WorldWideScience

Sample records for small expendable deployer

  1. Sensitivity Analysis of ProSEDS (Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System) Data Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Nohpill; Reagan, Shawn; Franks, Greg; Jones, William G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses analytical approaches to evaluating performance of Spacecraft On-Board Computing systems, thereby ultimately achieving a reliable spacecraft data communications systems. The sensitivity analysis approach of memory system on the ProSEDS (Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System) as a part of its data communication system will be investigated. Also, general issues and possible approaches to reliable Spacecraft On-Board Interconnection Network and Processor Array will be shown. The performance issues of a spacecraft on-board computing systems such as sensitivity, throughput, delay and reliability will be introduced and discussed.

  2. Thermal Orbital Environmental Parameter Study on the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) Using Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, John R.; McConnaughey, Paul K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The natural thermal environmental parameters used on the Space Station Program (SSP 30425) were generated by the Space Environmental Effects Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) utilizing extensive data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), a series of satellites which measured low earth orbit (LEO) albedo and outgoing long-wave radiation. Later, this temporal data was presented as a function of averaging times and orbital inclination for use by thermal engineers in NASA Technical Memorandum TM 4527. The data was not presented in a fashion readily usable by thermal engineering modeling tools and required knowledge of the thermal time constants and infrared versus solar spectrum sensitivity of the hardware being analyzed to be used properly. Another TM was recently issued as a guideline for utilizing these environments (NASA/TM-2001-211221) with more insight into the utilization by thermal analysts. This paper gives a top-level overview of the environmental parameters presented in the TM and a study of the effects of implementing these environments on an ongoing MSFC project, the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS), compared to conventional orbital parameters that had been historically used.

  3. Structural Analysis of Components of the Students for the Exploration and Development of Space Satellite (SEDSAT) for the Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) Project Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, Gary A.

    1998-01-01

    During the time frame allocated by the delivery order, members of the UAH Applied Research Program, with the cooperation of representatives from NASA investigated and conducted stress analysis of the SEDSAT1 satellite. The main area of concern was with the design of the deployable 10 m antennas. The placement of the holes for the antenna door hinge pin was too close to the edge of the antenna canister. Because of the load placed on the hinge pin, the stress analysis of this area suggested that more space would be needed between the holes and the edge of the material. Due to other conflicts, SEDSATI was removed from flying on the space shuttle and moved to the Delta Launch Vehicle. This changed many of the design requirements for the mounting and deployment of the satellite that forced a new design for the satellite. Once this happened, the stress analysis became obsolete, and the task was concluded.

  4. Advanced Deployable Structural Systems for Small Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Straubel, Marco; Wilkie, W. Keats; Zander, Martin E.; Fernandez, Juan M.; Hillebrandt, Martin F.

    2016-01-01

    One of the key challenges for small satellites is packaging and reliable deployment of structural booms and arrays used for power, communication, and scientific instruments. The lack of reliable and efficient boom and membrane deployment concepts for small satellites is addressed in this work through a collaborative project between NASA and DLR. The paper provides a state of the art overview on existing spacecraft deployable appendages, the special requirements for small satellites, and initial concepts for deployable booms and arrays needed for various small satellite applications. The goal is to enhance deployable boom predictability and ground testability, develop designs that are tolerant of manufacturing imperfections, and incorporate simple and reliable deployment systems.

  5. Small cell networks deployment, management, and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Claussen, Holger; Ho, Lester; Razavi, Rouzbeh; Kucera, Stepan

    2018-01-01

    Small Cell Networks: Deployment, Management, and Optimization addresses key problems of the cellular network evolution towards HetNets. It focuses on the latest developments in heterogeneous and small cell networks, as well as their deployment, operation, and maintenance. It also covers the full spectrum of the topic, from academic, research, and business to the practice of HetNets in a coherent manner. Additionally, it provides complete and practical guidelines to vendors and operators interested in deploying small cells. The first comprehensive book written by well-known researchers and engineers from Nokia Bell Labs, Small Cell Networks begins with an introduction to the subject--offering chapters on capacity scaling and key requirements of future networks. It then moves on to sections on coverage and capacity optimization, and interference management. From there, the book covers mobility management, energy efficiency, and small cell deployment, ending with a section devoted to future trends and applicat...

  6. Tether Deployer And Brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Joseph A.; Alexander, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    Design concept promises speed, control, and reliability. Scheme for deploying tether provides for fast, free, and snagless payout and fast, dependable braking. Developed for small, expendable tethers in outer space, scheme also useful in laying transoceanic cables, deploying guidance wires to torpedoes and missiles, paying out rescue lines from ship to ship via rockets, deploying antenna wires, releasing communication and power cables to sonobuoys and expendable bathythermographs, and in reeling out lines from fishing rods.

  7. Energy-expending behaviour in frightened caribou when dispersed singly or in small bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Blehr

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of single, and small bands of caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus when confronted by humans was compared with the energy—saving behaviour zoologists have ascribed to caribou in encounters with non-hunting wolves (Canis lupus. When confronted by me, or upon getting my scent, caribou ran away on all occasions. Their flight was occasionally interrupted by short stops to look back in my direction, but would continue on all occasions until they were out of sight. This behaviour is inconsistent with the one ascribed to caribou by zoologists when the intruder is a wolf instead of a human. In their view, the caribou stop their flight soon after the wolf gives up the chase, and accordingly save energy owing to their ability to distinguish between hunting and non-hunting wolves. However, small bands of caribou, as well as single animals, have never been observed to behave in this manner. On the contrary, the behaviour of caribou in such encounters is known to follow the same pattern as in their encounters with humans. Energy—saving behaviour is, however, sometimes observed when caribou become inquisitive about something in their surroundings. They will then readily approach as well as try to get down-wind of the object. When the object does not induce fear, it may simply be ignored, or charged before the caribou calm down. The effect of this "confirming behaviour" is that energy which would otherwise have been spent in needless flights from non-predators is saved.

  8. Problems in the Deployment of Learning Networks In Small Organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shankle, Dean E.; Shankle, Jeremy P.

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Shankle, D.E., & Shankle, J.P. (2006). Problems in the Deployment of Learning Networks In Small Organizations. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, TENCompetence Conference. March 30th-31st, Sofia, Bulgaria:

  9. Deployment Plan for Small Roving Annulus Inspection Vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minichan, R.

    2002-01-01

    The Small Roving Annulus Inspection Vehicle (SRAIV) is a modified commercially available wall crawler designed to supplement the In-Service Inspection (ISI) of Savannah River Site (SRS) Waste tanks. The SRAIV provides an improved capability to achieve a more complete inspection of the tank walls than existing methods. The SRAIV will be deployed through annulus risers in the tank to gain access to tank walls requiring inspection. The SRAIV will be deployed using a manually operated deployment pole and will be coupled to the wall using permanent magnet wheels. Navigation will be performed from the remote console where pictorial views can be displayed from the on-board cameras. The unit will incorporate multiple UT transducers for traditional weld examination. In addition, a specially developed Tandem Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (TSAFT) UT scanning bridge can be attached to provide further investigation of the knuckle region while the vehicle remains on the vertical surface of the tank wall. In summary, the SRAIV will provide features that enhance and expand the capability of the SRS ISI program

  10. Exploring the Deployment Potential of Small Modular Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Ahmed Y.

    This thesis reports the results of several investigations into the viability of an emergent technology. Due to the lack of data in such cases, and the sensitivity surrounding nuclear power, exploring the potential of small modular reactors (SMRs) proved challenging. Moreover, these reactors come in a wide range of sizes and can employ a number of technologies, which made investigating the category as a whole difficult. We started by looking at a subset of SMRs that were the most promising candidates for near to mid-term deployment: integral light water SMRs. We conducted a technically detailed elicitation of expert assessments of their capital costs and construction duration, focusing on five reactor deployment scenarios that involved a large reactor and two light water SMRs. Consistent with the uncertainty introduced by past cost overruns and construction delays, median estimates of the cost of new large plants varied by more than a factor of 2.5. Expert judgments about likely SMR costs displayed an even wider range. There was consensus that an SMR plant's construction duration would be shorter than a large reactor's. Experts identified more affordable unit cost, factory fabrication, and shorter construction schedules as factors that may make light water SMRs economically viable, though these reactors do not constitute a paradigm shift when it comes to nuclear power's safety and security. Using these expert assessments of cost and construction duration, we calculated levelized cost of electricity values for four of the five scenarios. For the large plant, median levelized cost estimates ranged from 56 to 120 per MWh. Median estimates of levelized cost ranged from 77 to 240 per MWh for a 45MWe SMR, and from 65 to 120 per MWh for a 225MWe unit. We concluded that controlling construction duration is important, though not as important a factor in the analysis as capital cost, and, given the price of electricity in some parts of the U.S., it is possible to construct an

  11. A Conceptual Design for a Small Deployer Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbo, S.

    2002-01-01

    industrial partners, has started the development of a space mission, named DeSat, focused on a new highly innovative micro satellite bus for LEO, entirely designed by an integrated team of students and researchers. The first mission is scheduled to fly at the end of 2003 on a converted Russian ICBM. The paper is intended to present the main features of DeSat mission, its goals and the activities that have been done by students and researchers to achieve the micro satellite platform design. The principal payload of the entire system is represented by a recirculating ball screw boom whose mass reaches one third of the total mass budget. The goal of the mission is to demonstrate the validity of its design also for space applications, which may range from precise off platform positioning of devices and instruments to GPS interferometry, sensor measurements and robotics. The satellite geometry, when the boom is in deployed configuration, is so stretched that the name "deployable satellite" has come out naturally. The large deployment mechanism, compared to the small bus, has influenced the design of every satellite subsystem leading to innovative solutions in terms of design, materials, equipment and instruments.

  12. The Inter-Cell Interference Dilemma in Dense Outdoor Small Cell Deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polignano, Michele; Mogensen, Preben; Fotiadis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    The deployment of low-power small cells is envisaged as the main driver to accommodate the mobile broadband traffic growth in cellular networks. Depending on the spatial distribution of the user traffic, a densification of the small cells may be required in confined areas. However, deploying more...... and more cells in given areas may imply an increase of the inter-cell interference among the small cells. This study aims at investigating if the inter-cell interference among outdoor small cells may represent an impairment to the user experience, and evaluates if and in what conditions the interference...... coordination is worthwhile compared to the universal frequency reuse. Results show that the inter-cell interference depends on the small cell deployment in the urban environment (e.g. streets and squares) and on the network load condition. In case of deployment along urban streets, the inter-cell interference...

  13. Knowledge Creation and Deployment in the Small, but Growing, Enterprise and the Psychological Contract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Tony

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains an account of a small scale investigation into the usefulness of the concepts of the learning organisation and organisational learning when seeking to describe the processes of knowledge creation and deployment within the small, but growing, enterprise (SME). A review of the literature reveals a concern that the relationship…

  14. Expendable launch vehicle studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainum, Peter M.; Reiss, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Analytical support studies of expendable launch vehicles concentrate on the stability of the dynamics during launch especially during or near the region of maximum dynamic pressure. The in-plane dynamic equations of a generic launch vehicle with multiple flexible bending and fuel sloshing modes are developed and linearized. The information from LeRC about the grids, masses, and modes is incorporated into the model. The eigenvalues of the plant are analyzed for several modeling factors: utilizing diagonal mass matrix, uniform beam assumption, inclusion of aerodynamics, and the interaction between the aerodynamics and the flexible bending motion. Preliminary PID, LQR, and LQG control designs with sensor and actuator dynamics for this system and simulations are also conducted. The initial analysis for comparison of PD (proportional-derivative) and full state feedback LQR Linear quadratic regulator) shows that the split weighted LQR controller has better performance than that of the PD. In order to meet both the performance and robustness requirements, the H(sub infinity) robust controller for the expendable launch vehicle is developed. The simulation indicates that both the performance and robustness of the H(sub infinity) controller are better than that for the PID and LQG controllers. The modelling and analysis support studies team has continued development of methodology, using eigensensitivity analysis, to solve three classes of discrete eigenvalue equations. In the first class, the matrix elements are non-linear functions of the eigenvector. All non-linear periodic motion can be cast in this form. Here the eigenvector is comprised of the coefficients of complete basis functions spanning the response space and the eigenvalue is the frequency. The second class of eigenvalue problems studied is the quadratic eigenvalue problem. Solutions for linear viscously damped structures or viscoelastic structures can be reduced to this form. Particular attention is paid to

  15. Paving the Way for Small Satellite Access to Orbit: Cyclops' Deployment of SpinSat, the Largest Satellite Ever Deployed from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, Matthew P.; Newswander, Daniel R.; Smith, James P.; Lamb, Craig R.; Ballard, Perry G.

    2015-01-01

    The Space Station Integrated Kinetic Launcher for Orbital Payload Systems (SSIKLOPS), known as "Cyclops" to the International Space Station (ISS) community, successfully deployed the largest satellite ever (SpinSat) from the ISS on November 28, 2014. Cyclops, a collaboration between the NASA ISS Program, NASA Johnson Space Center Engineering, and Department of Defense Space Test Program (DoD STP) communities, is a dedicated 10-100 kg class ISS small satellite deployment system. This paper will showcase the successful deployment of SpinSat from the ISS. It will also outline the concept of operations, interfaces, requirements, and processes for satellites to utilize the Cyclops satellite deployment system.

  16. Thermal analysis with expendable cartridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susaki, K.; Landgraf, F.J.G.

    1981-01-01

    The pratical method of thermal analysis with expendable cartridge and some aspects of its use are presented. The results of the method applied to the system Nb-Mn are presented together with data from microprobe. (Author) [pt

  17. Development and Deployment Strategy for a Small Advanced Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modro, S. Michael; Reith, Raymond; Babka, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses development and deployment strategies for the modular Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR). Modularity, small size, capability to transport whole modules including containment on road or by rail, simplicity and safety of this reactor allows innovative deployment strategies for a variety of applications. A larger plant may be constructed of many independent power generation units. The multi-module plant is intended to be operated as a base-load plant. Each reactor is to be operated at full load. However, in response to changes in power demand individual units can brought on line or shut down. A larger plant can be built in small increments to match the power demand balancing capital commitments with revenues from sales of electricity. Also, an unplanned shutdown of a reactor only affects a relatively small portion of the total plant capacity. Simplification of MASLWR design and extensive use of modularization coupled with factory fabrication will result in improved productivity of fieldwork and improved quality achieved in a factory environment. The initial MASLWR design concept development has been completed under the U.S. DOE (Department of Energy) Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project. This paper discusses a strategy for developing and deploying a MASLWR plant by 2015. This schedule is realistic because the plant design relies on existing industrial experience and manufacturing capabilities. The development strategy consists of the following elements: concept confirmation through testing (under the NERI program a scaled integral test facility has been constructed and initial testing performed), design concept optimization, and design certification based on prototype testing. (authors)

  18. Letter to the Editor : Rapidly-deployed small tent hospitals: lessons from the earthquake in Haiti.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, Y.; Gurman , P.; Verna, E.; Elman , N.; Labor, E. (Materials Science Division); (Superior NanoBioSystems LLC); (Fast Israeli Rescue & Search Team); (Clinique Adonai); (Mass. Inst. Tech.); (Univ. Haifa)

    2012-06-01

    The damage to medical facilities resulting form the January 2010 earthquake in haiti necessitated the establishment of field tent hospitals. Much of the local medical infrastructure was destroyed or limited operationally when the Fast Israel Rescue and Search Team (FIRST) arrived in Haiti shortly after the January 2010 earthquake. The FIRST deployed small tent hospitals in Port-au-Prince and in 11 remote areas outside of the city. Each tent was set up in less than a half hour. The tents were staffed with an orthopedic surgeon, gynecologists, primary care and emergency care physicians, a physician with previous experience in tropical medicine, nurses, paramedics, medics, and psychologists. The rapidly deployable and temporary nature of the effort allowed the team to treat and educate, as well as provide supplies for, thousands of refugees throughout Haiti. In addition, a local Haitian physician and his team created a small tent hospital to serve the Petion Refugee Camp and its environs. FIRST personnel also took shifts at this hospital.

  19. Regulatory potential for increasing small scale grid connected photovoltaic (PV) deployment in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaraman, Deepak; Horne, Ralph E.

    2011-01-01

    The last decade has seen significant innovation and change in regulatory incentives to support photovoltaic deployment globally. With high fossil fuel dependency and abundant solar resource availability in Australia, grid connected photovoltaics are a viable low carbon technology option in existing electricity grids. Drawing on international examples, the potential to increase grid PV deployment through government response and regulation is explored. For each renewable energy certificate (REC) earned by small scale photovoltaics until 2012, the market provides four additional certificates under the current banded renewable targets. Our analysis indicates that REC eligibility is not accurately estimated currently, and an energy model is developed to calculate the variance. The energy model estimates as much as 26% additional REC's to be obtained by a 3 kWp PV system, when compared to the currently used regulatory method. Moreover, the provision of REC's increases benefits to PV technologies, in the process distorting CO 2 abatement (0.21 tonne/REC) by 68%, when PV displaces peaking natural gas plants. Consideration of the secondary effects of a banded structure on emissions trading market is important in the context of designing a range of initiatives intended to support a transition to a low carbon electricity sector. - Research Highlights: →Grid connected photovoltaics hedge spikes in peak demand summer electricity prices. →Nationwide feed in tariff and new building regulations needed to increase PV deployment. →Australia has transitioned from a solar rebate to a banded solar credit structure. →The currently used regulatory deeming method underestimates REC eligibility by 27%. →The banded structure can potentially distort CO 2 abatement by as much as 68%.

  20. Small Modular Reactors: Nuclear Energy Market Potential for Near-term Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokhov, Alexey; Sozoniuk, Vladislav; Rothwell, Geoffrey; ); Cometto, Marco; Paillere, Henri; ); Crozat, Matt; Genoa, Paul; Joon Kim, Tae; McGough, Mike; Ingersoll, Dan; Rickman, Robin; Stout, Dan; Halnon, Greg; Chenais, Jacques; Briffod, Francois-Xavier; Perrier, Sylvain; Shahrokhi, Farshid; Kaufer, Barry; Wasylyk, Andrew; Shropshire, David; ); Danrong, Song; Swinburn, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Recent interest in small modular reactors (SMRs) is being driven by a desire to reduce the total capital costs associated with nuclear power plants and to provide power to small grid systems. According to estimates available today, if all the competitive advantages of SMRs were realised, including serial production, optimised supply chains and smaller financing costs, SMRs could be expected to have lower absolute and specific (per-kWe) construction costs than large reactors. Although the economic parameters of SMRs are not yet fully determined, a potential market exists for this technology, particularly in energy mixes with large shares of renewables. This report assesses the size of the market for SMRs that are currently being developed and that have the potential to broaden the ways of deploying nuclear power in different parts of the world. The study focuses on light water SMRs that are expected to be constructed in the coming decades and that strongly rely on serial, factory-based production of reactor modules. In a high-case scenario, up to 21 GWe of SMRs could be added globally by 2035, representing approximately 3% of total installed nuclear capacity. (authors)

  1. A small modular fast reactor as starting point for industrial deployment of fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yoon I.; Lo Pinto, Pierre; Konomura, Mamoru

    2006-01-01

    The current commercial reactors based on light water technology provide 17% of the electricity worldwide owing to their reliability, safety and competitive economics. In the near term, next generation reactors are expected to be evolutionary type, taking benefits of extensive LWR experience feedbacks and further improved economics and safety provisions. For the long term, however, sustainable energy production will be required due to continuous increase of the human activities, environmental concerns such as greenhouse effect and the need of alternatives to fossil fuels as long term energy resources. Therefore, future generation commercial reactors should meet some criteria of sustainability that the current generation cannot fully satisfy. In addition to the current objectives of economics and safety, waste management, resource extension and public acceptance become other major objectives among the sustainability criteria. From this perspective, two questions can be raised: what reactor type can meet the sustainability criteria, and how to proceed to an effective deployment in harmony with the high reliability and availability of the current nuclear reactor fleet. There seems to be an international consensus that the fast spectrum reactor, notably the sodium-cooled system is most promising to meet all of the long term sustainability criteria. As for the latter, we propose a small modular fast reactor project could become a base to prepare the industrial infrastructure. The paper has the following contents: - Introduction; - SMFR project; - Core design; - Supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycle; - Near-term reference plant; - Advanced designs; - Conclusions. To summarize, the sodium-cooled fast reactor is currently recognized as the technology of choice for the long term nuclear energy expansion, but some research and development are required to optimize and validate advanced design solutions. A small modular fast reactor can satisfy some existing near-term market niche

  2. A deployable mechanism concept for the collection of small-to-medium-size space debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, David; Sharf, Inna; Sagnières, Luc; Gosselin, Clément

    2018-03-01

    Current efforts in active debris removal strategies and mission planning focus on removing the largest, most massive debris. It can be argued, however, that small untrackable debris, specifically those smaller than 5 cm in size, also pose a serious threat. In this work, we propose and analyze a mission to sweep the most crowded Low Earth Orbit with a large cupola device to remove small-to-medium-size debris. The cupola consists of a deployable mechanism expanding more than 25 times its storage size to extend a membrane covering its surface. The membrane is sufficiently stiff to capture most small debris and to slow down the medium-size objects, thus accelerating their fall. An overview of the design of a belt-driven rigid-link mechanism proposed to support the collecting cupola surface is presented, based on our previous work. Because of its large size, the cupola will be subject to significant aerodynamic drag; thus, orbit maintenance analysis is carried out using the DTM-2013 atmospheric density model and it predicts feasible requirements. While in operation, the device will also be subject to numerous hyper-velocity impacts which may significantly perturb its orientation from the desired attitude for debris collection. Thus, another important feature of the proposed debris removal device is a distributed array of flywheels mounted on the cupola for reorienting and stabilizing its attitude during the mission. Analysis using a stochastic modeling framework for hyper-velocity impacts demonstrates that three-axes attitude stabilization is achievable with the flywheels array. MASTER-2009 software is employed to provide relevant data for all debris related estimates, including the debris fluxes for the baseline mission design and for assessment of its expected performance. Space debris removal is a high priority for ensuring sustainability of space and continual launch and operation of man-made space assets. This manuscript presents the first analysis of a small

  3. A pilot survey of post-deployment health care needs in small community-based primary care clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pugh Mary J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relatively little is known regarding to what extent community-based primary care physicians are encountering post-deployment health care needs among veterans of the Afghanistan or Iraq conflicts and their family members. Methods This pilot study conducted a cross-sectional survey of 37 primary care physicians working at small urban and suburban clinics belonging to a practice-based research network in the south central region of Texas. Results Approximately 80% of the responding physicians reported caring for patients who have been deployed to the Afghanistan or Iraq war zones, or had a family member deployed. Although these physicians noted a variety of conditions related to physical trauma, mental illnesses and psychosocial disruptions such as marital, family, financial, and legal problems appeared to be even more prevalent among their previously deployed patients and were also noted among family members of deployed veterans. Conclusions Community-based primary care physicians should be aware of common post-deployment health conditions and the resources that are available to meet these needs.

  4. The Wiphala Genomics: the deployment of molecular markers in small-scale potato crop systems in the Bolivian Andes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puente, D.

    2008-01-01

    The deployment of molecular markers in the small-scale potato systems in the Bolivian Andes takes place within two contradictory understandings of potato biodiversity. On the one hand, biodiversity is understood as raw material; farmers' varieties have no intrinsic value, value is added by breeders

  5. Future European Expendable Launcher Options and Technology Preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Sippel, Martin; van Foreest, Arnold; Klevanski, Josef; Gerstmann, Jens; Dutheil, Jean-Philippe; Jäger, Markus; Philip, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes latest results of the most recent activities in Germany in the technical assessment of future European launcher architecture. In a joint effort of DLR-SART with German launcher industry a next generation upper-medium class expendable TSTO and options for new liquid fuel upper stages for the small VEGA-launcher are addressed. The WOTAN study has investigated fully cryogenic launchers as well as those with a combination of solid and cryogenic stages, fulfilling a requirement...

  6. Study Trade-Offs on Future European Expendable Launchers

    OpenAIRE

    Sippel, Martin; van Foreest, Arnold; Philip, Peter; Jäger, Markus

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes latest results of recent activities in Germany in the technical assessment of future European launcher architecture. In a joint effort of DLR-SART with German launcher indus-try a next generation upper-medium class expendable TSTO and options for new liquid fuel upper stages for the small VEGA-launcher are addressed. The WOTAN study has investigated fully cryogenic launchers as well as those with a combination of solid and cryogenic stages, fulfilling a requirement of a...

  7. The Expendable Launch Vehicle Commercialization Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Department of Transportation will serve as the lead agency in the transfer of Expendable Launch Vehicles (ELV) to the private sector. The roles of the FAA, Coast Guard and materials Transportation Bureau were discussed.

  8. Role of small lead-cooled fast reactors for international deployment in worldwide sustainable nuclear energy supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Wade, D.C.; Moisseytsev, A.

    2008-01-01

    Most recently, the global nuclear energy partnership (GNEP) has identified, as one of its key objectives, the development and demonstration of concepts for small and medium-sized reactors (SMRs) that can be globally deployed while assuring a high level of proliferation resistance. Lead-cooled systems offer several key advantages in meeting these goals. The small lead-cooled fast reactor concept known as the small secure transportable autonomous reactor (SSTAR) has been under ongoing development as part of the US advanced nuclear energy systems programs. Meeting future worldwide projected energy demands during this century (e.g., 1000 to 2000 GWe by 2050) in a sustainable manner while maintaining CO2 emissions at or below today's level will require massive deployments of nuclear reactors in non-fuel cycle states as well as fuel cycle states. The projected energy demands of non-fuel cycle states will not be met solely through the deployment of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) in those states without using up the world's resources of fissile material (e.g., known plus speculative virgin uranium resources = 15 million tonnes). The present U.S. policy is focused upon domestic deployment of large-scale LWRs and sodium-cooled fast spectrum Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) working in a symbiotic relationship that burns existing fissile material while destroying the actinides which are generated. Other major nuclear nations are carrying out the development and deployment of SFR breeders as witness the planning for SFR breeder deployments in France, Japan, China, India, and Russia. Small (less that 300 MWe) and medium (300 to 700 MWe) size reactors are better suited to the growing economies and infrastructures of many non-fuel cycle states and developing nations. For those deployments, fast reactor converters which are fissile self-sufficient by creating as much fissile material as they consume are preferred to breeders that create more fissile material than they consume. Thus

  9. Optimizing small cell deployment by the use of C-RANs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Holm, Henrik Laumand; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2014-01-01

    A Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) is a novel mobile network architecture that has the potential to support extremely dense mobile network deployments enhancing the network capacity while offering cost savings on baseband resources. In this work we analyze cell traffic profiles and evaluate...... the conditions that impact the statistical multiplexing gain in the Baseband Unit (BBU) Pool. We conclude on the set of parameters that maximize the statistical multiplexing gain, leading to the highest potential cost savings. We then propose a packet based architecture that can adapt to changing traffic...... conditions. Furthermore, based on theoretical calculations and Network simulations we present considerations on deployment scenarios to optimize green field deployments in terms of Total Cost of Ownership (TCO). This involves optimizing the mix of cells with different traffic profiles and the BBU Pool...

  10. Elevated CO[sub 2] alters deployment of roots in small growth containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berntson, G M; McConnaughay, K D.M.; Bazzaz, F A [Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology

    1993-07-01

    Previously the authors examined how limited rooting space and nutrient supply influenced plant growth under elevated atmospheric CO[sub 2] concentrations. To gain insight into how elevated CO[sub 2] atmospheres affect how plants utilize available belowground space, when rooting space and nutrient supply are limited, they measured the deployment of roots within pots through time. Contrary to aboveground responses, patterns of belowground deployment were most strongly influenced by elevated CO[sub 2] in pots of different volume and shape. Further, elevated CO[sub 2] conditions interacted differently with limited belowground space for the two species studied, Abutilon theophrasti, a C[sub 3] dicot with a deep taproot, and Setaria faberii, a C4 monocot with a shallow fibrous root system. For Setaria, elevated CO[sub 2] increased the size of the largest region of low root density at the pot surface in larger rooting volumes independent of nutrient content, thereby decreasing their efficiency of deployment. For Abutilon, plants responded to elevated CO[sub 2] concentrations by equalizing the pattern of deployment in all the pots. Nutrient concentration, and not pot size or shape, greatly influenced the density of root growth. Root densities for Abutilon and Setaria were similar to those observed in field conditions, for annual dicots and monocots respectively, suggesting that studies using pots may successfully mimic natural conditions.

  11. A Small Spacecraft Swarm Deployment and Stationkeeping Strategy for Sun-Earth L1 Halo Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renea Conn, Tracie; Bookbinder, Jay

    2018-01-01

    Spacecraft orbits about the Sun-Earth librarian point L1 have been of interest since the 1950s. An L1 halo orbit was first achieved with the International Sun-Earth Explorer-3 (ISEE-3) mission, and similar orbits around Sun-Earth L1 were achieved in the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), Genesis, and Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) missions. With recent advancements in CubeSat technology, we envision that it will soon be feasible to deploy CubeSats at L1. As opposed to these prior missions where one large satellite orbited alone, a swarm of CubeSats at L1 would enable novel science data return, providing a topology for intersatellite measurements of heliophysics phenomena both spatially and temporally, at varying spatial scales.The purpose of this iPoster is to present a flight dynamics strategy for a swarm of numerous CubeSats orbiting Sun-Earth L1. The presented method is a coupled, two-part solution. First, we present a deployment strategy for the CubeSats that is optimized to produce prescribed, time-varying intersatellite baselines for the purposes of collecting magnetometer data as well as radiometric measurements from cross-links. Second, we employ a loose control strategy that was successfully applied to SOHO and ACE for minimized stationkeeping propellant expenditure. We emphasize that the presented solution is practical within the current state-of-the-art and heritage CubeSat technology, citing capabilities of CubeSat designs that will launch on the upcoming Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1) to lunar orbits and beyond. Within this iPoster, we present animations of the simulated deployment strategy and resulting spacecraft trajectories. Mission design parameters such as total Δv required for long-term station keeping and minimum/maximum/mean spacecraft separation distances are also presented.

  12. Multiyear ice transport and small scale sea ice deformation near the Alaska coast measured by air-deployable Ice Trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, A. R.; Kasper, J.; Winsor, P.

    2015-12-01

    Highly complex patterns of ice motion and deformation were captured by fifteen satellite-telemetered GPS buoys (known as Ice Trackers) deployed near Barrow, Alaska, in spring 2015. Two pentagonal clusters of buoys were deployed on pack ice by helicopter in the Beaufort Sea between 20 and 80 km offshore. During deployment, ice motion in the study region was effectively zero, but two days later the buoys captured a rapid transport event in which multiyear ice from the Beaufort Sea was flushed into the Chukchi Sea. During this event, westward ice motion began in the Chukchi Sea and propagated eastward. This created new openings in the ice and led to rapid elongation of the clusters as the westernmost buoys accelerated away from their neighbors to the east. The buoys tracked ice velocities of over 1.5 ms-1, with fastest motion occurring closest to the coast indicating strong current shear. Three days later, ice motion reversed and the two clusters became intermingled, rendering divergence calculations based on the area enclosed by clusters invalid. The data show no detectable difference in velocity between first year and multiyear ice floes, but Lagrangian timeseries of SAR imagery centered on each buoy show that first year ice underwent significant small-scale deformation during the event. The five remaining buoys were deployed by local residents on prominent ridges embedded in the landfast ice within 16 km of Barrow in order to track the fate of such features after they detached from the coast. Break-up of the landfast ice took place over a period of several days and, although the buoys each initially followed a similar eastward trajectory around Point Barrow into the Beaufort Sea, they rapidly dispersed over an area more than 50 km across. With rapid environmental and socio-economic change in the Arctic, understanding the complexity of nearshore ice motion is increasingly important for predict future changes in the ice and the tracking ice-related hazards

  13. Low-cost small scale parabolic trough collector design for manufacturing and deployment in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosz, Matthew; Mathaha, Paul; Tsiu, Anadola; Taele, B. M.; Mabea, Lengeta; Ntee, Marcel; Khakanyo, Makoanyane; Teker, Tamer; Stephens, Jordan; Mueller, Amy

    2016-05-01

    Concentrating Solar Power is expanding its deployment on the African subcontinent, highlighting the importance of efforts to indigenize manufacturing of this technology to increase local content and therefore local economic benefits of these projects. In this study a design for manufacturing (DFM) exercise was conducted to create a locally produced parabolic trough collector (the G4 PTC). All parts were sourced or fabricated at a production facility in Lesotho, and several examples of the design were prototyped and tested with collaborators in the Government of Lesotho's Appropriate Technology Services division and the National University of Lesotho. Optical and thermal performance was simulated and experimentally validated, and pedagogical pre-commercial versions of the PTC have been distributed to higher education partners in Lesotho and Europe. The cost to produce the PTC is 180 USD/m2 for a locally manufactured heat collection element (HCE) capable of sustaining 250C operation at ~65% efficiency. A version with an imported evacuated HCE can operate at 300°C with 70% efficiency. Economically relevant applications for this locally produced PTC include industrial process heat and distributed generation scenarios where cogeneration is required.

  14. Scientific Packages on Small Bodies, a Deployment Strategy for New Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardivel, Simon; Scheeres, D. J.; Michel, P.

    2013-10-01

    The exploration of asteroids is currently a topic of high priority for the space agencies. JAXA will launch its second asteroid explorer, aimed at 1999 JU3, in the second half of 2014. NASA has selected OSIRIS-REx to go to asteroid Bennu, and it will launch in 2016. ESA is currently performing the assessment study of the MarcoPolo-R space mission, in the framework of the M3 (medium) competition of its Cosmic Vision Program, whose objective is now 2008 EV5. In the continuity of these missions, landing for an extended period of time on the ground to perform measurements seems a logical next step to asteroid exploration. Yet, the surface behavior of an asteroid is not well known and landing the whole spacecraft on it could be hazardous, and pose other mission operations problems such as ensuring communication with Earth. Hence, we propose a new approach to asteroid surface exploration. Using a mothership spacecraft, we will present how multiple landers could be deployed to the surface of an asteroid using ballistic trajectories. Combining a detailed simulation of the bouncing and contact dynamics on the surface with numerical and mathematical analysis of the flight dynamics near an asteroid, we show how landing pods could be distributed at the surface of a body. The strategy has the advantages that the mothership always maintains a safe distance from the surface and the landers do not need any GNC (guidance, navigation and control system) or landing apparatus. Thus, it allows for simple operations and for the design of lightweight landers with minimum platform overhead and maximum payload. These pods could then be used as a single measurement apparatus (e.g. seismometers) or as independent and different instruments, using their widespread distribution to gain both global and local knowledge on the asteroid.

  15. Feasibility study of Tethered Capsule Endomicroscopy (TCE) deployment in the small intestine (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otuya, David O.; Verma, Yogesh; Dong, Jing; Gora, Michalina J.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2017-02-01

    Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) is a poorly understood disease of the small intestine that causes nutrient malabsorption in children, predominantly from low and middle income countries. The clinical importance of EED is neurological and growth stunting that remains as the child grows into adulthood. Tethered capsule endomicroscopy (TCE) has the potential to improve the understanding of EED and could be used to determine the effectiveness of EED interventions. TCE in the adult esophagus and the duodenum has been demonstrated for Barrett`s esophagus and celiac disease diagnosis, respectively. While adult subjects can independently swallow these capsules, it is likely that infants will not, and, as a result, new strategies for introducing these devices in young children aged 0.5-2 years need to be investigated. Our first approach will be to introduce the TCE devices in infants under the aid of endoscopic guidance. To determine the most effective method, we have tested endoscopic approaches for introducing TCE devices into the small intestine of living swine. These methods will be compared and contrasted to discuss the most effective means for endoscopic tethered capsule introduction into the small intestine.

  16. Design and Analysis of Cost-Efficient Sensor Deployment for Tracking Small UAS with Agent-Based Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sangmi; Park, Seongha; Kim, Yongho; Matson, Eric T

    2016-04-22

    Recently, commercial unmanned aerial systems (UAS) have gained popularity. However, these UAS are potential threats to people in terms of safety in public places, such as public parks or stadiums. To reduce such threats, we consider a design, modeling, and evaluation of a cost-efficient sensor system that detects and tracks small UAS. In this research, we focus on discovering the best sensor deployments by simulating different types and numbers of sensors in a designated area, which provide reasonable detection rates at low costs. Also, the system should cover the crowded areas more thoroughly than vacant areas to reduce direct threats to people underneath. This research study utilized the Agent-Based Modeling (ABM) technique to model a system consisting of independent and heterogeneous agents that interact with each other. Our previous work presented the ability to apply ABM to analyze the sensor configurations with two types of radars in terms of cost-efficiency. The results from the ABM simulation provide a list of candidate configurations and deployments that can be referred to for applications in the real world environment.

  17. Design and Analysis of Cost-Efficient Sensor Deployment for Tracking Small UAS with Agent-Based Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangmi Shin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, commercial unmanned aerial systems (UAS have gained popularity. However, these UAS are potential threats to people in terms of safety in public places, such as public parks or stadiums. To reduce such threats, we consider a design, modeling, and evaluation of a cost-efficient sensor system that detects and tracks small UAS. In this research, we focus on discovering the best sensor deployments by simulating different types and numbers of sensors in a designated area, which provide reasonable detection rates at low costs. Also, the system should cover the crowded areas more thoroughly than vacant areas to reduce direct threats to people underneath. This research study utilized the Agent-Based Modeling (ABM technique to model a system consisting of independent and heterogeneous agents that interact with each other. Our previous work presented the ability to apply ABM to analyze the sensor configurations with two types of radars in terms of cost-efficiency. The results from the ABM simulation provide a list of candidate configurations and deployments that can be referred to for applications in the real world environment.

  18. Modeling and Testing of Phase Transition-Based Deployable Systems for Small Body Sample Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadrelli, Marco; Backes, Paul; Wilkie, Keats; Giersch, Lou; Quijano, Ubaldo; Keim, Jason; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the modeling, simulation, and testing work related to the development of technology to investigate the potential that shape memory actuation has to provide mechanically simple and affordable solutions for delivering assets to a surface and for sample capture and return. We investigate the structural dynamics and controllability aspects of an adaptive beam carrying an end-effector which, by changing equilibrium phases is able to actively decouple the end-effector dynamics from the spacecraft dynamics during the surface contact phase. Asset delivery and sample capture and return are at the heart of several emerging potential missions to small bodies, such as asteroids and comets, and to the surface of large bodies, such as Titan.

  19. Development of Next Generation Memory Test Experiment for Deployment on a Small Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Todd; Ho, Fat D.

    2012-01-01

    The original Memory Test Experiment successfully flew on the FASTSAT satellite launched in November 2010. It contained a single Ramtron 512K ferroelectric memory. The memory device went through many thousands of read/write cycles and recorded any errors that were encountered. The original mission length was schedule to last 6 months but was extended to 18 months. New opportunities exist to launch a similar satellite and considerations for a new memory test experiment should be examined. The original experiment had to be designed and integrated in less than two months, so the experiment was a simple design using readily available parts. The follow-on experiment needs to be more sophisticated and encompass more technologies. This paper lays out the considerations for the design and development of this follow-on flight memory experiment. It also details the results from the original Memory Test Experiment that flew on board FASTSAT. Some of the design considerations for the new experiment include the number and type of memory devices to be used, the kinds of tests that will be performed, other data needed to analyze the results, and best use of limited resources on a small satellite. The memory technologies that are considered are FRAM, FLASH, SONOS, Resistive Memory, Phase Change Memory, Nano-wire Memory, Magneto-resistive Memory, Standard DRAM, and Standard SRAM. The kinds of tests that could be performed are read/write operations, non-volatile memory retention, write cycle endurance, power measurements, and testing Error Detection and Correction schemes. Other data that may help analyze the results are GPS location of recorded errors, time stamp of all data recorded, radiation measurements, temperature, and other activities being perform by the satellite. The resources of power, volume, mass, temperature, processing power, and telemetry bandwidth are extremely limited on a small satellite. Design considerations must be made to allow the experiment to not interfere

  20. Airborne eXpendable BathyThermographs (AXBT) data from Ocean Surveys in the Gulf of Mexico during Hurricane Lili 2002-10-02 to 2002-10-04 (NCEI Accession 0159386)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne eXpendable BathyThermographs (AXBT) data from deployments during field operations to study Hurricane Lili. The data were used in model simulations for...

  1. How much work is expended for respiration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A T

    1993-01-01

    The rate of work expended to move air in the respiratory system has been determined for five different airflow waveshapes, a non-linear respiratory model and five exercise levels. As expected, the rectangular waveshape was the most efficient. Model conditions were then changed one a time: (i) starting lung volume was allowed to vary, (ii) exhalation flow limitation was added, (iii) respiration was considered to be a metabolic burden determining part of the ventilation requirement and (iv) a respirator mask was added. Although there is no direct work advantage to varying initial lung volume, such volume changes appear to be dictated by the asymmetry of lung recoil pressure about the lung relaxation volume; allowing the work of respiration to become a metabolic burden clearly shows why respiratory waveforms change from rest to exercise; and, adding a respirator imposes a severe respiratory burden on the wearer engaging in moderate, heavy and very heavy exercise.

  2. Research on deployed Danish soldiers: why is knowledge derived from a small, Nordic country relevant for other countries?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen; Andersen, Soren Bo

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990s, the Danish military has deployed more than 40,000 soldiers to war zones, especially to the Balkans, Iraq, and Afghanistan. To the war in Afghanistan alone, the Danish Defense has to date deployed 9,918 unique soldiers with a total of 18,015 deployments. The total...... focusing on the development of posttraumatic stress (PTS) in this sample will be presented, and the relevance and generalizability of these findings to military populations from other countries will be discussed....

  3. 29 CFR 95.35 - Supplies and other expendable property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... supplies exceeding $5,000 in total aggregate value upon termination or completion of the project or program... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Supplies and other expendable property. 95.35 Section 95.35... Requirements Property Standards § 95.35 Supplies and other expendable property. (a) Title to supplies and other...

  4. 34 CFR 74.35 - Supplies and other expendable property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... supplies exceeding $5,000 in total aggregate value upon termination or completion of the project or program... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supplies and other expendable property. 74.35 Section... Requirements Property Standards § 74.35 Supplies and other expendable property. (a) Title to supplies and other...

  5. 7 CFR 3019.35 - Supplies and other expendable property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of unused supplies exceeding $5000 in total aggregate value upon termination or completion of the... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supplies and other expendable property. 3019.35... Requirements Property Standards § 3019.35 Supplies and other expendable property. (a) Title to supplies and...

  6. 2 CFR 215.35 - Supplies and other expendable property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... supplies exceeding $5000 in total aggregate value upon termination or completion of the project or program... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supplies and other expendable property. 215... Property Standards § 215.35 Supplies and other expendable property. (a) Title to supplies and other...

  7. 43 CFR 12.935 - Supplies and other expendable property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of unused supplies exceeding $5,000 in total aggregate value upon termination or completion of the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Supplies and other expendable property. 12... Organizations Post-Award Requirements § 12.935 Supplies and other expendable property. (a) Title to supplies and...

  8. 7 CFR 550.40 - Supplies and other expendable property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... is a residual inventory of unused supplies exceeding $5,000 in total aggregate value upon termination... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supplies and other expendable property. 550.40 Section... Management of Agreements Equipment/property Standards § 550.40 Supplies and other expendable property. (a...

  9. 22 CFR 518.35 - Supplies and other expendable property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... is a residual inventory of unused supplies exceeding $5000 in total aggregate value upon termination... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Supplies and other expendable property. 518.35... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 518.35 Supplies and other expendable property. (a...

  10. 49 CFR 19.35 - Supplies and other expendable property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... is a residual inventory of unused supplies exceeding $5000 in total aggregate value upon termination... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Supplies and other expendable property. 19.35... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 19.35 Supplies and other expendable property. (a...

  11. FEASIBILITY STUDY OF INEXPENSIVE THERMAL SENSORS AND SMALL UAS DEPLOYMENT FOR LIVING HUMAN DETECTION IN RESCUE MISSIONS APPLICATION SCENARIOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Levin

    2016-06-01

    use SUAVs and small thermal sensors for the human detection scenarios described above. Differences in temperatures were collected by deployed imaging acquisition platform are interpretable on FLIR images visually. Moreover, we applied ENVI image processing functions for calibration and numerical estimations of such a temperature differences. There are more potential system functionalities such as voice messages from rescue teams and even distant medication delivery for the victims of described emergencies. This paper describes experiments, processing results, and future research in more details.

  12. Novel techniques and insights into the deployment of pop-up satellite archival tags on a small-bodied deep-water chondrichthyan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, Oliver N.; Howey, Lucy A.; Tolentino, Emily R.; Jordan, Lance K. B.; Brooks, Edward J.

    2017-01-01

    Acquiring movement data for small-bodied, deep-water chondrichthyans is challenged by extreme effects of capture and handling stress, and post-release predation, however, it is urgently required to examine important fisheries interactions and assess the ecological role of these species within deep-water food webs. Here we suggest a novel release-cage mechanism to deploy pop-up satellite archival tags, as well as present vertical habitat data for a data-deficient, small-bodied, deep-water bycatch species, the Cuban dogfish (Squalus cubensis). Data were gathered from seven of eight High Rate X-Tags deployed on mature Cuban dogfish in the Exuma Sound, The Bahamas. Recovery periods appeared variable between individuals and are likely driven by capture-and-handling stress and tag burden. Application of the cross-correlation function to time-series depth and temperature data indicated three of the seven individuals suffered mortality through predation, which occurred during daytime, and suggests Cuban dogfish may constitute a proportion of deep-water apex predator diet in the Exuma Sound. Two animals were successfully released via a novel release-cage mechanism and displayed either no, or rapid (<15 mins) vertically stationary recovery periods and were not consumed by predators; data for these individuals were recorded for the entire deployment duration (14 days). Vertical habitat data suggests Cuban dogfish are diel-vertical migrators, similar to other deep-water taxa, and exhibit a relatively broad temperature and depth range, which may be driven by preference for specific bathymetric structures. These techniques provide an important first step into acquiring and presenting vertical habitat data for small-bodied, deep-water chondrichthyans, which can be directly applied to fisheries and ecosystem-based management approaches.

  13. Spatial and temporal benthic species assemblage responses with a deployed marine tidal energy device: a small scaled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadhurst, Melanie; Orme, C David L

    2014-08-01

    The addition of man-made structures to the marine environment is known to increase the physical complexity of the seafloor, which can influence benthic species community patterns and habitat structure. However, knowledge of how deployed tidal energy device structures influence benthic communities is currently lacking. Here we examined species biodiversity, composition and habitat type surrounding a tidal energy device within the European Marine Energy Centre test site, Orkney. Commercial fishing and towed video camera techniques were used over three temporal periods, from 2009 to 2010. Our results showed increased species biodiversity and compositional differences within the device site, compared to a control site. Both sites largely comprised of crustacean species, omnivore or predatory feeding regimes and marine tide-swept EUNIS habitat types, which varied over the time. We conclude that the device could act as a localised artificial reef structure, but that further in-depth investigations are required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Deployment and evaluation of a dual-sensor autofocusing method for on-machine measurement of patterns of small holes on freeform surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaomei; Longstaff, Andrew; Fletcher, Simon; Myers, Alan

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents and evaluates an active dual-sensor autofocusing system that combines an optical vision sensor and a tactile probe for autofocusing on arrays of small holes on freeform surfaces. The system has been tested on a two-axis test rig and then integrated onto a three-axis computer numerical control (CNC) milling machine, where the aim is to rapidly and controllably measure the hole position errors while the part is still on the machine. The principle of operation is for the tactile probe to locate the nominal positions of holes, and the optical vision sensor follows to focus and capture the images of the holes. The images are then processed to provide hole position measurement. In this paper, the autofocusing deviations are analyzed. First, the deviations caused by the geometric errors of the axes on which the dual-sensor unit is deployed are estimated to be 11 μm when deployed on a test rig and 7 μm on the CNC machine tool. Subsequently, the autofocusing deviations caused by the interaction of the tactile probe, surface, and small hole are mathematically analyzed and evaluated. The deviations are a result of the tactile probe radius, the curvatures at the positions where small holes are drilled on the freeform surface, and the effect of the position error of the hole on focusing. An example case study is provided for the measurement of a pattern of small holes on an elliptical cylinder on the two machines. The absolute sum of the autofocusing deviations is 118 μm on the test rig and 144 μm on the machine tool. This is much less than the 500 μm depth of field of the optical microscope. Therefore, the method is capable of capturing a group of clear images of the small holes on this workpiece for either implementation.

  15. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    evaluating the deployment repeatability builds upon the testing or analysis of deployment kinematics (Chapter 6) and adds repetition. Introduction...material yield or failure during a test. For the purposes of this chapter, zero shift will refer to permanent changes in the structure, while reversible ...the content of other chapters in this book: Gravity Compensation (Chapter 4) and Deployment Kinematics and Dynamics (Chapter 6). Repeating the

  16. Expendable bubble tiltmeter for geophysical monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Westphal, J. A.; Carr, M. A.; Miller, W. F.; Dzurisin, Daniel

    1983-01-01

    An unusually rugged highly sensitive and inexpensive bubble tiltmeter has been designed, tested, and built in quantity. These tiltmeters are presently used on two volcanoes and an Alaskan glacier, where they continuously monitor surface tilts of geological interest. This paper discusses the mechanical, thermal, and electric details of the meter, and illustrates its performance characteristics in both large ( > 10^(-4) radian) and small ( < 10^(-6) radian) tilt environments. The meter's ult...

  17. Expendable bubble tiltmeter for geophysical monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, J.A.; Carr, M.A.; Miller, W.F.; Dzurisin, D.

    1983-01-01

    An unusually rugged highly sensitive and inexpensive bubble tiltmeter has been designed, tested, and built in quantity. These tiltmeters are presently used on two volcanoes and an Alaskan glacier, where they continuously monitor surface tilts of geological interest. This paper discusses the mechanical, thermal, and electric details of the meter, and illustrates its performance characteristics in both large (>10-4 radian) and small (<10-6 radian) tilt environments. The meter's ultimate sensitivity is better than 2??10-8 radians rms for short periods (hours), and its useful dynamic range is greater than 10 4. Included is a short description of field use of the instrument for volcano monitoring.

  18. 28 CFR 70.35 - Supplies and other expendable property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... aggregate value upon termination or completion of the project or program and the supplies are not needed for... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supplies and other expendable property... AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 70.35 Supplies and...

  19. 10 CFR 600.135 - Supplies and other expendable property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... acquisition. If there is a residual inventory of unused supplies exceeding $5000 in total aggregate value upon... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supplies and other expendable property. 600.135 Section... Education, Hospitals, and Other Nonprofit Organizations Post-Award Requirements § 600.135 Supplies and other...

  20. 15 CFR 14.35 - Supplies and other expendable property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... recipient upon acquisition. If there is a residual inventory of supplies exceeding $5000 in total aggregate... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supplies and other expendable property...-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 14.35 Supplies and...

  1. 45 CFR 2543.35 - Supplies and other expendable property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... acquisition. If there is a residual inventory of unused supplies exceeding $5,000 in total aggregate value... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Supplies and other expendable property. 2543.35... OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 2543.35 Supplies and other...

  2. 20 CFR 435.35 - Supplies and other expendable property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... aggregate value upon termination or completion of the project or program and the supplies are not needed for... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Supplies and other expendable property. 435... ORGANIZATIONS, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 435.35 Supplies and...

  3. Design and deployment strategies for small and medium sized reactors (SMRs) to overcome loss of economies of scale and incorporate increased proliferation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.

    2007-01-01

    The designers of innovative small and medium sized reactors pursue new design and deployment strategies making use of certain advantages provided by smaller reactor size and capacity to achieve reduced design complexity and simplified operation and maintenance requirements, and to provide for incremental capacity increase through multi-module plant clustering. Competitiveness of SMRs (Small and Medium size Reactor) depends on the incorporated strategies to overcome loss of economies of scale but equally it depends on finding appropriate market niches for such reactors. For many less developed countries, these are the features of enhanced proliferation resistance and increased robustness of barriers for sabotage protection that may ensure the progress of nuclear power. For such countries, small reactors without on-site refuelling, designed for infrequent replacement of well-contained fuel cassette(s) in a manner that impedes clandestine diversion of nuclear fuel material, may provide a solution. Based on the outputs of recent IAEA activities for innovative SMRs, the paper provides a summary of the state-of-the-art in approaches to improve SMR competitiveness and incorporate enhanced proliferation resistance and energy security. (author)

  4. Development of a Small, Inexpensive, and Field-deployable Gas Chromatograph for the Automated Collection, Separation, and Analysis of Gas-phase Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skog, K.; Xiong, F.; Gentner, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    The identification and quantification of gas-phase organic compounds, like volatile organic compounds (VOCs), in the atmosphere relies on separation of complex mixtures and sensitive detection. Gas chromatography (GC) is widely applied, but relies on the need for high-purity compressed gases for separation and, often for detection. We have developed a low-cost, compact GC-based system for the collection and quantitative chemical speciation of complex mixtures of common atmospheric VOCs without the need for compressed high-purity gases or expensive detectors. We present results of lab and field testing against a commercially-available GC system. At optimized linear velocities challenging VOC pairs of similar volatility were resolved within 30 minutes, including n- and i-pentane; n-pentane and isoprene; and ethylbenzene and m/p-xylene. For 5-30 minute samples, we observe ppt-level detection limits for common VOCs such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, alpha-pinene, and limonene. We also present results of in-field use for VOC measurements. In all, this instrument is accurate, precise, small, and inexpensive (<$2500). Its lack of compressed gas cylinders make it ideal for field deployment and has been demonstrated to produce similar quality data to available GC technology.

  5. Advanced OS deployment system

    OpenAIRE

    Galiano Molina, Sebastián

    2007-01-01

    The main project’s objective is to design and build an OS deployment system taking advantage of the Linux OS and the Open Source community developments. This means to use existing technologies that modularize the system. With this philosophy in mind, the number of developed code lines within the project is keeping as small as possible. As REMBO, the OS deployment system to develop has to be transparent to the user. This means a system with a friendly user interface and no te...

  6. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-31

    large cohort of trials to spot unusual cases. However, deployment repeatability is inherently a nonlinear phenomenon, which makes modeling difficult...and GEMS tip position were both tracked during ground testing by a laser target tracking system. Earlier SAILMAST testing in 2005 [8] used...recalls the strategy used by SRTM, where a constellation of lights was installed at the tip of the boom and a modified star tracker was used to track tip

  7. Future Launch Vehicle Structures - Expendable and Reusable Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obersteiner, M. H.; Borriello, G.

    2002-01-01

    Further evolution of existing expendable launch vehicles will be an obvious element influencing the future of space transportation. Besides this reusability might be the change with highest potential for essential improvement. The expected cost reduction and finally contributing to this, the improvement of reliability including safe mission abort capability are driving this idea. Although there are ideas of semi-reusable launch vehicles, typically two stages vehicles - reusable first stage or booster(s) and expendable second or upper stage - it should be kept in mind that the benefit of reusability will only overwhelm if there is a big enough share influencing the cost calculation. Today there is the understanding that additional technology preparation and verification will be necessary to master reusability and get enough benefits compared with existing launch vehicles. This understanding is based on several technology and system concepts preparation and verification programmes mainly done in the US but partially also in Europe and Japan. The major areas of necessary further activities are: - System concepts including business plan considerations - Sub-system or component technologies refinement - System design and operation know-how and capabilities - Verification and demonstration oriented towards future mission mastering: One of the most important aspects for the creation of those coming programmes and activities will be the iterative process of requirements definition derived from concepts analyses including economical considerations and the results achieved and verified within technology and verification programmes. It is the intention of this paper to provide major trends for those requirements focused on future launch vehicles structures. This will include the aspects of requirements only valid for reusable launch vehicles and those common for expendable, semi-reusable and reusable launch vehicles. Structures and materials is and will be one of the

  8. An optical fiber expendable seawater temperature/depth profile sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiang; Chen, Shizhe; Zhang, Keke; Yan, Xingkui; Yang, Xianglong; Bai, Xuejiao; Liu, Shixuan

    2017-10-01

    Marine expendable temperature/depth profiler (XBT) is a disposable measuring instrument which can obtain temperature/depth profile data quickly in large area waters and mainly used for marine surveys, scientific research, military application. The temperature measuring device is a thermistor in the conventional XBT probe (CXBT)and the depth data is only a calculated value by speed and time depth calculation formula which is not an accurate measurement result. Firstly, an optical fiber expendable temperature/depth sensor based on the FBG-LPG cascaded structure is proposed to solve the problems of the CXBT, namely the use of LPG and FBG were used to detect the water temperature and depth, respectively. Secondly, the fiber end reflective mirror is used to simplify optical cascade structure and optimize the system performance. Finally, the optical path is designed and optimized using the reflective optical fiber end mirror. The experimental results show that the sensitivity of temperature and depth sensing based on FBG-LPG cascade structure is about 0.0030C and 0.1%F.S. respectively, which can meet the requirements of the sea water temperature/depth observation. The reflectivity of reflection mirror is in the range from 48.8% to 72.5%, the resonant peak of FBG and LPG are reasonable and the whole spectrum are suitable for demodulation. Through research on the optical fiber XBT (FXBT), the direct measurement of deep-sea temperature/depth profile data can be obtained simultaneously, quickly and accurately. The FXBT is a new all-optical seawater temperature/depth sensor, which has important academic value and broad application prospect and is expected to replace the CXBT in the future.

  9. 29 CFR 99.205 - Basis for determining Federal awards expended.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Basis for determining Federal awards expended. 99.205 Section 99.205 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 99.205 Basis for determining Federal awards expended. (a) Determining Federal awards...

  10. Processing Depth, Elaboration of Encoding, Memory Stores, and Expended Processing Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysenck, Michael W.; Eysenck, M. Christine

    1979-01-01

    The effects of several factors on expended processing capacity were measured. Expended processing capacity was greater when information was retrieved from secondary memory than from primary memory, when processing was of a deep, semantic nature than when it was shallow and physical, and when processing was more elaborate. (Author/GDC)

  11. Quality function deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    This book indicates quality function deployment with quality and deployment of quality function, process and prospect of quality function deployment and development, product process and conception of quality table, deployment of quality demand, design of quality table and application of concurrent multi design, progress design and quality development, main safe part and management of important function part, quality development and deployment of method of construction, quality deployment and economics, total system of quality function deployment and task of quality function deployment in the present and future.

  12. Bergy Bit and Melt Water Trajectories in Godthåbsfjord (SW Greenland Observed by the Expendable Ice Tracker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. Carlson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Icebergs and bergy bits makes up a significant component of the total freshwater flux from the Greenland Ice Sheet to the ocean. Observations of iceberg trajectories are biased toward larger icebergs and, as a result, the drift characteristics of smaller icebergs and bergy bits are poorly understood. In an attempt to fill this critical knowledge gap, we developed the open-source EXpendable Ice TrackEr (EXITE. EXITE is a low-cost, satellite-tracked GPS beacon capable of high-resolution temporal measurements over extended deployment periods (30 days or more. Furthermore, EXITE can transform to a surface drifter when its host iceberg capsizes or fragments. Here we describe basic construction of an EXITE beacon and present results from a deployment in Godthåbsfjord (SW Greenland in August 2016. Overall, EXITE trajectories show out-fjord surface transport, in agreement with a simple estuarine circulation paradigm. However, eddies and abrupt wind-driven reversals reveal complex surface transport pathways at time scales of hours to days.

  13. Modelling of energy expended by free swimming spermatozoa in temperature-dependent viscous semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Jong Yong Abdiel

    2010-01-01

    Derived models of fertilization kinetics have relied upon estimates of the swimming velocity of spermatozoa from the insemination site to a fallopian tube. However, limited derivations are available describing the probability and energy expended when spermatozoa collide with one another. An analytic approach of spermatozoon motion in a linear viscoelastic fluid is adopted to simplify the derivation. The complex kinematics of motion of an inextensible flagellum is modelled as planar flagellar wave of small amplitude. In humans, a temperature difference is expected between the cooler tubal isthmus and the warmer tubal ampulla. Thus, fluidic characteristics of semen such as viscosity can vary along the female reproductive tract. The results suggest that the probability of spermatozoa colliding in relatively lower viscous semen increases by 64.87% for a 0.5 degrees C surge in temperature. Moreover, this increases for a denser concentration of spermatozoa due to the limited semen volume available to manoeuvre. In addition, the propulsive forces and shear stress were 39.35% lower in less viscous semen due to an increase in temperature of only 0.5 degrees C. Hence, the described derivations herein can assist in the understanding of work done by a normal motile spermatozoon in a pool of semen.

  14. Prefrontal Cortical Inactivations Decrease Willingness to Expend Cognitive Effort on a Rodent Cost/Benefit Decision-Making Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, Jay G; Cocker, Paul J; Winstanley, Catharine A

    2016-04-01

    Personal success often necessitates expending greater effort for greater reward but, equally important, also requires judicious use of our limited cognitive resources (e.g., attention). Previous animal models have shown that the prelimbic (PL) and infralimbic (IL) regions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) are not involved in (physical) effort-based choice, whereas human studies have demonstrated PFC contributions to (mental) effort. Here, we utilize the rat Cognitive Effort Task (rCET) to probe PFC's role in effort-based decision making. In the rCET, animals can choose either an easy trial, where the attentional demand is low but the reward (sugar) is small or a difficult trial on which both the attentional demand and reward are greater. Temporary inactivation of PL and IL decreased all animals' willingness to expend mental effort and increased animals' distractibility; PL inactivations more substantially affected performance (i.e., attention), whereas IL inactivations increased motor impulsivity. These data imply that the PFC contributes to attentional resources, and when these resources are diminished, animals shift their choice (via other brain regions) accordingly. Thus, one novel therapeutic approach to deficits in effort expenditure may be to focus on the resources that such decision making requires, rather than the decision-making process per se. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Solar sail deployment experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Shimose, Shigeru; 下瀬 滋

    2006-01-01

    Solar Sail move by receiving momentum of photons in sunlight. This paper presents results of some Spin-Stabilized Solar Sail deployment experiment. ISAS has successfully deployed, for the first time in the world, the polyimide Solar Sail taking advantage of centrifugal force in space. Based on this result, the new deployment mechanism is being developed which retracts the 50 m diameter sail.

  16. Mastering Windows 7 Deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, Aidan; van Surksum, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Get professional-level instruction on Windows 7 deployment tools Enterprise-level operating system deployment is challenging and requires knowledge of specific tools. It is expected that Windows 7 will be extensively deployed in businesses worldwide. This comprehensive Sybex guide provides thorough coverage of the Microsoft deployment tools that were specifically created for Windows 7, preparing system administrators, MIS professionals, and corporate programmers to tackle the task effectively.Companies worldwide are expected to deploy Windows 7 as their enterprise operating system; system admi

  17. Emptying device for expendable bottles, especially small counter bottles for radioactive liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltermann, W.

    1975-01-01

    The device cuts up and empties, respectively, counting bottles and vials, respectively, for radioactive liquids. The vials are taken from a magazine and put on transport disks which move them past a circular saw blade cutting the vials into two cups. The liquid pouring out flows through a collection groove into a collection vessel. The two cups are pushed on the arms of a double turnstile by means of guide systems. Gas fed through lines running inside the arms of the turnstiles is used to flush the cups with nitrogen gas. In the downward movement of the double turnstile a catching surface removes the cups or they automatically fall into a collection bag, respectively. Baffle plates hold the vials on the transport disks. (DG/RF) [de

  18. Parts, Materials, and Processes Control Program for Expendable Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    cycle cost ; and 4. Improve procurement and test of small quantities of parts and materials that meet system requirements. This document supersedes...the reliability of program PMP to reduce PMP failures at all levels of assembly and test 3. Reduce program lifecycle cost 4. Improve procurement and...part shall be procured in single lots directly from the manufacturer or its authorized franchised distributor. The contractor shall be able to

  19. Supply strategy for SMR deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coccagna, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    This document provides a description of Babcock and Wilcox's deployment strategy for the mPower™ Small Modular Reactor from the perspective of Supply Chain and Manufacturing. A desirable future state of readiness is described as one which leverages and revitalizes an existing supply chain and manufacturing infrastructure, as well as leveraging an existing workforce of engineering, construction, and project management employees. B and W's mPower™ SMR value proposition offers many desired design and operating advantages to the SMR market. (author)

  20. Deployment of Small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS) in Emergency and Disaster Response Scenarios to Support Local Emergency Management Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamaio, C. L.; Walker, J.; Beck, J. M.; Graves, S. J.; Johnson, C.

    2017-12-01

    Researchers at the Information Technology and Systems Center at the University of Alabama in Huntsville are working closely with the Madison County Emergency Management Agency (EMA), GeoHuntsville's UAS Working Group, and the NOAA UAS Program Office, to conduct a series of practical demonstrations testing the use of small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) for emergency response activities in Madison County, Alabama. These exercises demonstrate the use of UAS to detect and visualize hazards in affected areas via the delivery of aerial imagery and associated data products to law enforcement first responders in a variety of different scenarios, for example, search and rescue, tornado track mapping, damage assessment, and situational awareness/containment during active shooter incidents. In addition to showcasing the use of UAS as a tool for emergency services, these pilot exercises provide the opportunity to engage the appropriate stakeholders from several communities including first responders, geospatial intelligence, active members of the unmanned systems industry, and academia. This presentation will showcase the challenges associated with delivering quality data products for emergency services in a timely manner as well as the related challenges in integrating the technology into local emergency management.

  1. To Construction of Expendable Hydroelectric Power Station Characteristics and Their Timely Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kh. Nasibov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides a technique of analytical construction of expendable characteristics and characteristics of a relative gain of water charge at a hydroelectric power station. Planning method and regression analysis have been applied for the construction of these characteristics.

  2. RSOI: Force Deployment Bottleneck

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Amato, Mark

    1998-01-01

    This study uses The Theory Of Constraints (TOC) management methodology and recent military missions to show that RSOI operations are generally the limiting constraint to force deployment operations...

  3. Center for Deployment Psychology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Deployment Psychology was developed to promote the education of psychologists and other behavioral health specialists about issues pertaining to the...

  4. Deployment Health Surveillance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeNicola, Anthony D

    2004-01-01

    .... Gulf War health questions have resulted in controversy over potentially hazardous exposures during the deployment, the possibility of adverse affects from preventive health measures, and the role...

  5. 45 CFR 263.1 - How much State money must a State expend annually to meet the basic MOE requirement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How much State money must a State expend annually... State's Maintenance of Effort? § 263.1 How much State money must a State expend annually to meet the... historic State expenditures. (2) However, if a State meets the minimum work participation rate requirements...

  6. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, K. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Belzer, D. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Livingston, O. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-11-01

    This report compiles information and conclusions gathered as part of the “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs” project. The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge in which future research is needed.

  7. Scientific Objectives of Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) and Deployable Camera 3 Digital (DCAM3-D): Observation of an Ejecta Curtain and a Crater Formed on the Surface of Ryugu by an Artificial High-Velocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, M.; Wada, K.; Saiki, T.; Kadono, T.; Takagi, Y.; Shirai, K.; Okamoto, C.; Yano, H.; Hayakawa, M.; Nakazawa, S.; Hirata, N.; Kobayashi, M.; Michel, P.; Jutzi, M.; Imamura, H.; Ogawa, K.; Sakatani, N.; Iijima, Y.; Honda, R.; Ishibashi, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Sawada, H.

    2017-07-01

    The Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) equipped on Hayabusa2 was developed to produce an artificial impact crater on the primitive Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) 162173 Ryugu (Ryugu) in order to explore the asteroid subsurface material unaffected by space weathering and thermal alteration by solar radiation. An exposed fresh surface by the impactor and/or the ejecta deposit excavated from the crater will be observed by remote sensing instruments, and a subsurface fresh sample of the asteroid will be collected there. The SCI impact experiment will be observed by a Deployable CAMera 3-D (DCAM3-D) at a distance of ˜1 km from the impact point, and the time evolution of the ejecta curtain will be observed by this camera to confirm the impact point on the asteroid surface. As a result of the observation of the ejecta curtain by DCAM3-D and the crater morphology by onboard cameras, the subsurface structure and the physical properties of the constituting materials will be derived from crater scaling laws. Moreover, the SCI experiment on Ryugu gives us a precious opportunity to clarify effects of microgravity on the cratering process and to validate numerical simulations and models of the cratering process.

  8. Part 8. Deployment considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dance, K.D.; Chang, Y.I.; Daly, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    This report addresses considerations of fast breeder reactor development and deployment from a national perspective. Nations vary greatly in their expertise and interest relative to nuclear power, and hence a single set of steps to be taken by a nation in decision-making on breeder development and deployment cannot be presented. The approach taken in this report is to present discussions on key factors influencing the breeder development and deployment decisions, especially in non-breeder nations, by drawing upon historical perspectives of the Light Water Reactor for comparison

  9. Heterogeneous Deployment Analysis for Cost-Effective Mobile Network Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coletti, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    network coverage and boosting network capacity in traffic hot-spot areas. The thesis deals with the deployment of both outdoor small cells and indoor femto cells. Amongst the outdoor solution, particular emphasis is put on relay base stations as backhaul costs can be reduced by utilizing LTE spectrum...... statistical models of deployment areas, the performance analysis is carried out in the form of operator case studies for large-scale deployment scenarios, including realistic macro network layouts and inhomogeneous spatial traffic distributions. Deployment of small cells is performed by means of proposed...... heuristic deployment algorithms, which combine network coverage and spatial user density information. As a secondary aspect, deployment solutions achieving the same coverage performance are compared in terms of Total Cost of Ownership (TCO), in order to investigate the viability of different deployment...

  10. On the biomechanical analysis of the calories expended in a straight boxing jab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohdi, T I

    2017-04-01

    Boxing and related sports activities have become a standard workout regime at many fitness studios worldwide. Oftentimes, people are interested in the calories expended during these workouts. This note focuses on determining the calories in a boxer's jab, using kinematic vector-loop relations and basic work-energy principles. Numerical simulations are undertaken to illustrate the basic model. Multi-limb extensions of the model are also discussed. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. Deployment Health Surveillance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeNicola, Anthony D

    2004-01-01

    ... of stress in causing chronic illness. The lack of comprehensive deployment health surveillance has made it difficult to determine possible causes of adverse health effects reported by Gulf War veterans...

  12. Modeling EERE deployment programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, K. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Belzer, D. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Livingston, O. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge for future research.

  13. RSOI: Force Deployment Bottleneck

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Amato, Mark

    1998-01-01

    .... This runs counter to the popular belief that strategic lift is the limiting constraint. The study begins by highlighting the genesis of the military's current force projection strategy and the resulting importance of rapid force deployments...

  14. Deployable Brake for Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, J. R.; Maloney, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    Aerodynamic shield that could be opened and closed proposed. Report presents concepts for deployable aerodynamic brake. Brake used by spacecraft returning from high orbit to low orbit around Earth. Spacecraft makes grazing passes through atmosphere to slow down by drag of brake. Brake flexible shield made of woven metal or ceramic withstanding high temperatures created by air friction. Stored until needed, then deployed by set of struts.

  15. Deployment of Mobile Learning Course Materials to Android Powered Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Lee

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article is to facilitate mobile teaching and learning by providing an alternative course material deployment method. This article suggests a course material deployment platform for small universities or individual instructors. Different from traditional course material deployment methods, the method discussed deploys course…

  16. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.

    2007-11-08

    The purpose of this report is to compile information and conclusions gathered as part of three separate tasks undertaken as part of the overall project, “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs,” sponsored by the Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation office within the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address improvements to modeling in the near term, and note gaps in knowledge where future research is needed.

  17. Remote Systems Design & Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2009-08-28

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) to provide information and lessons learned relating to the design, development and deployment of remote systems, particularly remote arm/manipulator systems. This report reflects PNNL’s experience with remote systems and lays out the most important activities that need to be completed to successfully design, build, deploy and operate remote systems in radioactive and chemically contaminated environments. It also contains lessons learned from PNNL’s work experiences, and the work of others in the national laboratory complex.

  18. Production of chemical energy carriers by non-expendable energy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitsch, J

    1976-01-01

    The different forms of energy (radiation, high-temperature heat and electricity) arising from non-expendable energy sources like solar energy can be used for the production of chemical energy-carriers. Possible methods are the splitting of water by means of photolysis, thermochemical cycles and electrolysis, as well as the storage of energy in closed loop chemical systems. These methods are described and efficiencies and costs of the production of these energy carriers are specified. Special problems of the long-distance transportation of hydrogen produced by solar energy are described and the resulting costs are estimated.

  19. Deploying Node.js

    CERN Document Server

    Pasquali, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    If you are an intermediate or advanced developer deploying your Node.js applications, then this book is for you. If you have already built a Node application or module and want to take your knowledge to the next level, this book will help you find your way.

  20. Cooperative Technolgy Deployed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenders, E.; Velt, R. in 't

    2011-01-01

    After the successful demonstrations of cooperative technology by the CVIS and Safespot projects the question remains how this technology can be successfully deployed. This question is explored by the Field Operational Test project FREILOT, which aims to provide fuel economy applications that must be

  1. Fusion Power Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.; Ogden, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Fusion power plants could be part of a future portfolio of non-carbon dioxide producing energy supplies such as wind, solar, biomass, advanced fission power, and fossil energy with carbon dioxide sequestration. In this paper, we discuss key issues that could impact fusion energy deployment during the last half of this century. These include geographic issues such as resource availability, scale issues, energy storage requirements, and waste issues. The resource needs and waste production associated with fusion deployment in the U.S. should not pose serious problems. One important feature of fusion power is the fact that a fusion power plant should be locatable within most local or regional electrical distribution systems. For this reason, fusion power plants should not increase the burden of long distance power transmission to our distribution system. In contrast to fusion power, regional factors could play an important role in the deployment of renewable resources such as wind, solar and biomass or fossil energy with CO2 sequestration. We examine the role of these regional factors and their implications for fusion power deployment

  2. Deploying Renewables - Best and Future Policy Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-23

    The global energy system faces urgent challenges. Concerns about energy security are growing, as highlighted by the recent political turmoil in Northern Africa and the nuclear incident in Fukushima. At the same time, the need to respond to climate change is more critical than ever. Against this background, many governments have increased efforts to promote deployment of renewable energy -- low-carbon sources that can strengthen energy security. This has stimulated unprecedented rise in deployment, and renewables are now the fastest growing sector of the energy mix. This 'coming of age' of renewable energy also brings challenges. Growth is focused on a few of the available technologies, and rapid deployment is confined to a relatively small number of countries. In more advanced markets, managing support costs and system integration of large shares of renewable energy in a time of economic weakness and budget austerity has sparked vigorous political debate. The IEA's new report, Deploying Renewables 2011: Best and Future Policy Practice: - Provides a comprehensive review and analysis of renewable energy policy and market trends; - Analyses in detail the dynamics of deployment and provides best-practice policy principles for different stages of market maturity; - Assesses the impact and cost-effectiveness of support policies using new methodological tools and indicators; - Investigates the strategic reasons underpinning the pursuit of RE deployment by different countries and the prospects for globalisation of RE. This new book builds on and extends a 2008 IEA publication, drawing on recent policy and deployment experience world-wide. It provides guidance for policy makers and other stakeholders to avoid past mistakes, overcome new challenges and reap the benefits of deploying renewables -- today and tomorrow.

  3. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alff, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility and costs were determined for a 1 m to 30 m diameter ambient temperature, infrared to submillimeter orbiting astronomical telescope which is to be shuttle-deployed, free-flying, and have a 10 year orbital life. Baseline concepts, constraints on delivery and deployment, and the sunshield required are examined. Reflector concepts, the optical configuration, alignment and pointing, and materials are also discussed. Technology studies show that a 10 m to 30 m diameter system which is background and diffraction limited at 30 micron m is feasible within the stated time frame. A 10 m system is feasible with current mirror technology, while a 30 m system requires technology still in development.

  4. Deployable reflector configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinel, A. B.; Meinel, M. P.; Woolf, N. J.

    Both the theoretical reasons for considering a non-circular format for the Large Deployable Reflector, and a potentially realizable concept for such a device, are discussed. The optimum systems for diffraction limited telescopes with incoherent detection have either a single filled aperture, or two such apertures as an interferometer to synthesize a larger aperture. For a single aperture of limited area, a reflector in the form of a slot can be used to give increased angular resolution. It is shown how a 20 x 8 meter telescope can be configured to fit the Space Shuttle bay, and deployed with relatively simple operations. The relationship between the sunshield design and the inclination of the orbit is discussed. The possible use of the LDR as a basic module to permit the construction of supergiant space telescopes and interferometers both for IR/submm studies and for the entire ultraviolet through mm wave spectral region is discussed.

  5. Treatment Deployment Evaluation Tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. A. Rynearson; M. M. Plum

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the final disposition of legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF). As a response, DOE's National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has been given the responsibility for the disposition of DOE-owned SNF. Many treatment technologies have been identified to treat some forms of SNF so that the resulting treated product is acceptable by the disposition site. One of these promising treatment processes is the electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) currently in development; a second is an Acid Wash Decladding process. The NSNFP has been tasked with identifying possible strategies for the deployment of these treatment processes in the event that a treatment path is deemed necessary. To support the siting studies of these strategies, economic evaluations are being performed to identify the least-cost deployment path. This model (tool) was developed to consider the full scope of costs, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule attributes over the life of each deployment alternative. Using standard personal computer (PC) software, the model was developed as a comprehensive technology economic assessment tool using a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis methodology. Model development was planned as a systematic, iterative process of identifying and bounding the required activities to dispose of SNF. To support the evaluation process, activities are decomposed into lower level, easier to estimate activities. Sensitivity studies can then be performed on these activities, defining cost issues and testing results against the originally stated problem

  6. The financial impact of deployments on reserve health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petinaux, Bruno

    2008-08-01

    This study retrospectively surveyed the financial impact of deployments on 17 U.S. Army Reserve health care providers. Due to multiple mobilizations, 29 separate deployments were reported. The deployments, mostly between 2001 and 2005, typically lasted 3 months during which 86% reported no civilian income and 76% reported no civilian benefits. Solo practice providers reported the greatest financial losses due to continuing financial responsibility related to their civilian practice despite being deployed. Overall, 2 deployments did not change, 9 increased, and 16 decreased the medical officer's income. Two were not reported. In this small retrospective convenience sample study, solo practice U.S. Army Reserve health care providers were found to be at highest risk of financial losses during military deployments. This being said, no price can be put on the privilege of serving our men and women in uniform.

  7. Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    .... The Proposed Action is the development, deployment, and operation of EELV systems. EELV systems would replace current Atlas 2A, Delta 2, and Titan 4B launch systems and are intended to meet the requirements of the U.S...

  8. Economics of ALMR deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Hudson, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) has the potential to extend the economic life of the nuclear option and of reducing the number of high level waste repositories which will eventually be needed in an expanding nuclear economy. This paper reports on an analysis which models and evaluates the economics of the use of ALMRs as a component of this country's future electricity generation mix. The ALMR concept has the ability to utilize as fuel the fissile material contained in previously irradiated nuclear fuel (i.e., spent fuel) or from surplus weapons grade material. While not a requirement for the successful deployment of ALMR power plant technology, the reprocessing of spent fuel from light water reactors (LWR) is necessary for any rapid introduction of ALMR power plants. In addition, the reprocessing of LWR spent fuel may reduce the number of high level waste repositories needed in the future by burning the long-lived actinides produced in the fission process. With this study, the relative economics of a number of potential scenarios related to these issues are evaluated. While not encompassing the full range of all possibilities, the cases reported here provide an indication of the potential costs, timings, and relative economic attractiveness of ALMR deployment

  9. ALMR deployment economic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Hudson, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    This analysis seeks to model and evaluate the economics of the use of Advanced Liquid Metal Reactors (ALMR) as a component of this country's future electricity generation mix. The ALMR concept has the ability to utilize as fuel the fissile material contained in previously irradiated nuclear fuel (i.e., spent fuel). While not a requirement for the successful deployment of ALMR power plant technology, the reprocessing of spent fuel from light water reactors (LWR) is necessary for any rapid introduction of ALMR power plants. In addition, the reprocessing of LWR spent fuel may reduce the number of high level waste repositories needed in the future by burning the long-lived actinides produced in the fission process. With this study, the relative economics of a number of potential scenarios related to these issues are evaluated. While not encompassing the full range of all possibilities, the cases reported here provide an indication of the potential costs, timings, and relative economic attractiveness of ALMR deployment

  10. Comprehension and Time Expended for a Doctoral Student with a Learning Disability when Reading with and without an Accommodation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanners, Adam; McDougall, Dennis; Skouge, Jim; Narkon, Drue

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this alternating treatment, single-case research study was to compare reading comprehension and time expended reading, of a doctoral student with learning disabilities, under two reading conditions. In condition one, the student used a self-discovered accommodation, that is, listening, on an iPod, to an audiobook version…

  11. Quality Function Deployment for Large Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1992-01-01

    Quality Function Deployment (QFD) is typically applied to small subsystems. This paper describes efforts to extend QFD to large scale systems. It links QFD to the system engineering process, the concurrent engineering process, the robust design process, and the costing process. The effect is to generate a tightly linked project management process of high dimensionality which flushes out issues early to provide a high quality, low cost, and, hence, competitive product. A pre-QFD matrix linking customers to customer desires is described.

  12. Complex Deployed Responsive Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Glenn; McLening, Marc; Caldwell, Nigel; Thompson, Rob

    A pizza restaurant must provide product, in the form of the food and drink, and service in the way this is delivered to the customer. Providing this has distinct operational challenges, but what if the restaurant also provides a home delivery service? The service becomes deployed as the customer is no-longer co-located with the production area. The business challenge is complicated as service needs to be delivered within a geographic region, to time or the pizza will be cold, and within a cost that is not ­prohibitive. It must also be responsive to short term demand; needing to balance the number of staff it has available to undertake deliveries against a forecast of demand.

  13. CCT deployment considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, B.

    1993-01-01

    The deployment of Clean Coal Technologies (CCT) is discussed by asserting that in the case of commercializing CCT, the government's involvement should not stop at the demonstration gate. Two areas in this regard are described. First, the need for the domestic DOE CCT Program to focus on the domestic deployment of demonstrated technologies, and second, the need to recognize that to participate in the phenomenal growth of international power markets through use of clean coal or advanced coal technologies an aggressive partnering between the government and industry to demonstrate technologies abroad will be required. The Clean Coal Technology Coalition's (CCT) primary mission has been to promote the development and use of CCTs. The CCT is a strong advocate for the DOE CCT Program and applauds the Department's and industry's success at developing many coal-based technologies. By current design, the DOE program is said to go no further than the initial demonstration of a technology. Since the inception of CCT in 1986, the Coalition has advocated the need to pursue a partnership with government in which more than one demonstration of the same or similar technology is supported by the clean coal program. Only in this way can one be assured of widespread acceptance of any given technology. There exists a gap (call it a open-quotes risk gapclose quotes) between CCTs that have been successfully demonstrated (and presumably available for commercial use) and their widespread commercial use. A technology matrix has been developed in which the developmental status of a variety of clean coal technologies is demonstrated. While still too early to pass judgment, it appears that while success is being achieved in demonstrating advanced coal technologies, the market place - for several reasons - is not, indeed may have no plans, to adopt these technologies

  14. CMS software deployment on OSG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, B; Avery, P; Thomas, M; Wuerthwein, F

    2008-01-01

    A set of software deployment tools has been developed for the installation, verification, and removal of a CMS software release. The tools that are mainly targeted for the deployment on the OSG have the features of instant release deployment, corrective resubmission of the initial installation job, and an independent web-based deployment portal with Grid security infrastructure login mechanism. We have been deploying over 500 installations and found the tools are reliable and adaptable to cope with problems with changes in the Grid computing environment and the software releases. We present the design of the tools, statistics that we gathered during the operation of the tools, and our experience with the CMS software deployment on the OSG Grid computing environment

  15. CMS software deployment on OSG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B; Avery, P [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Thomas, M [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wuerthwein, F [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)], E-mail: bockjoo@phys.ufl.edu, E-mail: thomas@hep.caltech.edu, E-mail: avery@phys.ufl.edu, E-mail: fkw@fnal.gov

    2008-07-15

    A set of software deployment tools has been developed for the installation, verification, and removal of a CMS software release. The tools that are mainly targeted for the deployment on the OSG have the features of instant release deployment, corrective resubmission of the initial installation job, and an independent web-based deployment portal with Grid security infrastructure login mechanism. We have been deploying over 500 installations and found the tools are reliable and adaptable to cope with problems with changes in the Grid computing environment and the software releases. We present the design of the tools, statistics that we gathered during the operation of the tools, and our experience with the CMS software deployment on the OSG Grid computing environment.

  16. Deployment of 464XLAT (RFC6877) alongside IPv6-only CPU resources at WLCG sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froy, T. S.; Traynor, D. P.; Walker, C. J.

    2017-10-01

    IPv4 is now officially deprecated by the IETF. A significant amount of effort has already been expended by the HEPiX IPv6 Working Group on testing dual-stacked hosts and IPv6-only CPU resources. Dual-stack adds complexity and administrative overhead to sites that may already be starved of resource. This has resulted in a very slow uptake of IPv6 from WLCG sites. 464XLAT (RFC6877) is intended for IPv6 single-stack environments that require the ability to communicate with IPv4-only endpoints. This paper will present a deployment strategy for 464XLAT, operational experiences of using 464XLAT in production at a WLCG site and important information to consider prior to deploying 464XLAT.

  17. Mastering Hyper-V Deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, Aidan

    2010-01-01

    The only book to take an in-depth look at deploying Hyper-V. Now in its second generation, the popular Hyper-V boasts technical advances that create even more dynamic systems than ever before. This unique resource serves an authoritative guide to deploying Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V comprehensively. Step-by-step instructions demonstrate how to design a Hyper-V deployment, build a Hyper-V host environment, and design a management system with System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2.: Features real-world examples that show you how to design a Hyper-V deployment, build a Hyper-V host env

  18. Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division advances transportation innovation by being leaders in infrastructure technology, including vehicles and...

  19. Origami-inspired, on-demand deployable and collapsible mechanical metamaterials with tunable stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zirui; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Hanqing

    2018-03-01

    Origami has been employed to build deployable mechanical metamaterials through folding and unfolding along the crease lines. Deployable metamaterials are usually flexible, particularly along their deploying and collapsing directions, which unfortunately in many cases leads to an unstable deployed state, i.e., small perturbations may collapse the structure along the same deployment path. Here we create an origami-inspired mechanical metamaterial with on-demand deployability and selective collapsibility through energy analysis. This metamaterial has autonomous deployability from the collapsed state and can be selectively collapsed along two different paths, embodying low stiffness for one path and substantially high stiffness for another path. The created mechanical metamaterial yields load-bearing capability in the deployed direction while possessing great deployability and collapsibility. The principle in this work can be utilized to design and create versatile origami-inspired mechanical metamaterials that can find many applications.

  20. Expendable launch vehicles technology: A report to the US Senate and the US House of Representatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    As directed in Public Law 100-657, Commercial Space Launch Act Amendments of 1988, and consistent with National Space Policy, NASA has prepared a report on a potential program of research on technologies to reduce the initial and recurring costs, increase reliability, and improve performance of expendable launch vehicles for the launch of commercial and government spacecraft into orbit. The report was developed in consultation with industry and in recognition of relevant ongoing and planned NASA and DoD technology programs which will provide much of the required launch systems technology for U.S. Government needs. Additional efforts which could be undertaken to strengthen the technology base are identified. To this end, focus is on needs for launch vehicle technology development and, in selected areas, includes verification to permit private-sector new technology application at reduced risk. If such a program were to be implemented, it would entail both government and private-sector effort and resources. The additional efforts identified would augment the existing launch vehicle technology programs. The additional efforts identified have not been funded, based upon agency assessments of relative priority vis-a-vis the existing programs. Throughout the consultation and review process, the industry representatives stressed the overriding importance of continuing the DoD/NASA Advanced Launch Development activity and other government technology programs as a primary source of essential launch vehicle technology.

  1. ABC-VED analysis of expendable medical stores at a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sushil; Chakravarty, A

    2015-01-01

    The modern system of medicine has evolved into a complex, sophisticated and expensive treatment modality in terms of cost of medicines and consumables. In any hospital, approximately 33% of total annual budget is spent on buying materials and supplies including medicines. ABC (Always, Better Control)-VED (Vital, Essential, Desirable) analysis of medical stores of a large teaching, tertiary care hospital of the Armed Forces was carried out to identify the categories of drugs needing focused managerial control. Annual consumption and expenditure data of expendable medical stores for one year was extracted from the drug expense book, followed by classification on its annual usage value. Subsequently, the factor of criticality was applied to arrive at a decision matrix for understanding the need for selective managerial control. The study revealed that out of 1536 items considered for the study, 6.77% (104), 19.27% (296) and 73.95% (1136) items were found to be A, B and C category items respectively. VED analysis revealed that vital items (V) accounted for 13.14% (201), essential items (E) for 56.37% (866) and desirable accounted for 30.49% items (469). ABC-VED matrix analysis of the inventory reveals that only 322 (21%) items out of an inventory of 1536 drugs belonging to category I will require maximum attention. Scientific inventory management tools need to be applied routinely for efficient management of medical stores, as it contributes to judicious use of limited resources and resultant improvement in patient care.

  2. Expendable launch vehicles technology: A report to the US Senate and the US House of Representatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-01

    As directed in Public Law 100-657, Commercial Space Launch Act Amendments of 1988, and consistent with National Space Policy, NASA has prepared a report on a potential program of research on technologies to reduce the initial and recurring costs, increase reliability, and improve performance of expendable launch vehicles for the launch of commercial and government spacecraft into orbit. The report was developed in consultation with industry and in recognition of relevant ongoing and planned NASA and DoD technology programs which will provide much of the required launch systems technology for U.S. Government needs. Additional efforts which could be undertaken to strengthen the technology base are identified. To this end, focus is on needs for launch vehicle technology development and, in selected areas, includes verification to permit private-sector new technology application at reduced risk. If such a program were to be implemented, it would entail both government and private-sector effort and resources. The additional efforts identified would augment the existing launch vehicle technology programs. The additional efforts identified have not been funded, based upon agency assessments of relative priority vis-a-vis the existing programs. Throughout the consultation and review process, the industry representatives stressed the overriding importance of continuing the DoD/NASA Advanced Launch Development activity and other government technology programs as a primary source of essential launch vehicle technology.

  3. Space platform expendables resupply concept definition study. Volume 3: Work breakdown structure and work breakdown structure dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The work breakdown structure (WBS) for the Space Platform Expendables Resupply Concept Definition Study is described. The WBS consists of a list of WBS elements, a dictionary of element definitions, and an element logic diagram. The list and logic diagram identify the interrelationships of the elements. The dictionary defines the types of work that may be represented by or be classified under each specific element. The Space Platform Expendable Resupply WBS was selected mainly to support the program planning, scheduling, and costing performed in the programmatics task (task 3). The WBS is neither a statement-of-work nor a work authorization document. Rather, it is a framework around which to define requirements, plan effort, assign responsibilities, allocate and control resources, and report progress, expenditures, technical performance, and schedule performance. The WBS element definitions are independent of make-or-buy decisions, organizational structure, and activity locations unless exceptions are specifically stated.

  4. Probability of Failure Analysis Standards and Guidelines for Expendable Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Paul D.; Morse, Elisabeth L.; Rosati, Paul; Cather, Corey

    2013-09-01

    Recognizing the central importance of probability of failure estimates to ensuring public safety for launches, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and U.S. Air Force (USAF), through the Common Standards Working Group (CSWG), developed a guide for conducting valid probability of failure (POF) analyses for expendable launch vehicles (ELV), with an emphasis on POF analysis for new ELVs. A probability of failure analysis for an ELV produces estimates of the likelihood of occurrence of potentially hazardous events, which are critical inputs to launch risk analysis of debris, toxic, or explosive hazards. This guide is intended to document a framework for POF analyses commonly accepted in the US, and should be useful to anyone who performs or evaluates launch risk analyses for new ELVs. The CSWG guidelines provide performance standards and definitions of key terms, and are being revised to address allocation to flight times and vehicle response modes. The POF performance standard allows a launch operator to employ alternative, potentially innovative methodologies so long as the results satisfy the performance standard. Current POF analysis practice at US ranges includes multiple methodologies described in the guidelines as accepted methods, but not necessarily the only methods available to demonstrate compliance with the performance standard. The guidelines include illustrative examples for each POF analysis method, which are intended to illustrate an acceptable level of fidelity for ELV POF analyses used to ensure public safety. The focus is on providing guiding principles rather than "recipe lists." Independent reviews of these guidelines were performed to assess their logic, completeness, accuracy, self- consistency, consistency with risk analysis practices, use of available information, and ease of applicability. The independent reviews confirmed the

  5. An innovative deployable solar panel system for Cubesats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoni, Fabio; Piergentili, Fabrizio; Donati, Serena; Perelli, Massimo; Negri, Andrea; Marino, Michele

    2014-02-01

    One of the main Cubesat bus limitations is the available on-board power. The maximum power obtained using body mounted solar panels and advanced triple junction solar cells on a triple unit Cubesat is typically less than 10 W. The Cubesat performance and the mission scenario opened to these small satellite systems could be greatly enhanced by an increase of the available power. This paper describes the design and realization of a modular deployable solar panel system for Cubesats, consisting of a modular hinge and spring system that can be potentially used on-board single (1U), double(2U), triple (3U) and six units (6U) Cubesats. The size of each solar panels is the size of a lateral Cubesat surface. The system developed is the basis for a SADA (Solar Array Drive Assembly), in which a maneuvering capability is added to the deployed solar array in order to follow the apparent motion of the sun. The system design trade-off is discussed, comparing different deployment concepts and architectures, leading to the final selection for the modular design. A prototype of the system has been realized for a 3U Cubesat, consisting of two deployable solar panel systems, made of three solar panels each, for a total of six deployed solar panels. The deployment system is based on a plastic fiber wire and thermal cutters, guaranteeing a suitable level of reliability. A test-bed for the solar panel deployment testing has been developed, supporting the solar array during deployment reproducing the dynamical situation in orbit. The results of the deployment system testing are discussed, including the design and realization of the test-bed, the mechanical stress given to the solar cells by the deployment accelerations and the overall system performance. The maximum power delivered by the system is about 50.4 W BOL, greatly enhancing the present Cubesat solar array performance.

  6. Rapid deployment intrusion detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    A rapidly deployable security system is one that provides intrusion detection, assessment, communications, and annunciation capabilities; is easy to install and configure; can be rapidly deployed, and is reusable. A rapidly deployable intrusion detection system (RADIDS) has many potential applications within the DOE Complex: back-up protection for failed zones in a perimeter intrusion detection and assessment system, intrusion detection and assessment capabilities in temporary locations, protection of assets during Complex reconfiguration, and protection in hazardous locations, protection of assets during Complex reconfiguration, and protection in hazardous locations. Many DOE user-need documents have indicated an interest in a rapidly deployable intrusion detection system. The purpose of the RADIDS project is to design, develop, and implement such a system. 2 figs

  7. Family Reintegration Following Guard Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    Somalia Peacekeepers. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 72(5), 909-913. Haas DM . Pazdernik LA. Olsen CH. A cross-sectional survey of the...relationship between partner deployment and stress in pregnancy during wartime. Haas DM . Pazdernik LA. Partner deployment and stress in pregnant...Identify 3-5 key words relating to the proposal. (Required) I used MESH Headings instead of the CRISP Thesaurus for key

  8. Advances in global development and deployment of small modular reactors and incorporating lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident into the designs of engineered safety features of advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadid Subki, M.; )

    2014-01-01

    The IAEA has been facilitating the Member States in incorporating the lessons-learned from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Accident into the designs of engineered safety features of advanced reactors, including small modular reactors. An extended assessment is required to address challenges for advancing reactor safety in the new evolving generation of SMR plants to preserve the historic lessons in safety, through: assuring the diversity in emergency core cooling systems following loss of onsite AC power; ensuring diversity in reactor depressurization following a transient or accident; confirming independence in reactor trip and safety systems for sensors, power supplies and actuation systems, and finally diversity in maintaining containment integrity following a severe accident

  9. An ARM Mobile Facility Designed for Marine Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiscombe, W. J.

    2007-05-01

    The U.S. Dept. of Energy's ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements) Program is designing a Mobile Facility exclusively for marine deployments. This marine facility is patterned after ARM's land Mobile Facility, which had its inaugural deployment at Point Reyes, California, in 2005, followed by deployments to Niger in 2006 and Germany in 2007 (ongoing), and a planned deployment to China in 2008. These facilities are primarily intended for the study of clouds, radiation, aerosols, and surface processes with a goal to include these processes accurately in climate models. They are preferably embedded within larger field campaigns which provide context. They carry extensive instrumentation (in several large containers) including: cloud radar, lidar, microwave radiometers, infrared spectrometers, broadband and narrowband radiometers, sonde-launching facilities, extensive surface aerosol measurements, sky imagers, and surface latent and sensible heat flux devices. ARM's Mobile Facilities are designed for 6-10 month deployments in order to capture climatically-relevant datasets. They are available to any scientist, U.S. or international, who wishes to submit a proposal during the annual Spring call. The marine facility will be adapted to, and ruggedized for, the harsh marine environment and will add a scanning two-frequency radar, a boundary-layer wind profiler, a shortwave spectrometer, and aerosol instrumentation adapted to typical marine aerosols like sea salt. Plans also include the use of roving small UAVs, automated small boats, and undersea autonomous vehicles in order to address the point-to-area-average problem which is so crucial for informing climate models. Initial deployments are planned for small islands in climatically- interesting cloud regimes, followed by deployments on oceanic platforms (like decommissioned oil rigs and the quasi-permanent platform of this session's title) and eventually on large ships like car carriers plying routine routes.

  10. IPv6 deployment and management

    CERN Document Server

    Dooley, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A guide for understanding, deploying, and managing Internet Protocol version 6 The growth of the Internet has created a need for more addresses than are available with Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4)-the protocol currently used to direct almost all Internet traffic. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6)-the new IP version intended to ultimately succeed IPv4-will expand the addressing capacity of the Internet to support the explosive growth of users and devices on the Internet as well as add flexibility to allocating addresses and efficiency for routing traffic. IPv6 Deploy

  11. Multi-site evaluation of a computer aided detection (CAD) algorithm for small acute intra-cranial hemorrhage and development of a stand-alone CAD system ready for deployment in a clinical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Ruchi R.; Fernandez, James; Lee, Joon K.; Chan, Tao; Liu, Brent J.; Huang, H. K.

    2010-03-01

    Timely detection of Acute Intra-cranial Hemorrhage (AIH) in an emergency environment is essential for the triage of patients suffering from Traumatic Brain Injury. Moreover, the small size of lesions and lack of experience on the reader's part could lead to difficulties in the detection of AIH. A CT based CAD algorithm for the detection of AIH has been developed in order to improve upon the current standard of identification and treatment of AIH. A retrospective analysis of the algorithm has already been carried out with 135 AIH CT studies with 135 matched normal head CT studies from the Los Angeles County General Hospital/ University of Southern California Hospital System (LAC/USC). In the next step, AIH studies have been collected from Walter Reed Army Medical Center, and are currently being processed using the AIH CAD system as part of implementing a multi-site assessment and evaluation of the performance of the algorithm. The sensitivity and specificity numbers from the Walter Reed study will be compared with the numbers from the LAC/USC study to determine if there are differences in the presentation and detection due to the difference in the nature of trauma between the two sites. Simultaneously, a stand-alone system with a user friendly GUI has been developed to facilitate implementation in a clinical setting.

  12. Deployment Effects of Marin Renewable Energy Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Polagye; Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nominally represent (1) a small pilot deployment, (2) an early, small commercial deployment, and (3) a large commercial scale plant. For the three technologies and scales at the selected site, this results in a total of nine deployment scenarios outlined in the report.

  13. Biomechanics of an Expandable Lumbar Interbody Fusion Cage Deployed Through Transforaminal Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mica, Michael Conti; Voronov, Leonard I.; Carandang, Gerard; Havey, Robert M.; Wojewnik, Bartosz

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A novel expandable lumbar interbody fusion cage has been developed which allows for a broad endplate footprint similar to an anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF); however, it is deployed from a minimally invasive transforaminal unilateral approach. The perceived benefit is a stable circumferential fusion from a single approach that maintains the anterior tension band of the anterior longitudinal ligament. The purpose of this biomechanics laboratory study was to evaluate the biomechanical stability of an expandable lumbar interbody cage inserted using a transforaminal approach and deployed in situ compared to a traditional lumbar interbody cage inserted using an anterior approach (control device). Methods Twelve cadaveric spine specimens (L1-L5) were tested intact and after implantation of both the control and experimental devices in two (L2-L3 and L3-L4) segments of each specimen; the assignments of the control and experimental devices to these segments were alternated. Effect of supplemental pedicle screw-rod stabilization was also assessed. Moments were applied to the specimens in flexion-extension (FE), lateral bending (LB), and axial rotation (AR). The effect of physiologic preload on construct stability was evaluated in FE. Segmental motions were measured using an optoelectronic motion measurement system. Results The deployable expendable TLIF cage and control devices significantly reduced FE motion with and without compressive preload when compared to the intact condition (p0.05). Adding bilateral pedicle screws resulted in further reduction of ROM for all loading modes compared to intact condition, with no statistical difference between the two constructs (p>0.05). Conclusions The ability of the deployable expendable interbody cage in reducing segmental motions was equivalent to the control cage when used as a stand-alone construct and also when supplemented with bilateral pedicle screw-rod instrumentation. The larger footprint of the fully

  14. Applications of Dynamic Deployment of Services in Industrial Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candido, Gonçalo; Barata, José; Jammes, François; Colombo, Armando W.

    Service-oriented Architecture (SOA) is becoming a de facto paradigm for business and enterprise integration. SOA is expanding into several domains of application envisioning a unified solution suitable across all different layers of an enterprise infrastructure. The application of SOA based on open web standards can significantly enhance the interoperability and openness of those devices. By embedding a dynamical deployment service even into small field de- vices, it would be either possible to allow machine builders to place built- in services and still allow the integrator to deploy on-the-run the services that best fit his current application. This approach allows the developer to keep his own preferred development language, but still deliver a SOA- compliant application. A dynamic deployment service is envisaged as a fundamental framework to support more complex applications, reducing deployment delays, while increasing overall system agility. As use-case scenario, a dynamic deployment service was implemented over DPWS and WS-Management specifications allowing designing and programming an automation application using IEC61131 languages, and deploying these components as web services into devices.

  15. When Loved Ones Get Deployed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... different from hearing about conflicts and violence that break out in the world during our own time. If someone you care about is in the military and is deployed for duty, it's natural to worry about their safety. That's especially true if the person is going ...

  16. Non-traditional Infrasound Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, M. H.; McComas, S.; Simpson, C. P.; Diaz-Alvarez, H.; Costley, R. D.; Hayward, C.; Golden, P.; Endress, A.

    2017-12-01

    Historically, infrasound arrays have been deployed in rural environments where anthropological noise sources are limited. As interest in monitoring low energy sources at local distances grows in the infrasound community, it will be vital to understand how to monitor infrasound sources in an urban environment. Arrays deployed in urban centers have to overcome the decreased signal-to-noise ratio and reduced amount of real estate available to deploy an array. To advance the understanding of monitoring infrasound sources in urban environments, local and regional infrasound arrays were deployed on building rooftops on the campus at Southern Methodist University (SMU), and data were collected for one seasonal cycle. The data were evaluated for structural source signals (continuous-wave packets), and when a signal was identified, the back azimuth to the source was determined through frequency-wavenumber analysis. This information was used to identify hypothesized structural sources; these sources were verified through direct measurement and dynamic structural analysis modeling. In addition to the rooftop arrays, a camouflaged infrasound sensor was installed on the SMU campus and evaluated to determine its effectiveness for wind noise reduction. Permission to publish was granted by Director, Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory.

  17. SATWG networked quality function deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Don

    1992-01-01

    The initiative of this work is to develop a cooperative process for continual evolution of an integrated, time phased avionics technology plan that involves customers, technologists, developers, and managers. This will be accomplished by demonstrating a computer network technology to augment the Quality Function Deployment (QFD). All results are presented in viewgraph format.

  18. Financial Services and the Deployment of Agricultural Innovations in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    As partners of farmers' associations and small agri-businesses, financial cooperatives can play an important role in the adoption of agricultural innovations by providing relevant financial services. This project will test the ability of financial services to support the deployment and large-scale adoption of innovations ...

  19. Real-life C-RAN deployment considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Line Maria Pyndt; Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2017-01-01

    procedures and best practices for roll out are yet to be established. This work provides a case study, where a small but densely populated part of the network owned by the Danish mobile network operator, TDC, is evaluated for C-RAN deployment. A roadmap is provided which uses traffic data as input...

  20. Deployable Propulsion, Power and Communications Systems for Solar System Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L.; Carr, J.; Boyd, D.

    2017-01-01

    NASA is developing thin-film based, deployable propulsion, power, and communication systems for small spacecraft that could provide a revolutionary new capability allowing small spacecraft exploration of the solar system. By leveraging recent advancements in thin films, photovoltaics, and miniaturized electronics, new mission-level capabilities will be enabled aboard lower-cost small spacecraft instead of their more expensive, traditional counterparts, enabling a new generation of frequent, inexpensive deep space missions. Specifically, thin-film technologies are allowing the development and use of solar sails for propulsion, small, lightweight photovoltaics for power, and omnidirectional antennas for communication.

  1. Deployment and Implementation Strategies for Massive MIMO in 5G

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panzner, Berthold; Zirwas, Wolfgang; Dierks, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    for 5G is a successful and cost-efficient integration in the overall network concept. This work highlights deployment and implementation strategies for massive MIMO in the context of 5G indoor small cell scenarios. Different massive MIMO deployment scenarios are analyzed for a standard 3GPP indoor...... to spatial streams is varied stepwise from equality to a factor of ten. For implementation of massive MIMO in 5G networks trends in beamforming techniques, mutually coupled subarrays, over the calibration procedure and estimated ADC performance in 2020 time-frame are discussed. Based on the debate the paper...

  2. EDITORIAL Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaura, Elena; Roedig, Utz; Brusey, James

    2010-12-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are among the most promising technologies of the new millennium. The opportunities afforded by being able to program networks of small, lightweight, low-power, computation- and bandwidth-limited nodes have attracted a large community of researchers and developers. However, the unique set of capabilities offered by the technology produces an exciting but complex design space, which is often difficult to negotiate in an application context. Deploying sensing physical environments produces its own set of challenges, and can push systems into failure modes, thus revealing problems that can be difficult to discover or reproduce in simulation or the laboratory. Sustained efforts in the area of wireless networked sensing over the last 15 years have resulted in a large number of theoretical developments, substantial practical achievements, and a wealth of lessons for the future. It is clear that in order to bridge the gap between (on the one hand) visions of very large scale, autonomous, randomly deployed networks and (on the other) the actual performance of fielded systems, we need to view deployment as an essential component in the process of developing sensor networks: a process that includes hardware and software solutions that serve specific applications and end-user needs. Incorporating deployment into the design process reveals a new and different set of requirements and considerations, whose solutions require innovative thinking, multidisciplinary teams and strong involvement from end-user communities. This special feature uncovers and documents some of the hurdles encountered and solutions offered by experimental scientists when deploying and evaluating wireless sensor networks in situ, in a variety of well specified application scenarios. The papers specifically address issues of generic importance for WSN system designers: (i) data quality, (ii) communications availability and quality, (iii) alternative, low-energy sensing

  3. Lessons learnt from WLCG service deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiers, J D

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarises the main lessons learnt from deploying WLCG production services, with a focus on Reliability, Scalability, Accountability, which lead to both manageability and usability. Each topic is analysed in turn. Techniques for zero-user-visible downtime for the main service interventions are described, together with pathological cases that need special treatment. The requirements in terms of scalability are analysed, calling for as much robustness and automation in the service as possible. The different aspects of accountability - which covers measuring/tracking/logging/monitoring what is going on - and has gone on - is examined, with the goal of attaining a manageable service. Finally, a simple analogy is drawn with the Web in terms of usability - what do we need to achieve to cross the chasm from small-scale adoption to ubiquity?

  4. Novel Tools in Determining the Physiological Demands and Nutritional Practices of Ontario FireRangers during Fire Deployments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A H Robertson

    Full Text Available The seasonal profession of wildland fire fighting in Canada requires individuals to work in harsh environmental conditions that are physically demanding. The purpose of this study was to use novel technologies to evaluate the physiological demands and nutritional practices of Canadian FireRangers during fire deployments.Participants (n = 21 from a northern Ontario Fire Base volunteered for this study and data collection occurred during the 2014 fire season and included Initial Attack (IA, Project Fire (P, and Fire Base (B deployments. Deployment-specific energy demands and physiological responses were measured using heart-rate variability (HRV monitoring devices (Zephyr BioHarness3 units. Food consumption behaviour and nutrient quantity and quality were captured using audio-video food logs on iPod Touches and analyzed by NutriBase Pro 11 software.Insufficient kilocalories were consumed relative to expenditure for all deployment types. Average daily kilocalories consumed: IA: 3758 (80% consumption rate; P: 2945±888.8; B: 2433±570.8. Average daily kilocalorie expenditure: IA: 4538±106.3; P: 4012±1164.8; B: 2842±649.9. The Average Macronutrient Distribution Range (AMDR for protein was acceptable: 22-25% (across deployment types. Whereas the AMDR for fat and carbohydrates were high: 40-50%; and low: 27-37% respectively, across deployment types.This study is the first to use the described methodology to simultaneously evaluate energy expenditures and nutritional practices in an occupational setting. The results support the use of HRV monitoring and video-food capture, in occupational field settings, to assess job demands. FireRangers expended the most energy during IA, and the least during B deployments. These results indicate the need to develop strategies centered on maintaining physical fitness and improving food practices.

  5. RSG Deployment Case Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owsley, Stanley L.; Dodson, Michael G.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Seim, Thomas A.; Alexander, David L.; Hawthorne, Woodrow T.

    2005-09-01

    The RSG deployment case design is centered on taking the RSG system and producing a transport case that houses the RSG in a safe and controlled manner for transport. The transport case was driven by two conflicting constraints, first that the case be as light as possible, and second that it meet a stringent list of Military Specified requirements. The design team worked to extract every bit of weight from the design while striving to meet the rigorous Mil-Spec constraints. In the end compromises were made primarily on the specification side to control the overall weight of the transport case. This report outlines the case testing results.

  6. Supporting Knowledge Transfer in IS Deployment Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönström, Mikael

    To deploy new information systems is an expensive and complex task, and does seldom result in successful usage where the system adds strategic value to the firm (e.g. Sharma et al. 2003). It has been argued that innovation diffusion is a knowledge integration problem (Newell et al. 2000). Knowledge about business processes, deployment processes, information systems and technology are needed in a large-scale deployment of a corporate IS. These deployments can therefore to a large extent be argued to be a knowledge management (KM) problem. An effective deployment requires that knowledge about the system is effectively transferred to the target organization (Ko et al. 2005).

  7. Histological Diagnoses of Military Personnel Undergoing Lung Biopsy After Deployment to Southwest Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madar, Cristian S; Lewin-Smith, Michael R; Franks, Teri J; Harley, Russell A; Klaric, John S; Morris, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    The current understanding of associations between lung disease and military deployment to Southwest Asia, including Iraq and Afghanistan, is both controversial and limited. We sought to clarify the relation between military deployment and biopsy-proven lung disease. Retrospective data were analyzed for military personnel with non-neoplastic lung biopsies evaluated at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology or Joint Pathology Center (January 2005 to December 2012). Of 391 subjects, 137 (35.0%) had deployed to Southwest Asia prior to biopsy. Compared to non-deployed subjects, those deployed were younger (median age 37 vs. 51 years) with higher representation of African Americans (30.0 vs. 16.9%). Deployed patients were more likely diagnosed with non-necrotizing granulomas (OR 2.4). Non-deployed subjects had higher frequency of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, particularly organizing pneumonia. Prevalence of small airways diseases including constrictive bronchiolitis was low. This study provides a broader understanding of diversity of biopsy-proven non-neoplastic lung disease as it relates to military deployment to Southwest Asia and importantly did not show an increased prevalence of small airway disease to include constrictive bronchiolitis.

  8. Reintegration Difficulty of Military Couples Following Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Response rate for Wave 8 = 88% Our final sample contained 554 men and 556 women (n = 554 cross- sex couples, 1 same- sex couple). Individuals were...story in the Killeen Daily Herald (10 April 2016) http://kdhnews.com/news/local/ kids -deployments-when-a-parent-deploys-children-face- tough...years old), and (c) “Me getting sick and having to go to sick call.” (deployed Army husband, 25 years old). Sex and fidelity. Comments fell into

  9. Security Support in Continuous Deployment Pipeline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Faheem; Raft, Adam Johannes; Shahin, Mojtaba

    2017-01-01

    Continuous Deployment (CD) has emerged as a new practice in the software industry to continuously and automatically deploy software changes into production. Continuous Deployment Pipeline (CDP) supports CD practice by transferring the changes from the repository to production. Since most of the CDP...... penetration tools. Our findings indicate that the applied tactics improve the security of the major components (i.e., repository, continuous integration server, main server) of a CDP by controlling access to the components and establishing secure connections....

  10. Energy expended during horizontal jumping: investigating the effects of surface compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel R. L. Coward

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the first data on the metabolic costs of horizontal jumping in humans, using this tractable model to explore variations in energy expenditure with substrate properties, and consider these findings in light of kinematic data. Twenty-four participants jumped consistently at the rate of 1 jump per 5 s between opposing springboards separated by either a short (1.2 m or long (1.8 m gap. Springboards were either ‘firm’ or ‘compliant’. Respiratory gas exchange was measured using a back-mounted portable respiratory gas analyser to represent rate of energy expenditure, which was converted to energy expenditure per metre jumped. Video data were recorded to interpret kinematic information. Horizontal jumping was found to be between around 10 and 20 times the energy cost of cursorial locomotion per unit distance moved. There is considerable evidence from the data that jumping 1.8 m from a compliant springboard (134.9 mL O2 m−1 is less costly energetically than jumping that distance from a firm springboard (141.6 mL O2 m−1, albeit the effect size is quite small within the range of compliances tested in this study. However, there was no evidence of an effect of springboard type for jumps of 1.2 m. The kinematic analyses indicate possible explanations for these findings. Firstly, the calf muscle is likely used more, and the thigh muscles less, to take-off from a firm springboard during 1.8 m jumps, which may result in the power required to take-off being produced less efficiently. Secondly, the angle of take-off from the compliant surface during 1.8 m jumps is closer to the optimal for energetic efficiency (45°, possible due to the impulse provided by the surface as it returns stored energy during the final stages of the take-off. The theoretical effect on energy costs due to a different take-off angle for jumps of only 1.2 m is close to negligible.

  11. Low Mass Aeroshell Deployment Mechanism, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop new shape memory polymer (SMP) deployment mechanisms for actuating thermal protective systems (TPS) panels to...

  12. Low Mass Aeroshell Deployment Mechanism, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop new shape memory polymer (SMP) deployment mechanisms for actuating thermal protection system (TPS) panels to...

  13. Calibration procedure for Slocum glider deployed optical instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinić, Ivona; Toro-Farmer, Gerardo; Ragan, Matthew; Oberg, Carl; Jones, Burton H

    2009-08-31

    Recent developments in the field of the autonomous underwater vehicles allow the wide usage of these platforms as part of scientific experiments, monitoring campaigns and more. The vehicles are often equipped with sensors measuring temperature, conductivity, chlorophyll a fluorescence (Chl a), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence, phycoerithrin (PE) fluorescence and spectral volume scattering function at 117 degrees, providing users with high resolution, real time data. However, calibration of these instruments can be problematic. Most in situ calibrations are performed by deploying complementary instrument packages or water samplers in the proximity of the glider. Laboratory calibrations of the mounted sensors are difficult due to the placement of the instruments within the body of the vehicle. For the laboratory calibrations of the Slocum glider instruments we developed a small calibration chamber where we can perform precise calibrations of the optical instruments aboard our glider, as well as sensors from other deployment platforms. These procedures enable us to obtain pre- and post-deployment calibrations for optical fluorescence instruments, which may differ due to the biofouling and other physical damage that can occur during long-term glider deployments. We found that biofouling caused significant changes in the calibration scaling factors of fluorescent sensors, suggesting the need for consistent and repetitive calibrations for gliders as proposed in this paper.

  14. Energy expended and knee joint load accumulated when walking, running, or standing for the same amount of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ross H; Edwards, W Brent; Deluzio, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests prolonged bouts of sitting are unhealthy, and some public health messages have recently recommended replacing sitting with more standing. However, the relative benefits of replacing sitting with standing compared to locomotion are not known. Specifically, the biomechanical consequences of standing compared to other sitting-alternatives like walking and running are not well known and are usually not considered in studies on sitting. We compared the total knee joint load accumulated (TKJLA) and the total energy expended (TEE) when performing either walking, running, or standing for a common exercise bout duration (30 min). Walking and running both (unsurprisingly) had much more TEE than standing (+300% and +1100%, respectively). TKJLA was similar between walking and standing and 74% greater in running. The results suggest that standing is a poor replacement for walking and running if one wishes to increases energy expenditure, and may be particularly questionable for use in individuals at-risk for knee osteoarthritis due to its surprisingly high TKJLA (just as high as walking, 56% of the load in running) and the type of loading (continuous compression) it places on cartilage. However, standing has health benefits as an "inactivity interrupter" that extend beyond its direct energy expenditure. We suggest that future studies on standing as an inactivity intervention consider the potential biomechanical consequences of standing more often throughout the day, particularly in the case of prolonged bouts of standing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Deploying Affordable and Available Telecommunications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    telecommunications backbone infrastructure to an ALL-IP network will address the ... bandwidth, foster regional integration and enhance economic and Small. Medium .... Recognising ICTs as a catalyst for socioeconomic development and the ...

  16. Concurrent engineering: effective deployment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unny Menon

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a comprehensive insight into current trends and developments in Concurrent Engineering for integrated development of products and processes with the goal of completing the entire cycle in a shorter time, at lower overall cost and with fewer engineering design changes after product release. The evolution and definition of Concurrent Engineering are addressed first, followed by a concise review of the following elements of the concurrent engineering approach to product development: Concept Development: The Front-End Process, identifying Customer Needs and Quality Function Deployment, Establishing Product Specifications, Concept Selection, Product Architecture, Design for Manufacturing, Effective Rapid Prototyping, and The Economics of Product Development. An outline of a computer-based tutorial developed by the authors and other graduate students funded by NASA ( accessible via the world-wide-web . is provided in this paper. A brief discussion of teamwork for successful concurrent engineering is included, t'ase histories of concurrent engineering implementation at North American and European companies are outlined with references to textbooks authored by Professor Menon and other writers. A comprehensive bibliography on concurrent engineering is included in the paper.

  17. Reintegration Difficulty of Military Couples Following Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    reintegration. Communication and Generalized Anxiety The emotional cycle of deployment model provides a descrip- tive framework for understanding the...counseling. Thus, communication can have a reciprocal influence on the very appraisals and emotions that motivate interaction in the first place. Communication...of service members back into family life after deployment can be extremely challenging for military couples. Understanding the factors that

  18. 5-Beam ADCP Deployment Strategy Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T.; Savidge, D. K.; Gargett, A.

    2016-02-01

    With the increasing availability of 5 beam ADCPs and expanding opportunities for their deployment within both observatory and dedicated process study settings, refinements in deployment strategies are needed.Measuring vertical velocities directly with a vertically oriented acoustic beam requires that the instrument be stably mounted and leveled within fractions of a degree. Leveled shallow water deployments to date have utilized divers to jet pipes into the sand for stability, manually mount the instruments on the pipes, and level them. Leveling has been guided by the deployed instrument's pitch and roll output, available in real-time because of the observatory settings in which the deployments occurred. To expand the range of feasible deployments to deeper, perhaps non-real-time capable settings, alternatives to diver deployment and leveling must be considered. To determine stability requirements, mooring motion (heading, pitch and roll) has been sampled at 1Hz by gimballed ADCPs at a range of instrument deployment depths, and in shrouded and unshrouded cages. Conditions under which ADCP cages resting on the bottom experience significant shifts in tilt, roll or heading are assessed using co-located wind and wave measurements. The accuracy of estimating vertical velocities using all five beams relative to a well leveled vertical single beam is assessed from archived high frequency five beam data, to explore whether easing the leveling requirement is feasible.

  19. Renewable Energy: Policy Considerations for Deploying Renewables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This information paper accompanies the IEA publication Deploying Renewables 2011: Best and Future Policy Practice (IEA, 2011a). It provides more detailed data and analysis on policies for Deploying Renewables, and is intended to complement the main publication. It provides an account of the strategic drivers underpinning renewable energy (RE) technology deployment (energy security, economic development and environment protection) and assesses RE technologies with respect to these drivers, including an estimate of GHG emissions reductions due to RE technologies. The paper also explores the different barriers to deploying renewables at a given stage of market maturity and discusses what tools policy makers can avail of to succeed in removing deployment barriers. An additional topical highlight explores the challenges associated with accelerating the diffusion of RE technologies in developing countries.

  20. Technology Deployment Annual Report 2014 December

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arterburn, George K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This report is a summary of key Technology Deployment activities and achievements for 2014, including intellectual property, granted copyrights, royalties, license agreements, CRADAs, WFOs and Technology-Based Economic Development. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory, technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to all federal agencies, to state and local governments, and to universities and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and made available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, creating jobs and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In other cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies or to regional small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. INL employees also work cooperatively with researchers and technical staff from the university and industrial sectors to further develop emerging technologies. In our multinational global economy, INL is contributing to the development of the next generation of engineers and scientists by licensing software to educational instiutitons throughout the world. This report is a catalog of selected INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically

  1. Tunable bandgaps in a deployable metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Aditya; Karami, M. A.

    2018-06-01

    In this manuscript, we investigate deployable structures (such as solar arrays) and origami-inspired foldable structures as metamaterials capable of tunable wave manipulation. Specifically, we present a metamaterial whose bandgaps can be modulated by changing the fold angle of adjacent panels. The repeating unit cell of the structure consists of a beam (representing a panel) and a torsional spring (representing the folding mechanism). Two important cases are considered. Firstly, the fold angle (angle between adjacent beams), Ψ, is zero and only flexural waves propagate. In the second case, the fold angle is greater than zero (Ψ > 0). This causes longitudinal and transverse vibration to be coupled. FEM models are used to validate both these analyses. Increasing the fold angle was found to inflict notable changes to the wave transmission characteristics of the structure. In general, increasing the fold angles caused the bandwidth of bandgaps to increase. For the lowest four bandgaps we found bandwidth increases of 252 %, 177 %, 230 % and 163 % respectively at Ψ = 90 deg (relative to the bandwidths at Ψ = 0). In addition, non-trivial increases in bandwidth of the odd-numbered bandgaps occurs even at small fold angles-the bandwidth for the first and third bandgaps effectively double in size (increase by 100 %) at Ψ = 20 deg relative to those at Ψ = 0. This could have ramifications in the context of tunable wave manipulation and adaptive filtering. In addition, by expanding out the characteristic equation of transfer matrix for the straight structure, we prove that the upper band edge of the nth bandgap will always equal the nth simply supported natural frequency of the constituent beam. Further, we found that the ratio (EI/kt) is a pertinent parameter affecting the bandwidth of bandgaps. For low values of the ratio, effectively, no bandgap exists. For higher values of the ratio (EI/kt), we obtain a relatively large bandgap over which no waves propagate. This can

  2. Deployable Propulsion and Power Systems for Solar System Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Carr, John

    2017-01-01

    NASA is developing thin-film based, deployable propulsion, power and communication systems for small spacecraft that could provide a revolutionary new capability allowing small spacecraft exploration of the solar system. The Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Scout reconnaissance mission will demonstrate solar sail propulsion on a 6U CubeSat interplanetary spacecraft and lay the groundwork for their future use in deep space science and exploration missions. Solar sails use sunlight to propel vehicles through space by reflecting solar photons from a large, mirror-like sail made of a lightweight, highly reflective material. This continuous photon pressure provides propellantless thrust, allowing for very high delta V maneuvers on long-duration, deep space exploration. Since reflected light produces thrust, solar sails require no onboard propellant. The Lightweight Integrated Solar Array and Transceiver (LISA-T) is a launch stowed, orbit deployed array on which thin-film photovoltaic and antenna elements are embedded. Inherently, small satellites are limited in surface area, volume, and mass allocation; driving competition between power, communications, and GN&C (guidance navigation and control) subsystems. This restricts payload capability and limits the value of these low-cost satellites. LISA-T is addressing this issue, deploying large-area arrays from a reduced volume and mass envelope - greatly enhancing power generation and communications capabilities of small spacecraft. The NEA Scout mission, funded by NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems Program and managed by NASA MSFC, will use the solar sail as its primary propulsion system, allowing it to survey and image one or more NEA's of interest for possible future human exploration. NEA Scout uses a 6U cubesat (to be provided by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory), an 86 sq m solar sail and will weigh less than 12 kilograms. NEA Scout will be launched on the first flight of the Space Launch System in 2018. Similar in concept

  3. Strategic Sealift Supporting Army Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    2002. Sister services, the Navy and the Air Force, are constructed around their modes of transportation. They take themselves to the battle around...The vessels returned to Diego Garcia in the Indian Ocean and transloaded all of the equipment to vessels small enough to be received at Mogadishu ...of their response time, though. Marines and Navy Seals were in Mogadishu before a port assessment had ever been done. Forces were committed without

  4. Rover deployment system for lunar landing mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutoh, Masataku; Hoshino, Takeshi; Wakabayashi, Sachiko

    2017-09-01

    For lunar surface exploration, a deployment system is necessary to allow a rover to leave the lander. The system should be as lightweight as possible and stored retracted when launched. In this paper, two types of retractable deployment systems for lunar landing missions, telescopic- and fold-type ramps, are discussed. In the telescopic-type system, a ramp is stored with the sections overlapping and slides out during deployment. In the fold-type system, it is stored folded and unfolds for the deployment. For the development of these ramps, a design concept study and structural analysis were conducted first. Subsequently, ramp deployment and rover release tests were performed using the developed ramp prototypes. Through these tests, the validity of their design concepts and functions have been confirmed. In the rover release test, it was observed that the developed lightweight ramp was sufficiently strong for a 50-kg rover to descend. This result suggests that this ramp system is suitable for the deployment of a 300-kg-class rover on the Moon, where the gravity is about one-sixth that on Earth. The lightweight and sturdy ramp developed in this study will contribute to both safe rover deployment and increase of lander/rover payload.

  5. Mechatronical Design Studies on Small Brushless Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Amrhein

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Brushless DC- and AC-permanent-magnet motors controlled by powerful micro-controller electronics have opened up a significant share of the small motor market in the last years. Based on the mechanical low cost construction of single-phase motor the paper presents electronic drive concepts to improve the performance and for special applications also the lifetime of brushless motors. The tangential and radial forces acting on the rotor are controlled by special phase current curves to reduce the torque ripple and to avoid expendable machinery parts like ball or sliding bearings.

  6. Miniature field deployable terahertz source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Mark G.

    2006-05-01

    Developments in terahertz sources include compacted electron beam systems, optical mixing techniques, and multiplication of microwave frequencies. Although significant advances in THz science have been achieved, efforts continue to obtain source technologies that are more mobile and suitable for field deployment. Strategies in source development have approached generation from either end of the THz spectrum, from up-conversion of high-frequency microwave to down-conversion of optical frequencies. In this paper, we present the design of a THz source which employs an up-conversion method in an assembly that integrates power supply, electronics, and radiative component into a man-portable unit for situations in which a lab system is not feasible. This unit will ultimately evolve into a ruggedized package suitable for use in extreme conditions, e.g. temporary security check points or emergency response teams, in conditions where THz diagnostics are needed with minimal planning or logistical support. In order to meet design goals of reduced size and complexity, the inner workings of the unit ideally would be condensed into a monolithic active element, with ancillary systems, e.g. user interface and power, coupled to the element. To attain these goals, the fundamental component of our design is a THz source and lens array that may be fabricated with either printed circuit board or wafer substrate. To reduce the volume occupied by the source array, the design employs a metamaterial composed of a periodic lattice of resonant elements. Each resonant element is an LC oscillator, or tank circuit, with inductance, capacitance, and center frequency determined by dimensioning and material parameters. The source array and supporting electronics are designed so that the radiative elements are driven in-phase to yield THz radiation with a high degree of partial coherence. Simulation indicates that the spectral width of operation may be controlled by detuning of critical dimensions

  7. Technology Deployment Annual Report 2013 December

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2014-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to all federal agencies, to state and local governments, and to universities and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and made available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, creating jobs and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In other cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies or to regional small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. INL employees also work cooperatively with researchers and technical staff from the university and industrial sectors to further develop emerging technologies. In a multinational global economy, INL is contributing to the development of the next generation of engineers and scientists by licensing software to educational institutions throughout the world. This report is a catalog of selected INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically authorized by technology transfer legislation (and corresponding contractual provisions) or involve the transfer of legal rights to technology to other parties. This report was compiled from primary records, which were readily

  8. A stowing and deployment strategy for large membrane space systems on the example of Gossamer-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seefeldt, Patric

    2017-09-01

    the Gossamer-1 hardware, it allows an analysis of other geometries. This is of particular interest as Gossamer-1 investigated deployment technology on a relatively small scale of 5m × 5m , while the currently considered solar sail missions require sails that are about one order of magnitude bigger.

  9. Work stressors, depressive symptoms and sleep quality among US Navy members: a parallel process latent growth modelling approach across deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Adrian J; Kelley, Michelle L; Swinkels, Cindy M; Ulmer, Christi S

    2017-11-03

    The present study examined whether work stressors contribute to sleep problems and depressive symptoms over the course of deployment (i.e. pre-deployment, post-deployment and 6-month reintegration) among US Navy members. Specifically, we examined whether depressive symptoms or sleep quality mediate the relationships between work stressors and these outcomes. Participants were 101 US Navy members who experienced an 8-month deployment after Operational Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom. Using piecewise latent growth models, we found that increased work stressors were linked to increased depressive symptoms and decreased sleep quality across all three deployment stages. Further, increases in work stressors from pre- to post-deployment contributed to poorer sleep quality post-deployment via increasing depressive symptoms. Moreover, sleep quality mediated the association between increases in work stressors and increases in depressive symptoms from pre- to post-deployment. These effects were maintained from post-deployment through the 6-month reintegration. Although preliminary, our results suggest that changes in work stressors may have small, but significant implications for both depressive symptoms and quality of sleep over time, and a bi-directional relationship persists between sleep quality and depression across deployment. Strategies that target both stress and sleep could address both precipitating and perpetuating factors that affect sleep and depressive symptoms. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  10. Project implementation plan: ASTD remote deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CRASS, D.W.

    1999-01-01

    This document is the project implementation plan for the ASTD Remote Deployment Project. The Plan identifies the roles and responsibilities for the project and defines the integration between the ASTD Project and the B-Cell Cleanout Project

  11. Office of Civilian Response Deployment Tracking System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The purpose of OCR DTS is to establish, manage and track relevant Civilian Response Corps teams for deployment by sector experience, training, education etc.

  12. RadNet Air Quality (Deployable) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — RadNet Deployable Monitoring is designed to collect radiological and meteorological information and data asset needed to establish the impact of radiation levels on...

  13. Self-Deploying, Composite Habitats, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG), proposes to develop self-deploying, composite structures for lunar habitats, based on CRG's VeritexTM materials. These...

  14. Community integration after deployment to Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Armour, Cherie; Andersen, Søren B.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In the years following military deployment, soldiers may experience problems integrating into the community. However, little is known about the nature and prevalence of these problems and if they relate to posttraumatic symptomatology. METHODS: In a prospective, longitudinal study...

  15. Deployment strategies of managed lanes on arterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This report investigates issues related to planning, financing, deployment, and operation of managed : lanes on arterials. In this report, a strategy for managed lanes refers to a combination of the managed : lane type, the design and implementation,...

  16. Deploying Missile Defense: Major Operational Challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bunn, M

    2004-01-01

    By October 2004, the United States will have begun initial deployment of a missile defense capability albeit a modest, limited, and not completely proven one to defend the homeland against a limited...

  17. Deployable structures for a human lunar base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Petra; Häuplik, Sandra; Imhof, Barbara; Özdemir, Kürsad; Waclavicek, Rene; Perino, Maria Antoinetta

    2007-06-01

    The study Lunar exploration architecture—deployable structures for a lunar base was performed within the Alcatel Alenia Space “Lunar Exploration Architecture” study for the European Space Agency. The purpose of the study was to investigate bionic concepts applicable to deployable structures and to interpret the findings for possible implementation concepts. The study aimed at finding innovative solutions for deployment possibilities. Translating folding/unfolding principles from nature, candidate geometries were developed and researched using models, drawings and visualisations. The use of materials, joints between structural elements and construction details were investigated for these conceptual approaches. Reference scenarios were used to identify the technical and environmental conditions, which served as design drivers. Mechanical issues and the investigation of deployment processes narrowed the selection down to six chosen concepts. Their applicability was evaluated at a conceptual stage in relation to the timescale of the mission.

  18. Military Families: Child Care Support During Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... temporary caregiver far in advance will make your children feel more secure. Try to have the caregiver connect prior to deployment through visits, phone calls, or social media. If you will be relocating to a family ...

  19. Concept of Deployable Network Operations Center (DNOC)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bordetsky, Alex; Thiry, Jeff; Johnson, Shawn

    2005-01-01

    .... The increasing use of expeditionary and special operations forces in ad hoc, dynamic, and tactical environments poses a need for an adaptable, flexible, and responsive deployable network operations center (DNOC...

  20. In-Flight Suppressant Deployment Temperatures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bein, Donald

    2006-01-01

    .... An assessment is made of the model output versus some aircraft measurement data, fire suppressant boiling point criterion, as well as the history of altitude/temperature at which fire suppressants have been deployed...

  1. Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-05-01

    This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop, held on March 12–13, 2014, at Argonne National Laboratory.

  2. Hours spent and energy expended in physical activity domains: Results from The Tomorrow Project cohort in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Knowledge of adult activity patterns across domains of physical activity is essential for the planning of population-based strategies that will increase overall energy expenditure and reduce the risk of obesity and related chronic diseases. We describe domain-specific hours of activity and energy expended among participants in a prospective cohort in Alberta, Canada. Methods The Past Year Total Physical Activity Questionnaire was completed by 15,591 Tomorrow Project® participants, between 2001 and 2005 detailing physical activity type, duration, frequency and intensity. Domain-specific hours of activity and activity-related energy expenditure, expressed as a percent of total energy expenditure (TEE) (Mean (SD); Median (IQR)) are reported across inactive (<1.4), low active (1.4 to 1.59), active (1.6 to 1.89) and very active (≥ 1.9) Physical Activity Level (PAL = TEE:REE) categories. Results In very active women and amongst all men except those classified as inactive, activity-related energy expenditure comprised primarily occupational activity. Amongst inactive men and women in active, low active and inactive groups, activity-related energy expenditure from household activity was comparable to, or exceeded that for occupational activity. Leisure-time activity-related energy expenditure decreased with decreasing PAL categories; however, even amongst the most active men and women it accounted for less than 10 percent of TEE. When stratified by employment status, leisure-time activity-related energy expenditure was greatest for retired men [mean (SD): 10.8 (8.5) percent of TEE], compared with those who were fully employed, employed part-time or not employed. Transportation-related activity was negligible across all categories of PAL and employment status. Conclusion For the inactive portion of this population, active non-leisure activities, specifically in the transportation and occupational domains, need to be considered for inclusion in daily routines

  3. A Novel Methodology for Charging Station Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhonghao; Zhao, Yunwei; He, Yueying; Li, Mingzhe

    2018-02-01

    Lack of charging stations has been a main obstacle to the promotion of electric vehicles. This paper studies deploying charging stations in traffic networks considering grid constraints to balance the charging demand and grid stability. First, we propose a statistical model for charging demand. Then we combine the charging demand model with power grid constraints and give the formulation of the charging station deployment problem. Finally, we propose a theoretical solution for the problem by transforming it to a Markov Decision Process.

  4. State perspectives on clean coal technology deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreland, T. [State of Illinois Washington Office, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    State governments have been funding partners in the Clean Coal Technology program since its beginnings. Today, regulatory and market uncertainties and tight budgets have reduced state investment in energy R and D, but states have developed program initiatives in support of deployment. State officials think that the federal government must continue to support these technologies in the deployment phase. Discussions of national energy policy must include attention to the Clean Coal Technology program and its accomplishments.

  5. DRAGON - 8U Nanosatellite Orbital Deployer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, Marcin; Grygorczuk, Jerzy; Kedziora, Bartosz; Tokarz, Marta; Borys, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences (SRC PAS) together with Astronika company have developed an Orbital Deployer called DRAGON for ejection of the Polish scientific nanosatellite BRITE-PL Heweliusz (Fig. 1). The device has three unique mechanisms including an adopted and scaled lock and release mechanism from the ESA Rosetta mission MUPUS instrument. This paper discusses major design restrictions of the deployer, unique design features, and lessons learned from development through testing.

  6. Review of Large Spacecraft Deployable Membrane Antenna Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Quan; Qiu, Hui; Li, Xiao; Yang, Shu-Li

    2017-11-01

    The demand for large antennas in future space missions has increasingly stimulated the development of deployable membrane antenna structures owing to their light weight and small stowage volume. However, there is little literature providing a comprehensive review and comparison of different membrane antenna structures. Space-borne membrane antenna structures are mainly classified as either parabolic or planar membrane antenna structures. For parabolic membrane antenna structures, there are five deploying and forming methods, including inflation, inflation-rigidization, elastic ribs driven, Shape Memory Polymer (SMP)-inflation, and electrostatic forming. The development and detailed comparison of these five methods are presented. Then, properties of membrane materials (including polyester film and polyimide film) for parabolic membrane antennas are compared. Additionally, for planar membrane antenna structures, frame shapes have changed from circular to rectangular, and different tensioning systems have emerged successively, including single Miura-Natori, double, and multi-layer tensioning systems. Recent advances in structural configurations, tensioning system design, and dynamic analysis for planar membrane antenna structures are investigated. Finally, future trends for large space membrane antenna structures are pointed out and technical problems are proposed, including design and analysis of membrane structures, materials and processes, membrane packing, surface accuracy stability, and test and verification technology. Through a review of large deployable membrane antenna structures, guidance for space membrane-antenna research and applications is provided.

  7. Study on the three-station typical network deployments of workspace Measurement and Positioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhi; Zhu, J. G.; Xue, B.; Ye, Sh. H.; Xiong, Y.

    2013-10-01

    As a novel network coordinate measurement system based on multi-directional positioning, workspace Measurement and Positioning System (wMPS) has outstanding advantages of good parallelism, wide measurement range and high measurement accuracy, which makes it to be the research hotspots and important development direction in the field of large-scale measurement. Since station deployment has a significant impact on the measurement range and accuracy, and also restricts the use-cost, the optimization method of station deployment was researched in this paper. Firstly, positioning error model was established. Then focusing on the small network consisted of three stations, the typical deployments and error distribution characteristics were studied. Finally, through measuring the simulated fuselage using typical deployments at the industrial spot and comparing the results with Laser Tracker, some conclusions are obtained. The comparison results show that under existing prototype conditions, I_3 typical deployment of which three stations are distributed in a straight line has an average error of 0.30 mm and the maximum error is 0.50 mm in the range of 12 m. Meanwhile, C_3 typical deployment of which three stations are uniformly distributed in the half-circumference of an circle has an average error of 0.17 mm and the maximum error is 0.28 mm. Obviously, C_3 typical deployment has a higher control effect on precision than I_3 type. The research work provides effective theoretical support for global measurement network optimization in the future work.

  8. Next generation sensing platforms for extended deployments in large-scale, multidisciplinary, adaptive sampling and observational networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, J. N.; Meinig, C.; Mordy, C. W.; Lawrence-Slavas, N.; Cokelet, E. D.; Jenkins, R.; Tabisola, H. M.; Stabeno, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    New autonomous sensors have dramatically increased the resolution and accuracy of oceanographic data collection, enabling rapid sampling over extremely fine scales. Innovative new autonomous platofrms like floats, gliders, drones, and crawling moorings leverage the full potential of these new sensors by extending spatiotemporal reach across varied environments. During 2015 and 2016, The Innovative Technology for Arctic Exploration Program at the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory tested several new types of fully autonomous platforms with increased speed, durability, and power and payload capacity designed to deliver cutting-edge ecosystem assessment sensors to remote or inaccessible environments. The Expendable Ice-Tracking (EXIT) gloat developed by the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) is moored near bottom during the ice-free season and released on an autonomous timer beneath the ice during the following winter. The float collects a rapid profile during ascent, and continues to collect critical, poorly-accessible under-ice data until melt, when data is transmitted via satellite. The autonomous Oculus sub-surface glider developed by the University of Washington and PMEL has a large power and payload capacity and an enhanced buoyancy engine. This 'coastal truck' is designed for the rapid water column ascent required by optical imaging systems. The Saildrone is a solar and wind powered ocean unmanned surface vessel (USV) developed by Saildrone, Inc. in partnership with PMEL. This large-payload (200 lbs), fast (1-7 kts), durable (46 kts winds) platform was equipped with 15 sensors designed for ecosystem assessment during 2016, including passive and active acoustic systems specially redesigned for autonomous vehicle deployments. The senors deployed on these platforms achieved rigorous accuracy and precision standards. These innovative platforms provide new sampling capabilities and cost efficiencies in high-resolution sensor deployment

  9. Simulating CubeSat Structure Deployment Dynamics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is high value in simulating the nonlinear dynamics of stowing, deploying, and performance of deployable space structures, especially given the profound...

  10. Rule-Based vs. Behavior-Based Self-Deployment for Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdiales, Cristina; Aguilera, Francisco; González-Parada, Eva; Cano-García, Jose; Sandoval, Francisco

    2016-07-07

    In mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSN), nodes are allowed to move autonomously for deployment. This process is meant: (i) to achieve good coverage; and (ii) to distribute the communication load as homogeneously as possible. Rather than optimizing deployment, reactive algorithms are based on a set of rules or behaviors, so nodes can determine when to move. This paper presents an experimental evaluation of both reactive deployment approaches: rule-based and behavior-based ones. Specifically, we compare a backbone dispersion algorithm with a social potential fields algorithm. Most tests are done under simulation for a large number of nodes in environments with and without obstacles. Results are validated using a small robot network in the real world. Our results show that behavior-based deployment tends to provide better coverage and communication balance, especially for a large number of nodes in areas with obstacles.

  11. Technology Deployment Annual Report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith Arterburn

    2009-12-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory, technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to all federal agencies, to state and local governments, and to universities and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and made available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, creating jobs and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In other cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies or to regional small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. In other interactions, INL employees work cooperatively with researchers and other technical staff of our partners to further develop emerging technologies. This report is a catalog of selected INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically authorized by technology transfer legislation (and corresponding contractual provisions) or involve the transfer of legal rights to technology to other parties.

  12. A Remotely Deployable Wind Sonic Anemometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Awais

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Communication and computing shape up base for explosion of Internet of Things (IoT era. Humans can efficiently control the devices around their environment as per requirements because of IoT, the communication between different devices brings more flexibility in surrounding. Useful data is also gathered from some of these devices to create Big Data; where, further analysis assist in making life easier by developing good business models corresponding to user needs, enhance scientific research, formulating weather prediction or monitoring systems and contributing in other relative fields as well. Thus, in this research a remotely deployable IoT enabled Wind Sonic Anemometer has been designed and deployed to calculate average wind speed, direction, and gust. The proposed design is remotely deployable, user-friendly, power efficient and cost-effective because of opted modules i.e., ultrasonic sensors, GSM module, and solar panel. The testbed was also deployed at the roof of Computer & Information Systems Engineering (CIS department, NED UET. Further, its calibration has been carried out by using long short-term memory (LSTM, a deep learning technique; where ground truth data has been gathered from mechanical wind speed sensor (NRG-40 H deployed at top of Industrial & Manufacturing (IM department of NED UET. The obtained results are satisfactory and the performance of designed sensor is also good under various weather conditions.

  13. Environmental issues affecting clean coal technology deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The author outlines what he considers to be the key environmental issues affecting Clean Coal Technology (CCT) deployment both in the US and internationally. Since the international issues are difficult to characterize given different environmental drivers in various countries and regions, the primary focus of his remarks is on US deployment. However, he makes some general remarks, particularly regarding the environmental issues in developing vs. developed countries and how these issues may affect CCT deployment. Further, how environment affects deployment depends on which particular type of clean coal technology one is addressing. It is not the author`s intention to mention many specific technologies other than to use them for the purposes of example. He generally categorizes CCTs into four groups since environment is likely to affect deployment for each category somewhat differently. These four categories are: Precombustion technologies such as coal cleaning; Combustion technologies such as low NOx burners; Postcombustion technologies such as FGD systems and postcombustion NOx control; and New generation technologies such as gasification and fluidized bed combustion.

  14. Scarab III Remote Vehicle Deployment for Waste Retrieval and Tank Inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burks, B.L.; Falter, D.D.; Noakes, M.; Vesco, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Robotics Technology Development Program now known as the Robotics Crosscut Program, funded the development and deployment of a small remotely operated vehicle for inspection and cleanout of small horizontal waste storage tanks that have limited access. Besides the advantage of access through tank risers as small as 18-in. diameter, the small robotic system is also significantly less expensive to procure and to operate than larger remotely operated vehicle (ROV) systems. The vehicle specified to support this activity was the ROV Technologies, Inc., Scarab. The Scarab is a tracked vehicle with an independently actuated front and rear ''toe'' degree-of-freedom which allows the stand-off and angle of the vehicle platform with respect to the floor to be changed. The Scarab is a flexible remote tool that can be used for a variety of tasks with its primary uses targeted for inspection and small scale waste retrieval. The vehicle and any necessary process equipment are mounted in a deployment and containment enclosure to simplify deployment and movement of the system from tank to tank. This paper outlines the technical issues related to the Scarab vehicle and its deployment for use in tank inspection and waste retrieval operation

  15. Small Column Ion Exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huff, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) leverages a suite of technologies developed by DOE across the complex to achieve lifecycle savings. Technologies are applicable to multiple sites. Early testing supported multiple sites. Balance of SRS SCIX testing supports SRS deployment. A forma Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) was performed and selected Small Column Ion Exchange columns containing Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) in a 2-column lead/lag configuration. SEE considered use of Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF). Advantages of approach at SRS include: (1) no new buildings, (2) low volume of Cs waste in solid form compared to aqueous strip effluent; and availability of downstream processing facilities for immediate processing of spent resin.

  16. Service Creation and Deployment in Converged Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soler, José

    for these experiences is the transition of telecommunication (telephony) networks from circuit switched based systems towards packet based ones. The text of this monograph proceeds, unaltered for the most, from the author’s PhD thesis “Framework for Deployment of Advanced Telecommunication Services in Current......This monograph (Early Experiences related to Service Creation & Deployment in Converged Networks) presents different experiences related to architectures and mechanisms for deployment of telephony services, understood as especial features complementing the basic voice service. The context...... and Future Converged Networks”, carried out at the Technical University of Denmark in the period [April 2002-April 2005]. Even though the technologies presented in the text have evolved from that period until now, the presented scenarios and setups are still valid as interesting initial steps in the realm....

  17. Deploying Embodied AI into Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, David J. H.

    The last two years have seen the start of commercial activity within virtual worlds. Unlike computer games where Non-Player-Character avatars are common, in most virtual worlds they are the exception — and until recently in Second Life they were non-existent. However there is real commercial scope for Als in these worlds — in roles from virtual sales staff and tutors to personal assistants. Deploying an embodied AI into a virtual world offers a unique opportunity to evaluate embodied Als, and to develop them within an environment where human and computer are on almost equal terms. This paper presents an architecture being used for the deployment of chatbot driven avatars within the Second Life virtual world, looks at the challenges of deploying an AI within such a virtual world, the possible implications for the Turing Test, and identifies research directions for the future.

  18. Deployment Instabilities of Lobed-Pumpkin Balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashino, Kyoichi

    A lobed-pumpkin balloon, currently being developed in ISAS/JAXA as well as in NASA, is a promising vehicle for long duration scientific observations in the stratosphere. Recent ground and flight experiments, however, have revealed that the balloon has deployment instabilities under certain conditions. In order to overcome the instability problems, a next generation SPB called 'tawara' type balloon has been proposed, in which an additional cylindrical part is appended to the standard lobed-pumpkin balloon. The present study investigates the deployment stability of tawara type SPB in comparison to that of standard lobed-pumpkin SPB through eigenvalue analysis on the basis of finite element methods. Our numerical results show that tawara type SPB enjoys excellent deployment performance over the standard lobed-pumpkin SPBs.

  19. Deployment Support Leading to Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, E E

    1997-10-01

    The following paragraphs summarize the progress of each research project funded under the WVU Cooperative Agreement during the third quarter of 1997 (July - September 1997). The projects are arranged according to their 1997 WVU task number. WVU Focus Area 1.0: Subsurface Contaminants, Containment and Remediation Task No. 1.1: Project discontinued. Task No. 1.2: Development of Standard Test Protocols and Barrier Design Models for Desiccation Barriers (K. Amininan & S. Ameri): A number of experiments were preformed this period to evaluate the ability of the dried sand-packs to act as a barrier to liquids. Water infiltration tests were done with a constant head, dispersing 80 ml of water, and by adding water in small increments. Results indicate that when the water is spilled over the sand-pack, it has the tendency to channel through the sand-pack, significantly reducing the capacity of the dried zone to retain liquid contaminants. This appears to be largely influenced by particle size. As the particle size is reduced, the capillary forces spread the water and prevent/delay channels from forming. The measured permeability values were in agreement with those measured with air. The water retention capacity and capillary rise were largely influenced by time and showed no sensitivity to channeling. The water retention capacity tests suggest the sand-packs can retain more water than the expected. Two sets of water infiltration and drying experiments were designed to evaluate the CAB's ability to prevent spills from spreading. Ten ml of water was injected every 20 minutes and 80 ml of water was added at one time. When injected slowly, results showed the drying process to be similar to the original drying process. The second set indicted the drying process follows a slowly declining drying with no break through. Results also suggested that air flow through the sand-pack can remove water infiltration. The air flow appeared to prevent any water channeling and thus should

  20. Comparing post-deployment mental health services utilization in soldiers deployed to Balkan, Iraq and Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, T; Sadowa Vedtofte, M; Nordentoft, M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Insight on how different missions have impacted rates of mental health service (MHS) utilization is unexplored. We compared postdeployment MHS utilization in a national cohort of first-time deployed to missions in Balkan, Iraq, and Afghanistan respectively. METHODS: A prospective...... national cohort study of 13 246 first-time deployed in the period 1996 through 2012 to missions in Balkan area, Iraq, or Afghanistan respectively. Soldiers 'MHS utilization was also compared with a 5:1 sex-, age-, and calendar year-matched never-deployed background population. Postdeployment utilization...... of psychotropics. RESULTS: Utilizing of psychiatric outpatient services and psychotropics was significantly higher in first-time deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan compared with deployed to Balkan. However, the rate of postdeployment admission to psychiatric hospital did not differ between missions. Postdeployment...

  1. Heterogeneous Deployment to Meet Traffic Demand in a Realistic LTE Urban Scenario

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coletti, Claudio; Hu, Liang; Nguyen, Huan Cong

    2012-01-01

    growth of mo-bile broadband traffic. Emphasis is put on how to optimally as-sign the spectrum for the different networks layers in an evolved HetNet including outdoor and indoor small cells. The study is conducted for a “Hot-Zone” scenario, i.e. a high-traffic area within a realistic dense urban...... performance with a minimum user data rate of 1 Mbps is achieved when deploying small cells on dedicated channels rather than co-channel deployment. Fur-thermore, the joint pico and femto deployment turns out to be the right trade-off between increased base station density and en-hanced network capacity....

  2. Industrial deployment of system engineering methods

    CERN Document Server

    Romanovsky, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    A formal method is not the main engine of a development process, its contribution is to improve system dependability by motivating formalisation where useful. This book summarizes the results of the DEPLOY research project on engineering methods for dependable systems through the industrial deployment of formal methods in software development. The applications considered were in automotive, aerospace, railway, and enterprise information systems, and microprocessor design.  The project introduced a formal method, Event-B, into several industrial organisations and built on the lessons learned to

  3. Challenges to Deploy Service Design in Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akasaka, Fumiya; Ohno, Takehiko; Jensen, Mika Yasuoka

    2016-01-01

    More and more companies are applying service design approaches to develop services and products. Not every project, however, has achieved its goals. In many cases, difficulties arise from organizational issues such as organization structure and evaluation system. In this research, we held workshops...... where success and failure factors of service design projects in organization are presented. By analysing the results, we construct a model that explains the “difficulties of deploying the service design approach in organization.” On the basis of the model, this paper discusses the challenges...... to the deployment of the service design approach in organizations....

  4. Small-satellite technology and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 4, 5, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horais, Brian J.

    Remote sensing applications and systems, small satellites for sensing missions, and supporting technologies are the broad topics discussed. Particular papers are presented on small satellites for water cycle experiments, low-cost spacecraft buses for remote sensing applications, Webersat (a low-cost imaging satellite), DARPA initiatives in small-satellite technologies, a solid-state magnetic azimuth sensor for small satellites, and thermal analysis of a small expendable tether satellite package. (For individual items see A93-24152 to A93-24175)

  5. On Efficient Deployment of Wireless Sensors for Coverage and Connectivity in Constrained 3D Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chase Q; Wang, Li

    2017-10-10

    Sensor networks have been used in a rapidly increasing number of applications in many fields. This work generalizes a sensor deployment problem to place a minimum set of wireless sensors at candidate locations in constrained 3D space to k -cover a given set of target objects. By exhausting the combinations of discreteness/continuousness constraints on either sensor locations or target objects, we formulate four classes of sensor deployment problems in 3D space: deploy sensors at Discrete/Continuous Locations (D/CL) to cover Discrete/Continuous Targets (D/CT). We begin with the design of an approximate algorithm for DLDT and then reduce DLCT, CLDT, and CLCT to DLDT by discretizing continuous sensor locations or target objects into a set of divisions without sacrificing sensing precision. Furthermore, we consider a connected version of each problem where the deployed sensors must form a connected network, and design an approximation algorithm to minimize the number of deployed sensors with connectivity guarantee. For performance comparison, we design and implement an optimal solution and a genetic algorithm (GA)-based approach. Extensive simulation results show that the proposed deployment algorithms consistently outperform the GA-based heuristic and achieve a close-to-optimal performance in small-scale problem instances and a significantly superior overall performance than the theoretical upper bound.

  6. A Tabu Search WSN Deployment Method for Monitoring Geographically Irregular Distributed Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we address the Wireless Sensor Network (WSN deployment issue. We assume that the observed area is characterized by the geographical irregularity of the sensed events. Formally, we consider that each point in the deployment area is associated a differentiated detection probability threshold, which must be satisfied by our deployment method. Our resulting WSN deployment problem is formulated as a Multi-Objectives Optimization problem, which seeks to reduce the gap between the generated events detection probabilities and the required thresholds while minimizing the number of deployed sensors. To overcome the computational complexity of an exact resolution, we propose an original pseudo-random approach based on the Tabu Search heuristic. Simulations show that our proposal achieves better performances than several other approaches proposed in the literature. In the last part of this paper, we generalize the deployment problem by including the wireless communication network connectivity constraint. Thus, we extend our proposal to ensure that the resulting WSN topology is connected even if a sensor communication range takes small values.

  7. A Tabu Search WSN Deployment Method for Monitoring Geographically Irregular Distributed Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitsaadi, Nadjib; Achir, Nadjib; Boussetta, Khaled; Pujolle, Guy

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we address the Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) deployment issue. We assume that the observed area is characterized by the geographical irregularity of the sensed events. Formally, we consider that each point in the deployment area is associated a differentiated detection probability threshold, which must be satisfied by our deployment method. Our resulting WSN deployment problem is formulated as a Multi-Objectives Optimization problem, which seeks to reduce the gap between the generated events detection probabilities and the required thresholds while minimizing the number of deployed sensors. To overcome the computational complexity of an exact resolution, we propose an original pseudo-random approach based on the Tabu Search heuristic. Simulations show that our proposal achieves better performances than several other approaches proposed in the literature. In the last part of this paper, we generalize the deployment problem by including the wireless communication network connectivity constraint. Thus, we extend our proposal to ensure that the resulting WSN topology is connected even if a sensor communication range takes small values.

  8. An efficient genetic algorithm for maximum coverage deployment in wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yourim; Kim, Yong-Hyuk

    2013-10-01

    Sensor networks have a lot of applications such as battlefield surveillance, environmental monitoring, and industrial diagnostics. Coverage is one of the most important performance metrics for sensor networks since it reflects how well a sensor field is monitored. In this paper, we introduce the maximum coverage deployment problem in wireless sensor networks and analyze the properties of the problem and its solution space. Random deployment is the simplest way to deploy sensor nodes but may cause unbalanced deployment and therefore, we need a more intelligent way for sensor deployment. We found that the phenotype space of the problem is a quotient space of the genotype space in a mathematical view. Based on this property, we propose an efficient genetic algorithm using a novel normalization method. A Monte Carlo method is adopted to design an efficient evaluation function, and its computation time is decreased without loss of solution quality using a method that starts from a small number of random samples and gradually increases the number for subsequent generations. The proposed genetic algorithms could be further improved by combining with a well-designed local search. The performance of the proposed genetic algorithm is shown by a comparative experimental study. When compared with random deployment and existing methods, our genetic algorithm was not only about twice faster, but also showed significant performance improvement in quality.

  9. Deployment Strategies and Clustering Protocols Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chérif Diallo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks face significant design challenges due to limited computing and storage capacities and, most importantly, dependence on limited battery power. Energy is a critical resource and is often an important issue to the deployment of sensor applications that claim to be omnipresent in the world of future. Thus optimizing the deployment of sensors becomes a major constraint in the design and implementation of a WSN in order to ensure better network operations. In wireless networking, clustering techniques add scalability, reduce the computation complexity of routing protocols, allow data aggregation and then enhance the network performance. The well-known MaxMin clustering algorithm was previously generalized, corrected and validated. Then, in a previous work we have improved MaxMin by proposing a Single- node Cluster Reduction (SNCR mechanism which eliminates single-node clusters and then improve energy efficiency. In this paper, we show that MaxMin, because of its original pathological case, does not support the grid deployment topology, which is frequently used in WSN architectures. The unreliability feature of the wireless links could have negative impacts on Link Quality Indicator (LQI based clustering protocols. So, in the second part of this paper we show how our distributed Link Quality based d- Clustering Protocol (LQI-DCP has good performance in both stable and high unreliable link environments. Finally, performance evaluation results also show that LQI-DCP fully supports the grid deployment topology and is more energy efficient than MaxMin.

  10. Iron Status of Deployed Military Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-04

    ready force Deploy with and care for the warrior Care for all entrusted to our care Nursing Competencies and Practice: Patient outcomes...duties, physical activities, iron intake through diet ). This additional information would improve the ability to determine factors associated with

  11. Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager advanced deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Coupland, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    If you are an experienced Configuration Manager administrator looking to advance your career or get more from your current environment, then this book is ideal for you. Prior experience of deploying and managing a Configuration Manager site would be helpful in following the examples throughout this book.

  12. Military Deployment and Elementary Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Terri; Dunham, Mardis; Lyons, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the impact that military deployment has upon academic achievement of elementary school students. TerraNova test scores of 137 fourth and fifth grade students in two elementary schools with a high proportion of military dependent children were examined for two consecutive years. Although the academic test performance fell…

  13. 77 FR 36903 - Accelerating Broadband Infrastructure Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... the Nation's global competitiveness in the 21st century, driving job creation, promoting innovation, and expanding markets for American businesses. Broadband access also affords public safety agencies... infrastructure has been deployed in a vast majority of communities across the country, today too many areas still...

  14. Guam: U.S. Defense Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    August 8, 2013; Ta Kung Pao, August 12, 2013. 22 Sam Kim, “N. Korea Deploys Medium-Range Missiles, Bolsters Special Forces,” Yonhap, Seoul, February 23...building up its submarine force (both nuclear-powered and diesel-electric). In November 2004, the PLA Navy sent a Han -class nuclear attack submarine

  15. A compact ultra-clean system for deploying radioactive sources inside the KamLAND detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banks, T.I.; Freedman, S.J.; Wallig, J.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Mitsui, T.; Nakamura, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B.D.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, S.; Kozlov, A.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; Piepke, A.; Bloxham, T.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Han, K.; Ichimura, K.; Murayama, H.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H.M.; Winslow, L.A.; Dwyer, D.A.; McKeown, R.D.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B.E.; Lane, C.E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J.G.; Matsuno, S.; Sakai, M.; Horton-Smith, G.A.; Downum, K.E.; Gratta, G.; Efremenko, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H.J.; Markoff, D.M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K.M.; Detwiler, J.A.; Enomoto, S.; Decowski, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a compact, ultra-clean device used to deploy radioactive sources along the vertical axis of the KamLAND liquid-scintillator neutrino detector for purposes of calibration. The device worked by paying out and reeling in precise lengths of a hanging, small-gauge wire rope (cable); an

  16. Very Low Head Turbine Deployment in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, P; Williams, C; Sasseville, Remi; Anderson, N

    2014-01-01

    The Very Low Head (VLH) turbine is a recent turbine technology developed in Europe for low head sites in the 1.4 - 4.2 m range. The VLH turbine is primarily targeted for installation at existing hydraulic structures to provide a low impact, low cost, yet highly efficient solution. Over 35 VLH turbines have been successfully installed in Europe and the first VLH deployment for North America is underway at Wasdell Falls in Ontario, Canada. Deployment opportunities abound in Canada with an estimated 80,000 existing structures within North America for possible low-head hydro development. There are several new considerations and challenges for the deployment of the VLH turbine technology in Canada in adapting to the hydraulic, environmental, electrical and social requirements. Several studies were completed to determine suitable approaches and design modifications to mitigate risk and confirm turbine performance. Diverse types of existing weirs and spillways pose certain hydraulic design challenges. Physical and numerical modelling of the VLH deployment alternatives provided for performance optimization. For this application, studies characterizing the influence of upstream obstacles using water tunnel model testing as well as full-scale prototype flow dynamics testing were completed. A Cold Climate Adaptation Package (CCA) was developed to allow year-round turbine operation in ice covered rivers. The CCA package facilitates turbine extraction and accommodates ice forces, frazil ice, ad-freezing and cold temperatures that are not present at the European sites. The Permanent Magnet Generator (PMG) presents some unique challenges in meeting Canadian utility interconnection requirements. Specific attention to the frequency driver control and protection requirements resulted in a driver design with greater over-voltage capability for the PMG as well as other key attributes. Environmental studies in Europe included fish friendliness testing comprised of multiple in

  17. Very Low Head Turbine Deployment in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, P.; Williams, C.; Sasseville, Remi; Anderson, N.

    2014-03-01

    The Very Low Head (VLH) turbine is a recent turbine technology developed in Europe for low head sites in the 1.4 - 4.2 m range. The VLH turbine is primarily targeted for installation at existing hydraulic structures to provide a low impact, low cost, yet highly efficient solution. Over 35 VLH turbines have been successfully installed in Europe and the first VLH deployment for North America is underway at Wasdell Falls in Ontario, Canada. Deployment opportunities abound in Canada with an estimated 80,000 existing structures within North America for possible low-head hydro development. There are several new considerations and challenges for the deployment of the VLH turbine technology in Canada in adapting to the hydraulic, environmental, electrical and social requirements. Several studies were completed to determine suitable approaches and design modifications to mitigate risk and confirm turbine performance. Diverse types of existing weirs and spillways pose certain hydraulic design challenges. Physical and numerical modelling of the VLH deployment alternatives provided for performance optimization. For this application, studies characterizing the influence of upstream obstacles using water tunnel model testing as well as full-scale prototype flow dynamics testing were completed. A Cold Climate Adaptation Package (CCA) was developed to allow year-round turbine operation in ice covered rivers. The CCA package facilitates turbine extraction and accommodates ice forces, frazil ice, ad-freezing and cold temperatures that are not present at the European sites. The Permanent Magnet Generator (PMG) presents some unique challenges in meeting Canadian utility interconnection requirements. Specific attention to the frequency driver control and protection requirements resulted in a driver design with greater over-voltage capability for the PMG as well as other key attributes. Environmental studies in Europe included fish friendliness testing comprised of multiple in

  18. Abstracting application deployment on Cloud infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiftimiei, D. C.; Fattibene, E.; Gargana, R.; Panella, M.; Salomoni, D.

    2017-10-01

    Deploying a complex application on a Cloud-based infrastructure can be a challenging task. In this contribution we present an approach for Cloud-based deployment of applications and its present or future implementation in the framework of several projects, such as “!CHAOS: a cloud of controls” [1], a project funded by MIUR (Italian Ministry of Research and Education) to create a Cloud-based deployment of a control system and data acquisition framework, “INDIGO-DataCloud” [2], an EC H2020 project targeting among other things high-level deployment of applications on hybrid Clouds, and “Open City Platform”[3], an Italian project aiming to provide open Cloud solutions for Italian Public Administrations. We considered to use an orchestration service to hide the complex deployment of the application components, and to build an abstraction layer on top of the orchestration one. Through Heat [4] orchestration service, we prototyped a dynamic, on-demand, scalable platform of software components, based on OpenStack infrastructures. On top of the orchestration service we developed a prototype of a web interface exploiting the Heat APIs. The user can start an instance of the application without having knowledge about the underlying Cloud infrastructure and services. Moreover, the platform instance can be customized by choosing parameters related to the application such as the size of a File System or the number of instances of a NoSQL DB cluster. As soon as the desired platform is running, the web interface offers the possibility to scale some infrastructure components. In this contribution we describe the solution design and implementation, based on the application requirements, the details of the development of both the Heat templates and of the web interface, together with possible exploitation strategies of this work in Cloud data centers.

  19. Deployable Propulsion, Power and Communication Systems for Solar System Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Carr, John A.; Boyd, Darren

    2017-01-01

    NASA is developing thin-film based, deployable propulsion, power, and communication systems for small spacecraft that could provide a revolutionary new capability allowing small spacecraft exploration of the solar system. By leveraging recent advancements in thin films, photovoltaics, and miniaturized electronics, new mission-level capabilities will be enabled aboard lower-cost small spacecraft instead of their more expensive, traditional counterparts, enabling a new generation of frequent, inexpensive deep space missions. Specifically, thin-film technologies are allowing the development and use of solar sails for propulsion, small, lightweight photovoltaics for power, and omnidirectional antennas for communication. Like their name implies, solar sails 'sail' by reflecting sunlight from a large, lightweight reflective material that resembles the sails of 17th and 18th century ships and modern sloops. Instead of wind, the sail and the ship derive their thrust by reflecting solar photons. Solar sail technology has been discussed in the literature for quite some time, but it is only since 2010 that sails have been proven to work in space. Thin-film photovoltaics are revolutionizing the terrestrial power generation market and have been found to be suitable for medium-term use in the space environment. When mounted on the thin-film substrate, these photovoltaics can be packaged into very small volumes and used to generate significant power for small spacecraft. Finally, embedded antennas are being developed that can be adhered to thin-film substrates to provide lightweight, omnidirectional UHF and X-band coverage, increasing bandwidth or effective communication ranges for small spacecraft. Taken together, they may enable a host of new deep space destinations to be reached by a generation of spacecraft smaller and more capable than ever before.

  20. Towards a local learning (innovation) model of solar photovoltaic deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shum, Kwok L.; Watanabe, Chihiro

    2008-01-01

    It is by now familiar that in the deployment of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, the cost dynamics of major system component like solar cell/module is subjected to experience curve effects driven by production learning and research and development at the supplier side. What is less clear, however, is the economics of system integration or system deployment that takes place locally close to the user, involving other market players, in the downstream solar PV value chain. Experts have agreed that suppliers of solar PV system must customize their flexible characteristics to address local unique users' and applications requirements and compete on price/performance basis. A lack of understanding of the drivers of the economics of system customization therefore is a deficiency in our understanding of the overall economics of this renewable energy technology option. We studied the non-module BOS cost for grid-connected small PV system using the experience curve framework. Preliminary analysis of PV statistics of the US from IEA seems to suggest that learning in one application type is taking place with respect to the cumulative installation among all types of grid-connected small PV projects. The effectiveness of this learning is also improving over time. A novel aspect is the interpretation of such experience curve effect or learning pattern. We draw upon the notion of product platform in the industrial management literature and consider different types of local small-scale grid-tied PV customization projects as adapting a standard platform to different idiosyncratic and local application requirements. Economics of system customization, which is user-oriented, involves then a refined notion of inter-projects learning, rather than volume-driven learning by doing. We formalized such inter-projects learning as a dynamic economy of scope, which can potentially be leveraged to manage the local and downstream aspect of PV deployment. This dynamic economy may serve as a focus

  1. Garden State Parkway Corridor : ITS early deployment planning study : strategic deployment plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    This Strategic Deployment Plan describes ways of improving travel within the Garden : State Parkway Corridor using intelligent transportation systems (ITS) and without : constructing additional roadway lanes. Travel improvements will be possible with...

  2. Extending the lifetime of wireless sensor network with partial SDN deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tomovic

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Energy efficiency is one of the key requirements in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs. In order to optimize energy usage at sensor nodes, this paper proposes a new network architecture that relies on concepts of Software Defined Networking (SDN. Since SDN is a relatively new technology, originally envisioned for wired networks, it cannot be expected to get immediately and completely adopted in WSN domain, regardless of potential benefits. For this reason, we consider incremental SDN deployment where SDN nodes coexist with traditional sensor nodes, and propose a new routing algorithm for SDN controller that prolongs the WSN lifetime even when a small percentage of SDN nodes is deployed.

  3. Deploy Nalu/Kokkos algorithmic infrastructure with performance benchmarking.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domino, Stefan P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ananthan, Shreyas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knaus, Robert C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Williams, Alan B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-29

    assembly timings faster than that observed on Haswell architecture. The computational workload of higher-order meshes, therefore, seems ideally suited for the many-core architecture and justi es further exploration of higher-order on NGP platforms. A Trilinos/Tpetra-based multi-threaded GMRES preconditioned by symmetric Gauss Seidel (SGS) represents the core solver infrastructure for the low-Mach advection/diffusion implicit solves. The threaded solver stack has been tested on small problems on NREL's Peregrine system using the newly developed and deployed Kokkos-view/SIMD kernels. fforts are underway to deploy the Tpetra-based solver stack on NERSC Cori system to benchmark its performance at scale on KNL machines.

  4. Deployable reflector configurations. [for space telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinel, A. B.; Meinel, M. P.; Woolf, N. J.

    1983-01-01

    Both the theoretical reasons for considering a non-circular format for the Large Deployable Reflector, and a potentially realizable concept for such a device, are discussed. The optimum systems for diffraction limited telescopes with incoherent detection have either a single filled aperture, or two such apertures as an interferometer to synthesize a larger aperture. For a single aperture of limited area, a reflector in the form of a slot can be used to give increased angular resolution. It is shown how a 20 x 8 meter telescope can be configured to fit the Space Shuttle bay, and deployed with relatively simple operations. The relationship between the sunshield design and the inclination of the orbit is discussed. The possible use of the LDR as a basic module to permit the construction of supergiant space telescopes and interferometers both for IR/submm studies and for the entire ultraviolet through mm wave spectral region is discussed.

  5. Planning and Management of Technology Deployment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Won; Joo, Po Kook; Kim, Jun Yeon and others

    2005-08-01

    The R and D contents are summarized as follows ; Models were set-up for transferring the developed technologies to the industry and managing technology deployment center to vitalize the commercialization and then the set-up model was tried to apply for transferring technologies for commercialization and to define interfaces between the R and D and industrial applications In this project, new products and processes were developed for promoting the commercialization. Infra-structures were firmly set-up for the venture company promotion and technology deployment developed during executing the proton Engineering frontier Project. Commercialization methodology connection with industrial companies were studied by outside specializing institute. Development of gem-stone coloring and new photo catalyst producing techniques are very high value-adding technologies, therefore, experimental and theoretical R and D were transacted simultaneously to obtain the originality of the technology. The theoretical R and D was committed to a specialist outside

  6. Towards the Ubiquitous Deployment of DNSSEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    and Session Initiation Protocol ( SIP ). However, it remains to be seen how quickly these enhancements are picked up and deployed. The second...Security RDI Resources for the DNSSEC Initiative System (the C&A system) RFC Request For Comments SIP Session Initiation Protocol SMTP Simple Mail...DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED 1 Summary The Secure Extensions to the Domain Name System (DNSSEC) comprise of a set of protocol extensions that fix a

  7. THE PROTECTION AND DEPLOYMENT OF FINANCIAL INNOVATION

    OpenAIRE

    PETER GIANIODIS; JILL A. BROWN

    2013-01-01

    Prevailing theory suggests that firms that effectively protect technological discoveries from emulation will create and capture value. Despite its importance, little research has examined the specific mechanisms of how to protect technological discoveries, and have heretofore emphasized the importance of inherent resource attributes to limit competitor emulation. Using a sample of financial patents, we test theory regarding the effects of resource attributes and deployment mechanisms on resou...

  8. IRIS. Progress in licensing and toward deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, B.; Carelli, M.D.; Kling, C.L.; Cavlina, N.; Grgic, D.

    2006-01-01

    The International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) is an advanced, integral, light water cooled, pressurized reactor of smaller generating capacity (1000 MWt, or 335 MWe). It is being developed through a strong international partnership by a team lead by Westinghouse and including organizations from 10 countries. The main objective of the project is to offer a simple nuclear power plant with outstanding safety, attractive economics and enhanced proliferation resistance characteristics ready for deployment within the next decade. IRIS embodies the requirements set forth by the recently announced US DOE Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program for worldwide deployment of a smaller-scale reactors and provides a viable bridge to Generation IV reactors. IRIS is designed to address the needs of both developed and emerging markets. Its smaller power level provides deployment flexibility in larger developed markets, and makes it in particular well suited for markets with limited grids or where the annual energy demand growth is moderate. Due to its short construction time and the staggered build option, IRIS significantly reduces the required financing, improves cash flow, and provides a viable solution for economies with limited resources. While based on proven and worldwide accepted LWR technology, IRIS introduces a number of innovative solutions to simplify its design and improve safety and operational characteristics, including the integral primary system and its components, as well as the safety-by-design approach. These features will be tested and demonstrated in a testing program that has been initiated. As its centerpiece, the program will include the integral test facility. Results of this program will support licensing with the US NRC. A multinational licensing is considered to facilitate worldwide deployment. (author)

  9. Bomber Deployments: A New Power Projection Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-21

    AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE DISTANCE LEARNING AIR UNIVERSITY BOMBER DEPLOYMENTS: A NEW POWER PROJECTION STRATEGY by...operating base (FOB), main operating base ( MOB ) and intermediate staging base (ISB).10 Each type of base requires certain actions to make it suitable for...closure of many main operating bases ( MOB ) overseas and the reluctance of many nations to permit permanent military bases on their soil.”15 This

  10. Deployment Effects of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies: Wave Energy Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    (1) a small pilot deployment, (2) a small commercial deployment, and (3) a large commercial scale plant. It is important to understand that the purpose of this study was to establish baseline scenarios based on basic device data that was provided to use by the manufacturer for illustrative purposes only.

  11. Reactor power system deployment and startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetch, J.R.; Nelin, C.J.; Britt, E.J.; Klein, G.; Rasor Associates, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA; California Institute of Technology, Pasadena)

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses issues that should receive further examination in the near-term as concept selection for development of a U.S. space reactor power system is approached. The issues include: the economics, practicality and system reliability associated with transfer of nuclear spacecraft from low earth shuttle orbits to operational orbits, via chemical propulsion versus nuclear electric propulsion; possible astronaut supervised reactor and nuclear electric propulsion startup in low altitude Shuttle orbit; potential deployment methods for nuclear powered spacecraft from Shuttle; the general public safety of low altitude startup and nuclear safe and disposal orbits; the question of preferred reactor power level; and the question of frozen versus molten alkali metal coolant during launch and deployment. These issues must be considered now because they impact the SP-100 concept selection, power level selection, weight and size limits, use of deployable radiators, reliability requirements, and economics, as well as the degree of need for and the urgency of developing space reactor power systems. 5 references

  12. Remotely deployable aerial inspection using tactile sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, C. N.; Cao, J.; Pierce, S. G.; Sullivan, J. C.; Pipe, A. G.; Dobie, G.; Summan, R.

    2014-02-01

    For structural monitoring applications, the use of remotely deployable Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) inspection platforms offer many advantages, including improved accessibility, greater safety and reduced cost, when compared to traditional manual inspection techniques. The use of such platforms, previously reported by researchers at the University Strathclyde facilitates the potential for rapid scanning of large areas and volumes in hazardous locations. A common problem for both manual and remote deployment approaches lies in the intrinsic stand-off and surface coupling issues of typical NDE probes. The associated complications of these requirements are obviously significantly exacerbated when considering aerial based remote inspection and deployment, resulting in simple visual techniques being the preferred sensor payload. Researchers at Bristol Robotics Laboratory have developed biomimetic tactile sensors modelled on the facial whiskers (vibrissae) of animals such as rats and mice, with the latest sensors actively sweeping their tips across the surface in a back and forth motion. The current work reports on the design and performance of an aerial inspection platform and the suitability of tactile whisking sensors to aerial based surface monitoring applications.

  13. FBR/VHTR deployment scenarios in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, Matt; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Co-deployment of Fast Breeder Reactors (FBRs) and Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTRs) can be used as the nuclear technologies to meet a significant portion of Japan's future energy demands. The FBR provides the fissile fuel for energy security and sustainability, and can be used to provide a significant portion of the electricity demand. The VHTR can provide flexible energy outputs (electricity, hydrogen, and high-temperature heat) with high efficiency, can operate with a wide variety of fuel cycles, and can be sited at locations that have limited availability of cooling water. These features, combined with its passive safety and high degree of proliferation resistance, make the VHTR an ideal complement for co-deployment with the FBR in Japan and also a very low-risk technology of export to foreign countries. In addition to hydrogen production, the high-temperature thermal energy produced by the VHTR fleet can be used for a wide variety of process-heat applications, and the VHTR can play a key role for significantly reducing greenhouse-gas emissions. This paper describes assessments for deploying FBRs and VHTRs in Japan using a closed fuel cycle, with the FBRs supplying the fissile material to sustain the combined FBR/VHTR fleet. (author)

  14. Hybrid deployable support truss designs for LDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgepeth, J.

    1988-01-01

    Concepts for a 20-meter diameter Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) deployable truss backup structure, and analytical predictions of its structural characteristics are discussed. The concept shown is referred to as the SIXPAC; It is a combination of the PACTRUSS concept and a single-fold beam, which would make up the desired backup structure. One advantage of retaining the PACTRUSS concept is its packaging density and its capability for synchronous deployment. Various 2-meter hexagonal panel arrangements are possible for this Hybrid PACTRUSS structure depending on the panel-to-structure attachment strategies used. Static analyses of the SIXPAC using various assumptions for truss designs and panel masses of 10 kg sq meters were performed to predict the tip displacement of the structure when supported at the center. The tip displacement ranged from 0.20 to 0.44 mm without the panel mass, and from 0.9 to 3.9 mm with the panel mass (in a 1-g field). The data indicate that the structure can be adequately ground tested to validate its required performance in space, assuming the required performance in space is approximately 100 microns. The static displacement at the tip of the structure when subjected to an angular acceleration of 0.001 rad/sec squared were estimated to range from 0.8 to 7.5 microns, depending on the type of truss elements.

  15. Light duty utility arm deployment in Hanford tank T-106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1997-07-01

    An existing gap in the technology for the remediation of underground waste storage tanks filled by the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. On September 27 and 30, 1996, the LDUA System was deployed in underground storage tank T-106 at Hanford. The system performed successfully, satisfying all objectives of the in-tank operational test (hot test); performing close-up video inspection of features of tank dome, risers, and wall; and grasping and repositioning in-tank debris. The successful completion of hot testing at Hanford means that areas of tank structure and waste surface that were previously inaccessible are now within reach of remote tools for inspection, waste analysis, and small-scale retrieval. The LDUA System has become a new addition to the arsenal of technologies being applied to solve tank waste remediation challenges.

  16. Light duty utility arm deployment in Hanford tank T-106

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1997-07-01

    An existing gap in the technology for the remediation of underground waste storage tanks filled by the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. On September 27 and 30, 1996, the LDUA System was deployed in underground storage tank T-106 at Hanford. The system performed successfully, satisfying all objectives of the in-tank operational test (hot test); performing close-up video inspection of features of tank dome, risers, and wall; and grasping and repositioning in-tank debris. The successful completion of hot testing at Hanford means that areas of tank structure and waste surface that were previously inaccessible are now within reach of remote tools for inspection, waste analysis, and small-scale retrieval. The LDUA System has become a new addition to the arsenal of technologies being applied to solve tank waste remediation challenges

  17. An Experimental Study of Advanced Receivers in a Practical Dense Small Cells Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assefa, Dereje; Berardinelli, Gilberto; Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão

    2016-01-01

    leads to significant limitations on the network throughput in such deployments. In addition, network densification introduces difficulty in network deployment. This paper presents a study on the benefits of advanced receiver in a practical uncoordinated dense small cells deployment. Our aim is to show...

  18. Modular VO oriented Java EE service deployer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinaro, Marco; Cepparo, Francesco; De Marco, Marco; Knapic, Cristina; Apollo, Pietro; Smareglia, Riccardo

    2014-07-01

    The International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) has produced many standards and recommendations whose aim is to generate an architecture that starts from astrophysical resources, in a general sense, and ends up in deployed consumable services (that are themselves astrophysical resources). Focusing on the Data Access Layer (DAL) system architecture, that these standards define, in the last years a web based application has been developed and maintained at INAF-OATs IA2 (Italian National institute for Astrophysics - Astronomical Observatory of Trieste, Italian center of Astronomical Archives) to try to deploy and manage multiple VO (Virtual Observatory) services in a uniform way: VO-Dance. However a set of criticalities have arisen since when the VO-Dance idea has been produced, plus some major changes underwent and are undergoing at the IVOA DAL layer (and related standards): this urged IA2 to identify a new solution for its own service layer. Keeping on the basic ideas from VO-Dance (simple service configuration, service instantiation at call time and modularity) while switching to different software technologies (e.g. dismissing Java Reflection in favour of Enterprise Java Bean, EJB, based solution), the new solution has been sketched out and tested for feasibility. Here we present the results originating from this test study. The main constraints for this new project come from various fields. A better homogenized solution rising from IVOA DAL standards: for example the new DALI (Data Access Layer Interface) specification that acts as a common interface system for previous and oncoming access protocols. The need for a modular system where each component is based upon a single VO specification allowing services to rely on common capabilities instead of homogenizing them inside service components directly. The search for a scalable system that takes advantage from distributed systems. The constraints find answer in the adopted solutions hereafter sketched. The

  19. Energy efficient design of cognitive small cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildemeersch, Matthias; Wildemeersch, Matthias; Quek, Tony Q.S.; Rabbachin, Alberto; Slump, Cornelis H.; Huang, Aiping; Kim, Dong-In; Mueller, P.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneous networks consisting of a macrocell tier and a small cell tier are considered an attractive solution to cope with the fierce increase of mobile traffic demand. Nevertheless, a massive deployment of small cell access points (SAPs) leads also to a considerable increase in energy

  20. Fundamentals of 3D Deployable Mechanisms in Space

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fundamentals of 3D Deployable Origami Structures in Space The primary objectives of my research are to study the application of 3D deployable origami structures in...

  1. STEP flight experiments Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    Flight testing plans for a large deployable infrared reflector telescope to be tested on a space platform are discussed. Subsystem parts, subassemblies, and whole assemblies are discussed. Assurance of operational deployability, rigidization, alignment, and serviceability will be sought.

  2. Elastic Deployable Composite Tubular Roll-Out Boom, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Deployable Space Systems (DSS) has developed an affordable and ultra-lightweight elastically self-deployable Roll-Out Boom technology that provides affordability and...

  3. Going with small ICBMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkin, W.M.

    1984-01-01

    Support for the small ICBM (SICBM) is coming from government bureaucrats, contractors, MX opponents, ''build-down'' supporters, and those who have no confidence in arms control. Despite this support, which the author sees as a failure of administration policies, the SICBM has most of the technological and basing drawbacks of the MX. Mobile and superhardening basing techniques are as questionable for the SICBM as for the MX. Moreover, there is no evidence to support the claim that their deployment will increase stability and enhance the arms control process

  4. Scientific Cluster Deployment and Recovery – Using puppet to simplify cluster management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrix, Val; Yao Yushu; Benjamin, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Deployment, maintenance and recovery of a scientific cluster, which has complex, specialized services, can be a time consuming task requiring the assistance of Linux system administrators, network engineers as well as domain experts. Universities and small institutions that have a part-time FTE with limited time for and knowledge of the administration of such clusters can be strained by such maintenance tasks. This current work is the result of an effort to maintain a data analysis cluster (DAC) with minimal effort by a local system administrator. The realized benefit is the scientist, who is the local system administrator, is able to focus on the data analysis instead of the intricacies of managing a cluster. Our work provides a cluster deployment and recovery process (CDRP) based on the puppet configuration engine allowing a part-time FTE to easily deploy and recover entire clusters with minimal effort. Puppet is a configuration management system (CMS) used widely in computing centers for the automatic management of resources. Domain experts use Puppet's declarative language to define reusable modules for service configuration and deployment. Our CDRP has three actors: domain experts, a cluster designer and a cluster manager. The domain experts first write the puppet modules for the cluster services. A cluster designer would then define a cluster. This includes the creation of cluster roles, mapping the services to those roles and determining the relationships between the services. Finally, a cluster manager would acquire the resources (machines, networking), enter the cluster input parameters (hostnames, IP addresses) and automatically generate deployment scripts used by puppet to configure it to act as a designated role. In the event of a machine failure, the originally generated deployment scripts along with puppet can be used to easily reconfigure a new machine. The cluster definition produced in our CDRP is an integral part of automating cluster deployment

  5. Scientific Cluster Deployment and Recovery - Using puppet to simplify cluster management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Val; Benjamin, Doug; Yao, Yushu

    2012-12-01

    Deployment, maintenance and recovery of a scientific cluster, which has complex, specialized services, can be a time consuming task requiring the assistance of Linux system administrators, network engineers as well as domain experts. Universities and small institutions that have a part-time FTE with limited time for and knowledge of the administration of such clusters can be strained by such maintenance tasks. This current work is the result of an effort to maintain a data analysis cluster (DAC) with minimal effort by a local system administrator. The realized benefit is the scientist, who is the local system administrator, is able to focus on the data analysis instead of the intricacies of managing a cluster. Our work provides a cluster deployment and recovery process (CDRP) based on the puppet configuration engine allowing a part-time FTE to easily deploy and recover entire clusters with minimal effort. Puppet is a configuration management system (CMS) used widely in computing centers for the automatic management of resources. Domain experts use Puppet's declarative language to define reusable modules for service configuration and deployment. Our CDRP has three actors: domain experts, a cluster designer and a cluster manager. The domain experts first write the puppet modules for the cluster services. A cluster designer would then define a cluster. This includes the creation of cluster roles, mapping the services to those roles and determining the relationships between the services. Finally, a cluster manager would acquire the resources (machines, networking), enter the cluster input parameters (hostnames, IP addresses) and automatically generate deployment scripts used by puppet to configure it to act as a designated role. In the event of a machine failure, the originally generated deployment scripts along with puppet can be used to easily reconfigure a new machine. The cluster definition produced in our CDRP is an integral part of automating cluster deployment

  6. Psychiatric Effects of Military Deployment on Children and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Trenton

    2012-01-01

    Deployments in the United States military have increased greatly in the past 10 years. Families and children are psychiatrically affected by these deployments, and recent studies are clarifying these effects. This article focuses on the psychiatric effects of deployment on children and uses a composite case example to review the use of play therapy to treat children who are having psychiatric issues related to the deployment of one or both parents. PMID:22468239

  7. Deployment-related risk factors of low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Lars Ravnborg; Marott, Jacob Louis; Gyntelberg, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Where much is known about the consequences of spinal and low back pain (LBP) during military deployments, there is lesser knowledge of risk factors for LBP among the deployed forces. The objective of this study was to identify deployment-related exposures associated with LBP. The study was a ques...... their subordinates and involve medical personnel, especially deployed physiotherapists, by giving advice to soldiers of different military occupational specialties on how to optimize ergonomics at work....

  8. Design aspects of a deployable tensegrity-hollow-rope footbridge

    OpenAIRE

    Rhode-Barbarigos , Landolf; Bel Hadj Ali , Nizar; Motro , René; Smith , Ian F.C.

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Tensegrity structures are composed of cables and struts in a pre-stressed self-equilibrium. Although tensegrity first appeared in the 1950s, it is seldom used in civil engineering. This paper focuses on the design aspects of a deployable tensegrity-hollow-rope footbridge. Deployment is usually not a critical design case for traditional deployable structures. However, for tensegrity systems deployment may be critical due to the actuation required. In this paper, deploym...

  9. Deployment Methods for an Origami-Inspired Rigid-Foldable Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirbel, Shannon A.; Trease, Brian P.; Magleby, Spencer P.; Howell, Larry L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate several deployment methods for an origami-inspired solar array at two size scales: 25-meter array and CubeSat array. The array enables rigid panel deployment and introduces new concepts for actuating CubeSat deployables. The design for the array was inspired by the origami flasher model (Lang, 1997; Shafer, 2001). Figure 1 shows the array prototyped from Garolite and Kapton film at the CubeSat scale. Prior work demonstrated that rigid panels like solar cells could successfully be folded into the final stowed configuration without requiring the panels to flex (Zirbel, Lang, Thomson, & al., 2013). The design of the array is novel and enables efficient use of space. The array can be wrapped around the central bus of the spacecraft in the case of the large array, or can accommodate storage of a small instrument payload in the case of the CubeSat array. The radial symmetry of this array around the spacecraft is ideally suited for spacecraft that need to spin. This work focuses on several actuation methods for a one-time deployment of the array. The array is launched in its stowed configuration and it will be deployed when it is in space. Concepts for both passive and active actuation were considered.

  10. The Global Outlook for Small Reactors: Opportunities, Challenges and Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, A.

    2012-01-01

    The fascinating topic of small nuclear is becoming more prevalent on the nuclear agenda. The discussions are generally focused within the country of technical origin. In this presentation 'The global outlook for small reactors' Rolls-Royce along with energy business analysts Douglas-Westwood present their shared views on the global opportunities for Small Reactor deployment in the context of the wider energy market. The presentation will: provide a compressive overview of trends and dynamics relating to Small Reactors in the context of the current world energy market, identify specific Small Reactor opportunities and areas of interest, address the challenges and potential solutions for Small Reactor deployment and operation.(author).

  11. Measurements of uranium in soils and small mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miera, F.R. Jr.

    1980-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the bioavailability of uranium to a single species of small mammal, Peromyscus maniculatus rufinus (Merriam), white-footed deer mouse, from two different source terms: a Los Alamos National Laboratory dynamic weapons testing site in north central New Mexico, where an estimated 70,000 kg of uranium have been expended over a 31-y period; and an inactive uranium mill tailings pile located in west central New Mexico near Grants, which received wastes over a 5-y period from the milling of 2.7 x 10 9 kg of uranium ore

  12. Measurements of uranium in soils and small mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miera, F.R. Jr.

    1980-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the bioavailability of uranium to a single species of small mammal, Peromyscus maniculatus rufinus (Merriam), white-footed deer mouse, from two different source terms: a Los Alamos National Laboratory dynamic weapons testing site in north central New Mexico, where an estimated 70,000 kg of uranium have been expended over a 31-y period; and an inactive uranium mill tailings pile located in west central New Mexico near Grants, which received wastes over a 5-y period from the milling of 2.7 x 10/sup 9/ kg of uranium ore.

  13. Alignment and phasing of deployable telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, N. J.; Ulich, B. L.

    1983-01-01

    The experiences in coaligning and phasing the Multi-Mirror Telescope (MMT), together with studies in setting up radio telescopes, are presented. These experiences are discussed, and on the basis they furnish, schemes are suggested for coaligning and phasing four large future telescopes with complex primary mirror systems. These telescopes are MT2, a 15-m-equivalent MMT, the University of California Ten Meter Telescope, the 10 m sub-mm wave telescope of the University of Arizona and the Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy, and the Large Deployable Reflector, a future space telescope for far-IR and sub-mm waves.

  14. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) feasibility study update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alff, W. H.; Banderman, L. W.

    1983-01-01

    In 1982 a workshop was held to refine the science rationale for large deployable reflectors (LDR) and develop technology requirements that support the science rationale. At the end of the workshop, a set of LDR consensus systems requirements was established. The subject study was undertaken to update the initial LDR study using the new systems requirements. The study included mirror materials selection and configuration, thermal analysis, structural concept definition and analysis, dynamic control analysis and recommendations for further study. The primary emphasis was on the dynamic controls requirements and the sophistication of the controls system needed to meet LDR performance goals.

  15. Quality function deployment: application to rehabilitation services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einspruch, E M; Omachonu, V K; Einspruch, N G

    1996-01-01

    Describes how the challenge of providing rehabilitative services at reasonable costs is beginning to mount. The management of quality in rehabilitative services is therefore gaining increasing attention in the health care arena. States that if a link is implied between the above stated goal and customer satisfaction, it is imperative to evaluate quality or customer satisfaction in the context of the patient's experience. Describes the quality function deployment (QFD) system and how it leads to a better understanding of the customer's needs and wants. Explores the process of applying the concept of QFD to physical therapy.

  16. Pre-deployment dissociation and personality as risk factors for post-deployment post-traumatic stress disorder in Danish soldiers deployed to Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponce de León, Beatriz; Andersen, Søren; Karstoft, Karen Inge

    2018-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated whether pre-deployment dissociation was associated with previously identified post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom trajectories from before to 2.5 years after military deployment. Furthermore, it examined whether the tendency to dissociate, pre-deployme......Objective: This study investigated whether pre-deployment dissociation was associated with previously identified post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom trajectories from before to 2.5 years after military deployment. Furthermore, it examined whether the tendency to dissociate, pre...

  17. Equipment for deployment of canisters with spent nuclear fuel and bentonite buffer in horizontal holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henttonen, V.; Suikki, M.

    1992-08-01

    The study presents the predesign of equipment for the deployment of canisters in long horizontal holes. The canisters are placed in the centre of the hole and are surrounded by a bentonite buffer. In thE study the canisters are assumed to have a diameter of 1.6 m and a length of 5.9 m, including the hemispherical ends. Their total weight is 60 tonnes. The bentonite buffer after homogenization is 400 mm thick, making a total package diameter of 2.4 m. The deployment system consists of four wagons for handling The canisters and the bentonite blocks. To ensure safe emplacement, every part is installed separately in its final position. This also makes it possible to use small clearances between the canisters and the bentonite blocks and between the blocks and the rock wall. With small clearances, backfilling can be avoided. Another basic design idea is that the wagons are equipped with wheels, which are in direct contact with the rock walls. Thus, rails, which have to be removed as the deployment progresses, are unnecessary. To minimize the time taken for deploying one canister, the wagons are designed so that only three trips from the service area to the deposit area are needed. Due to the radiation in the vicinity of the canisters, the wagons have to be teleoperated

  18. Equipment for deployment of canisters with spent nuclear fuel and bentonite buffer in horisontal holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henttonen, V.; Suikki, M.

    1992-06-01

    This study presents the predesign of equipment for the deployment of canisters in long horizontal holes. The canisters are placed in the centre of the hole and are surrounded by a bentonite buffer. In this study the canisters are assumed to have a diameter of 1.6 m and a length of 5.9 m, including the hemispherical ends. Their total weight is 60 tonnes. The bentonite buffer after homogenization is 400 mm thick, making a total package diameter of 2.4 m. The deployment system consists of four wagons for handling the canisters and the bentonite blocks. To ensure safe emplacement, every part is installed separately in its final position. This also makes it possible to use small clearances between the canisters and the bentonite blocks and between the blocks and the rock wall. With small clearances, backfilling can be avoided. Another basic design idea is that the wagons are equipped with wheels, which are in direct contact with the rock walls. Thus, rails, which have to be removed as the deployment progresses, are unnecessary. To minimize the time taken for deploying one canister, the wagons are designed so that only three trips from the service area to the deposit area are needed. Due to the radiation in the vicinity of the canisters, the wagons have to be teleoperated. (au)

  19. Development and modeling of self-deployable structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Depankar

    Deployable space structures are prefabricated structures which can be transformed from a closed, compact configuration to a predetermined expanded form in which they are stable and can bear loads. The present research effort investigates a new family of deployable structures, called the Self-Deployable Structures (SDS). Unlike other deployable structures, which have rigid members, the SDS members are flexible while the connecting joints are rigid. The joints store the predefined geometry of the deployed structure in the collapsed state. The SDS is stress-free in both deployed and collapsed configurations and results in a self-standing structure which acquires its structural properties after a chemical reaction. Reliability of deployment is one of the most important features of the SDS, since it does not rely on mechanisms that can lock during deployment. The unit building block of these structures is the self-deployable structural element (SDSE). Several SDSE members can be linked to generate a complex building block such as a triangular or a tetrahedral structure. Different SDSE and SDS concepts are investigated in the research work, and the performance of SDS's are experimentally and theoretically explored. Triangular and tetrahedral prototype SDS have been developed and presented. Theoretical efforts include modeling the behavior of 2-dimensional SDSs. Using this design tool, engineers can study the effects of different packing configurations and deployment sequence; and perform optimization on the collapsed state of a structure with different external constraints. The model also predicts if any lockup or entanglement occurs during deployment.

  20. SmallSat Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropulos, Dolores; Bittner, David; Murawski, Robert; Golden, Bert

    2015-01-01

    The SmallSat has an unrealized potential in both the private industry and in the federal government. Currently over 70 companies, 50 universities and 17 governmental agencies are involved in SmallSat research and development. In 1994, the U.S. Army Missile and Defense mapped the moon using smallSat imagery. Since then Smart Phones have introduced this imagery to the people of the world as diverse industries watched this trend. The deployment cost of smallSats is also greatly reduced compared to traditional satellites due to the fact that multiple units can be deployed in a single mission. Imaging payloads have become more sophisticated, smaller and lighter. In addition, the growth of small technology obtained from private industries has led to the more widespread use of smallSats. This includes greater revisit rates in imagery, significantly lower costs, the ability to update technology more frequently and the ability to decrease vulnerability of enemy attacks. The popularity of smallSats show a changing mentality in this fast paced world of tomorrow. What impact has this created on the NASA communication networks now and in future years? In this project, we are developing the SmallSat Relational Database which can support a simulation of smallSats within the NASA SCaN Compatability Environment for Networks and Integrated Communications (SCENIC) Modeling and Simulation Lab. The NASA Space Communications and Networks (SCaN) Program can use this modeling to project required network support needs in the next 10 to 15 years. The SmallSat Rational Database could model smallSats just as the other SCaN databases model the more traditional larger satellites, with a few exceptions. One being that the smallSat Database is designed to be built-to-order. The SmallSat database holds various hardware configurations that can be used to model a smallSat. It will require significant effort to develop as the research material can only be populated by hand to obtain the unique data

  1. The effect of military deployment on mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyk-Jensen, Stéphanie; Weatherall, Cecilie Dohlmann; W. Jepsen, Peter

    for the non-deployed eligible men, and our results hold to various robustness checks. Our administrative records provide objective measures of mental health service use in the form of psychiatric diagnoses and purchase of mental health-related medication. The very rich data makes it possible to control......In this paper we estimate the causal effect of military deployment on soldiers’ mental health. To handle the selection bias problem, we use longitudinal data for deployed and non-deployed eligible men in a difference-in-differences setting. Using pair-wise matching, we impute deployment dates...... for important variables like intelligence tests and family background. We find significant adverse effects of military deployment on soldiers’ mental health service use. Highlights: - Causal effect of military deployment on soldiers’ use of mental health service - Using a difference-in-differences approach...

  2. Integrated assessment of dispersed energy resources deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnay, Chris; Blanco, Raquel; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Kawaan, Cornelia P.; Osborn, Julie G.; Rubio, F. Javier

    2000-06-01

    The goal of this work is to create an integrated framework for forecasting the adoption of distributed energy resources (DER), both by electricity customers and by the various institutions within the industry itself, and for evaluating the effect of this adoption on the power system, particularly on the overall reliability and quality of electrical service to the end user. This effort and follow on contributions are intended to anticipate and explore possible patterns of DER deployment, thereby guiding technical work on microgrids towards the key technical problems. An early example of this process addressed is the question of possible DER adopting customer disconnection. A deployment scenario in which many customers disconnect from their distribution company (disco) entirely leads to a quite different set of technical problems than a scenario in which customers self generate a significant share or all of their on-site electricity requirements and additionally buy and sell energy and ancillary services (AS) locally and/or into wider markets. The exploratory work in this study suggests that the economics under which customers disconnect entirely are unlikely.

  3. Hadoop Cluster Deployment: A Methodological Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Celso Messias Correia

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available For a long time, data has been treated as a general problem because it just represents fractions of an event without any relevant purpose. However, the last decade has been just about information and how to get it. Seeking meaning in data and trying to solve scalability problems, many frameworks have been developed to improve data storage and its analysis. As a framework, Hadoop was presented as a powerful tool to deal with large amounts of data. However, it still causes doubts about how to deal with its deployment and if there is any reliable method to compare the performance of distinct Hadoop clusters. This paper presents a methodology based on benchmark analysis to guide the Hadoop cluster deployment. The experiments employed The Apache Hadoop and the Hadoop distributions of Cloudera, Hortonworks, and MapR, analyzing the architectures on local and on clouding—using centralized and geographically distributed servers. The results show the methodology can be dynamically applied on a reliable comparison among different architectures. Additionally, the study suggests that the knowledge acquired can be used to improve the data analysis process by understanding the Hadoop architecture.

  4. Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short, W.; Sullivan, P.; Mai, T.; Mowers, M.; Uriarte, C.; Blair, N.; Heimiller, D.; Martinez, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) is a deterministic optimization model of the deployment of electric power generation technologies and transmission infrastructure throughout the contiguous United States into the future. The model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Strategic Energy Analysis Center, is designed to analyze the critical energy issues in the electric sector, especially with respect to potential energy policies, such as clean energy and renewable energy standards or carbon restrictions. ReEDS provides a detailed treatment of electricity-generating and electrical storage technologies and specifically addresses a variety of issues related to renewable energy technologies, including accessibility and cost of transmission, regional quality of renewable resources, seasonal and diurnal generation profiles, variability of wind and solar power, and the influence of variability on the reliability of the electrical grid. ReEDS addresses these issues through a highly discretized regional structure, explicit statistical treatment of the variability in wind and solar output over time, and consideration of ancillary services' requirements and costs.

  5. SMUD Community Renewable Energy Deployment Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sison-Lebrilla, Elaine [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Tiangco, Valentino [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lemes, Marco [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Ave, Kathleen [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2015-06-08

    This report summarizes the completion of four renewable energy installations supported by California Energy Commission (CEC) grant number CEC Grant PIR-11-005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Assistance Agreement, DE-EE0003070, and the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Community Renewable Energy Deployment (CRED) program. The funding from the DOE, combined with funding from the CEC, supported the construction of a solar power system, biogas generation from waste systems, and anaerobic digestion systems at dairy facilities, all for electricity generation and delivery to SMUD’s distribution system. The deployment of CRED projects shows that solar projects and anaerobic digesters can be successfully implemented under favorable economic conditions and business models and through collaborative partnerships. This work helps other communities learn how to assess, overcome barriers, utilize, and benefit from renewable resources for electricity generation in their region. In addition to reducing GHG emissions, the projects also demonstrate that solar projects and anaerobic digesters can be readily implemented through collaborative partnerships. This work helps other communities learn how to assess, overcome barriers, utilize, and benefit from renewable resources for electricity generation in their region.

  6. Dynamic analysis of the large deployable reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleson, Robert E.; Scott, A. Don

    1987-01-01

    The Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) is to be an astronomical observatory orbiting above Earth's obscuring atmosphere and operating in the spectral range between 30 microns and 1000 microns wavelength. The LDR will be used to study such astronomical phenomena as stellar and galactic formation, cosmology, and planetary atmospheres. The LDR will be the first observatory to be erected and assembled in space. This distinction brings with it several major technological challenges such as the development of ultra-lightweight deployable mirrors, advanced mirror fabrication techniques, advanced structures, and control of vibrations due to various sources of excitation. The purpose of this analysis is to provide an assessment of the vibrational response due to secondary mirror chopping and LDR slewing. The dynamic response of two 20-m LDR configurations was studied. Two mirror support configurations were investigated for the Ames concept, the first employs a six-strut secondary mirror support structure, while the second uses a triple-bipod support design. All three configurations were modeled using a tetrahedral truss design for the primary mirror support structure. Response resulting from secondary mirror chopping was obtained for the two Ames configurations, and the response of the primary mirror from slewing was obtained for all three configurations.

  7. Scenario study on the FBR deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Kiyoshi; Kofuji, Hirohide; Otaki, Akira; Yonezawa, Shigeaki; Shinoda, Yoshihiko; Hirao, Kazunori; Ikegami, Tetsuo

    2000-12-01

    This study on success scenarios for the Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) deployment was performed taking account of future situation of fossil, renewable and nuclear energies in Japan as well as the world from the viewpoints of the following four items; economics, environment, energy security and restriction of natural uranium resources. In the economics scenario, if carbon tax is added to generating cost of LNG, coal and oil and the economics of FBR cycle is competitive with LWR cycle in the future, FBR cycle will be expected to introduce as the middle and base load power plant. In the environment scenario, there is also any possibility that FBR cycle which can burn and transmute minor actinide and fission product elements will be introduced in order to reduce the burden of deposit facility and the toxicity of high-level waste. In the uranium resources restriction scenario, FBR cycle needs to be deployed at the latest in the middle of 21st century from the viewpoint of the restriction of natural uranium resources. This study was carried out in a part of JNC's feasibility study on commercialized FBR cycle system. (author)

  8. The medical software quality deployment method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, N; Timpka, T; Eriksson, H

    1999-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a Quality Function Deployment (QFD) model for design of information systems in health-care environments. Consecutive blocked-subject case studies were conducted, based on action research methods. Starting with a QFD model for software development, a model for information system design, the Medical Software Quality Deployment (MSQD) model, was developed. The MSQD model was divided into the pre-study phase, in which the customer categories and their power to influence the design are determined; the data collection phase, in which the voice of customers (VoC) is identified by observations and interviews and quantified by Critical. Incident questionnaires; the need specification phase, where the VoC is specified into ranked customer needs; and the design phase where the customer needs are transformed stepwise to technical requirements and design attributes. QFD showed to be useful for integrating the values of different customer categories in software development for health-care settings. In the later design phases, other quality methods should be used for software implementation and testing.

  9. Space Situational Awareness of Large Numbers of Payloads From a Single Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerman, A.; Byers, J.; Emmert, J.; Nicholas, A.

    2014-09-01

    The nearly simultaneous deployment of a large number of payloads from a single vehicle presents a new challenge for space object catalog maintenance and space situational awareness (SSA). Following two cubesat deployments last November, it took five weeks to catalog the resulting 64 orbits. The upcoming Kicksat mission will present an even greater SSA challenge, with its deployment of 128 chip-sized picosats. Although all of these deployments are in short-lived orbits, future deployments will inevitably occur at higher altitudes, with a longer term threat of collision with active spacecraft. With such deployments, individual scientific payload operators require rapid precise knowledge of their satellites' locations. Following the first November launch, the cataloguing did not initially associate a payload with each orbit, leaving this to the satellite operators. For short duration missions, the time required to identify an experiment's specific orbit may easily be a large fraction of the spacecraft's lifetime. For a Kicksat-type deployment, present tracking cannot collect enough observations to catalog each small object. The current approach is to treat the chip cloud as a single catalog object. However, the cloud dissipates into multiple subclouds and, ultimately, tiny groups of untrackable chips. One response to this challenge may be to mandate installation of a transponder on each spacecraft. Directional transponder transmission detections could be used as angle observations for orbit cataloguing. Of course, such an approach would only be employable with cooperative spacecraft. In other cases, a probabilistic association approach may be useful, with the goal being to establish the probability of an element being at a given point in space. This would permit more reliable assessment of the probability of collision of active spacecraft with any cloud element. This paper surveys the cataloguing challenges presented by large scale deployments of small spacecraft

  10. Testing the Deployment Repeatability of a Precision Deployable Boom Prototype for the Proposed SWOT Karin Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnes, Gregory S.; Waldman, Jeff; Hughes, Richard; Peterson, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's proposed Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, scheduled to launch in 2020, would provide critical information about Earth's oceans, ocean circulation, fresh water storage, and river discharge. The mission concept calls for a dual-antenna Ka-band radar interferometer instrument, known as KaRIn, that would map the height of water globally along two 50 km wide swaths. The KaRIn antennas, which would be separated by 10 meters on either side of the spacecraft, would need to be precisely deployable in order to meet demanding pointing requirements. Consequently, an effort was undertaken to design build and prototype a precision deployable Mast for the KaRIn instrument. Each mast was 4.5-m long with a required dilitation stability of 2.5 microns over 3 minutes. It required a minimum first mode of 7 Hz. Deployment repeatability was less than +/- 7 arcsec in all three rotation directions. Overall mass could not exceed 41.5 Kg including any actuators and thermal blanketing. This set of requirements meant the boom had to be three times lighter and two orders of magnitude more precise than the existing state of the art for deployable booms.

  11. Finding Their Way Back In: Family Reintegration Following Guard Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messecar, Deborah C

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe deployed National Guard members' and their families' perceptions of their experience with family reintegration, and the causes and conditions of challenges reintegration presents after deployment. A total of 26 National Guard members and 19 family members participated in individual (n = 22), couples (n = 6), or focus group (n = 17) interviews. In-depth interviews were used to assess needs and maximize input from military families regarding deployment-related experiences and reintegration issues. Qualitative coding and analysis of data were completed using NVivo. Finding their way back in is the key process that the military members must complete to successfully reestablish their desired social connections with the family and reclaim their place within the family. Several conditions shape the degree of challenges with reintegration that veterans and their family will encounter. These include preparation for deployment, length and type of deployment, communication during deployment, and finally, awareness of how deployment changes the military member and the family. Support resources dedicated to providing National Guard members and their families with assistance in preparing for deployments and educating them about the importance of communication during deployment should be maintained and expanded. Broader educational efforts that increase awareness of what to expect regarding how deployment changes the military member and the family are needed. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  12. Cavola experiment site: geophysical investigations and deployment of a dense seismic array on a landslide

    OpenAIRE

    L. Martelli; M. Cercato; P. Augliera; G. Di Giulio; G. Milana; J. Haines; P. Bordoni; F. Cara; undefined Cavola Experiment Team

    2007-01-01

    Geophysical site investigations have been performed in association with deployment of a dense array of 95 3-component seismometers on the Cavola landslide in the Northern Apennines. The aim of the array is to study propagation of seismic waves in the heterogeneous medium through comparison of observation and modelling. The small-aperture array (130 m×56 m) operated continuously for three months in 2004. Cavola landslide consists of a clay body sliding over mudstone-shale b...

  13. Experience in Reviewing Small Modular Reactor Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Nabil Abdul Rahim; Alfred, S.L.; Phongsakorn, P.

    2015-01-01

    Malaysia is in the stage of conducting Preliminary Technical Feasibility Study for the Deployment of Small Modular Reactor (SMR). There are different types of SMR, some already under construction in Argentina (CAREM) and China (HTR-PM) - (light water reactor and high temperature reactor technologies), others with near-term deployment such as SMART in South Korea, ACP100 in China, mPower and NuScale in the US, and others with longer term deployment prospects (liquid-metal cooled reactor technologies). The study was mainly to get an overview of the technology available in the market. The SMR ranking in the study was done through listing out the most deployable technology in the market according to their types. As a new comer country, the proven technology with an excellent operation history will usually be the main consideration points. (author)

  14. QUALITY FUNCTION DEPLOYMENT AS A STRATEGIC PLANNINGTOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu DEVRİM İÇTENBAŞ

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Quality Function Deployment (QFD uses a house of quality to translate customerrequirements into engineering specifications. QFD has been widely used as a toolto develop new products. It has been adopted in thefields of education quality,service quality, software development and marketingplanning. The tool hasrecently been applied in strategic planning .In this study authors reviewed currentresearch which uses QFD as a strategic planning tool and described how QFDmethods can be used as a robust tool in strategic planning. This study provides aninsight for strategic planners to utilize a QFD- based philosophy and the methodsare useful tools for the design of a customer-driven strategy and show how itsystematically translates vision into action, targeting opportunities and creatinginnovative strategies.

  15. OpenFlow Deployment and Concept Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Hegr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Terms such as SDN and OpenFlow (OF are often used in the research and development of data networks. This paper deals with the analysis of the current state of OpenFlow protocol deployment options as it is the only real representative protocol that enables the implementation of Software Defined Networking outside an academic world. There is introduced an insight into the current state of the OpenFlow specification development at various levels is introduced. The possible limitations associated with this concept in conjunction with the latest version (1.3 of the specification published by ONF are also presented. In the conclusion there presented a demonstrative security application addressing the lack of IPv6 support in real network devices since most of today's switches and controllers support only OF v1.0.

  16. Stochastic Optimization for Nuclear Facility Deployment Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Ross Daniel

    Single-use, low-enriched uranium oxide fuel, consumed through several cycles in a light-water reactor (LWR) before being disposed, has become the dominant source of commercial-scale nuclear electric generation in the United States and throughout the world. However, it is not without its drawbacks and is not the only potential nuclear fuel cycle available. Numerous alternative fuel cycles have been proposed at various times which, through the use of different reactor and recycling technologies, offer to counteract many of the perceived shortcomings with regards to waste management, resource utilization, and proliferation resistance. However, due to the varying maturity levels of these technologies, the complicated material flow feedback interactions their use would require, and the large capital investments in the current technology, one should not deploy these advanced designs without first investigating the potential costs and benefits of so doing. As the interactions among these systems can be complicated, and the ways in which they may be deployed are many, the application of automated numerical optimization to the simulation of the fuel cycle could potentially be of great benefit to researchers and interested policy planners. To investigate the potential of these methods, a computational program has been developed that applies a parallel, multi-objective simulated annealing algorithm to a computational optimization problem defined by a library of relevant objective functions applied to the Ver ifiable Fuel Cycle Simulati on Model (VISION, developed at the Idaho National Laboratory). The VISION model, when given a specified fuel cycle deployment scenario, computes the numbers and types of, and construction, operation, and utilization schedules for, the nuclear facilities required to meet a predetermined electric power demand function. Additionally, it calculates the location and composition of the nuclear fuels within the fuel cycle, from initial mining through

  17. Clean energy deployment: addressing financing cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ameli, Nadia; Kammen, Daniel M

    2012-01-01

    New methods are needed to accelerate clean energy policy adoption. To that end, this study proposes an innovative financing scheme for renewable and energy efficiency deployment. Financing barriers represent a notable obstacle for energy improvements and this is particularly the case for low income households. Implementing a policy such as PACE—property assessed clean energy—allows for the provision of upfront funds for residential property owners to install electric and thermal solar systems and make energy efficiency improvements to their buildings. This paper will inform the design of better policies tailored to the creation of the appropriate conditions for such investments to occur, especially in those countries where most of the population belongs to the low–middle income range facing financial constraints. (letter)

  18. Techno-Economics of Residential Broadband Deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Halldor Matthias

    2007-01-01

    on account of their existing telecom network (”the raw copper”), and typically they will prefer an xDSL-based strategy (various types of Digital Subscriber Line-technology: ADSL, VDSL, etc.), where the rate of speed of data connections are increased gradually to 10-50 Mbit/s or even more, in order to gain...... broadband deployment strategy is depending on a complexed set of parameters, and there is a demand for precise techno-economic cost models estimating financial feasibility. The existing cost models do not consider the dynamic developments in the market caused by competition. The PhD thesis has a profound...... the general principles from the Danish LRAIC-model (Long Run Average Incremental Cost) and divides Denmark in 4 geografical profiles. Considering the existing copper-infrastructure the most advantageous strategies for the players of each of these profiles are identified. The importance of the time horizon...

  19. Rapid deployable global sensing hazard alert system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordaro, Joseph V; Tibrea, Steven L; Shull, Davis J; Coleman, Jerry T; Shuler, James M

    2015-04-28

    A rapid deployable global sensing hazard alert system and associated methods of operation are provided. An exemplary system includes a central command, a wireless backhaul network, and a remote monitoring unit. The remote monitoring unit can include a positioning system configured to determine a position of the remote monitoring unit based on one or more signals received from one or more satellites located in Low Earth Orbit. The wireless backhaul network can provide bidirectional communication capability independent of cellular telecommunication networks and the Internet. An exemplary method includes instructing at least one of a plurality of remote monitoring units to provide an alert based at least in part on a location of a hazard and a plurality of positions respectively associated with the plurality of remote monitoring units.

  20. Scientific data management challenges, technology and deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Rotem, Doron

    2010-01-01

    Dealing with the volume, complexity, and diversity of data currently being generated by scientific experiments and simulations often causes scientists to waste productive time. Scientific Data Management: Challenges, Technology, and Deployment describes cutting-edge technologies and solutions for managing and analyzing vast amounts of data, helping scientists focus on their scientific goals. The book begins with coverage of efficient storage systems, discussing how to write and read large volumes of data without slowing the simulation, analysis, or visualization processes. It then focuses on the efficient data movement and management of storage spaces and explores emerging database systems for scientific data. The book also addresses how to best organize data for analysis purposes, how to effectively conduct searches over large datasets, how to successfully automate multistep scientific process workflows, and how to automatically collect metadata and lineage information. This book provides a comprehensive u...

  1. Clean energy deployment: addressing financing cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameli, Nadia; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2012-09-01

    New methods are needed to accelerate clean energy policy adoption. To that end, this study proposes an innovative financing scheme for renewable and energy efficiency deployment. Financing barriers represent a notable obstacle for energy improvements and this is particularly the case for low income households. Implementing a policy such as PACE—property assessed clean energy—allows for the provision of upfront funds for residential property owners to install electric and thermal solar systems and make energy efficiency improvements to their buildings. This paper will inform the design of better policies tailored to the creation of the appropriate conditions for such investments to occur, especially in those countries where most of the population belongs to the low-middle income range facing financial constraints.

  2. Dopamine antagonism decreases willingness to expend physical, but not cognitive, effort: a comparison of two rodent cost/benefit decision-making tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, Jay G; Floresco, Stan B; Winstanley, Catharine A

    2015-03-01

    Successful decision making often requires weighing a given option's costs against its associated benefits, an ability that appears perturbed in virtually every severe mental illness. Animal models of such cost/benefit decision making overwhelmingly implicate mesolimbic dopamine in our willingness to exert effort for a larger reward. Until recently, however, animal models have invariably manipulated the degree of physical effort, whereas human studies of effort have primarily relied on cognitive costs. Dopamine's relationship to cognitive effort has not been directly examined, nor has the relationship between individuals' willingness to expend mental versus physical effort. It is therefore unclear whether willingness to work hard in one domain corresponds to willingness in the other. Here we utilize a rat cognitive effort task (rCET), wherein animals can choose to allocate greater visuospatial attention for a greater reward, and a previously established physical effort-discounting task (EDT) to examine dopaminergic and noradrenergic contributions to effort. The dopamine antagonists eticlopride and SCH23390 each decreased willingness to exert physical effort on the EDT; these drugs had no effect on willingness to exert mental effort for the rCET. Preference for the high effort option correlated across the two tasks, although this effect was transient. These results suggest that dopamine is only minimally involved in cost/benefit decision making with cognitive effort costs. The constructs of mental and physical effort may therefore comprise overlapping, but distinct, circuitry, and therapeutic interventions that prove efficacious in one effort domain may not be beneficial in another.

  3. Average energy expended per ion pair, exciton enhanced ionization (Jesse effect), electron drift velocity, average electron energy and scintillation in rare gas liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doke, T.; Hitachi, A.; Hoshi, Y.; Masuda, K.; Hamada, T.

    1977-01-01

    Precise measurements of W-values, the average energy expended per electron-hole pair in liquid Ar and Xe, were made by the electron-pulse method, and that in liquid Kr by the steady conduction current method. The results showed that the W-values were clearly smaller than those in gaseous Ar, Xe and Kr as predicted by Doke. The results can be explained by the conduction bands which exist in these rare gas liquids as well as in the solid state. The enhanced ionization yield was observed for Xe-doped liquid Ar, and it was attributed to the ionizing excitation transfer process from Ar excitons to doped Xe. This is very similar to the Jesse effect in the gas phase. The saturated value of the enhanced ionization was in good agreement with the theoretical value, and it provides strong evidence for the existence of the exciton states in liquid Ar. Fano factors in liquid Ar, Kr, Xe and Xe-doped liquid Ar have been estimated from the Fano Formula, and they were smaller than those in the gas phase. The drift velocity of electrons in liquid Ar, liquid Ar-gas mixtures and liquid Xe have been measured with gridded ionization chambers. The average electron energy in liquid Ar has been measured. The electron-induced scintillations of liquid Xe and Ar have been studied. (Kato, T.)

  4. Perceptions of general environmental problems, willingness to expend federal funds on these problems, and concerns regarding the Los Alamos national laboratory: Hispanics are more concerned than Whites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, Joanna; Myers, O.; Boring, C.S.; Dixon, C.; Lord, C.; Ramos, R.; Shukla, S.; Gochfeld, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Perceptions about general environmental problems, governmental spending for these problems, and major concerns about the US Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) were examined by interviewing 356 people attending a gun show in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The hypothesis that there are differences in these three areas as a function of ethnicity was examined. We predicted that if differences existed, they would exist for all three evaluations (general environmental problems, government spending, and environmental concerns about LANL). However, this was not the case; there were fewer ethnic differences concerning LANL. Hispanics rated most general environmental problems higher than Whites and rated their willingness to expend federal funds higher than Whites, although all groups gave a lower score on willingness than on concern. Further, the congruence between these two types of ratings was higher for Hispanics than for others. In general, the concerns expressed by subjects about LANL showed few ethnic differences, and everyone was most concerned about contamination. These data indicate that Hispanics attending a gun show are equally or more concerned than others about environmental problems generally but are not more concerned about LANL. The data can be useful for developing future research and stewardship plans and for understanding general environmental problems and their relationship to concerns about LANL. More generally, they indicate that the attitudes and perceptions of Hispanics deserve increased study in a general population

  5. Time Deployment Study for Annulus Pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    REBERGER, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    Radioactive wastes from processing irradiated uranium fuels have been stored as alkaline slurries in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. Single-shell tanks (SST) and double-shell tanks (DST) of various sizes were used for waste storage. Of the total 177 tanks, there are 28 DSTs. DSTs are located in AN, AP, AW, AY, AZ, and SY tank farms in the 200 East (200E) and 200-West (200W) Areas. The storage capacities of the DSTs vary from 980,000 to 1,140,000 gal. DSTs are designed and constructed as an integral steel structure, i.e., an inner shell within an outer shell, so that any leak from the inner shell is confined within the annulus without impacting the environment. The inner shell provides primary containment for the wastes and the outer shell provides secondary containment in the form of an annulus. The annulus of a DST is equipped with a pump pit, leak detection probes, and other accessories. The existing annulus pumps in the DSTs need to be revamped with a new system to reduce operating costs and reduce the time to deploy a pumping system. The new pumping system will minimize the likelihood of a release of waste into the environment; improve capability of waste removal to the maximum extent possible to comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-640 and Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 40 CFR 265.193. This study addresses the time required to deploy an annulus pumping system designed to fit any DST after detection of a leak in the inner shell of the DST

  6. Airbag deployment-related eye injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koisaari, Tapio; Leivo, Tiina; Sahraravand, Ahmad; Haavisto, Anna-Kaisa; Sulander, Pekka; Tervo, Timo M T

    2017-07-04

    We studied the correlation between airbag deployment and eye injuries using 2 different data sets. The registry of the Finnish Road Accident (FRA) Investigation Teams was analyzed to study severe head- and eyewear-related injuries. All fatal passenger car or van accidents that occurred during the years 2009-2012 (4 years) were included (n = 734). Cases in which the driver's front airbag was deployed were subjected to analysis (n = 409). To determine the proportion of minor, potentially airbag-related eye injuries, the results were compared to the data for all new eye injury patients (n = 1,151) recorded at the Emergency Clinic of the Helsinki University Eye Hospital (HUEH) during one year, from May 1, 2011, to April 30, 2012. In the FRA data set, the unbelted drivers showed a significantly higher risk of death (odds ratio [OR] = 5.89, 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.33-10.9, P = 2.6E-12) or of sustaining head injuries (OR = 2.50, 95% CI, 1.59-3.97, P = 3.8E-5). Only 4 of the 1,151 HUEH patients were involved in a passenger car accident. In one of the crashes, the airbag operated, and the belted driver received 2 sutured eye lid wounds and showed conjunctival sugillation. No permanent eye injuries were recorded during the follow-up. The calculated annual airbag-related eye injury incidence was less than 1/1,000,000 people, 4/100,000 accidents, and 4/10,000 injured occupants. Airbag-related eye injuries occurred very rarely in car accidents in cases where the occupant survived and the restraint system was appropriately used. Spectacle use did not appear to increase the risk of eye injury in restrained occupants.

  7. Early identification of posttraumatic stress following military deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Statnikov, Alexander; Andersen, Søren B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pre-deployment identification of soldiers at risk for long-term posttraumatic stress psychopathology after home coming is important to guide decisions about deployment. Early post-deployment identification can direct early interventions to those in need and thereby prevents...... the development of chronic psychopathology. Both hold significant public health benefits given large numbers of deployed soldiers, but has so far not been achieved. Here, we aim to assess the potential for pre- and early post-deployment prediction of resilience or posttraumatic stress development in soldiers...... by application of machine learning (ML) methods. METHODS: ML feature selection and prediction algorithms were applied to a prospective cohort of 561 Danish soldiers deployed to Afghanistan in 2009 to identify unique risk indicators and forecast long-term posttraumatic stress responses. RESULTS: Robust pre...

  8. Accounting for variation in wind deployment between Canadian provinces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson-Martin, Christopher J.; Hill, Stephen D.

    2011-01-01

    Wind energy deployment varies widely across regions and this variation cannot be explained by differences in natural wind resources alone. Evidence suggests that institutional factors beyond physical wind resources can influence the deployment of wind energy systems. Building on the work of , this study takes a historical institutionalist approach to examine the main factors influencing wind energy deployment across four Canadian provinces Canada: Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario and Nova Scotia. Our case studies suggest that wind energy deployment depends upon a combination of indirect causal factors-landscape values, political and social movements, government electricity policy, provincial electricity market structure and incumbent generation technologies and direct causal factors-grid architecture, ownership patterns, renewable incentive programs, planning and approvals processes and stakeholder support and opposition. - Research highlights: → Examines the reasons for variations in wind deployment between Canadian provinces. → Employs a historical institutional approach to the analysis. → Discusses social factors that affect wind deployment across Canadian jurisdictions.

  9. Autonomous Deployment and Restoration of Sensor Network using Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Suzuki

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an autonomous deployment and restoration of a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN using mobile robots. The authors have been developing an information-gathering system using mobile robots and WSNs in underground spaces in post-disaster environments. In our system, mobile robots carry wireless sensor nodes (SN and deploy them into the environment while measuring Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI values to ensure communication, thereby enabling the WSN to be deployed and restored autonomously. If the WSN is disrupted, mobile robots restore the communication route by deploying additional or alternate SNs to suitable positions. Utilizing the proposed method, a mobile robot can deploy a WSN and gather environmental information via the WSN. Experimental results using a verification system equipped with a SN deployment and retrieval mechanism are presented.

  10. Autonomous Deployment and Restoration of Sensor Network using Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Suzuki

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an autonomous deployment and restoration of a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN using mobile robots. The authors have been developing an information-gathering system using mobile robots and WSNs in underground spaces in post-disaster environments. In our system, mobile robots carry wireless sensor nodes (SN and deploy them into the environment while measuring Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI values to ensure communication, thereby enabling the WSN to be deployed and restored autonomously. If the WSN is disrupted, mobile robots restore the communication route by deploying additional or alternate SNs to suitable positions. Utilizing the proposed method, a mobile robot can deploy a WSN and gather environmental information via the WSN. Experimental results using a verification system equipped with a SN deployment and retrieval mechanism are presented.

  11. Performance of an autonomously deployable telemetered deep ocean seismic observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jonathan; Laske, Gabe; Orcutt, John; Babcock, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    We describe a transformative technology that can provide near real-time telemetry of sensor data from the ocean bottom without a moored buoy or a cable to shore. The breakthrough technology that makes this system possible is an autonomous surface vehicle called a Wave Glider developed by Liquid Robotics, which harvests wave and solar energy for motive and electrical power. For navigation, the wave glider is equipped with a small computer, a GPS receiver, a rudder, solar panels and batteries, AIS ship detection receiver, weather station, and an Iridium satellite modem. Wave gliders have demonstrated trans-oceanic range and long-term station keeping capabilities. We present results from several deployments of a prototype system that demonstrate the feasibility of this concept. The system comprises ocean bottom package (OBP) and an ocean surface gateway (OSG). Acoustic communications connect the OBP instruments with OSG while communications between the gateway and land are provided by the Iridium satellite constellation. The most recent deployment of the OBP was off the edge of the Patton Escarpment some 300 km west of San Diego in 4000 m of water. The OSG was launched about 30 km west of San Diego harbor and programmed to navigate to the site of the ocean bottom package. Arriving after 161 hours, the OSG then commenced holding station at the site for the next 68 days. Speeds over-the-ground varied with wind, wave, and surface current conditions but averaged 0.5 m/s while winds varied between 0 m/s and 17 m/s and wave heights between 0.2 m and 5.9 m. Over this period the median total data latency was 260 s and the data loss less that 0.2% when the wave glider was within 1.5 km of the central point. We have also tested a full-scale model of a towable ocean bottom package, which demonstrated that a wave glider could tow and navigate an autonomously deployable ocean bottom package. Taken together, these tests have demonstrated that the concept is viable for long

  12. Supporting Military Families with Young Children throughout the Deployment Lifecycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Group, Family Advocacy, Child and Family Behavioral Health, Soldier Readiness Program (SRP), Family Life Chaplain Training Center, Fort Hood Housing ...resilience and child well-being, Soldier and non-deploying parents must successfully meet the challenges of caregiving throughout the deployment cycle ...reintegration program to reduce parenting stress and promote family resilience in Active Duty military families through all phases of the deployment cycle

  13. White Paper on Dish Stirling Technology: Path Toward Commercial Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andraka, Charles E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Concentrating Solar Power Dept.; Stechel, Ellen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Concentrating Solar Power Dept.; Becker, Peter [Stirling Energy Systems, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Messick, Brian [Stirling Energy Systems, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Dish Stirling energy systems have been developed for distributed and large-scale utility deployment. This report summarizes the state of the technology in a joint project between Stirling Energy Systems, Sandia National Laboratories, and the Department of Energy in 2011. It then lays out a feasible path to large scale deployment, including development needs and anticipated cost reduction paths that will make a viable deployment product.

  14. Self managing monitoring for highly elastic large scale Cloud deployments

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Jonathan Stuart; Barker, Adam David

    2014-01-01

    Infrastructure as a Service computing exhibits a number of properties, which are not found in conventional server deployments. Elasticity is among the most significant of these properties which has wide reaching implications for applications deployed in cloud hosted VMs. Among the applications affected by elasticity is monitoring. In this paper we investigate the challenges of monitoring large cloud deployments and how these challenges differ from previous monitoring problems. In order to mee...

  15. Intelligent Network Flow Optimization (INFLO) prototype : Seattle small-scale demonstration report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report describes the performance and results of the INFLO Prototype Small-Scale Demonstration. The purpose of : the Small-Scale Demonstration was to deploy the INFLO Prototype System to demonstrate its functionality and : performance in an opera...

  16. Multiobjective Shape Optimization for Deployment and Adjustment Properties of Cable-Net of Deployable Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang You

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on structural features of cable-net of deployable antenna, a multiobjective shape optimization method is proposed to help to engineer antenna’s cable-net structure that has better deployment and adjustment properties. In this method, the multiobjective optimum mathematical model is built with lower nodes’ locations of cable-net as variables, the average stress ratio of cable elements and strain energy as objectives, and surface precision and natural frequency of cable-net as constraints. Sequential quadratic programming method is used to solve this nonlinear mathematical model in conditions with different weighting coefficients, and the results show the validity and effectiveness of the proposed method and model.

  17. Verification Test for Ultra-Light Deployment Mechanism for Sectioned Deployable Antenna Reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajac, Kai; Schmidt, Tilo; Schiller, Marko; Seifart, Klaus; Schmalbach, Matthias; Scolamiero, Lucio

    2013-09-01

    The ultra-light deployment mechanism (UDM) is based on three carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) curved tape springs made of carbon fibre / cyanate ester prepregs.In the frame of the activity its space application suitability for the deployment of solid reflector antenna sections was investigated. A projected diameter of the full reflector of 4 m to 7 m and specific mass in the order of magnitude of 2.6kg/m2 was focused for requirement derivation.Extensive verification tests including health checks, environmental and functional tests were carried out with an engineering model to enable representative characterizing of the UDM unit.This paper presents the design and a technical description of the UDM as well as a summary of achieved development status with respect to test results and possible design improvements.

  18. Market and Policy Barriers to Energy Storage Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, Dhruv [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Currier, Aileen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hernandez, Jacquelynne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ma, Ookie [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Kirby, Brendan [Consultant

    2013-09-01

    Electric energy storage technologies can provide numerous grid services; there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, cross-cutting barriers and technology barriers.

  19. LWR Spent Fuel Management for the Smooth Deployment of FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukasawa, T.; Yamashita, J.; Hoshino, K.; Sasahira, A.; Inoue, T.; Minato, K.; Sato, S.

    2015-01-01

    Fast breeder reactors (FBR) and FBR fuel cycle are indispensable to prevent the global warming and to secure the long-term energy supply. Commercial FBR expects to be deployed from around 2050 until around 2110 in Japan by the replacement of light water reactors (LWR) after their 60 years life. The FBR deployment needs Pu (MOX) from the LWR-spent fuel (SF) reprocessing. As Japan can posses little excess Pu, its balance control is necessary between LWR-SF management (reprocessing) and FBR deployment. The fuel cycle systems were investigated for the smooth FBR deployment and the effectiveness of proposed flexible system was clarified in this work. (author)

  20. Human Metabolism and Interactions of Deployment-Related Chemicals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hodgson, Ernest

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the human-metabolism and metabolic interactions of a subset of deployment-related chemicals, including chlorpyrifos, DEET, permethrin, pyridostigmine bromide, and sulfur mustard metabolites...

  1. Rapidly Evolving Distributed Systems by Bridging the Deployment Gap

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wolf, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    .... The University of Colorado EDCS project has been successful in achieving its objective: producing innovative, useful, and interesting research results in the areas of software configuration and deployment...

  2. Rapidly Evolving Distributed Systems by Bridging the Deployment Gap

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wolf, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    .... The University of Colorado EDCS project has been successful in achieving its objective; producing innovative, useful and interesting research results in the areas of software configuration and deployment...

  3. Deployment Testing of the De-Orbit Sail Flight Hardware

    OpenAIRE

    Hillebrandt, Martin; Meyer, Sebastian; Zander, Martin; Hühne, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the results of the deployment testing of the De-Orbit Sail flight hardware, a drag sail for de-orbiting applications, performed by DLR. It addresses in particular the deployment tests of the fullscale sail subsystem and deployment force tests performed on the boom deployment module. For the fullscale sail testing a gravity compensation device is used which is described in detail. It allows observations of the in-plane interaction of the booms with the sail membrane and the...

  4. Evaluation of Methods for In-Situ Calibration of Field-Deployable Microphone Phased Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M.; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Culliton, William G.; McSwain, Robert G.

    2017-01-01

    Current field-deployable microphone phased arrays for aeroacoustic flight testing require the placement of hundreds of individual sensors over a large area. Depending on the duration of the test campaign, the microphones may be required to stay deployed at the testing site for weeks or even months. This presents a challenge in regards to tracking the response (i.e., sensitivity) of the individual sensors as a function of time in order to evaluate the health of the array. To address this challenge, two different methods for in-situ tracking of microphone responses are described. The first relies on the use of an aerial sound source attached as a payload on a hovering small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS) vehicle. The second relies on the use of individually excited ground-based sound sources strategically placed throughout the array pattern. Testing of the two methods was performed in microphone array deployments conducted at Fort A.P. Hill in 2015 and at Edwards Air Force Base in 2016. The results indicate that the drift in individual sensor responses can be tracked reasonably well using both methods. Thus, in-situ response tracking methods are useful as a diagnostic tool for monitoring the health of a phased array during long duration deployments.

  5. Six policy actions for accelerated deployment of renewable energy. READy Renewable Energy Action on Deployment. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-03-15

    The READy book presents a kaleidoscope of policy options that have proven to accelerate the deployment of renewable energy technologies, based on experiences around the world at the local and national levels. Lessons learned from successful cases are distilled into six essential action points. Together these categories of policy actions compose the ACTION Star, a guide for taking action now while preparing for growth over the long term.

  6. The Deployment Life Study: Longitudinal Analysis of Military Families Across the Deployment Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    deployment. The 11 events, grouped by type of trauma, are as follows: • combat – engaging in hand-to-hand combat – being physically knocked over...leaving home; missing classes at school because you don’t like your school; missing after-school activities (such as school activities, sports ) because...you don’t feel like participating; missing after-school activities (such as school activi- ties, sports ) because of transportation problems/issues

  7. Swarm Deployable Boom Assembly (DBA) Development of a Deployable Magnetometer Boom for the Swarm Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Paul; Jung, Hans-Juergen; Edwards, Jeff

    2013-09-01

    The Swarm programme consists of 3 magnetically clean satellites flying in close formation designed to measure the Earth's magnetic field using 2 Magnetometers mounted on a 4.3m long deployable boom.Deployment is initiated by releasing 3 HDRMs, once released the boom oscillates back and forth on a pair of pivots, similar to a restaurant kitchen door hinge, for around 120 seconds before coming to rest on 3 kinematic mounts which are used to provide an accurate reference location in the deployed position. Motion of the boom is damped through a combination of friction, spring hysteresis and flexing of the 120+ cables crossing the hinge. Considerable development work and accurate numerical modelling of the hinge motion was required to predict performance across a wide temperature range and ensure that during the 1st overshoot the boom did not damage itself, the harness or the spacecraft.Due to the magnetic cleanliness requirements of the spacecraft no magnetic materials could be used in the design of the hardware.

  8. Small Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Pemberton (Steven)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractThe term “Open Data” often goes hand in hand with the term “Big Data”, where large data sets get released allowing for analysis, but the Cinderella of the Open Data ball is Small Data, small amounts of data, nonetheless possibly essential, that are too small to be put in some database or

  9. Deploying Renewables -- principles for effective policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-09-29

    Renewable energy can play a fundamental role in tackling climate change, environmental degradation and energy security. As these challenges have become ever more pressing, governments and markets are seeking innovative solutions. Yet, what are the key factors that will determine the success of renewable energy policies? How can current policies be improved to encourage greater deployment of renewables? What impact can more effective policies have on renewables' share in the future global energy mix and how soon? This publication addresses these questions. Responding to the Gleneagles G8 call for a clean and secure energy future, it highlights key policy tools to fast-track renewables into the mainstream. This analysis illustrates good practices by applying the combined metrics of effectiveness and efficiency to renewable energy policies in the electricity, heating and transport sectors. It highlights significant barriers to accelerating renewables penetration, and argues that the great potential of renewables can be exploited much more rapidly and to a much larger extent if good practices are adopted. Carefully designed policy frameworks, customised to support technologies at differing stages of maturity, will deliver a strong portfolio of renewable energy technologies. The document provides recommendations on key principles for policy design as a template for decision makers.

  10. Automating NEURON Simulation Deployment in Cloud Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockton, David B; Santamaria, Fidel

    2017-01-01

    Simulations in neuroscience are performed on local servers or High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities. Recently, cloud computing has emerged as a potential computational platform for neuroscience simulation. In this paper we compare and contrast HPC and cloud resources for scientific computation, then report how we deployed NEURON, a widely used simulator of neuronal activity, in three clouds: Chameleon Cloud, a hybrid private academic cloud for cloud technology research based on the OpenStack software; Rackspace, a public commercial cloud, also based on OpenStack; and Amazon Elastic Cloud Computing, based on Amazon's proprietary software. We describe the manual procedures and how to automate cloud operations. We describe extending our simulation automation software called NeuroManager (Stockton and Santamaria, Frontiers in Neuroinformatics, 2015), so that the user is capable of recruiting private cloud, public cloud, HPC, and local servers simultaneously with a simple common interface. We conclude by performing several studies in which we examine speedup, efficiency, total session time, and cost for sets of simulations of a published NEURON model.

  11. Deployable structures using bistable reeled composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daton-Lovett, Andrew J.; Compton-Bishop, Quentin M.; Curry, Richard G.

    2000-06-01

    This paper describes an innovative, patented use of composite materials developed by RolaTube Technology Ltd. to make smart deployable structures. Bi-stable reeled composites (BRCs) can alternate between two stable forms; that of a strong, rigid structure and that of a compact coil of flat-wound material. Bi-stability arises as a result of the manipulation of Poisson's ratio and isotropy in the various layers of the material. BRCs are made of fiber- reinforced composite materials, most often with a thermoplastic matrix. A range of fibers and polymer matrices can be used according to the requirements of the operating environment. Samples of a BRC structure were constructed using layers of unidirectional, fiber-reinforced thermoplastic sheet with the layers at different angles. The whole assembly was then consolidated under conditions of elevated temperature and pressure. The properties of the BRC are described and the result of a series of experiments performed on the sample to determine the tensile strength of the BRC structure are reported. A full analysis using finite element methods is being undertaken in collaboration with the University of Cambridge, England. The first commercial use has been to fabricate boom and drive mechanisms for the remote inspection of industrial plant.

  12. Development, deployment and operations of ATLAS databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaniachine, A. V.; von der Schmitt, J. G.

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for ATLAS data taking, a coordinated shift from development towards operations has occurred in ATLAS database activities. In addition to development and commissioning activities in databases, ATLAS is active in the development and deployment (in collaboration with the WLCG 3D project) of the tools that allow the worldwide distribution and installation of databases and related datasets, as well as the actual operation of this system on ATLAS multi-grid infrastructure. We describe development and commissioning of major ATLAS database applications for online and offline. We present the first scalability test results and ramp-up schedule over the initial LHC years of operations towards the nominal year of ATLAS running, when the database storage volumes are expected to reach 6.1 TB for the Tag DB and 1.0 TB for the Conditions DB. ATLAS database applications require robust operational infrastructure for data replication between online and offline at Tier-0, and for the distribution of the offline data to Tier-1 and Tier-2 computing centers. We describe ATLAS experience with Oracle Streams and other technologies for coordinated replication of databases in the framework of the WLCG 3D services

  13. New technologies deployment for advanced power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyoshi, Yamauchi

    2007-01-01

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has been the total engineering and manufacturing company of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in Japan since the commencement of commercial operations of Mihama Unit 1 of the Kansai Electric Power Company in 1970. Over these decades, MHI has endeavored to develop a broad spread of nuclear technology, from design, manufacturing, and construction, to plant maintenance services. More recently, with the ever rising need for nuclear power generation around the world to prevent global warming and to cope with surging oil prices, MHI is striving to expand its nuclear power business in the world market, such as US-APWR (Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor) in the U.S., as well as to develop technology for advanced reactors and nuclear fuel cycles to ensure energy security in the future. This paper introduces these approaches, especially focused on new technologies deployment for the global needs, and clarifies the current status and future prospects of MHI as the world's leading nuclear company. (author)

  14. Deploying the advanced U.S. EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, C.

    2007-01-01

    As electricity demand, clean air concerns and energy prices increase in the U.S., interest in new nuclear reactors is also on the rise. These factors - along with decades of outstanding performance of the nation's existing nuclear fleet - have contributed to a favorable market for new nuclear power in the U.S. Although no U.S. company has declared it actually will buy and build new reactors, many have actively expressed their interest through investment and regulatory interaction. The timing is also right for new reactors in terms of public perception, government policy and acceptance of the investment community. Amid this environment, the U.S. commercial power industry recently has begun pursuing new nuclear generation in earnest. AREVA, whose ongoing global market analyses indicated the need for additional baseload nuclear generation in the U.S., chose to license its EPR design to meet that need. This article will discuss the American market landscape for new nuclear and how AREVA is approaching it, present an overview of the company's U.S. EPR technology, and provide an update on the regulatory status of the design and deployment schedule. (orig.)

  15. Quality function deployment in launch operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portanova, P. L.; Tomei, E. J., Jr.

    1990-11-01

    The goal of the Advanced Launch System (ALS) is a more efficient launch capability that provides a highly reliable and operable system at substantially lower cost than current launch systems. Total Quality Management (TQM) principles are being emphasized throughout the ALS program. A continuous improvement philosophy is directed toward satisfying users' and customer's requirements in terms of quality, performance, schedule, and cost. Quality Function Deployment (QFD) is interpreted as the voice of the customer (or user), and it is an important planning tool in translating these requirements throughout the whole process of design, development, manufacture, and operations. This report explores the application of QFD methodology to launch operations, including the modification and addition of events (operations planning) in the engineering development cycle, and presents an informal status of study results to date. QFD is a technique for systematically analyzing the customer's (Space Command) perceptions of what constitutes a highly reliable and operable system and functionally breaking down those attributes to identify the critical characteristics that determine an efficient launch system capability. In applying the principle of QFD, a series of matrices or charts are developed with emphasis on the one commonly known as the House of Quality (because of its roof-like format), which identifies and translates the most critical information.

  16. Conceptual design of EAST multi-purpose maintenance deployer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Hongtao [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Rd, Hefei, Anhui (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230022 (China); He, Kaihui, E-mail: hekh@iterchina.cn [China International Nuclear Fusion Energy Program Execution Center, Beijing 100862 (China); Cheng, Yong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Rd, Hefei, Anhui (China); Song, Yuntao [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Rd, Hefei, Anhui (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230022 (China); Yang, Yang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Rd, Hefei, Anhui (China); Villedieu, Eric [CEA-IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Shi, Shanshuang; Yang, Songzhu [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Rd, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • A redundant 11-DOF articulated robot for EAST in-vessel maintenance is presented. • A new modular joint developed to optimize the yaw joint actuator for the robot is described. • A 3-DOF gripper integrated with cameras and torque sensor is developed. - Abstract: EAST multi-purpose maintenance deployer (EMMD) system, being collaboratively developed by ASIPP and CEA-IRFM, is built as upgrades for EAMA. Updated kinematics parameters such as DOF distribution and joint angle for EMMD robot are performed and verified in a simulation platform. A new modular joint has been developed to optimize the yaw joint actuator for easy assembly and flexibility reduction. A 3-DOF gripper with cameras and torque sensor has been designed to provide inspection and dexterous handling of small fragments inside the EAST chamber. A conceptual upgrade for EAMA-CASK has been developed for the purpose of protecting the end-effector's sensors which do not have temperature-resistant qualification. The high temperature and vacuum compatible solutions and validation experiments have been presented in this paper.

  17. Conceptual design of EAST multi-purpose maintenance deployer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Hongtao; He, Kaihui; Cheng, Yong; Song, Yuntao; Yang, Yang; Villedieu, Eric; Shi, Shanshuang; Yang, Songzhu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A redundant 11-DOF articulated robot for EAST in-vessel maintenance is presented. • A new modular joint developed to optimize the yaw joint actuator for the robot is described. • A 3-DOF gripper integrated with cameras and torque sensor is developed. - Abstract: EAST multi-purpose maintenance deployer (EMMD) system, being collaboratively developed by ASIPP and CEA-IRFM, is built as upgrades for EAMA. Updated kinematics parameters such as DOF distribution and joint angle for EMMD robot are performed and verified in a simulation platform. A new modular joint has been developed to optimize the yaw joint actuator for easy assembly and flexibility reduction. A 3-DOF gripper with cameras and torque sensor has been designed to provide inspection and dexterous handling of small fragments inside the EAST chamber. A conceptual upgrade for EAMA-CASK has been developed for the purpose of protecting the end-effector's sensors which do not have temperature-resistant qualification. The high temperature and vacuum compatible solutions and validation experiments have been presented in this paper.

  18. Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-15

    FY13+ Phase I Buy Contractor: United Launch Services, LLC Contractor Location: 9501 East Panorama Circle Centennial , CO 80112 Contract Number...Contract Name: FY13+ Phase I Buy Contractor: United Launch Services, LLC Contractor Location: 9501 East Panorama Circle Centennial , CO 80112 Contract...FY12 EELV Launch Services (ELS5) Contractor: United Launch Services, LLC. Contractor Location: 9501 East Panorama Circle Centennial , CO 80112

  19. Daddy's Days Away. A Deployment Activity Book for Parents & Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps, Washington, DC.

    This booklet grew from an idea that the children of Marines might appreciate some special discussion of their family's separation during deployment. Information is provided for parents to help them express their feelings with their children about the deployment. Outlines of activities to do before leaving are included. Suggestions are given for…

  20. Hitting the ground running: Healthgrid deployment and adoption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gwadry-Sridhar, Femida; Olabarriaga, Silvia D.; van Kampen, Antoine; Bauer, Michael; Solomonides, Tony

    2010-01-01

    We consider the issues of healthgrid development, deployment and adoption in health care and research environments. While healthgrid technology could be deployed to support advanced medical research, we are not seeing its wide adoption. Understanding why this technology is not being exploited is one

  1. Accommodating Thickness in Origami-Based Deployable Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirbel, Shannon A.; Magleby, Spencer P.; Howell, Larry L.; Lang, Robert J.; Thomson, Mark W.; Sigel, Deborah A.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Trease, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to create deployment systems with a large ratio of stowed-to-deployed diameter. Deployment from a compact form to a final flat state can be achieved through origami-inspired folding of panels. There are many models capable of this motion when folded in a material with negligible thickness; however, when the application requires the folding of thick, rigid panels, attention must be paid to the effect of material thickness not only on the final folded state, but also during the folding motion (i.e., the panels must not be required to flex to attain the final folded form). The objective is to develop new methods for deployment from a compact folded form to a large circular array (or other final form). This paper describes a mathematical model for modifying the pattern to accommodate material thickness in the context of the design, modeling, and testing of a deployable system inspired by an origami six-sided flasher model. The model is demonstrated in hardware as a 1/20th scale prototype of a deployable solar array for space applications. The resulting prototype has a ratio of stowed-to-deployed diameter of 9.2 (or 1.25 m deployed outer diameter to 0.136 m stowed outer diameter).

  2. Post-deployment usability evaluation of a radiology workstation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Wiard; Cnossen, Fokie; Dierckx, Rudi; Oudkerk, Matthijs; van Ooijen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the usability of a radiology workstation after deployment in a hospital. Significance In radiology, it is difficult to perform valid pre-deployment usability evaluations due to the heterogeneity of the user group, the complexity of the radiological workflow, and the complexity

  3. How Have Deployments During the War on Terrorism Affected Reenlistment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Ethiopia, certain areas of Greece, Haiti, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kenya, Kosovo, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Liberia, Malaysia ...deployment is a direct source of utility, as modeled in Chapter Three. Deployment is not simply another form of “work” that takes time away from “ leisure

  4. 50 CFR 635.21 - Gear operation and deployment restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear operation and deployment restrictions....21 Gear operation and deployment restrictions. Link to an amendment published at 75 FR 57701, Sept. 22, 2010. The green-stick gear authorization requirements under paragraphs (c)(2)(v)(A), (c)(2)(v)(B...

  5. Veterinary College Virologist To Discuss Small Pox

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, Jeffrey S.

    2003-01-01

    The words "small pox" have become almost synonymous with the word "bio-terrorism" in our post 9/11 world. Once thought eradicated, it is now viewed as the number one threat among a host of bio-terror agents that might be deployed against America and an immunization program is underway.

  6. Review of deployment technology for tethered satellite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, B. S.; Wen, H.; Jin, D. P.

    2018-03-01

    Tethered satellite systems (TSSs) have attracted significant attention due to their potential and valuable applications for scientific research. With the development of various launched on-orbit missions, the deployment of tethers is considered a crucial technology for operation of a TSS. Both past orbiting experiments and numerical results have shown that oscillations of the deployed tether due to the Coriolis force and environmental perturbations are inevitable and that the impact between the space tether and end-body at the end of the deployment process leads to complicated nonlinear phenomena. Hence, a set of suitable control methods plays a fundamental role in tether deployment. This review article summarizes previous work on aspects of the dynamics, control, and ground-based experiments of tether deployment. The relevant basic principles, analytical expressions, simulation cases, and experimental results are presented as well.

  7. Deploying HEP applications using Xen and Globus Virtual Workspaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, A; Desmarais, R; Gable, I; Grundy, D; P-Brown, D; Seuster, R; Vanderster, D C; Sobie, R; Charbonneau, A; Enge, R

    2008-01-01

    The deployment of HEP applications in heterogeneous grid environments can be challenging because many of the applications are dependent on specific OS versions and have a large number of complex software dependencies. Virtual machine monitors such as Xen could be used to package HEP applications, complete with their execution environments, to run on resources that do not meet their operating system requirements. Our previous work has shown HEP applications running within Xen suffer little or no performance penalty as a result of virtualization. However, a practical strategy is required for remotely deploying, booting, and controlling virtual machines on a remote cluster. One tool that promises to overcome the deployment hurdles using standard grid technology is the Globus Virtual Workspaces project. We describe strategies for the deployment of Xen virtual machines using Globus Virtual Workspace middleware that simplify the deployment of HEP applications

  8. Clinical Predictive Modeling Development and Deployment through FHIR Web Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilia, Mohammed; Choi, Myung; Henderson, Amelia; Iyengar, Sneha; Braunstein, Mark; Sun, Jimeng

    2015-01-01

    Clinical predictive modeling involves two challenging tasks: model development and model deployment. In this paper we demonstrate a software architecture for developing and deploying clinical predictive models using web services via the Health Level 7 (HL7) Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) standard. The services enable model development using electronic health records (EHRs) stored in OMOP CDM databases and model deployment for scoring individual patients through FHIR resources. The MIMIC2 ICU dataset and a synthetic outpatient dataset were transformed into OMOP CDM databases for predictive model development. The resulting predictive models are deployed as FHIR resources, which receive requests of patient information, perform prediction against the deployed predictive model and respond with prediction scores. To assess the practicality of this approach we evaluated the response and prediction time of the FHIR modeling web services. We found the system to be reasonably fast with one second total response time per patient prediction.

  9. Military deployment and reintegration: a systematic review of child coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Utu, Cindy F; DeSocio, Janiece E

    2015-02-01

    Child coping with parent military deployment and family reintegration. A systematic review of research literature was conducted to examine the effects of deployment and family reintegration on children in military families. A search of CINAHL, PubMed, Psyc-INFO, and SocINDEX databases was performed using the terms "military family," "military child," "child coping," "deployment," and "reintegration." The search was limited to publications between 2001 and 2014 to focus on the effects of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), and Operation New Dawn (OND). Twenty-seven research reports met inclusion criteria. Three themes were extracted: A child's coping is influenced by (a) the child's age and development, (b) the mental health and coping of the non-deployed parent during deployment, and the mental health of both parents during family reintegration, and (c) the pre-existing resilience/vulnerability, cumulative risks, and resources of the child and family. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Shape memory alloy fracture as a deployment actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buban, Darrick M; Frantziskonis, George N

    2013-01-01

    The paper reports an experimental investigation into using shape memory alloy (SMA) as a deployment actuator. SMA specimens were heated and pulled to failure or pulled and heated to failure, thus developing an environmental and structural operating envelope for application as deployment mechanisms. The experimental results strongly suggest that SMAs can be implemented as deployment actuators. Recorded data shows that SMA fracture is possible over a wide range of temperatures and strains, filling a material performance gap not found in the literature. The obtained information allows design engineers to appropriately size SMAs given the design requirements for achieving the desired deployment effects. The major conclusion of the reported work is that SMAs as actuators are strong competitors to typical existing deployment efforts that use explosive or non-explosive actuators having implementation drawbacks such as the expense associated with special handling and the volume encountered in mounting the devices. (paper)

  11. Design of the De-Orbit Sail Boom Deployment Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sebastian; Hillebrandt, Martin; Straubel, Marco; Huhne, Christian

    2014-06-01

    The design of the De-Orbit Sail boom deployment unit is strongly driven by volume constraints, which are given by the cubesat container. Four CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced polymer) booms [4] with a cross-sectional shape of a double-omega and a length of 3.6 m are reeled on one spool in the center of the unit. The deployment of the four booms are controlled by an electric motor, which acts on the boom spool. Due to the volume limitation caused by the dimensions of the cubesat deployer the deployment unit has little room for the mechanisms components. With the aim to achieve a robust design, the deployment concept of the unit has greatly changed during the development process. The history of the design as well as the mechanisms are described. Additionally the results of the flight model testing are presented.

  12. Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2014-10-01

    This report documents work performed in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) program. The report presents information and results from economic analyses to describe current electricity market conditions and those key factors that may impact the deployment of AdvSMRs or any other new nuclear power plants. Thus, this report serves as a reference document for DOE as it moves forward with its plans to develop advanced reactors, including AdvSMRs. For the purpose of this analysis, information on electricity markets and nuclear power plant operating costs will be combined to examine the current state of the nuclear industry and the process required to successfully move forward with new nuclear power in general and AdvSMRs in particular. The current electricity market is generally unfavorable to new nuclear construction, especially in deregulated markets with heavy competition from natural gas and subsidized renewables. The successful and profitable operation of a nuclear power plant (or any power plant) requires the rate at which the electricity is sold to be sufficiently greater than the cost to operate. The wholesale rates in most US markets have settled into values that provide profits for most operating nuclear power plants but are too low to support the added cost of capital recovery for new nuclear construction. There is a strong geographic dependence on the wholesale rate, with some markets currently able to support new nuclear construction. However, there is also a strong geographic dependence on pronuclear public opinion; the areas where power prices are high tend to have unfavorable views on the construction of new nuclear power plants. The use of government-backed incentives, such as subsidies, can help provide a margin to help justify construction projects that otherwise may not seem viable. Similarly, low interest rates for the project will also add a positive margin to the economic

  13. Perceived effect of deployment on families of UK military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thandi, G; Greenberg, N; Fear, N T; Jones, N

    2017-10-01

    In the UK, little is known about the perceived effects of deployment, on military families, from military personnel in theatre. To investigate military personnel's perceptions of the impact of deployment on intimate relationships and children. Deployed service personnel who were in a relationship, and who had children, completed a survey while deployed on combat operations. Data were taken from four mental health surveys carried out in Iraq in 2009 and Afghanistan in 2010, 2011 and 2014. Among 4265 participants, after adjusting for military and social-demographic covariates, perceiving that deployment had a negative impact on intimate relationships and children was associated with psychological distress, and traumatic stress symptoms. Military personnel who reported being in danger of being injured or killed during deployment, were more likely to report a perceived negative effect of deployment on their intimate relationships. Reservists were less likely to report a perceived negative impact of deployment on their children compared with regulars. Military personnel who themselves planned to separate from their partner were more likely to report psychological distress, and stressors at home. Perceived insufficient support from the Ministry of Defence was associated with poor mental health, and holding a junior rank. Deployed UK military personnel with symptoms of psychological distress, who experienced stressors at home, were especially likely to perceive that their family were inadequately supported by the military. Those planning to separate from their partner were at increased risk of suffering with mental health problems while deployed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. Impact of Federal Tax Policy on Utility-Scale Solar Deployment Given Financing Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mai, Trieu; Cole, Wesley; Krishnan, Venkat; Bolinger, Mark

    2015-09-28

    In this study, the authors conducted a literature review of approaches and assumptions used by other modeling teams and consultants with respect to solar project financing; developed and incorporated an ability to model the likely financing shift away from more expensive sources of capital and toward cheaper sources as the investment tax credit declines in the ReEDS model; and used the 'before and after' versions of the ReEDS model to isolate and analyze the deployment impact of the financing shift under a range of conditions. Using ReEDS scenarios with this improved capability, we find that this 'financing' shift would soften the blow of the ITC reversion; however, the overall impacts of such a shift in capital structure are estimated to be small and near-term utility-scale PV deployment is found to be much more sensitive to other factors that might drive down utility-scale PV prices.

  15. The South Dakota Model: Health Care Professions Student Disaster Preparedness and Deployment Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Matt P; Buffington, Cheri; Frost, Michael P; Waldner, Randall J

    2017-12-01

    The Association of American Medical Colleges recommended an increase in medical education for public health emergencies, bioterrorism, and weapons of mass destruction in 2003. The University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine (USD SSOM) implemented a 1-day training event to provide disaster preparedness training and deployment organization for health professions students called Disaster Training Day (DTD). Hospital staff and emergency medical services personnel provided the lecture portion of DTD using Core Disaster Life Support (CDLS; National Disaster Life Support Foundation) as the framework. Pre-test and post-test analyses were presented to the students. Small group activities covered leadership, anaphylaxis, mass fatality, points of dispensing deployment training, psychological first aid, triage, and personal protective equipment. Students were given the option to sign up for statewide deployment through the South Dakota Statewide Emergency Registry of Volunteers (SERV SD). DTD data and student satisfaction surveys from 2009 to 2016 were reviewed. Since 2004, DTD has provided disaster preparedness training to 2246 students across 13 health professions. Significant improvement was shown on CDLS post-test performance with a t-score of -14.24 and a resulting P value of training, small group sessions, and perceived self-competency relating to disaster response. SERV SD registration increased in 2015, and 77.5% of the participants registered in 2016. DTD at the USD SSOM provides for an effective 1-day disaster training course for health professions students. Resources from around the state were coordinated to provide training, liability coverage, and deployment organization for hundreds of students representing multiple health professions. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:735-740).

  16. Small Data

    OpenAIRE

    Pemberton, Steven

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractThe term “Open Data” often goes hand in hand with the term “Big Data”, where large data sets get released allowing for analysis, but the Cinderella of the Open Data ball is Small Data, small amounts of data, nonetheless possibly essential, that are too small to be put in some database or online dataset to be put to use. RDFa is a technology that allows Cinderella to go to the ball.

  17. Green heterogeneous small-cell networks: Toward reducing the CO2 emissions of mobile communications industry using uplink power adaptation

    KAUST Repository

    Shakir, Muhammad Zeeshan; Qaraqe, Khalid A.; Tabassum, Hina; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim; Serpedin, Erchin; Imran, Muhammad Ali

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneous small cell networks, or Het- SNets, are considered as a standard part of future mobile networks in which multiple lowpower low-cost user deployed base stations complement the existing macrocell infrastructure. This article proposes an energy-efficient deployment of the cells where the small cell base stations are arranged around the edge of the reference macrocell, and the deployment is referred to as cell-on-edge (COE) deployment. The proposed deployment ensures an increase in the network spectral and energy efficiency by facilitating cell edge mobile users with small cells. Moreover, COE deployment guarantees reduction of the carbon footprint of mobile operations by employing adaptive uplink power control. In order to calibrate the reduction in CO2 emissions, this article quantifies the ecological and associated economical impacts of energy savings in the proposed deployment. Simulation results quantify the improvements in CO2 emissions and spectral and energy gains of the proposed COE deployment compared to macro-only networks and typical small cell deployment strategies where small cells are randomly deployed within a given macrocell. © 2013 IEEE.

  18. Green heterogeneous small-cell networks: Toward reducing the CO2 emissions of mobile communications industry using uplink power adaptation

    KAUST Repository

    Shakir, Muhammad Zeeshan

    2013-06-01

    Heterogeneous small cell networks, or Het- SNets, are considered as a standard part of future mobile networks in which multiple lowpower low-cost user deployed base stations complement the existing macrocell infrastructure. This article proposes an energy-efficient deployment of the cells where the small cell base stations are arranged around the edge of the reference macrocell, and the deployment is referred to as cell-on-edge (COE) deployment. The proposed deployment ensures an increase in the network spectral and energy efficiency by facilitating cell edge mobile users with small cells. Moreover, COE deployment guarantees reduction of the carbon footprint of mobile operations by employing adaptive uplink power control. In order to calibrate the reduction in CO2 emissions, this article quantifies the ecological and associated economical impacts of energy savings in the proposed deployment. Simulation results quantify the improvements in CO2 emissions and spectral and energy gains of the proposed COE deployment compared to macro-only networks and typical small cell deployment strategies where small cells are randomly deployed within a given macrocell. © 2013 IEEE.

  19. Home front: post-deployment mental health and divorces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrusa, Brighita; Negrusa, Sebastian

    2014-06-01

    Since 2003, about 14 % of U.S. Army soldiers have reported symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following deployments. In this article, we examine how post-deployment symptoms of PTSD and of other mental health conditions are related to the probability of divorce among married active-duty U.S. Army soldiers. For this purpose, we combine Army administrative individual-level longitudinal data on soldiers' deployments, marital history, and sociodemographic characteristics with their self-reported post-deployment health information. Our estimates indicate that time spent in deployment increases the divorce risk among Army enlisted personnel and that PTSD symptoms are associated with further increases in the odds of divorce. Although officers are generally less likely to screen positive for PTSD than enlisted personnel, we find a stronger relationship between PTSD symptoms and divorces among Army officers who are PTSD-symptomatic than among enlisted personnel. We estimate a larger impact of deployments on the divorce risk among female soldiers, but we do not find a differential impact of PTSD symptoms by gender. Also, we find that most of the effect of PTSD symptoms occurs early in the career of soldiers who deploy multiple times.

  20. Photovoltaic deployment strategy in Japan and the USA-an institutional appraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shum, Kwok L.; Watanabe, Chihiro

    2007-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) is a renewable energy technology, along side with other modular energy generation technologies such as micro-turbines, fuel cells, etc., which will enable the alternative distributed generation paradigm compared to the incumbent fossil fuel based centralized generation paradigm. Distributed generation utilizing renewable energy resources offers opportunities for significant carbon dioxide and emissions reductions thus contributing solutions to broader climate change issues. Yet, renewable energy technologies like PV face various barriers for their widespread adoption. Aside from technical and cost issues, renewable technologies have to overcome the so-called carbon lock-in effects. This refers to the techno-institutional complex associated with the fossil-fuel based centralized generation regime that currently dominates energy production and use. Governmental interventions to address these issues usually can be seen as composed of research, development, demonstration and deployment or RD3 [PCAST, 1999. Panel on International Cooperation in Energy Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment]. This paper focused on comparing the deployment aspect of PV technology in Japan and the USA. While both governments promoted PV as part of their larger strategies to address various environmental and energy security issues, Japan has built a PV installation capacity three times that of the USA as of December 2003 with over 90% of PV installation in the grid-connected small residential system category. This is in marked contrast to the case in the USA in which the cumulative installation is spilt among different types of applications involving the grid and off the grid. We put forward two models to explain these differences in deployment strategies and their possible consequences. The first deployment model leverages upon PV as a manufactured technology with minimal customization to achieve massive deployment. The second deployment model leverages upon

  1. Pneumothorax, without chest wall fracture, following airbag deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Parsons

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Air bags are an automatic crash protection system. They have been shown to reduce mortality from motor vehicle accidents by 31% following direct head-on impacts, by 19% following any frontal impact and by 11% overall. Despite obvious benefits there has been a corresponding increase in the number of injuries resulting from their deployment. We describe a case of a pneumothorax in the absence of chest wall pathology associated with airbag deployment, in a belted driver. There has been one previous description of pneumothorax associated with airbag deployment, in an unbelted driver.

  2. Small hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, K.; Tung, T.

    1995-01-01

    A small hydro plant in Canada is defined as any project between 1 MW and 15 MW but the international standard is 10 MW. The global market for small hydro development was considered good. There are some 1000 to 2000 MW of generating capacity being added each year. In Canada, growth potential is considered small, primarily in remote areas, but significant growth is anticipated in Eastern Europe, Africa and Asia. Canada with its expertise in engineering, manufacturing and development is considered to have a good chance to take advantage of these growing markets

  3. Water Quality Vocabulary Development and Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, B. A.; Yu, J.; Cox, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Semantic descriptions of observed properties and associated units of measure are fundamental to understanding of environmental observations, including groundwater, surface water and marine water quality. Semantic descriptions can be captured in machine-readable ontologies and vocabularies, thus providing support for the annotation of observation values from the disparate data sources with appropriate and accurate metadata, which is critical for achieving semantic interoperability. However, current stand-alone water quality vocabularies provide limited support for cross-system comparisons or data fusion. To enhance semantic interoperability, the alignment of water-quality properties with definitions of chemical entities and units of measure in existing widely-used vocabularies is required. Modern ontologies and vocabularies are expressed, organized and deployed using Semantic Web technologies. We developed an ontology for observed properties (i.e. a model for expressing appropriate controlled vocabularies) which extends the NASA/TopQuadrant QUDT ontology for Unit and QuantityKind with two additional classes and two properties (see accompanying paper by Cox, Simons and Yu). We use our ontology to populate the Water Quality vocabulary with a set of individuals of each of the four key classes (and their subclasses), and add appropriate relationships between these individuals. This ontology is aligned with other relevant stand-alone Water Quality vocabularies and domain ontologies. Developing the Water Quality vocabulary involved two main steps. First, the Water Quality vocabulary was populated with individuals of the ObservedProperty class, which was determined from a census of existing datasets and services. Each ObservedProperty individual relates to other individuals of Unit and QuantityKind (taken from QUDT where possible), and to IdentifiedObject individuals. As a large fraction of observed water quality data are classified by the chemical substance involved, the

  4. Patriot PAC-2 Development and Deployment in The Gulf War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sherman, J

    2003-01-01

    .... Patriot PAC-2 is a case study in effective project management that resulted in the extraordinary acceleration in the final stages of development production and deployment in time to play a historic role in the Gulf War...

  5. University of Tennessee deploys force10 switch for CERN work

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Force20 networks, the pioneer in building and securing reliable networks, today announced that the University of Tennessee physics department has deployed the C300 resilient switch to analyze data form CERN's Large Hadron Collider." (1/2 page)

  6. New Analysis and Theory of Deployable Folded Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recently developed mathematical theory has great value for deployable space structures and in situ manufacture of large beams, panels, cylinders and other...

  7. New Analysis and Theory of Deployable Folded Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recently developed mathematical folding theory has great value for deployable space structures and in situ manufacture of large beams, panels and cylinders. The...

  8. Costs and benefits of MDOT intelligent transportation system deployments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report analyses costs and benefits of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) deployed by : the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT). MDOT ITS focuses on traffic incident : management and also provide Freeway Courtesy Patrol services. A...

  9. Design and Deployment of Mobile FSO Communication System

    KAUST Repository

    Alheadary, Wael Ghazy

    2017-05-08

    As a potential solution to many applications, we developed a mobile free-space optical (FSO) system that achieves 1Gbps with transmission distance of 70 m. This system needs minimal preparation to be deployed within an hour.

  10. Effects of Deployments on Homestation Job Stress and Burnout

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, S. R

    2005-01-01

    .... The increased rate of deployments, coupled with the reduction in resources, has military leaders concerned that these changing demands will cause undue strain, adversely affecting the military member's quality of life...

  11. Morphing structures using soft polymers for active deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daynes, Stephen; Grisdale, Amy; Trask, Richard; Seddon, Annela

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we take inspiration from morphing strategies observed in nature, origami design and stiffness tailoring principles in engineering, to develop a thin walled, low cost, bistable cell geometry capable of reversibly unfolding from a flat configuration to a highly textured configuration. Finite element analysis was used to model the cell deployment and capture the experimentally observed bistability of the reinforced silicone elastomer. Through the combination of flexible elastomers with locally reinforced regions enables a highly tailorable and controllable deployment response. These cells are bistable allowing them to maintain their shape when either deployed or retracted without sustained actuation. It is proposed that such deployable cells with reversible surfaces and texture change can be used as a means of adaptive camouflage. (fast track communication)

  12. EOP CRITTERCAM Deployments on French Frigate Shoals monk seals

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRITTERCAMs, were deployed on a 42 monk seals at French Frigate Shoals Hawaii. Sixty nine hours of video comprised of 3192 recording segments collected at...

  13. Creating a Comprehensive Solar Water Heating Deployment Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Focus Marketing Services

    1999-08-18

    This report details the results of a research conducted in 1998 and 1999 and outlines a marketing deployment plan designed for businesses interested in marketing solar water heaters in the new home industry.

  14. Creating a Comprehensive Solar Water Heating Deployment Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focus Marketing Services

    1999-01-01

    This report details the results of a research conducted in 1998 and 1999 and outlines a marketing deployment plan designed for businesses interested in marketing solar water heaters in the new home industry

  15. Flexible, Phase Change Fabric for Deployable Decelerators, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SDMA proposes to develop a flexible fabric containing Phase Change Materials that is suitable for use on Deployable Decelerators. This technology will make...

  16. The feasibility of Quality Function Deployment (QFD) as an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The feasibility of Quality Function Deployment (QFD) as an assessment and quality ... and facilities that had the most pertinent information on the research focus. ... Keywords: Customer Satisfaction Performance; Graduate School; Quality ...

  17. The American Satellite Company (ASC) satellite deployed from payload bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The American Satellite Company (ASC) communications satellite is deployed from the payload bay of the Shuttle Discovery. A portion of the cloudy surface of the earth can be seen to the left of the frame.

  18. Accelerating the deployment of offshore renewable energy technologies. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, Mott

    2011-02-15

    Offshore wind energy and ocean energy (i.e. wave and tidal) are at different stages of technology development and deployment, and, as such, they require different approaches for successful deployment. However, regardless of their deployment stage, these technologies may face common hurdles in their way to market competitiveness. IEA-RETD has completed a study with the overall objective to assist policy makers and project developers in a better understanding of these barriers and the specifics of offshore renewable energy and to give them practical guidelines. These include an offshore energy deployment framework, substantiated by evidence-based analyses, and recommendations for future policies design, including best practices for allocation of seafloor rights.

  19. Design and Deployment of Mobile FSO Communication System

    KAUST Repository

    Alheadary, Wael Ghazy; Guo, Yong; Stegenburgs, Edgars; Park, Kihong; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2017-01-01

    As a potential solution to many applications, we developed a mobile free-space optical (FSO) system that achieves 1Gbps with transmission distance of 70 m. This system needs minimal preparation to be deployed within an hour.

  20. View of the deployed INSAT/PAM-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    View of the deployed Indian National Satellite (INSAT) attached to Payload Assist Module (PAM) D drifts above the earth's surface. A faint shadow of the open payload bay can be seen in the top left of the frame.

  1. Connected Vehicle Pilot Deployment Program Phase 2, Data Management Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-17

    This document represents a data management plan that delineates all of the data types and data treatment throughout the New York City Connected Vehicle Pilot Deployment (NYC CVPD). This plan includes an identification of the New York City connected v...

  2. Precision Deployable Mast for the SWOT KaRIn Instrument

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Design and prototype a lightweight, precision-deployable mast for the Ka-band Radar Interferometer (KaRIn) antennas in the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT)...

  3. Surface Optimization Techniques for Deployable Reflectors, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Under this and several other programs, CTD has developed TEMBOREG deployable solid-surface reflectors (TEMBOREG Reflectors) to provide future NASA and Air Force...

  4. Extreme Environment Sampling System Deployment Mechanism, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future Venus or Comet mission architectures may feature robotic sampling systems comprised of a Sampling Tool and Deployment Mechanism. Since 2005, Honeybee has been...

  5. The Deployment Experience: Organizational Climate and Work Life

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilcove, Gerry L

    2006-01-01

    ...) and shore personnel (n = 5,032). Results for 2005 showed that deployed personnel had significantly more negative attitudes than shore personnel on several indices, including job satisfaction, quality of command leadership, available...

  6. Deploying ICT with Entrepreneurship Culture can Fight Cyber-Crime ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deploying ICT with Entrepreneurship Culture can Fight Cyber-Crime Menace ... Again he innovates, introducing new products & technologies by the ... Keywords: Cyber-crimes, entrepreneurs, compupreneur, firewalls, computer forensics, ICT, ...

  7. New HTGR plant concept with inherently safe features aimed at small energy users needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Silady, F.S.; Shenoy, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    A small high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) concept is proposed which could provide the energy needs for certain sectors of industrialized nations and the developing countries. The key to the economic success for small reactors, which have potential benefits for special markets, lies in altering the traditional scaling laws. Toward this goal, a small HTGR concept embodying passive decay heat removal features is currently being evaluated. This paper emphasizes the safety-related aspects of a small HTGR. The proposed small reactor concept is new and still in the design development stage, and a significant effort must be expended to establish a design which is technically and economically feasible and will meet the increasingly demanding safety and licensing goals for reactors of the future

  8. Link Between Deployment Factors and Parenting Stress in Navy Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-11

    5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N/A Families 5b. GRANT NUMBER HT9404-13-1-TS05 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER N/A 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...Purpose: Many service members today are married, and many also have children; deployments affect all members of the military family . The purpose of this...conducted. Findings: As deployment factors increased, parenting stress increased for fathers in the reintegration period, with a potential mediation

  9. Is Military Deployment a Risk Factor for Maternal Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    679–684. 39. Quevedo LA, Silva RA, Godoy R, et al. The impact of ma- ternal post - partum depression on the language development of children at 12 months...Naval Health Research Center Is Military Deployment A Risk Factor for Maternal Depression ? Stacie Nguyen Cynthia A. LeardMann Besa Smith...Sylvester Road San Diego, California 92106-3521 Original Articles Is Military Deployment a Risk Factor for Maternal Depression ? Stacie Nguyen, MPH

  10. Deployment Models: Towards Eliminating Security Concerns From Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Gansen; Chunming, Rong; Jaatun, Martin Gilje; Sandnes, Frode Eika

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing has become a popular choice as an alternative to investing new IT systems. When making decisions on adopting cloud computing related solutions, security has always been a major concern. This article summarizes security concerns in cloud computing and proposes five service deployment models to ease these concerns. The proposed models provide different security related features to address different requirements and scenarios and can serve as reference models for deployment. D...

  11. Supporting Military Families with Young Children throughout the Deployment Lifecycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS) Conference. Chicago, IL. 2. Kritikos*, T.K. & DeVoe, E.R. Relationship quality of recently deployed military...prevention and family orientation of the study . We continue to have impact on multiple disciplinary areas, including social work, psychology , and public...resilience in Active Duty military families through all phases of the deployment cycle. The study will be conducted in three phases. In phase 1

  12. The effect of deployment frequencies on the military divorce rate

    OpenAIRE

    Arenstein, Stacy J.

    2011-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The primary goal of this research is to investigate whether the length and frequency of deployments affect the likelihood of divorce. The study uses data from the Contingency Tracking System (CTS) and the Active Duty Military Personnel file. The sample includes all active duty Navy and Marine Corps members from 2000 to 2009. Three models of divorce are estimated, each with a different control for the stress of deployment on the f...

  13. University of Cambridge deploys Procket Networks' PRO/8801

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Procket Networks, a provider of high performance Internet Protocol (IP) technology and products has announced that the University of Cambridge has deployed the PRO/8801(TM) router into its research network to develop industry-leading deep packet inspection applications. The major application for this deployment is to identify and understand new traffic patterns created by large scale scientific computations and downloads such as the GRID (1 page).

  14. Sensor Deployment for Air Pollution Monitoring Using Public Transportation System

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, James J. Q.; Li, Victor O. K.; Lam, Albert Y. S.

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution monitoring is a very popular research topic and many monitoring systems have been developed. In this paper, we formulate the Bus Sensor Deployment Problem (BSDP) to select the bus routes on which sensors are deployed, and we use Chemical Reaction Optimization (CRO) to solve BSDP. CRO is a recently proposed metaheuristic designed to solve a wide range of optimization problems. Using the real world data, namely Hong Kong Island bus route data, we perform a series of simulations an...

  15. Deployment of a pentagonal hollow-rope tensegrity module

    OpenAIRE

    Rhode-Barbarigos , Landolf; Bel Hadj Ali , Nizar; Motro , René; Smith , Ian F.C.

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Tensegrity structures are spatial reticulated structures composed of cables and struts. Tensegrity systems are good candidates for adaptive and deployable structures and thus have applications in various engineering fields. A "hollow-rope" tensegrity system composed of tensegrity-ring modules has been demonstrated by the authors to be a viable system for a pedestrian bridge. This paper focuses on the deployment of pentagonal ring modules. A geometric study is performed...

  16. Kundenorientierte Produktentwicklung mit Hilfe von Quality Function Deployment (QFD)

    OpenAIRE

    Schloske, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Die Produktentwicklung von heute muss in immer kürzeren Zeiträumen kunden- und kostenorientierte Produkte entwickeln. Zur systematischen Unterstützung dieser Aufgabe im Rahmen der Produktentwicklung wird die Methode Quality Function Deployment (QFD) eingesetzt. Die konsequente Umsetzung der Stimme des Kunden in die Sprache des Unternehmens gelingt mit Quality Function Deployment (QFD). Die Methode wertet systematisch Kundenanforderungen an Produkte aus und führt zu innovativen Lösungen, die s...

  17. Information Analysis Methodology for Border Security Deployment Prioritization and Post Deployment Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, Paul M.; Maple, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Due to international commerce, cross-border conflicts, and corruption, a holistic, information driven, approach to border security is required to best understand how resources should be applied to affect sustainable improvements in border security. The ability to transport goods and people by land, sea, and air across international borders with relative ease for legitimate commercial purposes creates a challenging environment to detect illicit smuggling activities that destabilize national level border security. Smuggling activities operated for profit or smuggling operations driven by cross border conflicts where militant or terrorist organizations facilitate the transport of materials and or extremists to advance a cause add complexity to smuggling interdiction efforts. Border security efforts are further hampered when corruption thwarts interdiction efforts or reduces the effectiveness of technology deployed to enhance border security. These issues necessitate the implementation of a holistic approach to border security that leverages all available data. Large amounts of information found in hundreds of thousands of documents can be compiled to assess national or regional borders to identify variables that influence border security. Location data associated with border topics of interest may be extracted and plotted to better characterize the current border security environment for a given country or region. This baseline assessment enables further analysis, but also documents the initial state of border security that can be used to evaluate progress after border security improvements are made. Then, border security threats are prioritized via a systems analysis approach. Mitigation factors to address risks can be developed and evaluated against inhibiting factor such as corruption. This holistic approach to border security helps address the dynamic smuggling interdiction environment where illicit activities divert to a new location that provides less resistance

  18. Cognitive small cell networks: energy efficiency and trade-offs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildemeersch, M.; Wildemeersch, Matthias; Quek, T.Q.S.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Rabbachin, A.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneous networks using a mix of macrocells and small cells are foreseen as one of the solutions to meet the ever increasing mobile traffic demand. Nevertheless, a massive deployment of small cell access points (SAPs) leads also to a considerable increase in energy consumption. Spurred by

  19. Adaptable Deployable Entry & Placement Technology (ADEPT) for Cubesat Delivery to Mars Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wercinski, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The Adaptable, Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT), uses a mechanical skeleton to deploy a revolutionary carbon fabric system that serves as both heat shield and primary structure during atmospheric entry. The NASA ADEPT project, currently funded by the Game Changing Development Program in STMD is currently focused on 1m class hypersonic decelerators for the delivery of very small payloads ( 5 kg) to locations of interest in an effort to leverage low-cost platforms to rapidly mature the technology while simultaneously delivering high-value science. Preliminary mission design and aerothermal performance testing in arcjets have shown the ADEPT system is quite capable of safe delivery of cubesats to Mars surface. The ability of the ADEPT to transit to Mars in a stowed configuration (similar to an umbrella) provides options for integration with the Mars 2020 cruise stage, even to consider multiple ADEPTs. System-level test campaigns are underway for FY15 execution or planning for FY16. These include deployment testing, wind tunnel testing, system-level arc jet testing, and a sounding rocket flight test. The goal is system level maturation (TRL 6) at a 1m class Mars design reference mission configuration.

  20. Using Deduplicating Storage for Efficient Disk Image Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Lin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Many clouds and network testbeds use disk images to initialize local storage on their compute devices. Large facilities must manage thousands or more images, requiring significant amounts of storage. At the same time, to provide a good user experience, they must be able to deploy those images quickly. Driven by our experience in operating the Emulab site at the University of Utah---a long-lived and heavily-used testbed---we have created a new service for efficiently storing and deploying disk images. This service exploits the redundant data found in similar images, using deduplication to greatly reduce the amount of physical storage required. In addition to space savings, our system is also designed for highly efficient image deployment---it integrates with an existing highly-optimized disk image deployment system, Frisbee, without significantly increasing the time required to distribute and install images. In this paper, we explain the design of our system and discuss the trade-offs we made to strike a balance between efficient storage and fast disk image deployment. We also propose a new chunking algorithm, called AFC, which enables fixed-size chunking for deduplicating allocated disk sectors. Experimental results show that our system reduces storage requirements by up to 3x while imposing only a negligible runtime overhead on the end-to-end disk-deployment process.

  1. Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples of Clean Energy Projects (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-09-01

    This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Community Renewable Energy Deployment (CommRE) program, which is a more than $20 million effort funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, to promote investment in clean energy solutions and provide real-life examples for other local governments, campuses, and small utilities to replicate. Five community-based renewable energy projects received funding from DOE through the CommRE and their progress is detailed.

  2. Life-Cycle Cost Analysis for Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems Deployed Aboard Coast Guard Cutters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    test, they utilized two ScanEagles (built by Boeing), and a Unicorn (built by Lockheed Martin). Later in 2012, they demonstrated an autonomous...area grows exponentially and the chance of recovering survivors decreases, demonstrating the benefit of increased surveillance assets early. Also

  3. Interference characterization and mitigation benefit analysis for LTE-A macro and small cell deployments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Victor Fernandez; Pedersen, Klaus I.; Soret, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    and evaluated. A dynamic FTP traffic model is applied, with varying amounts of traffic in the network. The results present an uneven use of resources in all feasible load regions. The interference under the dynamic traffic model shows a strong variability, and the impact of the dominant interferer...

  4. Emissions from small-scale burns of simulated deployed U.S. military waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, Brian D; Yamamoto, Dirk P; Gullett, Brian K; Touati, Abderrahmane

    2012-10-16

    U.S. military forces have historically relied on open burning as an expedient method of volume reduction and treatment of solid waste during the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. This study is the first effort to characterize a broad range of pollutants and their emission factors during the burning of military waste and the effects that recycling efforts, namely removing plastics, might have on emissions. Piles of simulated military waste were constructed, burned, and emissions sampled at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Open Burn Testing Facility (OBTF), Research Triangle Park, NC. Three tests contained polyethylene terephthalate (PET #1 or PET) plastic water bottles and four did not. Emission factors for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter (PM(10), PM(2.5)), polychlorinated and polybrominated dioxins/furans (PCDD/F and PBDD/F), and criteria pollutants were determined and are contained within. The average PCDD/F emission factors were 270 ng-toxic equivalency (TEQ) per kg carbon burned (ng-TEQ/kg Cb), ranging from 35 to 780 ng-TEQ/kg Cb. Limited testing suggests that targeted removal of plastic water bottles has no apparent effect on reducing pollutants and may even promote increased emissions.

  5. Online transit trip planner for small agencies using Google Transit : final deployment package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Google Transit is a public transportation trip planner that enables travelers to obtain information regarding available transit services between a : given origin and given destination. While transit agencies can publish their service information onto...

  6. Deployment Experiences of British Army Wives Before, During and After Deployment: Satisfaction with Military Life and Use of Support Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dandeker, Christopher; French, Claire; Birtles, Catherine; Wessely, S

    2006-01-01

    Introduction and Aims: During deployments, Service wives have to adapt to being alone and taking sole responsibility for their families and house-holds whilst dealing with the additional stress about whether their loved ones will return...

  7. The development and deployment of electronic personal health records records: a strategic positioning perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mark; Baxter, Ryan; Pouder, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of strategic position on the ability of an entrepreneurial firm to successfully develop and deploy electronic personal health records technology within the US healthcare industry. This study uses an in-depth longitudinal case study methodology. The study contributes by juxtaposing a longitudinal view of how the focal firm proposed and acted on different strategic positions in an attempt to achieve development and deployment success. In doing so, the study also elaborates on Porter's recognition that firms need to make trade-offs when choosing a strategic position, as the purposeful limitation of service offerings can protect against the degradation of existing value creating activities. The authors' study highlights the enormous challenge of facilitating the adoption and diffusion of technology enabled interventions in the US healthcare ecosystem. Future research that combines both interdisciplinary and multi-level investigation and analysis is sorely needed to develop a more sophisticated understanding of the phenomenon and to encourage the development and deployment of useful technology enabled interventions within the US healthcare industry. While the fragmented nature of the healthcare industry provides opportunities for entrepreneurial firms, such complexity within the ecosystem should not be underestimated as a reason for concern for small firms. Total economic burden due to chronic diseases and other healthcare-related expenses is massive for the USA. Consequently, prevention and early detection of future disease states has become a core component of the current healthcare reform debate. EPHRs are considered one core component of a broader healthcare strategy to improve health outcomes and lower costs. By deepening our understanding of how best to develop and deploy such interventions, society will surely benefit. The longitudinal nature of the authors' study provides a unique opportunity to understand the

  8. IEA Wind Task 23 Offshore Wind Technology and Deployment. Subtask 1 Experience with Critical Deployment Issues. Final Technical Report

    OpenAIRE

    Lemming, Jørgen Kjærgaard

    2010-01-01

    The final report for IEA Wind Task 23, Offshore Wind Energy Technology and Deployment, is made up of two separate reports: Subtask 1: Experience with Critical Deployment Issues and Subtask 2: Offshore Code Comparison Collaborative (OC3). The Subtask 1 report included here provides background information and objectives of Task 23. It specifically discusses ecological issues and regulation, electrical system integration and offshore wind, external conditions, and key conclusions for Subtask 1. ...

  9. Gender differences in the effects of deployment-related stressors and pre-deployment risk factors on the development of PTSD symptoms in National Guard Soldiers deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polusny, Melissa A; Kumpula, Mandy J; Meis, Laura A; Erbes, Christopher R; Arbisi, Paul A; Murdoch, Maureen; Thuras, Paul; Kehle-Forbes, Shannon M; Johnson, Alexandria K

    2014-02-01

    Although women in the military are exposed to combat and its aftermath, little is known about whether combat as well as pre-deployment risk/protective factors differentially predict post-deployment PTSD symptoms among women compared to men. The current study assesses the influence of combat-related stressors and pre-deployment risk/protective factors on women's risk of developing PTSD symptoms following deployment relative to men's risk. Participants were 801 US National Guard Soldiers (712 men, 89 women) deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan who completed measures of potential risk/protective factors and PTSD symptoms one month before deployment (Time 1) and measures of deployment-related stressors and PTSD symptoms about 2-3 months after returning from deployment (Time 2). Men reported greater exposure to combat situations than women, while women reported greater sexual stressors during deployment than men. Exposure to the aftermath of combat (e.g., witnessing injured/dying people) did not differ by gender. At Time 2, women reported more severe PTSD symptoms and higher rates of probable PTSD than did men. Gender remained a predictor of higher PTSD symptoms after accounting for pre-deployment symptoms, prior interpersonal victimization, and combat related stressors. Gender moderated the association between several risk factors (combat-related stressors, prior interpersonal victimization, lack of unit support and pre-deployment concerns about life/family disruptions) and post-deployment PTSD symptoms. Elevated PTSD symptoms among female service members were not explained simply by gender differences in pre-deployment or deployment-related risk factors. Combat related stressors, prior interpersonal victimization, and pre-deployment concerns about life and family disruptions during deployment were differentially associated with greater post-deployment PTSD symptoms for women than men. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. An Agile Methodology for Implementing Service-Oriented Architecture in Small and Medium Sized Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of Lean/Agile principles, using action research to develop and deploy new technology for Small and Medium sized enterprises. The research case was conducted at the Lapeer County Sheriff's Department and involves the initial deployment of a Service Oriented Architecture to alleviate the data…

  11. Deploy production sliding mesh capability with linear solver benchmarking.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domino, Stefan P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thomas, Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Barone, Matthew F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Williams, Alan B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ananthan, Shreyas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knaus, Robert C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Overfelt, James [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sprague, Mike [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rood, Jon [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    Wind applications require the ability to simulate rotating blades. To support this use-case, a novel design-order sliding mesh algorithm has been developed and deployed. The hybrid method combines the control volume finite element methodology (CVFEM) with concepts found within a discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element method (FEM) to manage a sliding mesh. The method has been demonstrated to be design-order for the tested polynomial basis (P=1 and P=2) and has been deployed to provide production simulation capability for a Vestas V27 (225 kW) wind turbine. Other stationary and canonical rotating ow simulations are also presented. As the majority of wind-energy applications are driving extensive usage of hybrid meshes, a foundational study that outlines near-wall numerical behavior for a variety of element topologies is presented. Results indicate that the proposed nonlinear stabilization operator (NSO) is an effective stabilization methodology to control Gibbs phenomena at large cell Peclet numbers. The study also provides practical mesh resolution guidelines for future analysis efforts. Application-driven performance and algorithmic improvements have been carried out to increase robustness of the scheme on hybrid production wind energy meshes. Specifically, the Kokkos-based Nalu Kernel construct outlined in the FY17/Q4 ExaWind milestone has been transitioned to the hybrid mesh regime. This code base is exercised within a full V27 production run. Simulation timings for parallel search and custom ghosting are presented. As the low-Mach application space requires implicit matrix solves, the cost of matrix reinitialization has been evaluated on a variety of production meshes. Results indicate that at low element counts, i.e., fewer than 100 million elements, matrix graph initialization and preconditioner setup times are small. However, as mesh sizes increase, e.g., 500 million elements, simulation time associated with \\setup-up" costs can increase to nearly 50% of

  12. Lightweight Solar Power for Small Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    The innovation targets small satellites or CubeSats for which conventional deployable arrays are not feasible due to their size, weight and complexity. This novel solar cell array includes a thin and flexible photovoltaic cell applied to an inflatable structure to create a high surface area array for collecting solar energy in a lightweight, simple and deployable structure. The inflatable array, with its high functional surface area, eliminates the need and the mechanisms required to point the system toward the sun. The power density achievable in these small arrays is similar to that of conventional high-power deployable/pointable arrays used on large satellites or space vehicles. Although inflatable solar arrays have been previously considered by others, the arrays involved the use of traditional rigid solar cells. Researchers are currently working with thin film photovoltaics from various suppliers so that the NASA innovation is not limited to any particular solar cell technology. NASA has built prototypes and tested functionality before and after inflation. As shown in the current-voltage currents below, deployment does not damage the cell performance.

  13. The impact of antecedent trauma exposure and mental health symptoms on the post-deployment mental health of Afghanistan-deployed Australian troops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Amelia K; Van Hooff, Miranda; Lawrence-Wood, Ellie R; Grace, Blair S; Saccone, Elizabeth J; Davy, Carol P; Lorimer, Michelle; McFarlane, Alexander C

    2017-10-01

    Both traumatic deployment experiences and antecedent traumas increase personnel's risk of developing PTSD and depression. However, only cross-sectional studies have assessed whether antecedent trauma moderates stress reactions to deployment experiences. This study prospectively examines whether antecedent trauma moderates the association between deployment trauma and post-deployment PTSD and depressive symptoms after accounting for antecedent mental health problems, in a large Australian Defence Force (ADF) sample. In the ADF Middle East Area of Operations Prospective Study, currently-serving military personnel deployed to Afghanistan across 2010-2012 (n = 1122) completed self-reported measures at pre-deployment and post-deployment. Within multivariable regressions, associations between deployment trauma and PTSD and depressive symptoms at post-deployment were stronger for personnel with greater antecedent trauma. However, once adjusting for antecedent mental health problems, these significant interaction effects disappeared. Instead, deployment-related trauma and antecedent mental health problems showed direct associations with post-deployment mental health problems. Antecedent trauma was also indirectly associated with post-deployment mental health problems through antecedent mental health problems. Similar associations were seen with prior combat exposure as a moderator. Antecedent and deployment trauma were reported retrospectively. Self-reports may also suffer from social desirability bias, especially at pre-deployment. Our main effects results support the pervasive and cumulative negative effect of trauma on military personnel, regardless of its source. While antecedent trauma does not amplify personnel's psychological response to deployment trauma, it is indirectly associated with increased post-deployment mental health problems. Antecedent mental health should be considered within pre-deployment prevention programs, and deployment-trauma within post

  14. Standardization of transportation classes for object-oriented deployment simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, J. F., Jr.; Howard, D. L.; Jackson, J.; Macal, C. M.; Nevins, M. R.; Van Groningen, C. N.

    1999-07-30

    Many recent efforts to integrate transportation and deployment simulations, although beneficial, have lacked a feature vital for seamless integration: a common data class representation. It is an objective of the Department of Defense (DoD) to standardize all classes used in object-oriented deployment simulations by developing a standard class attribute representation and behavior for all deployment simulations that rely on an underlying class representation. The Extensive Hierarchy and Object Representation for Transportation Simulations (EXHORT) is a collection of three hierarchies that together will constitute a standard and consistent class attribute representation and behavior that could be used directly by a large set of deployment simulations. The first hierarchy is the Transportation Class Hierarchy (TCH), which describes a significant portion of the defense transportation system; the other two deal with infrastructure and resource classes. EXHORT will allow deployment simulations to use the same set of underlying class data, ensure transparent exchanges, reduce the effort needed to integrate simulations, and permit a detailed analysis of the defense transportation system. This paper describes EXHORT's first hierarchy, the TCH, and provides a rationale for why it is a helpful tool for modeling major portions of the defense transportation system.

  15. Post-deployment family violence among UK military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Jamie; Jones, Margaret; Somaini, Greta; Hull, Lisa; Wessely, Simon; Fear, Nicola T; MacManus, Deirdre

    2017-12-19

    Research into violence among military personnel has not differentiated between stranger- and family-directed violence. While military factors (combat exposure and post-deployment mental health problems) are risk factors for general violence, there has been limited research on their impact on violence within the family environment. This study aims to compare the prevalence of family-directed and stranger-directed violence among a deployed sample of UK military personnel and to explore risk factors associated with both family- and stranger-directed violence. This study utilised data from a large cohort study which collected information by questionnaire from a representative sample of randomly selected deployed UK military personnel (n = 6711). The prevalence of family violence immediately following return from deployment was 3.6% and 7.8% for stranger violence. Family violence was significantly associated with having left service, while stranger violence was associated with younger age, male gender, being single, having a history of antisocial behaviour as well as having left service. Deployment in a combat role was significantly associated with both family and stranger violence after adjustment for confounders [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.92 (1.25-2.94), p = 0.003 and aOR = 1.77 (1.31-2.40), p violence both inside and outside the family environment and should be considered in violence reduction programmes for military personnel. Further research using a validated measurement tool for family violence would improve comparability with other research.

  16. Automated Deployment of Advanced Controls and Analytics in Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritoni, Marco

    Buildings use 40% of primary energy in the US. Recent studies show that developing energy analytics and enhancing control strategies can significantly improve their energy performance. However, the deployment of advanced control software applications has been mostly limited to academic studies. Larger-scale implementations are prevented by the significant engineering time and customization required, due to significant differences among buildings. This study demonstrates how physics-inspired data-driven models can be used to develop portable analytics and control applications for buildings. Specifically, I demonstrate application of these models in all phases of the deployment of advanced controls and analytics in buildings: in the first phase, "Site Preparation and Interface with Legacy Systems" I used models to discover or map relationships among building components, automatically gathering metadata (information about data points) necessary to run the applications. During the second phase: "Application Deployment and Commissioning", models automatically learn system parameters, used for advanced controls and analytics. In the third phase: "Continuous Monitoring and Verification" I utilized models to automatically measure the energy performance of a building that has implemented advanced control strategies. In the conclusions, I discuss future challenges and suggest potential strategies for these innovative control systems to be widely deployed in the market. This dissertation provides useful new tools in terms of procedures, algorithms, and models to facilitate the automation of deployment of advanced controls and analytics and accelerate their wide adoption in buildings.

  17. Biomarkers of post-deployment resilience among military service members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista B. Highland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of PTSD after military deployment is influenced by a combination of biopsychosocial risk and resilience factors. In particular, physiological factors may mark risk for symptom progression or resiliency. Research in civilian populations suggests elevated catecholamines after trauma are associated with PTSD months following the trauma. However, less is known regarding physiological markers of PTSD resilience among post-deployment service members (SM. We therefore assessed whether catecholamines obtained shortly after deployment were associated with combat-related PTSD symptoms three months later. Eighty-seven SMs completed the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-IV and blood draws within two months after return from deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan (“Time 1” or “T1” and three months later (“Time 2” or “T2”. Linear regression analyses demonstrated that lower norepinephrine at T1 was associated with lower PTSD symptoms at T2. In particular, T1 norepinephrine was positively associated with T2 symptom intensity and avoidance symptoms. The present findings represent a biologically-informed method of assessing PTSD resilience after deployment, which may aid clinicians in providing tailored treatments for those in the greatest need. Further research is needed to validate these findings and incorporate physiological measures within an assessment battery.

  18. Enhanced Deployment Strategy for Role-based Hierarchical Application Agents in Wireless Sensor Networks with Established Clusterheads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Audrey

    application had established the network traffic flow to the sink. The same scenario was repeated using a power-based IDS to compare it against the proposed model. To identify a clusterhead's ability to host monitoring agents after the temperature sensing application terminated, the deployed IDS utilized the communication history and other network factors in order to rank the nodes. Similarly, using the node's communication history, the deployed power-based IDS ranked nodes based on their remaining power. For each individual scenario, and after the IDS application was deployed, the temperature sensing application was run for a second time. This time, to monitor the temperature sensing agents as the data flowed towards the sink, the network traffic was rerouted through the new intrusion detection clusterheads. Consequently, if the clusterheads were shared, the re-routing step was not preformed. Experimental results in this research demonstrated the effectiveness of applying a robust deployment metric to improve upon the energy efficiency of a deployed application in a multi-application WSN. It was found that in the scenarios with the intrusion detection application that utilized the proposed model resulted in more remaining energy than in the scenarios that implemented the power-based IDS. The algorithm especially had a positive impact on the small, dense, and more homogeneous networks. This finding was reinforced by the smaller percentage of new clusterheads that was selected. Essentially, the energy cost of the route to the sink was reduced because the network traffic was rerouted through fewer new clusterheads. Additionally, it was found that the intrusion detection topology that used the proposed approach formed smaller and more connected sets of clusterheads than the power-based IDS. As a consequence, this proposed approach essentially achieved the research objective for enhancing energy use in a multi-application WSN.

  19. Supporting deployed operations: are military nurses gaining the relevant experience from MDHUs to be competent in deployed operations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Steven P; Allan, Helen T

    2014-01-01

    To explore how peacetime employment of military nurses in the UK National Health Service Medical Defence Hospital Units prepares them to be competent to practise in their role on deployment. Military secondary care nurses are employed within UK National Health Service Trusts to gain clinical experience that will be relevant to their military nursing role. A two-stage grounded theory study using mixed methods: postal questionnaire survey and in-depth interviews. In stage one a postal questionnaire was distributed to all serving military nurses. Stage two involved 12 semi-structured interviews. The data from both parts of the study were analysed using grounded theory. Four categories and one core category were identified, which suggested that participants did not feel fully prepared for deployment. Their feelings of preparedness increased with deployment experience and decreased when the nature of injuries seen on deployment changed. Respondents argued that even when unprepared, they did not feel incompetent. The findings suggest that the peacetime clinical experience gained in the National Health Service did not always develop the necessary competencies to carry out roles as military nurses on deployment. This study highlights the unique role of military nurses. We discuss these findings in the light of the literature on competency and expertise. The military nurses in this study did not feel fully prepared for deployed operations. We propose a new model for how military nurses could gain relevant experience from their National Health Service placements. National Health Service clinical placements need to be reassessed regularly to ensure that they are meeting military nurses' clinical requirements. Experiences of nurses returning from deployment could be shared and used as a basis for reflection and learning within National Health Service Trusts and also inform decisions regarding the appropriateness of clinical placements for qualified military nurses. © 2012

  20. A fuzzy quality function deployment approach to improve a component of a supervisory control and data acquisition system

    OpenAIRE

    Cristea Ciprian; Saşa Ciprian; Cristea Maria

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring and control of electric transformer stations, frequently spread out over small or large geographical areas, are achieved with supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA). Quality function deployment (QFD) is a valuable analyzing tool in product design and development. To solve the uncertainty or inherent imprecision in QFD, many researchers have applied the fuzzy set theory to QFD and have developed various fuzzy QFD approaches. The literature regarding applying fuzzy QFD for ...

  1. Deployment of SIP in MANET: challenges and circumvention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhamid Salma R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The immense growth in wireless network applications has encouraged the researchers to enhance and propose new approaches that facilitate the deployment of the widely used services, protocols, and applications of the wired networking area in the wireless networks. Among which, the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP is a signaling protocol that allows the establishment of multimedia sessions and calls between different parties. SIP functionality totally depends on a centralized infrastructure, and complexity arises when deploying such a protocol in a special type of wireless networks, namely Mobile Ad-hoc Networks (MANET, due to the absence of a centralized infrastructure, and the dynamic topology of the later. This paper highlights the the challenges arising when deploying SIP in MANETs and presents an overview of different proposed approaches to overcome these challenges.

  2. Optimal and Approximate Approaches for Deployment of Heterogeneous Sensing Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabie Ramadan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A modeling framework for the problem of deploying a set of heterogeneous sensors in a field with time-varying differential surveillance requirements is presented. The problem is formulated as mixed integer mathematical program with the objective to maximize coverage of a given field. Two metaheuristics are used to solve this problem. The first heuristic adopts a genetic algorithm (GA approach while the second heuristic implements a simulated annealing (SA algorithm. A set of experiments is used to illustrate the capabilities of the developed models and to compare their performance. The experiments investigate the effect of parameters related to the size of the sensor deployment problem including number of deployed sensors, size of the monitored field, and length of the monitoring horizon. They also examine several endogenous parameters related to the developed GA and SA algorithms.

  3. Vibration characteristics of a deployable controllable-geometry truss boom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical study was made to evaluate changes in the fundamental frequency of a two dimensional cantilevered truss boom at various stages of deployment. The truss could be axially deployed or retracted and undergo a variety of controlled geometry changes by shortening or lengthening the telescoping diagonal members in each bay. Both untapered and tapered versions of the truss boom were modeled and analyzed by using the finite element method. Large reductions in fundamental frequency occurred for both the untapered and tapered trusses when they were uniformly retracted or maneuvered laterally from their fully deployed position. These frequency reductions can be minimized, however, if truss geometries are selected which maintain cantilever root stiffness during truss maneuvers.

  4. Novel large deployable antenna backing structure concepts for foldable reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraux, V.; Lawton, M.; Reveles, J. R.; You, Z.

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes a number of large deployable antenna (LDA) reflector structure concepts developed at EnerSys-ABSL. Furthermore, EnerSys-ABSL has confirmed the desire to build a breadboard demonstrator of a backing deployable structure for a foldable reflector in the diameter range of 4-9 m. As part of this project EnerSys-ABSL has explored five novel deployable structure concepts. This paper presents the top level definition of these concepts together with the requirements considered in the design and selection of the preferred candidate. These new concepts are described and then compared through a trade-off analysis to identify the most suitable concept that EnerSys-ABSL would like to consider for the breadboard demonstrator. Finally, the kinematics of the chosen concept is described in more detail and future steps in the development process are highlighted.

  5. Security-by-Experiment: Lessons from Responsible Deployment in Cyberspace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Wolter; Hadžiosmanović, Dina; Dechesne, Francien

    2016-06-01

    Conceiving new technologies as social experiments is a means to discuss responsible deployment of technologies that may have unknown and potentially harmful side-effects. Thus far, the uncertain outcomes addressed in the paradigm of new technologies as social experiments have been mostly safety-related, meaning that potential harm is caused by the design plus accidental events in the environment. In some domains, such as cyberspace, adversarial agents (attackers) may be at least as important when it comes to undesirable effects of deployed technologies. In such cases, conditions for responsible experimentation may need to be implemented differently, as attackers behave strategically rather than probabilistically. In this contribution, we outline how adversarial aspects are already taken into account in technology deployment in the field of cyber security, and what the paradigm of new technologies as social experiments can learn from this. In particular, we show the importance of adversarial roles in social experiments with new technologies.

  6. Exploiting the oil-GDP effect to support renewables deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awerbuch, Shimon; Sauter, Raphael

    2006-01-01

    The empirical evidence from a growing body of academic literature clearly suggests that oil price increases and volatility dampen macroeconomic growth by raising inflation and unemployment and by depressing the value of financial and other assets. Surprisingly, this issue seems to have received little attention from energy policy makers. In percentage terms, the oil-GDP effect is relatively small, producing losses in the order of 0.5% of GDP for a 10% oil price increase. In absolute terms however, even a 10% oil price rise-oil has risen at least 50% in the last year alone-produces GDP losses that, could they have been averted, would significantly offset the cost of increased RE deployment. This paper draws on the empirical oil-GDP literature, which we summarize, to show that (i) by displacing gas and oil, renewable energy investments can help nations avoid costly macroeconomic losses produced by the oil-GDP effect and (ii) that these avoided losses represent a significant external macroeconomic benefit of such investments. We show that a 10% increase in RE share avoids GDP losses in the range of $29-$53 billion in the US and the EU ($49-$90 billion for OECD). These avoided losses offset one-fifth of the RE investment needs projected by the EREC and half the OECD investment projected by a G-8 Task Force. For the US, the figures further suggest that each additional kW of renewables, on average, avoids $250-$450 in GDP losses, a figure that varies across technologies as a function of annual capacity factors. We approximate that the offset is worth $200/kW for wind and solar and $800/kW for geothermal and biomass. While we focus only on renewables, the GDP offset will apply in some measure to other non-fossil technologies including energy efficiency, DSM and nuclear. The societal valuation of non-fossil alternatives must reflect these avoided GDP losses, whose benefit is not fully captured by private investors. This said, we fully recognize that wealth created in this

  7. Exploiting the oil-GDP effect to support renewables deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awerbuch, S.; Sauter, R.

    2006-01-01

    The empirical evidence from a growing body of academic literature clearly suggests that oil price increases and volatility dampen macroeconomic growth by raising inflation and unemployment and by depressing the value of financial and other assets. Surprisingly, this issue seems to have received little attention from energy policy makers. In percentage terms, the oil-GDP effect is relatively small, producing losses in the order of 0.5% of GDP for a 10% oil price increase. In absolute terms however, even a 10% oil price rise-oil has risen at least 50% in the last year alone-produces GDP losses that, could they have been averted, would significantly offset the cost of increased RE deployment. This paper draws on the empirical oil-GDP literature, which we summarize, to show that (i) by displacing gas and oil, renewable energy investments can help nations avoid costly macroeconomic losses produced by the oil-GDP effect and, (ii) that these avoided losses represent a significant external macroeconomic benefit of such investments. We show that a 10% increase in RE share avoids GDP losses in the range of $29-$53 billion in the US and the EU ($49-$90 billion for OECD). These avoided losses offset one-fifth of the RE investment needs projected by the EREC and half the OECD investment projected by a G-8 Task Force. For the US, the figures further suggest that each additional kW of renewables, on average, avoids $250-$450 in GDP losses, a figure that varies across technologies as a function of annual capacity factors. We approximate that the offset is worth $200/kW for wind and solar and $800/kW for geothermal and biomass. While we focus only on renewables, the GDP offset will apply in some measure to other non-fossil technologies including energy efficiency, DSM and nuclear. The societal valuation of non-fossil alternatives must reflect these avoided GDP losses, whose benefit is not fully captured by private investors. This said, we fully recognize that wealth created in this

  8. ­The Carnegie Quick Deploy Box (QDB) for use with broadband and intermediate period sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, L. S.; Roman, D.; Bartholomew, T.; Golden, S.; Schleigh, B.

    2017-12-01

    Recent data processing advances have increased the call for dense recordings of teleseismic data. However, traditional broadband field installations typically comprise 1) a sensor vault 2) a field box to hold the recording and power systems, and 3) a solar panel mount. The construction of these installations is time consuming and requires bulky construction materials, limiting the number of stations that can be installed from a single vehicle without repeated trips to a storage facility. Depending on the deployment location, watertight containers for both vault and field box can be difficult to find, resulting in a loss of data due to flooding. Recent technological improvements have made possible the direct burial of sensors (no vault required) and a reduction in the size of the solar panels needed to run a station. With support from the Brinson Foundation, we take advantage of these advances to create a field box/shipping container that will greatly simplify these types of seismic deployments. The goal of the Carnegie Quick Deploy Box (QDB) is to have everything needed for an intermediate period station install (except battery and shovel) contained in a single box for shipment, and to be able to leave everything (except the shovel) in that box when the station is deployed. The box is small enough ( 13"x13"x21") and lightweight enough (< 35 lbs) to be checked as airline luggage. The solar panel mount can be attached securely to the top of the box, but it can also be pole mounted with U-bolts or hose clamps. The sensor can be direct-buried. The sensor cable and solar panel cable plug into watertight bulkhead-fitted plugs on the outside of the box that are in turn plugged into the digitizer and power regulator inside the box. Our prototype boxes (Pelican Cases) have proved watertight when submerged for days. This equipment has been tested in Alaska in winter and Nicaragua in summer without failure due to flooding or power. The cost for parts for a single box (not

  9. Deployment of a Grid-based Medical Imaging Application

    CERN Document Server

    Amendolia, S R; Frate, C; Gálvez, J; Hassan, W; Hauer, T; Manset, D; McClatchey, R; Odeh, M; Rogulin, D; Solomonides, T; Warren, R

    2005-01-01

    The MammoGrid project has deployed its Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA)-based Grid application in a real environment comprising actual participating hospitals. The resultant setup is currently being exploited to conduct rigorous in-house tests in the first phase before handing over the setup to the actual clinicians to get their feedback. This paper elaborates the deployment details and the experiences acquired during this phase of the project. Finally the strategy regarding migration to an upcoming middleware from EGEE project will be described. This paper concludes by highlighting some of the potential areas of future work.

  10. Improvements for rotary viscous dampers used in spacecraft deployment mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Alphonso; Powers, Charles; Lyons, Ron

    1998-01-01

    During component level thermal-vacuum deployment testing of eight rotary viscous dampers for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, all the dampers failed to provide damping during a region of the deployment. Radiographic examination showed that air in the damping fluid caused the undamped motion when the dampers were operated in a vacuum environment. Improvements in the procedure used to fill the dampers with damping fluid, the installation of a Viton vacuum seal in the damper cover, and improved screening techniques eliminated the problem.

  11. Hezbollah Rockets and Missiles: Deployment and Defence Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Kulhánek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the issue of the proliferation of the rocket technology deployed in guerrilla warfare throughout the Near East. It evaluates assumptions and identifies potential regressions with respect to the most recent hot phase in the violent conflict between Hezbollah and Israel, with a focus on primary methods based on rocket shelling and resistance efforts. In comparing the two military forces, Israel emerges as the stronger, even if artillery and tactical ballistic missiles with warheads containing substances defined as weapons of mass destruction were to be deployed as an extreme first measure by Hezbollah, in which case an Israeli or American response would destroy at least parts of Lebanon.

  12. Software, component, and service deployment in computational Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Laszewski, G.; Blau, E.; Bletzinger, M.; Gawor, J.; Lane, P.; Martin, S.; Russell, M.

    2002-01-01

    Grids comprise an infrastructure that enables scientists to use a diverse set of distributed remote services and resources as part of complex scientific problem-solving processes. We analyze some of the challenges involved in deploying software and components transparently in Grids. We report on three practical solutions used by the Globus Project. Lessons learned from this experience lead us to believe that it is necessary to support a variety of software and component deployment strategies. These strategies are based on the hosting environment

  13. Base Station Antenna Pattern Distortion in Practical Urban Deployment Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Larrad, Ignacio; Nguyen, Huan Cong; Sørensen, Troels Bundgaard

    2014-01-01

    In real urban deployments, base station antennas are typically not placed in free space conditions. Therefore, the radiation pattern can be affected by mounting structures and nearby obstacles located in the proximity of the antenna (near-field), which are often not taken into consideration. Also...... presents a combination of near-field and far-field simulations aimed to provide an overview of the distortion experienced by the base station antenna pattern in two different urban deployment scenarios: rooftop and telecommunications tower. The study illustrates how, in comparison with the near...

  14. Market deployment strategies for photovoltaics: an international review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, R.

    2003-01-01

    In the last decade of the 20th century a wide variety of deployment strategies and dissemination programmes for grid-connected PV systems in the built environment has been launched by quite different organizations and institutions. Governmental bodies on national and local levels have launched strategies, as have electric utilities and NGOs. The core objective of this paper is to document and evaluate the most important past and current market deployment strategies for the broader dissemination of grid-connected PV systems in the built environment. (author)

  15. Intelligent quality function deployment system in concurrent engineering environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhihang; Che, Ada

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes work being undertaken in the development of an intelligent distributed quality function deployment (IDQFD) system, which supports product design team to transfer and deployment the `Voice of Customer' through `House of Quality' into the various stages of product planning, engineering and manufacturing. The requirement modeling of products, the optimization in QFD are indicated. The framework of the system, including QFD tools and platform for distributed collaborative work in QFD, is described. The strategy and methods for the collaboration processing in QFD process are presented. It shows promise for application in practice.

  16. Cognitive ability and risk of post-traumatic stress disorder after military deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Lars R.; Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Vedtofte, Mia S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Studies of the association between pre-deployment cognitive ability and post-deployment post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have shown mixed results. Aims: To study the influence of pre-deployment cognitive ability on PTSD symptoms 6-8 months post-deployment in a large population...

  17. 49 CFR 268.3 - Different phases of the Maglev Deployment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Different phases of the Maglev Deployment Program... DEPLOYMENT PROGRAM Overview § 268.3 Different phases of the Maglev Deployment Program. (a) The Maglev... deadlines—based on the progress of the Maglev Deployment Program; grantees will be notified accordingly. (b...

  18. 49 CFR 268.5 - Federal funding sources for the Maglev Deployment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal funding sources for the Maglev Deployment... TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT PROGRAM Overview § 268.5 Federal funding sources for the Maglev Deployment Program. (a) Federal Maglev Funds. Section 322 of Title 23 provides for the following funds for the Maglev Deployment...

  19. 15 CFR 270.102 - Conditions for establishment and deployment of a Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... deployment of a Team. 270.102 Section 270.102 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and... SAFETY TEAMS NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAMS Establishment and Deployment of Teams § 270.102 Conditions for establishment and deployment of a Team. (a) The Director may establish a Team for deployment...

  20. Connected Vehicle Pilot Deployment Program phase 1 : comprehensive deployment plan : New York City : volume 1 : technical application : part I : technical and management approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This document describes the Deployment Plan for the New York City Department of Transportation (NYC) Connected Vehicle Pilot Deployment (CVPD) Project. This plan describes the approach to complete Phase 2 Design/Build/Test, and Phase 3 Operate and Ma...

  1. Experimental Evaluation of Interference Rejection Combining for 5G small cells,

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assefa, Dereje; Berardinelli, Gilberto; Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão

    2015-01-01

    The Interference Rejection Combining (IRC) receiver can significantly boost the network throughput in scenarios characterized by dense uncoordinated deployment of small cells, as targeted by future 5th generation (5G) radio access technology. This paper presents an experimental study...

  2. Optimization of Hydroacoustic Equipment Deployment at Foster Dam, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, James S.; Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Fischer, Eric S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the fixed-location hydroacoustic systems at Foster Dam (FOS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods that minimized structural, electrical, and acoustic interference. Optimization of the hydroacoustic systems will establish methodology for sampling by active acoustic methods during this year-long evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage at FOS.

  3. Cloud Environment Automation: from infrastructure deployment to application monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiftimiei, C.; Costantini, A.; Bucchi, R.; Italiano, A.; Michelotto, D.; Panella, M.; Pergolesi, M.; Saletta, M.; Traldi, S.; Vistoli, C.; Zizzi, G.; Salomoni, D.

    2017-10-01

    The potential offered by the cloud paradigm is often limited by technical issues, rules and regulations. In particular, the activities related to the design and deployment of the Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) cloud layer can be difficult to apply and time-consuming for the infrastructure maintainers. In this paper the research activity, carried out during the Open City Platform (OCP) research project [1], aimed at designing and developing an automatic tool for cloud-based IaaS deployment is presented. Open City Platform is an industrial research project funded by the Italian Ministry of University and Research (MIUR), started in 2014. It intends to research, develop and test new technological solutions open, interoperable and usable on-demand in the field of Cloud Computing, along with new sustainable organizational models that can be deployed for and adopted by the Public Administrations (PA). The presented work and the related outcomes are aimed at simplifying the deployment and maintenance of a complete IaaS cloud-based infrastructure.

  4. Supporting Children Facing the Deployment of a Parent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahill, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    As the cycle of deployments to war zones by military service members and other federal government employees continue, school psychologists likely have encountered or will encounter children in their schools who have been dealing with an absence of a parent for extended periods of time. While some school psychologists who live and work near major…

  5. Spacecraft on-orbit deployment anomalies - What can be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Michael T.

    1993-04-01

    Modern communications satellites rely heavily upon deployable appendage (i.e. solar arrays, communications antennas, etc.) to perform vital functions that enable the spacecraft to effectively conduct mission objectives. Communications and telemetry antennas provide the radiofrequency link between the spacecraft and the earth ground station, permitting data to be transmitted and received from the satellite. Solar arrays serve as the principle source of electrical energy to the satellite, and recharge internal batteries during operation. However, since satellites cannot carry backup systems, if a solar array fails to deploy, the mission is lost. This article examines the subject of on-orbit anomalies related to the deployment of spacecraft appendage, and possible causes of such failures. Topics discussed shall include mechanical launch loading, on-orbit thermal and solar concerns, reliability of spacecraft pyrotechnics, and practical limitations of ground-based deployment testing. Of particular significance, the article will feature an in-depth look at the lessons learned from the successful recovery of the Telesat Canada Anik-E2 satellite in 1991.

  6. Modeling deployment of Pierce’s disease resistant grapevines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deployment of Pierce’s disease resistant grapevines is a key solution to mitigating economic losses caused by Xylella fastidiosa. While Pierce’s disease resistant grapevines under development display mild symptoms and have lower bacterial populations than susceptible varieties, all appear to remain ...

  7. Deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks in Crop Storages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Jakob Pilegaard; Green, Ole; Jacobsen, Rune Hylsberg

    2015-01-01

    of a wireless sensor network based system that provides continuous, automatic, and up-to-date information on a crop storage, while presenting the data in an easily accessible manner, is also described. The design decisions, challenges, and practical experiences from real-world large scale deployment...

  8. Beyond Continuous Delivery: An Empirical Investigation of Continuous Deployment Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahin, Mojtaba; Ali Babar, Muhammad; Zahedi, Mansooreh

    2017-01-01

    Context: A growing number of software organizations have been adopting Continuous DElivery (CDE) and Continuous Deployment (CD) practices. Researchers have started investing significant efforts in studying different aspects of CDE and CD. Many studies refer to CDE (i.e., where an application is p...

  9. Determining the Optimal C-130 Deployed Crew Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    components. The active component operates at a 1:2 (with a goal of 1:3) deploy-to- dwell while the ARC plans a 1:5 ( Stenner , 2011, pp. 5, 10). This...Rand Corporation, 2011. Rand Corporation. Intratheater Airlift Functional Solution Analysis. Santa Monica: Rand Corporation, 2011. Stenner

  10. Structural realism versus deployment realism: A comparative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Timothy D

    2016-10-01

    In this paper I challenge and adjudicate between the two positions that have come to prominence in the scientific realism debate: deployment realism and structural realism. I discuss a set of cases from the history of celestial mechanics, including some of the most important successes in the history of science. To the surprise of the deployment realist, these are novel predictive successes toward which theoretical constituents that are now seen to be patently false were genuinely deployed. Exploring the implications for structural realism, I show that the need to accommodate these cases forces our notion of "structure" toward a dramatic depletion of logical content, threatening to render it explanatorily vacuous: the better structuralism fares against these historical examples, in terms of retention, the worse it fares in content and explanatory strength. I conclude by considering recent restrictions that serve to make "structure" more specific. I show however that these refinements will not suffice: the better structuralism fares in specificity and explanatory strength, the worse it fares against history. In light of these case studies, both deployment realism and structural realism are significantly threatened by the very historical challenge they were introduced to answer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Municipal Real Estate deployed as a capital asset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appel - Meulenbroek, H.A.J.A.; Maussen, S.J.E.; de Bis, N.; Verkerk, B.G.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to introduce the principles of Corporate Real Estate Management (CREM) within the municipal organization. It is presumed that, looking at the private sector’s accomplishments in this field, these principles will allow a city council to deploy their real estate in a

  12. Abstraction Layer For Development And Deployment Of Cloud Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binh Minh Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will present an abstraction layer for cloud computing, which intends to simplify the manipulation with virtual machines in clouds for easy and controlled development and deployment of cloud services. It also ensures interoperability between different cloud infrastructures and allows developers to create cloud appliances easily via inheritance mechanisms.

  13. IPV6 Deployment - Mauritius to benefit from Opportunities and World ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user1

    gaming, and many other new applications cost even higher to be deployed on IPv4 ... mitigate the effects of the imminent depletion of the IPv4 address space and .... The government of Korea plans to achieve complete IPv6 transition in the.

  14. Wind Energy Deployment Process and Siting Tools (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, S.

    2015-02-01

    Regardless of cost and performance, some wind projects cannot proceed to completion as a result of competing multiple uses or siting considerations. Wind energy siting issues must be better understood and quantified. DOE tasked NREL researchers with depicting the wind energy deployment process and researching development considerations. This presentation provides an overview of these findings and wind siting tools.

  15. Design of a deployment rotation mechanism for microsatellite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdelal, G.F.; Bakr Elhady, A.; Kassab, M.

    2009-01-01

    Solar array rotation mechanism provides a hinged joint between the solar panel and satellite body, smooth rotation of the solar array into deployed position and its fixation in this position. After unlocking of solar panel (while in orbit), rotation bracket turns towards ready-to-work position under

  16. Novel Deployment Mechanism for Conventional Solar Array Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodgetts Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel mechanism is described, by which flexible blankets could be deployed from existing solar panel designs. These blankets could be covered with flexible cells, or they could be reflective films to form a concentrator array. Either way, the performance of an existing array design could be enhanced.

  17. Facilitating ICN deployment with an extended open flow protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuraniewski, P.W.; Adrichem, N.L.M. van; Ravesteijn, D.; IJntema, W.; Papadopoulos, C.; Fan, C.

    2017-01-01

    Named-Data Networking (NDN) is proposed as an approach to evolve the Internet infrastructure from a host- to an informationcentric (ICN) approach, which is better suited to the current usage of the Internet. However, the deployment of a global NDN-based Internet is still a long way out of reach. The

  18. A review of Lean Six Sigma deployment and maturity models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lameijer, B.A.; de Mast, J.; Does, R.J.M.M.

    2017-01-01

    For guidance in implementing Lean Six Sigma (LSS), both the academic and the practitioners’ literature offer deployment models and models for assessing the implementation’s maturity. This paper makes a critical appraisal of the quality and usefulness of a sample of 19 such models. The appraisal

  19. Quality function deployment in the food industry: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, A.I.A.; Dekker, M.; Jongen, W.M.F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed literature review on the topic of the application of quality function deployment (QFD) in the food industry. This review is extended with a thorough description of the methodologies involved in the practice of QFD within food companies, exemplified with the help of a

  20. Strategies for Power Line Communications Smart Metering Network Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Sendin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Smart Grids are becoming a reality all over the world. Nowadays, the research efforts for the introduction and deployment of these grids are mainly focused on the development of the field of Smart Metering. This emerging application requires the use of technologies to access the significant number of points of supply (PoS existing in the grid, covering the Low Voltage (LV segment with the lowest possible costs. Power Line Communications (PLC have been extensively used in electricity grids for a variety of purposes and, of late, have been the focus of renewed interest. PLC are really well suited for quick and inexpensive pervasive deployments. However, no LV grid is the same in any electricity company (utility, and the particularities of each grid evolution, architecture, circumstances and materials, makes it a challenge to deploy Smart Metering networks with PLC technologies, with the Smart Grid as an ultimate goal. This paper covers the evolution of Smart Metering networks, together with the evolution of PLC technologies until both worlds have converged to project PLC-enabled Smart Metering networks towards Smart Grid. This paper develops guidelines over a set of strategic aspects of PLC Smart Metering network deployment based on the knowledge gathered on real field; and introduces the future challenges of these networks in their evolution towards the Smart Grid.

  1. The Effects of Multiple Deployments on Army Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    deployment-related feelings.12 Focusing on a parent’s absence, dwelling on potential negative outcomes, or ruminating on problems often sends a child...maintain balance in the pull of both noble institutions. Some Army adolescents contend poorly in this dilemma; others—many more than soldiers or Army

  2. An early deployment strategy for carbon capture, utilisation, and storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, L.D.

    2012-11-01

    This report describes the current use of CO2 for EOR, and discusses potential expansion of EOR using CO2 from power plants. Analysis of potential EOR development in the USA, where most current CO2-based EOR production takes place, indicates that relatively low cost, traditional sources of CO2 for EOR (CO2 domes and CO2 from natural gas processing plants) are insufficient to exploit the full potential of EOR. To achieve that full potential will require use of CO2 from combustion and gasification systems, such as fossil fuel power plants, where capture of CO2 is more costly. The cost of current CCUS systems, even with the revenue stream for sale of the CO2 for EOR, is too high to result in broad deployment of the technology in the near term. In the longer term, research and development may be sufficient to reduce CO2 capture costs to a point where CCUS would be broadly deployed. This report describes a case study of conditions in the USA to explore a financial incentive to promote early deployment of CCUS, providing a range of immediate benefits to society, greater likelihood of reducing the long-term cost of CCUS, and greater likelihood of broad deployment of CCUS and CCS in the long term. Additionally, it may be possible to craft such an incentive in a manner that its cost is more than offset by taxes flowing from increased domestic oil production. An example of such an incentive is included in this report.

  3. Using Quality Function Deployment To Improve Academic Advising Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Richard; Murray, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    Quality Function Deployment, a set of concepts and tools used in manufacturing engineering to link consumer needs with product design, can also improve academic advising systems and processes. The technique promotes structured, logical examination of students' advising needs and their relationship to advising system design, processes, methods,…

  4. DEPLOYMENT OF VOIP ON WIRELINE NETWORK USING OPNET

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EKPAH

    study of VoIP traffic and other major devices. These results will ... pre-deployment analysis, planning and lack of ... given network under VoIP and data load traffic. OPNET contains a vast amount of models of .... There are a number of tools.

  5. Light Duty Utility Arm deployment in Tank WM-188

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) was successfully deployed in Tank WM-188 during February and March of 1999 at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) tank farm at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Some equipment problems were identified, but most were indicative of any first time activity. Deployment during cold weather imposed additional equipment risks, but in general, equipment response to the winter conditions was better than expected. Three end effectors were demonstrated during the deployment. All performed as expected, although the limited resolution of the Alternating Current Field Measurement end effector cannot absolutely confirm tank integrity, which is necessary for future tank inspections. Four heel samples were taken with the sampler end effector and a broad spectrum of analyses were performed. A detailed inspection of the tank interior was performed with the High Resolution Stereo Video System end effector. The sample information is proving invaluable to the development of new treatment flowsheets and waste forms. It is expected that the LDUA will be deployed for tank inspections through the next several years to support other Notice of Non-Compliance (NON) Consent Order requirements and several other ongoing initiatives

  6. Book Review: Deployment Psychology: Evidence-based strategies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review: Deployment Psychology: Evidence-based strategies to promote mental health in the Military. AB Adler, PD Bliese, CA Castro. Abstract. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association 2011 294 pages ISBN-13: 978-1-4338-0881-4. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  7. Energy storage deployment and innovation for the clean energy transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittner, Noah; Lill, Felix; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2017-09-01

    The clean energy transition requires a co-evolution of innovation, investment, and deployment strategies for emerging energy storage technologies. A deeply decarbonized energy system research platform needs materials science advances in battery technology to overcome the intermittency challenges of wind and solar electricity. Simultaneously, policies designed to build market growth and innovation in battery storage may complement cost reductions across a suite of clean energy technologies. Further integration of R&D and deployment of new storage technologies paves a clear route toward cost-effective low-carbon electricity. Here we analyse deployment and innovation using a two-factor model that integrates the value of investment in materials innovation and technology deployment over time from an empirical dataset covering battery storage technology. Complementary advances in battery storage are of utmost importance to decarbonization alongside improvements in renewable electricity sources. We find and chart a viable path to dispatchable US$1 W-1 solar with US$100 kWh-1 battery storage that enables combinations of solar, wind, and storage to compete directly with fossil-based electricity options.

  8. Deployment of vendor innovation capability in contract electronic manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perunovic, Zoran; Mefford, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores deployment of innovation capability in outsourcing from the vendor perspective. Vendor’s innovation-related competences are used to capture vendor innovativeness. A multiple-case study was applied with two Contract Electronic Manufacturers. Based on the data analysis we propose...

  9. Radiation technology in ground nut improvement and societal deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murty, G.S.S.; Badigannavar, A.M.; Kale, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    The best way to summarize the impact of mutation research in ground nut for societal deployment is for 1) developing suitable varieties for different agro-climatic zones in the country, 2) providing a source material for developing new varieties by other universities, 3) replacing traditional crops with TG varieties, 4) transforming socioeconomic status of peanut peasants and 5) enhanced ground nut productivity

  10. Deployment of Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Nigeria Institutional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deployment of Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Nigeria Institutional Digital Repository. ... that repositories are very important to universities in helping them showcase, manage and capture their intellectual assets as a part of their information service strategy and contribution to universal access to knowledge and information.

  11. Color impact in visual attention deployment considering emotional images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamaret, C.

    2012-03-01

    Color is a predominant factor in the human visual attention system. Even if it cannot be sufficient to the global or complete understanding of a scene, it may impact the visual attention deployment. We propose to study the color impact as well as the emotion aspect of pictures regarding the visual attention deployment. An eye-tracking campaign has been conducted involving twenty people watching half pictures of database in full color and the other half of database in grey color. The eye fixations of color and black and white images were highly correlated leading to the question of the integration of such cues in the design of visual attention model. Indeed, the prediction of two state-of-the-art computational models shows similar results for the two color categories. Similarly, the study of saccade amplitude and fixation duration versus time viewing did not bring any significant differences between the two mentioned categories. In addition, spatial coordinates of eye fixations reveal an interesting indicator for investigating the differences of visual attention deployment over time and fixation number. The second factor related to emotion categories shows evidences of emotional inter-categories differences between color and grey eye fixations for passive and positive emotion. The particular aspect associated to this category induces a specific behavior, rather based on high frequencies, where the color components influence the visual attention deployment.

  12. Light Duty Utility Arm deployment in Tank WM-188

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, M.W.

    1999-12-01

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) was successfully deployed in Tank WM-188 during February and March of 1999 at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) tank farm at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Some equipment problems were identified, but most were indicative of any first time activity. Deployment during cold weather imposed additional equipment risks, but in general, equipment response to the winter conditions was better than expected. Three end effectors were demonstrated during the deployment. All performed as expected, although the limited resolution of the Alternating Current Field Measurement end effector cannot absolutely confirm tank integrity, which is necessary for future tank inspections. Four heel samples were taken with the sampler end effector and a broad spectrum of analyses were performed. A detailed inspection of the tank interior was performed with the High Resolution Stereo Video System end effector. The sample information is proving invaluable to the development of new treatment flowsheets and waste forms. It is expected that the LDUA will be deployed for tank inspections through the next several years to support other Notice of Non-Compliance (NON) Consent Order requirements and several other ongoing initiatives.

  13. Light Duty Utility Arm Deployment in Tank WM-188

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Michael W

    2000-01-01

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) was successfully deployed in Tank WM-188 during February and March of 1999 at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) tank farm at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Some equipment problems were identified, but most were indicative of any first time activity. Deployment during cold weather imposed additional equipment risks, but in general, equipment response to the winter conditions was better than expected. Three end effectors were demonstrated during the deployment. All performed as expected, although the limited resolution of the Alternating Current Field Measurement end effector cannot absolutely confirm tank integrity, which is necessary for future tank inspections. Four heel samples were taken with the sampler end effector and a broad spectrum of analyses were performed. A detailed inspection of the tank interior was performed with the High Resolution Stereo Video System end effector. The sample information is proving invaluable to the development of new treatment flowsheets and waste forms. It is expected that the LDUA will be deployed for tank inspections through the next several years to support other Notice of NonCompliance (NON) Consent Order requirements and several other ongoing initiatives.

  14. Modeling and analysis of a large deployable antenna structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zhengrong; Deng, Zongquan; Qi, Xiaozhi; Li, Bing

    2014-02-01

    One kind of large deployable antenna (LDA) structure is proposed by combining a number of basic deployable units in this paper. In order to avoid vibration caused by fast deployment speed of the mechanism, a braking system is used to control the spring-actuated system. Comparisons between the LDA structure and a similar structure used by the large deployable reflector (LDR) indicate that the former has potential for use in antennas with up to 30 m aperture due to its lighter weight. The LDA structure is designed to form a spherical surface found by the least square fitting method so that it can be symmetrical. In this case, the positions of the terminal points in the structure are determined by two principles. A method to calculate the cable network stretched on the LDA structure is developed, which combines the original force density method and the parabolic surface constraint. Genetic algorithm is applied to ensure that each cable reaches a desired tension, which avoids the non-convergence issue effectively. We find that the pattern for the front and rear cable net must be the same when finding the shape of the rear cable net, otherwise anticlastic surface would generate.

  15. Low Cost and Flexible UAV Deployment of Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Yndal; Jacobsen, Lars Toft; Hansen, John Paulin

    2017-01-01

    -collection needs. The main contribution is the extensible architecture for modularized airborne sensor deployment and real-time data visualisation. Our open-source Android application provides data collection, flight path definition and map tools. Total cost of the system is below 800 dollars. The flexibility...

  16. Role of ENT Surgeon in Managing Battle Trauma During Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajguru, Renu

    2013-01-01

    With technological improvements in body armour and increasing use of improvised explosive devices, it is the injuries to head, face and neck are the cause for maximum fatalities as military personnel are surviving wounds that would have otherwise been fatal. The priorities of battlefield surgical treatment are to save life, eyesight and limbs and then to give the best functional and aesthetic outcome for other wounds. Modern day battlefields pose unique demands on the deployed surgical teams and management of head and neck wounds demands multispecialty approach. Optimal result will depend on teamwork of head and neck trauma management team, which should also include otolaryngologist. Data collected by various deployed HFN surgical teams is studied and quoted in the article to give factual figures. Otorhinolaryngology becomes a crucial sub-speciality in the care of the injured and military otorhinolaryngologists need to be trained and deployed accordingly. The otolaryngologist's clinical knowledge base and surgical domain allows the ENT surgeon to uniquely contribute in response to mass casualty incident. Military planners need to recognize the felt need and respond by deploying teams of specialist head and neck surgeons which should also include otorhinolaryngologists.

  17. The Deployment Life Study: Methodological Overview and Baseline Sample Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    previous conflicts over the past several decades (Belasco, 2007; Bruner , 2006; Serafino, 2003). Furthermore, deployed troops are surviving wounds at higher...Long-Term Contextual Threat,” Psychological Medicine, Vol. 15, No. 1, February 1985, pp. 189–194. Bruner , Edward F., Military Forces: What Is the

  18. Deployment of Recommender Systems: Operational and Strategic Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Abhijeet

    2011-01-01

    E-commerce firms are increasingly adopting recommendation systems to effectively target customers with products and services. The first essay examines the impact that improving a recommender system has on firms that deploy such systems. A market with customers heterogeneous in their search costs is considered. We find that in a monopoly, a firm…

  19. Optimization Techniques for 3D Graphics Deployment on Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Timo; Vatjus-Anttila, Jarkko

    2015-03-01

    3D Internet technologies are becoming essential enablers in many application areas including games, education, collaboration, navigation and social networking. The use of 3D Internet applications with mobile devices provides location-independent access and richer use context, but also performance issues. Therefore, one of the important challenges facing 3D Internet applications is the deployment of 3D graphics on mobile devices. In this article, we present an extensive survey on optimization techniques for 3D graphics deployment on mobile devices and qualitatively analyze the applicability of each technique from the standpoints of visual quality, performance and energy consumption. The analysis focuses on optimization techniques related to data-driven 3D graphics deployment, because it supports off-line use, multi-user interaction, user-created 3D graphics and creation of arbitrary 3D graphics. The outcome of the analysis facilitates the development and deployment of 3D Internet applications on mobile devices and provides guidelines for future research.

  20. Aerial Deployment and Inflation System for Mars Helium Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenmeler, Tim; Fairbrother, Debora; Shreves, Chris; Hall, Jeffery, L.; Kerzhanovich, Viktor V.; Pauken, Michael T.; Walsh, Gerald J.; White, Christopher V.

    2009-01-01

    A method is examined for safely deploying and inflating helium balloons for missions at Mars. The key for making it possible to deploy balloons that are light enough to be buoyant in the thin, Martian atmosphere is to mitigate the transient forces on the balloon that might tear it. A fully inflated Mars balloon has a diameter of 10 m, so it must be folded up for the trip to Mars, unfolded upon arrival, and then inflated with helium gas in the atmosphere. Safe entry into the Martian atmosphere requires the use of an aeroshell vehicle, which protects against severe heating and pressure loads associated with the hypersonic entry flight. Drag decelerates the aeroshell to supersonic speeds, then two parachutes deploy to slow the vehicle down to the needed safe speed of 25 to 35 m/s for balloon deployment. The parachute system descent dynamic pressure must be approximately 5 Pa or lower at an altitude of 4 km or more above the surface.

  1. Structural analysis of ITER multi-purpose deployer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manuelraj, Manoah Stephen; Dutta, Pramit; Gotewal, Krishan Kumar; Rastogi, Naveen; Tesini, Alessandro; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • System modelling for structural analysis of the Multi-Purpose Deployer (MPD). • Finite element modeling of the Multi-Purpose Deployer (MPD). • Static, modal and seismic response analysis of the Multi-Purpose Deployer (MPD). • Iterative structural analysis and design update to satisfy the structural criteria. • Modal analysis for various kinematic configurations. • Reaction force calculations on the interfacing systems. - Abstract: The Multi-Purpose Deployer (MPD) is a general purpose ITER in-vessel remote handling (RH) system. The main handling equipment, known as the MPD Transporter, consists of a series of linked bodies, which provide anchoring to the vacuum vessel port and an articulated multi-degree of freedom motion to perform various in-vessel maintenance tasks. During the in-vessel operations, the structural integrity of the system should be guaranteed against various operational and seismic loads. This paper presents the structural analysis results of the concept design of the MPD Transporter considering the seismic events. Static structural, modal and frequency response spectrum analyses have been performed to verify the structural integrity of the system, and to provide reaction forces to the interfacing systems such as vacuum vessel and cask. Iterative analyses and design updates are carried out based on the reference design of the system to improve the structural behavior of the system. The frequency responses of the system in various kinematics and payloads are assessed.

  2. Relationships between soldiers' PTSD symptoms and spousal communication during deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Sarah; Loew, Benjamin; Allen, Elizabeth; Stanley, Scott; Rhoades, Galena; Markman, Howard

    2011-06-01

    Social support, including support from spouses, may buffer against posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. The current study assessed whether the frequency of spousal communication during a recent deployment, a potentially important source of support for soldiers, was related to postdeployment PTSD symptoms. Data came from 193 married male Army soldiers who returned from military deployment within the past year. For communication modalities conceptualized as delayed (i.e., letters, care packages, and e-mails), greater spousal communication frequency during deployment was associated with lower postdeployment PTSD symptom scores, but only at higher levels of marital satisfaction (p = .009). At lower marital satisfaction, more delayed spousal communication during deployment was associated with more PTSD symptoms (p = .042). For communication modalities conceptualized as interactive (i.e., phone calls, instant messaging, instant messaging with video), the same general direction of effects was seen, but the interaction between communication frequency and marital satisfaction predicting PTSD symptoms did not reach significance. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  3. Operational deployment of genetic gain | Pallett | Southern Forests ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tree improvement is central to increasing plantation productivity per unit land area in many countries that rely on an exotic fast grown plantation resource as a source of wood and fibre. In order to achieve an acceptable return on the investment made in tree breeding, it is important that material be deployed with both good ...

  4. Security-by-experiment : lessons from responsible deployment in cyberspace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, W.; Hadžiosmanović, D.; Dechesne, F.

    Conceiving new technologies as social experiments is a means to discuss responsible deployment of technologies that may have unknown and potentially harmful side-effects. Thus far, the uncertain outcomes addressed in the paradigm of new technologies as social experiments have been mostly

  5. Security-by-Experiment: Lessons from Responsible Deployment in Cyberspace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Wolter; Hadziosmanovic, D.; Dechesne, Francien

    Conceiving new technologies as social experiments is a means to discuss responsible deployment of technologies that may have unknown and potentially harmful side-effects. Thus far, the uncertain outcomes addressed in the paradigm of new technologies as social experiments have been mostly

  6. Security-by-Experiment: Lessons from Responsible Deployment in Cyberspace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, W.; Hadziosmanovic, D.; Dechesne, F

    2015-01-01

    Conceiving new technologies as social experiments is a means to discuss responsible deployment of technologies that may have unknown and potentially harmful side-effects. Thus far, the uncertain outcomes addressed in the paradigm of new technologies as social experiments have been mostly

  7. Security-by-Experiment : Lessons from Responsible Deployment in Cyberspace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, W.; Hadžiosmanovi?, D.; Dechesne, F.

    2015-01-01

    onceiving new technologies as social experiments is a means to discuss responsible deployment of technologies that may have unknown and potentially harmful side-effects. Thus far, the uncertain outcomes addressed in the paradigm of new technologies as social experiments have been mostly

  8. Post-deployment usability evaluation of a radiology workstation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Wiard; Cnossen, Fokie; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Van Ooijen, Peter M. A.

    Objectives: To determine the number, nature and severity of usability issues radiologists encounter while using a commercially available radiology workstation in clinical practice, and to assess how well the results of a pre-deployment usability evaluation of this workstation generalize to clinical

  9. The ‘Deployment of Extra Processing’ Account of Attention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazekas, Peter; Nanay, Bence

    2015-01-01

    The paper formulates an alternative view about the core function of attention claiming that attention is not selection but the deployment of extra processing capacity. This way of thinking about attention has greater explanatory power, since it proposes a common implementation both for selection...

  10. Astronaut Tamara Jernigan deploys life raft during WETF training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Tamara E. Jernigan, STS-67 payload commander, deploys a life raft during a session of emergency bailout training. The training took place in the 25-feet deep pool at JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF). Jernigan was joined by her crew mates for the training session. Several SCUBA-equipped divers who assisted in the training can be seen in this photograph.

  11. Emergency deployment of genetically engineered veterinary vaccines in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramezanpour, Bahar; Foucauld, de Jean; Kortekaas, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    On the 9th of November 2015, preceding the World Veterinary Vaccine Congress, a workshop was held to discuss how veterinary vaccines can be deployed more rapidly to appropriately respond to future epizootics in Europe. Considering their potential and unprecedented suitability for surge

  12. The Feasibility of Quality Function Deployment (QFD) as an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    65mgdouglas

    qualitative case study approach was used with the deployment of ... QFD appears to supersede most models, where it compounds the market, social ... valuable strategy by means of which to align business, industry and ... business models' adoption in the services sector, ..... quality concepts are not effectively translated into.

  13. A demonstration of mobile phone deployment to support the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A demonstration of mobile phone deployment to support the treatment of acutely ill children under five in Bushenyi district, Uganda. Jerome Kabakyenga, Celestine Barigye, Jennifer Brenner, Samuel Maling, Denise Buchner, Alberto Nettle-Aquirre, Nalini Singhal, Teddy Kyomuhangi, David Tumusiime, Janet Finch, Stuart ...

  14. Domian Transfer as a Strategy Deployed to Portray Massive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also there are variations of public opinion on the intent, content, and context of the epistle, many of which come from the power brokers in Nigeria. What this essay does is to examine cases of domain transfer in the text. In the process, it discovers that the writer deploys lexical items from source domains- religion, military, ...

  15. Designing and Deploying Programming Courses: Strategies, Tools, Difficulties and Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinogalos, Stelios

    2016-01-01

    Designing and deploying programming courses is undoubtedly a challenging task. In this paper, an attempt to analyze important aspects of a sequence of two courses on imperative-procedural and object-oriented programming in a non-CS majors Department is made. This analysis is based on a questionnaire filled in by fifty students in a voluntary…

  16. Perencanaan Quality Function Deployment (Qfd) Pada Hotel Everbright Surabaya

    OpenAIRE

    Santoso, Christian Hanni; Henuk, Yohan Gunawan; Kristanti, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui Perencanaan Quality Function Deployment (QFD) pada Hotel Everbright Surabaya. Tujuan penggunaan QFD pada penelitian ini adalah mengetahui kebutuhan konsumen (customer requirements) dan tindakan perbaikan (technical characteristics). Selain itu juga mengetahui harapan dan persepsi konsumen serta gap antara harapan dan persepsi konsumen serta apakah ada perbedaan signifikan antara harapan dan persepsi. Data diolah dengan menggunakan Quality Function Dep...

  17. FY2000 Hanford Technology Deployment Accomplishments Fact Sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WIBLE, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Cleaning up the Hanford Site is one of the top priorities for the U. S. Department of Energy. The department is continually looking for ways to expedite cleanup and reduce costs. During Fiscal Year (FY) 2000. Hanford Site staff deployed 24 new technologies, which produced an estimated lifecycle cost savings of 479 million dollars. This is a clear indicator of the impacts new technology has had and will have on the cleanup efforts. The Hanford Site cleanup is focused on the following: Restoring the Columbia River Corridor; Building and operating the tank waste treatment complex to complete the cleanup of highly radioactive tank waste at Hanford; and Transitioning the Central Plateau. Applying innovative science and technology from national laboratories, universities, and private industry is critical to our complex cleanup mission. The 24 new technologies deployed in FY 2000 are significantly higher than our goal of 14 technological deployments. Eleven of these technologies supported restoring the Columbia River Corridor, and seven were involved with the remediation of radioactive tank waste. These deployments produced valuable information to determine the effectiveness of the new technologies in the field and the efficiencies gained over existing cleanup methods. In several cases, the technology deployed presented a solution to a problem where a clear path of remediation had not yet been determined. New and innovative technologies will play a significant role in the cleanup of the Hanford Site and enable remediation to be done more efficiently. Technology is being developed at a staggering pace. This requires excellent communication throughout the scientific and industry arenas. To effect this communication, we have implemented a technology needs process in conjunction with the multi-year work planning process. Through the combination of these two processes, technology developments and deployments address the near-term technology needs and enable us to plan for the

  18. Deployment, Design, and Commercialization of Carbon-Negative Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Daniel Lucio

    Climate change mitigation requires gigaton-scale carbon dioxide removal technologies, yet few examples exist beyond niche markets. This dissertation informs large-scale implementation of bioenergy with carbon capture and sequestration (BECCS), a carbon-negative energy technology. It builds on existing literature with a novel focus on deployment, design, commercialization, and communication of BECCS. BECCS, combined with aggressive renewable deployment and fossil emission reductions, can enable a carbon-negative power system in Western North America by 2050, with up to 145% emissions reduction from 1990 levels. BECCS complements other sources of renewable energy, and can be deployed in a manner consistent with regional policies and design considerations. The amount of biomass resource available limits the level of fossil CO2 emissions that can still satisfy carbon emissions caps. Offsets produced by BECCS are more valuable to the power system than the electricity it provides. Implied costs of carbon for BECCS are relatively low ( 75/ton CO2 at scale) for a capital-intensive technology. Optimal scales for BECCS are an order of magnitude larger than proposed scales found in existing literature. Deviations from optimal scaled size have little effect on overall systems costs - suggesting that other factors, including regulatory, political, or logistical considerations, may ultimately have a greater influence on plant size than the techno-economic factors considered. The flexibility of thermochemical conversion enables a viable transition pathway for firms, utilities and governments to achieve net-negative CO 2 emissions in production of electricity and fuels given increasingly stringent climate policy. Primary research, development (R&D), and deployment needs are in large-scale biomass logistics, gasification, gas cleaning, and geological CO2 storage. R&D programs, subsidies, and policy that recognize co-conversion processes can support this pathway to commercialization

  19. Industry Research and Recommendations for Small Buildings and Small Portfolios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, Rois [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hendron, Bob [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pless, Shanti [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Huppert, Mark [National Trust for Historic Preservation, Washington, DC (United States); Cochrane, Ric [National Trust for Historic Preservation, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Small buildings have been left behind in the energy efficiency marketplace because financial and technical resources have flowed to larger commercial buildings. DOE's Building Technologies Office works with the commercial building industry to accelerate the uptake of energy efficiency technologies and techniques in existing and new commercial buildings (DOE 2013). BTO recognizes the SBSP sector'spotential for significant energy savings and the need for investments in resources that are tailored to this sector's unique needs. The industry research and recommendations described in this report identify potential approaches and strategic priorities that BTO could explore over the next 3-5 years that will support the implementation of high-potential energy efficiency opportunities for thisimportant sector. DOE is uniquely positioned to provide national leadership, objective information, and innovative tools, technologies, and services to support cost-effective energy savings in the fragmented and complex SBSP sector. Properly deployed, the DOE effort could enhance and complement current energy efficiency approaches. Small portfolios are loosely and qualitatively defined asportfolios of buildings that include only a small number of small buildings. This distinction is important because the report targets portfolio owners and managers who generally do not have staff and other resources to track energy use and pursue energy efficiency solutions.

  20. Hi-g lithium thionyl chloride flat cells for artillery/air delivered expendables. Quarterly report no. 1, 10 October 31-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snuggerud, D.; Surprenant, J.; Waterhouse, R.

    1981-05-01

    Rate capability studies on small prototype cells showed that single anode designs should be adequate for Hi-G rate specifications. Large prototype cells safely delivered 1.6 amps for 6 hours. Design work was begun on seal structures to withstand extreme g forces.

  1. TQM and lean strategy deployment in Italian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarini, Andrea; Baccarani, Claudio

    2016-10-03

    Purpose This paper aims to contribute to the debate concerning total quality management (TQM)-Lean strategy in public healthcare by analyzing the deployment path for implementation, the possible benefits that can be achieved and the encountered pitfalls. Design/methodology/approach Three case studies are drawn from three large Italian hospitals with more than 500 beds each and structured with many departments. The hospitals are located in Tuscany, Italy. These three hospitals have embraced TQM and Lean, starting from strategic objectives and their deployment. At the same time, they have also implemented many TQM-Lean tools. The case studies are based on interviews held with four managers in each of these three public hospitals. Findings Results from the interviews show that there is a specific deployment path for TQM-Lean implementation. The hospitals have also achieved benefits linked to patient satisfaction and improved organizational performances. Problems related to organizational and cultural issues, such as senior managers' commitment, staff management, manufacturing culture and tools adaptation, could affect the benefits. Research limitations/implications The research has been carried out in just three Italian public hospitals. Hence, similar investigations could be managed in other countries. Researchers could also use a larger sample and investigate these issues by means of quantitative inquiry. Practical implications Practitioners could try to apply the deployment path revealed by these case studies in other public and private hospitals. Originality/value The results of this research show that there is a specific, new deployment path for implementing TQM-Lean strategy in some public hospitals.

  2. Reduction of environmental impact by FR cycle deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Atsushi; Nakai, Ryodai

    2005-03-01

    In this report radioactive waste generations in terms of disposal volume or disposal field equivalent, and the radioactive toxicity of HLW are evaluated to clarify the promising nuclear scenario for the sake of realization of sustainable society in 21st century. This analysis was conducted based on the outcomes of the mass flow evaluation tool 'FAMILY-21' which calculates a material balance for TRU in the following scenarios. 1) LWR once-through scenario, 2) Pu partly recycling in LWR scenario, 3) Pu full recycling in LWR scenario, 4) FBR deployment scenario, 5) Interim storage scenario. The result shows that the cumulative area of low level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal field at 2150 in the FR cycle deployment scenario is 1.8 times larger than that in the LWR once-through scenario. The area of LLW disposal field at 2150 is a few km 2 in all the scenarios. In contrast, the cumulative area of high level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal field at 2150 in the FR cycle deployment scenario is less than half of that in the LWR once-through scenario. The area of HLW disposal field at 2150 is about 10 times of the area of LLW disposal field. Moreover, the FR deployment reduces the radioactive toxicity of HLW by U/TRU recycling, and shortens the period to decay under the natural Uranium toxicity level. Considering the area of radioactive waste disposal field and the radioactive toxicity of HLW, the advantage of the FR cycle deployment is indicated quantitatively from the viewpoint of the environmental burden reduction. (author)

  3. Small talk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Przybylski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The poem Small talk conjures up a communicative situation in which the main character, a newcomer from Poland, answers conventional questions related to their country. Bearing in mind the fact that this poem is set during a military dictatorship, superficial interest in his homeland may trigger a feeling of impatience. This is at least the impression formed if we adopt the perspective defined within the romantic tradition, and when taking into account the conventional poetry of martial law in Poland. Nevertheless, Barańczak retains an ironic distance towards such communicative situations and, as a consequence, does not create poetry that meets most readersʼ expectations. His poetic imperative for verbal art to be the expression of mistrust remains valid.

  4. Small Composers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgersen, Sven-Erik; Bruun, Peter; Tjagvad, Mette

    2018-01-01

    the study: What expectations do the class teacher and the professional musicians have to the creative practice, i.e. to the collaboration and to the musical outcome? To which extent do the collaborating partners share a common understanding of the aim, content and method of the workshop? How do the roles......The present chapter discusses roles and responsibilities of the collaborating partners in a creative music workshop called Small Composers. The aim is to be attentive to a number of potential alterations implicated by the collaborating partners’ different backgrounds. The following questions guided...... and responsibilities of the collaborating partners become visible through the practice? How do the professional identities of the teacher and the musicians become visible and what are the implications for the workshop as a musical community of practice?...

  5. EarthScope's Transportable Array: Status of the Alaska Deployment and Guide to Resources for Lower48 Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, R. W.; Woodward, R.; Aderhold, K.; Frassetto, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Alaska Transportable Array deployment is completely installed, totaling 280 stations, with 194 new stations and 86 existing stations, 28 of those upgraded with new sensor emplacement. We briefly summarize the deployment of this seismic network, describe the added meteorological instruments and soil temperature gauges, and review our expectations for operation and demobilization. Curation of data from the contiguous Lower-48 States deployment of Transportable Array (>1800 stations, 2004-2015) has continued with the few gaps in real-time data replaced by locally archived files as well as minor adjustments in metadata. We highlight station digests that provide more detail on the components and settings of individual stations, documentation of standard procedures used throughout the deployment and other resources available online. In cooperation with IRIS DMC, a copy of the complete TA archive for the Lower-48 period has been transferred to a local disk to experiment with data access and software workflows that utilize most or all of the seismic timeseries, in contrast to event segments. Assembling such large datasets reliably - from field stations to a well managed data archive to a user's workspace - is complex. Sharing a curated and defined data volume with researchers is a potentially straightforward way to make data intensive analyses less difficult. We note that data collection within the Lower-48 continues with 160 stations of the N4 network operating at increased sample rates (100 sps) as part of the CEUSN, as operational support transitions from NSF to USGS.

  6. The Eagle’s Nest in the Horn of Africa: US Military Strategic Deployment in Djibouti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degang Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Djibouti is the only country in the world in which US, French, German, Italian, Spanish, and Japanese military forces are stationed simultaneously; China will soon have a presence there as well. The US military deployment in Djibouti has shifted from a soft military presence to an arrangement of significant strategic import, and from a small outpost to a large garrison in the past two decades. The internal dynamics of the US deployment are geopolitical, as the US presence facilitates the carrying out of its strategies regarding antiterrorism, anti-proliferation, the protection of energy investments, and anti-piracy. The external dynamics of the US deployment are geo-economic: the government of Djibouti, as the host nation, reaps economic windfalls from the US presence in this strategically located country. Given that the United States has failed since 2008 to persuade any country on the continent to host AFRICOM, the base in Djibouti is likely to remain the only one in East Africa. Djibouti may be part of a pattern whereby some small African nations, such as São Tomé and Príncipe, collect revenue through the provision of military bases to big powers.

  7. Values of Deploying a Compact Polarimetric Radar to Monitor Extreme Precipitation in a Mountainous Area: Mineral County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, B. L.; Kirstetter, P. E.; Yu, T. Y.; Busto, J.; Speeze, T.; Dennis, J.

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation in mountainous regions can trigger flash floods and landslides especially in areas affected by wildfire. Because of the small space-time scales required for observation, they remain poorly observed. A light-weighted X-band polarimetric radar can rapidly respond to the situation and provide continuous rainfall information with high resolution for flood forecast and emergency management. A preliminary assessment of added values to the operational practice in Mineral county, Colorado was performed in Fall 2014 and Summer 2015 with a transportable polarimetric radar deployed at the Lobo Overlook. This region is one of the numerous areas in the Rocky Mountains where the WSR-88D network does not provide sufficient weather coverage due to blockages, and the limitations have impeded forecasters and local emergency managers from making accurate predictions and issuing weather warnings. High resolution observations were collected to document the precipitation characteristics and demonstrate the added values of deploying a small weather radar in such context. The analysis of the detailed vertical structure of precipitation explain the decreased signal sampled by the operational radars. The specific microphysics analyzed though polarimetry suggest that the operational Z-R relationships may not be appropriate to monitor severe weather over this wildfire affected region. Collaboration with the local emergency managers and the National Weather Service shows the critical value of deploying mobile, polarimetric and unmanned radars in complex terrain. Several selected cases are provided in this paper for illustration.

  8. Assessing Health Outcomes After Environmental Exposures Associated With Open Pit Burning in Deployed US Service Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbeck, Patricia; Hu, Zheng; Mallon, Col Timothy M

    2016-08-01

    This study assessed the long-term health impact of environmental exposures associated with open pit burning in deployed US service members. Two hundred individuals deployed to Balad, Iraq, and Bagram, Afghanistan, with known exposure to open pits, were matched to 200 non-deployed service members. Both cohorts were observed for adverse health outcomes after returning from deployment. Slight increased risks were observed for respiratory diseases in the Bagram cohort (adj RR: 1.259), and for cardiovascular disease in the Balad cohort (adj RR: 1.072), but the findings were not significant. The combined deployed cohort showed lower risks for adverse health outcomes, suggesting a healthy deployer effect. In conclusion, this study did not find significantly increased risks for selected health outcomes after burn pit exposure during deployment among two deployed cohorts compared with a non-deployed cohort.

  9. Fixed-axis electric sail deployment dynamics analysis using hub-mounted momentum control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, JoAnna; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2018-03-01

    The deployment dynamics of a spin stabilized electric sail (E-sail) with a hub-mounted control actuator are investigated. Both radial and tangential deployment mechanisms are considered to take the electric sail from a post-launch stowed configuration to a fully deployed configuration. The tangential configuration assumes the multi-kilometer tethers are wound up on the exterior of the spacecraft hub, similar to yo-yo despinner configurations. The deployment speed is controlled through the hub rate. The radial deployment configuration assumes each tether is on its own spool. Here both the hub and spool rate are control variables. The sensitivity of the deployment behavior to E-sail length, maximum rate and tension parameters is investigated. A constant hub rate deployment is compared to a time varying hub rate that maintains a constant tether tension condition. The deployment time can be reduced by a factor of 2 or more by using a tension controlled deployment configuration.

  10. Performance Analysis of Scheduling Schemes for Femto to Macro Interference Coordination in LTE-Femtocell Deployment Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafina Destiarti Ainul

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Deploying femtocells that have low power level in LTE with small coverage area is an alternative solution for mobile operators to improve indoors network coverage area as well as system capacity. However deploying femtocells (HeNB that were used co-channel frequency, can be brought about interference problem to the Macro BTS (eNB. Close Subscriber Group (CSG of HeNB allows only User equipment (UE to access HeNB. HeNB is the source of interference for UE who cannot access it. Therefore it is necessary for interference coordination methods among the HeNB and eNB. The methods are ICIC (Intercell Interference Coordination and eICIC (enhanced Intercell Interference Coordination.  This paper proposed performance analysis of scheduling schemes for Femto to macro interference coordination that allocated resource in the frequency and time domain using LTE-Femtocell suburban and urban deployment scenario. Simulation result using ICIC methods can improve SINR performance 15.77 % in urban and 28.66 % in suburban, throughput performance 10.11 % in urban and 21.05 % in suburban. eICIC methods can improve SINR performance 17.44 % in urban and 31.14 % in suburban, throughput performance 19.83% in urban and 44.39 % in suburban.The result prove using eICIC method in time domain resource have better performance than using ICIC method in frequency resource. However using eICIC method in suburban deployment scenariocan increase the performance of SINR and throughput more effective than using eICIC method in urban deployment scenario.

  11. Small nonnative fishes as predators of larval razorback suckers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, J.; Mueller, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    The razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus), an endangered big-river fish of the Colorado River basin, has demonstrated no sustainable recruitment in 4 decades, despite presence of spawning adults and larvae. Lack of adequate recruitment has been attributed to several factors, including predation by nonnative fishes. Substantial funding and effort has been expended on mechanically removing nonnative game fishes, typically targeting large predators. As a result, abundance of larger predators has declined, but the abundance of small nonnative fishes has increased in some areas. We conducted laboratory experiments to determine if small nonnative fishes would consume larval razorback suckers. We tested adults of three small species (threadfin shad, Dorosoma petenense; red shiner, Cyprinella lutrensis; fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas) and juveniles of six larger species (common carp, Cyprinus carpio; yellow bullhead, Ameiurus natalis; channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus; rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss; green sunfish, Lepomis cyanellus; bluegill, L. macrochirus). These nonnative fishes span a broad ecological range and are abundant within the historical range of the razorback sucker. All nine species fed on larval razorback suckers (total length, 9-16 mm). Our results suggest that predation by small nonnative fishes could be responsible for limiting recovery of this endangered species.

  12. Robotic arm design for a remotely-deployed, in situ waste characterization probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F.; Haas, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes some design considerations for a system which will combine robotics and laser spectroscopy to produce an in situ monitoring system for heterogeneous waste materials. The new system will provide faster, cheaper, safer, and more complete characterization of mixed solids and liquids stored in tanks and drums or buried in pits. A small, fiberoptic multiprobe that performs Raman and fluorescence measurements of wastes composed of a variety of organic and inorganic compounds will be described. Design considerations for a novel sensor platform that positions and stabilizes the multiprobe relative to the sampling point in order to make accurate spectroscopic measurements and deploys the sensor in hazardous environments with minimal risk to workers will be presented. The core of the platform will be a 3-Degrees-Of-Freedom (3-DOF), spherical coordinate end effector equipped with a proximity sensor that compensates for errors introduced by the flexible nature of the support arm. The platform can be adapted to operate the most robotic deployment systems used in hazardous environments. The multisensor probe will be coupled to remote, portable laser spectrometer systems by a fiber-optic bundle. 5 refs

  13. Antenna Deployment for the Localization of Partial Discharges in Open-Air Substations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Guillermo; Fresno, José Manuel; Sánchez-Fernández, Matilde; Martínez-Tarifa, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Partial discharges are ionization processes inside or on the surface of dielectrics that can unveil insulation problems in electrical equipment. The charge accumulated is released under certain environmental and voltage conditions attacking the insulation both physically and chemically. The final consequence of a continuous occurrence of these events is the breakdown of the dielectric. The electron avalanche provokes a derivative of the electric field with respect to time, creating an electromagnetic impulse that can be detected with antennas. The localization of the source helps in the identification of the piece of equipment that has to be decommissioned. This can be done by deploying antennas and calculating the time difference of arrival (TDOA) of the electromagnetic pulses. However, small errors in this parameter can lead to great displacements of the calculated position of the source. Usually, four antennas are used to find the source but the array geometry has to be correctly deployed to have minimal errors in the localization. This paper demonstrates, by an analysis based on simulation and also experimentally, that the most common layouts are not always the best options and proposes a simple antenna layout to reduce the systematic error in the TDOA calculation due to the positions of the antennas in the array. PMID:27092501

  14. Robotic arm design for a remotely-deployed, in situ waste characterization probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kress, Reid; Haas, John; Jansen, John

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes some design considerations for a system which will combine robotics and laser spectroscopy to produce an in situ monitoring system for heterogeneous waste materials. The new system will provide faster, cheaper) safer, and more complete characterization of mixed solids and liquids stored in tanks and drums or buried in pits. A small, fiberoptic multiprobe that performs Raman and fluorescence measurements of wastes composed of a variety of organic and inorganic compounds will be described. Design considerations for a novel sensor platform that positions and stabilizes the multiprobe relative to the sampling point in order to male accurate spectroscopic measurements and deploys the sensor in hazardous environments with minimal risk to workers will be presented. The core of (he platform will be a 3-Degrees-Of-Freedom (3-DOF), spherical coordinate end effector equipped with a proximity sensor that compensates for errors introduced by the flexible nature of the support arm. The platform can be adapted to operate with most robotic deployment systems used in hazardous environments. The multisensor probe will be coupled to remote, portable laser spectrometer systems by a fiber-optic bundle. (author)

  15. Economic assessment of the IRIS reactor for deployment in Brazil using INPRO methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves Filho, Orlando Joao Agostinho

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the main results of the evaluation of the economic competitiveness of the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) for deployment in Brazil using the assessment methodology developed under the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO), co-ordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). INPRO was initiated in 2001 and has the main objective of helping to ensure that nuclear energy will be available to contribute in a sustainable manner to the energy needs of the 21st century. Among its missions are the development of a methodology to assess innovative nuclear energy systems (INS) on a global, regional and national basis, and to facilitate the co-operation among IAEA Member States for planning the development and deployment of INS. Brazil joined INPRO since its beginning and in 2005 submitted a proposal for the screening assessment of two small-sized integral-type PWR reactors as alternative components of an INS completed with a conventional open nuclear fuel cycle based on enriched uranium. This paper outlines the rationale and the main results of the economic assessment of the IRIS-based INS completed in August 2008. The study concluded that IRIS reference design satisfies most of INPRO criteria in the area of economics. (author)

  16. Keys to successful D and D technology deployments at the INEEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.M.; Meservey, R. H.; Shoemaker, H.

    2000-01-01

    Seven improved decontamination and decommissioning (DandD) technologies were successfully deployed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) during the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) Integrated Decontamination and Decommissioning (IDandD) project. The use of these improved technologies saved the INEEL $462K in fiscal year 1999, and is projected to save about $14M over the next ten years. Since deploying new technologies on DandD projects shows great potential for cost-savings, factors that led to successful deployment have been documented. These factors are described here as they apply to the seven deployments at the INEEL to assist with deployments at other DOE sites

  17. A hybrid fuzzy MCDM approach to maintenance Quality Function Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davy George Valavi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance Quality Function Deployment (MQFD is a model, which enhances the synergic power of Quality Function Deployment (QFD and Total Productive Maintenance (TPM. One of the crucial and important steps during the implementation of MQFD is the determination of the importance or weightages of the critical factors (CF and sub factors (SF. The CFs and SFs have to be compared precisely for the successful implementation of MQFD. The crisp pair-wise comparison in the conventional Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP may be insufficient to determine the degree of weightage of CFs and SFs where vagueness and uncetainties are associated. In this paper, a modification of AHP based MQFD by incorporating fuzzy operations is proposed, which can improve the accuracy of determination of the weightages. A case study showing the applicability of this method is illustrated in this paper.

  18. Design and Development of Mobile Phone Using Quality Function Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Ullah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents design and development of mobile phone using Quality Function Deployment. Quality Function Deployment is one of the total quality management tools used to convert customers’ needs into design specifications. A market survey is conducted to find out the voice of customer. The Voice of the Customer is converted into customers’ needs. Relative importance is assigned to customers’ needs. A list of technical requirements that could fulfill the customers’ needs is produced. A relationship matrix is developed between the customers’ needs and the technical requirements. The relationship matrix is converted into the House of Quality. Output from the House of Quality is used in concept generation of mobile phone. Concept generation is followed by concept selection. Final improved model of the mobile phone is presented.

  19. Clean coal technology deployment: From today into the next millennium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papay, L.T.; Trocki, L.K.; McKinsey, R.R. [Bechtel Technology and Consulting, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Department of Energy`s clean coal technology (CCT) program succeeded in developing more efficient, cleaner, coal-fired electricity options. The Department and its private partners succeeded in the demonstration of CCT -- a major feat that required more than a decade of commitment between them. As with many large-scale capital developments and changes, the market can shift dramatically over the course of the development process. The CCT program was undertaken in an era of unstable oil and gas prices, concern over acid rain, and guaranteed markets for power suppliers. Regulations, fuel prices, emergency of competing technologies, and institutional factors are all affecting the outlook for CCT deployment. The authors identify the major barriers to CCT deployment and then introduce some possible means to surmount the barriers.

  20. NEON's Mobile Deployment Platform: A Resource for Community Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanclements, M.

    2015-12-01

    Here we provide an update on construction and validation of the NEON Mobile Deployment Platforms (MDPs) as well as a description of the infrastructure and sensors available to researchers in the future. The MDPs will provide the means to observe stochastic or spatially important events, gradients, or quantities that cannot be reliably observed using fixed location sampling (e.g. fires and floods). Due to the transient temporal and spatial nature of such events, the MDPs will be designed to accommodate rapid deployment for time periods up to ~ 1 year. Broadly, the MDPs will be comprised of infrastructure and instrumentation capable of functioning individually or in conjunction with one another to support observations of ecological change, as well as education, training and outreach.