deployment scenarios that involved a large reactor and two light water SMRs. Consistent with the uncertainty introduced by past cost overruns and construction delays, median estimates of the cost of new large plants varied by more than a factor of 2.5. Expert judgments about likely SMR costs displayed an even wider range. There was consensus that an SMR plant's construction duration would be shorter than a large reactor's. Experts identified more affordable unit cost, factory fabrication, and shorter construction schedules as factors that may make light water SMRs economically viable, though these reactors do not constitute a paradigm shift when it comes to nuclear power's safety and security. Using these expert assessments of cost and construction duration, we calculated levelized cost of electricity values for four of the five scenarios. For the large plant, median levelized cost estimates ranged from 56 to 120 per MWh. Median estimates of levelized cost ranged from 77 to 240 per MWh for a 45MWe SMR, and from 65 to 120 per MWh for a 225MWe unit. We concluded that controlling construction duration is important, though not as important a factor in the analysis as capital cost, and, given the price of electricity in some parts of the U.S., it is possible to construct an

  10. 78 FR 64028 - Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0035] Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Reactors AGENCY... the NRC's regulations relating to the decommissioning process for nuclear power reactors. The revision... Commission (NRC) is issuing Revision 1 of regulatory guide (RG) 1.184 ``Decommissioning of Nuclear Power...

  11. Thermionic reactor power conditioner design for nuclear electric propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, A. S.; Tasca, D. M.

    1971-01-01

    Consideration of the effects of various thermionic reactor parameters and requirements upon spacecraft power conditioning design. A basic spacecraft is defined using nuclear electric propulsion, requiring approximately 120 kWe. The interrelationships of reactor operating characteristics and power conditioning requirements are discussed and evaluated, and the effects on power conditioner design and performance are presented.

  12. Tokamak power reactor ignition and time dependent fractional power operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vold, E.L.; Mau, T.K.; Conn, R.W.

    1986-06-01

    A flexible time-dependent and zero-dimensional plasma burn code with radial profiles was developed and employed to study the fractional power operation and the thermal burn control options for an INTOR-sized tokamak reactor. The code includes alpha thermalization and a time-dependent transport loss which can be represented by any one of several currently popular scaling laws for energy confinement time. Ignition parameters were found to vary widely in density-temperature (n-T) space for the range of scaling laws examined. Critical ignition issues were found to include the extent of confinement time degradation by alpha heating, the ratio of ion to electron transport power loss, and effect of auxiliary heating on confinement. Feedback control of the auxiliary power and ion fuel sources are shown to provide thermal stability near the ignition curve

  13. Statistic method of research reactors maximum permissible power calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosheva, N.A.; Kirsanov, G.A.; Konoplev, K.A.; Chmshkyan, D.V.

    1998-01-01

    The technique for calculating maximum permissible power of a research reactor at which the probability of the thermal-process accident does not exceed the specified value, is presented. The statistical method is used for the calculations. It is regarded that the determining function related to the reactor safety is the known function of the reactor power and many statistically independent values which list includes the reactor process parameters, geometrical characteristics of the reactor core and fuel elements, as well as random factors connected with the reactor specific features. Heat flux density or temperature is taken as a limiting factor. The program realization of the method discussed is briefly described. The results of calculating the PIK reactor margin coefficients for different probabilities of the thermal-process accident are considered as an example. It is shown that the probability of an accident with fuel element melting in hot zone is lower than 10 -8 1 per year for the reactor rated power [ru

  14. Power generation costs for alternate reactor fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolen, G.R.; Delene, J.G.

    1980-09-01

    The total electric generating costs at the power plant busbar are estimated for various nuclear reactor fuel cycles which may be considered for power generation in the future. The reactor systems include pressurized water reactors (PWR), heavy-water reactors (HWR), high-temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR), liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), light-water pre-breeder and breeder reactors (LWPR, LWBR), and a fast mixed spectrum reactor (FMSR). Fuel cycles include once-through, uranium-only recycle, and full recycle of the uranium and plutonium in the spent fuel assemblies. The U 3 O 8 price for economic transition from once-through LWR fuel cycles to both PWR recycle and LMFBR systems is estimated. Electric power generation costs were determined both for a reference set of unit cost parameters and for a range of uncertainty in these parameters. In addition, cost sensitivity parameters are provided so that independent estimations can be made for alternate cost assumptions

  15. How power is generated in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaminathan, V.

    1978-01-01

    Power generation by nuclear fission as a result of chain reaction caused by neutrons interacting with fissile material such as 235 U, 233 U and 239 Pu is explained. Electric power production by reactor is schematically illustrated. Materials used in thermal reactor and breeder reactor are compared. Fuel reprocessing and disposal of radioactive waste coming from reprocessing plant is briefly described. Nuclear activities in India are reviewed. Four heavy water plants and two power reactors are under construction and will be operative in the near future. Two power reactors are already in operation. Nuclear Fuel Complex at Hyderabad supplies fuel element to the reactors. Fuel reprocessing and waste management facility has been set up at Tarapur. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre at Bombay and Reactor Research Centre at Kalpakkam near Madras are engaged in applied and basic research in nuclear science and engineering. (B.G.W.)

  16. The keys to success in marketing small heating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDougall, D.S.; Lynch, G.F.

    1988-01-01

    The success of the SLOWPOKE Energy System requires acceptance of the SLOWPOKE reactor within the community where the reactor's energy is to be used. Public acceptance will be obtained once the public is convinced that this nuclear heat source is needed, safe and of economic benefit to the community. The need for a new application of nuclear energy is described and the ability of small reactors used for district heating to play that role is shown. The safety of the reactor is being demonstrated with the establishment of the SLOWPOKE Demonstration Reactor by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and with open, candid discussion with the involved community. Economic arguments are reviewed and include discussion of quantitative and qualitative issues. (orig.)

  17. Small hydroelectric power stations and their reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenski, Miroslav

    1999-01-01

    Construction of a small hydroelectric power station provides additional amounts of electric energy, engages a private capital, revives investment activities and promotes the use of renewable energy sources. Transmission losses are reduced, a voltage of higher quality is achieved and idle power is compensated by the generation of electricity in the small hydroelectric power stations and at the place of consumption. Legislation and technical regulations, however, require a multidisciplinary approach, defining of complex spaces and environmental protection. Unfortunately, complete documents should be prepared for small,hydroelectric plants just as for big ones what is a long procedure and many of those papers are unnecessary or even superfluous. (Author)

  18. The concept of the innovative power reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Won Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Fukushima accident reveals the vulnerability of existing active nuclear power plant (NPP design against prolonged loss of external electricity events. The passive safety system is considered an attractive alternative to cope with this kind of disaster. Also, the passive safety system enhances both the safety and the economics of NPPs. The adoption of a passive safety system reduces the number of active components and can minimize the construction cost of NPPs. In this paper, reflecting on the experience during the development of the APR+ design in Korea, we propose the concept of an innovative Power Reactor (iPower, which is a kind of passive NPP, to enhance safety in a revolutionary manner. The ultimate goal of iPower is to confirm the feasibility of practically eliminating radioactive material release to the environment in all accident conditions. The representative safety grade passive system includes a passive emergency core cooling system, a passive containment cooling system, and a passive auxiliary feedwater system. Preliminary analysis results show that these concepts are feasible with respect to preventing and/or mitigating the consequences of design base accidents and severe accidents.

  19. Integrated Control for Small Power Wind Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongliang Liu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The control strategies of the small power wind generator are usually divided into the maximum power point tracking (MPPT case, which requires the wind generator produce power as much as possible, and the power limited control (PLC case that demands the wind generator produce a power level following the load requirement. Integration of these two operating cases responding to flexible and sophisticated power demands is the main topic of this article. A small power wind generator including the sluggish mechanical dynamic phenomenon, which uses the permanent magnet synchronous generator, is introduced to validate different control methods integrating MPPT and PLC cases and based on hysteresis control. It is a matter of an indirect power control method derived from three direct methods following perturb and observe principle as well as from a look-up table. To analyze and compare the proposed power control methods, which are implemented into an emulator of a small power wind generator, a power demand profile is used. This profile is randomly generated based on measured rapid wind velocity data. Analyzing experimental results, from the power viewpoint, all proposed methods reveal steady-state error with big amount of peak resulting from the nature of perturb and observe.

  20. Small liquid metal reactor for an initial phase of fast breeder reactor introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Y.; Nascimento, J.A. do.

    1985-01-01

    Safety and burnup characteristics of a 1000 MWth liquid metal reactor have been examined for various fuel types. With metallic Pu/Th fuel containing a small amount of zirconium hydride, low sodium-void reactivity, a high Doppler coefficient, and small burnup reactivity swings can be achieved. A conservative design is considered for an initial phase of fast breeder reactor development and possible modifications are discussed. (Author) [pt

  1. Nuclear Power: Outlook for New U.S. Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parker, Larry; Holt, Mark

    2007-01-01

    .... The renewed interest in nuclear power has resulted primarily from higher prices for natural gas, improved operation of existing reactors, and uncertainty about future restrictions on coal emissions...

  2. Management of radioactive wastes at power reactor sites in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amalraj, R.V.; Balu, K.

    Indian nuclear power programme, at the present stage, is based on natural uranium fuelled heavy water moderated CANDU type reactors except for the first nuclear power station consisting of two units of enriched uranium fuelled, light water moderated, BWR type of reactors. Some of the salient aspects of radioactive waste management at power reactor sites in India are discussed. Brief reviews are presented on treatment of wastes, their disposal and environmental aspects. Indian experience in power reactor waste management is also summarised identifying some of the areas needing further work. (auth.)

  3. Instrumentation and control for reactor power setback in PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, Chandra Kant; Vasal, Tanmay; Nagaraj, C.P.; Madhusoodanan, K.

    2013-01-01

    In Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR), a 500 MWe plant, Reactor Power Setback is a special operation envisaged for bulk power reduction on occurrence of certain events in Balance of Plant. The bulk power reduction requires a large negative reactivity perturbation if reactor is operating on nominal power. This necessitates a reliable monitoring system with fault tolerant I and C architecture in order to inhibit reactor SCRAM on negative reactivity trip signal. The impact of above events on the process is described. Design of a functional prototype module to carry out RPSB logic operation and its interface with other instruments has been discussed. (author)

  4. Pellet bed reactor for multi-modal space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Williams, K.; Mast, P.; Mims, J.

    1987-01-01

    A review of forthcoming space power needs for both civil and military missions indicates that power requirements will be in the tens of megawatts. The electrical power requirements are envisioned to be twofold: long-duration lower power levels will be needed for station keeping, communications, and/or surveillance; short-duration higher power levels will be required for pulsed power devices. These power characteristics led to the proposal of a multi-modal space power reactor using a pellet bed design. Characteristics desired for such a multimegawatt reactor power source are standby, alert, and pulsed power modes; high-thermal output heat source (approximately 1000 MWt peak power); long lifetime station keeping power (10 to 30 years); high temperature output (1500 K to 1800 K); rapid-burst power transition; high reliability (above 95 percent); and stringent safety standards compliance. The proposed pellet bed reactor is designed to satisfy these characteristics

  5. Nuclear security regulatory framework analysis for small modular reactors in Canada and abroad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, A., E-mail: amjad.farah@uoit.ca [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) are gaining global attention as a potential solution for future power plants due to claims of flexibility and cost effectiveness, while maintaining or increasing safety and security. With the change of design and the potential deployment in remote areas, however, challenges arise from a regulatory standpoint, to meet the safety and security regulations while maintaining economic feasibility. This work comprises of a review of the nuclear security regulatory frameworks in place for SMRs in Canada, USA and the IAEA; how they compare to each other, and to those of large reactors. The goal is to gauge what needs to be adjusted in order to address the changes in design between the two reactor sizes. Some key challenges concern the type of reactor, transportation of reactor components and fuel to remote areas, reduced security staff, and increased complexity of emergency planning and evacuation procedures. (author)

  6. Nuclear security regulatory framework analysis for small modular reactors in Canada and abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farah, A.

    2015-01-01

    Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) are gaining global attention as a potential solution for future power plants due to claims of flexibility and cost effectiveness, while maintaining or increasing safety and security. With the change of design and the potential deployment in remote areas, however, challenges arise from a regulatory standpoint, to meet the safety and security regulations while maintaining economic feasibility. This work comprises of a review of the nuclear security regulatory frameworks in place for SMRs in Canada, USA and the IAEA; how they compare to each other, and to those of large reactors. The goal is to gauge what needs to be adjusted in order to address the changes in design between the two reactor sizes. Some key challenges concern the type of reactor, transportation of reactor components and fuel to remote areas, reduced security staff, and increased complexity of emergency planning and evacuation procedures. (author)

  7. Ready to regulate small reactors in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herstead, S.; Cook, S.; De Vos, M.; Howden, B.D. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    The success of any new build project is reliant upon all stakeholders - applicants, vendors, contractors and regulatory agencies - being ready to do their part. Over the past several years, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) has been working to ensure that it has the appropriate regulatory framework and internal processes in place for the timely and efficient licensing of all types of reactor, regardless of size. The CNSC's general nuclear safety objective requires that nuclear facilities be designed and operated in a manner that will protect the health, safety and security of persons and the environment from unreasonable risk, and to implement Canada's international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. For smaller facilities, this has traditionally allowed for the use of a graded approach to achieving safety.

  8. An approach of raising the low power reactor trip block (P-7) in Maanshan Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.C.

    1984-01-01

    The technical specification for the Maanshan Nuclear Power Station (FSAR Table 16.2.2-3) requires that with an increasing reactor power level above the setpoint of low power reactor trip block (P-7), a turbine trip shall initiate a reactor trip. This anticipatory reactor trip on turbine trip prevents the pressurizer PORV from openning during turbine trip event. In order to reduce unnecessary reactor trip due to turbine trip on low reactor power level during Maanshan start-up stage, Taiwan Power Company performed a transient analysis for turbine trip event by using RETRAN code. The highest reactor power level at which a turbine trip will not open the pressurizer PORV is searched. The results demonstrated that this power level can be increased from the original value-10% of the rated thermal power-to about 48% of the rated thermal power

  9. Determination of the theoretical and experimental zero-power frequency response of Ghana Research Reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intsiful, J.D.K.; Akaho, E.H.K.; Tetteh, G.K.

    1997-12-01

    The frequency response measurements of a reactor at low power help in determining the kinetic parameters of a reactor and ultimately in investigating its stability with respect to small perturbations in reactivity. In this report, we present the results of the zero-power frequency response measurements of GHARR-1 by rod method and its analytical analogue. The comparison in calculated and measured values is reasonably good in the frequency range used (author)

  10. Nuclear piston engine and pulsed gaseous core reactor power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, E.T.

    1976-01-01

    The investigated nuclear piston engines consist of a pulsed, gaseous core reactor enclosed by a moderating-reflecting cylinder and piston assembly and operate on a thermodynamic cycle similar to the internal combustion engine. The primary working fluid is a mixture of uranium hexafluoride, UF 6 , and helium, He, gases. Highly enriched UF 6 gas is the reactor fuel. The helium is added to enhance the thermodynamic and heat transfer characteristics of the primary working fluid and also to provide a neutron flux flattening effect in the cylindrical core. Two and four-stroke engines have been studied in which a neutron source is the counterpart of the sparkplug in the internal combustion engine. The piston motions which have been investigated include pure simple harmonic, simple harmonic with dwell periods, and simple harmonic in combination with non-simple harmonic motion. The results of the conducted investigations indicate good performance potential for the nuclear piston engine with overall efficiencies of as high as 50 percent for nuclear piston engine power generating units of from 10 to 50 Mw(e) capacity. Larger plants can be conceptually designed by increasing the number of pistons, with the mechanical complexity and physical size as the probable limiting factors. The primary uses for such power systems would be for small mobile and fixed ground-based power generation (especially for peaking units for electrical utilities) and also for nautical propulsion and ship power

  11. Reactor G1: high power experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laage, F. de; Teste du Baillet, A.; Veyssiere, A.; Wanner, G.

    1957-01-01

    The experiments carried out in the starting-up programme of the reactor G1 comprised a series of tests at high power, which allowed the following points to be studied: 1- Effect of poisoning by Xenon (absolute value, evolution). 2- Temperature coefficients of the uranium and graphite for a temperature distribution corresponding to heating by fission. 3- Effect of the pressure (due to the coiling system) on the reactivity. 4- Calibration of the security rods as a function of their position in the pile (1). 5- Temperature distribution of the graphite, the sheathing, the uranium and the air leaving the canals, in a pile running normally at high power. 6- Neutron flux distribution in a pile running normally at high power. 7- Determination of the power by nuclear and thermodynamic methods. These experiments have been carried out under two very different pile conditions. From the 1. to the 15. of August 1956, a series of power increases, followed by periods of stabilisation, were induced in a pile containing uranium only, in 457 canals, amounting to about 34 tons of fuel. A knowledge of the efficiency of the control rods in such a pile has made it possible to measure with good accuracy the principal effects at high temperatures, that is, to deal with points 1, 2, 3, 5. Flux charts giving information on the variations of the material Laplacian and extrapolation lengths in the reflector have been drawn up. Finally the thermodynamic power has been measured under good conditions, in spite of some installation difficulties. On September 16, the pile had its final charge of 100 tons. All the canals were loaded, 1,234 with uranium and 53 (i.e. exactly 4 per cent of the total number) with thorium uniformly distributed in a square lattice of 100 cm side. Since technical difficulties prevented the calibration of the control rods, the measurements were limited to the determination of the thermodynamic power and the temperature distributions (points 5 and 7). This report will

  12. Study on operation conditions and an operation system of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel, 'report of working group on application of a very small nuclear reactor to an ocean research'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ura, Tamaki; Takamasa, Tomoji; Nishimura, Hajime

    2001-07-01

    JAERI has studied on design of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel, which will navigate under sea mainly in the Arctic Ocean, as a part of the design activity of advanced marine reactors. This report describes operation conditions and an operating system of the vessel, which were discussed by the specialists of hull design, sound positioning, ship motions and oceanography, etc. The design conditions on ship motions for submersible vessels were surveyed considering regulations in our country, and ship motions were evaluated in the cases of underwater and surface navigations taking account of observation activities in the Arctic Ocean. The effect of ship motions on the compact nuclear reactor SCR was assessed. A submarine transponder system and an on-ice communication buoy system were examined as a positioning and communication system, supposing the activity under ice. The interval between transponders or communication buoys was recommended as 130 km. Procedures to secure safety of nuclear powered submersible research vessel were discussed according to accidents on the hull or the nuclear reactor. These results were reflected to the concept of the nuclear powered submersible research vessel, and subjects to be settled in the next step were clarified. (author)

  13. Study on operation conditions and an operation system of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel, 'report of working group on application of a very small nuclear reactor to an ocean research'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ura, Tamaki [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Takamasa, Tomoji [Tokyo Univ. of Mercantile Marine, Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, Hajime [Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, Yokosuka, Kanagawa (JP)] [and others

    2001-07-01

    JAERI has studied on design of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel, which will navigate under sea mainly in the Arctic Ocean, as a part of the design activity of advanced marine reactors. This report describes operation conditions and an operating system of the vessel, which were discussed by the specialists of hull design, sound positioning, ship motions and oceanography, etc. The design conditions on ship motions for submersible vessels were surveyed considering regulations in our country, and ship motions were evaluated in the cases of underwater and surface navigations taking account of observation activities in the Arctic Ocean. The effect of ship motions on the compact nuclear reactor SCR was assessed. A submarine transponder system and an on-ice communication buoy system were examined as a positioning and communication system, supposing the activity under ice. The interval between transponders or communication buoys was recommended as 130 km. Procedures to secure safety of nuclear powered submersible research vessel were discussed according to accidents on the hull or the nuclear reactor. These results were reflected to the concept of the nuclear powered submersible research vessel, and subjects to be settled in the next step were clarified. (author)

  14. Calculation of research reactor RA power at uncontrolled reactivity changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupac, S.

    1978-01-01

    The safety analysis of research reactor RA involves also the calculation of reactor power at uncontrolled reactivity changes. The corresponding computer code, based on Point Kinetics Model has been made. The short review of method applied for solving kinetic equations is given and several examples illustrating the reactor behaviour at various reactivity changes are presented. The results already obtained are giving rather rough picture of reactor behaviour in considered situations. This is the consequence of using simplified feed back and reactor cooling models, as well as temperature reactivity coefficients, which do not correspond to the actual reactor RA structure (which is now only partly fulfilled with 80% enriched uranium fuel). (author) [sr

  15. Nuclear power reactors in the world. Apr 1985 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This is the fifth edition of Reference Data Series No. 2, Nuclear Power Reactors in the World, which replaces the Agency's publication Power Reactors in Member States. This bulletin contains the following summarized information on nuclear power reactors in the world: General information as of the end of 1984 on reactors operating or under construction and such additional information on planned and shutdown reactors as is available; Performance data on major reactor types operating in the Agency's Member States. The information is collected by the Agency by circulating questionnaires to the Member States through the designated national correspondents. The replies are used to maintain computerized files on general and design data of and operating experience with reactors

  16. Proliferation resistance considerations for remote small modular reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitlock, J., E-mail: whitlockj@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Sprinkle, J., E-mail: j.sprinkle@iaea.org [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    Remotely located Small Modular Reactors at the low end of energy production (on the order of 10 MWe, referenced here as Very Small Modular Reactors or VSMRs) present unique proliferation resistance advantages and challenges. Addressing these challenges in the most efficient manner may not only be desirable, but necessary, for development of this technology. Incorporation of safeguards considerations early in the design process (Safeguards by Design) along with safety, security, economics and other key drivers, is of importance. Operational Transparency may become an essential aspect of the safeguards approach for such systems. (author)

  17. Design characteristics of zero power fast reactor Lasta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, M.; Stefanovic, D.; Pesic, M.; Popovic, D.; Nikolic, D.; Antic, D.; Zavaljevski, N.

    1987-01-01

    The concept, purpose and preliminary design of a zero power fast reactor LASTA are described. The methods of computing the reactor core parameters and reactor kinetics are presented with the basic calculated results and analysis for one selected LASTA configuration. The nominal parameters are determined according to the selected reactor safety criteria and results of calculations. Important aspects related to the overall safety are examined in detail. (author)

  18. Design studies of Tokamak power reactor in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, T.; Nishikawa, M.; Tanaka, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Recent design studies of tokamak power reactor and related activities conducted in JAERI are presented. A design study of the SPTR (Swimming-Pool Type Reactor) concept was carried out in FY81 and FY82. The reactor design studies in the last two years focus on nuclear components, heat transport and energy conversion systems. In parallel of design studies, tokamak systems analysis code is under development to evaluate reactor performances, cost and net energy balance

  19. Calculation of power density with MCNP in TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snoj, L.; Ravnik, M.

    2006-01-01

    Modern Monte Carlo codes (e.g. MCNP) allow calculation of power density distribution in 3-D geometry assuming detailed geometry without unit-cell homogenization. To normalize MCNP calculation by the steady-state thermal power of a reactor, one must use appropriate scaling factors. The description of the scaling factors is not adequately described in the MCNP manual and requires detailed knowledge of the code model. As the application of MCNP for power density calculation in TRIGA reactors has not been reported in open literature, the procedure of calculating power density with MCNP and its normalization to the power level of a reactor is described in the paper. (author)

  20. Power limit and quality limit of natural circulation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Guochang; Ma Changwen

    1997-01-01

    The circulation characteristics of natural circulation reactor in boiling regime are researched. It is found that, the circulation mass flow rate and the power have a peak value at a mass quality respectively. Therefore, the natural circulation reactor has a power limit under certain technological condition. It can not be increased steadily by continually increasing the mass quality. Corresponding to this, the mass quality of natural circulation reactor has a reasonable limit. The relations between the maximum power and the reactor parameters, such as the resistance coefficient, the working pressure and so on, are analyzed. It is pointed out that the power limit of natural circulation reactor is about 1000 MW at present technological condition. Taking the above result and low quality stability experimental result into account, the authors recommend that the reasonable mass quality of natural circulation reactor working in boiling regime is from 2% to 3% under the researched working pressure

  1. Cyber security for remote monitoring and control of small reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trask, D., E-mail: dave.trask@cnl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Jung, C. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, ON (Canada); MacDonald, M., E-mail: marienna.macdonald@cnl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    There is growing international interest and activity in the development of small nuclear reactor technology with a number of vendors interested in building small reactors in Canada to serve remote locations. A common theme of small reactor designs proposed for remote Canadian locations is the concept of a centrally located main control centre operating several remotely located reactors via satellite communications. This theme was echoed at a recent IAEA conference where a recommendation was made to study I&C for remotely controlled small modular reactors, including satellite links and cyber security. This paper summarizes the results of an AECL-CNSC research project to analyze satellite communication technologies used for remote monitoring and control functions in order to provide cyber security regulatory considerations. The scope of this research included a basic survey of existing satellite communications technology and its use in industrial control applications, a brief history of satellite vulnerabilities and a broad review of over 50 standards, guidelines, and regulations from recognized institutions covering safety, cyber security, and industrial communication networks including wireless communications in general. This paper concludes that satellite communications should not be arbitrarily excluded by standards or regulation from use for the remote control and monitoring of small nuclear reactors. Instead, reliance should be placed on processes that are independent of any particular technology, such as reducing risks by applying control measures and demonstrating required reliability through good design practices and testing. Ultimately, it is compliance to well-developed standards that yields the evidence to conclude whether a particular application that uses satellite communications is safe and secure. (author)

  2. Cyber security for remote monitoring and control of small reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trask, D.; Jung, C.; MacDonald, M.

    2014-01-01

    There is growing international interest and activity in the development of small nuclear reactor technology with a number of vendors interested in building small reactors in Canada to serve remote locations. A common theme of small reactor designs proposed for remote Canadian locations is the concept of a centrally located main control centre operating several remotely located reactors via satellite communications. This theme was echoed at a recent IAEA conference where a recommendation was made to study I&C for remotely controlled small modular reactors, including satellite links and cyber security. This paper summarizes the results of an AECL-CNSC research project to analyze satellite communication technologies used for remote monitoring and control functions in order to provide cyber security regulatory considerations. The scope of this research included a basic survey of existing satellite communications technology and its use in industrial control applications, a brief history of satellite vulnerabilities and a broad review of over 50 standards, guidelines, and regulations from recognized institutions covering safety, cyber security, and industrial communication networks including wireless communications in general. This paper concludes that satellite communications should not be arbitrarily excluded by standards or regulation from use for the remote control and monitoring of small nuclear reactors. Instead, reliance should be placed on processes that are independent of any particular technology, such as reducing risks by applying control measures and demonstrating required reliability through good design practices and testing. Ultimately, it is compliance to well-developed standards that yields the evidence to conclude whether a particular application that uses satellite communications is safe and secure. (author)

  3. Calibration of RB reactor power; Kalibrisanje snage reaktora RB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotic, O; Markovic, H; Ninkovic, M; Strugar, P; Dimitrijevic, Z; Takac, S; Stefanovic, D; Kocic, A; Vranic, S [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1976-09-15

    The first and only calibration of RB reactor power was done in 1962, and the obtained calibration ratio was used irrespective of the lattice pitch and core configuration. Since the RB reactor is being prepared for operation at higher power levels it was indispensable to reexamine the calibration ratio, estimate its dependence on the lattice pitch, critical level of heavy water and thickness of the side reflector. It was necessary to verify the reliability of control and dosimetry instruments, and establish neutron and gamma dose dependence on reactor power. Two series of experiments were done in June 1976. First series was devoted to tests of control and dosimetry instrumentation and measurements of radiation in the RB reactor building dependent on reactor power. Second series covered measurement of thermal and epithermal neuron fluxes in the reactor core and calculation of reactor power. Four different reactor cores were chosen for these experiments. Reactor pitches were 8, 8{radical}2, and 16 cm with 40, 52 and 82 fuel channels containing 2% enriched fuel. Obtained results and analysis of these results are presented in this document with conclusions related to reactor safe operation.

  4. Calculations for accidents in water reactors during operation at power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, H.; Dutraive, P.; Fabrega, S.; Millot, J.P.

    1976-07-01

    The behaviour of a water reactor on an accident occurring as the reactor is normally operated at power may be calculated through the computer code detailed in this article. Reactivity accidents, loss of coolant ones and power over-running ones are reviewed. (author)

  5. Comparison of Pickering NGS performance with world power reactors, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhay, S.

    Pickering NGS performance is compared, in highly graphic form, with the perfomance of other nuclear power plants around the world. The four Pickering reactors score in the top six, rated by gross capacity factor. Major system suppliers for world power reactors above 500 MW are cataloged. (E.C.B.)

  6. Study on a nuclear spaceship for interplanetary cruise. Core design of a small fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Taku; Yoshida, Yutaka; Honma, Yuji; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Shimazu, Yoichiro; Tsuji, Masashi

    2009-01-01

    In 21st century, the field which needs nuclear power plant systems are not just on the Earth. We considered that the nuclear power is proper for the energy source of the manned spaceship for interplanetary cruise. In this study, we considered the system configuration of the spaceship, the design of power generating system, some navigational plans to reach the Mars. The system configuration of the spaceship studied in our laboratory has one or two Fast Reactor with liquid sodium coolant as main heat source, dozens of Stirling Engines as main power generators and some Plasma Rockets called VASIMR as propulsion system. Because the Fast Reactor need not thick and heavy pressure vessel and the sodium has high performance of heat transfer, they are the best suited to the space nuclear reactor system. In addition, Stirling Engine has high theoretical thermal efficiency and need not water, steam generators, steam condenser and so on. This results in absence of sodium-water reaction and significant weight saving of power generator system. The VASIMR studied at ASPL is an advanced electric propulsion device which is able to convert large amount of electric power into great propulsion force. At reactor designing, we are using the SRAC2006 code developed at JAEA and pursuing the optimal fast reactor design for spaceship. We think that smaller reactor is better. To realize a system which has inherent safety, sodium void reactivity should be negative. We adopted the design of the small fast reactor named 4S (Super Safe, Small and Simple) as a reference design. As a result, we verified that a void reactivity had negative value in some of calculation cases and we realized safe, small and simple space fast reactor. In addition, to piece out power generator system in space, we need to consider if the budget of exhaust heat from radiator panels to space needed at this case is realistic. To obtain the optimal trajectory of rapid Mars transit, we made some analysis calculation codes

  7. Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modro, S.M.; Fisher, J.E.; Weaver, K.D.; Reyes, J.N.; Groome, J.T.; Babka, P.; Carlson, T.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objectives were to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility. This report presents the results of the project. After an initial exploratory and evolutionary process, as documented in the October 2000 report, the project focused on developing a modular reactor design that consists of a self-contained assembly with a reactor vessel, steam generators, and containment. These modular units would be manufactured at a single centralized facility, transported by rail, road, and/or ship, and installed as a series of self-contained units. This approach also allows for staged construction of an NPP and ''pull and replace'' refueling and maintenance during each five-year refueling cycle. Development of the baseline design concept has been sufficiently completed to determine that it complies with the safety requirements and criteria, and satisfies the major goals already noted. The more significant features of the baseline single-unit design concept include: (1) Thermal Power--150 MWt; (2) Net Electrical Output--35 MWe; (3) Steam Generator Type--Vertical, helical tubes; (4) Fuel UO 2 , 8% enriched; (5) Refueling Intervals--5 years; (6) Life-Cycle--60 years. The economic performance was assessed by designing a power plant with an electric generation capacity in the range of current and advanced evolutionary systems. This approach allows for direct comparison of economic performance and forms a basis for further evaluation, economic and technical, of the proposed design and for the design evolution towards a more cost competitive concept. Applications such as cogeneration

  8. Fuel element for high-temperature nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schloesser, J.

    1974-01-01

    The fuel element of the HTGR consists of a spherical graphite body with a spherical cavity. A deposit of fissile material, e.g. coated particles of uranium carbide, is fixed to the inner wall using binders. In addition to the fissile material, there are concentric deposits of fertile material, e.g. coated thorium carbide particles. The remaining cavity is filled with a graphite mass, preferably graphite powder, and the filling opening with a graphite stopper. At the beginning of the reactor operation, the fissile material layer provides the whole power. With progressing burn-up, the energy production is taken over by the fertile layer, which provides the heat production until the end of burn-up. Due to the relatively small temperature difference between the outer wall of the outer graphite body and the maximum fuel temperature, the power of the fuel element can be increased. (DG) [de

  9. Core optimization studies for a small heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galperin, A.

    1986-11-01

    Small heating reactor cores are characterized by a high contribution of the leakage to the neutron balance and by a large power density variation in the axial direction. A limited number of positions is available for the control rods, which are necessary to satisfy overall reactivity requirements subject to a safety related constraint on the maximum worth of each rod. Design approaches aimed to improve safety and fuel utilization performance of the core include separation of the cooling and moderating functions of the water with the core in order to reduce hot-to-cold reactivity shift and judicious application of the axial Gd zoning aimed to improve the discharge burnup distribution. Several design options are analyzed indicating a satisfactory solution of the axial burnup distribution problem. The feasibility of the control rod system including zircaloy, stainless steel, natural boron and possibly enriched boron rods is demonstrated. A preliminary analysis indicates directions for further improvements of the core performance by an additional reduction of the hot-to-cold reactivity shift and by a reduction of the depletion reactivity swing adopting a higher gadolinium concentration in the fuel or a two-batch fuel management scheme. (author)

  10. Seismic isolation of small modular reactors using metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witarto Witarto

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation of metamaterials at micro- to nanometer scales to metastructures at much larger scales offers a new alternative for seismic isolation systems. These new isolation systems, known as periodic foundations, function both as a structural foundation to support gravitational weight of the superstructure and also as a seismic isolator to isolate the superstructure from incoming seismic waves. Here we describe the application of periodic foundations for the seismic protection of nuclear power plants, in particular small modular reactors (SMR. For this purpose, a large-scale shake table test on a one-dimensional (1D periodic foundation supporting an SMR building model was conducted. The 1D periodic foundation was designed and fabricated using reinforced concrete and synthetic rubber (polyurethane materials. The 1D periodic foundation structural system was tested under various input waves, which include white noise, stepped sine and seismic waves in the horizontal and vertical directions as well as in the torsional mode. The shake table test results show that the 1D periodic foundation can reduce the acceleration response (transmissibility of the SMR building up to 90%. In addition, the periodic foundation-isolated structure also exhibited smaller displacement than the non-isolated SMR building. This study indicates that the challenge faced in developing metastructures can be overcome and the periodic foundations can be applied to isolating vibration response of engineering structures.

  11. Seismic isolation of small modular reactors using metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witarto, Witarto; Wang, S. J.; Yang, C. Y.; Nie, Xin; Mo, Y. L.; Chang, K. C.; Tang, Yu; Kassawara, Robert

    2018-04-01

    Adaptation of metamaterials at micro- to nanometer scales to metastructures at much larger scales offers a new alternative for seismic isolation systems. These new isolation systems, known as periodic foundations, function both as a structural foundation to support gravitational weight of the superstructure and also as a seismic isolator to isolate the superstructure from incoming seismic waves. Here we describe the application of periodic foundations for the seismic protection of nuclear power plants, in particular small modular reactors (SMR). For this purpose, a large-scale shake table test on a one-dimensional (1D) periodic foundation supporting an SMR building model was conducted. The 1D periodic foundation was designed and fabricated using reinforced concrete and synthetic rubber (polyurethane) materials. The 1D periodic foundation structural system was tested under various input waves, which include white noise, stepped sine and seismic waves in the horizontal and vertical directions as well as in the torsional mode. The shake table test results show that the 1D periodic foundation can reduce the acceleration response (transmissibility) of the SMR building up to 90%. In addition, the periodic foundation-isolated structure also exhibited smaller displacement than the non-isolated SMR building. This study indicates that the challenge faced in developing metastructures can be overcome and the periodic foundations can be applied to isolating vibration response of engineering structures.

  12. MINIMARS: An attractive small tandem mirror fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L.J.; Logan, B.G.; Doggett, J.N.; Devoto, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Through the innovative design of a novel end plug scheme employing octopole MHD stabilization, the authors present the conceptual design of ''MINIMARS'', a small commercial fusion reactor based on the tandem mirror principle. The current baseline for MINIMARS has a net electric output of 600 MWe and they have configured the design for short construction times, factory-built modules, inherently safe blanket systems, and multiplexing in station sizes of ≅ 600-2400 MWe. They demonstrate that the compact octopole end cell provides a number of advantages over the more conventional quadrupole (yin-yang) end cell encountered in the MARS tandem mirror reactor study, and enables ignition to be achieved with much shorter central cell lengths. Accordingly, being economic in small sizes, MINIMARS provides an attractive alternative to the more conventional larger conceptual fusion reactors encountered to date, and would contribute significantly to the lowering of utility financial risk in a developing fusion economy

  13. Power quality of small rural industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval, D.O.; Leonard, J.J.; Licsko, Z.J.

    1991-01-01

    Successful and economical operation of small rural industries (e.g., grain, dairy, irrigation, pig, poultry, beef feedlots, etc.) is a fundamental objective of society. However, when the performance and life expectancy of industrial electronic and electrical equipment is significantly affected by power supply anomalies caused by polluting loads at an industrial site and by utility normal operational activities, the economic benefits of this technology are quickly eradicated. This paper will present the results of a detailed power quality survey of 23 small rural industries sponsored by the Canadian Electrical Association and provides a knowledge base on rural power quality and the possible origins of power supply problems experienced at the various industrial sites. The results of the survey provide a basis for mitigating actions by the utilities and their rural industrial customers to design and operate their electrical systems to minimize the effects of power supply anomalies

  14. A new small modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor plant concept based on proven technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Goodjohn, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Based on the established and proven high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technologies from the Peach Bottom 1 and Fort St. Vrain utility-operated units, a new small modular HTGR reactor is currently being evaluated. The basic nuclear reactor heat source, with a prismatic core, is being designed so that the decay heat can be removed by passive means (i.e., natural circulation). Although this concept is still in the preconceptual design stage, emphasis is being placed on establishing an inherently safe or benign concept which, when engineered, will have acceptable capital cost and power generation economics. The proposed new HTGR concept has a variety of applications, including electrical power generation, cogeneration, and high-temperature process heat. This paper discusses the simplest application, i.e., a steam Rankine cycle electrical power generating version. The gas-cooled modular reactor concepts presented are based on a graphite moderated prismatic core of low-power density (i.e., 4.1 W/cm 3 ) with a thermal rating of 250 MW(t). With the potential for inherently safe characteristics, a new small reactor could be sited close to industrial and urban areas to provide electrical power and thermal heating needs (i.e., district and space heating). Incorporating a multiplicity of small modular units to provide a larger power output is also discussed. The potential for a small, inherently safe HTGR reactor concept is highlighted

  15. Small high temperature gas-cooled reactors with innovative nuclear burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liem, Peng Hong; Ismail; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Since the innovative concept of CANDLE (Constant Axial shape of Neutron Flux, nuclide densities and power shape During Life of Energy producing reactor) burning strategy was proposed, intensive research works have been continuously conducted to evaluate the feasibility and the performance of the burning strategy on both fast and thermal reactors. We learned that one potential application of the burning strategy for thermal reactors is for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) with prismatic/block-type fuel elements. Several characteristics of CANDLE burning strategy such as constant reactor characteristics during burn-up, no need for burn-up reactivity control mechanism, proportionality of core height with core lifetime, sub-criticality of fresh fuel elements, etc. enable us to design small sized HTGR with a high degree of safety easiness of operation and maintenance, and long core lifetime which are required for introducing the reactors into remote areas or developing countries with limited infrastructures and resources. In the present work, we report our evaluation results on small sized block-type HTGR designs with CANDLE burning strategy and compared with other existing small HTGR designs including the ones with pebble fuel elements, under both uranium and thorium fuel cycles. (author)

  16. Development of small reactor safety criteria in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, P.C.; French, P.M.; Axford, D.J.; Snell, V.G.

    1990-01-01

    A number of new small reactor designs have been proposed in Canada over the last several years and some have reached the stage where licensing discussions have been initiated with the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). An inter-organizational Small Reactor Criteria (SRC) working group was formed in 1988 to propose safety and licensing criteria for these small reactors. Two levels of criteria are proposed. The first level forms a safety philosophy and the second is a set of criteria for specific reactor applications. The safety philosophy consists of three basic safety objectives together with evaluation criteria, and fourteen fundamental principles measured by specific criteria, which must be implemented to meet the safety objectives. Two of the fourteen principles are prime: defence in depth, and safety culture; the other twelve principles can be seen as deriving from them. A benefit of this approach is that the concepts of defence in depth and safety culture become well-defined. The objectives and principles are presented in the paper and their criteria are summarized. The second level of criteria, under development, will form a safety application set and will provide small reactor criteria in a number of general areas, such as regulatory process and safety assessment, as well as for specific reactor life-cycle activities, from siting through to decommissioning. The criteria are largely deterministic. However, the frequencies and consequences of postulated accidents are assessed against numerical criteria to assist in judging the acceptability of plant design, operation, and proposed siting. All criteria proposed are designed to be testable in some evidentiary fashion, readily enabling an assessment of compliance for a given proposal

  17. Challenges for remote monitoring and control of small reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trask, D., E-mail: traskd@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Fredericton, New Brunswick (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    This paper considers a model for small, unmanned, remotely located reactors and discusses the ensuing cyber security and operational challenges for monitoring and control and how these challenges might be overcome through some of AECL's research initiatives and experience. (author)

  18. Axial power monitoring uncertainty in the Savannah River Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losey, D.C.; Revolinski, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    The results of this analysis quantified the uncertainty associated with monitoring the Axial Power Shape (APS) in the Savannah River Reactors. Thermocouples at each assembly flow exit map the radial power distribution and are the primary means of monitoring power in these reactors. The remaining uncertainty in power monitoring is associated with the relative axial power distribution. The APS is monitored by seven sensors that respond to power on each of nine vertical Axial Power Monitor (APM) rods. Computation of the APS uncertainty, for the reactor power limits analysis, started with a large database of APM rod measurements spanning several years of reactor operation. A computer algorithm was used to randomly select a sample of APSs which were input to a code. This code modeled the thermal-hydraulic performance of a single fuel assembly during a design basis Loss-of Coolant Accident. The assembly power limit at Onset of Significant Voiding was computed for each APS. The output was a distribution of expected assembly power limits that was adjusted to account for the biases caused by instrumentation error and by measuring 7 points rather than a continuous APS. Statistical analysis of the final assembly power limit distribution showed that reducing reactor power by approximately 3% was sufficient to account for APS variation. This data confirmed expectations that the assembly exit thermocouples provide all information needed for monitoring core power. The computational analysis results also quantified the contribution to power limits of the various uncertainties such as instrumentation error

  19. Small particle bed reactors: Sensitivity to Brayton cycle parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiner, John R.; Short, Barry J.

    Relatively simple particle bed reactor (PBR) algorithms were developed for optimizing low power closed Brayton cycle (CBC) systems. These algorithms allow the system designer to understand the relationship among key system parameters as well as the sensitivity of the PBR size and mass (a major system component) to variations in these parameters. Thus, system optimization can be achieved.

  20. Liquid-poison type power controlling device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Tetsuo; Yamanari, Shozo; Sugisaki, Toshihiko; Goto, Hiroshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the safety and the operability of a nuclear reactor by adjusting the density of liquid poison. Constitution: The thermal expansion follow-up failure between cladding and a pellet upon abrupt and local variations of the power is avoided by adjusting the density of liquid poison during ordinary operation in combination with a high density liquid poison tank and a filter and smoothly controlling the reactor power through a pipe installed in the reactor core. The high density liquid poison is abruptly charged in to the reactor core under relatively low pressure through the tube installed in the reactor core at the time of control rod insertion failure in an accident, thereby effectively shutting down the reactor and improving the safety and the operability of the reactor. (Yoshihara, H.)

  1. Reconstruction calculation of pin power for ship reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Haofeng; Shang Xueli; Chen Wenzhen; Wang Qiao

    2010-01-01

    Aiming at the limitation of the software that pin power distribution for ship reactor core was unavailable, the calculation model and method of the axial and radial pin power distribution were proposed. Reconstruction calculations of pin power along axis and radius was carried out by bicubic and bilinear interpolation and cubic spline interpolation, respectively. The results were compared with those obtained by professional reactor physical soft with fine mesh difference. It is shown that our reconstruction calculation of pin power is simple and reliable as well as accurate, which provides an important theoretic base for the safety analysis and operating administration of the ship nuclear reactor. (authors)

  2. Microgrids: Reliable power in a small package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krotz, D.

    2003-01-01

    A new approach to power generation in which a cluster of small, on-site generators serve office buildings, industrial parks and homes, is being developed by scientists at the University of California's Berkeley Campus. Called microgrid, the system may well be the answer to satisfying the growing thirst for electricity without the danger of overburdening the aging transmission lines, or building 1,000 new power plants that would be required to meet the ever-growing demand. The new approach relies on small generators such as ordinary reciprocating engines, microturbines, fuel cells, and photovoltaic systems. This microgrid of small generators appears to the main grid as just an ordinary customer. When the grid offers cheap electricity, the microgrid can purchase it, but when prices rise, or when there is a power failure, the microgrid can isolate itself, ensuring uninterrupted power to critical equipment such as computers, communications infrastructure and control systems. The idea is that if sensitive equipment can be powered locally, the vulnerable centralized power system becomes much less critical. The microgrid could be powered by recovered waste heat, a currently wasted by-product of power generation. Waste heat could also cool and dehumidify buildings using thermally activated processes. Microgrids also have the potential to introduce real competition into the electricity market by offering customers a choice; this is expected to have the effect of imposing competitive discipline on power companies. To extend the potential even farther, it is considered well within the realm of possibility that by introducing fuel cell-powered cars into the microgrid, the car could be used as a source of power by simply parking it and plugging it in to supply electricity to the home or the office

  3. Radiological characterization for small type light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Ken-ichi; Ichige, Hideaki; Tanabe, Hidenori

    2011-01-01

    In order to plan a decommissioning, amount investigation of waste materials and residual radioactivity inventory evaluation must be performed at the first stage of preparatory tasks. These tasks are called radiological characterization. Reliable information from radiological characterization is crucial for specification of decommissioning plan. With the information, we can perform radiological safety analysis and optimize decommissioning scenario. Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) has already started preparatory tasks for Tsuruga Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 (TS-1) that is the first commercial Small Type Light Water Reactor in Japan. To obtain reliable information about residual radioactivity inventory, we improved radioactivity inventory evaluation procedure. The procedure consists of neutron flux distribution calculation and radioactivity distribution calculation. We need a better understanding about characteristics of neutron transport phenomena in order to obtain reliable neutron flux distribution. Neutron flux was measured in Primary Containment Vessel (PCV) at 30 locations using activation foils. We chose locations where characteristic phenomena can be observed. Three dimensional (3D) neutron flux calculation was also performed to simulate continuous changes of neutron flux distribution. By assessing both the measured values and 3D calculation results, we could perform the calculation that simulates the phenomena well. We got knowledge about how to perform an appropriate neutron flux distribution calculation and also became able to calculate a reliable neutron flux distribution. Using the neutron flux distribution, we can estimate a reliable radioactivity distribution. We applied network-parallel-computing method to the estimation. And further we developed 'flux level approximation method' which use linear or parabola fitting method to estimation. Using these new methods, radioactivity by neutron irradiation, which is radioisotope formation, was calculated at

  4. Nuclear reactor power control system based on flexibility model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Gang; Zhao Fuyu; Li Chong; Tai Yun

    2011-01-01

    Design the nuclear reactor power control system in this paper to cater to a nonlinear nuclear reactor. First, calculate linear power models at five power levels of the reactor as five local models and design controllers of the local models as local controllers. Every local controller consists of an optimal controller contrived by the toolbox of Optimal Controller Designer (OCD) and a proportion-integration-differentiation (PID) controller devised via Genetic Algorithm (GA) to set parameters of the PID controller. According to the local models and controllers, apply the principle of flexibility model developed in the paper to obtain the flexibility model and the flexibility controller at every power level. Second, the flexibility model and the flexibility controller at a level structure the power control system of this level. The set of the whole power control systems corresponding to global power levels is to approximately carry out the power control of the reactor. Finally, the nuclear reactor power control system is simulated. The simulation result shows that the idea of flexibility model is feasible and the nuclear reactor power control system is effective. (author)

  5. Program of RA reactor start-up to nominal power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    The zero start-up program is followed by the program of RA reactor start-up to nominal power. This program is described in detail and includes the following measurements: radiation characteristics at the exit of the channels; gamma and fast neutron dose distribution in the reactor; influence of absorbers on the reactivity; temperature effect; absolute flux and calibration of ionization chambers; xenon effect; thermal and hydraulics; dosimetry around the reactor; neutron flux in the reactor core and in the reactor hall; heavy water level; thermal characteristics after shutdown. A list of measuring devices and instrumentation is included with the detailed action plan and list of responsible staff members

  6. Simulation of decreasing reactor power level with BWR simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwoto; Zuhair; Rivai, Abu Khalid

    2002-01-01

    Study on characteristic of BWR using Desktop PC Based Simulator Program was analysed. This simulator is more efficient and cheaper for analyzing of characteristic and dynamic respond than full scope simulator for decreasing power level of BW. Dynamic responses of BWR reactor was investigated during the power level reduction from 100% FP (Full Power) which is 3926 MWth to 0% FP with 25% steps and 1 % FP/sec rate. The overall results for core flow rate, reactor steam flow, feed-water flow and turbine-generator power show tendency proportional to reduction of reactor power. This results show that reactor power control in BWR could be done by control of re-circulation flow that alter the density of water used as coolant and moderator. Decreasing the re-circulation flow rate will decrease void density which has negative reactivity and also affect the position of control rods

  7. Power exhaust by impurity seeding in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernert, Matthias; Kallenbach, Arne; Dux, Ralph; Wischmeier, Marco [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Reimold, Felix [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, IEK, Juelich (Germany); Lipschultz, Bruce [University of York, York Plasma Institute, Heslington, York (United Kingdom); Collaboration: the ASDEX Upgrade team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-07-01

    Power exhaust is one of the big challenges for future fusion reactors. The power load at the divertor targets, the primary plasma-wall interaction zone, would exceed material limits and, thus, must be reduced. Therefore, 90% of the exhaust power needs to be dissipated and the divertor is anticipated to be in the detached regime, where the interaction of the plasma with the wall is significantly reduced. Radiation is the dominant dissipation process and is increased by impurity seeding. The radiation distribution can be tailored by using different seed impurities (N for radiation outside, Ne and Ar for radiation at the edge of and Kr for radiation inside the confined region). The tailoring of the radiation profile is required in order to maximize the radiated power and at the same time minimize the impact on the energy confinement. Recent experiments with intense impurity seeding at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak demonstrate operation at highest heat fluxes and detached divertor targets at radiated power fractions of up to 90%. In these scenarios the radiation originates predominantly from the confined region and leads to an unexpectedly small confinement reduction.

  8. Analysis of a small Fast Sodium Reactor concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilberti, Mauricio, E-mail: mgilber@eletronuclear.gov.br [Eletrobrás Termonuclear S.A. (ELETRONUCLEAR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Velasquez, Carlos E.; Vargas, Matheus L.; Martins, Felipe; Costa, Antonella L.; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the analyses and initial results of a Small Fast Sodium Reactor (SFSR) simulated using MCNPX. The goal is to build a nuclear model and determine the main core neutronic parameters over the cycle. Neutronics parameters such as burnup neutronic behavior, depletion fuel composition, absorbing elements, core reactivity control and reactivity coefficients that affect the reactor cooled by sodium along its operation cycle have been analyzed. The parameters are evaluated in terms of the reactivity coefficients at different cycle stages. The results present a comparison and discussion of the differences found between the model developed and some information available in the literature for a similar project. (author)

  9. Power start up of the Dalat nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Duy Hien; Ngo Quang Huy; Vu Hai Long; Tran Khanh Mai

    1994-01-01

    After accomplishing the physical start-up of the reactor, the power start-up was carried out in February 1984. The power of the reactor has reached: 10 KW on 6/2/1984, 100 KW on 7/2/1984, 200 KW and 300 KW on 8/2/1984; 400 KW and nominal power 500 KW on 9/2/1984. The reactivity temperature coefficient and the xenon poisoning were determined. 3 figs., 12 tabs

  10. Nonlinear analysis on power reactor dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, H.; Hayashi, K.

    1997-01-01

    We have shown that the origin of intermittent oscillation observed in a BWR can be ascribed to the couplings among the spatial modes starting from a non-linear center manifold equation with a delay-time and a spatial diffusion. We can reduce the problem to the stochastic coupled van der Pol oscillators with non-linear coupling term. This non-linear coupling term plays an important role to break the symmetry of the system and the non-linear damping of the system. The phenomenological generalization of van der Pol oscillator coupled by the linear diffusion term is not appropriate for describing the nuclear power reactors. However, one must start from the coupled partial differential equations by taking into account the two energy group neutrons, the thermo-hydraulic equations including two-phase flow. In this case, the diffusion constant must be a complex number as is demonstrated in a previous paper. The results will be reported in the near future. (J.P.N.)

  11. Identification of Selected Areas to Support Federal Clean Energy Goals Using Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, Randy [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P [ORNL

    2013-12-01

    This analysis identifies candidate locations, in a broad sense, where there are high concentrations of federal government agency use of electricity, which are also suitable areas for near-term SMRs. Near-term SMRs are based on light-water reactor (LWR) technology with compact design features that are expected to offer a host of safety, siting, construction, and economic benefits. These smaller plants are ideally suited for small electric grids and for locations that cannot support large reactors, thus providing utilities or governement entities with the flexibility to scale power production as demand changes by adding additional power by deploying more modules or reactors in phases. This research project is aimed at providing methodologies, information, and insights to assist the federal government in meeting federal clean energy goals.

  12. Guidance for preparing user requirements documents for small and medium reactors and their application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    During the past decade, several countries with highly developed nuclear power programs established user required documents (URDs) to guide the development and implementation of advanced light water reactors. These efforts built upon the extensive experience with operating reactors and included new insights from ongoing research and development to enhance the economic performance and safety of future nuclear power plants. Subsequently, a number of developing countries with plans for introducing nuclear energy into their national programs expressed strong interest in establishing analogous requirements. The IAEA has therefore taken the initiative to assist in the elaboration of such requirements. Building upon relevant documents this report recommends a URD structure and content outline to support developing countries in preparing their URDs for various applications of small and medium reactors (e.g. electricity generation and/or desalination). This report was prepared by representatives from both developing and developed Member States

  13. Unitary theory of xenon instability in nuclear thermal reactors - 1. Reactor at 'zero power'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novelli, A.

    1982-01-01

    The question of nuclear thermal-reactor instability against xenon oscillations is widespread in the literature, but most theories, concerned with such an argument, contradict each other and, above all, they conflict with experimentally-observed instability at very low reactor power, i.e. without any power feedback. It is shown that, in any nuclear thermal reactor, xenon instability originates at very low power levels, and a very general stability condition is deduced by an extension of the rigorous, simple and powerful reduction of the Nyquist criterion, first performed by F. Storrer. (author)

  14. Nuclear Power Reactors in the World. 2013 Ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Power Reactors in the World is an annual publication that presents the most recent data pertaining to nuclear power reactors in IAEA Member States. This thirty-third edition of Reference Data Series No. 2 provides a detailed comparison of various statistics through 31 December 2012. The tables and figures contain the following information: - General statistics on nuclear reactors in IAEA Member States; - Technical data on specific reactors that are either planned, under construction or operational, or that have been shut down or decommissioned; - Performance data on reactors operating in IAEA Member States, as reported to the IAEA. The data compiled in this publication is a product of the IAEA's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS). The PRIS database is a comprehensive source of data on all nuclear power reactors in the world. It includes specification and performance history data on operational reactors as well as on reactors under construction or in the decommissioning process. The IAEA collects data through designated national correspondents in Member States

  15. Nuclear Power Reactors in the World. 2014 Ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Power Reactors in the World is an annual publication that presents the most recent data pertaining to nuclear power reactors in IAEA Member States. This thirty-fourth edition of Reference Data Series No. 2 provides a detailed comparison of various statistics up to and including 31 December 2013. The tables and figures contain the following information: — General statistics on nuclear reactors in IAEA Member States; — Technical data on specific reactors that are either planned, under construction or operational, or that have been shut down or decommissioned; — Performance data on reactors operating in IAEA Member States, as reported to the IAEA. The data compiled in this publication is a product of the IAEA’s Power Reactor Information System (PRIS). The PRIS database is a comprehensive source of data on all nuclear power reactors in the world. It includes specification and performance history data on operational reactors as well as on reactors under construction or in the decommissioning process. The IAEA collects this data through designated national correspondents in Member States

  16. Power reactor noise measurements in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallagi, D.; Horanyi, S.; Hargitai, T.

    1975-01-01

    An outline is given of the history of reactor noise research in Hungary. A brief description is given of studies in the WWR-SM reactor, a modified version of the original WWR-S thermal reactor, for the detection of in-core simulated boiling by analysis of the noise of out-of-core ionization chambers. Coolant velocity measurements by transit time analysis of temperature fluctuations are described. (U.K.)

  17. Safety studies concerning nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly, Jean; Pelce, Jacques

    1980-01-01

    The safety of nuclear installations poses different technical problems, whether concerning pressurized water reactors or fast reactors. But investigating methods are closely related and concern, on the one hand, the behavior of shields placed between fuel and outside and, on the other, analysis of accidents. The article is therefore in two parts based on the same plan. Concerning light water reactors, the programme of studies undertaken in France accounts for the research carried out in countries where collaboration agreements exist. Concerning fast reactors, France has the initiative of their studies owing to her technical advance, which explains the great importance of the programmes under way [fr

  18. THE IMPACT OF POWER COEFFICIENT OF REACTIVITY ON CANDU 6 REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. KASTANYA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of reactivity coefficients, along with other core nuclear characteristics, determine reactor core behavior in normal operation and accident conditions. The Power Coefficient of Reactivity (PCR is an aggregate indicator representing the change in reactor core reactivity per unit change in reactor power. It is an integral quantity which captures the contributions of the fuel temperature, coolant void, and coolant temperature reactivity feedbacks. All nuclear reactor designs provide a balance between their inherent nuclear characteristics and the engineered reactivity control features, to ensure that changes in reactivity under all operating conditions are maintained within a safe range. The CANDU® reactor design takes advantage of its inherent nuclear characteristics, namely a small magnitude of reactivity coefficients, minimal excess reactivity, and very long prompt neutron lifetime, to mitigate the demand on the engineered systems for controlling reactivity and responding to accidents. In particular, CANDU reactors have always taken advantage of the small value of the PCR associated with their design characteristics, such that the overall design and safety characteristics of the reactor are not sensitive to the value of the PCR. For other reactor design concepts a PCR which is both large and negative is an important aspect in the design of their engineered systems for controlling reactivity. It will be demonstrated that during Loss of Regulation Control (LORC and Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident (LBLOCA events, the impact of variations in power coefficient, including a hypothesized larger than estimated PCR, has no safety-significance for CANDU reactor design. Since the CANDU 6 PCR is small, variations in the range of values for PCR on the performance or safety of the reactor are not significant.

  19. Comparative Study on Cyber Securities between Power Reactor and Research Reactor with Bayesian Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jinsoo; Heo, Gyunyoung; Son, Han Seong

    2016-01-01

    The Stuxnet has shown that nuclear facilities are no more safe from cyber-attack. Due to practical experiences and concerns on increasing of digital system application, cyber security has become the important issue in nuclear industry. Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and control (KINAC) published a regulatory standard (KINAC/RS-015) to establish cyber security framework for nuclear facilities. However, it is difficult to research about cyber security. It is hard to quantify cyber-attack which has malicious activity which is different from existing design basis accidents (DBAs). We previously proposed a methodology on development of a cyber security risk model with BBN. However, the methodology had a limitation in which the input data as prior information was solely on expert opinions. In this study, we propose a cyber security risk model for instrumentation and control (I and C) system of nuclear facilities with some equation for quantification by using Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) in order to overcome the limitation of previous research. The proposed model has been used for comparative study on cyber securities between large-sized nuclear power plants (NPPs) and small-sized Research Reactors (RR). In this study, we proposed the cyber security risk evaluation model with BBN. It includes I and C architecture, which is a target system of cyber-attack, malicious activity, which causes cyber-attack from attacker, and mitigation measure, which mitigates the cyber-attack risk. Likelihood and consequence as prior information are evaluated by considering characteristics of I and C architecture and malicious activity. The BBN model provides posterior information with Bayesian update by adding any of assumed cyber-attack scenarios as evidence. Cyber security risk for nuclear facilities is analyzed by comparing between prior information and posterior information of each node. In this study, we conducted comparative study on cyber securities between power reactor

  20. Comparative Study on Cyber Securities between Power Reactor and Research Reactor with Bayesian Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jinsoo; Heo, Gyunyoung [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Son, Han Seong [Joongbu Univiersity, Geumsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The Stuxnet has shown that nuclear facilities are no more safe from cyber-attack. Due to practical experiences and concerns on increasing of digital system application, cyber security has become the important issue in nuclear industry. Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and control (KINAC) published a regulatory standard (KINAC/RS-015) to establish cyber security framework for nuclear facilities. However, it is difficult to research about cyber security. It is hard to quantify cyber-attack which has malicious activity which is different from existing design basis accidents (DBAs). We previously proposed a methodology on development of a cyber security risk model with BBN. However, the methodology had a limitation in which the input data as prior information was solely on expert opinions. In this study, we propose a cyber security risk model for instrumentation and control (I and C) system of nuclear facilities with some equation for quantification by using Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) in order to overcome the limitation of previous research. The proposed model has been used for comparative study on cyber securities between large-sized nuclear power plants (NPPs) and small-sized Research Reactors (RR). In this study, we proposed the cyber security risk evaluation model with BBN. It includes I and C architecture, which is a target system of cyber-attack, malicious activity, which causes cyber-attack from attacker, and mitigation measure, which mitigates the cyber-attack risk. Likelihood and consequence as prior information are evaluated by considering characteristics of I and C architecture and malicious activity. The BBN model provides posterior information with Bayesian update by adding any of assumed cyber-attack scenarios as evidence. Cyber security risk for nuclear facilities is analyzed by comparing between prior information and posterior information of each node. In this study, we conducted comparative study on cyber securities between power reactor

  1. A method of reactor power decrease by 2DOF control system during BWR power oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Katsuo

    1998-09-01

    Occurrence of power oscillation events caused by void feedback effects in BWRs operated at low-flow and high-power condition has been reported. After thoroughly examining these events, BWRs have been equipped with the SRI (Selected Rod Insertion) system to avoid the power oscillation by decreasing the power under such reactor condition. This report presents a power control method for decreasing the reactor power stably by a two degree of freedom (2DOF) control. Performing a numerical simulation by utilizing a simple reactor dynamics model, it is found that the control system designed attains a satisfactory control performance of power decrease from a viewpoint of setting time and oscillation. (author)

  2. Small high cooling power space cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, T. V.; Raab, J.; Durand, D.; Tward, E. [Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems Redondo Beach, Ca, 90278 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    The small High Efficiency pulse tube Cooler (HEC) cooler, that has been produced and flown on a number of space infrared instruments, was originally designed to provide cooling of 10 W @ 95 K. It achieved its goal with >50% margin when limited by the 180 W output ac power of its flight electronics. It has also been produced in 2 stage configurations, typically for simultaneously cooling of focal planes to temperatures as low as 35 K and optics at higher temperatures. The need for even higher cooling power in such a low mass cryocooler is motivated by the advent of large focal plane arrays. With the current availability at NGAS of much larger power cryocooler flight electronics, reliable long term operation in space with much larger cooling powers is now possible with the flight proven 4 kg HEC mechanical cooler. Even though the single stage cooler design can be re-qualified for those larger input powers without design change, we redesigned both the linear and coaxial version passive pulse tube cold heads to re-optimize them for high power cooling at temperatures above 130 K while rejecting heat to 300 K. Small changes to the regenerator packing, the re-optimization of the tuned inertance and no change to the compressor resulted in the increased performance at 150 K. The cooler operating at 290 W input power achieves 35 W@ 150 K corresponding to a specific cooling power at 150 K of 8.25 W/W and a very high specific power of 72.5 W/Kg. At these powers the cooler still maintains large stroke, thermal and current margins. In this paper we will present the measured data and the changes to this flight proven cooler that were made to achieve this increased performance.

  3. Water turbine technology for small power stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salovaara, T.

    1980-02-01

    The paper examines hydro-power stations and the efficiency and costs of using water turbines to run them. Attention is given to different turbine types emphasizing the use of Kaplan-turbines and runners. Hydraulic characteristics and mechanical properties of low head turbines and small turbines, constructed of fully fabricated steel plate structures, are presented.

  4. A small modular fast reactor as starting point for industrial deployment of fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yoon I.; Lo Pinto, Pierre; Konomura, Mamoru

    2006-01-01

    The current commercial reactors based on light water technology provide 17% of the electricity worldwide owing to their reliability, safety and competitive economics. In the near term, next generation reactors are expected to be evolutionary type, taking benefits of extensive LWR experience feedbacks and further improved economics and safety provisions. For the long term, however, sustainable energy production will be required due to continuous increase of the human activities, environmental concerns such as greenhouse effect and the need of alternatives to fossil fuels as long term energy resources. Therefore, future generation commercial reactors should meet some criteria of sustainability that the current generation cannot fully satisfy. In addition to the current objectives of economics and safety, waste management, resource extension and public acceptance become other major objectives among the sustainability criteria. From this perspective, two questions can be raised: what reactor type can meet the sustainability criteria, and how to proceed to an effective deployment in harmony with the high reliability and availability of the current nuclear reactor fleet. There seems to be an international consensus that the fast spectrum reactor, notably the sodium-cooled system is most promising to meet all of the long term sustainability criteria. As for the latter, we propose a small modular fast reactor project could become a base to prepare the industrial infrastructure. The paper has the following contents: - Introduction; - SMFR project; - Core design; - Supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycle; - Near-term reference plant; - Advanced designs; - Conclusions. To summarize, the sodium-cooled fast reactor is currently recognized as the technology of choice for the long term nuclear energy expansion, but some research and development are required to optimize and validate advanced design solutions. A small modular fast reactor can satisfy some existing near-term market niche

  5. Effect of ship motions and flow stability in a small marine reactor driven by natural circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoritsune, Tsutomu; Ishida, Toshihisa

    2001-12-01

    By using a small reactor as a power source for investigations and developments under sea, widely expanded activity is expectable. In this case, as for a nuclear reactor, small-size and lightweightness, and simplification of a system are needed with the safety. In JAERI, very small reactors for submersible research vessel (Deep-sea Reactor DRX and submersible Compact Reactor SCR) have been designed on the basis of needs investigation of sea research. Although the reactor is a PWR type, self-pressurization and natural circulation system are adopted in a primary system for small size and lightweightness. The fluid flow condition of the reactor core outlet is designed to be the two-phase with a low quality. Although the flow of a primary system is the two-phase flow with a low quality, the density wave oscillation may occur according to operating conditions. Moreover, since there are ship motions of heaving (the vertical direction acceleration) etc., when a submersible research vessel navigates on the sea surface, the circulation flow of the primary system is directly influenced by this external force. In order to maintain stable operations of the reactor, it is necessary to clarify effects of the flow stability characteristic of the primary coolant system and the external force. Until now, as for the flow stability of a nuclear reactor itself, many research reports have been published including the nuclear-coupled thermal oscillation of BWRs such as LaSalle-2, WNP-2 etc. As for the effect of external force, it is reported that the acceleration change based on a seismic wave affects the reactor core flow and the reactor power in a BWR. On the other hand, also in a PWR, since adoption of natural circulation cooling is considered for a generation 4 reactor, it is thought that the margin of the reactor core flow stability becomes an important parameter in the design. The reactor coolant flow mentioned in this report is the two-phase natural circulation flow coupled with

  6. Some particular aspects of control in nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vathaire, F. de; Vernier, Ph.; Pascouet, A.

    1964-01-01

    This paper reviews the experience acquired in France on the question, of reactor safety. Since a special paper is being presented on reactors of the graphite gas type, the safety of the other types studied in France is discussed here: - heavy water-gas reactors, - fast neutron reactors, - water research reactors of the swimming-pool and tank types. The safety rules peculiar to the different types are explained, with emphasis on their influence on the reactor designs and on the power limits they impose. The corresponding safety studies are presented, particular stress being placed on the original work developed in these fields. Special mention is made of the experimental systems constructed for these studies: the reactor CABRI, pile loop for depressurization tests, loops outside the pile, mock-ups etc. (authors) [fr

  7. Passive safe small reactor for distributed energy supply system sited in water filled pit at seaside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Toshihisa; Imayoshi, Shou

    2003-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has developed a Passive Safe Small Reactor for Distributed Energy Supply System (PSRD) concept. The PSRD is an integrated-type PWR with reactor thermal power of 100 to 300 MW aimed at supplying electricity, district heating, etc. In design of the PSRD, high priority is laid on enhancement of safety as well as improvement of economy. Safety is enhanced by the following means: i) Extreme reduction of pipes penetrating the reactor vessel, by limiting to only those of the steam, the feed water and the safety valves, ii) Adoption of the water filled containment and the passive safety systems with fluid driven by natural circulation force, and iii) Adoption of the in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism, accompanying a passive reactor shut-down device. For improvement of economy, simplification of the reactor system and long operation of the core over five years without refueling with low enriched UO 2 fuel rods are achieved. To avoid releasing the radioactive materials to the circumstance even if a hypothetical accident, the containment is submerged in a pit filled with seawater at a seaside. Refueling or maintenance of the reactor can be conducted using an exclusive barge instead of the reactor building. (author)

  8. Damage of fuel assembly premature changing in a power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudik, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    Material balance, including energy recovery and nuclear fuel flow rate, under conditions of premature FA extraction from power reactor is considered. It is shown that in cases when before and after FA extraction reactor operates not under optimal conditions damage of FA premature changing is proportional to the first degree of fuel incomplete burning. If normal operating conditions of reactor or its operation after FA changing is optimal, the damage is proportional to the square of fuel incomplete burning

  9. The next generation of power reactors - safety characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modro, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The next generation of commercial nuclear power reactors is characterized by a new approach to achieving reliability of their safety systems. In contrast to current generation reactors, these designs apply passive safety features that rely on gravity-driven transfer processes or stored energy, such as gas-pressurized accumulators or electric batteries. This paper discusses the passive safety system of the AP600 and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) designs

  10. Design characteristics of research zero power fast reactor Lasta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, M.; Stefanovic, D.; Pesic, M.; Nikolic, D.; Antic, D.; Zavaljevski, N.; Popovic, D.

    1990-01-01

    LASTA is a flexible zero power reactor with uranium and plutonium fuel designed for research in the neutron physics and in the fast reactor physics. Safety considerations and experimental flexibility led to the choice of a fixed vertical assembly with two safety blocks as the main safety elements, so that safety devices would be operated by gravity. The neutron and reactor physics, the control and safety philosophy adopted in our design, are described in this paper. Developed computer programs are presented. (author)

  11. Radiation embrittlement in pressure vessels of power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempf, Rodolfo; Fortis, Ana M.

    2007-01-01

    It is presented the project to study the effect of lead factors on the mechanical behavior of Reactor Pressure Vessel steels. It is described the facility designed to irradiate Charpy specimens with V notch of SA-508 type 3 steel at power reactor temperature, installed in the RA-1 reactor. The objective is to obtain the fracture behavior of irradiated specimens with different lead factors and to know their dependence with the diffusion of alloy elements. (author) [es

  12. Nuclear power reactors in the world. April 2005 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This is the twenty-fifth edition of Reference Data Series No. 2, Nuclear Power Reactors in the World, which is published once per year, to present the most recent reactor data available to the Agency. It contains the following summarized information: - General information as of the end of 2004 on power reactors operating or under construction, and shut down; - Performance data on reactors operating in the Agency's Member States, as reported to the IAEA. The information is collected by the Agency by circulating questionnaires to Member States through the designated national correspondents. The replies are used to maintain computerized files on general and design data of, and operating experience with, power reactors. The Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) comprising the above files provides all the information and data previously published in the Agency's Power Reactors in Member States and currently published in the Agency's Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States and available at the Internet address http://www.iaea.org/programmes/a2

  13. Status report on nuclear reactors for space electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.

    1978-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is studying reactor power plants for space applications in the late 1980s and 1990s. The study is concentrating on high-temperature, compact, fast reactors that can be coupled with various radiation shielding systems and thermoelectric, dynamic, or thermionic electric power conversion systems, depending on the mission. Increased questions have been raised about safety since the COSMOS 954 incident. High orbits (above 400 to 500 nautical miles) have sufficient lifetimes to allow radioactive elements to decay to safe levels. The major proposed applications for satellites with reactors in Earth orbit are in geosynchronous orbit (19,400 nautical miles). In missions at geosynchronous orbit where orbital lifetimes are practically indefinite, the safety considerations are negligible. The potential missions, why reactors are being considered as a prime power candidate, reactor features, and safety considerations are discussed

  14. A small-scale modular reactor for electric source for remote places

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    Use of a small-scale modular reactor (SMR) as an electric source for remote places is one of scenarios for actual use of SMR parallel to alternative source of present nuclear power stations and co-generation source at urban suburbs, there is not only an actual experience to construct and operate for power source for military use in U.S.A. on 1950s to 1960s, but also four nuclear reactors (LWGR, 12 MW) in Vilyvino Nuclear Power Station in far northern district in Russia are under operation. Recently, Department of Energy in U.S.A. prepared the 'Report to Congress on Small Modular Nuclear Reactors' evaluating on feasibility of SMR as a power source for remote places according to requirement of the Congress. This report evaluated a feasibility study on nine SMRs in the world with 10 to 50 MW of output as electric source for remote places on economical efficiency and so on, together with analysis of their design concepts, to conclude that 'they could perform beginning of operations on 2000s because of no large technical problems and keeping a level capable of competing with power generation cost at remote place on its present economical efficiency'. Here was introduced on outlines of this report. (G.K.)

  15. Calculation device for fuel power history in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakagami, Masaharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable calculations for power history and various variants of power change in the power history of fuels in a BWR type reactor or the like. Constitution: The outputs of the process computation for the nuclear reactor by a process computer are stored and the reactor core power distribution is judged from the calculated values for the reactor core power distribution based on the stored data. Data such as for thermal power, core flow rate, control rod position and power distribution are recorded where the changes in the power distribution exceed a predetermined amount, and data such as for thermal power and core flow rate are recorded where the changes are within the level of the predetermined amount, as effective data excluding unnecessary data. Accordingly, the recorded data are taken out as required and the fuel power history and the various variants in the fuel power are calculated and determined in a calculation device for fuel power history and variants for fuel power fluctuation. (Furukawa, Y.)

  16. Containment vessel construction for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulzer, H.D.; Coletti, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear containment vessel houses an inner reactor housing structure whose outer wall is closely spaced from the inner wall of the containment vessel. The inner reactor housing structure is divided by an intermediate floor providing an upper chamber for housing the reactor and associated steam generators and a lower chamber directly therebeneath containing a pressure suppression pool. Communication between the upper chamber and the pressure suppression pool is established by conduits extending through the intermediate floor which terminate beneath the level of the pressure suppression pool and by inlet openings in the reactor housing wall beneath the level of the pressure suppression pool which communicate with the annulus formed between the outer wall of the reactor housing structure and the inner wall of the containment vessel. (Official Gazette)

  17. Technical and economic studies of small reactors for supply of electricity and steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiewak, I.; Klepper, O.H.; Fuller, L.C.

    1977-02-01

    Several years ago conventional opinion held that nuclear power plants must be very large to be competitive with fossil fuels. This situation has changed markedly in most countries within recent years, as oil and gas supplies have become more scarce and costly. Studies have been carried out for several nuclear steam supply systems in the small and intermediate size range. Detail studies are reported of the Consolidated Nuclear Steam Generator (CNSG), a 365 MW(th) pressurized water reactor being developed by Babcock and Wilcox, as applied to industrial energy needs. Both conventional and barge-mounted nuclear steam supply systems are considered. Conceptual studies have been started of pressurized and boiling water reactors in the range of 1000 MW(th), which are envisioned for utility operation for supply of electric power and steam. Design studies of a 500 MW(th) high temperature reactor are also reported. The small reactors are expected to have higher unit costs than the large commercial plants, but to have compensating advantages in higher plant availability, shorter construction schedule, and greater siting flexibility. Studies are also reported of power cycle parameters and cost allocations for extraction of steam from steam turbine plants. This steam could be used for industrial energy, district heating, or desalination

  18. Technical and economic studies of small reactors for supply of electricity and steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiewak, I.; Klepper, O.H.; Fuller, L.C.

    1977-01-01

    Several years ago conventional opinion held that nuclear power plants must be very large to be competitive with fossil fuels. This situation has changed markedly in most countries within recent years, as oil and gas supplies have become more scarce and costly. Studies have been carried out of several nuclear steam supply systems in the small and intermediate size range. Detail studies are reported of the Consolidated Nuclear Steam Generator (CNSG), a 313 MW(t) pressurized water reactor being developed by Babcock and Wilcox, as applied to industrial energy needs. Both conventional and barge-mounted nuclear steam supply systems are considered. Conceptual studies have been started of pressurized and boiling water reactors in the range of 1000 MW(t), which are envisioned for utility operation for supply of electric power and steam. Design studies of a 500 MW(t) high temperature reactor are also reported. The small reactors are expected to have higher unit costs than the large commercial plants, but to have compensating advantages in higher plant availability, shorter construction schedule and greater siting flexibility. Studies are also reported of power cycle parameters and cost allocations for extraction of steam from steam turbine plants. This steam could be used for industrial energy, district heating or desalination

  19. Multi-unit Operations in Non-Nuclear Systems: Lessons Learned for Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; DAgostino, A.

    2012-01-17

    The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. Small modular reactors (SMRs) are one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants and may be operated quite differently. One difference is that multiple units may be operated by a single crew (or a single operator) from one control room. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is examining the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of SMRs to support licensing reviews. While we reviewed information on SMR designs to obtain information, the designs are not completed and all of the design and operational information is not yet available. Nor is there information on multi-unit operations as envisioned for SMRs available in operating experience. Thus, to gain a better understanding of multi-unit operations we sought the lesson learned from non-nuclear systems that have experience in multi-unit operations, specifically refineries, unmanned aerial vehicles and tele-intensive care units. In this paper we report the lessons learned from these systems and the implications for SMRs.

  20. Technical and economic studies of small reactors for supply of electricity and steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiewak, I.; Klepper, O.H.; Fuller, L.C.

    1977-01-01

    Several years ago conventional opinion held that nuclear power plants must be very large to be competitive with fossil fuels. This situation has changed markedly in most countries within recent years, as oil and gas supplies have become more scarce and costly. Studies have been carried out of several nuclear steam supply systems in the small and intermediate size range. Detail studies are reported of the Consolidated Nuclear Steam Generator (CNSG), a 313MW(th) pressurized water reactor being developed by Babcock and Wilcox, as applied to industrial energy needs. Both conventional and barge-mounted nuclear steam supply systems are considered. Conceptual studies have been started of pressurized and boiling water reactors in the range of 1000MW(th), which are envisioned for utility operation for supply of electric power and steam. Design studies of a 500MW(th) high temperature reactor are also reported. The small reactors are expected to have higher unit costs than the large commercial plants, but to have compensating advantages in higher plant availability, shorter construction schedule and greater siting flexibility. Studies are also reported of power cycle parameters and cost allocations for extraction of steam from steam turbine plants. This steam could be used for industrial energy, district heating or desalination. (author)