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Sample records for small cerebral vessels

  1. What is cerebral small vessel disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    An accumulating amount of evidence suggests that the white matter hyperintensities on T 2 weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging predict an increased risk of dementia and gait disturbance. This state has been proposed as cerebral small vessel disease, including leukoaraiosis, Binswanger's disease, lacunar stroke and cerebral microbleeds. However, the concept of cerebral small vessel disease is still obscure. To understand the cerebral small vessel disease, the precise structure and function of cerebral small vessels must be clarified. Cerebral small vessels include several different arteries which have different anatomical structures and functions. Important functions of the cerebral small vessels are blood-brain barrier and perivasucular drainage of interstitial fluid from the brain parenchyma. Cerebral capillaries and glial endfeet, take an important role for these functions. However, the previous pathological investigations on cerebral small vessels have focused on larger arteries than capillaries. Therefore little is known about the pathology of capillaries in small vessel disease. The recent discoveries of genes which cause the cerebral small vessel disease indicate that the cerebral small vessel diseases are caused by a distinct molecular mechanism. One of the pathological findings in hereditary cerebral small vessel disease is the loss of smooth muscle cells, which is an also well-recognized finding in sporadic cerebral small vessel disease. Since pericytes have similar character with the smooth muscle cells, the pericytes should be investigated in these disorders. In addition, the loss of smooth muscle cells may result in dysfunction of drainage of interstitial fluid from capillaries. The precise correlation between the loss of smooth muscle cells and white matter disease is still unknown. However, the function that is specific to cerebral small vessel may be associated with the pathogenesis of cerebral small vessel disease. (author)

  2. Hypercholesterolemia induced cerebral small vessel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Peter; Schuhmann, Michael K; Garz, Cornelia; Jandke, Solveig; Urlaub, Daniela; Mencl, Stine; Zernecke, Alma; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Carare, Roxana O; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Schreiber, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    While hypercholesterolemia plays a causative role for the development of ischemic stroke in large vessels, its significance for cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) remains unclear. We thus aimed to understand the detailed relationship between hypercholesterolemia and CSVD using the well described Ldlr-/- mouse model. We used Ldlr-/- mice (n = 16) and wild-type (WT) mice (n = 15) at the age of 6 and 12 months. Ldlr-/- mice develop high plasma cholesterol levels following a high fat diet. We analyzed cerebral capillaries and arterioles for intravascular erythrocyte accumulations, thrombotic vessel occlusions, blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction and microbleeds. We found a significant increase in the number of erythrocyte stases in 6 months old Ldlr-/- mice compared to all other groups (P hypercholesterolemia is related to a thrombotic CSVD phenotype, which is different from hypertension-related CSVD that associates with a hemorrhagic CSVD phenotype. Our data demonstrate a relationship between hypercholesterolemia and the development of CSVD. Ldlr-/- mice appear to be an adequate animal model for research into CSVD.

  3. Small white matter lesion detection in cerebral small vessel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafoorian, Mohsen; Karssemeijer, Nico; van Uden, Inge; de Leeuw, Frank E.; Heskes, Tom; Marchiori, Elena; Platel, Bram

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a common finding on magnetic resonance images of elderly people. White matter lesions (WML) are important markers for not only the small vessel disease, but also neuro-degenerative diseases including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Volumetric measurements such as the "total lesion load", have been studied and related to these diseases. With respect to SVD we conjecture that small lesions are important, as they have been observed to grow over time and they form the majority of lesions in number. To study these small lesions they need to be annotated, which is a complex and time-consuming task. Existing (semi) automatic methods have been aimed at volumetric measurements and large lesions, and are not suitable for the detection of small lesions. In this research we established a supervised voxel classification CAD system, optimized and trained to exclusively detect small WMLs. To achieve this, several preprocessing steps were taken, which included a robust standardization of subject intensities to reduce inter-subject intensity variability as much as possible. A number of features that were found to be well identifying small lesions were calculated including multimodal intensities, tissue probabilities, several features for accurate location description, a number of second order derivative features as well as multi-scale annular filter for blobness detection. Only small lesions were used to learn the target concept via Adaboost using random forests as its basic classifiers. Finally the results were evaluated using Free-response receiver operating characteristic.

  4. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup

    2017-01-01

    disturbances. Some also present with extra-cerebral manifestations such as microangiopathy of the eyes and kidneys. Many present with clinically recognizable syndromes. Investigations include a thorough family medical history, medical history, neurological examination, neuroimaging, often supplemented...... is important. Enzyme replacement therapy is possible in Fabry disease, but treatment options remain overall very limited....

  5. Reproducibility and variability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging markers in cerebral small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guio, F. De; Jouvent, E.; Biessels, G.J.; Black, S.E.; Brayne, C.; Chen, C.; Cordonnier, C.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Dichgans, M.; Doubal, F.; Duering, M.; Dufouil, C.; Duzel, E.; Fazekas, F.; Hachinski, V.; Ikram, M.A.; Linn, J.; Matthews, P.M.; Mazoyer, B.; Mok, V.; Norrving, B.; O'Brien, J.T.; Pantoni, L.; Ropele, S.; Sachdev, P.; Schmidt, R.; Seshadri, S.; Smith, E.E.; Sposato, L.A.; Stephan, B.; Swartz, R.H.; Tzourio, C.; Buchem, M. van; Lugt, A. van der; Oostenbrugge, R.; Vernooij, M.W.; Viswanathan, A.; Werring, D.; Wollenweber, F.; Wardlaw, J.M.; Chabriat, H.

    2016-01-01

    Brain imaging is essential for the diagnosis and characterization of cerebral small vessel disease. Several magnetic resonance imaging markers have therefore emerged, providing new information on the diagnosis, progression, and mechanisms of small vessel disease. Yet, the reproducibility of these

  6. Reproducibility and variability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging markers in cerebral small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Guio, F. (François); Jouvent, E. (Eric); G.J. Biessels (Geert Jan); S.E. Black (Sandra); C. Brayne (Carol); C. Chen (Christopher); C. Cordonnier (Charlotte); H.F. de Leeuw (Frank); C. Kubisch (Christian); Doubal, F. (Fergus); Duering, M. (Marco); C. Dufouil (Carole); Duzel, E. (Emrah); F. Fazekas (Franz); V. Hachinski (Vladimir); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); J. Linn (Jennifer); P.M. Matthews (P.); B. Mazoyer (Bernard); Mok, V. (Vincent); B. Norrving (Bo); O'Brien, J.T. (John T.); Pantoni, L. (Leonardo); S. Ropele (Stefan); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); S. Seshadri (Sudha); E.E. Smith (Eric); L.A. Sposato (Luciano A); B.C.M. Stephan; Swartz, R.H. (Richard H.); C. Tzourio (Christophe); M.A. van Buchem (Mark); A. van der Lugt (Aad); R.J. van Oostenbrugge (Robert); M.W. Vernooij (Meike); Viswanathan, A. (Anand); D.J. Werring (David); Wollenweber, F. (Frank); J.M. Wardlaw (J.); Chabriat, H. (Hugues)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBrain imaging is essential for the diagnosis and characterization of cerebral small vessel disease. Several magnetic resonance imaging markers have therefore emerged, providing new information on the diagnosis, progression, and mechanisms of small vessel disease. Yet, the reproducibility

  7. White matters - The influence of cerebral small-vessel disease on depression, cognition and functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grool, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Depression and cognitive impairment are highly prevalent in later life, and frequently co-occur. One of the possible mechanisms that may underlie both conditions is the presence of cerebral small-vessel disease. The presence of cerebral small-vessel disease is strongly associated with common

  8. Loss of white matter integrity is associated with gait disorders in cerebral small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, K.F. de; Tuladhar, A.M.; Norden, A.G.W. van; Norris, D.G.; Zwiers, M.P.; Leeuw, F.E. de

    2011-01-01

    Gait disturbances are common in the elderly. Cerebral small vessel disease, including white matter lesions and lacunars infarcts, is thought to disrupt white matter tracts that connect important motor regions, hence resulting in gait disturbances. Pathological studies have demonstrated abnormalities

  9. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: Cognition, Mood, Daily Functioning, and Imaging Findings from a Small Pilot Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Baker

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral small vessel disease, a leading cause of cognitive decline, is considered a relatively homogeneous disease process, and it can co-occur with Alzheimer’s disease. Clinical reports of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI/computed tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT imaging and neuropsychology testing for a small pilot sample of 14 patients are presented to illustrate disease characteristics through findings from structural and functional imaging and cognitive assessment. Participants showed some decreases in executive functioning, attention, processing speed, and memory retrieval, consistent with previous literature. An older subgroup showed lower age-corrected scores at a single time point compared to younger participants. Performance on a computer-administered cognitive measure showed a slight overall decline over a period of 8–28 months. For a case study with mild neuropsychology findings, the MRI report was normal while the SPECT report identified perfusion abnormalities. Future research can test whether advances in imaging analysis allow for identification of cerebral small vessel disease before changes are detected in cognition.

  10. Baseline Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Is Not Associated with Gait Decline After Five Years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Holst, Helena M.; Van Uden, Ingeborg W.M.; de Laat, Karlijn F.; Van Leijsen, Esther M.C.; van Norden, Anouk G.W.; Norris, David G.; Van DIjk, Ewoud J.; Tuladhar, Anil M.; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik

    2017-01-01

    Background Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is cross-sectionally associated with gait disturbances, however, the relation between baseline SVD and gait decline over time is uncertain. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies on gait decline are currently lacking. Objective To

  11. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in cerebral small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenner, D.; Labreuche, J.; Pico, F.; Scheltens, P.; Poirier, O.; Cambien, F.; Amarenco, P.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) appears on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as leukoaraiosis (LA), état criblé (EC), and multiple lacunar infarctions (MLI). Although the pathophysiology of SVD is poorly understood, there is evidence of a genetic contribution. We sought to analyze

  12. Cerebral blood flow control in small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Y.S.

    2014-01-01

    In normal conditions CBF is maintained over a wide range of perfusion pressures (ca. 60~150 mm Hg) by two main control systems, i.e. mechanoregulation, referring to CA, and chemoregulation, also known as cerebrovascular CO2 responsiveness reflecting the vasodilatory capacity of the cerebral

  13. Hypertension-Induced Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Leading to Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Dong, Yan-Hong; Lyu, Pei-Yuan; Chen, Wei-Hong; Li, Rui

    2018-03-05

    Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia are responsible for more than 80% of dementia cases. These two conditions share common risk factors including hypertension. Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is strongly associated with both hypertension and cognitive impairment. In this review, we identify the pathophysiological changes in CSVD that are caused by hypertension and further explore the relationship between CSVD and cognitive impairment. We searched and scanned the PubMed database for recently published literatures up to December 2017. We used the keywords of "hypertension", "cerebral small vessel disease", "white matter lesions", "enlarged perivascular spaces", "lacunar infarcts", "cerebral microbleeds", and "cognitive impairment" in the database of PubMed. Articles were obtained and reviewed to analyze the hypertension-induced pathophysiological changes that occur in CSVD and the correlation between CSVD and cognitive impairment. In recent years, studies have demonstrated that hypertension-related changes (e.g., small vascular lesions, inflammatory reactions, hypoperfusion, oxidative stress, damage to autoregulatory processes and the blood-brain barrier, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy) can occur over time in cerebral small vessels, potentially leading to lower cognitive function when blood pressure (BP) control is poor or lacking. Both isolated and co-occurrent CSVD can lead to cognitive deterioration, and this effect may be attributable to a dysfunction in either the cholinergic system or the functionality of cortical and subcortical tracts. We explore the currently available evidence about the hypertensive vasculopathy and inflammatory changes that occur in CSVD. Both are vital prognostic indicators of the development of cognitive impairment. Future studies should be performed to validate the relationship between BP levels and CSVD progression and between the numbers, volumes, and anatomical locations of CSVD and cognitive impairment.

  14. Associations Between Cerebral Small-Vessel Disease and Alzheimer Disease Pathology as Measured by Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, M.I.; Goos, J.D.C.; Teunissen, C.E.; Benedictus, M.R.; Bouwman, F.H.; Wattjes, M.P.; Barkhof, F.; Scheltens, P.; van der Flier, W.M.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: It remains unclear if and how associations between cerebral small-vessel disease and Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology lead to cognitive decline and dementia. OBJECTIVE: To determine associations between small-vessel disease and AD pathology. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

  15. Alterations of the cerebral cortex in sporadic small vessel disease: A systematic review of in vivo MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Roxane; De Guio, François; Chabriat, Hugues; Jouvent, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel diseases of the brain are a major determinant of cognitive impairment in the elderly. In small vessel diseases, the most easily identifiable lesions, both at post-mortem evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging, lie in subcortical areas. However, recent results obtained post-mortem, particularly in severe cases, have highlighted the burden of cortex lesions such as microinfarcts and diffuse neuronal loss. The recent development of image post-processing methods allows now assessing in vivo multiple aspects of the cerebral cortex. This systematic review aimed to analyze in vivo magnetic resonance imaging studies evaluating cortex alterations at different stages of small vessel diseases. Studies assessing the relationships between small vessel disease magnetic resonance imaging markers obtained at the subcortical level and cortex estimates were reviewed both in community-dwelling elderly and in patients with symptomatic small vessel diseases. Thereafter, studies analyzing cortex estimates in small vessel disease patients compared with healthy subjects were evaluated. The results support that important cortex alterations develop along the course of small vessel diseases independently of concomitant neurodegenerative processes. Easy detection and quantification of cortex changes in small vessel diseases as well as understanding their underlying mechanisms are challenging tasks for better understanding cognitive decline in small vessel diseases. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. NADPH Oxidase Activity in Cerebral Arterioles Is a Key Mediator of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease—Implications for Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark F. McCarty

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD, a common feature of brain aging, is characterized by lacunar infarcts, microbleeds, leukoaraiosis, and a leaky blood-brain barrier. Functionally, it is associated with cognitive decline, dementia, depression, gait abnormalities, and increased risk for stroke. Cerebral arterioles in this syndrome tend to hypertrophy and lose their capacity for adaptive vasodilation. Rodent studies strongly suggest that activation of Nox2-dependent NADPH oxidase activity is a crucial driver of these structural and functional derangements of cerebral arterioles, in part owing to impairment of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS activity. This oxidative stress may also contribute to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier seen in SVD. Hypertension, aging, metabolic syndrome, smoking, hyperglycemia, and elevated homocysteine may promote activation of NADPH oxidase in cerebral arterioles. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase with phycocyanobilin from spirulina, as well as high-dose statin therapy, may have potential for prevention and control of SVD, and high-potassium diets merit study in this regard. Measures which support effective eNOS activity in other ways—exercise training, supplemental citrulline, certain dietary flavonoids (as in cocoa and green tea, and capsaicin, may also improve the function of cerebral arterioles. Asian epidemiology suggests that increased protein intakes may decrease risk for SVD; conceivably, arginine and/or cysteine—which boosts tissue glutathione synthesis, and can be administered as N-acetylcysteine—mediate this benefit. Ameliorating the risk factors for SVD—including hypertension, metabolic syndrome, hyperglycemia, smoking, and elevated homocysteine—also may help to prevent and control this syndrome, although few clinical trials have addressed this issue to date.

  17. NADPH Oxidase Activity in Cerebral Arterioles Is a Key Mediator of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease-Implications for Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F

    2015-04-15

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), a common feature of brain aging, is characterized by lacunar infarcts, microbleeds, leukoaraiosis, and a leaky blood-brain barrier. Functionally, it is associated with cognitive decline, dementia, depression, gait abnormalities, and increased risk for stroke. Cerebral arterioles in this syndrome tend to hypertrophy and lose their capacity for adaptive vasodilation. Rodent studies strongly suggest that activation of Nox2-dependent NADPH oxidase activity is a crucial driver of these structural and functional derangements of cerebral arterioles, in part owing to impairment of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity. This oxidative stress may also contribute to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier seen in SVD. Hypertension, aging, metabolic syndrome, smoking, hyperglycemia, and elevated homocysteine may promote activation of NADPH oxidase in cerebral arterioles. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase with phycocyanobilin from spirulina, as well as high-dose statin therapy, may have potential for prevention and control of SVD, and high-potassium diets merit study in this regard. Measures which support effective eNOS activity in other ways-exercise training, supplemental citrulline, certain dietary flavonoids (as in cocoa and green tea), and capsaicin, may also improve the function of cerebral arterioles. Asian epidemiology suggests that increased protein intakes may decrease risk for SVD; conceivably, arginine and/or cysteine-which boosts tissue glutathione synthesis, and can be administered as N-acetylcysteine-mediate this benefit. Ameliorating the risk factors for SVD-including hypertension, metabolic syndrome, hyperglycemia, smoking, and elevated homocysteine-also may help to prevent and control this syndrome, although few clinical trials have addressed this issue to date.

  18. Blood Pressure Control in Aging Predicts Cerebral Atrophy Related to Small-Vessel White Matter Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle C. Kern

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral small-vessel damage manifests as white matter hyperintensities and cerebral atrophy on brain MRI and is associated with aging, cognitive decline and dementia. We sought to examine the interrelationship of these imaging biomarkers and the influence of hypertension in older individuals. We used a multivariate spatial covariance neuroimaging technique to localize the effects of white matter lesion load on regional gray matter volume and assessed the role of blood pressure control, age and education on this relationship. Using a case-control design matching for age, gender, and educational attainment we selected 64 participants with normal blood pressure, controlled hypertension or uncontrolled hypertension from the Northern Manhattan Study cohort. We applied gray matter voxel-based morphometry with the scaled subprofile model to (1 identify regional covariance patterns of gray matter volume differences associated with white matter lesion load, (2 compare this relationship across blood pressure groups, and (3 relate it to cognitive performance. In this group of participants aged 60–86 years, we identified a pattern of reduced gray matter volume associated with white matter lesion load in bilateral temporal-parietal regions with relative preservation of volume in the basal forebrain, thalami and cingulate cortex. This pattern was expressed most in the uncontrolled hypertension group and least in the normotensives, but was also more evident in older and more educated individuals. Expression of this pattern was associated with worse performance in executive function and memory. In summary, white matter lesions from small-vessel disease are associated with a regional pattern of gray matter atrophy that is mitigated by blood pressure control, exacerbated by aging, and associated with cognitive performance.

  19. Causes and consequences of cerebral small vessel disease. The RUN DMC study: a prospective cohort study. Study rationale and protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norden, A.G.W. van; Laat, K.F. de; Gons, R.A.R.; Uden, I.W.M. van; Dijk, E.J. van; Oudheusden, L.J.B. van; Esselink, R.A.J.; Bloem, B.R.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Zwarts, M.J.; Tendolkar, I.; Olde-Rikkert, M.G.M.; Vlugt, M.J. van der; Zwiers, M.P.; Norris, D.G.; Leeuw, F.E. de

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a frequent finding on CT and MRI scans of elderly people and is related to vascular risk factors and cognitive and motor impairment, ultimately leading to dementia or parkinsonism in some. In general, the relations are weak, and not all subjects

  20. Characterization of Heterozygous HTRA1 Mutations in Taiwanese Patients With Cerebral Small Vessel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Chung; Chung, Chih-Ping; Chao, Nai-Chen; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Chang, Feng-Chi; Soong, Bing-Wing; Liao, Yi-Chu

    2018-07-01

    Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in the high temperature requirement serine peptidase A1 gene ( HTRA1 ) cause cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy. However, heterozygous HTRA1 mutations were recently identified to be associated with autosomal dominant cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). The present study aims at investigating the clinical features, frequency, and spectrum of HTRA1 mutations in a Taiwanese cohort with SVD. Mutational analyses of HTRA1 were performed by Sanger sequencing in 222 subjects, selected from a cohort of 337 unrelated patients with SVD after excluding those harboring a NOTCH3 mutation. The influence of these mutations on HTRA1 protease activities was characterized. Seven novel heterozygous mutations in HTRA1 were identified, including p.Gly120Asp, p.Ile179Asn, p.Ala182Profs*33, p.Ile256Thr, p.Gly276Ala, p.Gln289Ter, and p.Asn324Thr, and each was identified in 1 single index patient. All mutations significantly compromise the HTRA1 protease activities. For the 7 index cases and another 2 affected siblings carrying a heterozygous HTRA1 mutation, the common clinical presentations include lacunar infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, cognitive decline, and spondylosis at the fifth to sixth decade of life. Among the 9 patients, 4 have psychiatric symptoms as delusion, depression, and compulsive behavior, 3 have leukoencephalopathy in anterior temporal poles, and 2 patients have alopecia. Heterozygous HTRA1 mutations account for 2.08% (7 of 337) of SVD in Taiwan. The clinical and neuroradiological features of HTRA1 -related SVD and sporadic SVD are similar. These findings broaden the mutational spectrum of HTRA1 and highlight the pathogenic role of heterozygous HTRA1 mutations in SVD. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Burden Is Associated With Poststroke Depressive Symptoms: A 15-Month Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: All types of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD markers including lacune, white matter hyperintensities (WMH, cerebral microbleeds, and perivascular spaces were found to be associated with poststroke depressive symptoms (PDS. This study explored whether the combination of the four markers constituting an overall SVD burden was associated with PDS.Methods: A cohort of 563 patients with acute ischemic stroke were followed over a 15-month period after the index stroke. A score of ≥7 on the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale was defined as clinically significant PDS. Scores of the four SVD markers ascertained on magnetic resonance imaging were summed up to represent total SVD burden. The association between SVD burden and PDS was assessed with generalized estimating equation models.Results: The study sample had a mean age of 67.0 ± 10.2 years and mild-moderate stroke [National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score: 3, interquartile, 1–5]. PDS were found in 18.3%, 11.6%, and 12.3% of the sample at 3, 9, and 15 months after stroke, respectively. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, vascular risk factors, social support, stroke severity, physical and cognitive functions, and size and locations of stroke, the SVD burden was associated with an increased risk of PDS [odds ratio = 1.30; 95% confidence interval = 1.07–1.58; p = 0.010]. Other significant predictors of PDS were time of assessment, female sex, smoking, number of acute infarcts, functional independence, and social support.Conclusion: SVD burden was associated with PDS examined over a 15-month follow-up in patients with mild to moderate acute ischemic stroke.

  2. [Management of cerebral small vessel disease for the diagnosis and treatment of dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Masafumi

    2013-07-01

    With the demographic shift in life expectancy inexorably increasing in developed countries, dementia is set to become one of the most important health problems worldwide. In recent years, cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) has received much attention as an important cause of dementia. The reason for this is twofold: firstly, arteriosclerosis (type 1 SVD) is the leading cause of vascular cognitive impairment, and secondly, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA; type 2 SVD) is an almost invariable accompaniment of Alzheimer's disease. SVD is known to induce a variety of pathological changes; for example, type 1 SVD results in lacunar infarction, deep microbleeds, and white matter damage, while type 2 SVD leads to cortical microinfarcts, lobar microbleeds, and white matter damage. SVD is considered a spectrum of abnormalities, with the majority of patients experiencing symptoms from both type 1 and type 2 SVD as the disease progresses. The discouraging results of immunotherapy clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease have shifted the scientific attention from the classical neuron-centric approach towards a novel neurovascular approach. As arteries stiffen with age or with other co-morbid factors such as life-related diseases, amyloid β (Aβ) synthesis becomes upregulated, resulting in the deposition of insoluble Aβ not only in the parenchyma as senile plaques but also in the perivascular drainage pathways as CAA. Therefore, therapeutic strategies such as vasoactive drugs that enhance the patency of this Aβ drainage pathway may facilitate Aβ removal and help prevent cognitive decline in the elderly. Based on this emerging paradigm, clinical trials are warranted to investigate whether a neurovascular therapeutic approach can effectively halt cognitive decline and act as a preemptive medicine for patients at risk of dementia.

  3. Apathy, but not depression, is associated with executive dysfunction in cerebral small vessel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohner, Valerie; Brookes, Rebecca L; Hollocks, Matthew J; Morris, Robin G; Markus, Hugh S

    2017-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of apathy and depression in cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), and the relationships between both apathy and depression with cognition. To examine whether apathy is specifically related to impairment in executive functioning and processing speed. 196 patients with a clinical lacunar stroke and an anatomically corresponding lacunar infarct on MRI were compared to 300 stroke-free controls. Apathy and depression were measured using the Geriatric Depression Scale, and cognitive functioning was assessed using an SVD cognitive screening tool, the Brief Memory and Executive Test, which measures executive functioning/processing speed and memory/orientation. Path analysis and binary logistic regression were used to assess the relation between apathy, depression and cognitive impairment. 31 participants with SVD (15.8%) met criteria for apathy only, 23 (11.8%) for both apathy and depression, and 2 (1.0%) for depression only. In the SVD group the presence of apathy was related to global cognition, and specifically to impaired executive functioning/processing speed, but not memory/orientation. The presence of depression was not related to global cognition, impaired executive functioning/processing speed or memory/orientation. Apathy is a common feature of SVD and is associated with impaired executive functioning/processing speed suggesting the two may share biological mechanisms. Screening for apathy should be considered in SVD, and further work is required to develop and evaluate effective apathy treatment or management in SVD.

  4. Prevalence, risk factors and consequences of cerebral small vessel diseases: data from three Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Saima; Mok, Vincent; Youn, Young Chul; Wong, Adrian; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Chen, Christopher Li-Hsian

    2017-08-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) has been suggested to be more common in Asians compared with Caucasians. However, data from population-based studies in Asia are lacking. We report on the prevalence, risk factors and consequences of SVD from contemporary studies in three Asian countries using 3-Tesla MRI for the evaluation of SVD. Clinical, cognitive and 3-Tesla brain MRI assessments were performed among participants of three studies from Singapore, Hong Kong and Korea. SVD markers include white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) using the modified Fazekas scale, lacunes and microbleeds. Cognition was assessed using the Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Adjustments were made for age, sex and cardiovascular risk factors. A total of 1797 subjects were available for analysis (mean age: 70.1±6.3 years and 57% women). The prevalence of confluent WMH was 36.6%, lacunes, 24.6% and microbleeds, 26.9%. Presence of all three SVD markers showed a steeper increase with increasing age rising from 1.9% in the lowest to 46.2% in the highest 5-year age strata. The major risk factors for the increased severity of SVD markers were advancing age and hypertension. Moreover, increasing severity of SVD markers was independently associated with worse performance on MMSE and MoCA. Elderly Asians have a high burden of SVD which was associated with cognitive dysfunction. This suggests that SVD markers should be a potential target for treatment in clinical trials so as to delay progression of cerebrovascular disease and potentially cognitive decline. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Role of thalamic diffusion for disease differentiation between multiple sclerosis and ischemic cerebral small vessel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeztoprak, Bilge; Oeztoprak, Ibrahim; Salk, Ismail; Topalkara, Kamil; Erkoc, Mustafa F.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) and multiple sclerosis (MS) both harbor multiple, T2-hyperintense white matter lesions on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).We aimed to determine the microstructural changes via diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in normal appearing thalami. We hypothesized that the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values would be different in CSVD and MS, since the extent of arterial involvement is different in these two diseases. DWI was performed for 50 patients with CSVD and 35 patients with MS along with gender- and age-matched controls whose conventional MRI revealed normal findings. DWI was done with 1.5 Tesla MR devices using echo planar imaging (EPI) for b = 0, 1000 s/mm 2 . ADC values were obtained from the thalami which appeared normal on T2-weighted and FLAIR images. Standard oval regions of interest (ROIs) of 0.5 cm 2 which were oriented parallel to the long axis of the thalamus were used for this purpose. The mean ADC value of the thalamus was (0.99 ± 0.16) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s in patients with CSVD, whereas the mean ADC value was (0.78 ± 0.06) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s in the control group. The mean ADC value was significantly higher in patients with CSVD compared to the controls (p < 0.001). The mean ADC values of the thalamus were (0.78 ± 0.08) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s in MS patients, and (0.75 ± 0.08) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s in the control group, which are not significantly different (p > 0.05). Our study revealed a difference in the diffusion of the thalami between CSVD and MS. DWI may aid in the radiological disease differentiation. (orig.)

  6. Pattern and Rate of Cognitive Decline in Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: A Prospective Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Lawrence

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment, predominantly affecting processing speed and executive function, is an important consequence of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD. To date, few longitudinal studies of cognition in SVD have been conducted. We determined the pattern and rate of cognitive decline in SVD and used the results to determine sample size calculations for clinical trials of interventions reducing cognitive decline.121 patients with MRI confirmed lacunar stroke and leukoaraiosis were enrolled into the prospective St George's Cognition And Neuroimaging in Stroke (SCANS study. Patients attended one baseline and three annual cognitive assessments providing 36 month follow-up data. Neuropsychological assessment comprised a battery of tests assessing working memory, long-term (episodic memory, processing speed and executive function. We calculated annualized change in cognition for the 98 patients who completed at least two time-points.Task performance was heterogeneous, but significant cognitive decline was found for the executive function index (p<0.007. Working memory and processing speed decreased numerically, but not significantly. The executive function composite score would require the smallest samples sizes for a treatment trial with an aim of halting decline, but this would still require over 2,000 patients per arm to detect a 30% difference with power of 0.8 over a three year follow-up.The pattern of cognitive decline seen in SVD over three years is consistent with the pattern of impairments at baseline. Rates of decline were slow and sample sizes would need to be large for clinical trials aimed at halting decline beyond initial diagnosis using cognitive scores as an outcome measure. This emphasizes the importance of more sensitive surrogate markers in this disease.

  7. Role of thalamic diffusion for disease differentiation between multiple sclerosis and ischemic cerebral small vessel disease

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    Oeztoprak, Bilge; Oeztoprak, Ibrahim; Salk, Ismail [Cumhuriyet University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sivas (Turkey); Topalkara, Kamil [Bayindir Hospital, Department of Neurology, Ankara (Turkey); Erkoc, Mustafa F. [Bozok University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yozgat (Turkey)

    2015-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) and multiple sclerosis (MS) both harbor multiple, T2-hyperintense white matter lesions on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).We aimed to determine the microstructural changes via diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in normal appearing thalami. We hypothesized that the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values would be different in CSVD and MS, since the extent of arterial involvement is different in these two diseases. DWI was performed for 50 patients with CSVD and 35 patients with MS along with gender- and age-matched controls whose conventional MRI revealed normal findings. DWI was done with 1.5 Tesla MR devices using echo planar imaging (EPI) for b = 0, 1000 s/mm{sup 2}. ADC values were obtained from the thalami which appeared normal on T2-weighted and FLAIR images. Standard oval regions of interest (ROIs) of 0.5 cm{sup 2} which were oriented parallel to the long axis of the thalamus were used for this purpose. The mean ADC value of the thalamus was (0.99 ± 0.16) x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in patients with CSVD, whereas the mean ADC value was (0.78 ± 0.06) x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in the control group. The mean ADC value was significantly higher in patients with CSVD compared to the controls (p < 0.001). The mean ADC values of the thalamus were (0.78 ± 0.08) x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in MS patients, and (0.75 ± 0.08) x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in the control group, which are not significantly different (p > 0.05). Our study revealed a difference in the diffusion of the thalami between CSVD and MS. DWI may aid in the radiological disease differentiation. (orig.)

  8. Utilization of self-expanding stents in the treatment of intracranial atherosclerotic disease in the distal small cerebral vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turk, Aquilla S.; Niemann, David B.; Aagaard-Kienitz, Beverly; Ahmed, Azam; Brooks, Nathaniel; Levine, Ross L.

    2007-01-01

    Previously, endovascular treatment of stenosis related to intracranial atherosclerosis (ICAD) involving arteries measuring less than 2 mm in diameter was limited. To our knowledge, there are no reports in the literature addressing stent placement for treatment of stenosis in arteries of this size. Four patients aged 33 to 80 years (mean 57.5 years) with medically refractory ICAD underwent angioplasty and stenting of small (<2 mm) distal intracerebral arteries. Vessel location and length of follow-up were anterior cerebral artery (ACA) A1 segment (5 months), ACA A2 segment (18 months), middle cerebral artery M1 segment (18 months), and posterior cerebral artery P1 segment (8 months) with vessel calibers ranging from 1.2 to 1.8 mm. Clinical and imaging follow-up ranged from 5 to 18 months. All procedures were successfully performed without complications. Follow-up out to 18 months demonstrated one vessel that went on to occlusion while the other stented vessel segments remained patent. One patient died 8 months after stenting, but the death was not related to neurological disease. The remaining patients experienced resolution of the presenting symptomatology and remained asymptomatic throughout follow-up. In this small series, stenoses of distal (<2 mm) cerebral arteries were amenable to treatment using new self-expanding stents. We safely and successfully treated four arteries smaller than 2 mm in diameter with newer self-expanding stents. All patients remained clinically asymptomatic. One stent occluded at 5 months and the others remained patent during follow-up. Longer term clinical follow-up is required to determine the durability and viability of this therapy. (orig.)

  9. Clinical and magnetic resonance observations in cerebral small-vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwa, V.I.H.

    1999-01-01

    The study reported in this thesis tried to address the following questions: 1. Is it possible to detect genetic factors and vascular risk factors that are specifically associated with the development of small- or large-vessel disease? 2. Are the different clinical and MRI manifestations, that are

  10. Size ratio performance in detecting cerebral aneurysm rupture status is insensitive to small vessel removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauric, Alexandra; Baharoglu, Merih I; Malek, Adel M

    2013-04-01

    The variable definition of size ratio (SR) for sidewall (SW) vs bifurcation (BIF) aneurysms raises confusion for lesions harboring small branches, such as carotid ophthalmic or posterior communicating locations. These aneurysms are considered SW by many clinicians, but SR methodology classifies them as BIF. To evaluate the effect of ignoring small vessels and SW vs stringent BIF labeling on SR ruptured aneurysm detection performance in borderline aneurysms with small branches, and to reconcile SR-based labeling with clinical SW/BIF classification. Catheter rotational angiographic datasets of 134 consecutive aneurysms (60 ruptured) were automatically measured in 3-dimensional. Stringent BIF labeling was applied to clinically labeled aneurysms, with 21 aneurysms switching label from SW to BIF. Parent vessel size was evaluated both taking into account, and ignoring, small vessels. SR was defined accordingly as the ratio between aneurysm and parent vessel sizes. Univariate and multivariate statistics identified significant features. The square of the correlation coefficient (R(2)) was reported for bivariate analysis of alternative SR calculations. Regardless of SW/BIF labeling method, SR was equally significant in discriminating aneurysm ruptured status (P analysis of alternative SR had a high correlation of R(2) = 0.94 on the whole dataset, and R = 0.98 on the 21 borderline aneurysms. Ignoring small branches from SR calculation maintains rupture status detection performance, while reducing postprocessing complexity and removing labeling ambiguity. Aneurysms adjacent to these vessels can be considered SW for morphometric analysis. It is reasonable to use the clinical SW/BIF labeling when using SR for rupture risk evaluation.

  11. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Gene Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism and Small Vessel Cerebral Stroke in Indian Population

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    Puttachandra Prabhakar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hypertension is an established risk factor for small-vessel cerebral stroke and the renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in the maintenance of blood pressure. We aimed at evaluating the contribution of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE gene insertion/deletion (I/D polymorphism to the risk of small-vessel stroke in south Indian population. Materials and Methods. We investigated 128 patients diagnosed with small-vessel stroke and 236 age, and gender-matched healthy controls. ACE I/D polymorphism was detected by polymerase chain reaction. Results. Hypertension was significantly more prevalent in the patient group and was associated with 6-fold increase in risk for stroke. ACE genotypes were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in both patients and controls. Prevalence of DD, ID, and II genotypes in cases (34.4%, 43.7%, and 28% did not differ significantly from controls (31.8%, 43.2%, and 25%. The polymorphism was not associated with small-vessel stroke (OR: 1.34; 95% CI: 0.52–1.55. However, diastolic blood pressure was associated with the ACE I/D genotypes in the patients. (DD; 90.2±14.2> ID; 86.2±11.9> II; 82.3±7.8 mm Hg,  P=0.047. Conclusion. Our study showed that hypertension, but not ACE I/D polymorphism, increased the risk of small-vessel stroke.

  12. Relationship between cerebral blood flow and later cognitive decline in hypertensive patients with cerebral small vessel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Kazuo; Oku, Naohiko; Yagita, Yoshiki; Sakaguchi, Manabu; Sakoda, Saburo; Kimura, Yasuyuku; Hatazawa, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Vascular risk factors are thought to be important for dementia. However, there is little evidence for a prospective association between cerebral blood flow and the risk of cognitive decline. Twenty-seven cognitively intact hypertensive patients aged 55 years and older with lacunar infarction or white matter lesions in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) underwent positron emission tomography (PET) to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR). Cognitive function was assessed at baseline and 3 years later with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE). Patients whose MMSE score fell by more than three points were classified as having cognitive decline. Six patients showed cognitive decline. Baseline CBF in these patients was significantly lower than that of the 21 patients without cognitive decline (31.2±2.4 vs. 42.6±5.9 ml per 100 gmin -1 , respectively; P<0.001). A moderate linear association was found between CBF and change in MMSE score over a 3-year period (r=0.59, P=0.001), not between CBF and baseline MMSE score. In contrast, no association between CVR and later cognitive decline was found. This study suggests that cerebral hypoperfusion is associated with later cognitive decline. (author)

  13. Vitamin D status and vascular dementia due to cerebral small vessel disease in the elderly Asian Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Puttachandra; Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Supriya, Manjunath; Issac, Thomas Gregor; Prasad, Chandrajit; Christopher, Rita

    2015-12-15

    Vitamin D plays vital roles in human health and recent studies have shown its beneficial effect on brain functioning. The present study was designed to evaluate the association of vitamin D with vascular dementia (VaD) due to cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) in Asian Indian population. 140 VaD patients aged ≥ 60 years with neuroimaging evidence of SVD, and 132 age and gender-matched controls, were investigated. Vitamin D status was estimated by measuring serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D. Logistic regression model revealed that deficient levels of vitamin D (vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency (12-20 ng/ml), the odds were increased to 31.6-fold and 14.4-fold, respectively. However, in hypertensives with vitamin D sufficiency (>20 ng/ml), the odds of VaD were increased by 3.8-fold only. Pearson correlation showed that serum vitamin D was inversely associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (r=-0.401 and -0.411, pvitamin D-deficient subjects. Since the combined presence of hypertension and vitamin D deficiency increases the probability of developing VaD, screening for vitamin D status in addition to regular monitoring of blood pressure, could reduce the risk of VaD associated with cerebral SVD in the elderly Asian Indian subjects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cortical changes in cerebral small vessel diseases: a 3D MRI study of cortical morphology in CADASIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouvent, E.; Bousser, M.G.; Chabriat, H.; Jouvent, E.; Bousser, M.G.; Chabriat, H.; Porcher, R.; Viswanathan, A.; Viswanathan, A.; Viswanathan, A.; O'Sullivan, M.; Dichgans, M.; Guichard, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    Brain atrophy represents a key marker of disease progression in cerebrovascular disorders. The 3D changes of cortex morphology occurring during the course of small vessel diseases of the brain (SVDB) remain poorly understood. The objective of this study was to assess the changes affecting depth and surface area of cortical sulci and their clinical and radiological correlates in a cohort of patients with cerebral autosomal dominant arteriolopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a genetic SVDB. Data were obtained from a series of 69 CADASIL patients. Validated methods were used to determine depth and surface area of four cortical sulci. The ratio of brain to intracranial cavity volumes (brain parenchymal fraction-BPF), volume of lacunar lesions (LL) and of white matter hyper-intensities, number of cerebral micro-haemorrhages, and mean apparent diffusion coefficient were also measured. Association between depth and surface area of the cortical sulci and BPF, clinical status and subcortical MRI lesions were tested. Depth and surface area of cortical sulci obtained in 54 patients were strongly correlated with both cognitive score and disability scales. Depth was related to the extent of subcortical lesions, surface area was related only to age. In additional analyses, the depth of the cingular sulcus was independently associated with the volume of LL (P 0.001), and that of the superior frontal sulcus with the mean apparent diffusion coefficient (P 0.003). In CADASIL, important morphological changes of cortical sulci occur in association with clinical worsening,extension of subcortical tissue damage and progression of global cerebral atrophy. These results suggest that the examination of cortical morphology may be of high clinical relevance in SVDB. (authors)

  15. Total Cerebral Small Vessel Disease MRI Score Is Associated With Cognitive Decline In Executive Function In Patients With Hypertension

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    Renske Uiterwijk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hypertension is a major risk factor for white matter hyperintensities, lacunes, cerebral microbleeds and perivascular spaces, which are MRI markers of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD. Studies have shown associations between these individual MRI markers and cognitive functioning and decline. Recently, a total SVD score was proposed in which the different MRI markers were combined into one measure of SVD, to capture total SVD-related brain damage. We investigated if this SVD score was associated with cognitive decline over 4 years in patients with hypertension. Methods: In this longitudinal cohort study, 130 hypertensive patients (91 patients with uncomplicated hypertension and 39 hypertensive patients with a lacunar stroke were included. They underwent a neuropsychological assessment at baseline and after 4 years. The presence of white matter hyperintensities, lacunes, cerebral microbleeds, and perivascular spaces were rated on baseline MRI. Presence of each individual marker was added to calculate the total SVD score (range 0-4 in each patient. Results: Uncorrected linear regression analyses showed associations between SVD score and decline in overall cognition (p=0.017, executive functioning (p<0.001 and information processing speed (p=0.037, but not with memory (p=0.911. The association between SVD score and decline in overall cognition and executive function remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, education, anxiety and depression score, potential vascular risk factors, patient group and baseline cognitive performance.Conclusions: Our study shows that a total SVD score can predict cognitive decline, specifically in executive function, over 4 years in hypertensive patients. This emphasizes the importance of considering total brain damage due to SVD.

  16. Cerebral White Matter Hypoperfusion Increases with Small-Vessel Disease Burden. Data From the Third International Stroke Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arba, Francesco; Mair, Grant; Carpenter, Trevor; Sakka, Eleni; Sandercock, Peter A G; Lindley, Richard I; Inzitari, Domenico; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2017-07-01

    Leukoaraiosis is associated with impaired cerebral perfusion, but the effect of individual and combined small-vessel disease (SVD) features on white matter perfusion is unclear. We studied patients recruited with perfusion imaging in the Third International Stroke Trial. We rated individual SVD features (leukoaraiosis, lacunes) and brain atrophy on baseline plain computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Separately, we assessed white matter at the level of the lateral ventricles in the cerebral hemisphere contralateral to the stroke for visible areas of hypoperfusion (present or absent) on 4 time-based perfusion imaging parameters. We examined associations between SVD features (individually and summed) and presence of hypoperfusion using logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, hypertension, and diabetes. A total of 115 patients with median (interquartile range) age of 81 (72-86) years, 78 (52%) of which were male, had complete perfusion data. Hypoperfusion was most frequent on mean transit time (MTT; 63 patients, 55%) and least frequent on time to maximum flow (19 patients, 17%). The SVD score showed stronger independent associations with hypoperfusion (e.g., MTT, odds ratio [OR] = 2.80; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.56-5.03) than individual SVD markers (e.g., white matter hypoattenuation score, MTT, OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.09-2.04). Baseline blood pressure did not differ by presence or absence of hypoperfusion or across strata of SVD score. Presence of white matter hypoperfusion increased with SVD summed score. The SVD summed score was associated with hypoperfusion more consistently than individual SVD features, providing validity to the SVD score concept. Increasing SVD burden indicates worse perfusion in the white matter. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Causes and consequences of cerebral small vessel disease. The RUN DMC study: a prospective cohort study. Study rationale and protocol

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    van der Vlugt Maureen J

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD is a frequent finding on CT and MRI scans of elderly people and is related to vascular risk factors and cognitive and motor impairment, ultimately leading to dementia or parkinsonism in some. In general, the relations are weak, and not all subjects with SVD become demented or get parkinsonism. This might be explained by the diversity of underlying pathology of both white matter lesions (WML and the normal appearing white matter (NAWM. Both cannot be properly appreciated with conventional MRI. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI provides alternative information on microstructural white matter integrity. The association between SVD, its microstructural integrity, and incident dementia and parkinsonism has never been investigated. Methods/Design The RUN DMC study is a prospective cohort study on the risk factors and cognitive and motor consequences of brain changes among 503 non-demented elderly, aged between 50-85 years, with cerebral SVD. First follow up is being prepared for July 2011. Participants alive will be included and invited to the research centre to undergo a structured questionnaire on demographics and vascular risk factors, and a cognitive, and motor, assessment, followed by a MRI protocol including conventional MRI, DTI and resting state fMRI. Discussion The follow up of the RUN DMC study has the potential to further unravel the causes and possibly better predict the consequences of changes in white matter integrity in elderly with SVD by using relatively new imaging techniques. When proven, these changes might function as a surrogate endpoint for cognitive and motor function in future therapeutic trials. Our data could furthermore provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of cognitive and motor disturbances in elderly with SVD. The execution and completion of the follow up of our study might ultimately unravel the role of SVD on the microstructural integrity of the white

  18. Causes and consequences of cerebral small vessel disease. The RUN DMC study: a prospective cohort study. Study rationale and protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Norden, Anouk Gw; de Laat, Karlijn F; Gons, Rob Ar; van Uden, Inge Wm; van Dijk, Ewoud J; van Oudheusden, Lucas Jb; Esselink, Rianne Aj; Bloem, Bastiaan R; van Engelen, Baziel Gm; Zwarts, Machiel J; Tendolkar, Indira; Olde-Rikkert, Marcel G; van der Vlugt, Maureen J; Zwiers, Marcel P; Norris, David G; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik

    2011-02-28

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a frequent finding on CT and MRI scans of elderly people and is related to vascular risk factors and cognitive and motor impairment, ultimately leading to dementia or parkinsonism in some. In general, the relations are weak, and not all subjects with SVD become demented or get parkinsonism. This might be explained by the diversity of underlying pathology of both white matter lesions (WML) and the normal appearing white matter (NAWM). Both cannot be properly appreciated with conventional MRI. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides alternative information on microstructural white matter integrity. The association between SVD, its microstructural integrity, and incident dementia and parkinsonism has never been investigated. The RUN DMC study is a prospective cohort study on the risk factors and cognitive and motor consequences of brain changes among 503 non-demented elderly, aged between 50-85 years, with cerebral SVD. First follow up is being prepared for July 2011. Participants alive will be included and invited to the research centre to undergo a structured questionnaire on demographics and vascular risk factors, and a cognitive, and motor, assessment, followed by a MRI protocol including conventional MRI, DTI and resting state fMRI. The follow up of the RUN DMC study has the potential to further unravel the causes and possibly better predict the consequences of changes in white matter integrity in elderly with SVD by using relatively new imaging techniques. When proven, these changes might function as a surrogate endpoint for cognitive and motor function in future therapeutic trials. Our data could furthermore provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of cognitive and motor disturbances in elderly with SVD. The execution and completion of the follow up of our study might ultimately unravel the role of SVD on the microstructural integrity of the white matter in the transition from "normal" aging to cognitive and

  19. Association of Chronic Kidney Disease and Cerebral Small Vessel Disease with Cognitive Impairment in Elderly Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshitaka Umemura

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In recent years, the relationship between chronic kidney disease (CKD and cognitive impairment has been attracting attention. Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD is also associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. However, it is still unknown whether CKD markers are associated with cognitive impairment independently of SVD in elderly diabetic patients. Methods: Seventy-nine type 2 diabetic patients (mean age, 76.0 years were enrolled in the present study. CKD was defined as the presence of albuminuria and/or a low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR 2. SVD was evaluated by the presence and severity of silent brain infarcts (SBIs and white matter lesions (WMLs on brain magnetic resonance imaging. Neuropsychological tests were assessed using four validated cognitive instruments. Results: In multiple linear regression analyses, albuminuria was associated with worse modified Stroop Color Word scores (β = 0.284, p = 0.017 and low eGFR was associated with reduced Digit Symbol Substitution scores (β = -0.224, p = 0.026 after adjustment for age, sex, education years, diabetes duration, hypertension, multiple SBIs, and advanced WMLs. In contrast, there were no significant associations between CKD markers and Mini-Mental State Examination or Word Recall scores. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that albuminuria and low eGFR are associated with frontal lobe dysfunction independently of SVD in elderly type 2 diabetic patients.

  20. Probabilistic atlas based labeling of the cerebral vessel tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Giessen, Martijn; Janssen, Jasper P.; Brouwer, Patrick A.; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Dijkstra, Jouke

    2015-03-01

    Preoperative imaging of the cerebral vessel tree is essential for planning therapy on intracranial stenoses and aneurysms. Usually, a magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) or computed tomography angiography (CTA) is acquired from which the cerebral vessel tree is segmented. Accurate analysis is helped by the labeling of the cerebral vessels, but labeling is non-trivial due to anatomical topological variability and missing branches due to acquisition issues. In recent literature, labeling the cerebral vasculature around the Circle of Willis has mainly been approached as a graph-based problem. The most successful method, however, requires the definition of all possible permutations of missing vessels, which limits application to subsets of the tree and ignores spatial information about the vessel locations. This research aims to perform labeling using probabilistic atlases that model spatial vessel and label likelihoods. A cerebral vessel tree is aligned to a probabilistic atlas and subsequently each vessel is labeled by computing the maximum label likelihood per segment from label-specific atlases. The proposed method was validated on 25 segmented cerebral vessel trees. Labeling accuracies were close to 100% for large vessels, but dropped to 50-60% for small vessels that were only present in less than 50% of the set. With this work we showed that using solely spatial information of the vessel labels, vessel segments from stable vessels (>50% presence) were reliably classified. This spatial information will form the basis for a future labeling strategy with a very loose topological model.

  1. Association of Aortic Compliance and Brachial Endothelial Function with Cerebral Small Vessel Disease in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients: Assessment with High-Resolution MRI

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    Yan Shan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the possible association of aortic compliance and brachial endothelial function with cerebral small vessel disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2 patients by using 3.0 T high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods. Sixty-two clinically confirmed DM2 patients (25 women and 37 men; mean age: 56.8±7.5 years were prospectively enrolled for noninvasive MR examinations of the aorta, brachial artery, and brain. Aortic arch pulse wave velocity (PWV, flow-mediated dilation (FMD of brachial artery, lacunar brain infarcts, and periventricular and deep white matter hyperintensities (WMHs were assessed. Pearson and Spearman correlation analysis were performed to analyze the association between PWV and FMD with clinical data and biochemical test results. Univariable logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the association between PWV and FMD with cerebral small vessel disease. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to find out the independent predictive factors of cerebral small vessel disease. Results. Mean PWV was 6.73±2.00 m/s and FMD was 16.67±9.11%. After adjustment for compounding factors, PWV was found significantly associated with lacunar brain infarcts (OR = 2.00; 95% CI: 1.14–3.2; P<0.05 and FMD was significantly associated with periventricular WMHs (OR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.71–0.95; P<0.05. Conclusions. Quantitative evaluation of aortic compliance and endothelial function by using high-resolution MRI may be potentially useful to stratify DM2 patients with risk of cerebral small vessel disease.

  2. Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiac function and cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elderen, Saskia G.C. van; Brandts, A.; Westenberg, J.J.M.; Grond, J. van der; Buchem, M.A. van; Kroft, L.J.M.; Roos, A. de [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Tamsma, J.T.; Romijn, J.A.; Smit, J.W.A. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Endocrinology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate, with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whether aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is associated with cardiac left ventricular (LV) function and mass as well as with cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). We included 86 consecutive type 1 DM patients (49 male, mean age 46.9 {+-} 11.7 years) in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Exclusion criteria included aortic/heart disease and general MRI contra-indications. MRI of the aorta, heart and brain was performed for assessment of aortic PWV, as a marker of aortic stiffness, systolic LV function and mass, as well as for the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), microbleeds and lacunar infarcts. Multivariate linear or logistic regression was performed to analyse the association between aortic PWV and outcome parameters, with covariates defined as age, gender, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, BMI, smoking, DM duration and hypertension. Mean aortic PWV was 7.1 {+-} 2.5 m/s. Aortic PWV was independently associated with LV ejection fraction (ss= -0.406, P = 0.006), LV stroke volume (ss=-0.407, P = 0.001), LV cardiac output (ss= -0.458, P = 0.001), and with cerebral WMHs (P < 0.05). There were no independent associations between aortic stiffness and LV mass, cerebral microbleeds or lacunar infarcts. Aortic stiffness is independently associated with systolic LV function and cerebral WMHs in patients with type 1 DM. (orig.)

  3. Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiac function and cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elderen, Saskia G.C. van; Brandts, A.; Westenberg, J.J.M.; Grond, J. van der; Buchem, M.A. van; Kroft, L.J.M.; Roos, A. de; Tamsma, J.T.; Romijn, J.A.; Smit, J.W.A.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate, with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whether aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is associated with cardiac left ventricular (LV) function and mass as well as with cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). We included 86 consecutive type 1 DM patients (49 male, mean age 46.9 ± 11.7 years) in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Exclusion criteria included aortic/heart disease and general MRI contra-indications. MRI of the aorta, heart and brain was performed for assessment of aortic PWV, as a marker of aortic stiffness, systolic LV function and mass, as well as for the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), microbleeds and lacunar infarcts. Multivariate linear or logistic regression was performed to analyse the association between aortic PWV and outcome parameters, with covariates defined as age, gender, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, BMI, smoking, DM duration and hypertension. Mean aortic PWV was 7.1 ± 2.5 m/s. Aortic PWV was independently associated with LV ejection fraction (ss= -0.406, P = 0.006), LV stroke volume (ss=-0.407, P = 0.001), LV cardiac output (ss= -0.458, P = 0.001), and with cerebral WMHs (P < 0.05). There were no independent associations between aortic stiffness and LV mass, cerebral microbleeds or lacunar infarcts. Aortic stiffness is independently associated with systolic LV function and cerebral WMHs in patients with type 1 DM. (orig.)

  4. Age-Specific Associations of Renal Impairment With Magnetic Resonance Imaging Markers of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease in Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bian; Lau, Kui Kai; Li, Linxin; Lovelock, Caroline; Liu, Ming; Kuker, Wilhelm; Rothwell, Peter M

    2018-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) and chronic renal impairment may be part of a multisystem small-vessel disorder, but their association may simply be as a result of shared risk factors (eg, hypertension) rather than to a systemic susceptibility to premature SVD. However, most previous studies were hospital based, most had inadequate adjustment for hypertension, many were confined to patients with lacunar stroke, and none stratified by age. In a population-based study of transient ischemic attack and ischemic stroke (OXVASC [Oxford Vascular Study]), we evaluated the magnetic resonance imaging markers of cerebral SVD, including lacunes, white matter hyperintensities, cerebral microbleeds, and enlarged perivascular space. We studied the age-specific associations of renal impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min per 1.73 m 2 ) and total SVD burden (total SVD score) adjusting for age, sex, vascular risk factors, and premorbid blood pressure (mean blood pressure during 15 years preevent). Of 1080 consecutive patients, 1028 (95.2%) had complete magnetic resonance imaging protocol and creatinine measured at baseline. Renal impairment was associated with total SVD score (odds ratio [OR], 2.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.69-2.75; P <0.001), but only at age <60 years (<60 years: OR, 3.97; 95% CI, 1.69-9.32; P =0.002; 60-79 years: OR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.72-1.41; P =0.963; ≥80 years: OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.59-1.54; P =0.832). The overall association of renal impairment and total SVD score was also attenuated after adjustment for age, sex, history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and premorbid average systolic blood pressure (adjusted OR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.56-1.02; P =0.067), but the independent association of renal impairment and total SVD score at age <60 years was maintained (adjusted OR, 3.11; 95% CI, 1.21-7.98; P =0.018). Associations of renal impairment and SVD were consistent for each SVD marker at age <60 years but

  5. [Small vessel cerebrovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona Portela, P; Escrig Avellaneda, A

    2018-05-09

    Small vessel vascular disease is a spectrum of different conditions that includes lacunar infarction, alteration of deep white matter, or microbleeds. Hypertension is the main risk factor, although the atherothrombotic lesion may be present, particularly in large-sized lacunar infarctions along with other vascular risk factors. MRI findings are characteristic and the lesions authentic biomarkers that allow differentiating the value of risk factors and defining their prognostic value. Copyright © 2018 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanisms of cognitive impairment in cerebral small vessel disease: multimodal MRI results from the St George's cognition and neuroimaging in stroke (SCANS study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Lawrence

    Full Text Available Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD is a common cause of vascular cognitive impairment. A number of disease features can be assessed on MRI including lacunar infarcts, T2 lesion volume, brain atrophy, and cerebral microbleeds. In addition, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI is sensitive to disruption of white matter ultrastructure, and recently it has been suggested that additional information on the pattern of damage may be obtained from axial diffusivity, a proposed marker of axonal damage, and radial diffusivity, an indicator of demyelination. We determined the contribution of these whole brain MRI markers to cognitive impairment in SVD. Consecutive patients with lacunar stroke and confluent leukoaraiosis were recruited into the ongoing SCANS study of cognitive impairment in SVD (n = 115, and underwent neuropsychological assessment and multimodal MRI. SVD subjects displayed poor performance on tests of executive function and processing speed. In the SVD group brain volume was lower, white matter hyperintensity volume higher and all diffusion characteristics differed significantly from control subjects (n = 50. On multi-predictor analysis independent predictors of executive function in SVD were lacunar infarct count and diffusivity of normal appearing white matter on DTI. Independent predictors of processing speed were lacunar infarct count and brain atrophy. Radial diffusivity was a stronger DTI predictor than axial diffusivity, suggesting ischaemic demyelination, seen neuropathologically in SVD, may be an important predictor of cognitive impairment in SVD. Our study provides information on the mechanism of cognitive impairment in SVD.

  7. Significance of Haemodynamic and Haemostatic Factors in the Course of Different Manifestations of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: The SHEF-CSVD Study—Study Rationale and Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Staszewski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. This paper describes the rationale and design of the SHEF-CSVD Study, which aims to determine the long-term clinical and radiological course of cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD and to evaluate haemostatic and haemodynamic prognostic factors of the condition. Design. This single-centre, prospective, non-interventional cohort study will follow 150 consecutive patients with different clinical manifestations of CSVD (lacunar ischaemic stroke, vascular dementia, vascular parkinsonism or spontaneous deep, intracerebral haemorrhage and 50 age- and sex-matched controls over a period of 24 months. The clinical and radiological course will be evaluated basing on a detailed neurological, neuropsychological and MRI examinations. Haemodynamic (cerebral vasoreactivity, 24 h blood pressure control and haemostatic factors (markers of endothelial and platelet dysfunction, brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation test will be determined. Discussion. The scheduled study will specifically address the issue of haemodynamic and haemostatic prognostic factors and their course over time in various clinical manifestations of CSVD. The findings may aid the development of prophylactic strategies and individualised treatment plans, which are critical during the early stages of the disease.

  8. What is the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus status and the neuroradiological correlates of cerebral small vessel disease in adults? Protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funnell, Clark; Doyle-Waters, Mary M; Yip, Samuel; Field, Thalia

    2017-01-17

    Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is a common cause of stroke, dementia, and functional decline. In recent years, neuroradiologic correlates of CSVD have been identified. These imaging findings, best characterized on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), include some combination of white matter hyperintensities, lacunes, cerebral microbleeds, enlarged perivascular spaces, and cerebral atrophy. Though some cohorts have reported that participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), an important risk factor for CSVD, may have a distinct neuroradiologic phenotype, this relationship is not well-characterized. Adults with diabetes mellitus have a two- to threefold higher incidence of ischemic stroke compared to controls and are an increasingly important population given global trends of increasing diabetes prevalence. This study aims to determine if adults with CSVD and T2DM have a distinct neuroradiologic phenotype. A systematic search of the literature will be conducted to find articles that report the MRI features of CSVD in a cohort of participants including those with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A number of databases will be searched including MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and Web of Science. Proceedings and abstracts from key conferences will also be reviewed and relevant journals hand searched for additional papers. The references from selected papers will be scanned. Screening of potential articles, data extraction, and quality appraisal will be performed in duplicate by independent reviewers. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the presence versus absence of each neuroradiologic correlate of interest from each included study will be calculated. If sufficient homogeneity exists among studies, a meta-analysis will be performed for each neuroradiologic correlate of CSVD. If heterogeneity of studies precludes data pooling, results will be presented in narrative form. Determining whether a distinct neuroradiologic phenotype of CSVD exists in

  9. Study of white matter at the centrum semiovale level with magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging in cerebral small vessel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L A; Ling, X Y; Li, C; Zhang, S J; Chi, G B; Xu, A D

    2014-04-08

    White matter lesion (WML) in magnetic resonance imaging is commonly observed in patients with cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), but the pathological mechanism of WML in SVD is still unclear. We observed the metabolism and microscopic anatomy of white matter in SVD patients. Twelve subjects clinically diagnosed with SVD and 6 normal control subjects were examined with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The white matter at the centrum semiovale level was selected as the region of interest (ROI). The ROI metabolism parameters, including N-acetyl-l-aspartic acid (NAA), creatine (Cr), and choline (Cho) were measured by MRS. Microscopic parameters such as mean diffusion (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) in ROI were obtained by DTI. Compared with the normal control group, bilateral MD values in the SVD group were significantly elevated, whereas bilateral FA values in SVD were decreased, but the difference was not statistically significant. Additionally, NAA/Cho, Cho/Cr, and NAA/Cr showed no significant statistical differences. Our study suggests that the mechanisms of the SVD cognitive impairment are related to damage of the white matter structures rather than to brain metabolism.

  10. G-CSF and cognitive dysfunction in elderly diabetic mice with cerebral small vessel disease: Preventive intervention effects and underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhu-Fei; Tao, Ying-Hong; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Guo, Qi-Lin; Liu, Ying-Chao; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yan-Mei; Ji, Gang; Wu, Guo-Feng; Wang, Na-Na; Yang, Hao; Yu, Zhong-Yu; Guo, Jing-Chun; Zhou, Hou-Guang

    2017-06-01

    Although cognitive dysfunction is a common neurological complication in elderly patients with diabetes, the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain unclear, and effective preventive interventions have yet to be developed. Thus, this study investigated the preventive effects and mechanisms of action associated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on cognitive dysfunction in elderly diabetic mice with cerebral small vessel disease. This study included 40 male db/db diabetic and wild-type (WT) mice that were categorized into the following four groups at the age of 3 weeks: db/db group (DG), db/db+G-CSF group (DGG), WT group (WG), and WT+G-CSF group (WGG). The mice were fed normal diets for 4 months and then given G-CSF (75 μg/kg) via intraperitoneal injections for 1 month. At 7.5 months of age, the cognitive abilities of the mice were assessed with the Y-maze test and the Social Choice Test; body weight, blood pressure (BP), and blood glucose measurements were obtained throughout the study. Brain imaging and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) contrast imaging analyses were performed with a small animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, autophagosome levels were detected with a transmission electron microscope (TEM), hippocampal neurons were assessed with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining, and protein expressions and distributions were evaluated using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. (i) The body weight and blood glucose levels of the DG and DGG mice were significantly higher than those of the WG and WGG mice; (ii) social choice and spatial memory capabilities were significantly reduced in DG mice but were recovered by G-CSF in DGG mice; (iii) the MRI scans revealed multiple lacunar lesions and apparent hippocampal atrophy in the brains of DG mice, but G-CSF reduced the number of lacunar lesions and ameliorated hippocampal atrophy; (iv) the MRI-BOLD scans showed a downward trend in whole-brain activity and reductions

  11. Accumulation of MRI markers of cerebral small vessel disease is associated with decreased cognitive function. A study in first-ever lacunar stroke and hypertensive patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolein eHuijts

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background – White matter lesions (WMLs, asymptomatic lacunar infarcts, brain microbleeds (BMBs and enlarged perivascular spaces (EPVS have been identified as silent lesions due to cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD. All these markers have been individually linked to cognitive functioning, but are also strongly correlated with each other. The combined effect of these markers on cognitive function has never been studied and would possibly provide more useful information on the effect on cognitive function. Methods – Brain MRI and extensive neuropsychological assessment were performed in 189 patients at risk for cSVD (112 hypertensive patients and 77 first-ever lacunar stroke patients. We rated the presence of any asymptomatic lacunar infarct, extensive WMLs, any deep BMB, and moderate to extensive EPVS in the basal ganglia. The presence of each marker was summed to an ordinal score between 0 and 4. Associations with domains of cognitive function (memory, executive function, information processing speed and overall cognition were analyzed with correlation analyses. Results – Correlation analyses revealed significant associations between accumulating cSVD burden and decreased performance on all cognitive domains (all p≤.001. Results remained significant for information processing speed (r=-.181, p=.013 and overall cognition (r=-.178, p=.017, after correction for age and sex. Testing of trend using linear regression analyses revealed the same results. Discussion – We tested a new approach to capture total brain damage resulting from cSVD and found that accumulation of MRI burden of cSVD is associated with decreased performance on tests of information processing speed and overall cognition, implying that accumulating brain damage is accompanied by worse cognitive functioning.

  12. Hemorrhage recurrence risk factors in cerebral amyloid angiopathy: Comparative analysis of the overall small vessel disease severity score versus individual neuroimaging markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulouis, Gregoire; Charidimou, Andreas; Pasi, Marco; Roongpiboonsopit, Duangnapa; Xiong, Li; Auriel, Eitan; van Etten, Ellis S; Martinez-Ramirez, Sergi; Ayres, Alison; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Schwab, Kristin M; Rosand, Jonathan; Goldstein, Joshua N; Gurol, M Edip; Greenberg, Steven M; Viswanathan, Anand

    2017-09-15

    An MRI-based score of total small vessel disease burden (CAA-SVD-Score) in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) has been demonstrated to correlate with severity of pathologic changes. Evidence suggests that CAA-related intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) recurrence risk is associated with specific disease imaging manifestations rather than overall severity. We compared the correlation between the CAA-SVD-Score with the risk of recurrent CAA-related lobar ICH versus the predictive role of each of its components. Consecutive patients with CAA-related ICH from a single-center prospective cohort were analyzed. Radiological markers of CAA related SVD damage were quantified and categorized according to the CAA-SVD-Score (0-6 points). Subjects were followed prospectively for recurrent symptomatic ICH. Adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate associations between the CAA-SVD-Score as well as each of the individual MRI signatures of CAA and the risk of recurrent ICH. In 229 CAA patients with ICH, a total of 56 recurrent ICH events occurred during a median follow-up of 2.8years [IQR 0.9-5.4years, 781 person-years). Higher CAA-SVD-Score (HR=1.26 per additional point, 95%CI [1.04-1.52], p=0.015) and older age were independently associated with higher ICH recurrence risk. Analysis of individual markers of CAA showed that CAA-SVD-Score findings were due to the independent effect of disseminated superficial siderosis (HR for disseminated cSS vs none: 2.89, 95%CI [1.47-5.5], p=0.002) and high degree of perivascular spaces enlargement (RR=3.50-95%CI [1.04-21], p=0.042). In lobar CAA-ICH patients, higher CAA-SVD-Score does predict recurrent ICH. Amongst individual elements of the score, superficial siderosis and dilated perivascular spaces are the only markers independently associated with ICH recurrence, contributing to the evidence for distinct CAA phenotypes singled out by neuro-imaging manifestations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical study on the value of combining neuropsychological tests with auditory event-related potential P300 for cognitive assessment in elderly patients with cerebral small vessel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-ling ZHAO

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the value of combining neuropsychological tests with auditory event-related potential (ERP P300 for cognitive assessment in elderly patients with cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD.  Methods A total of 183 elderly patients with cSVD were enrolled in this study. They were divided into 3 groups according to brain MRI: lacunar infarct (LACI group (N = 62, white matter hyperintensity (WMH group (N = 60 and LACI + WMH group (N = 61. A total of 50 brain MRI normal persons were selected as control group. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, Chinese version was used to evaluate the cognitive function, and the amplitude and latency of P300 were measured in each group.  Results Compared with control group, the MoCA total score in LACI, WMH and LACI + WMH groups were significantly lower (P = 0.042, 0.015, 0.000, and the score in LACI + WMH group was significantly lower than that in LACI and WMH groups (P = 0.001, 0.042. In the eight cognitive domains of MoCA scale, the visual space and executive function (P = 0.006, 0.041, 0.035, delayed memory (P = 0.006, 0.012, 0.048, language (P = 0.001, 0.032, 0.047 and calculation (P = 0.009, 0.001, 0.003 in LACI + WMH group were significantly lower than those in control, LACI and WMH groups. The delayed memory in LACI group was significantly lower than that in control group (P = 0.037. The delayed memory (P = 0.005 and language (P = 0.047 in WMH group were significantly lower than those in control group. Compared with control group, the amplitudes of P300 (P = 0.025, 0.033, 0.000 in LACI, WMH and LACI + WMH groups were significantly decreased, and the latencies (P = 0.018, 0.000, 0.000 were significantly prolonged. The amplitude of P300 in LACI + WMH group was significantly lower than that in LACI and WMH groups (P = 0.041, 0.018, and the latency was significantly prolonged (P = 0.000, 0.022.  Conclusions Elderly patients of cSVD all suffer from different degrees of cognitive impairment

  14. Perivascular Spaces, Glymphatic Dysfunction, and Small Vessel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mestre, Humberto; Kostrikov, Serhii; Mehta, Rupal I.; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel diseases (SVD) range broadly in etiology but share a remarkably overlapping pathology. Features of SVD including enlarged perivascular spaces and formation of abluminal protein deposits cannot be completely explained by the putative pathophysiology. The recently discovered glymphatic system provides a new perspective to potentially address these gaps. This work provides a comprehensive review of the known factors that regulate glymphatic function and the disease mechanis...

  15. Spontaneous low-frequency oscillations in cerebral vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik W; Hansson, Andreas; Phillip, Dorte

    2010-01-01

    ). Analysis of CA by measurement of spontaneous oscillations in the low-frequency spectrum in cerebral vessels might be a useful tool for assessing risk and investigating different treatment strategies in carotid artery disease (CAD) and stroke. We reviewed studies exploring spontaneous oscillations...

  16. A case of small vessel vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhulika Mahashabde

    2014-01-01

    We are reporting a case of un-specified small vessel vasculitis, which was diagnosed on the basis of positive perinuclear anti neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA P MPO done by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA.

  17. Perfusion by Arterial Spin labelling following Single dose Tadalafil In Small vessel disease (PASTIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauls, Mathilde M H; Clarke, Natasha; Trippier, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    vascular territories. The aim of this trial is to test the hypothesis that tadalafil increases cerebral blood flow in older people with small vessel disease. METHODS/DESIGN: Perfusion by Arterial Spin labelling following Single dose Tadalafil In Small vessel disease (PASTIS) is a phase II randomised double......-blind crossover trial. In two visits, 7-30 days apart, participants undergo arterial spin labelling to measure cerebral blood flow and a battery of cognitive tests, pre- and post-dosing with oral tadalafil (20 mg) or placebo. SAMPLE SIZE: 54 participants are required to detect a 15% increase in cerebral blood...

  18. A relationship between the integrated assessment of magnetic resonance imaging markers for cerebral small vessel disease and the clinical and functional status in the acute period of ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kulesh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD is the most common neurological pathological process and contributes to the process of aging and to the development of dementia and stroke. At the same time, the role of CSVD as a factor influencing the course of acute ischemic stroke (IS has been little studied. There is no generally accepted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scale for the integrated assessment of CSVD markers.Objective: to carry out an integrated assessment of the MRI manifestations of CSVD in acute ischemic stroke and to analyze a correlation of both individual markers and the final indicator with the clinical and functional status of patients.Patients and methods. 100 patients with acute IS were examined. All patients underwent standard clinical, laboratory and instrumental examinations, as well as brain MRI estimating the number of lacunae, visible perivascular spaces (PVSs and leukoaraiosis. The number of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs was additionally calculated in 57 patients. Integral scale scores were calculated by gradation and summation of four MRI markers of CSVD.Results. The patients with acute IS showed the high representativeness of individual markers for CSVD. The values of MRI markers for CSVD correlated with age, education level, and cardiovascular parameters in patients. An integrated CSVD severity assessment scale was developed. The overall manifestations of CSVD, which were assessed using this scale, were associated with the severity of a stenotic process in the brachycephalic arteries, with BP levels at admission, ejection fraction, hyperglycemia, and atherogenic index of blood lipids. The high CSVD score was also correlated with low mobility and more severe disability in patients being discharged from hospital. The high severity of CSVD was associated with lower neurological deficit regression during inpatient treatment. Subgroup analysis showed the greatest negative impact of CSVD on the severity of stroke in female patients

  19. Vessel encoded arterial spin labeling with cerebral perfusion: preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Bing; Xiao Jiangxi; Xie Cheng; Wang Xiaoying; Jiang Xuexiang; Wong, E.C.; Wang Jing; Guo Jia; Zhang Beiru; Zhang Jue; Fang Jing

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a noninvasive vessel encoded imaging for selective mapping of the flow territories of the left and fight internal carotid arteries and vertebral-basilar arteries. Methods: Seven volunteers [(33.5 ± 4.1) years; 3 men, 4 women] and 6 patients [(55.2 ± 3.2) years; 2 men, 4 women] were given written informed consent approved by the institutional review board before participating in the study. A pseudo-continuous tagging pulse train is modified to encode all vessels of interest. The selectivity of this method was demonstrated. Regional perfusion imaging was developed on the same arterial spin labeling sequence. Perfusion-weighted images of the selectively labeled cerebral arteries were obtained by subtraction of the labeled from control images. The CBF values of hemisphere, white matter, and gray matter of volunteers were calculated. The vessel territories on patients were compared with DSA. The low perfusion areas were compared with high signal areas on T 2 -FLAIR. Results: High SNR maps of left carotid, right carotid, and basilar territories were generated in 8 minutes of scan time. Cerebral blood flow values measured with regional perfusion imaging in the complete hemisphere (32.6 ± 4.3) ml·min -1 · 100 g -1 , white matter (10.8 ± 0.9) ml·min -1 ·100 g -1 , and gray matter (55.6±2.9) ml·min -1 · 100 g -1 were in agreement with data in the literature. Vessel encoded imaging in patients had a good agreement with DSA. The low perfusion areas were larger than high signal areas on T 2 -FLAIR. Conclusion: We present a new method capable of evaluating both quantitatively and qualitatively the individual brain- feeding arteries in vivo. (authors)

  20. Neuroimaging standards for research into small vessel disease and its contribution to ageing and neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wardlaw, J.M.; Smith, E.E.; Biessels, G.J.; Cordonnier, C.; Fazekas, F.; Frayne, R.; Lindley, R.I.; O'Brien, J. T.; Barkhof, F.; Benavente, O.R.; Black, S.E.; Brayne, C.; Breteler, M.; Chabriat, H.; deCarli, C.; de Leeuw, F.E.; Doubal, F.; Duering, M.; Fox, N.C.; Greenberg, S.; Hachinski, V.; Kilimann, I.; Mok, V.; van Oostenbrugge, R.; Pantoni, L.; Speck, O.; Stephan, B.C.M.; Teipel, S.; Viswanathan, A.; Werring, D.; Chen, C.; Smith, C.; van Buchem, M.; Norrving, B.; Gorelick, P.B.; Dichgans, M.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a common accompaniment of ageing. Features seen on neuroimaging include recent small subcortical infarcts, lacunes, white matter hyperintensities, perivascular spaces, microbleeds, and brain atrophy. SVD can present as a stroke or cognitive decline, or can have

  1. Heterogeneity of muscarinic receptor subtypes in cerebral blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Villalon, A.L.; Krause, D.N.; Ehlert, F.J.; Duckles, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    The identity and distribution of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes and associated signal transduction mechanisms was characterized for the cerebral circulation using correlated functional and biochemical investigations. Subtypes were distinguished by the relative affinities of a panel of muscarinic antagonists, pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 [11-2-[[2-[diethylaminomethyl]- 1-piperidinyl]acetyl]-5,11-dihydro-6H- pyrido[2,3-b][1,4]benzodiazepine-6-one], hexahydrosiladifenidol, methoctramine, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methobromide, dicyclomine, para-fluoro-hexahydrosiladifenidol and atropine. Muscarinic receptors characterized by inhibition of [3H]quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in membranes of bovine pial arteries were of the M2 subtype. In contrast pharmacological analysis of [3H]-quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in bovine intracerebral microvessels suggests the presence of an M4 subtype. Receptors mediating endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rabbit pial arteries were of the M3 subtype, whereas muscarinic receptors stimulating endothelium-independent phosphoinositide hydrolysis in bovine pial arteries were of the M1 subtype. These findings suggest that characteristics of muscarinic receptors in cerebral blood vessels vary depending on the type of vessel, cellular location and function mediated

  2. Inherited neurovascular diseases affecting cerebral blood vessels and smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Christine; Li, Fei-Feng; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2015-10-01

    Neurovascular diseases are among the leading causes of mortality and permanent disability due to stroke, aneurysm, and other cardiovascular complications. Cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) and Marfan syndrome are two neurovascular disorders that affect smooth muscle cells through accumulation of granule and osmiophilic materials and defective elastic fiber formations respectively. Moyamoya disease, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II), and Fabry's disease are disorders that affect the endothelium cells of blood vessels through occlusion or abnormal development. While much research has been done on mapping out mutations in these diseases, the exact mechanisms are still largely unknown. This paper briefly introduces the pathogenesis, genetics, clinical symptoms, and current methods of treatment of the diseases in the hope that it can help us better understand the mechanism of these diseases and work on ways to develop better diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Autonomous radiation monitoring of small vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziock, K.P.; Cheriyadat, A.; Fabris, L.; Goddard, J.; Hornback, D.; Karnowski, T.; Kerekes, R.; Newby, J.

    2011-01-01

    Small private vessels are one avenue by which nuclear materials may be smuggled across international borders. While one can contemplate using the land-based approach of radiation portal monitors on the navigable waterways that lead to many ports, these systems are ill-suited to the problem. In contrast to roadways, where lanes segregate vehicles, and motion is well controlled by inspection booths; channels, inlets, and rivers present chaotic traffic patterns populated by vessels of all sizes. A unique solution to this problem is based on a portal-less portal monitor designed to handle free-flowing traffic on roadways with up to five-traffic lanes. The instrument uses a combination of visible-light and gamma-ray imaging to acquire and link radiation images to individual vehicles. This paper presents the results of a recent test of the system in a maritime setting.

  4. Report of the DHS Small Vessel Security Institute

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brownstein, Charles; Baker, John; Hull, Peter; Minogue, Nicholas; Murphy, George; Winston, Phyllis

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the National Small Vessel Security Summit (NSVSS) was to engage private, commercial and government stakeholders in discussions on a range of issues involving the security risks posed by small vessels in the U.S...

  5. Report of the DHS National Small Vessel Security Summit

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brownstein, Charles; Baker, John; Hull, Peter; Minogue, Nicholas; Murphy, George; Winston, Phyllis

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the National Small Vessel Security Summit (NSVSS) was to engage private, commercial and government stakeholders in discussions on a range of issues involving the security risks posed by small vessels in the U.S...

  6. Perivascular spaces, glymphatic dysfunction, and small vessel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Humberto; Kostrikov, Serhii; Mehta, Rupal I; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2017-09-01

    Cerebral small vessel diseases (SVDs) range broadly in etiology but share remarkably overlapping pathology. Features of SVD including enlarged perivascular spaces (EPVS) and formation of abluminal protein deposits cannot be completely explained by the putative pathophysiology. The recently discovered glymphatic system provides a new perspective to potentially address these gaps. This work provides a comprehensive review of the known factors that regulate glymphatic function and the disease mechanisms underlying glymphatic impairment emphasizing the role that aquaporin-4 (AQP4)-lined perivascular spaces (PVSs), cerebrovascular pulsatility, and metabolite clearance play in normal CNS physiology. This review also discusses the implications that glymphatic impairment may have on SVD inception and progression with the aim of exploring novel therapeutic targets and highlighting the key questions that remain to be answered. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  7. Ultrastructure of rat cerebral vessels 4 months after gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwanowski, L; Ostenda, M

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to check the current opinion that one of the late postirradiation changes is early senility (Maxwell, Kruger, 1964). The postirradiation changes of the brain parenchyma are well known from the literature; therefore our investigation is limited to brain capillaries and their closest vicinity. This paper constitutes a fragment of a larger work on the role of connective tissue in the aging brain. Six Wistar male rats of the same brood, about 3 months old, were irradiated over the whole body with gamma rays. Three rats were exposed to a dose of 400 R and three to 800 R. The chosen doses were the lowest and the highest, provoking brain edema but still not lethal. Four months after the exposure the rats were perfused with 4% glutaraldehyde intracardiacly and decapitated. Brain specimens were taken from frontoparietal cortex, lateral ventricle wall, from corpus callosum and griseum pontis. The samples were routinely handled for ultrastructural studies. Observations were performed under electron microscopes showed that the cerebral vessels of both groups of animals were similar.

  8. Autonomous Radiation Monitoring of Small Vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabris, Lorenzo; Hornback, Donald Eric

    2010-01-01

    Small private vessels are one avenue by which nuclear materials may be smuggled across international borders. While one can contemplate using the terrestrial approach of radiation portal monitors on the navigable waterways that lead to many ports, these systems are ill-suited to the problem. They require vehicles to pass at slow speeds between two closely-spaced radiation sensors, relying on the uniformity of vehicle sizes to space the detectors, and on proximity to link an individual vehicle to its radiation signature. In contrast to roadways where lanes segregate vehicles, and motion is well controlled by inspection booths; channels, inlets, and rivers present chaotic traffic patterns populated by vessels of all sizes. We have developed a unique solution to this problem based on our portal-less portal monitor instrument that is designed to handle free-flowing traffic on roadways with up to five-traffic lanes. The instrument uses a combination of visible-light and gamma-ray imaging to acquire and link radiation images to individual vehicles. It was recently tested in a maritime setting. In this paper we present the instrument, how it functions, and the results of the recent tests.

  9. Cerebral vessels segmentation for light-sheet microscopy image using convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chaoen; Hui, Hui; Wang, Shuo; Dong, Di; Liu, Xia; Yang, Xin; Tian, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral vessel segmentation is an important step in image analysis for brain function and brain disease studies. To extract all the cerebrovascular patterns, including arteries and capillaries, some filter-based methods are used to segment vessels. However, the design of accurate and robust vessel segmentation algorithms is still challenging, due to the variety and complexity of images, especially in cerebral blood vessel segmentation. In this work, we addressed a problem of automatic and robust segmentation of cerebral micro-vessels structures in cerebrovascular images acquired by light-sheet microscope for mouse. To segment micro-vessels in large-scale image data, we proposed a convolutional neural networks (CNNs) architecture trained by 1.58 million pixels with manual label. Three convolutional layers and one fully connected layer were used in the CNNs model. We extracted a patch of size 32x32 pixels in each acquired brain vessel image as training data set to feed into CNNs for classification. This network was trained to output the probability that the center pixel of input patch belongs to vessel structures. To build the CNNs architecture, a series of mouse brain vascular images acquired from a commercial light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) system were used for training the model. The experimental results demonstrated that our approach is a promising method for effectively segmenting micro-vessels structures in cerebrovascular images with vessel-dense, nonuniform gray-level and long-scale contrast regions.

  10. The development of cerebral amyloid angiopathy in cerebral vessels. A review with illustrations based upon own investigated post mortem cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, T A; Wierzba-Bobrowicz, T; Lewandowska, E; Stępień, T; Szpak, G M

    2013-12-01

    The process of β-amyloid accumulation in cerebral vessels is presented. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) was confirmed during an autopsy. It was diagnosed according to the Boston criteria. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy can involve all kinds of cerebral vessels (cortical and leptomeningeal arterioles, capillaries and veins). The development of CAA is a progressive process. β-amyloid appears first in the tunica media, surrounding smooth muscle cells, and in the adventitia. β-amyloid is progressively accumulated, causing a gradual loss of smooth muscle cells in the vessel wall and finally replacing them. Then, the detachment and delamination of the outer part of the tunica media results in the "double barrel" appearance, fibrinoid necrosis, and microaneurysm formation. Microbleeding with perivascular deposition of erythrocytes and blood breakdown products can also occur. β-amyloid can also be deposited in the surrounding of the affected vessels of the brain parenchyma, known as "dysphoric CAA". Ultrastructurally, when deposits of amyloid fibers were localized in or outside the arteriolar wall, the degenerating vascular smooth muscle cells were observed. In the Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology the study was carried out in a group of 48 patients who died due to intracerebral hemorrhage caused by sporadic CAA.

  11. MDCTA diagnosis of cerebral vessel disease among patients with arterial hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanko-Hrushchak, Nataliya

    2013-01-01

    to study changes involving cerebral vessels in patients with hypertension and various levels of total cardiovascular risk. One hundred and thirty-four patients underwent CT-angiography of intracranial vessels. Ninety-eight of them were diagnosed with hypertension. Taking into consideration high blood pressure, presence of risk factors and target organ damage subjects were divided into 4 groups: with low, medium, high and very high total cardiovascular risk. Control group included 36 patients. They were not diagnosed with hypertension at the time of examination. One hundred and five patients were examined using a 4-slice CT scanner (Toshiba Asteion 4, Toshiba Medical System, Japan), and 29 patients were examined using a 128-slice scanner (Siemens Definition AS+, Siemens Healthcare, Germany) with an injection system. We used iodine-containing contrast agents such as iodixanol and iopromide for angiography. Anatomical and topographic changes of cerebral vessels were most frequently found in hypertensive patients with high and very high total cardiovascular risk. Narrowing of vertebral vessels was the most common change (27 patients (27.55%), 21 patients (21.43%) had narrowing of the right artery, and 6 (6.12%) subjects – of the left one). Tortuous course of internal carotid arteries at the neck level was visualized in 11 patients (11.22%). Narrowing of A1 segment of anterior cerebral artery was noted in 9 patients (9.18%), of the right one – in 8 patients (8.16%), of the left one – in 1 patient (1.02%). Aneurysmal dilation of intracranial vessels was visualized in 6 patients (6.12%). Saccular aneurysm of left internal carotid artery was diagnosed in 2 patients (2.04%), one patient (1.02%) had right internal carotid artery aneurysm and one patient (1.02%) had an aneurysm of the basilar artery. the most common changes of cerebral vessels diagnosed in MDCTA among patients with hypertension included various degrees of narrowing of vertebral vessels, anterior

  12. [Clinical features of 32 patients with cutaneous small vessel vasculitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López de Maturana, Donaldo; Amaro, Patricio; Segovia, Laura; Balestrini, Claudia

    2004-02-01

    The skin is a common target of small vessel vasculitis, with a wide assortment of pathological changes. This condition is usually associated to systemic diseases. To report the clinical and pathological features of patients with cutaneous small vessel vasculitis. A retrospective review of 32 patients with a pathological diagnosis of cutaneous vasculitis. Seventy two percent of patients were women. Cutaneous lesions were mainly located in the lower limbs (94%). The most common lesion was palpable purpura (62%). Connective tissue diseases and systemic vasculitis were the most commonly associated systemic diseases. Palpable purpura is the most common manifestation of cutaneous small vessel vasculitis, that is usually associated to connective tissue diseases or systemic vasculitis.

  13. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated small-vessel vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    Purpose of reviews This review focuses on recent advance in the diagnosis pathogenesis and treatment of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated small-vessel vasculitis. Recent findings Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies are closely associated with Wegener's granulomatosis and

  14. Morphological changes of cerebral vessels and expression patterns of MMP-2 and MMP-9 on cerebrovascular wall of alcoholic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qian; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Guozhong; He, Wenjing; Ma, Rufei; Cong, Bin; Li, Yingmin

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol abuse increases the incidence of cerebral accidents, which correlates with cerebrovascular structural changes. The present study was designed to observe the cerebrovascular remodeling of drinking rats with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Short-term alcohol administration induced apparent amplification of perivascular spaces around small vessels in brain tissue, while long-term administration caused pathological changes of basilar arteries (BAs), including endothelial exfoliation, inner elastic lamina (IEL) fragmentation and thickening of tunica media and adventitia. In addition, the relationship between cerebrovascular remodeling and MMP-2 and MMP-9 synthesized by endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells was explored by immunohistochemistry. The two protein expression in cerebral vessels changed dynamically, peaking at 1-2 weeks after treatment, and decreasing as treatment continued. These results suggest that MMP-2 and MMP-9 may play a significant role in blood-brain barrier disruption after alcohol abuse. But the chronic changes of cerebral arteries resulted from drinking are not coincident with time course of MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression in situ.

  15. Cerebral microangiopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linn, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral microangiopathies are a very heterogenous group of diseases characterized by pathological changes of the small cerebral vessels. They account for 20 - 30 % of all ischemic strokes. Degenerative microangiopathy and sporadic cerebral amyloid angiography represent the typical acquired cerebral microangiopathies, which are found in over 90 % of cases. Besides, a wide variety of rare, hereditary microangiopathy exists, as e.g. CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy), Fabrys disease and MELAS syndrome (Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes). (orig.)

  16. Towards Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) for small sea vessels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abdul Gaffar, MY

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Aperture Radar (ISAR) for Small Sea Vessels M.Y. Abdul Gaffar Council for Scientific and Industrial Research University of Cape Town Slide 2 © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za What is ISAR? • Technique that produces cross range...

  17. Machine Learning for Quantification of Small Vessel Disease Imaging Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghafoorian, M.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to developing fully automated methods for quantification of small vessel disease imaging bio-markers, namely WMHs and lacunes, using vari- ous machine learning/deep learning and computer vision techniques. The rest of the thesis is organized as follows: Chapter 2 describes

  18. Modeling the Role of the Glymphatic Pathway and Cerebral Blood Vessel Properties in Alzheimer's Disease Pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Rose Kyrtsos

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, affecting over 10% population over the age of 65 years. Clinically, AD is described by the symptom set of short term memory loss and cognitive decline, changes in mentation and behavior, and eventually long-term memory deficit as the disease progresses. On imaging studies, significant atrophy with subsequent increase in ventricular volume have been observed. Pathology on post-mortem brain specimens demonstrates the classic findings of increased beta amyloid (Aβ deposition and the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs within affected neurons. Neuroinflammation, dysregulation of blood-brain barrier transport and clearance, deposition of Aβ in cerebral blood vessels, vascular risk factors such as atherosclerosis and diabetes, and the presence of the apolipoprotein E4 allele have all been identified as playing possible roles in AD pathogenesis. Recent research has demonstrated the importance of the glymphatic system in the clearance of Aβ from the brain via the perivascular space surrounding cerebral blood vessels. Given the variety of hypotheses that have been proposed for AD pathogenesis, an interconnected, multilayer model offers a unique opportunity to combine these ideas into a single unifying model. Results of this model demonstrate the importance of vessel stiffness and heart rate in maintaining adequate clearance of Aβ from the brain.

  19. Modeling the Role of the Glymphatic Pathway and Cerebral Blood Vessel Properties in Alzheimer's Disease Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrtsos, Christina Rose; Baras, John S

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, affecting over 10% population over the age of 65 years. Clinically, AD is described by the symptom set of short term memory loss and cognitive decline, changes in mentation and behavior, and eventually long-term memory deficit as the disease progresses. On imaging studies, significant atrophy with subsequent increase in ventricular volume have been observed. Pathology on post-mortem brain specimens demonstrates the classic findings of increased beta amyloid (Aβ) deposition and the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) within affected neurons. Neuroinflammation, dysregulation of blood-brain barrier transport and clearance, deposition of Aβ in cerebral blood vessels, vascular risk factors such as atherosclerosis and diabetes, and the presence of the apolipoprotein E4 allele have all been identified as playing possible roles in AD pathogenesis. Recent research has demonstrated the importance of the glymphatic system in the clearance of Aβ from the brain via the perivascular space surrounding cerebral blood vessels. Given the variety of hypotheses that have been proposed for AD pathogenesis, an interconnected, multilayer model offers a unique opportunity to combine these ideas into a single unifying model. Results of this model demonstrate the importance of vessel stiffness and heart rate in maintaining adequate clearance of Aβ from the brain.

  20. Small Vessel Cerebrovascular Disease: The Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Réza Behrouz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain infarction due to small vessel cerebrovascular disease (SVCD—also known as small vessel infarct (SVI or “lacunar” stroke—accounts for 20% to 25% of all ischemic strokes. Historically, SVIs have been associated with a favorable short-term prognosis. However, studies over the years have demonstrated that SVCD/SVI is perhaps a more complex and less benign phenomenon than generally presumed. The currently employed diagnostic and therapeutic strategies are based upon historical and contemporary perceptions of SVCD/SVI. What is discovered in the future will unmask the true countenance of SVCD/SVI and help furnish more accurate prognostication schemes and effective treatments for this condition. This paper is an overview of SVCD/SVI with respect to the discoveries of the past, what is known now, and what will the ongoing investigations evince in the future.

  1. Aerial Remote Radio Frequency Identification System for Small Vessel Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    technology as a tool that can benefit everyone (Warner 2008, p.144). Lippitt’s model , coupled with Vroom and Lawler’s Expectancy Theory (Miner 2005, p...Identification System for Small Vessel Monitoring 6. AUTHOR( S ) Jason Appler, Sean Finney, Michael McMellon 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING...ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING

  2. Report of the DHS Small Vessel Security Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-19

    Local Government Interests: LtCol Don Holway; Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Maj John Fetterman , Maine Department of Marine...AWW program to help fill gaps in law enforcement patrols. 68 National Small Vessel Security Summit Major John C. Fetterman – State of Maine...Major Fetterman currently serves as Vice President of the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators and for the last 30 years has been a

  3. Ultrastructural analysis of small blood vessels in skin biopsies in CADASIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lačković Vesna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL is an inherited small- and medium-artery disease of the brain caused by mutation of the Notch3 gene. Very often, this disease is misdiagnosed. We examined skin biopsies in two members of the first discovered Serbian family affected by CADASIL. Electron microscopy showed that skin blood vessels of both patients contain numerous deposits of granular osmiophilic material (GOM around vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs. We observed degeneration of VSMCs, reorganization of their cytoskeleton and dense bodies, disruption of myoendothelial contacts, and apoptosis. Our results suggest that the presence of GOM in small skin arteries represents a specific marker in diagnosis of CADASIL.

  4. An integrated 3-D image of cerebral blood vessels and CT view of tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suetens, P.; Baert, A.L.; Gybels, J.; Haegemans, S.; Jansen, P.; Oosterlinck, A.; Wilms, G.

    1984-01-01

    The authors developed a method that yields an integrated three-dimensional image of cerebral blood vessels and CT view of tumor. This method allows the neurosurgeon to choose any electrode trajectory that looks convenient to him, without imminent danger of causing a hemorrhage. Besides offering more safety to stereotactic interventions, this integrated 3-D image also has other applications. First, it gives a better characterization of most focal mass lesions seen by CT. Second, it allows high dose focal irradiation to be effected in such a way as to avoid arteries and veins. Third, it provides useful information for planning the strategy of open surgery

  5. Stent-assisted coil embolization of aneurysms with small parent vessels: safety and efficacy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Anna Luisa; Hou, Samuel Y; Puri, Ajit S; Silva, Christine F; Gounis, Matthew J; Wakhloo, Ajay K

    2016-06-01

    Stent-assisted coil embolization (SACE) is a viable therapeutic approach for wide-neck intracranial aneurysms. However, it can be technically challenging in small cerebral vessels (≤2 mm). To present our experience with stents approved for SACE in aneurysms with small parent arteries. All patients who underwent stent-assisted aneurysm treatment with either a Neuroform or an Enterprise stent device at our institution between June 2006 and October 2012 were identified. Additionally, we evaluated each patient's vascular risk factors, aneurysm characteristics (ruptured vs non-ruptured, incidental finding, recanalized) and follow-up angiography data. A total of 41 patients with 44 aneurysms met our criteria, including 31 women and 10 men. Most of the aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation (75%). Stent placement in vessels 1.2-2 mm in diameter was successful in 93.2%. Thromboembolic complications occurred in 6 cases and vessel straightening was seen in 1 case only. Initial nearly complete to complete aneurysm obliteration was achieved in 88.6%. Six-month follow-up angiography showed coil compaction in three cases, one asymptomatic in-stent stenosis and stent occlusion. Twelve to 20-months' follow-up showed stable coil compaction in two patients compared with previous follow-up, and aneurysm recanalization in two patients. Twenty-four to 36-months' follow-up showed further coil compaction in one of these patients and aneurysm recanalization in a previous case of stable coil compaction on mid-term follow-up. Our results suggest that SACE of aneurysms with small parent vessels is feasible in selected cases and shows good long-term patency rates of parent arteries. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Analysis of cerebral vessels dynamics using experimental data with missed segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, O. N.; Abdurashitov, A. S.; Ulanova, M. V.; Shihalov, G. M.; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O. V.; Pavlov, A. N.

    2018-04-01

    Physiological signals often contain various bad segments that occur due to artifacts, failures of the recording equipment or varying experimental conditions. The related experimental data need to be preprocessed to avoid such parts of recordings. In the case of few bad segments, they can simply be removed from the signal and its analysis is further performed. However, when there are many extracted segments, the internal structure of the analyzed physiological process may be destroyed, and it is unclear whether such signal can be used in diagnostic-related studies. In this paper we address this problem for the case of cerebral vessels dynamics. We perform analysis of simulated data in order to reveal general features of quantifying scaling features of complex signals with distinct correlation properties and show that the effects of data loss are significantly different for experimental data with long-range correlations and anti-correlations. We conclude that the cerebral vessels dynamics is significantly less sensitive to missed data fragments as compared with signals with anti-correlated statistics.

  7. Compliant electrospun silk fibroin tubes for small vessel bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelli, Benedetto; Alessandrino, Antonio; Farè, Silvia; Freddi, Giuliano; Mantovani, Diego; Tanzi, Maria Cristina

    2010-10-01

    Processing silk fibroin (SF) by electrospinning offers a very attractive opportunity for producing three-dimensional nanofibrillar matrices in tubular form, which may be useful for a biomimetic approach to small calibre vessel regeneration. Bypass grafting of small calibre vessels, with a diameter less than 6mm, is performed mainly using autografts, like the saphenous vein or internal mammary artery. At present no polymeric grafts made of SF are commercially available, mainly due to inadequate properties (low compliance and lack of endothelium cells). The aim of this work was to electrospin SF into tubular structures (Ø=6mm) for small calibre vessel grafting, characterize the morphological, chemico-physical and mechanical properties of the electrospun SF structures and to validate their potential to interact with cells. The morphological properties of electrospun SF nanofibres were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. Chemico-physical analyses revealed an increase in the crystallinity of the structure of SF nanofibres on methanol treatment. Mechanical tests, i.e. compliance and burst pressure measurements, of the electrospun SF tubes showed that the inner pressure to radial deformation ratio was linear for elongation up to 15% and pressure up to 400 mm Hg. The mean compliance value between 80 and 120 mm Hg was higher than the values reported for both Goretex(R) and Dacron(R) grafts and for bovine heterografts, but still slightly lower than those of saphenous and umbilical vein, which nowadays represent the gold standard for the replacement of small calibre arteries. The electrospun tubes resisted up to 575+/-17 mmHg, which is more than four times the upper physiological pressure of 120 mmHg and more than twice the pathological upper pressures (range 180-220 mmHg). The in vitro tests showed a good cytocompatibility of the electrospun SF tubes. Therefore, the electrospun SF tubes developed within this work represent a suitable candidate for small calibre

  8. Cerebral small-resistance artery structure and cerebral blood flow in normotensive subjects and hypertensive patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Ciuceis, Carolina; Porteri, Enzo; Rizzoni, Damiano; Boari, Gianluca E.M.; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti [University of Brescia, Clinica Medica, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Brescia (Italy); Cornali, Claudio; Mardighian, Dikran; Fontanella, Marco M. [University of Brescia, Section of Neurosurgery, Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties, Radiological Sciences and Public Health, Brescia (Italy); Pinardi, Chiara [Spedali Civili, Medical Physics Unit, Brescia (Italy); University of Brescia, Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties, Radiological Sciences and Public Health, Brescia (Italy); Rodella, Luigi F.; Rezzani, Rita [University of Brescia, Section of Anatomy, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Brescia (Italy); Gasparotti, Roberto [University of Brescia, Section of Neurosurgery, Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties, Radiological Sciences and Public Health, Brescia (Italy); University of Brescia, Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties, Radiological Sciences and Public Health, Brescia (Italy)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate whether the structure of cerebral small-resistance arteries is related to cerebral perfusion parameters as measured with dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) in a selected cohort of hypertensive and normotensive patients. Ten hypertensive and 10 normotensive patients were included in the study. All patients underwent neurosurgical intervention for an intracranial tumor and were investigated with DSC-MRI at 1.5 T. Cerebral small-resistance arteries were dissected from a small portion of morphologically normal cerebral tissue and mounted on an isometric myograph for the measurement of the media-to-lumen (M/L) ratio. A quantitative assessment of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and volume (CBV) was performed with a region-of-interest approach. Correlation coefficients were calculated for normally distributed variables. The institutional review board approved the study, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. Compared with normotensive subjects, hypertensive patients had significantly lower regional CBF (mL/100 g/min) in the cortical grey matter (55.63 ± 1.90 vs 58.37 ± 2.19, p < 0.05), basal ganglia (53.34 ± 4.39 vs 58.22. ± 4.33, p < 0.05), thalami (50.65 ± 3.23 vs 57.56 ± 4.45, p < 0.01), subcortical white matter (19.32 ± 2.54 vs 22.24 ± 1.9, p < 0.05), greater M/L ratio (0.099 ± 0.013 vs 0.085 ± 0.012, p < 0.05), and lower microvessel density (1.66 ± 0.67 vs 2.52 ± 1.28, p < 0.05). A statistically significant negative correlation was observed between M/L ratio of cerebral arteries and CBF in the cortical grey matter (r = -0.516, p < 0.05), basal ganglia (r = -0.521, p < 0.05), thalami (r = -0.527 p < 0.05), and subcortical white matter (r = -0.612, p < 0.01). Our results indicate that microvascular structure might play a role in controlling CBF, with possible clinical consequences. (orig.)

  9. Comprehensive gene expression profiling reveals synergistic functional networks in cerebral vessels after hypertension or hypercholesterolemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yi Ong

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic stenosis of cerebral arteries or intracranial large artery disease (ICLAD is a major cause of stroke especially in Asians, Hispanics and Africans, but relatively little is known about gene expression changes in vessels at risk. This study compares comprehensive gene expression profiles in the middle cerebral artery (MCA of New Zealand White rabbits exposed to two stroke risk factors i.e. hypertension and/or hypercholesterolemia, by the 2-Kidney-1-Clip method, or dietary supplementation with cholesterol. Microarray and Ingenuity Pathway Analyses of the MCA of the hypertensive rabbits showed up-regulated genes in networks containing the node molecules: UBC (ubiquitin, P38 MAPK, ERK, NFkB, SERPINB2, MMP1 and APP (amyloid precursor protein; and down-regulated genes related to MAPK, ERK 1/2, Akt, 26 s proteasome, histone H3 and UBC. The MCA of hypercholesterolemic rabbits showed differentially expressed genes that are surprisingly, linked to almost the same node molecules as the hypertensive rabbits, despite a relatively low percentage of 'common genes' (21 and 7% between the two conditions. Up-regulated common genes were related to: UBC, SERPINB2, TNF, HNF4A (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4A and APP, and down-regulated genes, related to UBC. Increased HNF4A message and protein were verified in the aorta. Together, these findings reveal similar nodal molecules and gene pathways in cerebral vessels affected by hypertension or hypercholesterolemia, which could be a basis for synergistic action of risk factors in the pathogenesis of ICLAD.

  10. Comprehensive Gene Expression Profiling Reveals Synergistic Functional Networks in Cerebral Vessels after Hypertension or Hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Wei-Yi; Ng, Mary Pei-Ern; Loke, Sau-Yeen; Jin, Shalai; Wu, Ya-Jun; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Wong, Peter Tsun-Hon

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerotic stenosis of cerebral arteries or intracranial large artery disease (ICLAD) is a major cause of stroke especially in Asians, Hispanics and Africans, but relatively little is known about gene expression changes in vessels at risk. This study compares comprehensive gene expression profiles in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) of New Zealand White rabbits exposed to two stroke risk factors i.e. hypertension and/or hypercholesterolemia, by the 2-Kidney-1-Clip method, or dietary supplementation with cholesterol. Microarray and Ingenuity Pathway Analyses of the MCA of the hypertensive rabbits showed up-regulated genes in networks containing the node molecules: UBC (ubiquitin), P38 MAPK, ERK, NFkB, SERPINB2, MMP1 and APP (amyloid precursor protein); and down-regulated genes related to MAPK, ERK 1/2, Akt, 26 s proteasome, histone H3 and UBC. The MCA of hypercholesterolemic rabbits showed differentially expressed genes that are surprisingly, linked to almost the same node molecules as the hypertensive rabbits, despite a relatively low percentage of ‘common genes’ (21 and 7%) between the two conditions. Up-regulated common genes were related to: UBC, SERPINB2, TNF, HNF4A (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4A) and APP, and down-regulated genes, related to UBC. Increased HNF4A message and protein were verified in the aorta. Together, these findings reveal similar nodal molecules and gene pathways in cerebral vessels affected by hypertension or hypercholesterolemia, which could be a basis for synergistic action of risk factors in the pathogenesis of ICLAD. PMID:23874591

  11. [Problems with certification of work capability for people with symptoms of functional and organic diseases of cerebral vessels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polakowska, B

    1993-01-01

    The problems of certifying work capability for people with the symptoms of functional and organic diseases of cerebral vessels were investigated basing on the documentation of 470 medical consultations performed at the Out-Patient Department of Occupational Diseases, the Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland. The certification was most difficult in people with angiogenic headache, symptoms of transient cerebral ischaemia and apoplexy with non-intensive deficiency signs. The certification criteria most appropriate for that group of diseases were formulated.

  12. Delayed astrocytic contact with cerebral blood vessels in FGF-2 deficient mice does not compromise permeability properties at the developing blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Norman R; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Unsicker, Klaus; Ek, C Joakim

    2016-11-01

    The brain functions within a specialized environment tightly controlled by brain barrier mechanisms. Understanding the regulation of barrier formation is important for understanding brain development and may also lead to finding new ways to deliver pharmacotherapies to the brain; access of many potentially promising drugs is severely hindered by these barrier mechanisms. The cellular composition of the neurovascular unit of the blood-brain barrier proper and their effects on regulation of its function are beginning to be understood. One hallmark of the neurovascular unit in the adult is the astroglial foot processes that tightly surround cerebral blood vessels. However their role in barrier formation is still unclear. In this study we examined barrier function in newborn, juvenile and adult mice lacking fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), which has been shown to result in altered astroglial differentiation during development. We show that during development of FGF-2 deficient mice the astroglial contacts with cerebral blood vessels are delayed compared with wild-type animals. However, this delay did not result in changes to the permeability properties of the blood brain barrier as assessed by exclusion of either small or larger sized molecules at this interface. In addition cerebral vessels were positive for tight-junction proteins and we observed no difference in the ultrastructure of the tight-junctions. The results indicate that the direct contact of astroglia processes to cerebral blood vessels is not necessary for either the formation of the tight-junctions or for basic permeability properties and function of the blood-brain barrier. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 1201-1212, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Transportable, small high-pressure preservation vessel for cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamimura, N; Sotome, S; Shimizu, A; Nakajima, K; Yoshimura, Y

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reported that the survival rate of astrocytes increases under high-pressure conditions at 4 0 C. However, pressure vessels generally have numerous problems for use in cell preservation and transportation: (1) they cannot be readily separated from the pressurizing pump in the pressurized state; (2) they are typically heavy and expensive due the use of materials such as stainless steel; and (3) it is difficult to regulate pressurization rate with hand pumps. Therefore, we developed a transportable high-pressure system suitable for cell preservation under high-pressure conditions. This high-pressure vessel has the following characteristics: (1) it can be easily separated from the pressurizing pump due to the use of a cock-type stop valve; (2) it is small and compact, is made of PEEK and weighs less than 200 g; and (3) pressurization rate is regulated by an electric pump instead of a hand pump. Using this transportable high-pressure vessel for cell preservation, we found that astrocytes can survive for 4 days at 1.6 MPa and 4 0 C.

  14. Small vessel disease is linked to disrupted structural network covariance in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, Sean M; Mišić, Bratislav; Ramirez, Joel; Zhao, Jiali; Graham, Simon J; Verhoeff, Nicolaas P L G; Stuss, Donald T; Masellis, Mario; Black, Sandra E

    2017-07-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is thought to contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD) through abnormalities in white matter networks. Gray matter (GM) hub covariance networks share only partial overlap with white matter connectivity, and their relationship with SVD has not been examined in AD. We developed a multivariate analytical pipeline to elucidate the cortical GM thickness systems that covary with major network hubs and assessed whether SVD and neurodegenerative pathologic markers were associated with attenuated covariance network integrity in mild AD and normal elderly control subjects. SVD burden was associated with reduced posterior cingulate corticocortical GM network integrity and subneocorticocortical hub network integrity in AD. These findings provide evidence that SVD is linked to the selective disruption of cortical hub GM networks in AD brains and point to the need to consider GM hub covariance networks when assessing network disruption in mixed disease. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantitative CT analysis of small pulmonary vessels in lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Katsutoshi; Tobino, Kazunori; Kurihara, Masatoshi; Kataoka, Hideyuki; Doi, Tokuhide; Hoshika, Yoshito; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Seyama, Kuniaki

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds: Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a destructive lung disease that share clinical, physiologic, and radiologic features with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study aims to identify those features that are unique to LAM by using quantitative CT analysis. Methods: We measured total cross-sectional areas of small pulmonary vessels (CSA) less than 5 mm 2 and 5–10 mm 2 and calculated percentages of those lung areas (%CSA), respectively, in 50 LAM and 42 COPD patients. The extent of cystic destruction (LAA%) and mean parenchymal CT value were also calculated and correlated with pulmonary function. Results: The diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide/alveolar volume (DL CO /VA %predicted) was similar for both groups (LAM, 44.4 ± 19.8% vs. COPD, 45.7 ± 16.0%, p = 0.763), but less tissue damage occurred in LAM than COPD (LAA% 21.7 ± 16.3% vs. 29.3 ± 17.0; p CO /VA %predicted, %CSA and mean parenchymal CT value were still greater for LAM than COPD (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Quantitative CT analysis revealing a correlation between cystic destruction and CSA in COPD but not LAM indicates that this approach successfully reflects different mechanisms governing the two pathologic courses. Such determinations of small pulmonary vessel density may serve to differentiate LAM from COPD even in patients with severe lung destruction.

  16. Case of Small Vessel Disease Associated with COL4A1 Mutations following Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao McONeil Plancher

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With this case report, we would like to heighten the awareness of clinicians about COL4A1 as a single-gene disorder causing cerebral small vessel disease and describe a previously unreported pathogenic missense substitution in COL4A1 (p.Gly990Val and a new clinical presentation. We identified a heterozygous putatively pathogenic mutation of COL4A1 in a 50-year-old female with a history of congenital cataracts and glaucoma who presented with multiple diffusion-positive infarcts and areas of contrast enhancement following mild head trauma. We believe that this presentation of multiple areas of acute brain and vascular injury in the setting of mild head trauma is a new manifestation of this genetic disorder. Imaging findings of multiple acute infarcts and regions of contrast enhancement with associated asymptomatic old deep microhemorrhages and leukomalacia in adults after head trauma should raise a high suspicion for a COL4A1 genetic disorder. Radiographic patterns of significant leukoaraiosis and deep microhemorrhages can also be seen in patients with long-standing vasculopathy associated with hypertension, which our patient lacked. Our findings demonstrate the utility of genetic screening for COL4A1 mutations in young patients who have small vessel vasculopathy on brain imaging but who do not have significant cardiovascular risk factors.

  17. Effects of the duration of hyperlipidemia on cerebral lipids, vessels and neurons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weichun; Shi, He; Zhang, Jianfen; Shen, Ziyi; Zhou, Guangyu; Hu, Minyu

    2017-01-31

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of hyperlipidemia on the cerebral lipids, vessels and neurons of rats, and to provide experimental evidence for subsequent intervention. One hundred adult SD rats, half of which were male and half of which were female, were randomly divided into five groups on the basis of serum total cholesterol (TC) levels. Four groups were fed a hypercholesterolemic diet (rat chow supplemented with 4% cholesterol, 1% cholic acid and 0.5% thiouracil - this is also called a CCT diet) for periods of 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks and 4 weeks, respectively. A control group was included. The levels of serum lipids, cerebral lipids, free fatty acids (FFA), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL), A-beta precursor proteins (APP), amyloid beta (Aβ), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and tight junction protein Claudin-5 were measured after the experiment. The pathologic changes and apoptosis of the rat brains were evaluated. Compared with the control group, after 1 week of a CCT diet, the levels of serum total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and brain triglycerides had increased by 2.40, 1.29 and 1.75 and 0.3 times, respectively. The serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) had decreased by 0.74 times (P neurons, had increased (P neurons had increased (P neuronal apoptosis in the rat brains, and they all were negatively correlated with Claudin-5 (P neurons by causing the secretion of TNF-α and IL-1 in the brains of rats. In the metabolic procession, brain tissue was shown to generate FFA that aggravated the biosynthesis of ox-LDL. With the extension of the duration of hyperlipidemia, high levels of cerebral TC and LDL-C were shown to aggravate the deposition of Aβ, induce the secretion of VEGF, reduce the expression of tight

  18. In vivo imaging of stepwise vessel occlusion in cerebral photothrombosis of mice by 19F MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesa Weise

    Full Text Available (19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was recently introduced as a promising technique for in vivo cell tracking. In the present study we compared (19F MRI with iron-enhanced MRI in mice with photothrombosis (PT at 7 Tesla. PT represents a model of focal cerebral ischemia exhibiting acute vessel occlusion and delayed neuroinflammation.Perfluorocarbons (PFC or superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO were injected intravenously at different time points after photothrombotic infarction. While administration of PFC directly after PT induction led to a strong (19F signal throughout the entire lesion, two hours delayed application resulted in a rim-like (19F signal at the outer edge of the lesion. These findings closely resembled the distribution of signal loss on T2-weighted MRI seen after SPIO injection reflecting intravascular accumulation of iron particles trapped in vessel thrombi as confirmed histologically. By sequential administration of two chemically shifted PFC compounds 0 and 2 hours after illumination the different spatial distribution of the (19F markers (infarct core/rim could be visualized in the same animal. When PFC were applied at day 6 the fluorine marker was only detected after long acquisition times ex vivo. SPIO-enhanced MRI showed slight signal loss in vivo which was much more prominent ex vivo indicative for neuroinflammation at this late lesion stage.Our study shows that vessel occlusion can be followed in vivo by (19F and SPIO-enhanced high-field MRI while in vivo imaging of neuroinflammation remains challenging. The timing of contrast agent application was the major determinant of the underlying processes depicted by both imaging techniques. Importantly, sequential application of different PFC compounds allowed depiction of ongoing vessel occlusion from the core to the margin of the ischemic lesions in a single MRI measurement.

  19. Dense Deposit Disease Mimicking a Renal Small Vessel Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lavleen; Bhardwaj, Swati; Sinha, Aditi; Bagga, Arvind; Dinda, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Dense deposit disease is caused by fluid-phase dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway and frequently deviates from the classic membranoproliferative pattern of injury on light microscopy. Other patterns of injury described for dense deposit disease include mesangioproliferative, acute proliferative/exudative, and crescentic GN. Regardless of the histologic pattern, C3 glomerulopathy, which includes dense deposit disease and C3 GN, is defined by immunofluorescence intensity of C3c two or more orders of magnitude greater than any other immune reactant (on a 0–3 scale). Ultrastructural appearances distinguish dense deposit disease and C3 GN. Focal and segmental necrotizing glomerular lesions with crescents, mimicking a small vessel vasculitis such as ANCA-associated GN, are a very rare manifestation of dense deposit disease. We describe our experience with this unusual histologic presentation and distinct clinical course of dense deposit disease, discuss the pitfalls in diagnosis, examine differential diagnoses, and review the relevant literature. PMID:26361799

  20. 'Variant' angina: Evidence for small vessel coronary artery spasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfisterer, M.; Mueller-Brand, J.; Cueni, T.; Luetold, B.; Burkart, F.; Basel Univ.

    1980-01-01

    A unique case of 'variant' angina pectoris has been observed in a patient with normal coronary arteries and typical chest pain appearing spontaneously at rest, and repeatedly provoked by ergonovine maleate (0.1 mg iv) associated with large transmural perfusion defects on 201 TI-imaging (after ergonovine) and a marked increase in T wave voltage despite no demonstrable spasm of a major coronary artery after the same doses of ergonovine. While saline solution could not provoke chest pain and treatment with a beta-blocking agent increased the frequency of ischemic attacks, a calcium antangonist therapy reduced and eventually eliminated the attacks. Thus, this case provides evidence for yet another aspect of a 'variant' form of angina pectoris: small vessel coronary artery spasm. (orig.) [de

  1. Quantitative CT analysis of small pulmonary vessels in lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Katsutoshi, E-mail: kando@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); The Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); Tobino, Kazunori [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Iizuka Hospital, 3-83 Yoshio-Machi, Iizuka-City, Fukuoka 820-8505 (Japan); The Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); Kurihara, Masatoshi; Kataoka, Hideyuki [Pneumothorax Center, Nissan Tamagawa Hospital, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); The Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); Doi, Tokuhide [Fukuoka Clinic, 7-18-11 Umeda, Adachi-Ku, Tokyo 123-0851 (Japan); Hoshika, Yoshito [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); The Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); Takahashi, Kazuhisa [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Seyama, Kuniaki [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); The Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Backgrounds: Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a destructive lung disease that share clinical, physiologic, and radiologic features with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study aims to identify those features that are unique to LAM by using quantitative CT analysis. Methods: We measured total cross-sectional areas of small pulmonary vessels (CSA) less than 5 mm{sup 2} and 5–10 mm{sup 2} and calculated percentages of those lung areas (%CSA), respectively, in 50 LAM and 42 COPD patients. The extent of cystic destruction (LAA%) and mean parenchymal CT value were also calculated and correlated with pulmonary function. Results: The diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide/alveolar volume (DL{sub CO}/VA %predicted) was similar for both groups (LAM, 44.4 ± 19.8% vs. COPD, 45.7 ± 16.0%, p = 0.763), but less tissue damage occurred in LAM than COPD (LAA% 21.7 ± 16.3% vs. 29.3 ± 17.0; p < 0.05). Pulmonary function correlated negatively with LAA% (p < 0.001) in both groups, yet the correlation with %CSA was significant only in COPD (p < 0.001). When the same analysis was conducted in two groups with equal levels of LAA% and DL{sub CO}/VA %predicted, %CSA and mean parenchymal CT value were still greater for LAM than COPD (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Quantitative CT analysis revealing a correlation between cystic destruction and CSA in COPD but not LAM indicates that this approach successfully reflects different mechanisms governing the two pathologic courses. Such determinations of small pulmonary vessel density may serve to differentiate LAM from COPD even in patients with severe lung destruction.

  2. Phase contrast MR imaging measurements of blood flow in healthy human cerebral vessel segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, Matthew Ethan; Frayne, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Phase contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging was used to obtain velocity measurements in 30 healthy subjects to provide an assessment of hemodynamic parameters in cerebral vessels. We expect a lower coefficient-of-variation (COV) of the volume flow rate (VFR) compared to peak velocity (v_p_e_a_k) measurements and the COV to increase in smaller caliber arteries compared to large arteries.PC velocity maps were processed to calculate v_p_e_a_k and VFR in 26 vessel segments. The mean, standard deviation and COV, of v_p_e_a_k and VFR in each segment were calculated. A bootstrap-style analysis was used to determine the minimum number of subjects required to accurately represent the population. Significance of v_p_e_a_k and VFR asymmetry was assessed in 10 vessel pairs.The bootstrap analysis suggested that averaging more than 20 subjects would give consistent results. When averaged over the subjects, v_p_e_a_k and VFR ranged from 5.2 ± 7.1 cm s"−"1, 0.41 ± 0.58 ml s"−"1 (in the anterior communicating artery; mean ± standard deviation) to 73 ± 23 cm s"−"1, 7.6 ± 1.7 ml s"−"1 (in the left internal carotid artery), respectively. A tendency for VFR to be higher in the left hemisphere was observed in 88.8% of artery pairs, while the VFR in the right transverse sinus was larger. The VFR COV was larger than v_p_e_a_k COV in 57.7% of segments, while smaller vessels had higher COV.Significance and potential impact: VFR COV was not generally higher than v_p_e_a_k COV. COV was higher in smaller vessels as expected. These summarized values provide a base against which v_p_e_a_k and VFR in various disease states can be compared. (paper)

  3. Dolichoectasia and Small Vessel Disease in Young Patients With Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Vincent; Grittner, Ulrike; Fazekas, Franz; McCabe, Dominick J H; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Kessler, Christof; Martus, Peter; Norrving, Bo; Ringelstein, Erich Bernd; Schmidt, Reinhold; Tanislav, Christian; Putaala, Jukka; Tatlisumak, Turgut; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Rolfs, Arndt; Enzinger, Christian

    2017-09-01

    We evaluated whether basilar dolichoectasia is associated with markers of cerebral small vessel disease in younger transient ischemic attack and ischemic stroke patients. We used data from the SIFAP1 study (Stroke in Young Fabry Patients), a large prospective, hospital-based, screening study for Fabry disease in young (ischemic attack/stroke patients in whom detailed clinical data and brain MRI were obtained, and stroke subtyping with TOAST classification (Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) was performed. Dolichoectasia was found in 508 of 3850 (13.2%) of patients. Dolichoectasia was associated with older age (odds ratio per decade, 1.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.44), male sex (odds ratio, 1.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.59-2.42), and hypertension (odds ratio, 1.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.70). Dolichoectasia was more common in patients with small infarctions (33.9% versus 29.8% for acute lesions, P =0.065; 29.1% versus 16.5% for old lesions, P ischemic attack and ischemic stroke. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00414583. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. MR angiography of the cerebral vessels with inflow-increased visualization by overcontiguous imaging and advanced processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLachian, S.; Simon, H.E.; de Graaf, R.; Ho, A.M.; Ruccio, W.J.; Steidley, J.W.; Pradhan, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to increase the visualization of cerebral vessels with MR angiography by using an inflow technique from transverse sections. Difficulties with visualization include the tortuous nature of the vessels and slow blood flow. The MR method is a transverse two-dimensional multiple single-section sequence with a velocity-compensated gradient echo and presaturation. A S15 imager with 10-mTm gradients and a prototype angiographic package is used. Overcontiguous acquisition yields smaller effective center-to-center sections. Interpolation is used to generate interleaved plane projections. A combination of image parameter swill reduce the level of the stationary tissue relative to the flowing blood. For vessels that are not perpendicular to the section, overlapping the sections by 25%--33% is shown to reduce the staircase appearance without affecting the apparent size of the vessels. Interpolation of the MR images will further reduce this artifact, giving the vessels a smooth structure. MR angiography of the brain performed with an inflow technique allows the visualization of vessels in the brain even if the vessels follow tortuous paths. Presaturation and user-defined regions of interest can be used for ease of interpretation

  5. Microsurgical Repair of Ruptured Aneurysms Associated with Moyamoya-Pattern Collateral Vessels of the Middle Cerebral Artery: A Report of Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Min; Moore, Nina Z; Witek, Alex M; Kshettry, Varun R; Bain, Mark D

    2017-09-01

    Patients with Moyamoya or other intracranial steno-occlusive disease are at risk for developing aneurysms associated with flow through collateral vessels. Because these lesions are rare, the optimal management remains unclear. Here, we describe 2 cases of microsurgical repair of ruptured collateral vessel aneurysms associated with middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion. The first patient was a 61-year-old man who presented with right frontal and intraventricular hemorrhage. Angiography revealed chronic right M1 occlusion and a 3-mm spherical lenticulostriate aneurysm. The frontal lobe hematoma was evacuated to reveal the aneurysm, which was safely cauterized and resected by coagulating and dividing the lenticulostriate parent vessel. The procedure was carried out with neuronavigation guidance and intraoperative neuromonitoring. The patient was discharged with no neurologic deficits. The second patient was a 53-year-old woman who presented with subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage. Computed tomography angiogram showed a 2-mm saccular MCA aneurysm. Emergency left decompressive hemicraniectomy and hematoma evacuation were performed. The aneurysm, arising from a small collateral type vessel, was safely clipped without complications. Postoperative angiography revealed absence of the superior MCA trunk with a dense network of collateral vessels at the site of the clipped aneurysm. The patient recovered well and was ambulating independently 6 months postoperatively. No rebleeding occurred in the 2 patients. Our experience suggests that patients with MCA occlusion can harbor associated aneurysms related to flow through collateral vessels and can present with hemorrhage. Microsurgical repair of these aneurysms can be performed safely to prevent rebleeding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Vitamin D Status in Small Vessel and Large Vessel Ischemic Stroke Patients: A Case–control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Manouchehri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin D insufficiency is a globally widespread issue. Recent studies have reported a high prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency in Middle-East countries. Studies have shown negative effects of Vitamin D deficiency on endothelium and related diseases such as ischemic brain stroke. Here, we assessed Vitamin D status in patients with different types of ischemic brain stroke and control group. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five patients (49.3% small vessel, 50.7% large vessel and 75 controls, matched for age (68.01 ± 10.94 vs. 67.64 ± 10.24 and sex (42 male and 33 female were recruited. 25(OH D levels were measured by Chemiluminescence immunoassay. 25(OH D status was considered as severely, moderately, or mildly deficient and normal with 25(OH D levels of less than 5, 5-10, 10-16, and> 16 ng/ml, respectively. Results: Mean ± standard error concentration of 25(OH D in cases and controls were 17.7 ± 1.5 and 26.9 ± 1.6 (P = 0.0001, respectively. Mild, moderate, and severe Vitamin D deficiency were observed in 10.8%, 32.4%, 8.1% vs. 34.3%, 31.5%, 9.5% of small vessel and large vessel group, respectively. 21.7% of the controls were Vitamin D deficient. Vitamin D deficiency was significantly associated with higher risk for ischemic stroke, (P = 0.000, OR = 7.17, 95% confidence interval: 3.36–15.29. 25(OH D levels were significantly higher in control group comparing to small vessel (26.9 ± 1.6 vs. 20.59 ± 2.6 P < 0.05 and large vessel (26.9 ± 1.6 vs. 13.4 ± 1.3 P < 0.001 stroke patients. Small vessel group had significantly higher levels of Vitamin D than large vessel (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency significantly increases the risk of ischemic stroke, favoring the types with the pathogenesis of large vessel strokes.

  7. [Conjunct changes in the resistance and engorgement of the cerebral vessels in shifts in the blood gas composition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasil'nikov, V G; Artem'eva, A I

    1982-08-01

    In anesthetized cats, under perfusion and with constant volume of the hemodynamically isolated brain, hypercapnia and hypoxia led to a decrease of cerebral vessels resistance and to a reduction of the brain blood flow, whereas a decrease in the PCO2 and an increase in the PO2 in the blood exerted on opposite effect. The different responses of the vessels had some similar features in respect to threshold changes of the PCO2 and PO2, to potentiation of effects of both parts of the brain vascular system on increased shifts of the blood gas tension, to greater sensitivity of both parts to PCO2 changes, to effect of the blood gas tension on reactivity of both parts to noradrenaline. The authors suggest a possibility of alterations of the filter-absorption interrelationships in the brain due to different responses of arterial and venous vessels to changes of the blood gas tension.

  8. Modeling the Role of the Glymphatic Pathway and Cerebral Blood Vessel Properties in Alzheimer’s Disease Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrtsos, Christina Rose; Baras, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, affecting over 10% population over the age of 65 years. Clinically, AD is described by the symptom set of short term memory loss and cognitive decline, changes in mentation and behavior, and eventually long-term memory deficit as the disease progresses. On imaging studies, significant atrophy with subsequent increase in ventricular volume have been observed. Pathology on post-mortem brain specimens demonstrates the classic findings of increased beta amyloid (Aβ) deposition and the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) within affected neurons. Neuroinflammation, dysregulation of blood-brain barrier transport and clearance, deposition of Aβ in cerebral blood vessels, vascular risk factors such as atherosclerosis and diabetes, and the presence of the apolipoprotein E4 allele have all been identified as playing possible roles in AD pathogenesis. Recent research has demonstrated the importance of the glymphatic system in the clearance of Aβ from the brain via the perivascular space surrounding cerebral blood vessels. Given the variety of hypotheses that have been proposed for AD pathogenesis, an interconnected, multilayer model offers a unique opportunity to combine these ideas into a single unifying model. Results of this model demonstrate the importance of vessel stiffness and heart rate in maintaining adequate clearance of Aβ from the brain. PMID:26448331

  9. Cannulation and continuous cross-sectional area measurement of small blood vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanBavel, E.; Mooij, T.; Giezeman, M. J.; Spaan, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Techniques have been developed for the study of isolated small arteries. To pressurize and perfuse segments of these vessels, a cannula with a low resistance to flow was developed. This cannula consisted of two concentric micropipettes. The end of a vessel segment was sucked into the inner pipette

  10. Cerebral ischemia produced by four-vessel occlusion in the rat: a quantitative evaluation of cerebral blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furlow, T.W. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia was produced in the rat by simultaneous occlusion of the vertebral and carotid arteries according to the method of Pulsinelli and Brierley (Stroke 10: 267, 1979). Local cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined by polarographic and autoradiographic techniques. Hydrogen-clearance measurements showed that mean CBF fell in four monitored regions of the hemispheres to between 0.11 and 0.18 ml/g/min, being least in deep rostal gray, intermediate in superficial gray, and greatest in deep caudal gray. However, individual animals had local CBF in excess of 0.20 and even 0.30 ml/g/min, and no animal showed zero CBF. When animals were rendered hypotensive (MABP of 50 Torr) during vascular occlusion, mean CBF ranged between 0.03 and 0.10 ml/g/min in the same regional order. With hypotension, total arrest of flow occurred. Autoradiographic data confirmed the above findings and indicated adequate CBF to the lower brainstem. During vascular occlusion, sufficient CBF may be present ot sustain cerebral tissue as in animals with a well developed spinal circulation or an inadvertently patent vertebral artery

  11. Report of the DHS National Small Vessel Security Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-19

    Fetterman , Maine Department of Marine Resources Lt Bill Krul, Marine Patrol, St. Clair County, Michigan Sgt Jim Lambert, Marine Patrol, Alameda...Major John C. Fetterman – State of Maine Major Fetterman currently serves as Vice President of the National Association of State Boating Law...or seemingly out of place vessel enters a maritime community, it will attract the attention of his officers. Major Fetterman was concerned that

  12. Measurement of flow velocity fields in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals using micro ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (micro-EPIV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Ming; Niu Lili; Jiang Bo; Jin Qiaofeng; Jiang Chunxiang; Zheng Hairong; Wang Yanping

    2010-01-01

    Determining a multidimensional velocity field within microscale opaque fluid flows is needed in areas such as microfluidic devices, biofluid mechanics and hemodynamics research in animal studies. The ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (EchoPIV) technique is appropriate for measuring opaque flows by taking advantage of PIV and B-mode ultrasound contrast imaging. However, the use of clinical ultrasound systems for imaging flows in small structures or animals has limitations associated with spatial resolution. This paper reports on the development of a high-resolution EchoPIV technique (termed as micro-EPIV) and its application in measuring flows in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals. Phantom experiments demonstrate the validity of the technique, providing velocity estimates within 4.1% of the analytically derived values with regard to the flows in a small straight vessel-mimic phantom, and velocity estimates within 5.9% of the computationally simulated values with regard to the flows in a small stenotic vessel-mimic phantom. Animal studies concerning arterial and venous flows of living rats and rabbits show that the micro-EPIV-measured peak velocities within several cardiac cycles are about 25% below the values measured by the ultrasonic spectral Doppler technique. The micro-EPIV technique is able to effectively measure the flow fields within microscale opaque fluid flows.

  13. Measurement of flow velocity fields in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals using micro ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (micro-EPIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ming; Niu, Lili; Wang, Yanping; Jiang, Bo; Jin, Qiaofeng; Jiang, Chunxiang; Zheng, Hairong

    2010-10-21

    Determining a multidimensional velocity field within microscale opaque fluid flows is needed in areas such as microfluidic devices, biofluid mechanics and hemodynamics research in animal studies. The ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (EchoPIV) technique is appropriate for measuring opaque flows by taking advantage of PIV and B-mode ultrasound contrast imaging. However, the use of clinical ultrasound systems for imaging flows in small structures or animals has limitations associated with spatial resolution. This paper reports on the development of a high-resolution EchoPIV technique (termed as micro-EPIV) and its application in measuring flows in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals. Phantom experiments demonstrate the validity of the technique, providing velocity estimates within 4.1% of the analytically derived values with regard to the flows in a small straight vessel-mimic phantom, and velocity estimates within 5.9% of the computationally simulated values with regard to the flows in a small stenotic vessel-mimic phantom. Animal studies concerning arterial and venous flows of living rats and rabbits show that the micro-EPIV-measured peak velocities within several cardiac cycles are about 25% below the values measured by the ultrasonic spectral Doppler technique. The micro-EPIV technique is able to effectively measure the flow fields within microscale opaque fluid flows.

  14. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy severity is linked to dilation of juxtacortical perivascular spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veluw, Susanne J; Biessels, Geert Jan; Bouvy, Willem H; Spliet, Wim Gm; Zwanenburg, Jaco Jm; Luijten, Peter R; Macklin, Eric A; Rozemuller, Annemieke Jm; Gurol, M Edip; Greenberg, Steven M; Viswanathan, Anand; Martinez-Ramirez, Sergi

    2016-01-01

    Perivascular spaces are an emerging marker of small vessel disease. Perivascular spaces in the centrum semiovale have been associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy. However, a direct topographical relationship between dilated perivascular spaces and cerebral amyloid angiopathy severity has not

  15. Small-vessel Survey and Auction Sampling to Estimate Growth and Maturity of Eteline Snappers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Small-vessel Survey and Auction Sampling to Estimate Growth and Maturity of Eteline Snappers and Improve Data-Limited Stock Assessments. This biosampling project...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: COL4A1-related brain small-vessel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hemorrhage Johns Hopkins Medicine Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery: Intracerebral Hemorrhage Johns Hopkins Medicine Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery: Stroke MalaCards: col4a1-related brain small-vessel disease ...

  17. Computed tomography depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, Gonca; Courtier, Jesse L.; Phelps, Andrew; Marcovici, Peter A.; MacKenzie, John D. [UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is extremely important in characterizing blood vessel anatomy and vascular lesions in children. Recent advances in CT reconstruction technology hold promise for improved image quality and also reductions in radiation dose. This report evaluates potential improvements in image quality for the depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo trademark), a technique developed to improve image quality and reduce noise. To evaluate Veo trademark as an improved method when compared to adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR trademark) for the depiction of small vessels on pediatric CT. Seventeen patients (mean age: 3.4 years, range: 2 days to 10.0 years; 6 girls, 11 boys) underwent contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest and abdomen in this HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved study. Raw data were reconstructed into separate image datasets using Veo trademark and ASIR trademark algorithms (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). Four blinded radiologists subjectively evaluated image quality. The pulmonary, hepatic, splenic and renal arteries were evaluated for the length and number of branches depicted. Datasets were compared with parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Readers stated a preference for Veo trademark over ASIR trademark images when subjectively evaluating image quality criteria for vessel definition, image noise and resolution of small anatomical structures. The mean image noise in the aorta and fat was significantly less for Veo trademark vs. ASIR trademark reconstructed images. Quantitative measurements of mean vessel lengths and number of branches vessels delineated were significantly different for Veo trademark and ASIR trademark images. Veo trademark consistently showed more of the vessel anatomy: longer vessel length and more branching vessels. When compared to the more established adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, model

  18. Computed tomography depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koc, Gonca; Courtier, Jesse L.; Phelps, Andrew; Marcovici, Peter A.; MacKenzie, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is extremely important in characterizing blood vessel anatomy and vascular lesions in children. Recent advances in CT reconstruction technology hold promise for improved image quality and also reductions in radiation dose. This report evaluates potential improvements in image quality for the depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo trademark), a technique developed to improve image quality and reduce noise. To evaluate Veo trademark as an improved method when compared to adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR trademark) for the depiction of small vessels on pediatric CT. Seventeen patients (mean age: 3.4 years, range: 2 days to 10.0 years; 6 girls, 11 boys) underwent contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest and abdomen in this HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved study. Raw data were reconstructed into separate image datasets using Veo trademark and ASIR trademark algorithms (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). Four blinded radiologists subjectively evaluated image quality. The pulmonary, hepatic, splenic and renal arteries were evaluated for the length and number of branches depicted. Datasets were compared with parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Readers stated a preference for Veo trademark over ASIR trademark images when subjectively evaluating image quality criteria for vessel definition, image noise and resolution of small anatomical structures. The mean image noise in the aorta and fat was significantly less for Veo trademark vs. ASIR trademark reconstructed images. Quantitative measurements of mean vessel lengths and number of branches vessels delineated were significantly different for Veo trademark and ASIR trademark images. Veo trademark consistently showed more of the vessel anatomy: longer vessel length and more branching vessels. When compared to the more established adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, model

  19. Correlation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 single nucleotide polymorphisms with the risk of small vessel disease (SVD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Zhu, Wusheng; Yun, Wenwei; Wang, Qizhang; Cheng, Maogang; Zhang, Zhizhong; Liu, Xinfeng; Zhou, Xianju; Xu, Gelin

    2015-09-15

    Maladjustment of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) results in cerebral vasculature and blood-brain barrier dysfunction, which is associated with small vessel disease (SVD). This study was to aim at evaluating correlations between matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms and the risk of SVD. A total of 178 patients with SVD were enrolled into this study via Nanjing Stroke Registry Program (NSRP) from January 2010 to November 2011. SVD patients were further subtyped as isolated lacunar infarction (ILI, absent or with mild leukoaraiosis) and ischemic leukoaraiosis (ILA, with moderate or severe leukoaraiosis) according to the Fazekas scale. 100 age- and gender-matched individuals from outpatient medical examination were recruited as the control group. The genotypes of MMP-2-1306 T/C and MMP-9-1562 C/T were determined by the TaqMan method. Of 178 SVD patients, 86 and 92 patients were classified as ILI and ILA, respectively. Comparison analysis between SVD patients and controls revealed a significant correlation between SVD and hypertension, as well as a prevalence of hypertension in ILA. Further genotype analysis showed that the frequency of MMP-2-1306 CC genotype was higher in ILA patients than in controls (P=0.009, χ(2) test; P=0.027, the multiple test with Bonferroni correction). Finally, logistic regression analysis with adjustment of age, sex and vascular risk factors showed that the MMP-2-1306 T/C polymorphism was an independent predictor for ILA (OR: 2.605; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.067-6.364; P=0.036). Our findings suggest that the MMP-2-1306 T/C polymorphism is a direct risk factor for ILA. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Small vessel vasculitis History, classification, etiology, histopathology, clinic, diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Matteson, Eric L; Restrepo, Jose Felix

    2007-01-01

    Small-vessel vasculitis is a convenient descriptor for a wide range of diseases characterized by vascular inflammation of the venules, capillaries, and/or arterioles with pleomorphic clinical manifestations. The classical clinical phenotype is leucocytoclastic vasculitis with palpable purpura, but manifestations vary widely depending upon the organs involved. Histopathologic examination in leucocytoclastic vasculitis reveals angiocentric segmental inflammation, fibrinoid necrosis, and a neutrophilic infiltrate around the blood vessel walls with erythrocyte extravasation. The etiology of small-vessel vasculitis is unknown in many cases, but in others, drugs, post viral syndromes, malignancy, primary vasculitis such as microscopic polyarteritis, and connective tissue disorders are associated, The diagnosis of small- vessel vasculitis relies on a thorough history and physical examination, as well as relevant antibody testing including antinuclear antibody and anti neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, hepatitis B and C serologies, assessment of complement, immunoglobulins, blood count, serum creatinine liver function tests, urinalysis, radiographic imaging and biopsy. The treatment is based primarily on corticosteroid and immunosuppressive agents

  1. Relationship between cerebral angiography, Doppler ultrasound velocimetry in the major cervical vessels and cerebral blood flow as determined by cerebrography using xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seebach, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of patient data gave evidence to prove that the findings revealed in the major cervical vessels by means of the Doppler ultrasound technique and angiography were largely consistent (in 82-90.8% of cases); the Doppler flow values recorded for advanced stenoses, by contrast with those obtained in stenoses of a minor degree were always characterised by a distinctive pattern; unless the patient examined showed acute ischemia, stenoses of the two carotid arteries or the vertebral artery had no perceptible influence on the rCBF values; the most valuable information as to the quality of cerebral blood flow was provided by the parameters of the Doppler ultrasound technique; reduced rCBF and Doppler flow values confirmed the preliminary diagnosis in cases of suspected generalised arteriosclerosis. (TRV) [de

  2. Macular Choroidal Small-Vessel Layer, Sattler's Layer and Haller's Layer Thicknesses: The Beijing Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Ya Xing; Zhang, Qi; Wei, Wen Bin; Xu, Liang; Jonas, Jost B

    2018-03-13

    To study macular choroidal layer thickness, 3187 study participants from the population-based Beijing Eye Study underwent spectral-domain optical coherence tomography with enhanced depth imaging for thickness measurements of the macular small-vessel layer, including the choriocapillaris, medium-sized choroidal vessel layer (Sattler's layer) and large choroidal vessel layer (Haller's layer). In multivariate analysis, greater thickness of all three choroidal layers was associated (all P  0.05) associated with the prevalence of open-angle glaucoma or diabetic retinopathy. There was a tendency (0.07 > P > 0.02) toward thinner choroidal layers in chronic angle-closure glaucoma. The ratio of small-vessel layer thickness to total choroidal thickness increased (P layer and Haller's layer thickness to total choroidal thickness decreased. A higher ratio of small-vessel layer thickness to total choroidal thickness was significantly associated with a lower prevalence of AMD (early type, intermediate type, late geographic type). Axial elongation-associated and aging-associated choroidal thinning affected Haller's and Sattler's layers more markedly than the small-vessel layer. Non-exudative and exudative AMD, except for geographic atrophy, was associated with slightly increased choroidal thickness.

  3. Small, smooth, nonmobile cardiac myxoma detected by transesophageal echocardiography following recurrent cerebral infarction: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuki; Aizawa, Yoshihiro; Monno, Koyuru; Nagashima, Koichi; Kurokawa, Sayaka; Osaka, Shunji; Akimoto, Takayoshi; Kamei, Satoshi; Tanaka, Masashi; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2017-05-10

    Cardiac myxoma is known to cause repeated events of cerebral embolism. Soft and irregularly shaped myxomas with high mobility are associated with a higher occurrence of cerebral embolism. In contrast, nonmobile cardiac myxomas with a round regular shape are rarely considered to be a cause of cerebral embolism. In this case, we present a patient with recurrent cerebral embolism associated with a small and nonmobile cardiac myxoma of round regular shape. A 76-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital with weakness in his right upper extremity. He had a history of right frontal lobe infarction in the previous month. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed an area of hyperintensity in the left precentral gyrus, indicating acute cerebral infarction. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed normal left ventricular function and no abnormalities. However, transesophageal echocardiography showed a small and nonmobile left atrial tumor with round regular shape attached to the ostium secundum of the atrial septum. Based on these findings, we diagnosed recurrent cerebral infarction due to embolization caused by left atrial myxoma, and cardiac tumor extraction was performed on hospitalization day 36. The excised tumor measured 0.6 × 0.6 × 0.5 cm and was diagnosed as cardiac myxoma by histologic examination. Even small and nonmobile cardiac myxomas with a round regular shape may cause recurrent cerebral infarction. The diagnosis of this type of atrial myxoma is elusive and transesophageal echocardiography was an effective method of detection. In a clinical situation, this type of cardiac myxoma may be overlooked as a cause of cerebral infarction.

  4. Assessing the Efficiency of Small-Scale and Bottom Trawler Vessels in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Pinello

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the technical and scale efficiency of two types of Greek fishing vessels, small-scale vessels and bottom trawlers, using a bias-corrected input-oriented Data Envelopment Analysis model. Moreover, the associations between efficiency scores and vessel’s and skipper’s characteristics are also explored. The results indicate that small-scale vessels achieve a very low average technical efficiency score (0.42 but a much higher scale efficiency score (0.81. Conversely, bottom trawlers achieve lower scale but higher technical efficiency scores (0.68 and 0.73, respectively. One important finding of this study is that the technical efficiency of small-scale vessels, in contrast to trawlers, is positively associated with the experience of the skipper. In a looser context, it can be said that small-scale fisheries mainly rely on skill, whereas bottom trawlers rely more on technology. This study concludes that there is space for improvement in efficiency, mainly for small-scale vessels, which could allow the achievement of the same level of output by using reduced inputs.

  5. Neuroimaging of cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wengenroth, M.; Saam, T.; Haehnel, S.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vasculitis can have a variety of origins. Furthermore, there are no vasculitis-specific symptoms or imaging signs and vasculitis of the CNS can mimic many other neurological diseases, which require different treatment approaches. Thus, the clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis is challenging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR angiography (MRA) should be the radiological imaging methods of choice to assess the degree of parenchymal damage and to detect vessel wall changes. If the results are unclear digital subtraction angiography (DSA) should be pursued in order to also detect changes in medium sized vessels. Vasculitis of small vessels cannot be detected by vascular imaging and requires brain or leptomeningeal biopsy. In this review we present the current diagnostic approach and a variety of imaging findings in cerebral vasculitis and discuss the main radiological differential diagnoses. (orig.) [de

  6. Middle Cerebral Artery, Ophthalmic Artery, and Multibranch Retinal Vessel Occlusion After Cosmetic Autologous Fat Transfer to Forehead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshandel, Danial; Soheilian, Masoud; Pakravan, Mohammad; Aghayan, Sara; Peyman, Gholam A

    2015-05-01

    A 65-year-old woman with left hemiparesis and sudden loss of visual acuity in her right eye presented a few hours after cosmetic injection of autologous fat to her forehead. Right eye visual acuity was no light perception. Funduscopy revealed widespread retinal whitening and multibranch retinal vessel occlusion. Fluorescein angiography showed markedly delayed choroidal and retinal filling together with occlusion of multiple branches of retinal arteries and veins. On magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, multiple lesions compatible with recent infarction were detected. The authors diagnosed multibranch retinal artery and vein occlusion in the right ophthalmic and middle cerebral arteries due to fat emboli. This case emphasizes the need to reevaluate the safety of such aesthetic procedures, particularly in the facial zone to prevent devastating complications. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Cerebral perfusion computerized tomography: influence of reference vessels, regions of interest and interobserver variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soustiel, Jean F.; Mor, Nadav; Zaaroor, Menashe; Goldsher, Dorith

    2006-01-01

    There are still no standardized guidelines for perfusion computerized tomography (PCT) analysis. A total of 61 PCT studies were analyzed using either the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) or the middle cerebral artery (MCA) as the arterial reference, and the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) or the vein of Galen (VG) as the venous reference. The sizes of regions of interest (ROI) were investigated comparing PCT results obtained using a hemispheric ROI combined with vascular pixel elimination with those obtained using five smaller ROIs located over the cortex and basal ganglia. In addition, interobserver variations were explored using a standardized protocol. MCA-based measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and blood volume (CBV) were in accordance with those obtained with the ACA except in 16 patients with ischemic stroke, in whom CBF was overestimated by the ipsilateral MCA. Venous maximal intensity was significantly lower with the VG when compared with the SSS, resulting in overestimation of CBF and CBV. However, in 13.3% of patients the VG ROI yielded higher maximal intensities than the SSS ROI. There was no difference in PCT results between hemispheric ROI and averaged separate ROI when vascular pixel elimination was used. Finally, interobserver variations were as high as 11% for CBF and 12% for CBV. The present results suggest that pathological rather than anatomical considerations should dictate the choice of the arterial ROI. For venous ROI, although SSS seems to be adequate in most instances, deep cerebral veins may occasionally generate higher maximal intensities and should therefore be selected. Importantly, significant user-dependency should be taken into account. (orig.)

  8. Simulation of onboard power supply system for small hydrographic vessel «Vaygach»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. И. Паньков

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Computer simulation is a method resorted to more and more frequently for the development of the prospective power supply systems, in particular the vessel power supply system. It provides valuable insights into the transient processes and indicators of electric power quality in the system without building its physical model, thus significantly improving the efficiency and quality of the physical model.Nowadays MathLab package with Simulink application is used with increasing frequency for simulation of such systems.The paper presents a model of the power supply system of small hydrographic vessel ‘Vaygach’ built in MatLab environment. The system vulnerabilities and their remedies have been identified. Changes in sinusoid before and after the non-linear load on the network have been demonstrated and solutions for improving the non-linear distortion factor are proposed. The model developed for the vessel power supply system can be used for building models of different vessels.

  9. [Therapeutic effects on cerebral white matter injury of premature infants treated with acupuncture for promoting the governor vessel and tranquilizing the mind].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shuying; Liu, Zhenhuan; Peng, Guilan; Huang, Xinfa; Li, Yinlan; Hu, Shuxiang

    2018-01-12

    To explore the repair effects of acupuncture for promoting the governor vessel and tranquilizing the mind (acupuncture technique) on cerebral white matter injury of premature infants. A total of 56 cases of cerebral whiter matter injury of premature infants, the fetal age less than 35 weeks were selected and randomized into an observation group (27 cases) and a control group (29 cases). The routine basic rehabilitation therapy was used in the two groups. Additionally, in the observation group, the acupuncture technique was added, once a day and the treatment for 15 days was as 1 course. Totally, 3 courses of treatment were required. Before and after treatment, the cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were adopted to observe the location and severity of cerebral white matter injury. The Gesell developmental scale was used to assess the nerve motor development. After treatment, the difference was not significant statistically in the severity of cerebral white matter injury in the infants between the two groups ( P >0.05). The FA value of cerebral white matter in the interesting zone was increased as compared with that before treatment in the infants of the two groups (both P control groups ( P control group (all P 0.05). Acupuncture technique for promoting the governor vessel and tranquilizing the mind promotes the repair of the function in the premature infants with cerebral white matter injury and further benefits the promotion of the intelligence.

  10. High-resolution MRI vessel wall imaging: spatial and temporal patterns of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome and central nervous system vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obusez, E C; Hui, F; Hajj-Ali, R A; Cerejo, R; Calabrese, L H; Hammad, T; Jones, S E

    2014-08-01

    High-resolution MR imaging is an emerging tool for evaluating intracranial artery disease. It has an advantage of defining vessel wall characteristics of intracranial vascular diseases. We investigated high-resolution MR imaging arterial wall characteristics of CNS vasculitis and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome to determine wall pattern changes during a follow-up period. We retrospectively reviewed 3T-high-resolution MR imaging vessel wall studies performed on 26 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of CNS vasculitis and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome during a follow-up period. Vessel wall imaging protocol included black-blood contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences with fat suppression and a saturation band, and time-of-flight MRA of the circle of Willis. Vessel wall characteristics including enhancement, wall thickening, and lumen narrowing were collected. Thirteen patients with CNS vasculitis and 13 patients with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome were included. In the CNS vasculitis group, 9 patients showed smooth, concentric wall enhancement and thickening; 3 patients had smooth, eccentric wall enhancement and thickening; and 1 patient was without wall enhancement and thickening. Six of 13 patients had follow-up imaging; 4 patients showed stable smooth, concentric enhancement and thickening; and 2 patients had resoluton of initial imaging findings. In the reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome group, 10 patients showed diffuse, uniform wall thickening with negligible-to-mild enhancement. Nine patients had follow-up imaging, with 8 patients showing complete resolution of the initial findings. Postgadolinium 3T-high-resolution MR imaging appears to be a feasible tool in differentiating vessel wall patterns of CNS vasculitis and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome changes during a follow-up period. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  11. Morphological evaluation of the cerebral blood vessels in the late gestation fetal sheep following hypoxia in utero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburamani, Ana A; Lo, Camden; Castillo-Melendez, Margie; Walker, David W

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia can significantly contribute to the development of permanent brain injury in the term neonate; however the response of cerebral blood vessels is not well understood. This study aimed to quantitatively measure vascular density and morphology using laminin immunohistochemistry as a marker of blood vessels, and determine the effects of a single, severe bout of hypoxia (umbilical cord occlusion, UCO) late in gestation on the developing cerebrovasculature in fetal sheep. At 124-126 days gestation singleton fetal sheep underwent surgery for implantation of catheters and placement of an inflatable cuff around the umbilical cord. A 10 min UCO or sham UCO (n=5) occurred at 132 days gestation. Fetal brains were collected at 24 h (n=5) or 48 h (n=4) after UCO for vascular density and morphology analysis of laminin immunohistochemistry. 48 h following a single, brief bout of severe hypoxia late in gestation decreased vascular density was seen in the caudate nucleus and no changes in vascular morphology occurred. However closer analysis revealed a significant shift in the frequency of smaller (≤10 μm) to larger (≤100 μm) perimeter blood vessels in periventricular and subcortical white matter. Close examination of the frequency distribution of vascular perimeter highlights that alterations in vascular morphology persist in the near term fetal brain for up to 48 h following a brief (10 min) hypoxia in white but not gray matter. These findings suggest that the near term brain may still be vulnerable to white matter injury following in utero hypoxia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fractal dimension and vessel complexity in patients with cerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot Reishofer

    Full Text Available The fractal dimension (FD can be used as a measure for morphological complexity in biological systems. The aim of this study was to test the usefulness of this quantitative parameter in the context of cerebral vascular complexity. Fractal analysis was applied on ten patients with cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM and ten healthy controls. Maximum intensity projections from Time-of-Flight MRI scans were analyzed using different measurements of FD, the Box-counting dimension, the Minkowski dimension and generalized dimensions evaluated by means of multifractal analysis. The physiological significance of this parameter was investigated by comparing values of FD first, with the maximum slope of contrast media transit obtained from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data and second, with the nidus size obtained from X-ray angiography data. We found that for all methods, the Box-counting dimension, the Minkowski dimension and the generalized dimensions FD was significantly higher in the hemisphere with AVM compared to the hemisphere without AVM indicating that FD is a sensitive parameter to capture vascular complexity. Furthermore we found a high correlation between FD and the maximum slope of contrast media transit and between FD and the size of the central nidus pointing out the physiological relevance of FD. The proposed method may therefore serve as an additional objective parameter, which can be assessed automatically and might assist in the complex workup of AVMs.

  13. Relationship between diminution of small pulmonary vessels and emphysema in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashimo, Shuko; Chubachi, Shotaro; Tsutsumi, Akihiro; Kameyama, Naofumi; Sasaki, Mamoru; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Nakamura, Hidetoshi; Asano, Koichiro; Reilly, John J; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    To investigate the relationship between small pulmonary vessels and extent of emphysema on CT in individual lungs with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Forty-nine patients were included. The percentage of cross-sectional area of vessels emphysema were assessed. Less than half of the COPD patients demonstrated an inverse correlation between %CSA <5 and percentage of low attenuation area (LAA%). In the remaining patients, %CSA <5 was homogeneously distributed. Not all patients with COPD demonstrated an inverse correlation of the distributions between %CSA <5 and LAA% in individual lungs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Parametrically defined cerebral blood vessels as non-invasive blood input functions for brain PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asselin, Marie-Claude; Cunningham, Vincent J; Amano, Shigeko; Gunn, Roger N; Nahmias, Claude

    2004-01-01

    A non-invasive alternative to arterial blood sampling for the generation of a blood input function for brain positron emission tomography (PET) studies is presented. The method aims to extract the dimensions of the blood vessel directly from PET images and to simultaneously correct the radioactivity concentration for partial volume and spillover. This involves simulation of the tomographic imaging process to generate images of different blood vessel and background geometries and selecting the one that best fits, in a least-squares sense, the acquired PET image. A phantom experiment was conducted to validate the method which was then applied to eight subjects injected with 6-[ 18 F]fluoro-L-DOPA and one subject injected with [ 11 C]CO-labelled red blood cells. In the phantom study, the diameter of syringes filled with an 11 C solution and inserted into a water-filled cylinder were estimated with an accuracy of half a pixel (1 mm). The radioactivity concentration was recovered to 100 ± 4% in the 8.7 mm diameter syringe, the one that most closely approximated the superior sagittal sinus. In the human studies, the method systematically overestimated the calibre of the superior sagittal sinus by 2-3 mm compared to measurements made in magnetic resonance venograms on the same subjects. Sources of discrepancies related to the anatomy of the blood vessel were found not to be fundamental limitations to the applicability of the method to human subjects. This method has the potential to provide accurate quantification of blood radioactivity concentration from PET images without the need for blood samples, corrections for delay and dispersion, co-registered anatomical images, or manually defined regions of interest

  15. Adult primary angiitis of the central nervous system: isolated small-vessel vasculitis represents distinct disease pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boysson, Hubert; Boulouis, Grégoire; Aouba, Achille; Bienvenu, Boris; Guillevin, Loïc; Zuber, Mathieu; Touzé, Emmanuel; Naggara, Olivier; Pagnoux, Christian

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to identify whether presentations and outcomes in adult patients with isolated small-vessel primary angiitis of the CNS (PACNS) would differ from other patients with large/medium-vessel involvement. In the French PACNS cohort, we compared the characteristics, treatments and outcomes of patients with isolated small-vessel disease (normal CT, MR and/or conventional angiograms, brain biopsy positive for vasculitis) with other patients who had large/medium-vessel involvement (vessel abnormalities on CT, MR or conventional angiograms). A good functional outcome was defined as a modified Rankin scale ⩽2 at last follow-up, regardless of the occurrence of relapse. Among the 102 patients in the cohort, 26 (25%) had isolated small-vessel PACNS, whereas the 76 others demonstrated large/medium-vessel involvement. Patients with isolated small-vessel PACNS had more seizures (P adult patients with isolated small-vessel PACNS presented some distinct disease features and relapsed more often than other PACNS patients who had large/medium-vessel involvement. Functional outcomes and mortality did not differ. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Synchrotron-based intravenous cerebral angiography in a small animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Michael E; Schueltke, Elisabeth; Fiedler, Stephan; Nemoz, Christian; Guzman, Raphael; Corde, Stephanie; Esteve, Francois; LeDuc, Geraldine; Juurlink, Bernhard H J; Meguro, Kotoo

    2007-01-01

    K-edge digital subtraction angiography (KEDSA), a recently developed synchrotron-based technique, utilizes monochromatic radiation and allows acquisition of high-quality angiography images after intravenous administration of contrast agent. We tested KEDSA for its suitability for intravenous cerebral angiography in an animal model. Adult male New Zealand rabbits were subjected to either angiography with conventional x-ray equipment or synchrotron-based intravenous KEDSA, using an iodine-based contrast agent. Angiography with conventional x-ray equipment after intra-arterial administration of contrast agent demonstrated the major intracranial vessels but no smaller branches. KEDSA was able to visualize the major intracranial vessels as well as smaller branches in both radiography mode (planar images) and tomography mode. Visualization was achieved with as little as 0.5 ml kg -1 of iodinated contrast material. We were able to obtain excellent visualization of the cerebral vasculature in an animal model using intravenous injection of contrast material, using synchrotron-based KEDSA

  17. Effect of edaravone on favorable outcome in patients with acute cerebral large vessel occlusion: subanalysis of RESCUE-Japan Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaji, Yuki; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Egashira, Yusuke; Shirakawa, Manabu; Uchida, Kazutaka; Kageyama, Hirohito; Tomogane, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    The data of the nationwide prospective registry of acute cerebral large vessel occlusion (LVO; RESCUE-Japan Registry) were analyzed to know the effect of edaravone, a free radical scavenger, on clinical outcome at 90 days after onset. In this registry, patients with acute cerebral LVO admitted within 24 h after onset were prospectively registered. The effect of various factors including endovascular treatment (EVT), intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV rt-PA), and other medication including edaravone on favorable outcome (modified Rankin scale 0-1) was analyzed. Of the 1,454 registered patients, 1,442 patients (99.2%) had the information of edaravone were analyzed. In total, edaravone group had more patients with favorable outcome compared to non-edaravone group (22.9% vs. 13.8%, p = 0.0006). Edaravone increased favorable outcome in patients treated with IV rt-PA (29.4% vs. 11.1%, p = 0.0107), but not with EVT (21.2% vs. 13.9%, p = 0.309). Logistic regression analysis revealed that higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score on admission [odds ratio (OR) 0.875, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.858-0.894] and advanced age (OR 0.963, 95%CI 0.952-0.975) were significantly related to unfavorable outcome. In contrast, IV rt-PA (OR 2.489, 95%CI 1.867-3.319), EVT (OR 1.375, 95%CI 1.013-1.865), and edaravone (OR 1.483, 95%CI 1.027-2.143) were significantly associated with favorable outcome. This analysis indicated that IV rt-PA, EVT, and edaravone were effective to obtain favorable outcome in patients with acute LVO. Combination IV rt-PA with edaravone was more effective.

  18. Motion correction for passive radiation imaging of small vessels in ship-to-ship inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziock, K.P., E-mail: ziockk@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boehnen, C.B.; Ernst, J.M.; Fabris, L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hayward, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Karnowski, T.P.; Paquit, V.C.; Patlolla, D.R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trombino, D.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Passive radiation detection remains one of the most acceptable means of ascertaining the presence of illicit nuclear materials. In maritime applications it is most effective against small to moderately sized vessels, where attenuation in the target vessel is of less concern. Unfortunately, imaging methods that can remove source confusion, localize a source, and avoid other systematic detection issues cannot be easily applied in ship-to-ship inspections because relative motion of the vessels blurs the results over many pixels, significantly reducing system sensitivity. This is particularly true for the smaller watercraft, where passive inspections are most valuable. We have developed a combined gamma-ray, stereo visible-light imaging system that addresses this problem. Data from the stereo imager are used to track the relative location and orientation of the target vessel in the field of view of a coded-aperture gamma-ray imager. Using this information, short-exposure gamma-ray images are projected onto the target vessel using simple tomographic back-projection techniques, revealing the location of any sources within the target. The complex autonomous tracking and image reconstruction system runs in real time on a 48-core workstation that deploys with the system.

  19. Study on the combustion behavior of radiolytically generated hydrogen explosion in small scale annular vessels at the reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Tatsuya; Tamauchi, Yoshikazu; Arai, Nobuyuki; Dai, Wenbin; Sakaihara, Motohiro; Kanehira, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water, etc. in process vessels in reprocessing plant. Usually, the hydrogen is scavenged by compressed air into vessels to prevent hydrogen explosion. When an earthquake beyond design based occurs, for example, the compressed air may stop and the hydrogen starts accumulating in the vessels, and under this condition, an ignition source might set off hydrogen explosion. Therefore, the explosion derived by the radiolytically generated hydrogen is designated as one of severe accidents on Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant in new regulatory requirements. It is important to understand the combustion behavior of hydrogen explosion inside a vessel for consideration of safety measures against the severe accident, because the influences of detonation are not considered in the design basis of vessels. Especially, the investigations about the combustion behavior which considered influence of interior obstacles inside the vessel are not performed yet. In order to investigate the combustion behavior comprehensively, explosion experiment, combustion analysis and structural analysis are carried out using the representative vessels (small scale annular vessel, small scale plate vessel, large scale annular vessel and large scale cylindrical vessel) selected from Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. In this paper, the results of experiments and analysis of small scale annular vessel (as one of representative vessel, imitated a pulsed column in the reprocessing plant) are reported. As imitated vessels, three vessels are manufactured with different interior obstacle arrangements as follows, A) cylindrical obstacles are faithfully reproduced and are arranged based on the actual vessel, B) cylindrical obstacles are arranged more densely than the actual vessel, and C) there are no obstacles inside the vessel. Experiments of hydrogen explosion are performed under condition of stoichiometric hydrogen-air ratio (premixed hydrogen-air is used). As a result of

  20. IV and IP administration of rhodamine in visualization of WBC-BBB interactions in cerebral vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Zachary Wilmer; Li, Hongbo; Gaughan, John P; Elliott, Melanie; Tuma, Ronald

    2015-10-01

    Epi-illuminescence intravital fluorescence microscopy has been employed to study leukocyte-endothelial interactions in a number of brain pathologies. Historically, dyes such as Rhodamine 6G have been injected intravenously. However, intravenous injections can predispose experimental animals to a multitude of complications and requires a high degree of technical skill. Here, we study the efficacy of injecting Rhodamine 6G into the peritoneum (IP) for the purpose of analyzing leukocyte-endothelial interactions through a cranial window during real time intravital microscopy. After examining the number of rolling and adherent leukocytes through a cranial window, we found no advantage to the intravenous injection (IV). Additionally, we tested blood from both routes of injection by flow cytometry to gain a very precise picture of the two methods. The two routes of administration failed to show any difference in the ability to detect cells. The study supports the notion that IP Rhodamine 6G works as efficaciously as IV and should be considered a viable alternative in experimental design for investigations employing intravital microscopy. Facilitated intravital studies will allow for more exploration into cerebral pathologies and allow for more rapid translation from the laboratory to the patient with less chance of experimental error from failed IV access. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Neuroimaging Characteristics of Small-Vessel Disease in Older Adults with Normal Cognition, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Mimenza-Alvarado

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebral small-vessel disease (SVD represents the most frequent type of vascular brain lesions, often coexisting with Alzheimer disease (AD. By quantifying white matter hyperintensities (WMH and hippocampal and parietal atrophy, we aimed to describe the prevalence and severity of SVD among older adults with normal cognition (NC, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and probable AD and to describe associated risk factors. Methods: This study included 105 older adults evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging and clinical and neuropsychological tests. We used the Fazekas scale (FS for quantification of WMH, the Scheltens scale (SS for hippocampal atrophy, and the Koedam scale (KS for parietal atrophy. Logistic regression models were performed to determine the association between FS, SS, and KS scores and the presence of NC, MCI, or probable AD. Results: Compared to NC subjects, SVD was more prevalent in MCI and probable AD subjects. After adjusting for confounding factors, logistic regression showed a positive association between higher scores on the FS and probable AD (OR = 7.6, 95% CI 2.7–20, p < 0.001. With the use of the SS and KS (OR = 4.5, 95% CI 3.5–58, p = 0.003 and OR = 8.9, 95% CI 1–72, p = 0.04, respectively, the risk also remained significant for probable AD. Conclusions: These results suggest an association between severity of vascular brain lesions and neurodegeneration.

  2. Exercise preconditioning improves behavioral functions following transient cerebral ischemia induced by 4-vessel occlusion (4-VO) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahamtan, Mahshid; Allahtavakoli, Mohammad; Abbasnejad, Mehdi; Roohbakhsh, Ali; Taghipour, Zahra; Taghavi, Mohsen; Khodadadi, Hassan; Shamsizadeh, Ali

    2013-12-01

    There is evidence that exercise decreases ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats. Since behavioral deficits are the main outcome in patients after stroke, our study was designed to investigate whether exercise preconditioning improves the acute behavioral functions and also brain inflammatory injury following cerebral ischemia. Male rats weighing 250-300 g were randomly allocated into five experimental groups. Exercise was performed on a treadmill 30min/day for 3 weeks. Ischemia was induced by 4-vessel occlusion method. Recognition memory was assessed by novel object recognition task (NORT) and step-through passive avoidance task. Sensorimotor function and motor movements were evaluated by adhesive removal test and ledged beam-walking test, respectively. Brain inflammatory injury was evaluated by histological assessment. In NORT, the discrimination ratio was decreased after ischemia (P test, a significant reduction in response latency was observed in the ischemic group. Exercise preconditioning significantly decreased the response latency in the ischemic rats (P test, latency to touch and remove the sticky labels from forepaw was increased following induction of ischemia (all P beam-walking test, the slip ratio was increased following ischemia (P < 0.05).  In the ischemia group, marked neuronal injury in hippocampus was observed. These neuropathological changes were attenuated by exercise preconditioning (P < 0.001). Our results showed that exercise preconditioning improves behavioral functions and maintains more viable cells in the dorsal hippocampus of the ischemic brain.

  3. Serum Hepatocyte Growth Factor Is Associated with Small Vessel Disease in Alzheimer’s Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Zhu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: While hepatocyte growth factor (HGF is known to exert cell growth, migration and morphogenic effects in various organs, recent studies suggest that HGF may also play a role in synaptic maintenance and cerebrovascular integrity. Although increased levels of HGF have been reported in brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD, it is unclear whether peripheral HGF may be associated with cerebrovascular disease (CeVD and dementia. In this study, we examined the association of baseline serum HGF with neuroimaging markers of CeVD in a cohort of pre-dementia (cognitive impaired no dementia, CIND and AD patients.Methods: Serum samples from aged, Non-cognitively impaired (NCI controls, CIND and AD subjects were measured for HGF levels. CeVD (cortical infarcts, microinfarcts, lacunes, white matter hyperintensities (WMH and microbleeds were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI.Results: After controlling for covariates, higher levels of HGF were associated with both CIND and AD. Among the different CeVD MRI markers in CIND and AD, only small vessel disease, but not large vessel disease markers were associated with higher HGF levels.Conclusion: Serum HGF may be a useful peripheral biomarker for small vessel disease in subjects with cognitive impairment and AD.

  4. Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients with small diseased peripheral vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruparelia, Neil; Buzzatti, Nicola; Romano, Vittorio; Longoni, Matteo; Figini, Fillipo; Montorfano, Matteo; Kawamoto, Hiroyoshi; Miyazaki, Tadashi; Spagnolo, Pietro; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio; Latib, Azeem

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility, safety and short-term outcomes of transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI) in patients with small diseased peripheral vessels. Background: The transfemoral (TF) route for transcatheter aortic valve (TAVI) is the default option due to associated advantages. However, this is limited due to the high prevalence of significant peripheral arterial disease and increased risk of vascular complications. Methods: Of 539 consecutive patients undergoing TAVI in a single Italian center, 23 patients underwent TF-TAVI in the presence of small peripheral vessels as defined by a minimal luminal diameter (MLD) of ≤ 5.5 mm [by computed tomography (CT)] and/or the inability to advance a large-bore sheath. Calcification was defined as being concentric if calcium extended more than 270° around the circumference of the artery. All patients underwent 30-day clinical follow-up. Results: 17 (73.9%) patients underwent peripheral vessel pre-dilatation with a semi-compliant balloon and 6 (26.1%) patients with a Solopath sheath. 6 (26.1%) patients suffered a peri-procedural complication, with 1 patient requiring surgical embolectomy for thrombotic occlusion and the remaining patients successfully managed percutaneously in the catheter laboratory. No patient suffered a vessel perforation or required implantation of a covered stent. At 30-day follow-up, all patients were free of symptoms and signs or symptoms of peripheral vascular disease, with well-functioning TAVI prostheses as evaluated by echocardiography. Conclusions: Performing TF-TAVI is feasible in patients with no other viable vascular access option in the presence of small MLD and calcification of the peripheral vasculature, with any anticipated acute vascular complication managed in the catheter laboratory with established percutaneous techniques. - Highlights: • Small peripheral vessels is regarded as contraindication to transfemoral TAVI.

  5. Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients with small diseased peripheral vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruparelia, Neil [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Buzzatti, Nicola; Romano, Vittorio; Longoni, Matteo; Figini, Fillipo; Montorfano, Matteo; Kawamoto, Hiroyoshi; Miyazaki, Tadashi; Spagnolo, Pietro; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Latib, Azeem, E-mail: info@emocolumbus.it [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility, safety and short-term outcomes of transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI) in patients with small diseased peripheral vessels. Background: The transfemoral (TF) route for transcatheter aortic valve (TAVI) is the default option due to associated advantages. However, this is limited due to the high prevalence of significant peripheral arterial disease and increased risk of vascular complications. Methods: Of 539 consecutive patients undergoing TAVI in a single Italian center, 23 patients underwent TF-TAVI in the presence of small peripheral vessels as defined by a minimal luminal diameter (MLD) of ≤ 5.5 mm [by computed tomography (CT)] and/or the inability to advance a large-bore sheath. Calcification was defined as being concentric if calcium extended more than 270° around the circumference of the artery. All patients underwent 30-day clinical follow-up. Results: 17 (73.9%) patients underwent peripheral vessel pre-dilatation with a semi-compliant balloon and 6 (26.1%) patients with a Solopath sheath. 6 (26.1%) patients suffered a peri-procedural complication, with 1 patient requiring surgical embolectomy for thrombotic occlusion and the remaining patients successfully managed percutaneously in the catheter laboratory. No patient suffered a vessel perforation or required implantation of a covered stent. At 30-day follow-up, all patients were free of symptoms and signs or symptoms of peripheral vascular disease, with well-functioning TAVI prostheses as evaluated by echocardiography. Conclusions: Performing TF-TAVI is feasible in patients with no other viable vascular access option in the presence of small MLD and calcification of the peripheral vasculature, with any anticipated acute vascular complication managed in the catheter laboratory with established percutaneous techniques. - Highlights: • Small peripheral vessels is regarded as contraindication to transfemoral TAVI.

  6. Improvements in the Quantitative Assessment of Cerebral Blood Volume and Flow with the Removal of Vessel Voxels from MR Perfusion Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mu Huo Teng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To improve the quantitative assessment of cerebral blood volume (CBV and flow (CBF in the brain voxels from MR perfusion images. Materials and Methods. Normal brain parenchyma was automatically segmented with the time-to-peak criteria after cerebrospinal fluid removal and preliminary vessel voxel removal. Two scaling factors were calculated by comparing the relative CBV and CBF of the segmented normal brain parenchyma with the absolute values in the literature. Using the scaling factors, the relative values were converted to the absolute CBV and CBF. Voxels with either CBV > 8 mL/100 g or CBF > 100 mL/100 g/min were characterized as vessel voxels and were excluded from the quantitative measurements. Results. The segmented brain parenchyma with normal perfusion was consistent with the angiographic findings for each patient. We confirmed the necessity of dual thresholds including CBF and CBV for proper removal of vessel voxels. The scaling factors were 0.208 ± 0.041 for CBV, and 0.168 ± 0.037, 0.172 ± 0.037 for CBF calculated using standard and circulant singular value decomposition techniques, respectively. Conclusion. The automatic scaling and vessel removal techniques provide an alternative method for obtaining improved quantitative assessment of CBV and CBF in patients with thromboembolic cerebral arterial disease.

  7. Reactor pressure vessel behaviour with a small crack in the cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayolle, P.; Churier-Bossennec, H.; Faidy, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on fracture mechanic analysis of a PWR reactor pressure vessel with a 3.5 mm embedded circumferential crack in the cladding under a small lost of cooling accident transient. Different RTNDT level and effect of irradiation on material properties are considered. The study compares simplified one-dimensional and two-dimensional elastic approach and complete elastoplastic approach using J-parameter. The results show: good correlation between the different elastic approaches, important conservatism of the elastic approach compared to elastoplastic approach, no influence of irradiated material properties. The behavior of a vessel with this type of crack is acceptable for RTNDT less than 135 deg and safety injection temperature of 60 deg

  8. Cerebral MR imaging in vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.; Geissler, A.; Peter, H.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging for the detection of cerebral involvement in vasculitis. Seventy-six patient with proved systematic vasculitis and two with isolated cerebral vasculitis were examined. Half of them had central nervous system symptoms. T2-weighted sequences were performed at 2 T in most cases. All but two symptomatic and one-third of the asymptomatic patients showed pathologic changes in the white matter. The distribution and shape of lesions depend on the caliber of the involved vessel. In small-vessel vasculitis, the distribution was mostly subcortical, the average size was 0.5--10 mm, and lesions were predominantly round

  9. [Morphological signs of mitochondrial cytopathy in skeletal muscles and micro-vessel walls in a patient with cerebral artery dissection associated with MELAS syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharova, A V; Kalashnikova, L A; Chaĭkovskaia, R P; Mir-Kasimov, M F; Nazarova, M A; Pykhtina, T N; Dobrynina, L A; Patrusheva, N L; Patrushev, L I; Protskiĭ, S V

    2012-01-01

    Skin and muscles biopsy specimens of a patient harboring A3243G mutation in mitochondrial DNA, with dissection of internal carotid and vertebral arteries, associated with MELAS were studied using histochemical and electron-microscopy techniques. Ragged red fibers, regional variability of SDH histochemical reaction, two types of morphologically atypical mitochondria and their aggregation were found in muscle. There was correlation between SDH histochemical staining and number of mitochondria revealed by electron microscopy in muscle tissue. Similar mitochondrial abnormality, their distribution and cell lesions followed by extra-cellular matrix mineralization were found in the blood vessel walls. In line with generalization of cytopathy process caused by gene mutation it can be supposed that changes found in skin and muscle microvessels also exist in large cerebral vessels causing the vessel wall "weakness", predisposing them to dissection.

  10. Differentiation of deep subcortical infarction using high-resolution vessel wall MR imaging of middle cerebral artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Yun Jung; Choi, Byung Se; Jung, Cheol Kyu; Yoon, Yeon Hong; Sunwoo, Leonard; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Bae, Hee Joon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    To evaluate the utility of high-resolution vessel wall imaging (HR-VWI) of middle cerebral artery (MCA), and to compare HR-VWI findings between striatocapsular infarction (SC-I) and lenticulostriate infarction (LS-I). This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board, and informed consent was waived. From July 2009 to February 2012, 145 consecutive patients with deep subcortical infarctions (SC-I, n = 81; LS-I, n = 64) who underwent HR-VWI were included in this study. The degree of MCA stenosis and the characteristics of MCA plaque (presence, eccentricity, location, extent, T2-high signal intensity [T2-HSI], and plaque enhancement) were analyzed, and compared between SC-I and LS-I, using Fisher's exact test. Stenosis was more severe in SC-I than in LS-I (p = 0.040). MCA plaque was more frequent in SC-I than in LS-I (p = 0.028), having larger plaque extent (p = 0.001), more T2-HSI (p = 0.001), and more plaque enhancement (p = 0.002). The eccentricity and location of the plaque showed no significant difference between the two groups.Both SC-I and LS-I have similar HR-VWI findings of the MCA plaque, but SC-I had more frequent, larger plaques with greater T2-HSI and enhancement. This suggests that HR-VWI may have a promising role in assisting the differentiation of underlying pathophysiological mechanism between SC-I and LS-I.

  11. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography depicts small tumor vessels for the evaluation of pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Yuko; Kawamoto, Hirofumi; Takaki, Akinobu; Ishida, Etsuji; Ogawa, Tsuneyoshi; Kuwaki, Kenji; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Sakaguchi, Kohsaku; Shiratori, Yasushi

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography for the diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. Materials and methods: Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with Levovist was performed on 62 consecutive patients (53 with pancreatic cancer, 4 with islet cell tumor, 3 with inflammatory pancreatic tumor, and 2 with metastatic tumor). The vascular and perfusion image phases of the tumors were evaluated and compared with the findings of contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Results: Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography showed tumor vessels around and/or in the tumor at the vascular image phase in 79% of pancreatic cancer patients (42/53). At the perfusion image phase, 96% of pancreatic cancers (51/53) were classified as hypo-enhancement type. However, tiny spotty or irregular heterogeneous enhanced lesions were found in 84% of hypo-enhanced pancreatic cancer patients (43/51). The presence of small vessels at the vascular image phase was closely correlated with the presence of these intratumor regional enhanced lesions at the perfusion image phase (κ coefficient = 0.42). The sensitivity of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (100%) for pancreatic cancer was superior to that of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (91%), but no significant difference was observed between the two (McNemar test: p = 0.063). Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with Levovist successfully visualizes fine vessels and enhancement in pancreatic tumors, and is useful for evaluating pancreatic tumors

  12. Short-Term Blood Pressure Variability Relates to the Presence of Subclinical Brain Small Vessel Disease in Primary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filomena, Josefina; Riba-Llena, Iolanda; Vinyoles, Ernest; Tovar, José L; Mundet, Xavier; Castañé, Xavier; Vilar, Andrea; López-Rueda, Antonio; Jiménez-Baladó, Joan; Cartanyà, Anna; Montaner, Joan; Delgado, Pilar

    2015-09-01

    Blood pressure (BP) variability is associated with stroke risk, but less is known about subclinical cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD). We aimed to determine whether CSVD relates to short-term BP variability independently of BP levels and also, whether they improve CSVD discrimination beyond clinical variables and office BP levels. This was a cohort study on asymptomatic hypertensives who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging and 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. Office and average 24-hour, daytime and nighttime BP levels, and several metrics of BP variability (SD, weighted SD, coefficient of variation, and average real variability [ARV]) were calculated. Definition of CSVD was based on the presence of lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensity grades. Multivariate analysis and integrated discrimination improvement were performed to assess whether BP variability and levels were independently associated with CSVD and improved its discrimination. Four hundred eighty-seven individuals participated (median age, 64; 47% women). CSVD was identified in 18.9%, related to age, male sex, diabetes mellitus, use of treatment, ambulatory BP monitoring-defined BP levels, and ARV of systolic BP at any period. The highest prevalence (33.7%) was found in subjects with both 24-hour BP levels and ARV elevated. BP levels at any period and ARV (24 hours and nocturnal) emerged as independent predictors of CSVD, and discrimination was incrementally improved although not to a clinically significant extent (integrated discrimination improvement, 5.31%, 5.17% to 5.4%). Ambulatory BP monitoring-defined BP levels and ARV of systolic BP relate to subclinical CSVD in hypertensive individuals. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. White matter microstructural damage in small vessel disease is associated with Montreal cognitive assessment but not with mini mental state examination performances: vascular mild cognitive impairment Tuscany study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasi, Marco; Salvadori, Emilia; Poggesi, Anna; Ciolli, Laura; Del Bene, Alessandra; Marini, Sandro; Nannucci, Serena; Pescini, Francesca; Valenti, Raffaella; Ginestroni, Andrea; Toschi, Nicola; Diciotti, Stefano; Mascalchi, Mario; Inzitari, Domenico; Pantoni, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) has been proposed as a screening tool in vascular cognitive impairment. Diffusion tensor imaging is sensitive to white matter microstructural damage. We investigated if diffusion tensor imaging-derived indices are more strongly associated with performances on MoCA or on the widely used mini mental state examination in patients with mild cognitive impairment and small vessel disease. Mild cognitive impairment patients with moderate/severe degrees of white matter hyperintensities on MRI were enrolled. Lacunar infarcts, cortical atrophy, medial temporal lobe atrophy and median values of mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy of the cerebral white matter were studied and correlated with cognitive tests performances. Seventy-six patients (mean age 75.1±6.8 years, mean years of education 8.0±4.3) were assessed. In univariate analyses, a significant association of both MoCA and mini mental state examination scores with age, education, cortical atrophy, and medial temporal lobe atrophy was found, whereas mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were associated with MoCA. In partial correlation analyses, adjusting for all demographic and neuroimaging variables, both mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were associated only with MoCA (mean diffusivity: r= -0.275, P=0.023; fractional anisotropy: r=0.246, P=0.043). In patients with mild cognitive impairment and small vessel disease, diffusion tensor imaging-measured white matter microstructural damage is more related to MoCA than mini mental state examination performances. MoCA is suited for the cognitive screening of patients with small vessel disease. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Genetic and Vascular Risk Factors for Cognitive Decline and Cerebral Small-Vessel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Reitz (Christiane)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractOne of the earliest known written reports on dementia is attributed to Pythagoras in the 7th century BC, who described old age as a period of decline and decay of the human body and regression of mental capacities. In 1907, Alois Alzheimer, a german psychiatrist and scientist, observed

  15. Strategic lacunes and their relationship to cognitive impairment in cerebral small vessel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Lacunes are important predictors of cognitive impairment in SVD. We highlight the importance of spatial distribution, particularly of anteromedial thalamic lacunes which are associated with impaired information processing speed and may mediate cognitive impairment via disruption of connectivity to the prefrontal cortex.

  16. Characterising the grey matter correlates of leukoaraiosis in cerebral small vessel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Lambert

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that SVD severity is associated with regional cortical thinning. Furthermore a quantitative measure of SVD severity (WMH volume can be predicted from grey matter measures, supporting an association between white and grey matter damage. The pattern of cortical thinning and volumetric decline is distinctive for SVD severity compared to ageing. These results, taken together, suggest that there is a phenotypic pattern of atrophy associated with SVD severity.

  17. Patterns of cortical degeneration in an elderly cohort with cerebral small vessel disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reid, A.T.; Norden, A.G.W. van; Laat, K.F. de; Oudheusden, L.J.B. van; Zwiers, M.P.; Evans, A.C.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Kotter, R.

    2010-01-01

    Emerging noninvasive neuroimaging techniques allow for the morphometric analysis of patterns of gray and white matter degeneration in vivo, which may help explain and predict the occurrence of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. A single center prospective follow-up study (Radboud

  18. Quantitative and qualitative MRI evaluation of cerebral small vessel disease in an elderly population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nylander, Ruta; Fahlström, Markus; Rostrup, Egill

    2018-01-01

    flow (rCBF) at baseline was related to the progression of white matter (WM) lesions. Material and Methods In a population-based study, 406 participants aged 75 years underwent morphological MRI of the brain and 252 of them again at age 80 years. At age 75 years, a perfusion scan was also done. WMHs...... were evaluated qualitatively (visual scoring) and quantitatively (CASCADE software). Lacunes and microbleeds were counted. Results A significant progression of the WMH score and WMH volume occurred over five years ( P 

  19. The antioxidant and antiapoptotic effects of crocin pretreatment on global cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury induced by four vessels occlusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruc, Serdar; Gönül, Yücel; Tunay, Kamil; Oruc, Oya Akpinar; Bozkurt, Mehmet Fatih; Karavelioğlu, Ergün; Bağcıoğlu, Erman; Coşkun, Kerem Senol; Celik, Sefa

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury is a process in which oxidative and apoptotic mechanisms play a part. Neuroprotective agents to be found could work out well for the efficient and safe minimization of cerebral IR injury. Crocin is a strong antioxidant agent; however the influence of this agent on the experimental cerebral ischemia model has not been studied extensively and thus it is not well-known. The objective of our study was to investigate the antioxidant, antiapoptotic and protective effects of crocin on the global cerebral IR induced by four-vessel occlusion. A total of 30 adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were equally and randomly separated into three groups as follows: sham, IR and IR+crocin (40mg/kg/day orally for 10days). 24h after electrocauterization of bilateral vertebral arteries, bilateral common carotid arteries were occluded for 30min and reperfused for 30min. Oxidative stress parameters (TAS, TOS, OSI), haematoxylin and eosin staining, caspase-3 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) expressions and TUNEL methods were investigated. There was a significant difference between the IR and sham groups by means of OSI level, histopathological scoring, caspase-3, HIF-1α and TUNEL-positive cell parameters. We have also observed that pre-treatment with crocin reduced these parameter levels back to the baseline. The data obtained from the present study suggest that crocin may exert antiapoptotic, antioxidant and protective effects in IR-mediated brain injury induced by four-vessel occlusion. To the best of our knowledge, this would be the first study to be conducted in this field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cerebral Vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Khorvash

    2017-02-01

    protocol for cerebral vasculitis should include initial MRI to assess the degree of parenchymal damage and to detect vessel wall changes, in particular in large-vessel vasculitis. If the results are ambiguous or medium-sized arteries are affected (beyond the spatial resolution of MRI DSA should follow. Small-vessel vasculitides entirely evade detection by vascular imaging and consequently require brain or leptomeningeal biopsy . Exclusion of differential diagnoses: Important differential diagnoses include RCVS,  intracranial atherosclerosis Moyamoy disease, autoimmune encephalopathies and infectious disorder such as varicella zoster virus (VZV vasculopathies or endocarditis. Therapy: Vasculitis is a serious disease that is potentially fatal or leads to permanent disability and requires rapid institution of immunosuppressive treatment. Possible therapeutic options include glucocorticoids, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, intravenous immunoglobulins and mycophenolate mofetil.

  1. Characterisation of creep cavitation damage in a stainless steel pressure vessel using small angle neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchard, P J; Treimer, W

    2002-01-01

    Grain-boundary cavitation is the dominant failure mode associated with initiation of reheat cracking, which has been widely observed in austenitic stainless steel pressure vessels operating at temperatures within the creep range (>450 C). Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments at the LLB PAXE instrument (Saclay) and the V12 double-crystal diffractometer of the HMI-BENSC facility (Berlin) are used to characterise cavitation damage (in the size range R=10-2000 nm) in a variety of creep specimens extracted from ex-service plant. Factors that affect the evolution of cavities and the cavity-size distribution are discussed. The results demonstrate that SANS techniques have the potential to quantify the development of creep damage in type-316H stainless steel, and thereby link microstructural damage with ductility-exhaustion models of reheat cracking. (orig.)

  2. The Dual Role of Cerebral Autoregulation and Collateral Flow in the Circle of Willis After Major Vessel Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy McConnell, Flora; Payne, Stephen

    2017-08-01

    Ischaemic stroke is a leading cause of death and disability. Autoregulation and collateral blood flow through the circle of Willis both play a role in preventing tissue infarction. To investigate the interaction of these mechanisms a one-dimensional steady-state model of the cerebral arterial network was created. Structural variants of the circle of Willis that present particular risk of stroke were recreated by using a network model coupled with: 1) a steady-state physiological model of cerebral autoregulation; and 2) one wherein the cerebral vascular bed was modeled as a passive resistance. Simulations were performed in various conditions of internal carotid and vertebral artery occlusion. Collateral flow alone is unable to ensure adequate blood flow ([Formula: see text] normal flow) to the cerebral arteries in several common variants during internal carotid artery occlusion. However, compared to a passive model, cerebral autoregulation is better able to exploit available collateral flow and maintain flows within [Formula: see text] of baseline. This is true for nearly all configurations. Hence, autoregulation is a crucial facilitator of collateral flow through the circle of Willis. Impairment of this response during ischemia will severely impact cerebral blood flows and tissue survival, and hence, autoregulation should be monitored in this situation.

  3. THE SECOND BLIND SPOT: SMALL RETINAL VESSEL VASCULOPATHY AFTER VACCINATION AGAINST NEISSERIA MENINGITIDIS AND YELLOW FEVER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysidis, Stavros N; Koulisis, Nicole; Patel, Vivek R; Kashani, Amir H; Rao, Narsing A; Humayun, Mark S; Rodger, Damien C

    2017-01-01

    To describe a case of small retinal vessel vasculopathy postvaccination. We report the case of a 41-year-old white man who presented with a "second blind spot," describing a nasal scotoma in the right eye that started 4 days after vaccinations against Neisseria meningitidis and the yellow fever virus, and after a 2-month period of high stress and decreased sleep. Clinical examination, Humphrey visual field testing, and multimodal imaging with fundus photographs, autofluorescence, fluorescein angiography, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography and angiography were performed. Clinical examination revealed a well-circumscribed, triangular area of retinal graying of about 1-disk diameter in size, located at the border of the temporal macula. This corresponded to a deep scotoma similar in size to the physiologic blind spot on Humphrey visual field 24-2 testing. There was mild hypoautofluoresence of this lesion on autofluorescence, hypofluorescence on fluorescein angiography, and focal attenuation of a small artery just distal to the bifurcation of an artery supplying the involved area. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography through the lesion conveyed hyperreflectivity most prominent in the inner and outer plexiform layers, with extension of the hyperreflectivity into the ganglion cell and inner nuclear layers. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography angiography demonstrated arteriolar and capillary dropout, more pronounced in the superficial retinal layer compared to the deeper retinal layer. At 1-month follow-up, his scotoma improved with monitoring, with reduction from -32 dB to -7 dB on Humphrey visual field testing. There was clinical resolution of the area of graying and decreased hyperreflectivity on spectral domain optical coherence tomography, with atrophy of the inner retina. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography angiography showed progression of arteriolar and capillary dropout, more so in the superficial than in the deep capillary

  4. A miniature research vessel: A small-scale ocean-exploration demonstration of geophysical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, S. M.; Boston, B.; Sleeper, J. D.; Cameron, M. E.; Togia, H.; Anderson, A.; Sigurdardottir, T. D.; Tree, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Graduate student members of the University of Hawaii Geophysical Society have designed a small-scale model research vessel (R/V) that uses sonar to create 3D maps of a model seafloor in real-time. A pilot project was presented to the public at the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology's (SOEST) Biennial Open House weekend in 2013 and, with financial support from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists and National Science Foundation, was developed into a full exhibit for the same event in 2015. Nearly 8,000 people attended the two-day event, including children and teachers from Hawaii's schools, home school students, community groups, families, and science enthusiasts. Our exhibit demonstrates real-time sonar mapping of a cardboard volcano using a toy size research vessel on a programmable 2-dimensional model ship track suspended above a model seafloor. Ship waypoints were wirelessly sent from a Windows Surface tablet to a large-touchscreen PC that controlled the exhibit. Sound wave travel times were recorded using an ultrasonic emitter/receiver attached to an Arduino microcontroller platform and streamed through a USB connection to the control PC running MatLab, where a 3D model was updated as the ship collected data. Our exhibit demonstrates the practical use of complicated concepts, like wave physics, survey design, and data processing in a way that the youngest elementary students are able to understand. It provides an accessible avenue to learn about sonar mapping, and could easily be adapted to talk about bat and marine mammal echolocation by replacing the model ship and volcano. The exhibit received an overwhelmingly positive response from attendees and incited discussions that covered a broad range of earth science topics.

  5. Cerebral infarcts resulting from trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, G.

    1985-01-01

    Vascular occlusions due to cerebral trauma have always been regarded as great rarities. However, we have found hypo-dense foci of vascular distribution in 3.5% of 3500 CT examinations for trauma during the late phase. Lesions in the vascular territory of the posterior cerebral artery are usually the result of supratentorial pressure rise from epidural and subdural haematomas, leading to compression of the vessels against the edge of the tentorium. Typical infacts in the territory of the medial and anterior cerebral arteries were found only rarely by CT after cerebral trauma. Infarcts at the watersheds between the three vascular territories were found with surprising frequency and small infarcts were found in the basal ganglia. It is assumed that these were due to ischaemic or hypoxic events due to cardiac or pulmonary complications during the initial phase. (orig.) [de

  6. Small ships don't shine: classification of ocean vessels from low resolution, large swath area SAR acquisitions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyer, Rory GV

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available the Understanding of Our Living Planet, 10-15 July 2016, Beijing, China Small ships don't shine: Classification of ocean vessels from low resolution, large swath area SAR acquisitions R. G. V. Meyer ; W. Kleynhans ; C. P. Schwegmann Abstract: Monitoring...

  7. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Treatment of Cerebral Metastases From Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta, Micaela; Vecchio, Antonella del; Attuati, Luca; Picozzi, Piero; Perna, Lucia; Franzin, Alberto; Bolognesi, Angelo; Cozzarini, Cesare; Calandrino, Riccardo; Mortini, Pietro; Muzio, Nadia di

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical and physico-dosimetric variables affecting clinical outcome of patients treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for brain metastases from non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between 2001 and 2006, 373 patients (298 men and 75 women, median age 65 years) with brain metastases from NSCLC underwent GKRS. All of them had KPS ≥ 60%, eight or fewer brain metastases, confirmed histopathological diagnosis and recent work-up ( 3 . Median marginal dose was 22.5 Gy at 50% isodose.; median 10 Gy and 12 Gy isodose volumes were 30.8 cm 3 and 15.8 cm 3 , respectively. Follow-up with MRI was performed every 3 months. Overall survival data were collected from internal database, telephone interviews, and identifying registries. Results: Mean follow-up after GKRS was 51 months (range, 6 to 96 months); mean overall survival was 14.2 months. Of 373 patients, 29 were alive at time of writing, 104 had died of cerebral progression, and 176 had died of systemic progression. In 64 cases it was not possible to ascertain the cause. Univariate and multivariate analysis were adjusted for the following: RPA class, surgery, WBRT, age, gender, number of lesions, median tumor volume, median peripheral dose, and 10 Gy and 12 Gy volumes. Identified RPA class and overall tumor volume >5 cc were the only two covariates independently predictive of overall survival in patients who died of cerebral progression. Conclusions: Global volume of brain disease should be the main parameter to consider for performing GKRS, which is a first-line therapy for patient in good general condition and controlled systemic disease.

  8. Structural characterization of the human cerebral myelin sheath by small angle x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Felici, M; Felici, R; Ferrero, C; Tartari, A; Gambaccini, M; Finet, S

    2008-01-01

    Myelin is a multi-lamellar membrane surrounding neuronal axons and increasing their conduction velocity. When investigated by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), the lamellar quasi-periodical arrangement of the myelin sheath gives rise to distinct peaks, which allow the determination of its molecular organization and the dimensions of its substructures. In this study we report on the myelin sheath structural determination carried out on a set of human brain tissue samples coming from surgical biopsies of two patients: a man around 60 and a woman nearly 90 years old. The samples were extracted either from white or grey cerebral matter and did not undergo any manipulation or chemical-physical treatment, which could possibly have altered their structure, except dipping them into a formalin solution for their conservation. Analysis of the scattered intensity from white matter of intact human cerebral tissue allowed the evaluation not only of the myelin sheath periodicity but also of its electronic charge density profile. In particular, the thicknesses of the cytoplasm and extracellular regions were established, as well as those of the hydrophilic polar heads and hydrophobic tails of the lipid bilayer. SAXS patterns were measured at several locations on each sample in order to establish the statistical variations of the structural parameters within a single sample and among different samples. This work demonstrates that a detailed structural analysis of the myelin sheath can also be carried out in randomly oriented samples of intact human white matter, which is of importance for studying the aetiology and evolution of the central nervous system pathologies inducing myelin degeneration.

  9. A multi-scale tensor voting approach for small retinal vessel segmentation in high resolution fundus images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulidis, Argyrios; Hurtut, Thomas; Tahar, Houssem Ben; Cheriet, Farida

    2016-09-01

    Segmenting the retinal vessels from fundus images is a prerequisite for many CAD systems for the automatic detection of diabetic retinopathy lesions. So far, research efforts have concentrated mainly on the accurate localization of the large to medium diameter vessels. However, failure to detect the smallest vessels at the segmentation step can lead to false positive lesion detection counts in a subsequent lesion analysis stage. In this study, a new hybrid method for the segmentation of the smallest vessels is proposed. Line detection and perceptual organization techniques are combined in a multi-scale scheme. Small vessels are reconstructed from the perceptual-based approach via tracking and pixel painting. The segmentation was validated in a high resolution fundus image database including healthy and diabetic subjects using pixel-based as well as perceptual-based measures. The proposed method achieves 85.06% sensitivity rate, while the original multi-scale line detection method achieves 81.06% sensitivity rate for the corresponding images (p<0.05). The improvement in the sensitivity rate for the database is 6.47% when only the smallest vessels are considered (p<0.05). For the perceptual-based measure, the proposed method improves the detection of the vasculature by 7.8% against the original multi-scale line detection method (p<0.05). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Proliferative Retinopathy in Type 1 Diabetes Is Associated With Cerebral Microbleeds, Which Is Part of Generalized Microangiopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woerdeman, J.P.; van Duinkerken, E.; Wattjes, M.P.; Barkhof, F.; Snoek, F.J.; Moll, A.C.; Klein, M.; de Boer, M.P.; IJzerman, R.G.; Serne, E.H.; Diamant, M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether proliferative diabetic retinopathy in type 1 diabetic patients can be generalized to cerebral small vessel disease and whether it is associated with impaired peripheral microvascular function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Thirty-three patients with proliferative

  11. Occupational Safety and Health Conditions Aboard Small- and Medium-Size Fishing Vessels: Differences among Age Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zytoon, Mohamed A; Basahel, Abdulrahman M

    2017-02-24

    Although marine fishing is one of the most hazardous occupations, research on the occupational safety and health (OSH) conditions aboard marine fishing vessels is scarce. For instance, little is known about the working conditions of vulnerable groups such as young and aging fishermen. The objective of the current paper is to study the OSH conditions of young and aging fishermen compared to middle-aged fishermen in the small- and medium-size (SM) marine fishing sector. A cross-sectional study was designed, and 686 fishermen working aboard SM fishing vessels were interviewed to collect information about their safety and health. The associations of physical and psychosocial work conditions with safety and health outcomes, e.g., injuries, illnesses and job satisfaction, are presented. The results of the current study can be utilized in the design of effective accident prevention and OSH training programs for the three age groups and in the regulation of working conditions aboard fishing vessels.

  12. Patient perceptions about illness self-management in ANCA-associated small vessel vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, C T; DeVellis, R F; Blalock, S J; Hogan, S L; Lewis, M A; DeVellis, B M

    2008-06-01

    To characterize patient perceptions, related to eight self-management behaviours relevant for adults with ANCA-associated small vessel vasculitis (ANCA-SVV), and to determine if these perceptions were associated with performance of each behaviour. Adults with ANCA-SVV (n = 202) completed a self-administered questionnaire that assessed eight self-management behaviours (adherence to recommendations for medication, health service use, diet, exercise, infection avoidance and symptom monitoring; prompt reporting of symptoms and side effects; and adjusting activities in response to symptoms), perceptions about these behaviours, socio-demographics, clinical factors and social desirability bias. Descriptive statistics were generated to characterize patients' perceptions about difficulty of, importance of, and specific barriers to performing each behaviour. Regression analyses explored whether these variables were associated with performing each behaviour, controlling for potential confounders. With few exceptions, higher perceived importance and lower perceived difficulty of each behaviour were associated with more frequent performance of the behaviour. For each behaviour, several specific barriers were frequently endorsed by patients and a number of these were associated with lower levels of self-management. This study reveals that patient perceptions about the illness and its treatment influence ANCA-SVV self-management. Perceived barriers to medication, health services, diet and exercise adherence were similar to those in other illnesses. This study also provides insight into barriers experienced by patients in performing behaviours (infection avoidance, symptom monitoring, reporting symptoms and side-effects and adjusting activities) not often previously studied. How the identification of these barriers can help inform future interventions for ANCA-SVV patients is to be discussed.

  13. Application of Texture Analysis to Study Small Vessel Disease and Blood–Brain Barrier Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del C. Valdés Hernández

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesWe evaluate the alternative use of texture analysis for evaluating the role of blood–brain barrier (BBB in small vessel disease (SVD.MethodsWe used brain magnetic resonance imaging from 204 stroke patients, acquired before and 20 min after intravenous gadolinium administration. We segmented tissues, white matter hyperintensities (WMH and applied validated visual scores. We measured textural features in all tissues pre- and post-contrast and used ANCOVA to evaluate the effect of SVD indicators on the pre-/post-contrast change, Kruskal–Wallis for significance between patient groups and linear mixed models for pre-/post-contrast variations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF with Fazekas scores.ResultsTextural “homogeneity” increase in normal tissues with higher presence of SVD indicators was consistently more overt than in abnormal tissues. Textural “homogeneity” increased with age, basal ganglia perivascular spaces scores (p < 0.01 and SVD scores (p < 0.05 and was significantly higher in hypertensive patients (p < 0.002 and lacunar stroke (p = 0.04. Hypertension (74% patients, WMH load (median = 1.5 ± 1.6% of intracranial volume, and age (mean = 65.6 years, SD = 11.3 predicted the pre/post-contrast change in normal white matter, WMH, and index stroke lesion. CSF signal increased with increasing SVD post-contrast.ConclusionA consistent general pattern of increasing textural “homogeneity” with increasing SVD and post-contrast change in CSF with increasing WMH suggest that texture analysis may be useful for the study of BBB integrity.

  14. Mass optimization of a small pressure vessel using metal/FRP (fiber reinforced polymers) hybrid structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisar, J.A.; Abdullah, A.N.; Iqbal, N.

    2004-01-01

    In hybrid pressure vessels, composite (Fiber) is wound over a metallic liner (Steel/Aluminum) in hoop direction. In this concept of hybrid pressure vessel structure, metallic liner takes all the axial loads and fiber reinforced polymers (FRP/sub s/) takes load in circumferential (Hoop) direction. Hybrid structures combine the relatively high shear stiffness and ductility of metal alloy with high specific stiffness, strength and fatigue properties of FRP/sub s/. The relatively simple methods for producing hybrid structures circumvent the need for the complex and expensive equipment that is used for advanced composites processing. This paper presents an efficient way of designing a hybrid pressure vessel where prime concern is weight reduction over an equivalent aluminum structure and investigates various methodologies regarding combinations of metals and FRP/sub s/ for optimization of a given pressure vessel. For this purpose we adopted two different methods of simulation one is computer simulation using ANSYS and other is experimental verification by hydrostatic testing of manufactured pressure vessel. Two different pressure vessels one with aluminum liner and other with steel liner were fabricated. Kevlar 49/epoxy was wrapped around the liners in hoop direction. Both the pressure vessels were put into hydrostatic test. Strains were measured during the test and then converted into corresponding stresses. Results of hydrostatic test were quite in favor of the ANSYS results. In this way we have successfully designed, manufactured and tested the Hybrid pressure vessel saving almost 40% weight in case of aluminum liner and 43.6% in case of steel liner. (author)

  15. Influence exerted by new pyrimidine derivatives on cerebral circulation auto-regulation and vasodilatating function of vessels endothelium in rats' brains under chronic hemic hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Voronkov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Our research goal was to examine influences exerted by new pyrimidine derivatives coded as BL0 and BL2 on cerebral hemodynamics auto-regulation parameters and vasodilatating function of vessels endothelium as risk factors causing ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes under chronic hemic hypoxia. We performed an experiment on white Wistar rats to prove that endothelial dysfunction which evolves under chronic hemic hypoxia leads to disorders in endothelium-mediated mechanisms for cerebral circulation auto-regulation in rats. We modeled hypoxia in animals via granting them free access to 0.2 % sodium nitrite solution instead of ordinary drinking water. Endothelial dysfunction was confirmed as per disorders in vasodilatation and vasoconstriction reactions at intravenous introduction of acetyl choline (0.1 mg/kg and methyl ether hydrochloride nitro-L-arginine (10 mg/kg. Cerebral blood flow speed was measured with MM-D-K-Minimax v.2.1. ultrasound Doppler. We assessed cerebral circulation auto-regulation as per compression test results which allowed us to calculate overshoot coefficient and auto-regulation power. Examined pyrimidine derivatives and comparison preparations were introduced orally 60 minutes prior to taking readings. Mexidol doses were calculated on the basis of interspecific recalculation of a maximum daily dose for a man. Nicergoline dose was taken as a most effective one as per literature data. When new pyrimidine derivatives BL0 and BL2 are applied under chronic hemic hypoxia, it causes overshoot coefficient to grow authentically higher than in a negative control group but it doesn't exert any positive influence on collateral reserve parameter, namely auto-regulation power. BL0 and BL2 improve endothelium vasodilatating function at intravenous acetylcholine introduction (0.1 mg/kg and don't exert any influence on vasoconstricting function at L-NAME intravenous introduction (10 mg/kg. The examined substance BL0 has more apparent

  16. Multiple small hemorrhagic infarcts in cerebral air embolism: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togo, Masaya; Hoshi, Taku; Matsuoka, Ryosuke; Imai, Yukihiro; Kohara, Nobuo

    2017-11-16

    Cerebral air embolism is a rare cause of cerebral infarction. In cerebral air embolism, T2 star-weighted imaging shows numerous spotty hypointense signals. Previous reports have suggested that these signals represent air in the brain and are gradually diminished and absorbed. We experienced two cases of cerebral air embolism, and in one of them, we conducted an autopsy. Case 1 was a 76-year-old Japanese man with lung cancer and emphysema. A spasmodic cough induced massive cerebral and cardiac air embolisms and the patient died because of cerebral herniation. T2 star-weighted imaging of brain magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple spotty low signals. Brain autopsy showed numerous spotty hemorrhagic infarcts in the area of T2 star-weighted imaging signals. Case 2 was an 85-year-old Japanese man with emphysema who suffered from acute stroke. Similar spotty T2 star-weighted imaging signals were observed and remained unchanged 2 months after the onset. These findings indicate that T2 star-weighted imaging in cerebral air embolism partially represents micro-hemorrhagic infarction caused by air bubbles that have migrated into the brain.

  17. Quantitative assessment of cross-sectional area of small pulmonary vessels in patients with COPD using inspiratory and expiratory MDCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Yukiko; Kawata, Naoko; Yanagawa, Noriyuki; Sugiura, Toshihiko; Sakurai, Yoriko; Sato, Misuzu; Iesato, Ken; Terada, Jiro; Sakao, Seiichiro; Tada, Yuji; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Yoichi; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Structural and functional changes in pulmonary vessels are prevalent at the initial stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These vascular alterations can be assessed using cross-sectional area (CSA) of small pulmonary vessels. However, neither in non-COPD smokers nor in COPD patients it has been defined whether the structural changes of pulmonary vessels detected by paired inspiratory and expiratory CT scans are associated with emphysematous changes. We quantified the CSA and low attenuation area (LAA) and evaluated the changes in these parameters in the inspiratory and expiratory phases. Materials and methods: Fifty consecutive non-COPD smokers and COPD patients were subjected to multi detector-row CT and the percentage of vessels with a CSA less than 5 mm 2 as well as the percentage LAA for total lung area (%CSA < 5, %LAA, respectively) were calculated. Results: The %CSA < 5 correlated negatively with %LAA. The %CSA < 5 was lower in COPD patients with emphysema as compared with non-COPD smokers and COPD patients with or without mild emphysema. In addition, the %CSA < 5 was lower in the no/mild emphysema subgroup as compared with non-COPD smokers. The respiratory phase change of %CSA < 5 in COPD patients was greater than that in non-COPD smokers. Conclusion: The percentage of small pulmonary vessels decreased as emphysematous changes increase, and this decrease was observed even in patients with no/mild emphysema. Furthermore, respiratory phase changes in CSA were higher in COPD patients than in non-COPD smokers

  18. Quantitative assessment of cross-sectional area of small pulmonary vessels in patients with COPD using inspiratory and expiratory MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Yukiko, E-mail: matsuyuki_future@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Kawata, Naoko, E-mail: chumito_03@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Yanagawa, Noriyuki, E-mail: yanagawa@ho.chiba-u.ac.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Sugiura, Toshihiko, E-mail: sugiura@js3.so-net.ne.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Sakurai, Yoriko, E-mail: yoliri@nifty.com [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Sato, Misuzu, E-mail: mis_misuzu@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Iesato, Ken, E-mail: iesato_k@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Terada, Jiro, E-mail: jirotera@chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Sakao, Seiichiro, E-mail: sakao@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Tada, Yuji, E-mail: ytada@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Tanabe, Nobuhiro, E-mail: ntanabe@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Suzuki, Yoichi, E-mail: ysuzuki@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of public Health, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Tatsumi, Koichiro, E-mail: tatsumi@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan)

    2013-10-01

    Objectives: Structural and functional changes in pulmonary vessels are prevalent at the initial stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These vascular alterations can be assessed using cross-sectional area (CSA) of small pulmonary vessels. However, neither in non-COPD smokers nor in COPD patients it has been defined whether the structural changes of pulmonary vessels detected by paired inspiratory and expiratory CT scans are associated with emphysematous changes. We quantified the CSA and low attenuation area (LAA) and evaluated the changes in these parameters in the inspiratory and expiratory phases. Materials and methods: Fifty consecutive non-COPD smokers and COPD patients were subjected to multi detector-row CT and the percentage of vessels with a CSA less than 5 mm{sup 2} as well as the percentage LAA for total lung area (%CSA < 5, %LAA, respectively) were calculated. Results: The %CSA < 5 correlated negatively with %LAA. The %CSA < 5 was lower in COPD patients with emphysema as compared with non-COPD smokers and COPD patients with or without mild emphysema. In addition, the %CSA < 5 was lower in the no/mild emphysema subgroup as compared with non-COPD smokers. The respiratory phase change of %CSA < 5 in COPD patients was greater than that in non-COPD smokers. Conclusion: The percentage of small pulmonary vessels decreased as emphysematous changes increase, and this decrease was observed even in patients with no/mild emphysema. Furthermore, respiratory phase changes in CSA were higher in COPD patients than in non-COPD smokers.

  19. The association of cerebral palsy and death with small-for-gestational-age birthweight in preterm neonates by individualized and population-based percentiles.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grobman, William A

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether an individualized growth standard (IS) improves the identification of preterm small-for-gestational-age (SGA) neonates at risk of developing moderate\\/severe cerebral palsy (CP) or death.

  20. MR vascular fingerprinting: A new approach to compute cerebral blood volume, mean vessel radius, and oxygenation maps in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, T; Pannetier, N A; Ni, W W; Qiu, D; Moseley, M E; Schuff, N; Zaharchuk, G

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, we describe a fingerprinting approach to analyze the time evolution of the MR signal and retrieve quantitative information about the microvascular network. We used a Gradient Echo Sampling of the Free Induction Decay and Spin Echo (GESFIDE) sequence and defined a fingerprint as the ratio of signals acquired pre- and post-injection of an iron-based contrast agent. We then simulated the same experiment with an advanced numerical tool that takes a virtual voxel containing blood vessels as input, then computes microscopic magnetic fields and water diffusion effects, and eventually derives the expected MR signal evolution. The parameter inputs of the simulations (cerebral blood volume [CBV], mean vessel radius [R], and blood oxygen saturation [SO2]) were varied to obtain a dictionary of all possible signal evolutions. The best fit between the observed fingerprint and the dictionary was then determined by using least square minimization. This approach was evaluated in 5 normal subjects and the results were compared to those obtained by using more conventional MR methods, steady-state contrast imaging for CBV and R and a global measure of oxygenation obtained from the superior sagittal sinus for SO2. The fingerprinting method enabled the creation of high-resolution parametric maps of the microvascular network showing expected contrast and fine details. Numerical values in gray matter (CBV=3.1±0.7%, R=12.6±2.4μm, SO2=59.5±4.7%) are consistent with literature reports and correlated with conventional MR approaches. SO2 values in white matter (53.0±4.0%) were slightly lower than expected. Numerous improvements can easily be made and the method should be useful to study brain pathologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The influence of residual stresses on small through-clad cracks in pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    deLorenzi, H.G.; Schumacher, B.I.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of cladding residual stresses on the crack driving force for shallow cracks in the wall of a nuclear pressure vessel is investigated. Thermo-elastic-plastic analyses were carried out on long axial through-clad and sub-clad flaws on the inside of the vessel. The depth of the flaws were one and three times the cladding thickness, respectively. An analysis of a semielliptical axial through-clad flaw was also performed. It was assumed that the residual stresses arise due to the difference in the thermal expansion between the cladding and the base material during the cool down from stress relieving temperature to room temperature and due to the subsequent proof test before the vessel is put into service. The variation of the crack tip opening displacement during these loadings and during a subsequent thermal shock on the inside wall is described. The analyses for the long axial flaws suggest that the crack driving force is smaller for this type of flaw if the residual stresses in the cladding are taken into account than if one assumes that the cladding has no residual stresses. However, the analysis of the semielliptical flaw shows significantly different results. Here the crack driving force is higher than when the residual stresses are not taken into account and is maximum in the cladding at or near the clad/base material interface. This suggests that the crack would propagate along the clad/base material interface before it would penetrate deeper into the wall. The elastic-plastic behavior found in the analyses show that the cladding and the residual stresses in the cladding should be taken into acocunt when evaluating the severity of shallow surface cracks on the inside of a nuclear pressure vessel

  2. Evaluation of Mechanical Properties and Medical Applications of Polycaprolactone Small Diameter Artificial Blood Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnazsadat Mirbagheri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the cardiovascular diseases and decreasing the possibility of autograft surgery are important factors that cause the choice of artificial vascular graft as an alternative treatment method. In this regard, producing artificial grafts similar to natural vessels is an important purpose that has long been followed as a gold standard by many researchers worldwide. In addition, mechanical properties including strength, long patency, bio-compatibility and hydrophobicity are necessary properties to achieve ideal vascular grafts. Hence there are various factors such as polymer type and preparation methods, which contribute to suitable mechanical properties. The electrospinning as an optimized method on one side and biocompatible, degradable and semicrystalline polycaprolactone (PCL on the other side are used for their acceptable mechanical properties to manufacture synthetic vessels. In this study, PCL vascular grafts have been reviewed and a wide range of parameters affecting the improvement of mechanical properties and their performance have been described along with clinical applications. Therefore, by investigating and comparing single and composite PCL vascular grafts, we achieved acceptable results in the field of cell growth and adhesion as well as implanting grafts in animals such as rat and rabbit. By reviewing other studies, it was revealed that synthetic composite vessels made of PCL and natural polymers such as collagen and chitosan and synthetic polymers such as polyurethane (PU for long patency and acceptable cell adhesion have shown good clinical results.

  3. EEG in Silent Small Vessel Disease : sLORETA Mapping Reveals Cortical Sources of Vascular Cognitive Impairment No Dementia in the Default Mode Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheorajpanday, Rishi V. A.; Marien, Peter; Weeren, Arie J. T. M.; Nagels, Guy; Saerens, Jos; van Putten, Michel J. A. M.; De Deyn, Peter P.

    Introduction: Vascular cognitive impairment, no dementia (vCIND) is a prevalent and potentially preventable disorder. Clinical presof the small vessel subcortical subtype may be insidious and difficult to diagnose in the initial stage. We investigated electroencephalographic sources of subcortical

  4. Development of in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism for a innovative small reactor (Contract research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoritsune, Tsutomu; Ishida, Toshihisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Although the control rod drive mechanism of an existing large scale light water reactor is generally installed outside the reactor vessel, an in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism (INV-CRDM) is installed inside the reactor vessel. The INV-CRDM contributes to compactness and simplicity of the reactor system, and it can eliminate the possibility of a rod ejection accident. Therefore, INV-CRDM is an important technology adopted in an innovative small reactor. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has developed this type of CRDM driven by an electric motor, which can work under high temperature and high pressure water for the advanced marine reactor. On the basis of this research result, a driving motor coil and a bearing were developed to be used under the high temperature steam, severe condition for an innovative small reactor. About the driving motor, we manufactured the driving motor available for high temperature steam and carried out performance test under room temperature atmosphere to confirm the electric characteristic and coolability of the driving coil. With these test results and the past test results under high temperature water, we analyzed and evaluated the electric performance and coolability of the driving coil under high temperature steam. Concerning bearing, we manufactured the test pieces using some candidate material for material characteristic test and carried out the rolling wear test under high temperature steam to select the material. Consequently, we confirmed that performance of the driving coil for the advanced type driving motor, is enough to be used under high temperature steam. And, we evaluated the performance of the bearing and selected the material of the bearing, which can be used under high temperature steam. From these results, we have obtained the prospect that the INV-CRDM can be used for an innovative small reactor under steam atmosphere could be developed. (author)

  5. Acute hypertensive encephalopathy with widespread small-vessel disease at MRI in a diabetic patient: pathogenetic hypotheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotton, F. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Department of Radiology, Pierre Benite (France); Universite Claude-Bernard Lyon-I, CREATIS, UMR CNRS (France); Universite Claude-Bernard Lyon-I, Laboratoire d' Anatomie, Laennec (France); Kamoun, S.; Rety-Jacob, F.; Tran-Minh, V.A. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Department of Radiology, Pierre Benite (France); Nighoghossian, N. [Hopital Neurologique et Neurochirurgical, Department of Neurology, Bron (France); Universite Claude-Bernard Lyon-I, CREATIS, UMR CNRS (France); Hermier, M. [Hopital Neurologique et Neurochirurgical, Department of Neuroradiology and MRI, Bron (France); Universite Claude-Bernard Lyon-I, CREATIS, UMR CNRS (France)

    2005-08-01

    We report unusual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in a diabetic patient with neglected hypertension and hyperglycemia, presenting with seizures and coma. Outcome was fatal despite intensive care. The MRI findings included bilateral insular and temporo-occipital grey and white matter involvement, and numerous, scattered, lacunar-like lesions involving the peripheral and deep white matter, basal ganglia grey matter, and brainstem. Lesions had a low apparent diffusion coefficient, and some enhanced following contrast injection. Hypertensive encephalopathy with widespread and severe acute small-vessel disease was considered. Pathophysiology is discussed. (orig.)

  6. Acute hypertensive encephalopathy with widespread small-vessel disease at MRI in a diabetic patient: pathogenetic hypotheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotton, F.; Kamoun, S.; Rety-Jacob, F.; Tran-Minh, V.A.; Nighoghossian, N.; Hermier, M.

    2005-01-01

    We report unusual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in a diabetic patient with neglected hypertension and hyperglycemia, presenting with seizures and coma. Outcome was fatal despite intensive care. The MRI findings included bilateral insular and temporo-occipital grey and white matter involvement, and numerous, scattered, lacunar-like lesions involving the peripheral and deep white matter, basal ganglia grey matter, and brainstem. Lesions had a low apparent diffusion coefficient, and some enhanced following contrast injection. Hypertensive encephalopathy with widespread and severe acute small-vessel disease was considered. Pathophysiology is discussed. (orig.)

  7. About a mechanism of the influence of shear stress for viscosity of the blood in vessels of small diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Лев Николаевич Катюхин

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is proposed a physiological and experimentally confirmed explanation of Fåhraeus-Lindqvist-effect in capillaries using the profile analyses of osmotic deformability of red blood cells. It was shown the dose-dependent change of the erythrocytes deformability in the stage of isotropic spheres after forming artificial water pores (nystatin and occlusion (PbCl2 of available pores. The Sigma-effect reducing of hematocrit and viscosity in a shear flow of blood through the vessels of a small diameter was conditioned by the interchange of liquid phase between the erythrocyte and the plasma.

  8. Application of small specimens to fracture mechanics characterization of irradiated pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, M.A.; Wallin, K.; McCabe, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, precracked Charpy V-notch (PCVN) specimens were used to characterize the fracture toughness of unirradiated and irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels in the transition region by means of three-point static bending. Fracture toughness at cleavage instability was calculated in terms of elastic-plastic K Jc values. A statistical size correction based upon weakest-link theory was performed. The concept of a master curve was applied to analyze fracture toughness properties. Initially, size-corrected PCVN data from A 533 grade B steel, designated HSST Plate O2, were used to position the master curve and a 5% tolerance bound for K Jc data. By converting PCVN data to IT compact specimen equivalent K Jc data, the same master curve and 5% tolerance bound curve were plotted against the Electric Power Research Institute valid linear-elastic K Jc database and the ASME lower bound K Ic curve. Comparison shows that the master curve positioned by testing several PCVN specimens describes very well the massive fracture toughness database of large specimens. These results give strong support to the validity of K Jc with respect to K Ic in general and to the applicability of PCVN specimens to measure fracture toughness of reactor vessel steels in particular. Finally, irradiated PCVN specimens of other materials were tested, and the results are compared to compact specimen data. The current results show that PCVNs demonstrate very good capacity for fracture toughness characterization of reactor pressure vessel steels. It provides an opportunity for direct measurement of fracture toughness of irradiated materials by means of precracking and testing Charpy specimens from surveillance capsules. However, size limits based on constraint theory restrict the operational test temperature range for K Jc data from PCVN specimens. 13 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  9. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy change vessel tree geometry and metastatic spread in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Frenzel

    Full Text Available Tumor vasculature is critical for tumor growth, formation of distant metastases and efficiency of radio- and chemotherapy treatments. However, how the vasculature itself is affected during cancer treatment regarding to the metastatic behavior has not been thoroughly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the influence of hypofractionated radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy on vessel tree geometry and metastasis formation in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model to investigate the spread of malignant cells during different treatments modalities.The biological data gained during these experiments were fed into our previously developed computer model "Cancer and Treatment Simulation Tool" (CaTSiT to model the growth of the primary tumor, its metastatic deposit and also the influence on different therapies. Furthermore, we performed quantitative histology analyses to verify our predictions in xenograft mouse tumor model.According to the computer simulation the number of cells engrafting must vary considerably to explain the different weights of the primary tumor at the end of the experiment. Once a primary tumor is established, the fractal dimension of its vasculature correlates with the tumor size. Furthermore, the fractal dimension of the tumor vasculature changes during treatment, indicating that the therapy affects the blood vessels' geometry. We corroborated these findings with a quantitative histological analysis showing that the blood vessel density is depleted during radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy. The CaTSiT computer model reveals that chemotherapy influences the tumor's therapeutic susceptibility and its metastatic spreading behavior.Using a system biological approach in combination with xenograft models and computer simulations revealed that the usage of chemotherapy and radiation therapy determines the spreading behavior by changing the blood vessel geometry of the primary tumor.

  10. Treatment selection for unruptured small cerebral arteriovenous malformations with clinical decision analysis. Observation, gamma knife or microsurgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serizawa, Toru; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Ono, Junichi

    2006-01-01

    We present an optimal treatment for unruptured small (3 cm or less) cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) among conservative treatment, gamma knife surgery (GKS) and microsurgery using clinical decision analysis according to patients' age. All cases for this study were small AVMs. We analyzed 973 cases with conservative treatment, 176 with GKS and 110 with microsurgery. The expected utility indexes were calculated from the results of each group. We hypothesized the standardized expected utility indexes as 100 in healthy, 75 in disabled and 0 in dead. Microsurgery was the first choice for patients younger than 55 years with AVM located in a surgically accessible region. GKS is recommended for patients aged between 55 and 70, and the best treatment is observation for patients older than 70 years. The proposed clinical decision analysis is very useful in obtaining informed consent for choosing the treatment modality for unruptured small AVM. (author)

  11. [Telescopic adhesive anastomosis of small blood vessel applied in formation of arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, G; Leng, Y; Rong, G

    1997-03-01

    The formation of an arteriovenous fistual for dialysis by routine interrupted sutures anastomosing the vein and artery is difficult to perform and time-consuming. A new method, telescopic adhesive anastomosis was studied and applied in 10 hemodialysis patients, who were in need of an arteriovenous fistula. The external diameter of the vessels anastomosed was 2.40 +/- 0.20 mm (radial artery) or 2.40 +/- 0.35 mm (cephalic vein). After thorough debridement of the vascular ends, the arterial end was put in the venous lumen. In order to fix the telescopic vessels, two stitches were applied 180 degrees apart from each other and tied. Each stitch was inserted from vein (penetrating the whole wall) to artery (just through the adventitia and partial thickness of the media vasorum). The distance from the stitch to the edge of the vein was 0.5 mm, and that of the artery was approximated to the external diameter of the vessle. The medical adhesive was then applied for sealing the anastomotic adventitia. Ten seconds were given for the solidification of the adhesive. The patients were followed up for 8 months. The patency rate was 100%, and the rate of blood flow was more than 300 ml/min (measured by ultrasonography). It was shown that this method could be managed easily and quickly, and the so-formed fistula would fulfill the need of hemodialysis.

  12. Detection of small surface vessels in near, medium, and far infrared spectral bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulski, R.; Milewski, S.; Kastek, M.; Trzaskawka, P.; Szustakowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.; Zyczkowski, M.

    2011-11-01

    Protection of naval bases and harbors requires close co-operation between security and access control systems covering land areas and those monitoring sea approach routes. The typical location of naval bases and harbors - usually next to a large city - makes it difficult to detect and identify a threat in the dense regular traffic of various sea vessels (i.e. merchant ships, fishing boats, tourist ships). Due to the properties of vessel control systems, such as AIS (Automatic Identification System), and the effectiveness of radar and optoelectronic systems against different targets it seems that fast motor boats called RIB (Rigid Inflatable Boat) could be the most serious threat to ships and harbor infrastructure. In the paper the process and conditions for the detection and identification of high-speed boats in the areas of ports and naval bases in the near, medium and far infrared is presented. Based on the results of measurements and recorded thermal images the actual temperature contrast delta T (RIB / sea) will be determined, which will further allow to specify the theoretical ranges of detection and identification of the RIB-type targets for an operating security system. The data will also help to determine the possible advantages of image fusion where the component images are taken in different spectral ranges. This will increase the probability of identifying the object by the multi-sensor security system equipped additionally with the appropriate algorithms for detecting, tracking and performing the fusion of images from the visible and infrared cameras.

  13. Experimental and numerical study on density stratification erosion phenomena with a vertical buoyant jet in a small vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Satoshi, E-mail: abe.satoshi@jaea.go.jp; Ishigaki, Masahiro; Sibamoto, Yasuteru; Yonomoto, Taisuke

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • This paper shows results of a small scale experiment and CFD analyses on a density stratification erosion with a vertical buoyant jet. • The particle image velocimetry (PIV) and quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) with a multiport rotating valve were applied. • Two typical well-used RANS models were applied. • The simulated stratification erosion was in agreement with the experimental result, which suggested that the turbulence mixing occurred only in the jet impinging region. - Abstract: The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the ROSA-SA project to investigate thermal hydraulic phenomena in a reactor containment vessel during a severe accident. The hydrogen distribution in the vessel is one of significant safety issues in discussing a potential of hydrogen combustion in the containment. Density stratification and its break-up are important phenomena affecting the hydrogen distribution. This paper focuses on a density stratification erosion and break-up mechanism with a vertical buoyant jet promoting the turbulent helium transport. Small scale experiment and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses were carried out for investigating this phenomena. In the experiment, a rectangular vessel made with acrylic plates with a width of 1.5 m, a length of 1.5 m and a height of 1.8 m was used for visualizing flow field with particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system with a multiport rotating valve was applied for measuring gaseous concentration at 20 elevation points. In CFD analysis with OpenFOAM, two typical well-used turbulence models were used: low-Reynolds number type k–ε model and SST k–ω model, with a turbulence model modification to consider the buoyant effect in the stratification. As a result, the stratification erosion in the CFD analyses with the modified turbulence model agreed well with the experimental data, indicating importance of the turbulence damping by the buoyant effect.

  14. Experimental and numerical study on density stratification erosion phenomena with a vertical buoyant jet in a small vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Satoshi; Ishigaki, Masahiro; Sibamoto, Yasuteru; Yonomoto, Taisuke

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper shows results of a small scale experiment and CFD analyses on a density stratification erosion with a vertical buoyant jet. • The particle image velocimetry (PIV) and quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) with a multiport rotating valve were applied. • Two typical well-used RANS models were applied. • The simulated stratification erosion was in agreement with the experimental result, which suggested that the turbulence mixing occurred only in the jet impinging region. - Abstract: The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the ROSA-SA project to investigate thermal hydraulic phenomena in a reactor containment vessel during a severe accident. The hydrogen distribution in the vessel is one of significant safety issues in discussing a potential of hydrogen combustion in the containment. Density stratification and its break-up are important phenomena affecting the hydrogen distribution. This paper focuses on a density stratification erosion and break-up mechanism with a vertical buoyant jet promoting the turbulent helium transport. Small scale experiment and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses were carried out for investigating this phenomena. In the experiment, a rectangular vessel made with acrylic plates with a width of 1.5 m, a length of 1.5 m and a height of 1.8 m was used for visualizing flow field with particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system with a multiport rotating valve was applied for measuring gaseous concentration at 20 elevation points. In CFD analysis with OpenFOAM, two typical well-used turbulence models were used: low-Reynolds number type k–ε model and SST k–ω model, with a turbulence model modification to consider the buoyant effect in the stratification. As a result, the stratification erosion in the CFD analyses with the modified turbulence model agreed well with the experimental data, indicating importance of the turbulence damping by the buoyant effect.

  15. Small specimen measurements of dynamic fracture toughness of heavy section steels for nuclear pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Iwadate, T.; Suzuki, K.

    1987-01-01

    This study presents the dynamic fracture toughness properties (KId) of 12 heats of RPV steels measured using small specimens and analysed based on the current research. The correlation between the KId test and other engineering small specimen tests such as Charpy test and drop weight test are also discussed and a method to predict the KId value is presented. (orig./HP)

  16. Small vessel vasculitis History, classification, etiology, histopathology, clinic, diagnosis and treatment; Vasculitis de pequenos vasos. Historia, clasificacion, etiologia, histopatologia, clinica, diagnostico y tratamiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Matteson, Eric L; Restrepo, Jose Felix

    2007-07-01

    Small-vessel vasculitis is a convenient descriptor for a wide range of diseases characterized by vascular inflammation of the venules, capillaries, and/or arterioles with pleomorphic clinical manifestations. The classical clinical phenotype is leucocytoclastic vasculitis with palpable purpura, but manifestations vary widely depending upon the organs involved. Histopathologic examination in leucocytoclastic vasculitis reveals angiocentric segmental inflammation, fibrinoid necrosis, and a neutrophilic infiltrate around the blood vessel walls with erythrocyte extravasation. The etiology of small-vessel vasculitis is unknown in many cases, but in others, drugs, post viral syndromes, malignancy, primary vasculitis such as microscopic polyarteritis, and connective tissue disorders are associated, The diagnosis of small- vessel vasculitis relies on a thorough history and physical examination, as well as relevant antibody testing including antinuclear antibody and anti neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, hepatitis B and C serologies, assessment of complement, immunoglobulins, blood count, serum creatinine liver function tests, urinalysis, radiographic imaging and biopsy. The treatment is based primarily on corticosteroid and immunosuppressive agents.

  17. Effects of JPEG data compression on magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of small vessels ischemic lesions of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuriki, Paulo Eduardo de Aguiar; Abdala, Nitamar; Nogueira, Roberto Gomes; Carrete Junior, Henrique; Szejnfeld, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to establish the maximum achievable JPEG compression ratio without affecting quantitative and qualitative magnetic resonance imaging analysis of ischemic lesion in small vessels of the brain. Material and method: fifteen DICOM images were converted to JPEG with a compression ratio of 1:10 to 1:60 and were assessed together with the original images by three neuro radiologists. The number, morphology and signal intensity of the lesions were analyzed. Results: lesions were properly identified up to a 1:30 ratio. More lesions were identified with a 1:10 ratio then in the original images. Morphology and edges were properly evaluated up toa 1:40 ratio. Compression did not affect signal. Conclusion: small lesions were identified ( < 2 mm ) and in all compression ratios the JPEG algorithm generated image noise that misled observers to identify more lesions in JPEG images then in DICOM images, thus generating false-positive results.(author)

  18. Small-target leak detection for a closed vessel via infrared image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ling; Yang, Hongjiu

    2017-03-01

    This paper focus on a leak diagnosis and localization method based on infrared image sequences. Some problems on high probability of false warning and negative affect for marginal information are solved by leak detection. An experimental model is established for leak diagnosis and localization on infrared image sequences. The differential background prediction is presented to eliminate the negative affect of marginal information on test vessel based on a kernel regression method. A pipeline filter based on layering voting is designed to reduce probability of leak point false warning. A synthesize leak diagnosis and localization algorithm is proposed based on infrared image sequences. The effectiveness and potential are shown for developed techniques through experimental results.

  19. [Small vessel-childhood primary angiitis of the central nervous system: a case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, J; Fang, F; Wang, X H; Ge, M; He, L J; Zhang, N

    2018-02-02

    Objective: To summarize the clinical and pathological features of small vessel-childhood primary angiitis of the central nervous system (SV-cPACNS), discuss the immune therapy and increase the attention to brain biopsy in SV-cPACNS. Methods: The clinical data, pathology of brain biopsy, treatment and outcome of an SV-cPACNS patient hospitalized in Beijing Children's Hospital in February 2016 were analyzed retrospectively. The cases reported at Pubmed, CNKI and Wanfang databases from 2007 to 2017 were searched, the clinical and pathological features, immunotherapy and prognosis of the disease were summarized according to the literature review. Results: A 70 months old girl had 6 times relapses during 5 months' disease course. Symptoms included convulsions, limb paralysis, blurred vision and speech difficulty. Multiple cortical lesions were found successively in brain MRI but CT angiography was negative. The pathology of brain biopsy revealed thickening of small vessel walls together with lymphocytic infiltration. After the treatment with rituximab, remission was achieved and remained stable without recurrence in 1 year follow up. A total of 44 pathologically confirmed cases reported in nearly 10 years were retrieved. Male to female ratio was 1∶3.5. The average onset age was 9.8 years. Clinical manifestations included seizures (37/45, 82%), headache (35/45, 78%), cognitive decline (28/45, 62%), speech regression(20/45, 44%), paralysis (15/45, 33%), and so on; 70% (19/27) patients experienced relapses. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein slightly elevated, antinuclear antibody and other autoimmune antibodies were mostly negative. Mild lymphocytosis in cerebrospinal fluid was found in 67%(29/43) patients. 53%(23/43) patients had elevated CSF protein level, several had elevated IgG and positive oligoclonal band. Bilateral multifocal lesions were revealed in 80% (36/45) brain MRIs, meanwhile all angiographies were unremarkable. The pathology showed

  20. Limitations of quantitative photoacoustic measurements of blood oxygenation in small vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Mathangi; Maslov, Konstantin; Zhang, Hao F; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of obtaining accurate quantitative information, such as local blood oxygenation level (sO 2 ), with a spatial resolution of about 50 μm from spectral photoacoustic (PA) measurements. The optical wavelength dependence of the peak values of the PA signals is utilized to obtain the local blood oxygenation level. In our in vitro experimental models, the PA signal amplitude is found to be linearly proportional to the blood optical absorption coefficient when using ultrasonic transducers with central frequencies high enough such that the ultrasonic wavelengths are shorter than the light penetration depth into the blood vessels. For an optical wavelength in the 578-596 nm region, with a transducer central frequency that is above 25 MHz, the sensitivity and accuracy of sO 2 inversion is shown to be better than 4%. The effect of the transducer focal position on the accuracy of quantifying blood oxygenation is found to be negligible. In vivo oxygenation measurements of rat skin microvasculature yield results consistent with those from in vitro studies, although factors specific to in vivo measurements, such as the spectral dependence of tissue optical attenuation, dramatically affect the accuracy of sO 2 quantification in vivo

  1. Investigation of magnetic nanoparticle targeting in a simplified model of small vessel aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzababaei, S.N. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Noshirvani Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gorji, Tahereh B., E-mail: gorji.tahereh@stu.nit.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Noshirvani Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baou, M.; Gorji-Bandpy, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Noshirvani Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fatouraee, Nasser [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    An in simulacra study was conducted to investigate the capture efficiency (CE) of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in aneurysm model, under the effect of a bipolar permanent magnetic system positioned at the vicinity of the model vessel. The bipolar magnetic system with an active space of 9 cm was designed by FEMM software. The MNPs were magnetite nanoparticles synthesized by the hydrothermal method which were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope and magnetometer measurements. Ferrofluid velocity, magnetic field strength, and aneurysm volume all proved to be important parameters which affect the capturing of MNPs. Overall, the results of this in simulacra study confirmed the effectiveness of magnetic targeting for possible aneurysm embolization. - Highlights: • An in simulacra investigation of the magnetic targeting in mechanical aneurysm embolization was conducted. • A bipolar permanent magnetic system with an active space of 9 cm was designed by FEMM software. • Magnetic nanofluid was synthetized and applied in an experimental setup to study the effect of different flow, magnetic field and geometry parameters on the capture efficiency of the magnetic particles acting as a dug carrier agent.

  2. Principles of Network Architecture Emerging from Comparisons of the Cerebral Cortex in Large and Small Brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara L Finlay

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The cerebral cortex retains its fundamental organization, layering, and input-output relations as it scales in volume over many orders of magnitude in mammals. How is its network architecture affected by size scaling? By comparing network organization of the mouse and rhesus macaque cortical connectome derived from complete neuroanatomical tracing studies, a recent study in PLOS Biology shows that an exponential distance rule emerges that reveals the falloff in connection probability with distance in the two brains that in turn determines common organizational features.

  3. FMCW radar system for detection and classification of small vessels in high sea state conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasselin, J.-P.; Mazuel, S.; Itcia, E.; Huizing, A.G.; Theil, A.

    2012-01-01

    The ROCKWELL COLLINS France radar department is currently developing a FMCW radar system for the detection and the classification of small maritime targets in the frame of the SISMARIS, SARGOS & I2C projects. Several test campaigns have been conducted since 2009 to develop a sensor as well as an

  4. Evaluation of ductile-brittle transition behavior with neutron irradiation in nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels using small punch test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M. C.; Lee, B. S.; Oh, Y. J.

    2003-01-01

    A Small Punch (SP) test was performed to evaluate the ductile-brittle transition temperature before and after neutron irradiation in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels produced by different manufacturing (refining) processes. The results were compared to the standard transition temperature shifts from the Charpy test and Master Curve fracture toughness test in accordance with the ASTM standard E1921. The samples were taken from 1/4t location of the vessel thickness and machined into a 10x10x0.5mm dimension. Irradiation of the samples was carried out in the research reactor at KAERI (HANARO) at about 290 .deg. C of the different fluence levels respectively. SP tests were performed in the temperature range of RT to -196 .deg. C using a 2.4mm diameter ball. For the materials before and after irradiation, SP transition temperatures (T sp ), which are determined at the middle of the upper and lower SP energies, showed a linear correlation with the Charpy index temperature, T 41J . T sp from the irradiated samples was increased as the fluence level increased and was well within the deviation range of the unirradiated data. The TSP had a correlation with the reference temperature (T 0 ) from the master curve method using a pre-cracked Charpy V-notched (PCVN) specimen

  5. Association of MTHFR C677T Genotype With Ischemic Stroke Is Confined to Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Subtype

    OpenAIRE

    Rutten-Jacobs, Loes Carola; Traylor, Matthew Stephen; Adib-Samii, Poneh; Thijs, Vincent; Sudlow, Cathie; Rothwell, Peter M; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Dichgans, Martin; Meschia, James; Maguire, Jane; Levi, Christopher; Rost, Natalia S; Rosand, Jonathan; Hassan, Ahamad; Bevan, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose—Elevated plasma homocysteine levels are associated with stroke. However, this might be a reflection of bias or confounding because trials have failed to demonstrate an effect from homocysteine lowering in stroke patients, although a possible benefit has been suggested in lacunar stroke. Genetic studies could potentially overcome these issues because genetic variants are inherited randomly and are fixed at conception. Therefore, we tested the homocysteine levels–associat...

  6. Cerebral haemodynamics in female teenagers exposed to ionizing irradiation in low doses and living in 'clean' areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumova, G.I.; Naumov, A.D.

    1999-01-01

    Thirty seven girls living in various districts of the Mogilev Region and having received absorbed irradiation dose at thyroid gland owing to iodine 131 more than 1 Gy and 65 ones living in relatively free from radionuclide areas were examined. The results indicated changes in cerebral haemodynamics in the first group. Vegetative vessels dystonia syntrom had been revealed at 31 exposed to iodine 131 irradiation patients (83%) and at 16 patients (25%) from the control group. The changes tended to induce hypotonia of small cerebral peripheral blood vessels with indices asymmetry of left and right cerebral hemispheres

  7. The Effect of Pulsatile Flow on bMSC-Derived Endothelial-Like Cells in a Small-Sized Artificial Vessel Made by 3-Dimensional Bioprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Woog Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of small-sized vessels is still challenging. This study is aimed at investigating the possibility of small-sized artificial vessels made by 3-dimensional bioprinting and the effect of pulsatile flow on bMSC-derived endothelial-like cells. Cells were harvested from rabbit bone marrow and primary cultured with or without growth factors. Endothelial differentiation was confirmed by the Matrigel tube formation assay, Western blot, and qRT-PCR. In addition, embedment of endothelial-like cells in an artificial vessel was made by 3-dimensional bioprinting, and the pulsatile flow was performed. For pumped and nonpumped groups, qRT-PCR was performed on CD31 and VE-cadherin gene expression. Endothelial-like cells showed increased gene expression of CD31 and VE-cadherin, and tube formation is observed at each week. Endothelial-like cells grow well in a small-sized artificial vessel made by 3-dimensional bioprinting and even express higher endothelial cell markers when they undergo pulsatile flow condition. Moreover, the pulsatile flow condition gives a positive effect for cell observation not only on the sodium alginate hydrogel layer but also on the luminal surface of the artificial vessel wall. We have developed an artificial vessel, which is a mixture of cells and carriers using a 3-dimensional bioprinting method, and applied pulsatile flow using a peristaltic pump, and we also demonstrated cell growth and differentiation into endothelial cells. This study suggests guidelines regarding a small-sized artificial vessel in the field of tissue engineering.

  8. Proton density differences in signal characteristics of multiple sclerosis plaques versus white matter lesions of small vessel disease and vasculitis on high-field strength MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyster, R.G.; Siegal, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines if variations in signal intensity characteristics on multi-spin-echo images obtained with a high-field-strength magnet can be useful in differentiating demyelinating plaques of multiple sclerosis from other pathologic white matter processes due to small vessel disease and vasculities. Using the first of two multi-spin-echo images obtained with a General Electric 1.5-T magnet, the investigators compared signal intensity characteristics in 30 patients with a firm clinical diagnosis of multiple sclerosis versus a control group of 30 patients with a known clinical history of small-vessel disease and vasculitis are isodense to gray matter on proton-density images

  9. Changes in cross-sectional area of pulmonary vessels on chest computed tomography after chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayama, Masato; Inui, Naoki; Kusagaya, Hideki; Suzuki, Seiichiro; Inoue, Yusuke; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-05-01

    Chemotherapy is associated with a risk of vascular damage. Novel anti-angiogenic agents, which can directly affect tumor angiogenesis, are increasingly being used. However, the effects of these agents on normal vasculature are not well understood. Here, we evaluated the effects of chemotherapy in general, and the anti-angiogenic agent bevacizumab, more specifically, on the pulmonary vasculature in patients with advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). For this, we used the cross-sectional area of pulmonary vessels (CSA), which is an easily measurable indicator of small pulmonary vasculature on non-contrast chest computed tomography (CT). We retrospectively reviewed CT scans of the lungs of 75 chemo-naïve patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC, for measurement of CSA, before and after first-line platinum-based chemotherapy, using a semi-automatic image-processing program. Measured vessels were classified in two groups: small vessels with CSA area (%CSAsmall-diameter vessels, with a significant decrease in %CSAsmall pulmonary vascular damage. Use of bevacizumab does not enhance the reduction in area of pulmonary vessels.

  10. Focal and diffuse papillary muscle fibrosis and small vessel sclerosis of the heart. A clinical-pathologic study of 375 autopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steer, A; Danzig, M D; Robertson, T L; Kawashima, T; Nakashima, T; Lee, K K

    1975-01-01

    A retrospective clinical-pathologic study was made of papillary muscle fibrosis and small vessel sclerosis of the heart in 375 autopsies from the ABCC-JNIH Adult Health Study sample in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The histopathologic findings were correlated with clinical diagnoses which included hypertension, hypertensive heart disease, myocardial infarction, and diabetes mellitus. (7 tables, 5 figures) (auth)

  11. Porous hybrid structures based on P(DLLA-co-TMC) and collagen for tissue engineering of small-diameter blood vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttafoco, L.; Boks, Niels P.; Engbers-Buijtenhuijs, P.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Poot, Andreas A.; Dijkstra, Pieter J.; Vermes, I.; Feijen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Poly (D,L-lactide)-7co-(1,3-trimethylene carbonate) [P(DLLA-co-TMC)] (83 mol % DLLA) was used to produce matrices suitable for tissue engineering of small-diameter blood vessels. The copolymer was processed into tubular structures with a porosity of 98% by melt spinning and fiber winding, thus

  12. Progress Towards a Core Set of Outcome Measures in Small-vessel Vasculitis. Report from OMERACT 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    MERKEL, PETER A.; HERLYN, KAREN; MAHR, ALFRED D.; NEOGI, TUHINA; SEO, PHILIP; WALSH, MICHAEL; BOERS, MAARTEN; LUQMANI, RAASHID

    2011-01-01

    The past decade has seen a substantial increase in the number and quality of clinical trials of new therapies for vasculitis, including randomized, controlled, multicenter trials that have successfully incorporated measures of disease activity and toxicity. However, because current treatment regimens for severe disease effectively induce initial remission and reduce mortality, future trials will focus on any of several goals including: (a) treatment of mild—moderate disease; (b) prevention of chronic damage; (c) reduction in treatment toxicity; or (d) more subtle differences in remission induction or maintenance. Thus, new trials will require outcome measure instruments that are more precise and are better able to detect effective treatments for different disease states and measure chronic manifestations of disease. The OMERACT Vasculitis Working Group comprises international clinical investigators with expertise in vasculitis who, since 2002, have worked collaboratively to advance the refinement of outcome measures in vasculitis, create new measures to address domains of illness not covered by current research approaches, and harmonize outcome assessment in vasculitis. The focus of the OMERACT group to date has been on outcome measures in small-vessel vasculitis with an overall goal of creating a core set of outcome measures for vasculitis, each of which fulfills the OMERACT filter of truth, discrimination, feasibility, and identifying additional domains requiring further research. This process has been informed by several ongoing projects providing data on outcomes of disease activity, disease-related damage, multidimensional health-related quality of life, and patient-reported ratings of the burden of vasculitis. PMID:19820226

  13. Prognostic value of intraventricular bleeding in spontaneous intraparenchymal cerebral hemorrhage of small volume: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes Lima, Telmo Tiburcio; Prandini, Mirto Nelso; Gallo, Pasquale; Cavalheiro, Sérgio

    2012-04-01

    The literature is controversial on whether intraventricular bleeding has a negative impact on the prognosis of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Nevertheless, an association between intraventricular bleeding and spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage volumes has been consistently reported. To evaluate the prognostic value of intraventricular bleeding in deep intraparenchymal hypertensive spontaneous hemorrhage with a bleeding volume bleeding was calculated by the LeRoux scale. Clinical data, including neurological complications, were collected daily during hospitalization. Neurological outcome was evaluated 30 days after the event by using the Glasgow outcome scale. Patients were assigned to 1 of 3 groups according to intraventricular bleeding: Control, no intraventricular bleeding; LR 1, intraventricular bleeding with LeRoux scale scores of 1 to 8; or LR 2, intraventricular bleeding with LeRoux scale scores >8. There were no significant differences among groups concerning age, mean blood pressure, and time from onset to brain CT scan. Patients with greater intraventricular bleeding presented lower initial Glasgow coma scale scores, increased ventricular index and width of temporal horns, increased number of clinical and neurological complications, and longer hospitalization. Furthermore, their relative risk for unfavorable clinical outcome was 1.9 (95% confidence interval 1.25-2.49). Intraventricular bleeding with a LeRoux scale score >8 appears to have a negative effect on deep spontaneous intraparenchymal cerebral hemorrhage of small volume.

  14. X-ray computed tomography (CT) study of small, deep and recent infarcts (SDRIs) of the cerebral hemispheres in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Launay, M.; N'Diaye, M.; Bories, J.

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of CT signs of small deep infarcts of the cerebral hemispheres in thirty adults, in the first five weeks, has been retrospectively studied. The relevant literature has been reviewed and an attempt has been made to present a synthesis, accompanied by a commentary. It is impossible now to give the frequency of each type of evolution, but the main data are as follows: 1. The shortest delay in apparance of an hypodense area is about 17 to 21 h, but at 27 h the densities may be still normal. 2. The evolution of the hypodense area is also variable: after a minimum attenuation is reached - at approximately 72 h - there is a risk of ''fogging effect'', which reduces the visibility of ischemic lesions; it could be seen from the end of the 1st week to the beginning of the 4th, but its frequency and its duration have yet to be better determined. 3. In our series, contrast enhancement has been found in the gray matter of the basal ganglia between the 8th and the 22nd days - but according to some observations recorded in the literature, it may be found from the second to the twenty sixth day - and there was no obvious contrast enhancement in the white matter. The significance of the evolving CT signs is discussed in connection with the clinical applications, principally in the management of these patients and with the attempts to correlate the clinical and CT findings. (orig.)

  15. Impact of Strategically Located White Matter Hyperintensities on Cognition in Memory Clinic Patients with Small Vessel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesbroek, J Matthijs; Weaver, Nick A; Hilal, Saima; Kuijf, Hugo J; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Xu, Xin; Tan, Boon Yeow; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Postma, Albert; Biessels, Geert Jan; Chen, Christopher P L H

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the impact of small vessel disease (SVD) on cognition generally focus on white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume. The extent to which WMH location relates to cognitive performance has received less attention, but is likely to be functionally important. We examined the relation between WMH location and cognition in a memory clinic cohort of patients with sporadic SVD. A total of 167 patients with SVD were recruited from memory clinics. Assumption-free region of interest-based analyses based on major white matter tracts and voxel-wise analyses were used to determine the association between WMH location and executive functioning, visuomotor speed and memory. Region of interest-based analyses showed that WMHs located particularly within the anterior thalamic radiation and forceps minor were inversely associated with both executive functioning and visuomotor speed, independent of total WMH volume. Memory was significantly associated with WMH volume in the forceps minor, independent of total WMH volume. An independent assumption-free voxel-wise analysis identified strategic voxels in these same tracts. Region of interest-based analyses showed that WMH volume within the anterior thalamic radiation explained 6.8% of variance in executive functioning, compared to 3.9% for total WMH volume; WMH volume within the forceps minor explained 4.6% of variance in visuomotor speed and 4.2% of variance in memory, compared to 1.8% and 1.3% respectively for total WMH volume. Our findings identify the anterior thalamic radiation and forceps minor as strategic white matter tracts in which WMHs are most strongly associated with cognitive impairment in memory clinic patients with SVD. WMH volumes in individual tracts explained more variance in cognition than total WMH burden, emphasizing the importance of lesion location when addressing the functional consequences of WMHs.

  16. Genetic modification of cerebral arterial wall: implications for prevention and treatment of cerebral vasospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Anantha; Santhanam, R; Katusic, Zvonimir S

    2006-10-01

    Genetic modification of cerebral vessels represents a promising and novel approach for prevention and/or treatment of various cerebral vascular disorders, including cerebral vasospasm. In this review, we focus on the current understanding of the use of gene transfer to the cerebral arteries for prevention and/or treatment of cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We also discuss the recent developments in vascular therapeutics, involving the autologous use of progenitor cells for repair of damaged vessels, as well as a cell-based gene delivery approach for the prevention and treatment of cerebral vasospasm.

  17. Intravenous thrombolysis of large vessel occlusions is associated with higher hospital costs than small vessel strokes: a rationale for developing stroke severity-based financial models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Ansaar T; Evans, Kim; Riggs, Jack E; Hobbs, Gerald R

    2016-04-01

    Owing to their severity, large vessel occlusion (LVO) strokes may be associated with higher costs that are not reflected in current coding systems. This study aimed to determine whether intravenous thrombolysis costs are related to the presence or absence of LVO. Patients who had undergone intravenous thrombolysis over a 9-year period were divided into LVO and no LVO (nLVO) groups based on admission CT angiography. The primary outcome was hospital cost per admission. Secondary outcomes included admission duration, 90-day clinical outcome, and discharge destination. 119 patients (53%) had LVO and 104 (47%) had nLVO. Total mean±SD cost per LVO patient was $18,815±14,262 compared with $15,174±11,769 per nLVO patient (p=0.04). Hospital payments per admission were $17,338±13,947 and $15,594±16,437 for LVO and nLVO patients, respectively (p=0.4). A good outcome was seen in 33 LVO patients (27.7%) and in 69 nLVO patients (66.4%) (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1 to 0.3, pregression analysis after controlling for comorbidities showed the presence of LVO to be an independent predictor of higher total hospital costs. The presence or absence of LVO is associated with significant differences in hospital costs, outcomes, admission duration, and home discharge. These differences can be important when developing systems of care models for acute ischemic stroke. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Cerebral microbleeds. Imaging characteristics, causes and differential diagnoses; Zerebrale Mikroblutungen. Bildgebung, Ursachen und Differenzialdiagnosen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linn, Jennifer [Universitaetsklinikum Dresden (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie

    2016-12-15

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMB) represent small hemosiderin deposits, which are surrounded by normal brain tissue and can be depicted as small, rounded or ovoid areas of signal loss on susceptibility-sensitive MRI sequences. This review summarizes helpful methodological considerations to identify CMBs and to differentiate them from other causes of focal hypointensities on these sequences. Important differential diagnoses and ''mimics'' are presented and the clinical relevance of CMBs is discussed, in particular their role as important MRI marker of various cerebral small vessel diseases.

  19. [Cerebral protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, A D

    1993-09-01

    Cerebral protection means prevention of cerebral neuronal damage. Severe brain damage extinguishes the very "human" functions such as speech, consciousness, intellectual capacity, and emotional integrity. Many pathologic conditions may inflict injuries to the brain, therefore the protection and salvage of cerebral neuronal function must be the top priorities in the care of critically ill patients. Brain tissue has unusually high energy requirements, its stores of energy metabolites are small and, as a result, the brain is totally dependent on a continuous supply of substrates and oxygen, via the circulation. In complete global ischemia (cardiac arrest) reperfusion is characterized by an immediate reactive hyperemia followed within 20-30 min by a delayed hypoperfusion state. It has been postulated that the latter contributes to the ultimate neurologic outcome. In focal ischemia (stroke) the primary focus of necrosis is encircled by an area (ischemic penumbra) that is underperfused and contains neurotoxic substances such as free radicals, prostaglandins, calcium, and excitatory neurotransmitters. The variety of therapeutic effort that have addressed the question of protecting the brain reflects their limited success. 1) Barbiturates. After an initial enthusiastic endorsement by many clinicians and years of vigorous controversy, it can now be unequivocally stated that there is no place for barbiturate therapy following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. One presumed explanation for this negative statement is that cerebral metabolic suppression by barbiturates (and other anesthetics) is impossible in the absence of an active EEG. Conversely, in the event of incomplete ischemia EEG activity in usually present (albeit altered) and metabolic suppression and hence possibly protection can be induced with barbiturates. Indeed, most of the animal studies led to a number of recommendations for barbiturate therapy in man for incomplete ischemia. 2) Isoflurane. From a cerebral

  20. Vessel Operating Units (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for vessels that are greater than five net tons and have a current US Coast Guard documentation number. Beginning in1979, the NMFS...

  1. Robust and enduring atorvastatin-mediated memory recovery following the 4-vessel occlusion/internal carotid artery model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion in middle-aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghi, Gislene Gonçalves Dias; Godinho, Jacqueline; Ferreira, Emilene Dias Fiuza; Ribeiro, Matheus Henrique Dal Molin; Previdelli, Isolde Santos; de Oliveira, Rúbia Maria Weffort; Milani, Humberto

    2016-02-04

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) is a common condition associated with the development and/or worsening of age-related dementia.We previously reported persistent memory loss and neurodegeneration after CCH in middle-aged rats. Statin-mediated neuroprotection has been reported after acute cerebral ischemia. Unknown, however, is whether statins can alleviate the outcome of CCH. The present study investigated whether atorvastatin attenuates the cognitive and neurohistological outcome of CCH. Rats (12–15 months old) were trained in a non-food-rewarded radial maze, and then subjected to CCH. Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered for 42 days or 15 days, beginning 5 h after the first occlusion stage. Retrograde memory performance was assessed at 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days of CCH, and expressed by “latency,” “number of reference memory errors” and “number of working memory errors.” Neurodegeneration was then examined at the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Compared to sham, CCH caused profound and persistent memory loss in the vehicle-treated groups, as indicated by increased latency (91.2% to 107.3%) and number of errors (123.5% to 2508.2%), effects from which the animals did not spontaneously recover across time. This CCH-induced retrograde amnesia was completely prevented by atorvastatin (latency: −4.3% to 3.3%; reference/working errors: −2.5% to 45.7%), regardless of the treatment duration. This effect was sustained during the entire behavioral testing period (5 weeks), even after discontinuing treatment. This robust and sustained memory-protective effect of atorvastatin occurred in the absence of neuronal rescue (39.58% to 56.45% cell loss). We suggest that atorvastatin may be promising for the treatment of cognitive sequelae associated with CCH.

  2. Intra-arterial thrombolysis using rt-PA in patients with acute stroke due to vessel occlusion of anterior and/or posterior cerebral circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tountopoulou, Argyro; Ahl, Bjoern; Weissenborn, Karin [Hannover Medical School, Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Hannover (Germany); Becker, Hartmut; Goetz, Friedrich [Hannover Medical School, Department of Neuroradiology, Hannover (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of intra-arterial (IA) thrombolysis using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in patients with acute stroke due to occlusion in the anterior or posterior circulation. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and radiological data of 88 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke who underwent emergency cerebral angiography for the purpose of subsequent IA thrombolysis. The neurological deficit on admission and discharge was graded using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score. Baseline computer tomography (CT) scans were examined for any signs indicative of cerebral ischemia. The angiographic findings were classified according to the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) score for myocardial infarction. Follow-up CT scans were examined for hemorrhagic complication. Of the 88 patients who underwent IA thrombolysis, 63 presented with complete or partial arterial occlusion in the suspected perfusion area. In these 63 patients, the median NIHSS score dropped from 15 points on admission to 10 points at discharge. The recanalization rate was 52.6% for partial and complete reperfusion. In-hospital mortality was 20.6% (9.1% for carotid, 44.4% for basilar territory occlusion). Intracerebral bleeding (ICB) occurred in 38.6% of the patients with occlusion in the anterior circulation, resulting in these patients presenting a worse clinical outcome than those without ICB. Only minor extracranial bleedings occurred in 20.6% of patients. Patients with ICB had a significantly higher frequency of ischemic signs on the baseline CT scan. Occlusion of a cerebral artery is present in about 75% of the patients eligible for thrombolytic therapy. Intra-arterial thrombolysis using rt-PA in patients with acute ischemic stroke can achieve re-vascularization, although ICB remains the major risk factor affecting its efficacy. (orig.)

  3. Intra-arterial thrombolysis using rt-PA in patients with acute stroke due to vessel occlusion of anterior and/or posterior cerebral circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tountopoulou, Argyro; Ahl, Bjoern; Weissenborn, Karin; Becker, Hartmut; Goetz, Friedrich

    2008-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of intra-arterial (IA) thrombolysis using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in patients with acute stroke due to occlusion in the anterior or posterior circulation. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and radiological data of 88 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke who underwent emergency cerebral angiography for the purpose of subsequent IA thrombolysis. The neurological deficit on admission and discharge was graded using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score. Baseline computer tomography (CT) scans were examined for any signs indicative of cerebral ischemia. The angiographic findings were classified according to the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) score for myocardial infarction. Follow-up CT scans were examined for hemorrhagic complication. Of the 88 patients who underwent IA thrombolysis, 63 presented with complete or partial arterial occlusion in the suspected perfusion area. In these 63 patients, the median NIHSS score dropped from 15 points on admission to 10 points at discharge. The recanalization rate was 52.6% for partial and complete reperfusion. In-hospital mortality was 20.6% (9.1% for carotid, 44.4% for basilar territory occlusion). Intracerebral bleeding (ICB) occurred in 38.6% of the patients with occlusion in the anterior circulation, resulting in these patients presenting a worse clinical outcome than those without ICB. Only minor extracranial bleedings occurred in 20.6% of patients. Patients with ICB had a significantly higher frequency of ischemic signs on the baseline CT scan. Occlusion of a cerebral artery is present in about 75% of the patients eligible for thrombolytic therapy. Intra-arterial thrombolysis using rt-PA in patients with acute ischemic stroke can achieve re-vascularization, although ICB remains the major risk factor affecting its efficacy. (orig.)

  4. Cerebral vasculitis and its simulators. Diagnostic and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimaru, Hideki; Nakajima, Kazuaki; Matsuoka, Yohjiro; Sakamoto, Ayami; Sakugawa, Takayuki; Morikawa, Minoru; Inuzuka, Michiko; Kimura, Seigo

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral vasculitis, although rare in general, is an important cause of cerebral ischemia, because the treatment strategy is different from that of usual cerebral infarction. On the other hand, a variety of common and uncommon nonvasculitic disorders may mimic vasculitis angiographically or clinically. It is also important to distinguish these vasculitis simulators from true vasculitis in order to avoid the unnecessary and harmful side effects of corticosteroid and immunosuppressant, the mainstay of drug therapy for vasculitis. The diagnosis is often difficult. Angiography is expected to demonstrate the underlying vascular pathology; however, many vasculitides affect small arteries beyond the spatial resolution of conventional angiography. The most important role of the diagnostic imaging is the identification of brain lesions consistent with cerebral vasculitis. Multiple lesions in more than one vascular territory should raise this suspicion, although no specific pattern for this entity exists. In large and medium-sized vessel vasculitis, MRI can directly demonstrate mural thickening and enhancement, which is considered to specific for active inflammation. We propose here a classification for cerebral vasculitis and simulators according to the size of the affected brain vessels, which would help us to make a differential diagnosis. We also review the endovascular techniques for this entity, and its indications. (author)

  5. Cerebral angiography in patients with complicated migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiler, K.; Wessely, P.; Holzner, F.

    1985-08-01

    38 patients (mean age: 29 years) were investigated by means of complete 4-vessel angiography: all of them were suffering from complicated migraine without detectable vascular malformation. Stenoses of the great craniocervical vessels were found in 11 patients (28.9%), but there was not a single case of vascular occlusion. A correlation between the localization of the stenosis, the localization of the headache and the presumed region of the transient cerebral function disturbance was found only in a few patients. Concerning the morphological changes of the small intracranial arterial branches, there was hardly an difference between clinically affected and non-affected territories of the middle cerebral artery. The angiograms of the 38 cases of complicated migraine were compared with the angiograms of 40 patients suffering from strokes in the young and those of 49 patients with transient ischaemic attacks. There were remarkably fewer stenoses or occlusions in the great craniocervical arteries of patients suffering from complicated migraine (28.9%) than in the vessels of cases of stroke in the young (52.5%). However, the incidence was comparable with the results in patients with transient ischaemic attacks (34.7%). The degree of morphological changes in the small intracranial arterial branches is likely to depend primarily on the patient's age and less on the diagnosis. The results suggest that in almost 30% of patients with complicated migraine - even at juvenile age-stenoses of the great craniocervical vessels might be found. However, considering the fact that most of the stenoses are without haemodynamic significance and their localization is not in agreement with the clinical data, the pathogenetic value of these vessel wall changes is highly questionable. (Author).

  6. An everolimus-eluting stent versus a paclitaxel-eluting stent in small vessel coronary artery disease: a pooled analysis from the SPIRIT II and SPIRIT III trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartorelli, Antonio L; Serruys, Patrick W; Miquel-Hébert, Karine; Yu, Shui; Pierson, Wes; Stone, Gregg W

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the XIENCE V everolimus-eluting stent compared to the TAXUS paclitaxel-eluting stent in small vessels. The XIENCE V everolimus-eluting stent (EES) has been shown to improve angiographic and clinical outcomes after percutaneous myocardial revascularization, but its performance in small coronary arteries has not been investigated. In this pooled analysis, we studied a cohort of 541 patients with small coronary vessels (reference diameter SPIRIT II and SPIRIT III studies. TAXUS Express (73% of lesions) and TAXUS Liberté (27% of lesions) paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES) were used as controls in SPIRIT II. In SPIRIT III, Taxus Express(2) PES was the control. Mean angiographic in-stent and in-segment late loss was significantly less in the EES group compared with the PES group, (0.15 +/- 0.37 mm vs. 0.30 +/- 0.44 mm; P = 0.011 for in-stent; 0.10 +/- 0.38 mm vs. 0.21 +/- 0.34 mm; P = 0.034 for in-segment). EES also resulted in a significant reduction in composite major adverse cardiac events at 1 year (19/366 [5.2%] vs. 17/159 [10.7%]; P = 0.037), due to fewer non-Q-wave myocardial infarctions and target lesion revascularizations. At 1 year, the rate of non-Q-wave myocardial infarction was significantly lower in the EES group compared with that of the PES group (6/366 [1.6%] vs. 8/159 [5.0%]; P = 0.037). In patients with small vessel coronary arteries, the XIENCE V EES was superior to the TAXUS PES. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Cerebral MRI findings in very-low-birth-weight and small-for-gestational-age children at 15 years of age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skranes, Jon S.; Brubakk, Ann-Mari; Martinussen, Marit; Smevik, Olaug; Myhr, Gunnar; Indredavik, Marit; Vik, Torstein

    2005-01-01

    A high prevalence of abnormal cerebral MRI findings has been reported in low-birth-weight children. To compare MRI findings in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) and term small-for-gestational-age (SGA) children with controls in early adolescence. Cerebral MRI was used to examine 55 VLBW, 54 SGA and 66 controls at 15 years of age. The MR images were qualitatively assessed, and size of ventricles, white-matter and grey-matter abnormalities were reported. The VLBW teenagers had a higher prevalence of various MRI abnormalities than SGA children and controls. Dilation of the ventricular system, especially of the occipital horns, was found in 82% of the VLBW group, in 19% of the SGA group and in 21% of controls. White-matter reduction was found in 53% of the VLBW, in 6% of the SGA and in 2% of controls. Corpus callosum thinning was found in 47% of the VLBW, in 2% of the SGA and in 6% of controls. Periventricular gliosis was found in 29% of the VLBW, in 4% of the SGA and in 8% of controls. Cerebral MRI pathology in white matter is a common finding in VLBW teenagers. The findings may indicate minor perinatal PVL with resulting loss of white-matter tissue and ventricular dilation. (orig.)

  8. Multimodal quantitation of the effects of endovascular therapy for vasospasm on cerebral blood flow, transcranial doppler ultrasonographic velocities, and cerebral artery diameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskouian, Rod J; Martin, Neil A; Lee, Jae Hong; Glenn, Thomas C; Guthrie, Donald; Gonzalez, Nestor R; Afari, Arash; Viñuela, Fernando

    2002-07-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify the effects of endovascular therapy on vasospastic cerebral vessels. We reviewed the medical records for 387 patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms who were treated at a single institution (University of California, Los Angeles) between May 1, 1993, and March 31, 2001. Patients who developed cerebral vasospasm and underwent cerebral arteriographic, transcranial Doppler ultrasonographic, and cerebral blood flow (CBF) studies before and after endovascular therapy for cerebral arterial spasm (vasospasm) were included in this study. Forty-five patients fulfilled the aforementioned criteria and were treated with either papaverine infusion, papaverine infusion with angioplasty, or angioplasty alone. After balloon angioplasty (12 patients), CBF increased from 27.8 +/- 2.8 ml/100 g/min to 28.4 +/- 3.0 ml/100 g/min (P = 0.87); the middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity was 1 57.6 +/- 9.4 cm/s and decreased to 76.3 +/- 9.3 cm/s (P < 0.05), with a mean increase in cerebral artery diameters of 24.4%. Papaverine infusion (20 patients) transiently increased the CBF from 27.5 +/- 2.1 ml/100 g/min to 38.7 +/- 2.8 ml/100 g/min (P < 0.05) and decreased the middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity from 109.9 +/- 9.1 cm/s to 82.8 +/- 8.6 cm/s (P < 0.05). There was a mean increase in vessel diameters of 30.1% after papaverine infusion. Combined treatment (13 patients) significantly increased the CBF from 33.3 +/- 3.2 ml/100 g/min to 41.7 +/- 2.8 ml/100 g/min (P< 0.05) and decreased the transcranial Doppler velocities from 148.9 +/- 12.7 cm/s to 111.4 +/- 10.6 cm/s (P < 0.05), with a mean increase in vessel diameters of 42.2%. Balloon angioplasty increased proximal vessel diameters, whereas papaverine treatment effectively dilated distal cerebral vessels. In our small series, we observed no correlation between early clinical improvement or clinical outcomes and any of our quantitative or physiological data (CBF, transcranial Doppler

  9. Rigid 3D-3D registration of TOF MRA integrating vessel segmentation for quantification of recurrence volumes after coiling cerebral aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saering, Dennis; Forkert, Nils Daniel; Fiehler, Jens; Ries, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    A fast and reproducible quantification of the recurrence volume of coiled aneurysms is required to enable a more timely evaluation of new coils. This paper presents two registration schemes for the semi-automatic quantification of aneurysm recurrence volumes based on baseline and follow-up 3D MRA TOF datasets. The quantification of shape changes requires a previous definition of corresponding structures in both datasets. For this, two different rigid registration methods have been developed and evaluated. Besides a state-of-the-art rigid registration method, a second approach integrating vessel segmentations is presented. After registration, the aneurysm recurrence volume can be calculated based on the difference image. The computed volumes were compared to manually extracted volumes. An evaluation based on 20 TOF MRA datasets (baseline and follow-up) of ten patients showed that both registration schemes are generally capable of providing sufficient registration results. Regarding the quantification of aneurysm recurrence volumes, the results suggest that the second segmentation-based registration method yields better results, while a reduction of the computation and interaction time is achieved at the same time. The proposed registration scheme incorporating vessel segmentation enables an improved quantification of recurrence volumes of coiled aneurysms with reduced computation and interaction time. (orig.)

  10. Rare variants of the 3’-5’ DNA exonuclease TREX1 in early onset small vessel stroke [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah McGlasson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Monoallelic and biallelic mutations in the exonuclease TREX1 cause monogenic small vessel diseases (SVD. Given recent evidence for genetic and pathophysiological overlap between monogenic and polygenic forms of SVD, evaluation of TREX1 in small vessel stroke is warranted. Methods: We sequenced the TREX1 gene in an exploratory cohort of patients with lacunar stroke (Edinburgh Stroke Study, n=290 lacunar stroke cases. We subsequently performed a fully blinded case-control study of early onset MRI-confirmed small vessel stroke within the UK Young Lacunar Stroke Resource (990 cases, 939 controls. Results: No patients with canonical disease-causing mutations of TREX1 were identified in cases or controls. Analysis of an exploratory cohort identified a potential association between rare variants of TREX1 and patients with lacunar stroke. However, subsequent controlled and blinded evaluation of TREX1 in a larger and MRI-confirmed patient cohort, the UK Young Lacunar Stroke Resource, identified heterozygous rare variants in 2.1% of cases and 2.3% of controls. No association was observed with stroke risk (odds ratio = 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.49-1.65 p=0.74. Similarly no association was seen with rare TREX1 variants with predicted deleterious effects on enzyme function (odds ratio = 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 0.43-2.61 p=0.91. Conclusions: No patients with early-onset lacunar stroke had genetic evidence of a TREX1-associated monogenic microangiopathy. These results show no evidence of association between rare variants of TREX1 and early onset lacunar stroke. This includes rare variants that significantly affect protein and enzyme function. Routine sequencing of the TREX1 gene in patients with early onset lacunar stroke is therefore unlikely to be of diagnostic utility, in the absence of syndromic features or family history.

  11. Blood-Vessel Mimicking Structures by Stereolithographic Fabrication of Small Porous Tubes Using Cytocompatible Polyacrylate Elastomers, Biofunctionalization and Endothelialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Huber

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Blood vessel reconstruction is still an elusive goal for the development of in vitro models as well as artificial vascular grafts. In this study, we used a novel photo-curable cytocompatible polyacrylate material (PA for freeform generation of synthetic vessels. We applied stereolithography for the fabrication of arbitrary 3D tubular structures with total dimensions in the centimeter range, 300 µm wall thickness, inner diameters of 1 to 2 mm and defined pores with a constant diameter of approximately 100 µm or 200 µm. We established a rinsing protocol to remove remaining cytotoxic substances from the photo-cured PA and applied thio-modified heparin and RGDC-peptides to functionalize the PA surface for enhanced endothelial cell adhesion. A rotating seeding procedure was introduced to ensure homogenous endothelial monolayer formation at the inner luminal tube wall. We showed that endothelial cells stayed viable and adherent and aligned along the medium flow under fluid-flow conditions comparable to native capillaries. The combined technology approach comprising of freeform additive manufacturing (AM, biomimetic design, cytocompatible materials which are applicable to AM, and biofunctionalization of AM constructs has been introduced as BioRap® technology by the authors.

  12. CBF and CMRo2 during craniotomy for small supratentorial cerebral tumours in enflurane anaesthesia. A dose-response study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, J.B.; Cold, G.E.; Eriksen, H.O.; Eskesen, V.; Blatt-Lyon, B.

    1986-01-01

    In 14 patients with supratentorial cerebral tumours with midline shift ≤ 10 mm, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRo 2 ) were measured twice on the contralateral side of the craniotomy, using a modification of the Kety and Schmidt method. For induction of anaesthesia, thiopental, fentanyl and pancuronium were used. The anaesthesia was maintained with enflurane 1% in nitrous oxide 67%. Moderate hypocapnia to a level averaging 4.3 kPa was achieved. The patients were divided into two groups. In group 1 (n=7), 1% enflurane was used throughout the anaesthesia, and CBF and CMRo 2 measured about 70 min after induction averaged 30.1 ml 100 g -1 min -1 and 1.98 ml O 2 100 g -1 min -1 , respectively. During the second CBF study 1 h later, CBF and CMRo 2 were unchanged (P>0.05). In group 2 (n=7), the inspiratory enflurane concentration was increased from 1 to 2% after the first CBF measurement. In this group a significant decrease in CMRo 2 was observed, while CBF was unchanged. In six patients EEG was recorded simultaneously with the CBF measurements. In patients subjected to increasing enflurane concentration (Group 2), a suppression in the EEG activity was observed without spike waves. It is concluded that enflurane induces a dose-related decrease in CMRo 2 and suppression in the EEG activity, whereas CBF was unchanged (author)

  13. Neuroimaging of cerebral vasculitis; Bildgebung zerebraler Vaskulitiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wengenroth, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Institut fuer Neuroradiologie, Luebeck (Germany); Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Institut fuer klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Saam, T. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Institut fuer klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Haehnel, S. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung Neuroradiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Cerebral vasculitis can have a variety of origins. Furthermore, there are no vasculitis-specific symptoms or imaging signs and vasculitis of the CNS can mimic many other neurological diseases, which require different treatment approaches. Thus, the clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis is challenging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR angiography (MRA) should be the radiological imaging methods of choice to assess the degree of parenchymal damage and to detect vessel wall changes. If the results are unclear digital subtraction angiography (DSA) should be pursued in order to also detect changes in medium sized vessels. Vasculitis of small vessels cannot be detected by vascular imaging and requires brain or leptomeningeal biopsy. In this review we present the current diagnostic approach and a variety of imaging findings in cerebral vasculitis and discuss the main radiological differential diagnoses. (orig.) [German] Die zerebrale Vaskulitis kann viele Ursachen haben. Daher ist die klinische und radiologische Diagnose schwierig, auch weil es etliche vaskulitistypische Symptome und MR-Befunde bei anderen Erkrankungen gibt. Die ZNS-Vaskulitis kann zahlreiche andere neurologische Erkrankungen imitieren, die unterschiedlicher Therapie beduerfen. MRT und MR-Angiographie (MRA) sind die Verfahren der Wahl, mit denen die radiologische Diagnostik begonnen werden sollte, um den Parenchymschaden und den Gefaessbefall zu beurteilen. Bei unklaren Befunden kann eine digitale Subtraktionsangiographie (DSA) ergaenzt werden, um auch mittelgrosse Gefaesse beurteilen zu koennen. Der Befall kleiner Gefaesse kann nur bioptisch nachgewiesen werden. In der folgenden Uebersicht stellen wir das diagnostische Herangehen bei zerebraler Vaskulitis vor, praesentieren zahlreiche Befunde und diskutieren die wichtigsten radiologischen Differenzialdiagnosen. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of the cerebral vasculature by intrarterial DSA - with emphasis on in vivo resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Bussaka, H.; Nakagawa, N.

    1984-01-01

    Comparative study was performed between IA DSA and stereoscopic magnification angiography in relation to small vessel resolution, image quality of the vessels and image quality of various pathologic lesions. The vessels of various diameters accurately measured by stereoscopic magnification angiography, were localized on IA DSA and their resolution was carefully assessed. The vessels more than 1 mm in diameter were equally visualized on IA DSA and conventional angiography. The vessels between 1 mm and 0.5 mm showed fair resolution on IA DSA, whereas IA DSA did not resolve the vessels smaller than 0.5 mm in diameter to good advantage. In addition, image quality of the vessels on IA DSA was compared with the conventional methods. Cerebral gyrus, venous sinuses, and intracerebral veins are often shown better on DSA. The small vessels such as lenticulostriate, small cortical, thalamoperforate and meningohypophyseal arteries were not defined on DSA. Equal or better image quality was obtained in more than 85% of cases with pathologic lesions. Examinations were performed faster with lower cost and lower complication rate. Information provided by DSA was often sufficient for managements of patients. Combined use of DSA and conventional angiography will improve diagnostic accuracy and decrease the complication rate. (orig.)

  15. ASTM international symposium on small specimen test techniques and their applications to pressure vessel annealing and plant life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Hamilton, M.L.; Heinisch, H.L.; Kumar, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    Miniature sheet-type tensile specimens are currently being used in a variety of radiation damage studies conducted in a number of different reactors. Although these specimens are very small, they have proven successful in addressing issues encountered in both thermal reactors and anticipated fusion reactors. This paper reviews the results of a number of recent studies that illustrate the range of applicability of these small specimens. When combined with other types of specimens and other types of measurements made prior to tensile testing, miniature tensile specimens have been found to serve as very useful tools for application to both fundamental studies and alloy screening studies

  16. Research vessels

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.S.

    The role of the research vessels as a tool for marine research and exploration is very important. Technical requirements of a suitable vessel and the laboratories needed on board are discussed. The history and the research work carried out...

  17. Adrenergic-induced enhancement of brain barrier system permeability to small nonelectrolytes: choroid plexus versus cerebral capillaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, V.A.; Johanson, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    Acute hypertension induced by adrenergic agents opens up the blood-CSF barrier (choroid plexus) to nonelectrolyte and protein tracers. Sprague-Dawley adult rats anesthetized with ketamine were given an intravenous bolus of either epinephrine (10 micrograms/kg), phenylephrine (100 micrograms/kg), isoproterenol (10 micrograms/kg), or D,L-amphetamine (2 mg/kg). Tracers were injected simultaneously with test agents, and the animals killed 10 min later. Epinephrine raised MABP by 57 mm Hg, to a peak pressure of 160 mm Hg; and it increased the volume of distribution (Vd) of urea, mannitol, and 125 I-bovine serum albumin in CSF by 1.5-, 2.7-, and 30-fold, respectively. There was enhanced uptake by lateral and fourth ventricle choroid plexuses, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, medulla, and thalamus. Phenylephrine also elevated MABP to 160 mm Hg, but it increased permeation of tracers into CSF (and several brain regions) to a lesser extent than epinephrine, attributable to protective vasoconstriction associated with alpha-agonist activity. Ratio analysis of Vd data provides evidence that augmented permeation of nonelectrolyte tracers in acute hypertension occurs predominantly by diffusion rather than vesicular transport. It is postulated that elevated MABP distends the central cores of choroid plexus villi and cerebral capillaries, with resultant stretching and opening of tight junctions in both barrier systems; with less hindrance to diffusion, urea and mannitol are cleared at rates closer to free diffusion. Neither isoproterenol (decreased MABP by 40 mm Hg) nor amphetamine (did not alter MABP) significantly opened the choroid plexus or blood-brain barrier to tracers

  18. Duplicated middle cerebral artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion. PMID:22140405

  19. Nuclear reactor plant with a small gas-cooled HT reactor accommodated in a steel pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoening, J.; Elter, C.

    1986-01-01

    The plant has a small HT reactor and an He/He heat exchanger situated above this, with preferably two parallel circulating blowers connected after it. It also has at least one post-shutdown heat removal system, which is situated after the He/He heat exchanger in the direction of flow and which always has the total quantity of primary helium flowing through it. In one version of the design, the heat exchanger consists of two concentric bundles of helices connected after one another, which have primary helium flowing in one direction and secondary helium in the opposite direction. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Evaluation of fracture toughness of vessel materials using small-size specimens and full stress-strain curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, A A; Chausov, N G [Akademyiya Nauk Ukrayini, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1994-12-31

    Physically substantiated dependences between crack resistance characteristics determined by the parameters of descending sections of full stress-strain curves and stressed state rigidity at crack initiation moment, have been experimentally obtained. The possibility of crack resistance reliable estimation based on full stress-strain obtained using small-size specimens with different concentrators, has thus been experimentally substantiated. Results obtained by the method and actual temperature dependence of irradiated steel 15X2NMFA crack resistance characteristics, agreed well. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  2. Endothelial Mineralocorticoid Receptor Mediates Parenchymal Arteriole and Posterior Cerebral Artery Remodeling During Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Otero, Janice M; Fisher, Courtney; Downs, Kelsey; Moss, M Elizabeth; Jaffe, Iris Z; Jackson, William F; Dorrance, Anne M

    2017-12-01

    The brain is highly susceptible to injury caused by hypertension because the increased blood pressure causes artery remodeling that can limit cerebral perfusion. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonism prevents hypertensive cerebral artery remodeling, but the vascular cell types involved have not been defined. In the periphery, the endothelial MR mediates hypertension-induced vascular injury, but cerebral and peripheral arteries are anatomically distinct; thus, these findings cannot be extrapolated to the brain. The parenchymal arterioles determine cerebrovascular resistance. Determining the effects of hypertension and MR signaling on these arterioles could lead to a better understanding of cerebral small vessel disease. We hypothesized that endothelial MR signaling mediates inward cerebral artery remodeling and reduced cerebral perfusion during angiotensin II (AngII) hypertension. The biomechanics of the parenchymal arterioles and posterior cerebral arteries were studied in male C57Bl/6 and endothelial cell-specific MR knockout mice and their appropriate controls using pressure myography. AngII increased plasma aldosterone and decreased cerebral perfusion in C57Bl/6 and MR-intact littermates. Endothelial cell MR deletion improved cerebral perfusion in AngII-treated mice. AngII hypertension resulted in inward hypotrophic remodeling; this was prevented by MR antagonism and endothelial MR deletion. Our studies suggest that endothelial cell MR mediates hypertensive remodeling in the cerebral microcirculation and large pial arteries. AngII-induced inward remodeling of cerebral arteries and arterioles was associated with a reduction in cerebral perfusion that could worsen the outcome of stroke or contribute to vascular dementia. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Malaria cerebral Cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Hugo Zapata Zapata

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available La malaria Cerebral (MC es la complicación más frecuente de la malaria por P. falciparum; aproximadamente el 90% de las personas que la han padecido se recuperan completamente sin secuelas neurológicas. Aún no se conoce con claridad su patogénesis pero se han postulado cuatro hipótesis o mecanismos posibles: 1 citoadherencia y secuestro de glóbulos rojos parasitados en la microvasculatura cerebral; 2 formación de rosetas y aglutinación de glóbulos rojos parasitados; 3 producción de citoquinas y activación de segundos mensajeros y, 4 apertura de la barrera hematoencefálica. Sin embargo, queda un interrogante sin resolver aún: ¿qué proceso se lleva a cabo para que el parásito, desde el espacio microvascular, pueda interferir transitoriamente con la función cerebral? Recientemente se ha utilizado el precursor de la proteína b-Amiloide como un marcador de daño neuronal en MC; este precursor será de gran ayuda en futuras investigaciones realizadas en nuestro medio que aporten información para comprender la patogénesis de la MC. Is the most common complication of P. falciparum malaria; nearly 90% of people who have suffered CM can recover without neurological problems. Currently there are four hypotheses that explain pathogenesis of CM: cytoadherence and sequestering of parasitized red blood cells to cerebral capillaries; rosette formation and parasitized red blood cells agglutination; production of cytokines and activation of second messengers and opening of the blood-brain barrier. However the main question remains to be answered; how the host-parasite interaction in the vascular space interferes transiently with cerebral function? Recently, the beta amyloid precursor peptide has been employed as marker of neural injury in CM. It is expected that the beta amyloid precursor peptide will help to understand the pathogenesis of CM in complicated patients of endemic areas of Colombia.

  4. Graywater Discharges from Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    metals (e.g., cadmium, chromium, lead, copper , zinc, silver, nickel, and mercury), solids, and nutrients (USEPA, 2008b; USEPA 2010). Wastewater from... flotation ), and disinfection (using ultraviolet light) as compared to traditional Type II MSDs that use either simple maceration and chlorination, or...Coliform Naval Vessels Oceanographic Vessels Small Cruise Ships 25a Vendor 2 Hamann AG Biological Treatment with Dissolved Air Flotation and

  5. Context is everything: From cardiovascular disease to cerebral microbleeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charidimou, Andreas; Blacker, Deborah; Viswanathan, Anand

    2018-01-01

    Increasingly, our approach to cerebrovascular disease has become blurred by evidence published in literature often without careful consideration of what this evidence implies for specific patients at hand. In this essay, we analyze key contextual issues in cerebrovascular small vessel disease, in an attempt to highlight the symbolic gap that exists between research and clinical practice, a recurring theme in medicine. We highlight the importance of considering context when using data from epidemiologic, neuroimaging, and biomarker studies in determining relevance to the patient at hand. We argue, that while biomarkers and neuroimaging may eventually serve to help to identify individuals with specific cerebrovascular diseases, we must always continue to understand patients in a specific clinical context. These reflections are particularly relevant when considering cerebral microbleeds-a key marker of cerebrovascular small vessel disease whose detection often raises thorny clinical dilemmas.

  6. Impact of short-term treatment with telmisartan on cerebral arterial remodeling in SHR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Foulquier

    Full Text Available Chronic hypertension decreases internal diameter of cerebral arteries and arterioles. We recently showed that short-term treatment with the angiotensin II receptor blocker telmisartan restored baseline internal diameter of small cerebral arterioles in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, via reversal of structural remodeling and inhibition of the angiotensin II vasoconstrictor response. As larger arteries also participate in the regulation of cerebral circulation, we evaluated whether similar short-term treatment affects middle cerebral arteries of SHR.Baseline internal diameters of pressurised middle cerebral arteries from SHR and their respective controls, Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY and responses to angiotensin II were studied in a small vessel arteriograph. Pressure myogenic curves and passive internal diameters were measured following EDTA deactivation, and elastic modulus from stress-strain relationships.Active baseline internal diameter was 23% lower in SHR compared to WKY, passive internal diameter (EDTA 28% lower and elastic modulus unchanged. Pressure myogenic curves were shifted to higher pressure values in SHR. Telmisartan lowered blood pressure but had no effect on baseline internal diameter nor on structural remodeling (passive internal diameter and elastic modulus remained unchanged compared to SHR. Telmisartan shifted the pressure myogenic curve to lower pressure values than SHR.In the middle cerebral arteries of SHR, short-term treatment with telmisartan had no effect on structural remodeling and did not restore baseline internal diameter, but allowed myogenic tone to adapt towards lower pressure values.

  7. Cerebral and extracerebral vasoreactivity in symptomatic lacunar stroke patients: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deplanque, Dominique; Lavallee, Philippa C; Labreuche, Julien; Gongora-Rivera, Fernando; Jaramillo, Arturo; Brenner, David; Abboud, Halim; Klein, Isabelle F; Touboul, Pierre-Jean; Vicaut, Eric; Amarenco, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    Whether cerebral artery endothelial dysfunction is a key factor of symptomatic lacunar stroke and cerebral small vessel disease remains unclear. Cerebral and extracerebral vasoreactivity were measured in 81 patients with recent symptomatic lacunar stroke and in 81 control subjects matched for main vascular risk factors. Cerebral vasoreactivity and carotid endothelial-dependent vasodilation were measured after five-minutes of carbon dioxide-induced hypercapnia. Brachial endothelial-dependent vasodilation was assessed after hyperemia induced by deflating a cuff around the forearm previously inflated to 200 mmHg for four-minutes. Carotid and brachial endothelial-independent vasodilation were measured five-minutes after administration of sublingual nitroglycerin 300 μg. Brain magnetic resonance imaging were analyzed in lacunar stroke patients. One-month after stroke onset, patients had more severely impaired cerebral vasoreactivitys than matched controls (mean ± standard deviation, 14·4 ± 12·1% vs. 19·4 ± 17·4%; P = 0·049). Severe alterations of both carotid and brachial endothelial-dependent and at a lesser degree of carotid and brachial endothelial-independent vasodilation were observed in both groups. After adjustment for confounders, subjects with a cerebral vasoreactivity value in the two lower tertiles (≤19·6%) were more likely to have had a symptomatic lacunar stroke (adjusted odds ratio, 3·78; 95% confidence interval, 1·42 to 10·08; P = 0·008). Only alteration of brachial endothelial-independent vasodilation correlated with parenchymal abnormalities, namely microbleeds and leukoaraiosis. While abnormalities in extracerebral vasoreactivity seem related to vascular risk factors, the severity of endothelial dysfunction in cerebral arteries may be determinant in the occurrence of symptomatic lacunar stroke in patients with small vessel disease. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke

  8. Diffusion tensor image segmentation of the cerebrum provides a single measure of cerebral small vessel disease severity related to cognitive change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen A. Williams

    2017-01-01

    DSEG θ is a powerful tool for characterising subtle brain change in SVD that has a negative impact on cognition and remains a significant predictor of cognitive change when other MRI markers of brain change are accounted for. DSEG provides an automatic segmentation of the whole cerebrum that is sensitive to a range of SVD related structural changes and successfully predicts cognitive change. Power analysis shows DSEG θ has potential as a monitoring tool in clinical trials. As such it may provide a marker of SVD severity from a single imaging modality (i.e. DTIs.

  9. Magnetic resonance angiography of the cerebral vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, P.E.; Bongartz, G.; Drews, C.

    1990-01-01

    In a prospective study involving 52 patients, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was compared with arterial digital subtraction angiography (IA-DSA). MRA was performed within three days of the IA-DSA. It was carried out without knowledge of the findings on IA-DSA. Of 38 stenoses of the carotid arteries or their branches, demonstrated by IA-DSA, 33 could be seen on MRA; in four cases the stenosis was outside the imaging area of the coil. Sixteen out of 17 carotid occlusions were diagnosed by MRA. There was one false positive. In the vertebral artery territory, eleven out of 13 stenoses and three out of four occlusions were diagnosed by MRA. In evaluating the degree of stenosis, there was agreement in only 16 out of 33 cases. MRA over-estimated the severity of stenoses in 15 cases and underestimated it in two. MRA is a new non-invasive method in the diagnosis of cerebro-vascular disease which must be evaluated by further studies. (orig.) [de

  10. Experimental study on secondary depressurization action for PWR vessel bottom small break LOCA with HPI failure and gas inflow (ROSA-V/LSTF test SB-PV-03)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Takeshi; Asaka, Hideaki; Nakamura, Hideo

    2005-06-01

    A small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) experiment was conducted at the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) of ROSA-V program to study effects of accident management (AM) measures on core cooling, which is important in case of high pressure injection (HPI) system failure during an SBLOCA at a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The LSTF is a full-height and 1/48 volume-scaled facility simulating 4-loop Westinghouse-type PWR (3423 MWt). The experiment, SB-PV-03, simulated a PWR vessel bottom SBLOCA with a rupture of ten instrument-tubes which is equivalent to 0.2% cold leg break. Total HPI failure, non-condensable gas inflow from accumulator injection system (AIS) and operator AM actions on steam generator (SG) secondary depressurization at a rate of -55 K/h and auxiliary feedwater (AFW) supply for 30 minutes were assumed as experiment conditions. It is clarified that the AM actions are effective on primary system depressurization until the end of AIS injection at 1.6 MPa, but thereafter become less effective due to inflow of the non-condensable gas, resulting in delay of low pressure injection (LPI) actuation and whole core heatup under continuous water discharge through the bottom break. The report describes these thermohydraulic phenomena related with transient primary coolant mass and AM actions in addition to estimation of non-condensable gas behavior which affected primary-to-secondary heat transfer. (author)

  11. An experimental study on effective depressurization actions for PWR vessel bottom small break LOCA with HPI failure and gas inflow (ROSA-V test SB-PV-04)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Takeshi; Asaka, Hideaki; Nakamura, Hideo

    2006-03-01

    A small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) experiment was conducted at the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) of ROSA-V program to study effects of accident management (AM) measures on core cooling, which are important in case of total failure of high pressure injection (HPI) system during an SBLOCA at a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The LSTF is a full-height and 1/48 volume-scaled facility simulating a 4-loop Westing-house-type PWR (3423 MWt). The experiment, SB-PV-04, simulated a PWR vessel bottom SBLOCA with a rupture of ten instrument-tubes which is equivalent to 0.2% cold leg break. It is clarified that AM actions with steam generator (SG) rapid depressurization by fully opening relief valves and auxiliary feedwater supply are effective to avoid core uncovery by actuating the low pressure injection (LPI) system though the primary depressurization is degraded by non-condensable gas inflow to the primary loops from the accumulator injection system. The effective core cooling was established by the rapid depressurization which contributed to preserve larger primary coolant mass than in the previous experiment (SB-PV-03) which was conducted with smaller primary cooling rate of -55 K/h as AM actions. (author)

  12. Image-guided microneurosurgical management of small cerebral arteriovenous malformations: the value of navigated computed tomographic angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coenen, V.A.; Reinges, M.H.T.; Gilsbach, J.M.; Rohde, V.; Dammert, S.; Mull, M.

    2005-01-01

    In small arteriovenous malformations (AVM) with large hematomas, surgery remains the main therapeutic option. However, intraoperative identification of the AVM, feeders, and draining veins could be difficult in the environment of substantial intracerebral blood. In those selected cases, we use navigated computed tomographic angiography (CTA) for the microneurosurgical management. It is our objective to report our initial experiences. Prior to operation a conventional CTA with superficial skin fiducials placed on a patient's head was acquired for diagnostic and neuronavigation purposes. Image data were transferred to a neuronavigation device with integrated volume rendering capacities which allows a three-dimensional reconstruction of the vascular tree and the AVM to be created. In all patients the AVM was removed successfully after having been localized with CTA-based neuronavigation. Navigated CTA is helpful for the operative management of small AVMs with large hematomas. The technique allows feeding arteries to be distinguished from draining veins thereby allowing the nidus of the AVM to be identified despite the presence of substantial intracerebral blood. CTA can be easily implemented into commercial neuronavigation systems. (orig.)

  13. Detection of small human cerebral cortical lesions with MRI under different levels of Gaussian smoothing: applications in epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor-Rivera, Diego; Goubran, Maged; Kraguljac, Alan; Bartha, Robert; Peters, Terry

    2010-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the effect of smoothing filter selection in Voxel-Based Morphometry studies on structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. Gaussian filters of 4 mm, 8 mm or 10 mm Full Width at High Maximum are commonly used, based on the assumption that the filter size should be at least twice the voxel size to obtain robust statistical results. The hypothesis of the presented work was that the selection of the smoothing filter influenced the detectability of small lesions in the brain. Mesial Temporal Sclerosis associated to Epilepsy was used as the case to demonstrate this effect. Twenty T1-weighted MRIs from the BrainWeb database were selected. A small phantom lesion was placed in the amygdala, hippocampus, or parahippocampal gyrus of ten of the images. Subsequently the images were registered to the ICBM/MNI space. After grey matter segmentation, a T-test was carried out to compare each image containing a phantom lesion with the rest of the images in the set. For each lesion the T-test was repeated with different Gaussian filter sizes. Voxel-Based Morphometry detected some of the phantom lesions. Of the three parameters considered: location,size, and intensity; it was shown that location is the dominant factor for the detection of the lesions.

  14. Fractal analysis reveals reduced complexity of retinal vessels in CADASIL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Cavallari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL affects mainly small cerebral arteries and leads to disability and dementia. The relationship between clinical expression of the disease and progression of the microvessel pathology is, however, uncertain as we lack tools for imaging brain vessels in vivo. Ophthalmoscopy is regarded as a window into the cerebral microcirculation. In this study we carried out an ophthalmoscopic examination in subjects with CADASIL. Specifically, we performed fractal analysis of digital retinal photographs. Data are expressed as mean fractal dimension (mean-D, a parameter that reflects complexity of the retinal vessel branching. Ten subjects with genetically confirmed diagnosis of CADASIL and 10 sex and age-matched control subjects were enrolled. Fractal analysis of retinal digital images was performed by means of a computer-based program, and the data expressed as mean-D. Brain MRI lesion volume in FLAIR and T1-weighted images was assessed using MIPAV software. Paired t-test was used to disclose differences in mean-D between CADASIL and control groups. Spearman rank analysis was performed to evaluate potential associations between mean-D values and both disease duration and disease severity, the latter expressed as brain MRI lesion volumes, in the subjects with CADASIL. The results showed that mean-D value of patients (1.42±0.05; mean±SD was lower than control (1.50±0.04; p = 0.002. Mean-D did not correlate with disease duration nor with MRI lesion volumes of the subjects with CADASIL. The findings suggest that fractal analysis is a sensitive tool to assess changes of retinal vessel branching, likely reflecting early brain microvessel alterations, in CADASIL patients.

  15. Cerebral Cavernous Malformation and Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: SMALL • LARGE Cerebral Cavernous Angioma and Hemorrhage By Jack Hoch; Reviewed by Dr. Issam Awad ... for years, the mechanism by which these lesions hemorrhage remains poorly understood. Hemorrhage Types Since cavernous angiomas ...

  16. Características generales de 29 pacientes con vasculitis de pequeños vasos General characteristics of 29 patients with small vessel vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Di Benedetto

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de esta serie fue describir las características generales y manifestaciones clínicas de pacientes con vasculitis de pequeños vasos que concurrieron al servicio de autoinmunidad de un hospital de la comunidad y compararlas con la literatura. Se revisaron de manera retrospectiva las historias clínicas archivadas bajo el rótulo de vasculitis en un período de 16 años. Se seleccionaron aquellos pacientes que cumplieran criterios diagnósticos de vasculitis de pequeños vasos. Se extrajeron los datos de interés y se constató la supervivencia mediante contacto telefónico. Posteriormente se realizó una búsqueda bibliográfica y se compararon los resultados. Se incluyeron 13 pacientes con granulomatosis de Wegener, 6 con síndrome de Churg Strauss y 10 con poliangeítis microscópica. El 55% (16 fueron menores de 55 años al diagnóstico y hubo predominio del sexo femenino (2.6:1. La demora diagnóstica fue mayor a un año en el 46% de los casos. Los sistemas más frecuentemente afectados fueron respiratorio y otorrinolaringológico. El 79% presentó anticuerpos anti-citoplasma de neutrófilos (ANCA positivos. La mortalidad fue del 24% (7/29. Al comparar las características de los pacientes incluidos en esta serie con lo descripto en la literatura, se hallaron diferencias en cuanto a la forma de presentación, sistemas comprometidos y porcentaje de pacientes ANCA positivos; además se observó que el resultado negativo de este marcador parece asociarse con mayor demora diagnóstica y en consecuencia peor pronóstico, lo que remarca su importancia como herramienta adicional no invasiva al momento del diagnóstico.The objective of this series was to describe the general characteristics and clinical manifestations of patients with small vessel vasculitis who were assisted in the autoimmunity department of a community public hospital and to compare the results with the literature. Clinical records under the label of vasculitis in a

  17. Cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenan, T.J.; Grossman, R.I.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews retrospectively MR, CT, and angiographic findings in patients with cerebral vasculitis in order to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the various imaging modalities, as well as the spectrum of imaging abnormalities in this disease entity. Studies were retrospectively reviewed in 12 patients with cerebral vasculitis proved by means of angiography and/or brain biopsy

  18. Chronic kidney disease, 24-h blood pressure and small vessel diseases are independently associated with cognitive impairment in lacunar infarct patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yasumasa; Ohara, Tomoyuki; Nagakane, Yoshinari; Tanaka, Eijiro; Morii, Fukiko; Koizumi, Takashi; Akiguchi, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Although the relationships between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cognitive impairment (CI) have been highlighted, the etiology of CI in CKD remains uncertain. Subjects comprised 224 consecutive patients with symptomatic lacunar infarction who underwent magnetic resonance imaging and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Diurnal blood pressure (BP) patterns were categorized into three groups: dippers, non-dippers and risers. Lacunar infarcts (LIs), including both symptomatic and silent and diffuse white matter lesions (WMLs), were graded into three grades according to their degree. The results of kidney function were evaluated using estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), categorized into three groups: stage 1, >60; stage 2, 30-60; and stage 3, -1 per 1.73 m 2 . There were 44 patients with CI. Confluent WMLs, including WML 2 and WML 3, were found in 36 patients (81.8%), and multiple lacunae including LI 2 and LI 3 were found in 30 patients (68.1%) with CI. Age >75 years (odds ratio (OR), 5.5; P -1 per 1.73 m 2 (OR, 2.9; P -1 per 1.73 m 2 (OR, 23.8; P 75 years (OR, 4.1; P -1 per 1.73 m 2 (OR, 3.7; P -1 per 1.73 m 2 (OR, 8.7; P<0.05) were independently associated with WML grade 3. Extensive small vessel diseases, CKD and non-dipping status were independently associated with CI. CKD appears to mainly contribute to vascular CI, whereas possibilities of overlapping with other mechanisms such as degenerative CI cannot be excluded. Strict night time BP control and renoprotective treatment may be warranted to prevent CI. (author)

  19. An automated vessel segmentation of retinal images using multiscale vesselness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Abdallah, M.; Malek, J.; Tourki, R.; Krissian, K.

    2011-01-01

    The ocular fundus image can provide information on pathological changes caused by local ocular diseases and early signs of certain systemic diseases, such as diabetes and hypertension. Automated analysis and interpretation of fundus images has become a necessary and important diagnostic procedure in ophthalmology. The extraction of blood vessels from retinal images is an important and challenging task in medical analysis and diagnosis. In this paper, we introduce an implementation of the anisotropic diffusion which allows reducing the noise and better preserving small structures like vessels in 2D images. A vessel detection filter, based on a multi-scale vesselness function, is then applied to enhance vascular structures.

  20. Positron annihilation spectroscopy and small angle neutron scattering characterization of nanostructural features in high-nickel model reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glade, Stephen C. [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States)]. E-mail: bdwirth@nuc.berkeley.edu; Odette, G. Robert [University of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Asoka-Kumar, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Irradiation embrittlement in nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels results from the hardening by a high number density of nanometer scale features. In steels with more than {approx}0.10% Cu, the dominant features are often Cu-rich precipitates typically alloyed with Mn, Ni and Si. At low-Cu and low-to-intermediate Ni levels, so-called matrix hardening features are believed to be vacancy-solute cluster complexes, or their remnants. However, Mn-Ni-Si rich precipitates, with Mn plus Ni contents greater than Cu, can form at high alloy Ni contents and are promoted at irradiation temperatures lower than the nominal 290 deg. C. Even at very low-Cu levels, late blooming Mn-Ni-Si rich precipitates are a significant concern due to their potential to form large volume fractions of hardening features. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) and small angle neutron scattering neutron (SANS) measurements were used to characterize the fine-scale microstructure in split-melt A533B steels with varying Ni and Cu contents, irradiated at selected conditions from 270 to 310 deg. C between {approx}0.04 and 1.6 x 10{sup 23} n m{sup -2}. The objective was to assess the character, composition and magnetic properties of Cu-rich precipitates, as well as to gain insight on the matrix features. The results suggest that the irradiated very low-Cu and intermediate Ni steel contains small vacancy-Mn-Ni-Si cluster complexes, but not large, well-formed and highly enriched Mn-Ni-Si phases. The hardening features in steels containing 0.2% and 0.4% Cu, and 0.8% and 1.6% Ni are consistent with well-formed, non-magnetic Cu-Ni-Mn precipitates. The precipitate number densities and volume fractions increase, while their sizes decrease, with increasing Ni and decreasing irradiation temperature. The precipitates evolve with fluence in stages of nucleation, growth and limited coarsening.

  1. Altered low frequency oscillations of cortical vessels in patients with cerebrovascular occlusive disease – a NIRS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillip, Dorte; Iversen, Helle K; Schytz, Henrik W

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of cerebral autoregulation by measuring spontaneous oscillations in the low frequency spectrum of cerebral cortical vessels might be a useful tool for assessing risk and investigating different treatment strategies in carotid artery disease and stroke. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS...

  2. Gold nanoparticles administration induces disarray of heart muscle, hemorrhagic, chronic inflammatory cells infiltrated by small lymphocytes, cytoplasmic vacuolization and congested and dilated blood vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhalim Mohamed Anwar K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite significant research efforts on cancer therapy, diagnostics and imaging, many challenges remain unsolved. There are many unknown details regarding the interaction of nanoparticles (NPs and biological systems. The structure and properties of gold nanoparticles (GNPs make them useful for a wide array of biological applications. However, for the application of GNPs in therapy and drug delivery, knowledge regarding their bioaccumulation and associated local or systemic toxicity is necessary. Information on the biological fate of NPs, including distribution, accumulation, metabolism, and organ specific toxicity is still minimal. Studies specifically dealing with the toxicity of NPs are rare. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of intraperitoneal administration of GNPs on histological alterations of the heart tissue of rats in an attempt to identify and understand the toxicity and the potential role of GNPs as a therapeutic and diagnostic tool. Methods A total of 40 healthy male Wistar-Kyoto rats received 50 μl infusions of 10, 20 and 50 nm GNPs for 3 or 7 days. Animals were randomly divided into groups: 6 GNP-treated rats groups and one control group (NG. Groups 1, 2 and 3 received infusions of 50 μl GNPs of size 10 nm (3 or 7 days, 20 nm (3 or 7 days and 50 nm (3 or 7 days, respectively. Results In comparison with the respective control rats, exposure to GNPs doses produced heart muscle disarray with a few scattered chronic inflammatory cells infiltrated by small lymphocytes, foci of hemorrhage with extravasation of red blood cells, some scattered cytoplasmic vacuolization and congested and dilated blood vessels. None of the above alterations were observed in the heart muscle of any member of the control group. Conclusions The alterations induced by intraperitoneal administration of GNPs were size-dependent, with smaller ones inducing greater affects, and were also related to the time exposure to

  3. Vessel wall and indium-111-labelled platelet response to carotid endarterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusby, R.J.; Ferrell, L.D.; Englestad, B.L.; Price, D.C.; Lipton, M.J.; Stoney, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Postendarterectomy platelet deposition and thrombus formation may play an important role not only in vessel wall healing but also in the small incidence of postoperative cerebral ischemia and postoperative stenosis. A study has been performed using a canine model to investigate the healing response to carotid endarterectomy and the validity of an in vivo indium-111 (In-111) radiotracer technique in the assessment of postendarterectomy deposition of autologous labelled platelets. Sixteen endarterectomized carotid arteries showed uptake of autologous In-111 platelets immediately after infusion, reaching a maximum by 1 hour with little increase at 24 or 48 hours. No uptake was seen in ten control vessels following platelet infusion (P less than 0.05). At autopsy, seven vessels were demonstrated to have In-111 platelet deposition immediately prior to sacrifice of the animals. Postmortem scanning confirmed the localization to the vessel lumens, and microscopy revealed thrombus formation with or without partial endothelialization. Complete reendothelialization had occurred in the vessels that failed to show platelet deposition. Delayed healing was associated with continuing platelet deposition, excessive thrombus formation, and luminal stenosis. Arteriotomy closure with a vein patch altered the healing characteristics of the vessel with segmental thrombus formation over the vein patch. A preliminary study of the postendarterectomy in vivo In-111 platelet response in humans demonstrated platelet deposition that was not influenced by the administration of antiplatelet drugs at currently prescribed levels

  4. Analysis of peritumoral cerebral edema of meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Masaaki; Tanaka, Katsuyuki; Abe, Juzo; Sekino, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Takei; Hayashi, Tatsuo.

    1992-01-01

    Peritumoral edema associated with 28 meningiomas was studied. The results of radiological investigation, using MRI, CT, and angiography, and histological studies were described and correlated with each other in order to clarify the mechanism of peritumoral cerebral edema production. Extensive peritumoral edema was recognized when the venous sinus or cortical veins, especially the superficial and deep Sylvian veins, were invaded and/or compressed markedly by the tumor. Therefore, large tumors (more than 5 cm in diameter) which were located in the parasagittal area and the middle cranial fossa had a tendency to be associated with extensive peritumoral edema. The posterior fossa meningiomas were associated with small edema because there were rich venous channels in the posterior fossa. Although there have been several reports that the peritumoral edema of meningioma would be produced by the vessels of the tumor itself and would migrate through the tumor capsule into the surrounding brain tissue, and although mechanical factors alone are not sufficient to explain peritumoral edema production, we would like to postulate that the longstanding mechanical compression of venous circulation by the meningioma might be an important factor in the production of the peritumoral cerebral edema. (author)

  5. Absolute quantification of regional cerebral glucose utilization in mice by 18F-FDG small animal PET scanning and 2-14C-DG autoradiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Hiroshi; Ichise, Masanori; Liow, Jeih-San; Modell, Kendra J; Vines, Douglass C; Esaki, Takanori; Cook, Michelle; Seidel, Jurgen; Sokoloff, Louis; Green, Michael V; Innis, Robert B

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of absolute quantification of regional cerebral glucose utilization (rCMR(glc)) in mice by use of (18)F-FDG and a small animal PET scanner. rCMR(glc) determined with (18)F-FDG PET was compared with values determined simultaneously by the autoradiographic 2-(14)C-DG method. In addition, we compared the rCMR(glc) values under isoflurane, ketamine and xylazine anesthesia, and awake states. Immediately after injection of (18)F-FDG and 2-(14)C-DG into mice, timed arterial samples were drawn over 45 min to determine the time courses of (18)F-FDG and 2-(14)C-DG. Animals were euthanized at 45 min and their brain was imaged with the PET scanner. The brains were then processed for 2-(14)C-DG autoradiography. Regions of interest were manually placed over cortical regions on corresponding coronal (18)F-FDG PET and 2-(14)C-DG autoradiographic images. rCMR(glc) values were calculated for both tracers by the autoradiographic 2-(14)C-DG method with modifications for the different rate and lumped constants for the 2 tracers. Average rCMR(glc) values in cerebral cortex with (18)F-FDG PET under normoglycemic conditions (isoflurane and awake) were generally lower (by 8.3%) but strongly correlated with those of 2-(14)C-DG (r(2) = 0.95). On the other hand, under hyperglycemic conditions (ketamine/xylazine) average cortical rCMR(glc) values with (18)F-FDG PET were higher (by 17.3%) than those with 2-(14)C-DG. Values for rCMR(glc) and uptake (percentage injected dose per gram [%ID/g]) with (18)F-FDG PET were significantly lower under both isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine anesthesia than in the awake mice. However, the reductions of rCMR(glc) were markedly greater under isoflurane (by 57%) than under ketamine and xylazine (by 19%), whereas more marked reductions of %ID/g were observed with ketamine/xylazine (by 54%) than with isoflurane (by 37%). These reverse differences between isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine may be due to

  6. Cerebral angiographic findings in thromboangiitis obliterans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No, Young J.; Lee, Eun M.; Kim, Jong S.; Lee, Deok H.

    2005-01-01

    Transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) or ischemic stroke may complicate thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO). However, there has been debate regarding the mechanism of ischemic stroke in TAO. We report the case of a patient with TAO who developed repeated TIAs. An angiogram showed multiple alternative areas of arterial occlusions in the distal segments of both middle cerebral arteries. Extensive collateral vessels around the occluded segment were also observed, which resembled the ''tree root'' or ''corkscrew'' vessels described in the peripheral arteries in TAO. Our patient illustrates that cerebral manifestations of TAO may occur with vascular changes that are identical with those encountered in the limb arteries in TAO. (orig.)

  7. Containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbirohowski-Koscia, K.F.; Roberts, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    A concrete containment vessel for nuclear reactors is disclosed that is spherical and that has prestressing tendons disposed in first, second and third sets, the tendons of each set being all substantially concentric and centred around a respective one of the three orthogonal axes of the sphere; the tendons of the first set being anchored at each end at a first anchor rib running around a circumference of the vessel, the tendons of the second set being anchored at each end at a second anchor rib running around a circumference of the sphere and disposed at 90 0 to the first rib, and the tendons of the third set being anchored some to the first rib and the remainder to the second rib. (author)

  8. VIP/PACAP receptors in cerebral arteries of rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdling, André; Sheykhzade, Majid; Maddahi, Aida

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP)-containing nerves surround cerebral blood vessels. The peptides have potent vasodilator properties via smooth muscle cell receptors and activation of adenylate cyclase. The purpose of this s......BACKGROUND: Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP)-containing nerves surround cerebral blood vessels. The peptides have potent vasodilator properties via smooth muscle cell receptors and activation of adenylate cyclase. The purpose...

  9. Reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van De Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaouuadi, R.

    1998-01-01

    Research and development activities related to reactor pressure vessel steels during 1997 are reported. The objectives of activities of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN in this domain are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate a methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use

  10. Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaoudi, R

    1998-07-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels in performed in support of the RVP integrity assessment. Its main objectives are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate the applied methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported.

  11. Cerebral artery dilatation maintains cerebral oxygenation at extreme altitude and in acute hypoxia--an ultrasound and MRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, Mark H.; Edsell, Mark E. G.; Davagnanam, Indran; Hirani, Shashivadan P.; Martin, Dan S.; Levett, Denny Z. H.; Thornton, John S.; Golay, Xavier; Strycharczuk, Lisa; Newman, Stanton P.; Montgomery, Hugh E.; Grocott, Mike P. W.; Imray, Christopher H. E.; Ahuja, V.; Aref-Adib, G.; Burnham, R.; Chisholm, A.; Clarke, K.; Coates, D.; Coates, M.; Cook, D.; Cox, M.; Dhillon, S.; Dougall, C.; Doyle, P.; Duncan, P.; Edsell, M.; Edwards, L.; Evans, L.; Gardiner, P.; Grocott, M.; Gunning, P.; Hart, N.; Harrington, J.; Harvey, J.; Holloway, C.; Howard, D.; Hurlbut, D.; Imray, C.; Ince, C.; Jonas, M.; van der Kaaij, J.; Khosravi, M.; Kolfschoten, N.; Levett, D.; Luery, H.; Luks, A.; Martin, D.; McMorrow, R.; Meale, P.

    2011-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler is a widely used noninvasive technique for assessing cerebral artery blood flow. All previous high altitude studies assessing cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the field that have used Doppler to measure arterial blood velocity have assumed vessel diameter to not alter. Here, we

  12. Hemodynamics in stenotic vessels of small diameter under steady state conditions: Effect of viscoelasticity and migration of red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimakopoulos, Yannis; Kelesidis, George; Tsouka, Sophia; Georgiou, Georgios C; Tsamopoulos, John

    2015-01-01

    In microcirculation, the non-Newtonian behavior of blood and the complexity of the microvessel network are responsible for the high flow resistance and the large reduction of the blood pressure. Red blood cell aggregation along with inward radial migration are two significant mechanisms determining the former. Yet, their impact on hemodynamics in non-straight vessels is not well understood. In this study, the steady state blood flow in stenotic rigid vessels is examined, employing a sophisticated non-homogeneous constitutive law. The effect of red blood cells migration on the hydrodynamics is quantified and the constitutive model's accuracy is evaluated. A numerical algorithm based on the two-dimensional mixed finite element method and the EVSS/SUPG technique for a stable discretization of the mass and momentum conservation equations in addition to the constitutive model is employed. The numerical simulations show that a cell-depleted layer develops along the vessel wall with an almost constant thickness for slow flow conditions. This causes the reduction of the drag force and the increase of the pressure gradient as the constriction ratio decreases. Viscoelastic effects in blood flow were found to be responsible for steeper decreases of tube and discharge hematocrits as decreasing function of constriction ratio.

  13. MRI in human immunodeficiency virus-associated cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkefeld, J.; Lanfermann, H.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral ischaemia caused by inflammatory vasculopathies has been described as complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Imaging studies have shown ischaemic lesions and changes of the vascular lumen, but did not allow demonstration of abnormalities within the vessel wall itself. Two HIV-infected men presented with symptoms of a transient ischaemic attack. Initial MRI of the first showed no infarct; in the second two small lacunar lesions were detected. In both cases, multiplanar 3-mm slice contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images showed aneurysmal dilatation, with thickening and contrast enhancement of the wall of the internal carotid and middle cerebral (MCA) arteries. These findings were interpreted as indicating cerebral vasculitis. In the first patient the vasculopathy progressed to carotid artery occlusion, and he developed an infarct in the MCA territory, but then remained neurologically stable. In the second patient varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection was the probable cause of vasculitis. The clinical deficits and vasculitic MRI changes regressed with antiviral and immunosuppressive therapy. (orig.)

  14. MRI in human immunodeficiency virus-associated cerebral vasculitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkefeld, J.; Lanfermann, H. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie; Enzensberger, W. [Klinik fuer Neurologie, Klinikum der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Univ. Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    Cerebral ischaemia caused by inflammatory vasculopathies has been described as complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Imaging studies have shown ischaemic lesions and changes of the vascular lumen, but did not allow demonstration of abnormalities within the vessel wall itself. Two HIV-infected men presented with symptoms of a transient ischaemic attack. Initial MRI of the first showed no infarct; in the second two small lacunar lesions were detected. In both cases, multiplanar 3-mm slice contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images showed aneurysmal dilatation, with thickening and contrast enhancement of the wall of the internal carotid and middle cerebral (MCA) arteries. These findings were interpreted as indicating cerebral vasculitis. In the first patient the vasculopathy progressed to carotid artery occlusion, and he developed an infarct in the MCA territory, but then remained neurologically stable. In the second patient varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection was the probable cause of vasculitis. The clinical deficits and vasculitic MRI changes regressed with antiviral and immunosuppressive therapy. (orig.)

  15. Gammatography of thick lead vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghunath, V.M.; Bhatnagar, P.K.; Sundaram, V.M.

    1979-01-01

    Radiography, scintillation and GM counting and dose measurements using ionisation chamber equipment are commonly used for detecting flaws/voids in materials. The first method is mostly used for steel vessels and to a lesser extent thin lead vessels also and is essentially qualitative. Dose measuring techniques are used for very thick and large lead vessels for which high strength radioactive sources are required, with its inherent handling problems. For vessels of intermediate thicknesses, it is ideal to use a small strength source and a GM or scintillation counter assembly. At the Reactor Research Centre, Kalpakkam, such a system was used for checking three lead vessels of thicknesses varying from 38mm to 65mm. The tolerances specified were +- 4% variation in lead thickness. The measurements also revealed the non concentricity of one vessel which had a thickness varying from 38mm to 44mm. The second vessel was patently non-concentric and the dimensional variation was truly reproduced in the measurements. A third vessel was fabricated with careful control of dimensions and the measurements exhibited good concentricity. Small deviations were observed, attributable to imperfect bondings between steel and lead. This technique has the following advantages: (a) weaker sources used result in less handling problems reducing the personnel exposures considerably; (b) the sensitivity of the instrument is quite good because of better statistics; (c) the time required for scanning a small vessel is more, but a judicious use of a scintillometer for initial fast scan will help in reducing the total scanning time; (d) this method can take advantage of the dimensional variations themselves to get the calibration and to estimate the deviations from specified tolerances. (auth.)

  16. Hemopexin induces neuroprotection in the rat subjected to focal cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Beibei; Cai, Min; Fang, Zongping; Wei, Haidong; Zhu, Fangyun; Li, Guochao; Dong, Hailong; Xiong, Lize

    2013-06-10

    The plasma protein hemopexin (HPX) exhibits the highest binding affinity to free heme. In vitro experiments and gene-knock out technique have suggested that HPX may have a neuroprotective effect. However, the expression of HPX in the brain was not well elucidated and its expression after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was also poorly studied. Furthermore, no in vivo data were available on the effect of HPX given centrally on the prognosis of focal cerebral ischemia. In the present study, we systematically investigated expression of HPX in normal rat brain by immunofluorescent staining. The results showed that HPX was mainly expressed in vascular system and neurons, as well as in a small portion of astrocytes adjacent to the vessels in normal rat brain. Further, we determined the role of HPX in the process of focal cerebral ischemic injury and explored the effects of HPX treatment in a rat model of transient focal cerebral ischemia. After 2 h' middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by 24 h' reperfusion, the expression of HPX was increased in the neurons and astrocytes in the penumbra area, as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot techniques. Intracerebroventricular injection of HPX at the onset of reperfusion dose-dependently reduced the infarct volumes and improved measurements of neurological function of the rat subjected to transient focal cerebral ischemia. The neuroprotective effects of HPX sustained for up to 7 days after experiments. Our study provides a new insight into the potential neuroprotective role of HPX as a contributing factor of endogenous protective mechanisms against focal cerebral ischemia injury, and HPX might be developed as a potential agent for treatment of ischemic stroke.

  17. Current meter components and other data from XCP casts from VARIOUS SMALL VESSELS and other platforms from the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the OCEAN DUMPING and other projects from 01 December 1990 to 01 June 1991 (NODC Accession 9300076)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter components and other data were collected from XCP casts from VARIOUS SMALL VESSELS and other platforms in the North Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected...

  18. Recurrent cerebral thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Abe, Shin-e; Kubo, Hideki; Hanyu, Haruo; Takasaki, Masaru

    1992-01-01

    Neuroradiological techniques were used to elucidate pathophysiology of recurrent cerebral thrombosis. Twenty-two patients with cerebral thrombosis who suffered a second attack under stable conditions more than 22 days after the initial stroke were studied. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia were also seen in 20, 8, and 12 patients, respectively. The patients were divided into three groups according to their symptoms: (I) symptoms differed between the first and second strokes (n=12); (II) initial symptoms were suddenly deteriorated (n=6); and (III) symptoms occurring in groups I and II were seen (n=4). In group I, contralateral hemiparesis or suprabulbar palsy was often associated with the initial hemiparesis. The time of recurrent stroke varied from 4 months to 9 years. CT and MRI showed not only lacunae in both hemispheres, but also deep white-matter ischemia of the centrum semi-ovale. In group II, hemiparesis or visual field defect was deteriorated early after the initial stroke. In addition, neuroimaging revealed that infarction in the posterior cerebral artery was progressed on the contralateral side, or that white matter lesion in the middle artery was enlarged in spite of small lesion in the left cerebral hemisphere. All patients in group III had deterioration of right hemiparesis associated with aphasia. CT, MRI, SPECT, and angiography indicated deep white-matter ischemia caused by main trunk lesions in the left hemisphere. Group III seemed to be equivalent to group II, except for laterality of the lesion. Neuroradiological assessment of the initial stroke may help to predict the mode of recurrence, although pathophysiology of cerebral thrombosis is complicated and varies from patient to patient. (N.K.)

  19. Training model for cerebral aneurysm clipping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Tenjin, M.D., Ph.D.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Clipping of cerebral aneurysms is still an important skill in neurosurgery. We have made a training model for the clipping of cerebral aneurysms. The concepts for the model were 1: training model for beginners, 2: three dimensional manipulation using an operating microscope, 3: the aneurysm model is to be perfused by simulated blood causing premature rupture. The correct relationship between each tissue, and softness of the brain and vessels were characteristics of the model. The skull, brain, arteries, and veins were made using a 3D printer with data from DICOM. The brain and vessels were made from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA. One training course was held and this model was useful for training of cerebral aneurysm surgery for young neurosurgeons.

  20. Etiologic evaluation of periventricular hyperintensity in MR images of first-ever cerebral thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Enomoto, Mutsurou; Ogawa, Kimikazu; Yanagawa, Kiyotaka; Takasaki, Masaru [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1995-02-01

    To clarify the etiology of periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) seen on magnetic resonance (MR) images (especially on T2-weighted images), PVH was investigated in relation to causative lesions, angiographic findings, and risk factors for cerebrovascular accidents. The subjects were 103 patients with first-ever cerebral thrombosis (thrombosis group). Age-matched 37 patients with hypertension or diabetes mellitus (risk group) and 78 other patients with neither stroke nor any risk factor served as controls. MR imaging and angiography were undertaken within 3 months after the onset of stroke. Causative lesions were confined to the cerebral cortex (CR type, n=25), centrum semiovale (CS type, n=10), internal capsule/corona radiata (IC/CR type, n=46), and brainstem/cerebellum (BS type, n=22). PVH was classified into none, rims/caps, patchy, and diffuse. Patchy and diffuse types were significantly more common in the thrombosis group and the risk group of hypertensive patients than the other control patients. Diffuse type PVH coexisted with stenosed major cerebral artery and CS type infarction. In contrast, patchy PVH was closely correlated with IC/CR infarction caused by lesions of the perforating artery. These findings suggest that hemodynamic changes caused by large vessel diseases may result in diffuse PVH, while patchy PVH was confluent with multiple lesions induced by small vessel diseases. (N.K.).

  1. Effects of JPEG data compression on magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of small vessels ischemic lesions of the brain; Efeitos da compressao de dados JPEG na avaliacao de lesoes vasculares cerebrais isquemicas de pequenos vasos em ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriki, Paulo Eduardo de Aguiar; Abdala, Nitamar; Nogueira, Roberto Gomes; Carrete Junior, Henrique; Szejnfeld, Jacob [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: paulokuriki@gmail.com

    2006-01-15

    Objective: to establish the maximum achievable JPEG compression ratio without affecting quantitative and qualitative magnetic resonance imaging analysis of ischemic lesion in small vessels of the brain. Material and method: fifteen DICOM images were converted to JPEG with a compression ratio of 1:10 to 1:60 and were assessed together with the original images by three neuro radiologists. The number, morphology and signal intensity of the lesions were analyzed. Results: lesions were properly identified up to a 1:30 ratio. More lesions were identified with a 1:10 ratio then in the original images. Morphology and edges were properly evaluated up toa 1:40 ratio. Compression did not affect signal. Conclusion: small lesions were identified ( < 2 mm ) and in all compression ratios the JPEG algorithm generated image noise that misled observers to identify more lesions in JPEG images then in DICOM images, thus generating false-positive results.(author)

  2. Primary angiitis of the central nervous system with diffuse cerebral mass effect and giant cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, J A

    2012-02-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS), also called primary CNS vasculitis, is an idiopathic inflammatory condition affecting only intracranial and spinal cord vessels, particularly medium-sized and smaller arteries and arterioles. Angiography and histopathology typically do not reveal evidence of systemic vasculitis.(1,2) Histopathology usually reveals granulomatous inflammation affecting arterioles and small arteries of the parenchyma and\\/or leptomeninges, similar to that seen in Takayasu\\'s or giant cell arteritis.(1-3) We report a patient with biopsy-proven PACNS with giant cells and cerebral mass effect on MRI. Magnetic resonance angiography and cerebral angiography appeared normal and there was no evidence of extracranial vasculitis.

  3. Glycopyrrolate abolishes the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Thomas; Fisher, James P; Young, Colin N

    2010-01-01

    Brain blood vessels contain muscarinic receptors that are important for cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, but whether a cholinergic receptor mechanism is involved in the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion or affects cerebral metabolism remains unknown. We evaluated CBF and cerebral......(mean) during ergometer cycling (n = 8). Separate, randomized and counterbalanced trials were performed in control (no drug) conditions and following muscarinic cholinergic receptor blockade by glycopyrrolate. Glycopyrrolate increased resting heart rate from approximately 60 to approximately 110 beats min(-1...... abolished by glycopyrrolate (P important for the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion without affecting the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen....

  4. CBF and CMRo/sub 2/ during craniotomy for small supratentorial cerebral tumours in enflurane anaesthesia. A dose-response study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, J.B.; Cold, G.E.; Eriksen, H.O.; Eskesen, V.; Blatt-Lyon, B.

    1986-01-01

    In 14 patients with supratentorial cerebral tumors with midline shift less than or equal to 10 mm, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRo/sub 2/) were measured twice on the contralateral side of the craniotomy, using a modification of the Kety and Schmidt method. For induction of anaesthesia, thiopental, fentanyl and pancuronium were used. The anaesthesia was maintained with enflurane 1% in nitrous oxide 67%. Moderate hypocapnia to a level averaging 4.3 kPa was achieved. The patients were divided into two groups. In group 1 (n=7), 1% enflurane was used throughout the anaesthesia, and CBF and CMRo/sub 2/ measured about 70 min after induction averaged 30.1 ml 100 g/sup -1/ min/sub -1/ and 1.98 ml O/sub 2/ 100 g/sup -1/ min/sup -1/, respectively. During the second CBF study 1 h later, CBF and CMRo/sub 2/ were unchanged (P>0.05). In group 2 (n=7), the inspiratory enflurane concentration was increased from 1 to 2% after the first CBF measurement. In this group a significant decrease in CMRo/sub 2/ was observed, while CBF was unchanged. In six patients EEG was recorded simultaneously with the CBF measurements. In patients subjected to increasing enflurane concentration (Group 2), a suppression in the EEG activity was observed without spike waves. It is concluded that enflurane induces a dose-related decrease in CMRo/sub 2/ and suppression in the EEG activity, whereas CBF was unchanged.

  5. United Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your local affiliate Find your local affiliate United Cerebral Palsy United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is a trusted resource for individuals with Cerebral Palsy and other disabilities and their networks. Individuals with ...

  6. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  7. Birth Defects: Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Cerebral palsy Cerebral palsy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Cerebral palsy (also called CP) is a group of conditions ...

  8. Vessel Operator System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Operator cards are required for any operator of a charter/party boat and or a commercial vessel (including carrier and processor vessels) issued a vessel permit from...

  9. Improvement in regional CBF by L-serine contributes to its neuroprotective effect in rats after focal cerebral ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao-Jie Ren

    Full Text Available To investigate the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of L-serine, permanent focal cerebral ischemia was induced by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery while monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF. Rats were divided into control and L-serine-treated groups after middle cerebral artery occlusion. The neurological deficit score and brain infarct volume were assessed. Nissl staining was used to quantify the cortical injury. L-serine and D-serine levels in the ischemic cortex were analyzed with high performance liquid chromatography. We found that L-serine treatment: 1 reduced the neurological deficit score, infarct volume and cortical neuron loss in a dose-dependent manner; 2 improved CBF in the cortex, and this effect was inhibited in the presence of apamin plus charybdotoxin while the alleviation of both neurological deficit score and infarct volume was blocked; and 3 increased the amount of L-serine and D-serine in the cortex, and inhibition of the conversion of L-serine into D-serine by aminooxyacetic acid did not affect the reduction of neurological deficit score and infarct volume by L-serine. In conclusion, improvement in regional CBF by L-serine may contribute to its neuroprotective effect on the ischemic brain, potentially through vasodilation which is mediated by the small- and intermediate-conductance Ca(2+-activated K(+ channels on the cerebral blood vessel endothelium.

  10. Is elevated SUA associated with a worse outcome in young Chinese patients with acute cerebral ischemic stroke?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Bin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated serum uric acid (SUA levels can enhance its antioxidant prosperities and reduce the occurrence of cerebral infarction. Significantly elevated SUA levels have been associated with a better prognosis in patients with cerebral infarction; however, the results from some studies on the relationship between SUA and the prognosis of patients with cerebral infarction remain controversial. Methods We analyzed the relationship between SUA and clinical prognosis of 585 young Chinese adults with acute ischemic stroke as determined by the modified Rankin Scale at discharge. Using multivariate logistic regression modeling, we explore the relationship between SUA levels and patient's clinical prognosis. Results Lower SUA levels at time of admission were observed more frequently in the lowest quintile for patients with severe stroke (P = 0.02. Patients with cerebral infarction patients caused by small-vessel blockage had higher SUA concentrations (P = 0.01 and the lower mRS scores (P Conclusion Elevated SUA is an independent predictor for good clinical outcome of acute cerebral infarction among young adults.

  11. Cerebral vasculitis associated with Schistosoma mansoni infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camuset Guillaume

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral involvement in schistosomiasis is not rare, but it is underdiagnosed because of the lack of clinical suspicion and the frequency of asymptomatic forms. Neurologic complications are generally supported by granuloma formation around ectopic eggs which have migrated to the brain. Moreover, vascular lesions and cerebral arteritis have been well documented in histopathological studies. Nevertheless, cerebral vasculitis in later stages of the Schistosoma mansoni infection have not yet been described in living subjects. Case presentation A 28-year-old french woman had a stroke linked with cerebral vasculitis, 6 monthes after returning from Burkina-Faso. At the same time, a S. mansoni disseminated infection was diagnosed. She suffered from a new stroke after undertaking praziquantel therapy, which lead us to associate the S. mansoni infection and cerebral vasculitis. Conclusion This is the first report of such association, since cerebral vasculitis has never been described in later stages of the S. mansoni infection. Although the causal link between the two pathologies could not be proved, we suggest that S. mansoni is able to cause severe vascular damage in cerebral vessels. Schistosomiasis must be investigated in the event of a brain infarct in young people, particularly in patients originating or returning from an endemic area.

  12. Quantification of modulated blood oxygenation levels in single cerebral veins by investigating their MR signal decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacik, Jan [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States). Div. of Translational Imaging Research; University Clinics Jena (Germany). Medical Physics Group; Rauscher, Alexander [University Clinics Jena (Germany). Medical Physics Group; British Columbia Univ., Vancouver (Canada). MRI Research Centre; Reichenbach, Juergen R. [University Clinics Jena (Germany). Medical Physics Group

    2009-07-01

    The transverse magnetization of a single vein and its surrounding tissue is subject to spin dephasing caused by the local magnetic field inhomogeneity which is induced by the very same vessel. This phenomenon can be approximated and simulated by applying the model of an infinitely long and homogeneously magnetized cylinder embedded in a homogeneous tissue background. It is then possible to estimate the oxygenation level of the venous blood by fitting the simulated magnetization-time-course to the measured signal decay. In this work we demonstrate the ability of this approach to quantify the blood oxygenation level (Y) of small cerebral veins in vivo, not only under normal physiologic conditions (Y{sub native}=0.5-0.55) but also during induced changes of physiologic conditions which affect the cerebral venous blood oxygenation level. Changes of blood's oxygenation level induced by carbogen (5% CO{sub 2}, 95% O{sub 2}) and caffeine were observed and quantified, resulting in values of Y{sub carbogen}=0.7 and Y{sub caffeine}=0.42, respectively. The proposed technique may ultimately help to better understand local changes in cerebral physiology during neuronal activation by quantifying blood oxygenation in veins draining active brain areas. It may also be beneficial in clinical applications where it may improve diagnosis of cerebral pathologies as well as monitoring of responses to therapy. (orig.)

  13. Cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truwit, C.L.; Barkovich, A.J.; Koch, T.; Ferreiro, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews cranial MR findings in patients with cerebral palsy (CP) to clarify and categorize this disorder. The MR images of 40 patients with clinical CP were retrospectively reviewed. All patients suffered either varying spastic plegias, hypotonicity, or choreoathetosis. Concomitantly, the patients suffered from static encephalopathy, developmental delay, and/or microcephaly. Twenty-four patients were born at or near term, 10 were premature, and incomplete birth histories were available in six. The MR images revealed mild to severe degrees of white matter damage in 24 patients (12 term, nine premature, three unknown)

  14. Flaw distribution development from vessel ISI data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulds, J.R.; Kennedy, E.L.; Basin, S.L.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1991-01-01

    Previous attempts to develop flaw distributions for use in the structural integrity evaluation of pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessels have aimed at the estimation of a ''generic'' distribution applicable to all vessels. In contrast, this paper describes the analysis of vessel-specific in-service inspection (ISI) data for the development of a flaw distribution reliably representative of the condition of the particular vessel inspected. The application of the methodology may be extended to other vessels, but has been primarily developed for PWR reactor vessels. For this study, the flaw data analyzed included data obtained from three recently performed PWR vessel ISIs and from laboratory inspection of selected weldment sections of the Midland reactor vessel. The variability in both the character of the reviewed data (size range of flaws, number of flaws) and the UT (ultrasonic test) inspection system performance identified a need for analyzing the inspection results on a vessel-, or data set-specific basis. For this purpose, traditional histogram-based methods were inadequate, and a new methodology that can accept a very small number of flaws (typical of vessel-specific ISI results) and that includes consideration of inspection system flaw detection reliability, flaw sizing accuracy and flaw detection threshold, was developed. Results of the application of the methodology to each of the four PWR reactor vessel cases studied are presented and discussed

  15. Vacuum vessel for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Kurita, Gen-ichi; Onozuka, Masaki; Suzuki, Masaru.

    1997-01-01

    Heat of inner walls of a vacuum vessel that receive radiation heat from plasmas by way of first walls is removed by a cooling medium flowing in channels for cooling the inner walls. Nuclear heat generation of constitutional materials of the vacuum vessel caused by fast neutrons and γ rays is removed by a cooling medium flowing in cooling channels disposed in the vacuum vessel. Since the heat from plasmas and the nuclear heat generation are removed separately, the amount of the cooling medium flowing in the channels for cooling inner walls is increased for cooling a great amount of heat from plasmas while the amount of the cooling medium flowing in the channels for cooling the inside of the vacuum vessel is reduced for cooling the small amount of nuclear heat generation. Since the amount of the cooling medium can thus be optimized, the capacity of the facilities for circulating the cooling medium can be reduced. In addition, since the channels for cooling the inner walls and the channels of cooling medium formed in the vacuum vessel are disposed to the inner walls of the vacuum vessel on the side opposite to plasmas, integrity of the channels relative to leakage of the cooling medium can be ensured. (N.H.)

  16. Vacuum vessel for thermonuclear device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Kurita, Gen-ichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Onozuka, Masaki; Suzuki, Masaru

    1997-07-31

    Heat of inner walls of a vacuum vessel that receive radiation heat from plasmas by way of first walls is removed by a cooling medium flowing in channels for cooling the inner walls. Nuclear heat generation of constitutional materials of the vacuum vessel caused by fast neutrons and {gamma} rays is removed by a cooling medium flowing in cooling channels disposed in the vacuum vessel. Since the heat from plasmas and the nuclear heat generation are removed separately, the amount of the cooling medium flowing in the channels for cooling inner walls is increased for cooling a great amount of heat from plasmas while the amount of the cooling medium flowing in the channels for cooling the inside of the vacuum vessel is reduced for cooling the small amount of nuclear heat generation. Since the amount of the cooling medium can thus be optimized, the capacity of the facilities for circulating the cooling medium can be reduced. In addition, since the channels for cooling the inner walls and the channels of cooling medium formed in the vacuum vessel are disposed to the inner walls of the vacuum vessel on the side opposite to plasmas, integrity of the channels relative to leakage of the cooling medium can be ensured. (N.H.)

  17. Suture retraction technique to prevent parent vessel obstruction following aneurysm tandem clipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Tarek; Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh

    2015-08-01

    With large or giant aneurysms, the use of multiple tandem clips can be essential for complete obliteration of the aneurysm. One potential disadvantage, however, is the considerable cumulative weight of these clips, which may lead to kinking of the underlying parent vessels and obstruction of flow. The authors describe a simple technique to address this problem, guided by intraoperative blood flow measurements, in a patient with a ruptured near-giant 2.2 × 1.7-cm middle cerebral artery bifurcation aneurysm that was treated with the tandem clipping technique. A total of 11 clips were applied in a vertical stacked fashion. The cumulative weight of the clips caused kinking of the temporal M2 branch of the bifurcation with reduction of flow. A 4-0 Nurolon suture tie was applied to the hub of one of the clips and was tethered to the dura of the sphenoid ridge by a small mini-clip and reinforced by application of tissue sealant. The patient underwent intraoperative indocyanine green videoangiography as well as catheter angiography, which demonstrated complete aneurysmal obliteration and preservation of vessel branches. Postoperative angiography confirmed patency of the bifurcation vessels with mild vasospasm. The patient had a full recovery with no postoperative complications and was neurologically intact at her 6-month follow-up. The suture retraction technique allows a simple solution to parent vessel obstruction following aneurysm tandem clipping, in conjunction with the essential guidance provided by intraoperative flow measurements.

  18. Functional stability of cerebral circulatory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalenko, Y. Y.

    1980-01-01

    The functional stability of the cerebral circulation system seems to be based on the active mechanisms and on those stemming from specific of the biophysical structure of the system under study. This latter parameter has some relevant criteria for its quantitative estimation. The data obtained suggest that the essential part of the mechanism for active responses of cerebral vessels which maintains the functional stability of this portion of the vascular system, consists of a neurogenic component involving central nervous structures localized, for instance, in the medulla oblongata.

  19. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth / For Teens / Cerebral Palsy What's in this ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  20. Performance improvements of the BNC tubes from unique double-silicone-tube bioreactors by introducing chitosan and heparin for application as small-diameter artificial blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Tang, Jingyu; Bao, Luhan; Chen, Lin; Hong, Feng F

    2017-12-15

    In order to improve property of bacterial nano-cellulose (BNC) to achieve the requirements of clinical application as small caliber vascular grafts, chitosan (CH) was deposited into the fibril network of the BNC tubes fabricated in unique Double-Silicone-Tube bioreactors. Heparin (Hep) was then chemically grafted into the BNC-based tubes using EDC/NHS crosslinking to improve performance of anticoagulation and endothelialization. Physicochemical and mechanical property, blood compatibility, and cytocompatibility were compared before and after compositing. The results indicated that strength at break was increased but burst pressure decreased slightly after compositing. Performance of the BNC tubes was improved remarkably after introducing chitosan and heparin. The EDC/NHS crosslinking catalyzed both amide bonds and ester bonds formation in the BNC/CH-Hep composites. Three-dimensional surface structure and roughness were firstly obtained and discussed in relation to the hemocompatibility of BNC-based tubes. This work demonstrates the heparinized BNC-based tubes have great potential in application as small-diameter vascular prosthesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Epidemiological study of 183 patients with spontaneous rupture of cerebral aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonova, D.; Tasheva, E.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral vessels aneurysms represent a significant part of the cerebral vessels pathology. There is no extensive study on that in Bulgaria. We present a study of 183 patients with spontaneous rupture of cerebral aneurysm, diagnosed and treated in UMHATEM ‘Pirogov’, Sofia. We used clinical methods - data from subject history, analysis of the accompanying documentation, subject medical chart; imaging-diagnostics methods - CT, DSA and MRI; and statistical methods. A total of 183 patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms were studied. 65% were females and 35% were men.The ration female/male is 1.86, The mean age of all patients is 53.1 ±10.1 years. The highest incidence of ruptured aneurysms is seen in the age group 50 to 59 years. Aneurysms of a. cerebri media and a. communicants anterior are the most frequent (63.4% in total); while the lest are those of a basilaris (4.9%). 88.5% of the aneurysms in the studied group are small, 9.8% are large and 1.6% are giant. Intracranial hematomas are seen in 13.1% of the patients with ruptured aneurysms. Most frequently hematomas are connected with a. cerebri media and a.communicants anterior (87.5% in total). Patients with multiple aneurysms are 11.5% in total, 85.7% of them with an aneurysm of a.cerebri media. The incidence of ruptured cerebral aneurysms is higher amongst female. Frequency in the fifth decade of life is the highest. Most often seen are the aneurysms of a. cerebri media and a. communicants anterior, and the least - those of a. basilaris. Intracranial hematomas most frequently are associated with ruptures of a. cerebri media and a. communicants anterior, in patients with multiple aneurysms the highest is the frequency of aneurysms of a. cerebri media. (authors)

  2. Non operative management of cerebral abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batubara, C. A.

    2018-03-01

    Cerebral abscess is a focal intracerebral infection that begins as a localized area of cerebritis and develops into a collection of pus surrounded by a well-vascularized capsule. Patients typically present with varying combinations of aheadache, progressive neurologic deficits, seizures, and evidence of infection. Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imagingare the most important diagnostic tools in diagnosing cerebral abscess. The treatment of cerebral abscess has been a challenge. Small cerebralabscesses (managed by the use of intravenous mannitol (or hypertonic saline) and dexamethasone. Acute seizures should be terminated with the administration of intravenous benzodiazepines or by intravenous fosphenytoin. Anticonvulsants prophylaxis must be initiated immediately and continued at least one year due to high risk in the cerebral abscesses. Easier detection of underlying conditions, monitoring of the therapeutic progress, and recognition of complications have probably contributed to the improved prognosis.

  3. Old people's extensive traumatic cerebral infarction (analysis of 48 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wenhui

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To analyse clinically the genetic mechanism, clinical characteristics and the prognosis of old people's extensive traumatic cerebral infarction. Method: Forty eight such cases have been observed and analysed. Results: Old people's extensive traumatic cerebral infarction had its characteristics, which occurred mostly in the blood supply area of big branch blood vessels, and had observed nerve function defect. Conclusion: It has more clinical complication and bad prognosis. The death rate is high

  4. Multiple shell pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedellsborg, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described of fabricating a pressure vessel comprising the steps of: attaching a first inner pressure vessel having means defining inlet and outlet openings to a top flange, placing a second inner pressure vessel, having means defining inlet and outlet opening, concentric with and spaced about the first inner pressure vessel and attaching the second inner pressure vessel to the top flange, placing an outer pressure vessel, having inlet and outlet openings, concentric with and spaced apart about the second inner pressure vessel and attaching the outer pressure vessel to the top flange, attaching a generally cylindrical inner inlet conduit and a generally cylindrical inner outlet conduit respectively to the inlet and outlet openings in the first inner pressure vessel, attaching a generally cylindrical outer inlet conduit and a generally cylindrical outer outlet conduit respectively to the inlet and outlet opening in the second inner pressure vessel, heating the assembled pressure vessel to a temperature above the melting point of a material selected from the group, lead, tin, antimony, bismuth, potassium, sodium, boron and mixtures thereof, filling the space between the first inner pressure vessel and the second inner pressure vessel with material selected from the group, filling the space between the second inner pressure vessel and the outer pressure vessel with material selected from the group, and pressurizing the material filling the spaces between the pressure vessels to a predetermined pressure, the step comprising: pressurizing the spaces to a pressure whereby the wall of the first inner pressure vessel is maintained in compression during steady state operation of the pressure vessel

  5. Cerebral hematocrit decreases with hemodynamic compromise in carotid artery occlusion: a PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, H; Fukuyama, H; Nagahama, Y; Katsumi, Y; Okazawa, H

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated whether in patients with internal carotid artery occlusion the regional cerebral hematocrit correlates with cerebral hemodynamics or metabolic state and, if so, how the regional cerebral hematocrit changes in the hemodynamically compromised region. We used positron emission tomography to study seven patients with unilateral internal carotid artery occlusion and no cortical infarction in the chronic stage. The distributions of red blood cell and plasma volumes were assessed using oxygen-15-labeled carbon monoxide and copper-62-labeled human serum albumin-dithiosemicarbazone tracers, respectively. The calculated hematocrit value was compared with the hemodynamic and metabolic parameters measured with the oxygen-15 steady-state technique. In the cerebral cortex, the value of the cerebral hematocrit varied but was correlated with the hemodynamic and metabolic status. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that the large vessel hematocrit, the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen, and the cerebral blood flow or the oxygen extraction fraction accounted for a significant proportion of variance of the cerebral hematocrit. The oxygen extraction fraction and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen negatively correlated with the cerebral hematocrit, whereas the cerebral blood flow correlated positively: patients with reduced blood supply relative to metabolic demand (decreased blood flow with increased oxygen extraction fraction) showed low hematocrit values. In carotid artery occlusion in the chronic stage, regional cerebral hematocrit may vary according to cerebral hemodynamics and metabolic status. Regional cerebral hematocrit may decrease with hemodynamic compromise unless oxygen metabolism concomitantly decreases.

  6. Post-mortem assessment of hypoperfusion of cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Taya; Miners, Scott; Love, Seth

    2015-04-01

    Perfusion is reduced in the cerebral neocortex in Alzheimer's disease. We have explored some of the mechanisms, by measurement of perfusion-sensitive and disease-related proteins in post-mortem tissue from Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and age-matched control brains. To distinguish physiological from pathological reduction in perfusion (i.e. reduction exceeding the decline in metabolic demand), we measured the concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a protein induced under conditions of tissue hypoxia through the actions of hypoxia-inducible factors, and the myelin associated glycoprotein to proteolipid protein 1 (MAG:PLP1) ratio, which declines in chronically hypoperfused brain tissue. To evaluate possible mechanisms of hypoperfusion, we also measured the levels of amyloid-β40, amyloid-β42, von Willebrand factor (VWF; a measure of microvascular density) and the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin 1 (EDN1); we assayed the activity of angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE), which catalyses the production of another potent vasoconstrictor, angiotensin II; and we scored the severity of arteriolosclerotic small vessel disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and determined the Braak tangle stage. VEGF was markedly increased in frontal and parahippocampal cortex in Alzheimer's disease but only slightly and not significantly in vascular dementia. In frontal cortex the MAG:PLP1 ratio was significantly reduced in Alzheimer's disease and even more so in vascular dementia. VEGF but not MAG:PLP1 increased with Alzheimer's disease severity, as measured by Braak tangle stage, and correlated with amyloid-β42 and amyloid-β42: amyloid-β40 but not amyloid-β40. Although MAG:PLP1 tended to be lowest in cortex from patients with severe small vessel disease or cerebral amyloid angiopathy, neither VEGF nor MAG:PLP1 correlated significantly with the severity of structural vascular pathology (small vessel disease, cerebral amyloid angiopathy or VWF

  7. Transbrachial artery approach for selective cerebral angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touho, Hajime; Karasawa, Jun; Shishido, Hisashi; Morisako, Toshitaka; Numazawa, Shinichi; Yamada, Keisuke; Nagai, Shigeki; Shibamoto, Kenji

    1990-01-01

    Transaxillary or transbrachial approaches to the cerebral vessels have been reported, but selective angiography of all four vessels has not been possible through one route. In this report, a new technique for selective cerebral angiography with transbrachial approach is described. One hundred and twenty three patients with cerebral infarction, vertebrobasilar insufficiency, intracerebral hemorrhage, epilepsy, or cerebral tumor were examined. Those patients consisted of 85 outpatients and 38 inpatients whose age ranged from 15 years old to 82 years old. The patients were examined via the transbrachial approach (97 cases via the right brachial, 29 cases via the left). Materials included a DSA system (Digital Fluorikon 5000, General Electric Co.), a 4 French tight J-curved Simmons 80-cm catheter, a 19-gauge extra-thin-wall Seldinger needle, and a J/Straight floppy 125-cm guide-wire. Generally, the volume of the contrast agent (300 mgI/ml iopamidol) used in the common carotid artery angiogram was 6 ml, while that used in the vertebral artery angiogram was 4 ml. If catheterization of the vertebral artery or right common carotid artery was unsuccessful, about 8 ml of the contrast agent was injected into the subclavian or branchiocephalic artery. Definitive diagnosis and a decision on proper treatment of the patients can be easily obtained, and the results were clinically satisfactory. Moreover, no complications were encountered in this study. This new technique making a transbrachial approach to the cerebral vessels using the DSA system is introduced here. Neurosurgeons can use this technique easily, and they will find that it provides them with all the information they need about the patient. (author)

  8. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Edip Gürol

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid beta-peptides (Ab in the walls of leptomeningeal arteries, arterioles, and veins. Despite the fact that these pathological changes were first described in 1909, major advancement in our understanding of the clinicoradiological manifestations, neurobiology, and course of CAA has occurred only during the last 30 years. No significant associations have been shown between CAA and other systemic/visceral amyloidoses or vascular risk factors, including hypertension. CAA is well known as the most common cause of spontaneous and anticoagulant-related lobar parenchymal ICH in the elderly. It also causes lobar cerebral microbleeds (CMBs, small dot-like dark susceptibility artifacts visible with gradient recalled echo (GRE-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. CMBs are important markers of disease severity and predictors of CAA progression. Amyloid angiopathy is also a common cause of ischemic microvascular white matter disease (WMD and deep cerebral infarctions. Such WMD is defined as subcortical and periventricular white matter changes without obvious infarction, as well as a dark appearance on computerized tomography (CT and a bright appearance on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR-MRI. CAA-related vascular dysfunction, with its hemorrhagic and ischemic complications, is a recognized contributor to vascular cognitive impairment in the elderly, an independent effect that is synergistically increased by Alzheimer pathologies, such as plaques and tangles. A set of clinicoradiological criteria was established for the accurate diagnosis of CAA. According to the Boston Criteria, patients aged 55 years and older with multiple hemorrhages (on CT or GRE-MRI restricted to the lobar, cortical, or corticosubcortical regions (cerebellar hemorrhage allowed are diagnosed as probable CAA when no other etiology is found; a single hemorrhage in the same region is classified as possible

  9. Simplified techniques of cerebral angiography using a mobile X-ray unit and computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondo, Gakuji; Ishiwata, Yusuke; Yamashita, Toshinori; Iida, Takashi; Moro, Yutaka

    1989-01-01

    Simplified techniques of cerebral angiography using a mobile X-ray unit and computed radiography (CR) are discussed. Computed radiography is a digital radiography system in which an imaging plate is used as an X-ray detector and a final image is displayed on the film. In the angiograms performed with CR, the spatial frequency components can be enhanced for the easy analysis of fine blood vessels. Computed radiography has an automatic sensitivity and a latitude-setting mechanism, thus serving as an 'automatic camera.' This mechanism is useful for radiography with a mobile X-ray unit in hospital wards, intensive care units, or operating rooms where the appropriate setting of exposure conditions is difficult. We applied this mechanism to direct percutaneous carotid angiography and intravenous digital subtraction angiography with a mobile X-ray unit. Direct percutaneous carotid angiography using CR and a mobile X-ray unit were taken after the manual injection of a small amount of a contrast material through a fine needle. We performed direct percutaneous carotid angiography with this method 68 times on 25 cases from August 1986 to December 1987. Of the 68 angiograms, 61 were evaluated as good, compared with conventional angiography. Though the remaining seven were evaluated as poor, they were still diagnostically effective. This method is found useful for carotid angiography in emergency rooms, intensive care units, or operating rooms. Cerebral venography using CR and a mobile X-ray unit was done after the manual injection of a contrast material through the bilateral cubital veins. The cerebral venous system could be visualized from 16 to 24 seconds after the beginning of the injection of the contrast material. We performed cerebral venography with this method 14 times on six cases. These venograms were better than conventional angiograms in all cases. This method may be useful in managing patients suffering from cerebral venous thrombosis. (J.P.N.)

  10. 75 FR 78063 - Passenger Weight and Inspected Vessel Stability Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... for determining the maximum passenger capacity of small passenger pontoon vessels either by: Dividing.... 176.110 explicitly calling attention to the OCMI's prerogative to consider a vessel's suitability for... factors to which vessel masters should give special attention in both sections, and a requirement in Sec...

  11. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  12. Improvement to reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The vessel described includes a prestressed concrete vessel containing a chamber and a removable cover closing this chamber. The cover is in concrete and is kept in its closed position by main and auxiliary retainers, comprising fittings integral with the concrete of the vessel. The auxiliary retainers pass through the concrete of the cover. This improvement may be applied to BWR, PWR and LMFBR type reactor vessel [fr

  13. [Cerebral aspergillosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattevin, P; Jauréguiberry, S; Gangneux, J-P

    2004-05-01

    The brain is almost always a localization of invasive aspergillosis, after hematogenous spread from pulmonary aspergillosis. Brain aspergilosis is not rare and is one of the worst prognosis factors of invasive aspergillosis. The incidence of this severe mycosis is currently on the rise due to the development of major immunosuppressive treatments. Brain aspergillosis is noteworthy for its vascular tropism, leading to infectious cerebral vasculitis, mainly involving thalamoperforating and lenticulostriate arteries, with a high frequency of thalamic or basal nuclei lesions. Extra-neurologic features that suggest this diagnosis are: i) risk factors for invasive aspergillosis (major or prolonged neutropenia, hematologic malignancies, prolonged corticosteroid treatment, bone marrow or solid organ transplant, AIDS); ii) persistent fever not responding to presumptive antibacterial treatment; iii) respiratory signs (brain aspergillosis is associated with pulmonary aspergillosis in 80 to 95 p. 100 of cases). Perspectives. Two recent major improvements in brain aspergillosis management must be outlined: i) for diagnostic purposes, the development of testing for Aspergillus antigenemia (a non-invasive procedure with good diagnostic value for invasive aspergillosis); ii) for therapeutic purposes, the demonstration that voriconazole is better than amphotericin B in terms of clinical response, tolerance and survival, for all types of invasive aspergillosis, the benefit being probably even greater in case of brain aspergillosis because of the good diffusion of voriconazole into the central nervous system. Brain aspergillosis is a severe emerging opportunistic infection for which diagnostic and therapeutic tools have recently improved. Thus, this diagnostic must be suspected early, especially in the immunocompromised patient, in the event of respiratory symptoms and when the brain lesions are localized in the central nuclei and the thalamus.

  14. Microglia in diffuse plaques in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis (Dutch). An immunohistochemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat-Schieman, M. L.; Rozemuller, A. J.; van Duinen, S. G.; Haan, J.; Eikelenboom, P.; Roos, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    In hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis (Dutch) (HCHWA-D) beta/A4 amyloid deposition is found in meningocortical blood vessels and in diffuse plaques in the cerebral cortex. Diffuse plaques putatively represent early stages in the formation of senile plaques. Microglia are intimately

  15. Acetazolamide as a vasodilatory stimulus in cerebrovascular diseases and in conditions affecting the cerebral vasculature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Settakis, G.; Molnár, C.; Kerényi, L.; Kollár, J.; Legemate, D.; Csiba, L.; Fülesdi, B.

    2003-01-01

    Pathologic processes affecting the brain vessels may damage cerebral vasodilatory capacity. Early detection of cerebral dysfunction plays an important role in the prevention of cerebrovascular diseases. In recent decades acetazolamide (AZ) has frequently been used for this purpose. In the present

  16. Prevalence of cerebral and pulmonary thrombosis in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Thomsen, C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) have a high prevalence of thrombosis, the most frequently described locations being the cerebral and pulmonary vessels. The reported prevalence of both cerebral infarction and pulmonary thrombosis has been highly variable. The aim...

  17. MAPK signaling pathway regulates cerebrovascular receptor expression in human cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansar, Saema; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Waldsee, Roya

    2013-01-01

    if the upregulation of contractile cerebrovascular receptors after 48 h of organ culture of human cerebral arteries involves MAPK pathways and if it can be prevented by a MEK1/2 inhibitor. Human cerebral arteries were obtained from patients undergoing intracranial tumor surgery. The vessels were divided into ring...

  18. Cerebral and non-cerebral coenurosis: on the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Taenia multiceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulopoulos, Georgios; Dinkel, Anke; Romig, Thomas; Ebi, Dennis; Mackenstedt, Ute; Loos-Frank, Brigitte

    2016-12-01

    We characterised the causative agents of cerebral and non-cerebral coenurosis in livestock by determining the mitochondrial genotypes and morphological phenotypes of 52 Taenia multiceps isolates from a wide geographical range in Europe, Africa, and western Asia. Three studies were conducted: (1) a morphological comparison of the rostellar hooks of cerebral and non-cerebral cysts of sheep and goats, (2) a morphological comparison of adult worms experimentally produced in dogs, and (3) a molecular analysis of three partial mitochondrial genes (nad1, cox1, and 12S rRNA) of the same isolates. No significant morphological or genetic differences were associated with the species of the intermediate host. Adult parasites originating from cerebral and non-cerebral cysts differed morphologically, e.g. the shape of the small hooks and the distribution of the testes in the mature proglottids. The phylogenetic analysis of the mitochondrial haplotypes produced three distinct clusters: one cluster including both cerebral isolates from Greece and non-cerebral isolates from tropical and subtropical countries, and two clusters including cerebral isolates from Greece. The majority of the non-cerebral specimens clustered together but did not form a monophyletic group. No monophyletic groups were observed based on geography, although specimens from the same region tended to cluster. The clustering indicates high intraspecific diversity. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that all variants of T. multiceps can cause cerebral coenurosis in sheep (which may be the ancestral phenotype), and some variants, predominantly from one genetic cluster, acquired the additional capacity to produce non-cerebral forms in goats and more rarely in sheep.

  19. Stroke from Vasospasm due to Marijuana Use: Can Cannabis Synergistically with Other Medications Trigger Cerebral Vasospasm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Marium; Zafar, Atif; Adeel Faizi, Syed; Zawar, Ifrah

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of imaging proven cerebral vasospasm causing ischemic stroke in a young patient chronically on buprenorphine-naloxone for heroin remission who started smoking cannabis on a daily basis. With cannabis legalization spreading across the states in the USA, it is important for physicians not only to be aware of cannabis reported association with cerebral vasospasm in some patients but also to be on the lookout for possible interacting medications that can synergistically affect cerebral vessels causing debilitating strokes.

  20. ALICE HMPID Radiator Vessel

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    View of the radiator vessels of the ALICE/HMPID mounted on the support frame. Each HMPID module is equipped with 3 indipendent radiator vessels made out of neoceram and fused silica (quartz) windows glued together. The spacers inside the vessel are needed to stand the hydrostatic pressure. http://alice-hmpid.web.cern.ch/alice-hmpid

  1. Cerebral hemodynamics in adult ischemic-type patients with moyamoya disease compared with those of atherothrombotic middle cerebral artery occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idei, Masaru; Yamane, Kanji; Nishida, Masahiro; Manabe, Kazufumi; Yokota, Akira

    2005-01-01

    We measured regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in adult ischemic-type patients with moyamoya disease and in patients with atherothrombotic middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) to investigate cerebral hemodynamics in adult ischemic-type of moyamoya disease. In this study we measured rCBF and regional cerebro-vascular response (rCVR) using acetazolamide by Xe-non-enhanced CT. Our subjects consisted of 15 adult ischemic-type patients with moyamoya disease and 27 atherothrombotic stroke patients with proximal occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. The region of inter est was conducted in the anterior cerebral artery, middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery territories as well as basal ganglia regions. rGBF was preserved in all regions of patients with moyamoya disease. However, rCVR severely decreased in the anterior circulation territory in patients with moyamoya disease compared with those of MCAO. These results suggest that rCBF in the anterior circulation territory of adult ischemic-type patients with moyamoya disease is preserved by vasodilation of the cerebral arteries, while cerebral hemodynamic reserve capacity is severely reduced. The results indicated that basal moyamoya vessels are dilated. These findings may be one of the reasons why stroke occurs more frequently in adult than child patients with moyamoya disease. (author)

  2. Self-expanding stent-assisted middle cerebral artery recanalization: technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauvageau, Eric; Levy, Elad I.

    2006-01-01

    Investigation into pharmacological and mechanical means of improving recanalization rates by intraarterial therapy has led to technological development. Angiographic recanalization has been associated with improvement in clinical outcome. A clot retriever has recently joined an imperfect armamentarium for intraarterial stroke therapy. In this report, we describe successful recanalization of an acute thrombotic occlusion of the inferior division of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) achieved with a self-expanding stent. An 82-year-old woman with a history of coronary atherosclerosis and previous cerebellar hemorrhage presented with a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of 11. Perfusion computed tomography imaging showed a left MCA territory deficit. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a small punctiform insular hyperintensity. Angiography documented occlusion of the inferior division of the left MCA (Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction or Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction, TIMI/TICI, grade 0). Intraarterial delivery of eptifibatide to the occlusion site failed to recanalize the vessel. Deployment of a self-expanding stent in the occluded segment resulted in complete revascularization of the distal vascular bed. Angiography performed on the next day confirmed patency of the stented vessel segment (TIMI/TICI 3). The patient was discharged 3 days after the procedure (NIHSS 3). MR angiography obtained 3 months after the procedure documented left MCA patency. This technique may have a role worthy of further investigation in acute stroke therapy. (orig.)

  3. Chronic cocaine disrupts neurovascular networks and cerebral function: optical imaging studies in rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiujia; You, Jiang; Volkow, Nora D.; Choi, Jeonghun; Yin, Wei; Wang, Wei; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2016-02-01

    Cocaine abuse can lead to cerebral strokes and hemorrhages secondary to cocaine's cerebrovascular effects, which are poorly understood. We assessed cocaine's effects on cerebrovascular anatomy and function in the somatosensory cortex of the rat's brain. Optical coherence tomography was used for in vivo imaging of three-dimensional cerebral blood flow (CBF) networks and to quantify CBF velocities (CBFv), and multiwavelength laser-speckle-imaging was used to simultaneously measure changes in CBFv, oxygenated (Δ[HbO2]) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (Δ[HbR]) concentrations prior to and after an acute cocaine challenge in chronically cocaine exposed rats. Immunofluorescence techniques on brain slices were used to quantify microvasculature density and levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). After chronic cocaine (2 and 4 weeks), CBFv in small vessels decreased, whereas vasculature density and VEGF levels increased. Acute cocaine further reduced CBFv and decreased Δ[HbO2] and this decline was larger and longer lasting in 4 weeks than 2 weeks cocaine-exposed rats, which indicates that risk for ischemia is heightened during intoxication and that it increases with chronic exposures. These results provide evidence of cocaine-induced angiogenesis in cortex. The CBF reduction after chronic cocaine exposure, despite the increases in vessel density, indicate that angiogenesis was insufficient to compensate for cocaine-induced disruption of cerebrovascular function.

  4. Cerebral blood flow reduction in Alzheimer's disease: impact of capillary occlusions on mice and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Maxime; Merlo, Adlan; Peyrounette, Myriam; Doyeux, Vincent; Smith, Amy; Cruz-Hernandez, Jean; Bracko, Oliver; Haft-Javaherian, Mohammad; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B.; Davit, Yohan; Quintard, Michel; Lorthois, Sylvie

    2017-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease may be the most common form of dementia, yet a satisfactory diagnosis procedure has still to be found. Recent studies suggest that a significant decrease of cerebral blood flow, probably caused by white blood cells stalling small vessels, may be among the earliest biological markers. To assess this hypothesis we derive a blood flow model, validate it against in vitro controlled experiments and in vivo measurements made on mice. We then investigate the influence of capillary occlusions on regional perfusion (sum of all arteriole flowrates feeding the network) of large mice and humans anatomical networks. Consistent with experiments, we observe no threshold effect, so that even a small percentage of occlusions (2-4%) leads to significant blood flow decrease (5-12%). We show that both species share the same linear dependance, suggesting possible translation from mice to human. ERC BrainMicroFlow GA61510, CALMIP HPC (Grant 2017-1541).

  5. Dynamic digitized cerebral parenchymography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theron, J.; Alachkar, F.; Nelson, M.; Mazia, D.

    1992-01-01

    Aortic arch injections centred on the head have been performed routinely in patients with cerebral ischaemia. Digital angiograms with modified windowing (low and narrow) have been used. This 'cerebral' arch injection allows much improved analysis of the cerebral parenchymal vascularization, giving better understanding of hemispheric ischaemia and making the decision about revascularization more rational. (orig.)

  6. Clinical application of three-dimensional spiral CT cerebral angiography with volume rendering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Shaoyin; Huang Xi'en; Kang Jianghe; Zhang Dantong; Lin Qingchi; Cai Guoxiang; Xu Meixin; Pang Ruilin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the methodology and assess the clinical value of three-dimensional CT angiography (3D-CTA) with volume rendering (VR) in cerebral vessels. Methods: Sixty-two patients were examined by means of 3D-CTA with volume rendering. VR was used in the reconstruction of 3D images, and the demonstration of normal vessels and vascular lesions were particularly analyzed. At the same time, comparisons were made between the images of VR and SSD, MIP, and also between the diagnosis of VR-CTA and DSA or postoperative results. Results: In VR images, cerebral vessel routes and vessel cavities were showed clearly, while the relationship among vascular lesions, surrounding vessels, and neighboring structure was distinguished. 50 cases (80.6%) were found positive, 48 of which were correct and 2 were false-positive compared with DSA or postoperative results. The accurate rate of diagnosis was 96.0%. There was no obvious difference in showing the cerebral vessel among the images of VR, SSD and MIP (P > 0.25). Conclusion: Three-dimensional CT cerebral angiography with VR is a new noninvasive effective method. It can even partly replace the DSA. The 3D-images have the characteristics of showing the cerebral vascular cavity and overlapped vessels without cutting the skull

  7. Pathological review of late cerebral radionecrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Yoshihiko

    2008-01-01

    Late cerebral radionecrosis may be considered to be a specific chronic inflammatory response, although it is unknown whether the initial damage by brain irradiation is to an endothelial cell or a glial cell. I discuss the pathological specificity of late cerebral radionecrosis by studying the published literature and a case that I experienced. In late cerebral radionecrosis, there are typical coagulation necrosis areas containing fibrinoid necrosis with occlusion of the lumina and poorly active inflammatory areas with many inflammatory ghost cells, focal perivascular lymphocytes, hyalinized vessels, and telangiectatic vascularization near and in the necrotic tissue, and more active inflammatory areas formed as a partial rim of the reactive zone by perivascular lymphocytes, much vascularization, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes at the corticomedullary border adjacent to necrotic tissue in the white matter. It is difficult to believe that coagulation necrosis occurs without first disordering the vascular endothelial cells because fibrinoid necrosis is a main feature and a diffusely multiple lesion in late cerebral radionecrosis. Because various histological findings do develop, progress, and extend sporadically at different areas and times in the irradiated field of the brain for a long time after radiation, uncontrolled chronic inflammation containing various cytokine secretions may also play a key role in progression of this radionecrosis. Evaluation of the mechanism of the development/aggravation of late cerebral radionecrosis requires a further study for abnormal cytokine secretions and aberrant inflammatory reactions. (author)

  8. Computerized tomography of cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, K; Mihara, T; Kobayashi, E; Yamamoto, K; Kusumoto, K [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1978-12-01

    In 120 cases of patients with cerebral infarction, the affected areas in the CT images were analyzed with special reference to the site, the size, and the extension. Moreover, on 39 scans of 34 cases examined with 8 weeks after the onset of strokes, the CT images were analyzed from the viewpoint of the presence of a mass effect, edema, contrast enhancement, and the accompanying hemorrhage. From these investigations, the authors have obtained the following results; 1) The greatest incidence of infarcts was in the area supplied by the middle cerebral artery (57% of the cases), and, among those, the area of the lenticulostriate arteries showed the highest incidence (53%). Even in the posterior fossa, infarcts were found in 6% of the cases. These findings are coincident with those in autopsied cases. 2) Putaminal infarcts and infarctions occurring in the area supplied by the calcarine artery seemed to be uniformity of the arcuate pattern. 3) Most of the infarcts in the perfusion area of the anterior cerebral artery and the basal ganglia were found to be small and multifocal; they were thought to correspond with water-shed and/or lacunar infarcts. 4) In approximately 25% of the cases examined within 8 weeks after the onset of strokes, the CT images revealed mass effects which had never been observed after more than 3 weeks. In conclusion, the presence of a mass effect, accompanying hemorrhage, and contrast enhancement detected by CT should lead us to reconsider the conventional management of cerebral infarction.

  9. Power Management of Small Naval Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    Nernst Equation (an equation which can be used to determine the equilibrium. The current controlled voltage source,/^/) represents the overall effect of...the effective partial pressures of both hydrogen and oxygen. The effective pressures are used in the Nernst equation to find PEMFC output voltage...used to set up the model for the system. MathCAD® and MATLAB® were involved in order to achieve system transfer function for both inputs. Equations

  10. Small Ro/Pax Vessel stability study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, Henrik; Kristensen, Hans Otto Holmegaard; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2015-01-01

    In 2009 new damage stability requirements for passenger ships based on a probabilistic method were adopted by IMO and are now part of the current SOLAS Chapter II-1 regulations (SOLAS 2009). The mandate from IMO was to keep the same safety level as inherent in the old deterministic damage stabili...

  11. Clinical manifestations of small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, M.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major health problem worldwide. However, the mortality risk in patients with cardiovascular disease has decreased due to early detection of the disease and improved treatment possibilities. The downside of increased survival rates are higher rates of long-term functional

  12. Vessel discoloration detection in malarial retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agurto, C.; Nemeth, S.; Barriga, S.; Soliz, P.; MacCormick, I.; Taylor, T.; Harding, S.; Lewallen, S.; Joshi, V.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a life-threatening clinical syndrome associated with malarial infection. It affects approximately 200 million people, mostly sub-Saharan African children under five years of age. Malarial retinopathy (MR) is a condition in which lesions such as whitening and vessel discoloration that are highly specific to CM appear in the retina. Other unrelated diseases can present with symptoms similar to CM, therefore the exact nature of the clinical symptoms must be ascertained in order to avoid misdiagnosis, which can lead to inappropriate treatment and, potentially, death. In this paper we outline the first system to detect the presence of discolored vessels associated with MR as a means to improve the CM diagnosis. We modified and improved our previous vessel segmentation algorithm by incorporating the `a' channel of the CIELab color space and noise reduction. We then divided the segmented vasculature into vessel segments and extracted features at the wall and in the centerline of the segment. Finally, we used a regression classifier to sort the segments into discolored and not-discolored vessel classes. By counting the abnormal vessel segments in each image, we were able to divide the analyzed images into two groups: normal and presence of vessel discoloration due to MR. We achieved an accuracy of 85% with sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 67%. In clinical practice, this algorithm would be combined with other MR retinal pathology detection algorithms. Therefore, a high specificity can be achieved. By choosing a different operating point in the ROC curve, our system achieved sensitivity of 67% with specificity of 100%.

  13. Method of burying vessel containing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Yoshihito.

    1989-01-01

    A float having an inert gas sealed therein is attached to a tightly closed vessel containing radioactive wastes. The vessel is inserted and kept in a small hole for burying the tightly closed vessel in an excavated shaft in rocks such as of granite or rock salts, while filling bentonite as shielding material therearound. In this case, the float is so adjusted that the apparent specific gravity is made equal or nearer between the tightly closed vessel and the bentonite, so that the rightly closed vessel does not sink and cause direct contact with the rocks even if bentonite flows due to earthquakes, etc. This can prevent radioactivity contamination through water in the rocks. (S.K.)

  14. Clinical and pathological study on 10 cases of cerebral lobe hemorrhage related with cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-qi LI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the clinical data and pathological features of 10 cases of cerebral lobar hemorrhage related with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA diagnosed pathologically, thereby to improve the knowledge and diagnosis of the disease. Methods The clinical data of 10 cases of cerebral lobar hemorrhage related with CAA, collected in the General Hospital of Shenyang Command from 1983 up to now, were retrospectively analyzed, and the clinical and neuropathological features of these cases were summarized. Results Of the 10 patients, 2 suffered from single lobar hemorrhage and 8 multiple lobar hemorrhage, all of them were confirmed pathologically to have ruptured into the subarachnoid space. Pathological examination revealed microaneurysm in 2 cases, "double barrel" change in 4 cases, multiple arteriolar clusters in 5 cases, obliterative onion-liked intima change in 4 cases, and fibrinoid necrosis of vessel wall in 7 cases. In addition, neurofibrillary tangles were found in 8 cases, and senile plaque was observed in 5 cases. Conclusions Cerebral lobar hemorrhage related with CAA is mainly located in the parietal, temporal and occipital lobes, readily breaking into the subarachnoid space, and it is often multiple and recurrent. The CAA associated microvasculopathy was found frequently in the autopsy sample of CAA related cerebral lobar hemorrhage, and it may contribute to the pathogenesis of cerebral hemorrhage. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.07.04

  15. Effects of Milrinone continuous intravenous infusion on global cerebral oxygenation and cerebral vasospasm after cerebral aneurysm surgical clipping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Ghanem

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Milrinone improved significantly the global cerebral oxygenation and reduced the incidence of cerebral vasospasm during the dangerous period of cerebral spasm after cerebral aneurysm clipping.

  16. Microembolism after cerebral angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manaka, Hiroshi; Sakai, Hideki; Nagata, Izumi

    2000-01-01

    Acute microemboli are detected more precisely with the recently developed diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI). We happened to obtain 24 DWIs after 350 diagnostic cerebral angiographies in 1999. DWIs after cerebral angiographies showed bright lesions in 7 patients (28%), of whom 6 had no neurological symptoms after cerebral angiography. Seven of the 24 patients had risk factors for arteriosclerosis. Only one patient had embolic events due to angiography. Microemboli related to cerebral angiographies are inevitable in some patients. Most are silent, however, we should investigate the cause of microemboli and should make cerebral angiography safer. (author)

  17. Automatic generation of anatomic characteristics from cerebral aneurysm surface models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, M; Lawonn, K; Beuing, O; Preim, B

    2013-03-01

    Computer-aided research on cerebral aneurysms often depends on a polygonal mesh representation of the vessel lumen. To support a differentiated, anatomy-aware analysis, it is necessary to derive anatomic descriptors from the surface model. We present an approach on automatic decomposition of the adjacent vessels into near- and far-vessel regions and computation of the axial plane. We also exemplarily present two applications of the geometric descriptors: automatic computation of a unique vessel order and automatic viewpoint selection. Approximation methods are employed to analyze vessel cross-sections and the vessel area profile along the centerline. The resulting transition zones between near- and far- vessel regions are used as input for an optimization process to compute the axial plane. The unique vessel order is defined via projection into the plane space of the axial plane. The viewing direction for the automatic viewpoint selection is derived from the normal vector of the axial plane. The approach was successfully applied to representative data sets exhibiting a broad variability with respect to the configuration of their adjacent vessels. A robustness analysis showed that the automatic decomposition is stable against noise. A survey with 4 medical experts showed a broad agreement with the automatically defined transition zones. Due to the general nature of the underlying algorithms, this approach is applicable to most of the likely aneurysm configurations in the cerebral vasculature. Additional geometric information obtained during automatic decomposition can support correction in case the automatic approach fails. The resulting descriptors can be used for various applications in the field of visualization, exploration and analysis of cerebral aneurysms.

  18. Relation of plasma homocyst(e)ine to cerebral infarction and cerebral atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, J H; Chung, C S; Kang, S S

    1998-12-01

    A number of investigations support the theory that the elevated plasma homocyst(e)ine is associated with occlusive vascular disease. The aim of this study is to examine whether moderate hyperhomocyst(e)inemia is an independent risk factor for cerebral infarction. In addition, we examined the association between plasma homocyst(e)ine and the severity of cerebral atherosclerosis. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study with 140 male controls and 78 male patients with nonfatal cerebral infarction, aged between 39 and 82 years. Plasma homocyst(e)ine levels were analyzed in 218 subjects. Fifty-five patients were evaluated for cerebral vascular stenosis by MR angiography. The mean plasma level of homocyst(e)ine was higher in cases than in controls (11.8+/-5.6 versus 9.6+/-4.1 micromol/L; P=0.002). The proportion of subjects with moderate hyperhomocyst(e)inemia was significantly higher in cases than in controls (16.7% versus 5.0%; P=0.004). Based on the logistic regression model, the odds ratio of the highest 5% of homocyst(e)ine levels in control group was 4.17 (95% confidence interval, 3.71 to 4. 71)(P=0.0001). After additional adjustment for total cholesterol, hypertension, smoking, diabetes, and age, the odds ratio was 1.70 (95% confidence interval, 1.48 to 1.95) (P=0.0001). The plasma homocyst(e)ine levels of patients having vessels with 3 or 2 stenosed sites were significantly higher than those of patients having vessels with 1 stenosed site or normal vessels (14.6+/-1.4, 11.0+/-1.4 versus 7.8+/-1.5, 8.9+/-1.4 micromol/L respectively; P<0. 02). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that moderate hyperhomocyst(e)ienemia was significantly associated with the number of stenosed vessels (P=0.001). These findings suggest that moderate hyperhomocyst(e)inemia is an independent risk factor for cerebral infarction and may predict the severity of cerebral atherosclerosis in patients with cerebral infarction.

  19. Diagnostic value of dynamic CT in early cerebral infarct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, K.-M.; Shih, T.T.F.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have tried to demonstrate early cerebral infarct by dynamic CT scanning without any CT change. They also have tried to find a correlation between the clinical outcome and the hemodynamic change of the damaged brain tissue supplied by the occluded vessels. (author) 14 refs.; 3 figs

  20. Pressure vessel design manual

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels are closed containers designed to hold gases or liquids at a pressure substantially different from the ambient pressure. They have a variety of applications in industry, including in oil refineries, nuclear reactors, vehicle airbrake reservoirs, and more. The pressure differential with such vessels is dangerous, and due to the risk of accident and fatality around their use, the design, manufacture, operation and inspection of pressure vessels is regulated by engineering authorities and guided by legal codes and standards. Pressure Vessel Design Manual is a solutions-focused guide to the many problems and technical challenges involved in the design of pressure vessels to match stringent standards and codes. It brings together otherwise scattered information and explanations into one easy-to-use resource to minimize research and take readers from problem to solution in the most direct manner possible. * Covers almost all problems that a working pressure vessel designer can expect to face, with ...

  1. Catastrophic cerebral antiphospholipid syndrome presenting as cerebral infarction with haemorrhagic transformation after sudden withdrawal of warfarin in a patient with primary antiphospholipid syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Abdul Majid; Hussain, Waleed Mohd; Mejally, Mousa Ali Al; Ali, Khaled Shawkat; Raja, Sadeya Hanif; Maimani, Wael Al; Bafaraj, Mazen G; Bashraheel, Ashraf; Akhtar, Mubeena; Khoujah, Amer Mohd

    2010-01-01

    Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is caused by thrombotic vascular occlusions that affect both small and large vessels, producing ischaemia in the affected organs. The “catastrophic” variant of the antiphospholipid syndrome (cAPS) develops over a short period of time. Although patients with cAPS represent <1% of all patients with APS, they are usually life threatening with a 50% mortality rate. A strong association with concomitant infection is thought to act as the main trigger of microthromboses in cAPS. Several theories have been proposed to explain these physiopathological features. Some of them suggest the possibility of molecular mimicry between components of infectious microorganisms and natural anticoagulants, which might be involved in the production of cross-reacting antiphospholipid antibodies. We present a case of catastrophic cerebral APS characterised by massive temporal lobe infarction and subsequent haemorrhagic transformation after sudden withdrawal of warfarin. PMID:22242060

  2. Egas Moniz: 90 Years (1927–2017 from Cerebral Angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Artico

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In June 2017 we celebrate the 90th anniversary of the pioneer discovery of cerebral angiography, the seminal imaging technique used for visualizing cerebral blood vessels and vascular alterations as well as other intracranial disorders. Egas Moniz (1874–1955 was the first to describe the use of this revolutionary technique which, until 1975 (when computed tomography, CT, scan was introduced in the clinical practice, was the sole diagnostic tool to provide an imaging of cerebral vessels and therefore alterations due to intracranial pathology. Moniz introduced in the clinical practice this fundamental and important diagnostic tool. The present contribution wishes to pay a tribute to the Portuguese neurosurgeon, who was also a distinguished neurologist and statesman. Despite his tremendous contribution in modern brain imaging, Egas Moniz was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1949 for prefrontal leucotomy, the neurosurgical intervention nowadays unacceptable, but should rather be remembered for his key contribution to modern brain imaging.

  3. Egas Moniz: 90 Years (1927-2017) from Cerebral Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Marco; Spoletini, Marialuisa; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Biagioni, Francesca; Ryskalin, Larisa; Fornai, Francesco; Salvati, Maurizio; Frati, Alessandro; Pastore, Francesco Saverio; Taurone, Samanta

    2017-01-01

    In June 2017 we celebrate the 90th anniversary of the pioneer discovery of cerebral angiography, the seminal imaging technique used for visualizing cerebral blood vessels and vascular alterations as well as other intracranial disorders. Egas Moniz (1874-1955) was the first to describe the use of this revolutionary technique which, until 1975 (when computed tomography, CT, scan was introduced in the clinical practice), was the sole diagnostic tool to provide an imaging of cerebral vessels and therefore alterations due to intracranial pathology. Moniz introduced in the clinical practice this fundamental and important diagnostic tool. The present contribution wishes to pay a tribute to the Portuguese neurosurgeon, who was also a distinguished neurologist and statesman. Despite his tremendous contribution in modern brain imaging, Egas Moniz was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1949 for prefrontal leucotomy, the neurosurgical intervention nowadays unacceptable, but should rather be remembered for his key contribution to modern brain imaging.

  4. Egas Moniz: 90 Years (1927–2017) from Cerebral Angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Marco; Spoletini, Marialuisa; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Biagioni, Francesca; Ryskalin, Larisa; Fornai, Francesco; Salvati, Maurizio; Frati, Alessandro; Pastore, Francesco Saverio; Taurone, Samanta

    2017-01-01

    In June 2017 we celebrate the 90th anniversary of the pioneer discovery of cerebral angiography, the seminal imaging technique used for visualizing cerebral blood vessels and vascular alterations as well as other intracranial disorders. Egas Moniz (1874–1955) was the first to describe the use of this revolutionary technique which, until 1975 (when computed tomography, CT, scan was introduced in the clinical practice), was the sole diagnostic tool to provide an imaging of cerebral vessels and therefore alterations due to intracranial pathology. Moniz introduced in the clinical practice this fundamental and important diagnostic tool. The present contribution wishes to pay a tribute to the Portuguese neurosurgeon, who was also a distinguished neurologist and statesman. Despite his tremendous contribution in modern brain imaging, Egas Moniz was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1949 for prefrontal leucotomy, the neurosurgical intervention nowadays unacceptable, but should rather be remembered for his key contribution to modern brain imaging. PMID:28974927

  5. Tumor Blood Vessel Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Lance

    2009-11-01

    ``Normalization'' of tumor blood vessels has shown promise to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics. In theory, anti-angiogenic drugs targeting endothelial VEGF signaling can improve vessel network structure and function, enhancing the transport of subsequent cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In practice, the effects are unpredictable, with varying levels of success. The predominant effects of anti-VEGF therapies are decreased vessel leakiness (hydraulic conductivity), decreased vessel diameters and pruning of the immature vessel network. It is thought that each of these can influence perfusion of the vessel network, inducing flow in regions that were previously sluggish or stagnant. Unfortunately, when anti-VEGF therapies affect vessel structure and function, the changes are dynamic and overlapping in time, and it has been difficult to identify a consistent and predictable normalization ``window'' during which perfusion and subsequent drug delivery is optimal. This is largely due to the non-linearity in the system, and the inability to distinguish the effects of decreased vessel leakiness from those due to network structural changes in clinical trials or animal studies. We have developed a mathematical model to calculate blood flow in complex tumor networks imaged by two-photon microscopy. The model incorporates the necessary and sufficient components for addressing the problem of normalization of tumor vasculature: i) lattice-Boltzmann calculations of the full flow field within the vasculature and within the tissue, ii) diffusion and convection of soluble species such as oxygen or drugs within vessels and the tissue domain, iii) distinct and spatially-resolved vessel hydraulic conductivities and permeabilities for each species, iv) erythrocyte particles advecting in the flow and delivering oxygen with real oxygen release kinetics, v) shear stress-mediated vascular remodeling. This model, guided by multi-parameter intravital imaging of tumor vessel structure

  6. Maury Journals - German Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — German vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  7. Containment vessel stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harstead, G.A.; Morris, N.F.; Unsal, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    The stability analysis for a steel containment shell is presented herein. The containment is a freestanding shell consisting of a vertical cylinder with a hemispherical dome. It is stiffened by large ring stiffeners and relatively small longitudinal stiffeners. The containment vessel is subjected to both static and dynamic loads which can cause buckling. These loads must be combined prior to their use in a stability analysis. The buckling loads were computed with the aid of the ASME Code case N-284 used in conjunction with general purpose computer codes and in-house programs. The equations contained in the Code case were used to compute the knockdown factors due to shell imperfections. After these knockdown factors were applied to the critical stress states determined by freezing the maximum dynamic stresses and combining them with other static stresses, a linear bifurcation analysis was carried out with the aid of the BOSOR4 program. Since the containment shell contained large penetrations, the Code case had to be supplemented by a local buckling analysis of the shell area surrounding the largest penetration. This analysis was carried out with the aid of the NASTRAN program. Although the factor of safety against buckling obtained in this analysis was satisfactory, it is claimed that the use of the Code case knockdown factors are unduly conservative when applied to the analysis of buckling around penetrations. (orig.)

  8. BY FRUSTUM CONFINING VESSEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Khazaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Helical piles are environmentally friendly and economical deep foundations that, due to environmental considerations, are excellent additions to a variety of deep foundation alternatives available to the practitioner. Helical piles performance depends on soil properties, the pile geometry and soil-pile interaction. Helical piles can be a proper alternative in sensitive environmental sites if their bearing capacity is sufficient to support applied loads. The failure capacity of helical piles in this study was measured via an experimental research program that was carried out by Frustum Confining Vessel (FCV. FCV is a frustum chamber by approximately linear increase in vertical and lateral stresses along depth from top to bottom. Due to special geometry and applied bottom pressure, this apparatus is a proper choice to test small model piles which can simulate field stress conditions. Small scale helical piles are made with either single helix or more helixes and installed in fine grained sand with three various densities. Axial loading tests including compression and tension tests were performed to achieve pile ultimate capacity. The results indicate the helical piles behavior depends essentially on pile geometric characteristics, i.e. helix configuration and soil properties. According to the achievements, axial uplift capacity of helical model piles is about equal to usual steel model piles that have the helixes diameter. Helical pile compression bearing capacity is too sufficient to act as a medium pile, thus it can be substituted other piles in special geoenvironmental conditions. The bearing capacity also depends on spacing ratio, S/D, and helixes diameter.

  9. [Research on brain white matter network in cerebral palsy infant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Yuanjun; Nie, Shengdong

    2017-10-01

    Present study used diffusion tensor image and tractography to construct brain white matter networks of 15 cerebral palsy infants and 30 healthy infants that matched for age and gender. After white matter network analysis, we found that both cerebral palsy and healthy infants had a small-world topology in white matter network, but cerebral palsy infants exhibited abnormal topological organization: increased shortest path length but decreased normalize clustering coefficient, global efficiency and local efficiency. Furthermore, we also found that white matter network hub regions were located in the left cuneus, precuneus, and left posterior cingulate gyrus. However, some abnormal nodes existed in the frontal, temporal, occipital and parietal lobes of cerebral palsy infants. These results indicated that the white matter networks for cerebral palsy infants were disrupted, which was consistent with previous studies about the abnormal brain white matter areas. This work could help us further study the pathogenesis of cerebral palsy infants.

  10. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method for sealing the cold leg nozzles of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location during maintenance and inspection of associated steam generators and pumps while the pressure vessel and refueling canal are filled with water. The apparatus includes a sealing plug for mechanically sealing the cold leg nozzle from the inside of a reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plugs include a primary and a secondary O-ring. An installation tool is suspended within the reactor vessel and carries the sealing plug. The tool telescopes to insert the sealing plug within the cold leg nozzle, and to subsequently remove the plug. Hydraulic means are used to activate the sealing plug, and support means serve to suspend the installation tool within the reactor vessel during installation and removal of the sealing plug

  11. Containment vessel drain system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Scott G.

    2018-01-30

    A system for draining a containment vessel may include a drain inlet located in a lower portion of the containment vessel. The containment vessel may be at least partially filled with a liquid, and the drain inlet may be located below a surface of the liquid. The system may further comprise an inlet located in an upper portion of the containment vessel. The inlet may be configured to insert pressurized gas into the containment vessel to form a pressurized region above the surface of the liquid, and the pressurized region may operate to apply a surface pressure that forces the liquid into the drain inlet. Additionally, a fluid separation device may be operatively connected to the drain inlet. The fluid separation device may be configured to separate the liquid from the pressurized gas that enters the drain inlet after the surface of the liquid falls below the drain inlet.

  12. Cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen metabolism in thalamic hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, Nobuyuki; Asakura, Ken

    1987-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral oxygen consumption (CMRO 2 ), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) were studied in 20 cases of thalamic hemorrhage using positron CT and 15 O labeled gas steady-state inhalation method. CBF reduction was limited around the thalamus in the small sized hematoma. CBF were significantly diminished in the mean cortical, parietal, temporal, basal ganglia and thalamic area ipsilateral and cerebellar cortex contralateral to the medium sized hematoma. There was bilateral and diffuse CBF reduction in the large sized hematoma which was caused by increased intracranial pressure. CMRO 2 value were similary changed as CBF. OEF change showed within normal limit. Diffuse CBV reduction was observed in the large sized hematoma. This reduction was the result of decreased vascular bed caused by mass effect of the hematoma and hydrocephalus. Effect of surgical treatment such as ventricular drainage and hematoma evacuation were also discussed in correlation to CBF in some case using positron and single photon ECT. (author)

  13. Serial neuroradiological studies in focal cerebritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatta, S.; Mochizuki, H.; Kuru, Y.; Miwa, H.; Kondo, T.; Mori, H.; Mizuno, Y.

    1994-01-01

    We report serial neuroradiological studies in a patient with focal cerebritis in the head of the left caudate nucleus. On the day after the onset of symptoms, CT showed an ill-defined low density lesion. The lack of contrast enhancement appeared to be the most important finding for differentiating focal cerebritis from an encapsulated brain abscess or a tumour. MRI two days later revealed the centre of the lesion to be of slightly low intensity on T1-weighted inversion recovery (IR) images and very low intensity on T2-weighted spin echo images, which appeared to correspond to the early cerebritis stage of experimentally induced cerebritis and brain abscess. Ten days after the onset of symptoms, CT revealed a thin ring of enhancement in the head of the caudate nucleus, and a similar small ring was seen in the hypothalamus 16 days after the onset, corresponding to the late cerebritis stage. MRI nine days later revealed ill-defined high signal lesions within the involved area on the T1-weighted IR images. To our knowledge, this is the first published MRI documentation of the early cerebritis stage developing into an encapsulated brain abscess. The mechanisms underlying of these radiographic changes are discussed. (orig.)

  14. MRI - a noninvasive tool for evaluating therapeutic embolisation of cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, L.; Wimberger, D.; Kramer, J.; Stiglbauer, R.; Richling, B.; Bavinzski, G.; Matula, Ch.; Imhof, H.

    1991-01-01

    Of 86 patients with whose cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) were embolised in the period 1985-1990 29 were examined by high-field spin-echo (SE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after endovascular therapy with histoacryl-lipiodol. Embolisation-related changes in the nidus of the AVM and in the surrounding brain parenchyma were assessed. Results were compared with pretreatment MR and CT, and with follow-up angiograms in all patients. In accordance with angiographic findings, complete obliteration of pathological vessels was noted in 7 patients (24.1%) and partial occlusion in 22 (75.9%); small ischaemic infarcts were observed in 8 patients (27.6%) and extravascular deposits of blood breakdown products were seen in 3 (10.3%). MRI is a valuable noninvasive technique for assessing morphology and haemodynamics of cerebral AVMs before and after treatment. However, following embolotherapy, variable effects on signal intensity in vascular lumina caused by flowing blood, thrombosis and the embolisation agent have to be carefully analysed. To assess the exact site of histoacryl-lipiodol in embolised nidus territories or small areas of possible intracerebral hemorrhage, the time interval between endovascular therapy and MR examinations may have to be modified. (orig.)

  15. MRI - a noninvasive tool for evaluating therapeutic embolisation of cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, L. [Dept. of Radiology and MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Wimberger, D. [Dept. of Radiology and MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria)]|[Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Kramer, J. [Dept. of Radiology and MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Stiglbauer, R. [Dept. of Radiology and MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Richling, B. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Bavinzski, G. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Matula, Ch. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Imhof, H. [Dept. of Radiology and MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    1991-08-01

    Of 86 patients with whose cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) were embolised in the period 1985-1990 29 were examined by high-field spin-echo (SE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after endovascular therapy with histoacryl-lipiodol. Embolisation-related changes in the nidus of the AVM and in the surrounding brain parenchyma were assessed. Results were compared with pretreatment MR and CT, and with follow-up angiograms in all patients. In accordance with angiographic findings, complete obliteration of pathological vessels was noted in 7 patients (24.1%) and partial occlusion in 22 (75.9%); small ischaemic infarcts were observed in 8 patients (27.6%) and extravascular deposits of blood breakdown products were seen in 3 (10.3%). MRI is a valuable noninvasive technique for assessing morphology and haemodynamics of cerebral AVMs before and after treatment. However, following embolotherapy, variable effects on signal intensity in vascular lumina caused by flowing blood, thrombosis and the embolisation agent have to be carefully analysed. To assess the exact site of histoacryl-lipiodol in embolised nidus territories or small areas of possible intracerebral hemorrhage, the time interval between endovascular therapy and MR examinations may have to be modified. (orig.)

  16. Final processing vessel for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejima, Takaya; Hiraki, Akimitsu.

    1989-01-01

    An inorganic inner layer comprising dense inorganic material such as organic polymer-impregnated concretes is formed to about 10 - 50 mm in average thickness at the inside of a metal vessel. Further, the surface of the vessel is formed as a flat surface with no or only small reinforcing protrusions. Thus, if the final processing vessel should be dropped during transportation or handling by mistake, since impact shocks do not concentrate to protrusions as usual, no local stress concentration occurs to the inorganic inner liner layer. Accordingly, the risk of rapture can be reduced greatly. Further, since impact shock resistance layer put between the metal vessel and the inorganic inner liner layer absorbs shocks, a further sufficient strength can be obtained against dropping accident. (T.M.)

  17. Study on operation conditions and an operation system of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel, 'report of working group on application of a very small nuclear reactor to an ocean research'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ura, Tamaki; Takamasa, Tomoji; Nishimura, Hajime

    2001-07-01

    JAERI has studied on design of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel, which will navigate under sea mainly in the Arctic Ocean, as a part of the design activity of advanced marine reactors. This report describes operation conditions and an operating system of the vessel, which were discussed by the specialists of hull design, sound positioning, ship motions and oceanography, etc. The design conditions on ship motions for submersible vessels were surveyed considering regulations in our country, and ship motions were evaluated in the cases of underwater and surface navigations taking account of observation activities in the Arctic Ocean. The effect of ship motions on the compact nuclear reactor SCR was assessed. A submarine transponder system and an on-ice communication buoy system were examined as a positioning and communication system, supposing the activity under ice. The interval between transponders or communication buoys was recommended as 130 km. Procedures to secure safety of nuclear powered submersible research vessel were discussed according to accidents on the hull or the nuclear reactor. These results were reflected to the concept of the nuclear powered submersible research vessel, and subjects to be settled in the next step were clarified. (author)

  18. Study on operation conditions and an operation system of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel, 'report of working group on application of a very small nuclear reactor to an ocean research'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ura, Tamaki [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Takamasa, Tomoji [Tokyo Univ. of Mercantile Marine, Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, Hajime [Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, Yokosuka, Kanagawa (JP)] [and others

    2001-07-01

    JAERI has studied on design of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel, which will navigate under sea mainly in the Arctic Ocean, as a part of the design activity of advanced marine reactors. This report describes operation conditions and an operating system of the vessel, which were discussed by the specialists of hull design, sound positioning, ship motions and oceanography, etc. The design conditions on ship motions for submersible vessels were surveyed considering regulations in our country, and ship motions were evaluated in the cases of underwater and surface navigations taking account of observation activities in the Arctic Ocean. The effect of ship motions on the compact nuclear reactor SCR was assessed. A submarine transponder system and an on-ice communication buoy system were examined as a positioning and communication system, supposing the activity under ice. The interval between transponders or communication buoys was recommended as 130 km. Procedures to secure safety of nuclear powered submersible research vessel were discussed according to accidents on the hull or the nuclear reactor. These results were reflected to the concept of the nuclear powered submersible research vessel, and subjects to be settled in the next step were clarified. (author)

  19. Behcet's disease with cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scardamaglia, L.; Desmond, P.M.; Gonzales, M.F.; Bendrups, A.; Brodtmann, A.

    2001-01-01

    The case presented illustrates the diagnostic dilemma off neurological involvement in Behcet's disease and other inflammatory diseases. 'Psychiatric' symptoms were present for 2 years without abnormalities on SPECT or MRI and without CSF pleocytosis. Even at the time of fitting, no CSF abnormalities were observed. The preceding psychiatric presentations may have been due to cerebral vasculitis that was exacerbated by withdrawal of steroids. Magnetic resonance imaging is currently the most sensitive imaging modality. Lesions are usually in the brainstem, cerebellum, basal ganglia region or periventricular white matter, and the pons and the mesencephalon are commonly affected. In our patient there was no diencephalic or brainstem involvement. The inflammatory process can appear as a very large lesion, with gadolinium enhancement and significant mass effect, as in our patient. Brain magnetic resonance imaging. Postgadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid, axial image shows two large lesions in the right frontal lobe, with the larger, posterior lesion demonstrating vivid ring enhancement. A central nodule is isodense, with the cerebral white matter within the larger lesion. Surrounding low T 1 signal involves the hemispheric white matter without cortical extension and is consistent with vasogenic oedema. Minor mass effect is demonstrated with bowing of the anterior falx cerebri to the left. Biopsy shows prominent fibrinoid necrosis in small calibre postcapillary venules and cerebral white matter. There are surrounding acute and chronic inflammatory cells and nuclear debris, consistent with vasculitis

  20. NCSX Vacuum Vessel Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viola ME; Brown T; Heitzenroeder P; Malinowski F; Reiersen W; Sutton L; Goranson P; Nelson B; Cole M; Manuel M; McCorkle D.

    2005-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is being constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of this experiment is to develop a device which has the steady state properties of a traditional stellarator along with the high performance characteristics of a tokamak. A key element of this device is its highly shaped Inconel 625 vacuum vessel. This paper describes the manufacturing of the vessel. The vessel is being fabricated by Major Tool and Machine, Inc. (MTM) in three identical 120 o vessel segments, corresponding to the three NCSX field periods, in order to accommodate assembly of the device. The port extensions are welded on, leak checked, cut off within 1-inch of the vessel surface at MTM and then reattached at PPPL, to accommodate assembly of the close-fitting modular coils that surround the vessel. The 120 o vessel segments are formed by welding two 60 o segments together. Each 60 o segment is fabricated by welding ten press-formed panels together over a collapsible welding fixture which is needed to precisely position the panels. The vessel is joined at assembly by welding via custom machined 8-inch (20.3 cm) wide spacer ''spool pieces''. The vessel must have a total leak rate less than 5 X 10 -6 t-l/s, magnetic permeability less than 1.02(micro), and its contours must be within 0.188-inch (4.76 mm). It is scheduled for completion in January 2006

  1. Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharbaugh, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction comprising: (a) a nuclear reactor core having a bottom platform support structure; (b) a reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core; (c) a containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and having a sidewall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and having a base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall; (d) a central small diameter post anchored to the containment structure base mat and extending upwardly to the reactor vessel to axially fix the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and provide a center column support for the lower end of the reactor core; (e) annular support structure disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall and extending about the lower end of the core; (f) structural support means disposed between the containment structure base mat and bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and cooperating for supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event; (g) a bed of insulating material disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall; freely expand radially from the central post as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof; (h) a deck supported upon the wall of the containment vessel above the top open end of the reactor vessel; and (i) extendible and retractable coupling means extending between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnecting the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck

  2. Radioactive waste processing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Masaru; Suzuki, Osamu; Ishizaki, Kanjiro.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a vessel of a reduced weight and with no external leaching of radioactive materials. Constitution: The vessel main body is constituted, for example, with light weight concretes or foamed concretes, particularly, foamed concretes containing fine closed bubbles in the inside. Then, layers having dense texture made of synthetic resin such as polystylene, vinylchloride resin, etc. or metal plate such as stainless plate are integrally disposed to the inner surface of the vessel main body. The cover member also has the same structure. (Sekiya, K.)

  3. Tempest in a vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    As the ASN made some statements about anomalies of carbon content in the EPR vessel bottom and top, the author recalls and comments some technical issues to better understand the information published on this topic. He notably addresses the role of the vessel, briefly indicates its operating conditions, shape and structure, and mechanical components for the top, its material and mechanical properties, and test samples used to assess mechanical properties. He also comments the phenomenon of radio-induced embrittlement, the vessel manufacturing process, and evokes the applicable regulations. He quotes and comments statements made by the ASN and Areva which evoke further assessments of the concerned components

  4. Cerebral venous angioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagawa, Tetsuji; Taguchi, Haruyoshi; Kamiya, Kazuko; Yano, Takashi; Nakajima, Reiko

    1984-01-01

    This report presents a 27-year-old male patient who was diagnosed as having cerebral venous angioma in the postero-temporal area by CT scan and cerebral angiography. The patient improved by removing angioma with electrocoagulation of medullary veins. (Namekawa, K.)

  5. Usefulness of selective cerebral intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography by transbrachial approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, Naofumi; Hayashi, Kuniaki; Uetani, Masataka; Hirao, Koichi; Fukuda, Toshio; Aikawa, Hisayuki; Iwao, Masaaki; Hombo, Zen-ichiro

    1988-01-01

    Selective cerebral intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IA-DSA) by the transbrachial approach was performed on 53 patients (including 34 outpatients) with suspected cerebrovascular diseases or brain tumors. 80-cm-long, 4F modified Simmons catheter was used. Success rates of selective catheterization to the common carotid and vertebral arteries were 86.0 % from right transbrachial approach (35 cases) and 79.6 % from left approach (18 cases). Successful catheterization to the common carotid and ipsilateral vertebral arteries is obtained in 91.3 % from right transbrachial approach, and 78.7 % from left approach. Righ common carotid artery could be catheterized in all 55 cases from right transbrachial approach, but in only 6 of 15 patients (40 %) from left approach. As for contrast material, 4 or 6 ml of Iopamidol 300 mgI/ml were mechanically injected into common carotid artery at a flow rate of 2 - 3 ml/sec, and 9 ml two-fold diluted Iopamidol were injected into the vertebral artery at a flow rate of 6 ml/sec. There was no recoil of the catheter. Visualization of the relatively small vessels such as cortical branches was excellent in most cases. However, smaller vessel such as meningohypophyseal trunk was not well visualized with IA-DSA. Spatial resolution of IA-DSA was generally satisfactory. However, conventional angiography was still required, particularly to clearly delineate small cerebral aneurysms. Major complications were never experienced. It was concluded that this procedure is useful, particularly for the screening and postoperative follow-up studies, and can also be applied to outpatients. (author)

  6. Cerebral Microbleeds and the Risk of Incident Ischemic Stroke in CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy With Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puy, Laurent; De Guio, François; Godin, Ophélia; Duering, Marco; Dichgans, Martin; Chabriat, Hugues; Jouvent, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Cerebral microbleeds are associated with an increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. Recent data suggest that microbleeds may also predict the risk of incident ischemic stroke. However, these results were observed in elderly individuals undertaking various medications and for whom causes of microbleeds and ischemic stroke may differ. We aimed to test the relationship between the presence of microbleeds and incident stroke in CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy With Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy)-a severe monogenic small vessel disease known to be responsible for both highly prevalent microbleeds and a high incidence of ischemic stroke in young patients. We assessed microbleeds on baseline MRI in all 378 patients from the Paris-Munich cohort study. Incident ischemic strokes were recorded during 54 months. Survival analyses were used to test the relationship between microbleeds and incident ischemic stroke. Three hundred sixty-nine patients (mean age, 51.4±11.4 years) were followed-up during a median time of 39 months (interquartile range, 19 months). The risk of incident ischemic stroke was higher in patients with microbleeds than in patients without (35.8% versus 19.6%, hazard ratio, 1.87; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-3.01; P =0.009). These results persisted after adjustment for history of ischemic stroke, age, sex, vascular risk factors, and antiplatelet agents use (hazard ratio, 1.89; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-3.26; P =0.02). The presence of microbleeds is an independent risk marker of incident ischemic stroke in CADASIL, emphasizing the need to carefully interpret MRI data. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Cheboygan Vessel Base

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Cheboygan Vessel Base (CVB), located in Cheboygan, Michigan, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). CVB was established by congressional...

  8. High Performance Marine Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, Liang

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Marine Vessels (HPMVs) range from the Fast Ferries to the latest high speed Navy Craft, including competition power boats and hydroplanes, hydrofoils, hovercraft, catamarans and other multi-hull craft. High Performance Marine Vessels covers the main concepts of HPMVs and discusses historical background, design features, services that have been successful and not so successful, and some sample data of the range of HPMVs to date. Included is a comparison of all HPMVs craft and the differences between them and descriptions of performance (hydrodynamics and aerodynamics). Readers will find a comprehensive overview of the design, development and building of HPMVs. In summary, this book: Focuses on technology at the aero-marine interface Covers the full range of high performance marine vessel concepts Explains the historical development of various HPMVs Discusses ferries, racing and pleasure craft, as well as utility and military missions High Performance Marine Vessels is an ideal book for student...

  9. 2011 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  10. 2011 Fishing Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  11. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air

  12. 2013 Tanker Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  13. Maury Journals - US Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  14. Coastal Logbook Survey (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains catch (landed catch) and effort for fishing trips made by vessels that have been issued a Federal permit for the Gulf of Mexico reef fish,...

  15. In-vessel tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Yoshio; Ohya, Kaoru; Ashikawa, Naoko; Ito, Atsushi M.; Kato, Daiji; Kawamura, Gakushi; Takayama, Arimichi; Tomita, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Ono, Tadayoshi; Kawashima, Hisato; Shimizu, Katsuhiro; Takizuka, Tomonori; Nakano, Tomohide; Nakamura, Makoto; Hoshino, Kazuo; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Wada, Motoi; Saito, Seiki; Takagi, Ikuji; Tanaka, Yasunori; Tanabe, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Masafumi; Toma, Mitsunori; Hatayama, Akiyoshi; Homma, Yuki; Tolstikhina, Inga Yu.

    2012-01-01

    The in-vessel tritium research is closely related to the plasma-materials interaction. It deals with the edge-plasma-wall interaction, the wall erosion, transport and re-deposition of neutral particles and the effect of neutral particles on the fuel recycling. Since the in-vessel tritium shows a complex nonlinear behavior, there remain many unsolved problems. So far, behaviors of in-vessel tritium have been investigated by two groups A01 and A02. The A01 group performed experiments on accumulation and recovery of tritium in thermonuclear fusion reactors and the A02 group studied theory and simulation on the in-vessel tritium behavior. In the present article, outcomes of the research are reviewed. (author)

  16. Reactor pressure vessel support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butti, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    A link and pin support system provides the primary vertical and lateral support for a nuclear reactor pressure vessel without restricting thermally induced radial and vertical expansion and contraction. (Auth.)

  17. 2013 Cargo Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  18. 2013 Fishing Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  19. 2013 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  20. Ocean Station Vessel

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean Station Vessels (OSV) or Weather Ships captured atmospheric conditions while being stationed continuously in a single location. While While most of the...

  1. Vessel Sewage Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessel sewage discharges are regulated under Section 312 of the Clean Water Act, which is jointly implemented by the EPA and Coast Guard. This homepage links to information on marine sanitation devices and no discharge zones.

  2. Reactor pressure vessel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foehl, J.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. In chapter 2, the general principles of reactor pressure vessel design are elaborated. Crack and fracture initiation and propagation are treated in some detail

  3. Holographic and acoustic emission evaluation of pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    Optical holographic interfereometry and acoustic emission monitoring were simultaneously used to evaluate two small, high pressure vessels during pressurization. The techniques provide pressure vessel designers with both quantitative information such as displacement/strain measurements and qualitative information such as flaw detection. The data from the holographic interferograms were analyzed for strain profiles. The acoustic emission signals were monitored for crack growth and vessel quality

  4. LANL Robotic Vessel Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Nels W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in J-1 DARHT Operations Group uses 6ft spherical vessels to contain hazardous materials produced in a hydrodynamic experiment. These contaminated vessels must be analyzed by means of a worker entering the vessel to locate, measure, and document every penetration mark on the vessel. If the worker can be replaced by a highly automated robotic system with a high precision scanner, it will eliminate the risks to the worker and provide management with an accurate 3D model of the vessel presenting the existing damage with the flexibility to manipulate the model for better and more in-depth assessment.The project was successful in meeting the primary goal of installing an automated system which scanned a 6ft vessel with an elapsed time of 45 minutes. This robotic system reduces the total time for the original scope of work by 75 minutes and results in excellent data accumulation and transmission to the 3D model imaging program.

  5. 77 FR 35743 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel SECOND CHANCE; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD 2012 0067] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel SECOND CHANCE; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... SECOND CHANCE is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``Small group charters.'' Geographic Region...

  6. Reversible cerebral vasconstriction syndrome: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Sub; Park, Ji Kang; Kim, Seung Hyoung; Jeong, Sun Young

    2013-01-01

    We report a 46-year-old woman patient with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS). She presented with severe headache, multiple cerebral infarction, and multifocal severe stenosis in the intracranial arteries on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). One month after the episode, a small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) was incidentally detected during the evaluation of severe anemia and GIST was removed. Follow-up MRA was performed 3 months and 1 year after an initial attack of headache, and multifocal severe intracranial arterial stenotic lesions were completely resolved, she did not experience any episode of RCVS during the 2 years.

  7. Reversible cerebral vasconstriction syndrome: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Sub; Park, Ji Kang; Kim, Seung Hyoung; Jeong, Sun Young [Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    We report a 46-year-old woman patient with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS). She presented with severe headache, multiple cerebral infarction, and multifocal severe stenosis in the intracranial arteries on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). One month after the episode, a small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) was incidentally detected during the evaluation of severe anemia and GIST was removed. Follow-up MRA was performed 3 months and 1 year after an initial attack of headache, and multifocal severe intracranial arterial stenotic lesions were completely resolved, she did not experience any episode of RCVS during the 2 years.

  8. FFTF and CRBRP reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor vessel and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) reactor vessel each serve to enclose a fast spectrum reactor core, contain the sodium coolant, and provide support and positioning for the closure head and internal structure. Each vessel is located in its reactor cavity and is protected by a guard vessel which would ensure continued decay heat removal capability should a major system leak develop. Although the two plants have significantly different thermal power ratings, 400 megawatts for FFTF and 975 megawatts for CRBRP, the two reactor vessels are comparable in size, the CRBRP vessel being approximately 28% longer than the FFTF vessel. The FFTF vessel diameter was controlled by the space required for the three individual In-Vessel Handling Machines and Instrument Trees. Utilization of the triple rotating plug scheme for CRBRP refueling enables packaging of the larger CRBRP core in a vessel the same diameter as the FFTF vessel

  9. A patient with Moyamoya-like vessels after radiation therapy for a tumor in the basal ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Koichi; Tomura, Noriaki; Kato, Koki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Watarai, Jiro; Sasajima, Toshio; Mizoi, Kazuo

    2001-01-01

    A patient with Moyamoya-like vessels after radiation therapy for treatment of a tumor in the basal ganglia is reported. He was diagnosed as Down syndrome at birth. He had a tumor in the left basal ganglionic region at 12 years of the age. The tumor increased in size at age 14. He underwent cerebral angiography, which did not show a stenosis nor occlusion of the internal carotid artery, anterior cerebral artery, nor the middle cerebral artery. He received radiation therapy with a total dose of 56 Gy. He presented a dressing apraxia at age 19. MRI showed cerebral infarction in the left temporo-occipital region. Right internal carotid angiography revealed a severe stenosis of the internal carotid artery and anterior cerebral artery as well as a severe stenosis of the middle cerebral artery on the right side. Moyamoya-like vessels were seen in the basal ganglionic region. Left internal carotid angiography also showed a stenosis of the internal carotid artery and anterior cerebral artery as well as a severe stenosis of the middle cerebral artery on the left side. Moyamoya-like vessels were seen in the basal ganglionic region. Leptomeningeal anastomose and transdural anastomose were bilaterally seen. These arterial occlusion and stenotic phenomenon corresponded to a previous radiation field. These Moyamoya-like vessels with arterial stenosis and occlusion were thought to be due to radiation-induced vasculopathy, because a previous cerebral angiography showed a normal caliber of cerebral arteries. This patient showed that patients with radiation therapy in their early childhood should be carefully observed considering the possibility of the phenomenon. (author)

  10. Unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Katsumi [Department of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital, 1-2 Higashi-Takada-cho, Mibu, Nakagyo-ku, 604-8845 Kyoto (Japan); Kanda, Toyoko; Yamori, Yuriko [Department of Pediatric Neurology, St. Joseph Hospital for Handicapped Children, 603-8323 Kyoto (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    We evaluated six children in whom MR imaging showed unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral atrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy. The aim of this study was to clarify whether this disorder based on neuroimaging constitutes a new homogeneous clinical entity. The subjects were six children whose ages at the time of MR imaging ranged from 8 months to 11 years. Their clinical and MR features were analyzed. All of the children were born between 38 and 42 weeks gestation, without any significant perinatal events. Spastic hemiplegia and epilepsy were observed in all of the patients, and mental retardation was observed in four. The MR findings included unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy in all patients. The ipsilateral sylvian fissure was hypoplastic in four patients. These patients showed relatively homogeneous clinical and neuroimaging features. Although the additional clinical features varied according to the site and the extent affected by the polymicrogyria, this disorder could constitute a new relatively homogeneous clinical entity. (orig.)

  11. Unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Katsumi; Kanda, Toyoko; Yamori, Yuriko

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated six children in whom MR imaging showed unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral atrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy. The aim of this study was to clarify whether this disorder based on neuroimaging constitutes a new homogeneous clinical entity. The subjects were six children whose ages at the time of MR imaging ranged from 8 months to 11 years. Their clinical and MR features were analyzed. All of the children were born between 38 and 42 weeks gestation, without any significant perinatal events. Spastic hemiplegia and epilepsy were observed in all of the patients, and mental retardation was observed in four. The MR findings included unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy in all patients. The ipsilateral sylvian fissure was hypoplastic in four patients. These patients showed relatively homogeneous clinical and neuroimaging features. Although the additional clinical features varied according to the site and the extent affected by the polymicrogyria, this disorder could constitute a new relatively homogeneous clinical entity. (orig.)

  12. Depressurization as a means of leak checking large vacuum vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callis, R.W.; Langhorn, A.; Petersen, P.I.; Ward, C.; Wesley, J.

    1985-01-01

    A common problem associated with large vacuum vessels used in magnetic confinement fusion experiments is that leak checking is hampered by the inaccessibility to most of the vacuum vessel surface. This inaccessibility is caused by the close proximity of magnetic coils, diagnostics and, for those vessels that are baked, the need to completely surround the vessel with a thermal insulation blanket. These obstructions reduce the effectiveness of the standard leak checking method of using a mass spectrometer and spraying a search gas such as helium on the vessel exterior. Even when the presence of helium is detected, its entry point into the vessel cannot always be pinpointed. This paper will describe a method of overcoming this problem. By slightly depressurizing the vessel, an influx of helium through the leak is created. The leak site can then be identified by personnel within the vessel using standard sniffing procedures. There are two conditions which make this method of leak checking practical. First, the vessel need only be depressurized 2 psi, thus allowing personnel inside to perform the sniffing operation. Second, the sniffing probe used (Leybold--Heraus ''Quick Test'') could detect a change in helium concentration as small as 100 ppb, which allows for faster scanning of the vessel inferior. Use of this technique to find an elusive 10 -3 Torrxl/s leak in the Doublet III tokamak vacuum vessel will be presented

  13. Crack propagation on spherical pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebey, J.; Roche, R.

    1975-01-01

    The risk presented by a crack on a pressure vessel built with a ductile steel cannot be well evaluated by simple application of the rules of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics, which only apply to brittle materials. Tests were carried out on spherical vessels of three different scales built with the same steel. Cracks of different length were machined through the vessel wall. From the results obtained, crack initiation stress (beginning of stable propagation) and instable propagation stress may be plotted against the lengths of these cracks. For small and medium size, subject to ductile fracture, the resulting curves are identical, and may be used for ductile fracture prediction. Brittle rupture was observed on larger vessels and crack propagation occurred at lower stress level. Preceedings curves are not usable for fracture analysis. Ultimate pressure can be computed with a good accuracy by using equivalent energy toughness, Ksub(1cd), characteristic of the metal plates. Satisfactory measurements have been obtained on thin samples. The risks of brittle fracture may then judged by comparing Ksub(1cd) with the calculated K 1 value, in which corrections for vessel shape are taken into account. It is thus possible to establish the bursting pressure of cracked spherical vessels, with the help of two rules, one for brittle fracture, the other for ductile instability. A practical method is proposed on the basis of the work reported here

  14. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine: regional cerebral blood flow and blood flow velocity in migraine patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, L.H.; Jacobsen, V.B.; Haderslev, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves are closely associated with cranial blood vessels. CGRP is the most potent vasodilator known in isolated cerebral blood vessels. CGRP can induce migraine attacks, and two selective CGRP receptor antagonists are effective in the treatment...

  15. Cerebral Vascular Disease and Neurovascular Injury in Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoming; De Silva, T. Michael; Chen, Jun; Faraci, Frank M.

    2017-01-01

    The consequences of cerebrovascular disease are among the leading health issues worldwide. Large and small cerebral vessel disease can trigger stroke and contribute to the vascular component of other forms of neurological dysfunction and degeneration. Both forms of vascular disease are driven by diverse risk factors, with hypertension as the leading contributor. Despite the importance of neurovascular disease and subsequent injury following ischemic events, fundamental knowledge in these areas lag behind our current understanding of neuroprotection and vascular biology in general. The goal of this review is to address select key structural and functional changes in the vasculature that promote hypoperfusion and ischemia, while also affecting the extent of injury and effectiveness of therapy. In addition, as damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major consequences of ischemia, we discuss cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying ischemia-induced changes in BBB integrity and function, including alterations in endothelial cells and the contribution of pericytes, immune cells, and matrix metalloproteinases. Identification of cell types, pathways, and molecules that control vascular changes before and after ischemia may result in novel approaches to slow the progression of cerebrovascular disease and lessen both the frequency and impact of ischemic events. PMID:28154097

  16. Acrylic vessel cleaning tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, D.; Hahn, R.L.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.

    1997-01-01

    The acrylic vessel as constructed is dirty. The dirt includes blue tape, Al tape, grease pencil, gemak, the glue or residue form these tapes, finger prints and dust of an unknown composition but probably mostly acrylic dust. This dirt has to be removed and once removed, the vessel has to be kept clean or at least to be easily cleanable at some future stage when access becomes much more difficult. The authors report on the results of a series of tests designed: (a) to prepare typical dirty samples of acrylic; (b) to remove dirt stuck to the acrylic surface; and (c) to measure the optical quality and Th concentration after cleaning. Specifications of the vessel call for very low levels of Th which could come from tape residues, the grease pencil, or other sources of dirt. This report does not address the concerns of how to keep the vessel clean after an initial cleaning and during the removal of the scaffolding. Alconox is recommended as the cleaner of choice. This acrylic vessel will be used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

  17. The effect of combined treatment with transcranial direct current stimulation on cerebral blood flow in patients with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Yatsenko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available There is a close link between the activity of the brain and cerebral blood supply. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS modulates the activity of the cerebral cortex and thus affects the cerebral blood flow. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of combined treatment with tDCS on cerebral blood flow in patients with cerebral palsy (CP. Materials and Methods. 60 patients with various forms of cerebral palsy were examined and received the course of treatment. The comparison group was formed from 30 children who received the course of basic medical and rehabilitation procedures. The main group included 30 children who, in addition to the same therapy, received a course of tDCS. A transcranial Doppler ultrasound examination of head blood vessels was used for the study of cerebral hemodynamics in children with cerebral palsy before and after combined treatment with tDCS. Results. tDCS reduced asymmetry coefficient of blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries (MCA by 12.3 %, whereas in the comparison group only by 2.5 %; in the anterior cerebral artery (ACA – 9.5 %, while in the comparison group – 0.8 %. tDCS significantly reduced the high mean blood flow velocity per cycle (MFV in the basilar artery (BA, MCA and ACA (21.7 %, 18.3 % and 7.8 %, respectively; in the comparison group no statistically significant positive dynamics was observed. tDCS significantly increased the low MVF in the BA, MCA and ACA (29.7 %, 21.2 % and 9.7 % respectively; a statistically significant increase of MVF by 9.9 % was only in the CMA in the comparison group of patients. Conclusions. Our data indicate that the use of tDCS in the combined treatment of CP patients improves cerebral hemodynamics in 87 % of patients, in contrast to 52 % in the comparison group. The addition of transcranial direct current stimulation method to the complex treatment of patients with cerebral palsy improves the effectiveness of treatment and may also

  18. The symmetrical calcification of the basal cerebral ganglia (SCBG): its clinical importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stellamor, V.; Summer, K.; Stellamor, K.

    1984-01-01

    Since CT is has been possible to detect subtle SCBG. Usually they are without any symptoms. Massive calcification is visible in conventional radiogram; it can form the patho-anatomical substrate for neuro-psychiatric defects. Fahr's triad consists of SCBG, typical neuro-psychiatric symptoms, and decreased activity of the parathyroid symptoms, and decreased activity of the parathyroid glands leading to a pathologic calcium-metabolism. In our opinion SCBG is of clinical relevance in each stage. Calcium-metabolism, intoxications and sclerosis of cerebral vessels have to be looked for. The combination of hypoparathyroidism and sclerosis of the cerebral vessels turned out to be fatal with one of our patients. In a case of SCBG the neuro-psychiatric symptoms were progressive. Interventions in the calcium-metabolism e.g. in strumectomy should depend on the status of the cerebral vessels. (Author)

  19. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Going to an Occupational Therapist Scoliosis In the Band: Jens' Story Cerebral ... KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- ...

  20. Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contusions and Lacerations Concussion Diffuse Axonal Injury Intracranial Hematomas Skull Fracture Sports-Related Concussion Cerebral contusions are ... Contusions and Lacerations Concussion Diffuse Axonal Injury Intracranial Hematomas Skull Fracture Sports-Related Concussion NOTE: This is ...

  1. Studies on intracranial collateral circulation with multi-slice CT angiography in patients with symptomatic cerebral artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-qing ZHOU

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the features of intracranial collateral circulation in patients with symptomatic cerebral artery stenosis.Method Ninety-four patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease admitted from Apr.2004 to Jun.2009 were involved in present study.All the patients were examined with cerebral multi-slice CT angiography,and the features of cerebral artery stenosis and intracranial collateral circulation were evaluated using maximum intensity projection(MIP and volume rendering(VR images of CT angiography.Result Of the 94 patients involved,48 were diagnosed as cerebral artery stenosis,including 29 cases of cerebral infarction,18 of transient ischemic attack(TIA and 1 of moyamoya disease(MMD.Among the 14 cases of severe cerebral artery stenosis or occlusion,cerebral infarction was found in 6 cases with lesser intracranial collateral vessels(including massive cerebral infarction in 4 cases and watershed infarction in 2 cases,and focal infarction of central semi-ovale in 1 case and TIA in 7 cases were found with abundant intracranial collateral vessels.Multiple lacunar infarction was found in 22 cases of mild or moderate cerebral artery stenosis,but there was no significant correlation between the stenosed arteries and infarction sites.Abundant intracranial collateral vessels were found in one patient with Moyamoya disease but no infarction was observed.Conclusions Intracranial collateral circulation plays an important role of compensation in patients with severe cerebral artery stenosis or occlusion.Cerebral angiography with multi-slice CT is of great significance in evaluation of cerebral artery stenosis and intracranial collateral circulation.

  2. In vivo microCT imaging of rodent cerebral vasculature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Youngho; Hasegawa, Bruce H; Hashimoto, Tomoki; Nuki, Yoshitsugu

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) remains a critical diagnostic tool for evaluating patients with cerebrovascular disease, and the advent of specialized systems for imaging rodents has extended these techniques to small animal models of these diseases. We therefore have evaluated in vivo methods of imaging rat models of hemorrhagic stroke using a high resolution compact computed tomography ('microCT') system (FLEX(tm) X-O(tm), Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). For all in vivo studies, the head of the anesthetized rat was secured in a custom immobilization device for microCT imaging with 512 projections over 2 min at 60 kVp and 0.530 mA (I tube x t/rotation = 63.6 mAs). First, imaging without iodinated contrast was performed (a) to differentiate the effect of contrast agent in contrast-enhanced CT and (b) to examine the effectiveness of the immobilization device between two time points of CT acquisitions. Then, contrast-enhanced CT was performed with continuous administration of iopromide (300 mgI ml -1 at 1.2 ml min -1 ) to visualize aneurysms and other vascular formations in the carotid and cerebral arteries that may precede subarachnoid hemorrhage. The accuracy of registration between the noncontrast and contrast-enhanced CT images with the immobilization device was compared against the images aligned with normalized mutual information using FMRIB's linear image registration tool (FLIRT). Translations and rotations were examined between the FLIRT-aligned noncontrast CT image and the nonaligned noncontrast CT image. These two data sets demonstrated translational and rotational differences of less than 0.5 voxel (∼85 μm) and 0.5 deg., respectively. Noncontrast CT demonstrated a very small volume (0.1 ml) of femoral arterial blood introduced surgically into the rodent brain. Continuous administration of iopromide during the CT acquisition produced consistent vascular contrast in the reconstructed CT images. As a result, carotid arteries and major cerebral blood vessels

  3. In vivo microCT imaging of rodent cerebral vasculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Youngho; Hasegawa, Bruce H [Center for Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Hashimoto, Tomoki; Nuki, Yoshitsugu [Center for Cerebrovascular Research, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States)], E-mail: youngho.seo@radiology.ucsf.edu

    2008-04-07

    arteries and major cerebral blood vessels were visible with contrast-enhanced CT, but not with noncontrast CT. In conclusion, the CT-compatible immobilization device was useful for in vivo microCT imaging of intracranial blood and of vascular structures within and immediately adjacent to the rodent brain. The microCT imaging technique is also compatible with continuous administration of a conventional iodinated contrast agent (e.g. iopromide) and therefore does not require specialized small animal specific contrast agent that has comparatively long in vivo residence time. (note)

  4. Radioactive liquid containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurada, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Hironobu.

    1993-01-01

    Cooling jackets are coiled around the outer circumference of a container vessel, and the outer circumference thereof is covered with a surrounding plate. A liquid of good conductivity (for example, water) is filled between the cooling jackets and the surrounding plate. A radioactive liquid is supplied to the container vessel passing through a supply pipe and discharged passing through a discharge pipe. Cooling water at high pressure is passed through the cooling water jackets in order to remove the heat generated from the radioactive liquid. Since cooling water at high pressure is thus passed through the coiled pipes, the wall thickness of the container vessel and the cooling water jackets can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce the cost. Further, even if the radioactive liquid is leaked, there is no worry of contaminating cooling water, to prevent contamination. (I.N.)

  5. Cerebral venous angiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnoli, A.L.; Hildebrandt, G.

    1985-01-01

    Clinical symptoms and radiological signs in 15 patients with cerebral venous malformations are presented and the diagnostic problems discussed. The circulation time in combination with cerebral malformations and angiomas of the scalp are described. CT findings in cases of venous malformations of the brain stem are evaluated. Spot-like enhancement, as well as sharply demarcated round shaped enhancement are characteristic for venous angiomas. Cavernous angiomas usually present as homogenous or inhomogenous round shaped enhanced areas. (Author)

  6. Cerebral cartography and connectomics

    OpenAIRE

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamic...

  7. Cerebral venous outflow and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive B. Beggs

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the impact of restricted cerebral venous outflow on the biomechanics of the intracranial fluid system is investigated. The cerebral venous drainage system is often viewed simply as a series of collecting vessels channeling blood back to the heart. However there is growing evidence that it plays an important role in regulating the intracranial fluid system. In particular, there appears to be a link between increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pulsatility in the Aqueduct of Sylvius and constricted venous outflow. Constricted venous outflow also appears to inhibit absorption of CSF into the superior sagittal sinus. The compliance of the cortical bridging veins appears to be critical to the behaviour of the intracranial fluid system, with abnormalities at this location implicated in normal pressure hydrocephalus. The compliance associated with these vessels appears to be functional in nature and dependent on the free egress of blood out of the cranium via the extracranial venous drainage pathways. Because constricted venous outflow appears to be linked with increased aqueductal CSF pulsatility, it suggests that inhibited venous blood outflow may be altering the compliance of the cortical bridging veins.

  8. Lower Serum Caveolin-1 Is Associated with Cerebral Microbleeds in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Caveolin-1 (Cav-1 plays pivotal roles in the endothelial damage following stroke. The present study aimed to investigate whether serum Cav-1 level is associated with the presence of cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD in patients with acute ischemic stroke. To this end, 156 patients were consecutively enrolled. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging was analyzed to determine the surrogates of cSVD, including cerebral microbleeds (CMBs, silent lacunar infarcts (SLIs, and white matter hyperintensities (WMHs. After adjusting for potential confounders, patients with low Cav-1 level had a higher risk of CMBs than patients with high Cav-1 level (OR: 4.05, 95% CI: 1.77–9.30. However, there was no relationship between Cav-1 and the presence of SLIs or WMHs. When CMBs were stratified by location and number, a similar association was found in patients with deep or infratentorial CMBs (OR: 4.04, 95% CI: 1.59–10.25 and with multiple CMBs (OR: 3.18, 95% CI: 1.16–8.72. These results suggest lower serum Cav-1 levels may be associated with CMBs, especially those that are multiple and located in deep brain or infratentorial structures, in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Cav-1 may be involved in the pathophysiology of CMBs, and may act as a potential target for treating cSVD.

  9. Diffuse brain calcification after radiation therapy in infantile cerebral malignant glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondo, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Ryuichi; Yamada, Nobuhisa; Takeda, Norio

    1987-01-01

    We reported a case of infantile cerebral malignant glioma, which showed extensive intracranial calcification following radiation therapy, and reviewed the literature. A 4-month-old female infant was admitted to our hospital because of vomiting, enlargement of the head and convulsive seizures. Computerized tomography (CT) scans demonstrated a heterogeneously contrast-enhanced mass in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region and marked obstructive hydrocephalus. Subsequent to ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, biopsy was performed. The surgical specimen revealed anaplastic glioma. She then underwent whole brain irradiation with 1800 rads before subtotal removal and 3000 rads postoperatively. Calcification was first identified in the right frontal region and left basal ganglia 2.5 months after radiation therapy. At the age of 14 months, CT scans demonstrated extensive intracranial calcification in the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglias, thalami, pons and cerebellum. A biopsy specimen of the frontal lobe revealed calcospherites of various sizes within and beside the walls of small vessels, but no tumor cells were observed. Cranial radiation therapy is a standard modality for treatment of children with neoplasm in the central nervous system. Since, however this therapy possibly causes long-term complications on the developing brain, it is important to plan radiation therapy for the brain tumor carefully. (author)

  10. Cerebral aspergillosis: comparison of radiological and neuropathologic findings in patients with bone marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, U. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, University Hospital, Essen (Germany); Dept. of Neuroradiology, Gilead Hospital, Bielefeld (Germany); Hettmann, M.; Schwechheimer, K. [Dept. of Neuropathology, University Hospital, Essen (Germany); Maschke, M. [Dept. of Neurology, University Hospital, Essen (Germany); Doerfler, A.; Forsting, M. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, University Hospital, Essen (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Thirty-six lesions in six patients who died from cerebral Aspergillus infection after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) were studied with regard to signal intensity, contrast enhancement, size, and location. The diagnosis was confirmed in all cases by autopsy. Retrospective correlation of histopathological and radiological findings was possible for 14 lesions. Most of the lesions (22/36) had isointense to low signal intensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI). Histopathologically, hemorrhagic necrosis was determined in three of them. Areas of high signal intensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI) were related to gross hemorrhage. Two infarctions showed intravascular accumulation of fungal hyphae with secondary thrombosis of the vessel. The remaining 12 lesions had high signal intensity on T2WI and low on T1WI. Histopathologically, four were infectious and four were unspecific demyelinated lesions. In conclusion, cerebral aspergillosis typically presented with large lesions showing isointense to low signal intensity on T2WI that could have areas of high signal on T1WI. Contrast enhancement was only visible in 15 lesions, and the predominant locations were the subcortical white matter, the cerebellum, and the basal ganglia. Small lesions with high signal on T2WI and low signal on T1WI could not necessarily be related to Aspergillus infection. (orig.)

  11. Cerebral aspergillosis: comparison of radiological and neuropathologic findings in patients with bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, U.; Hettmann, M.; Schwechheimer, K.; Maschke, M.; Doerfler, A.; Forsting, M.

    2001-01-01

    Thirty-six lesions in six patients who died from cerebral Aspergillus infection after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) were studied with regard to signal intensity, contrast enhancement, size, and location. The diagnosis was confirmed in all cases by autopsy. Retrospective correlation of histopathological and radiological findings was possible for 14 lesions. Most of the lesions (22/36) had isointense to low signal intensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI). Histopathologically, hemorrhagic necrosis was determined in three of them. Areas of high signal intensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI) were related to gross hemorrhage. Two infarctions showed intravascular accumulation of fungal hyphae with secondary thrombosis of the vessel. The remaining 12 lesions had high signal intensity on T2WI and low on T1WI. Histopathologically, four were infectious and four were unspecific demyelinated lesions. In conclusion, cerebral aspergillosis typically presented with large lesions showing isointense to low signal intensity on T2WI that could have areas of high signal on T1WI. Contrast enhancement was only visible in 15 lesions, and the predominant locations were the subcortical white matter, the cerebellum, and the basal ganglia. Small lesions with high signal on T2WI and low signal on T1WI could not necessarily be related to Aspergillus infection. (orig.)

  12. Cerebral microbleeds, cognitive impairment, and MRI in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hong; Yang, Juan; Xie, Peihan; Dong, Yulan; You, Yong; Liu, Jincai

    2017-07-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), a typical imaging manifestation marker of sporadic cerebral small vessel disease, play a critical role in vascular cognitive impairment, which is often accompanied by diabetes mellitus (DM). Hence, CMBs may, in part, be responsible for the occurrence and development of cognitive impairment in patients with diabetes. Novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences, such as susceptibility-weighted imaging and T2*-weighted gradient-echo, have the capability of noninvasively revealing CMBs in the brain. Moreover, a correlation between CMBs and cognitive impairment in patients with diabetes has been suggested in applications of functional MRI (fMRI). Since pathological changes in the brain occur prior to observable decline in cognitive function, neuroimaging may help predict the progression of cognitive impairment in diabetic patients. In this article, we review the detection of CMBs using MRI in diabetic patients exhibiting cognitive impairment. Future studies should emphasize the development and establishment of a novel MRI protocol, including fMRI, for diabetic patients with cognitive impairment to detect CMBs. A reliable MRI protocol would also be helpful in understanding the pathological mechanisms of cognitive impairment in this important patient population. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. PMID:24204146

  14. [The pathogenetic prerequisites for the application of the general magnetic therapy in the children presenting with cerebral ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisova, O I; Davydkin, N F; Kulikov, A G

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the analysis of the current literature and the original data of the authors providing the rationale for the use of magnetic therapy for the treatment of the children presenting with cerebral ischemia taking into consideration pathogenesis of this disease. It is demonstrated that the application of the general magnetic field decreases the tone of the cerebral vessels and improves blood flow to the brain which increases resistance to cerebral hypoxia. The results of investigations into the microcirculatory changes and liquor dynamics in conjunction with the ventriculometric measurements give evidence of the effectiveness of the combined treatment of cerebral ischemia making use of general magnetic therapy.

  15. Lipid-soluble cigarette smoking particles induce expression of inflammatory and extracellular-matrix-related genes in rat cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikman, Petter; Xu, Cang-Bao; Edvinsson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    /JNK) and their downstream transcription factors (ATF-2, Elk-1 and c-Jun) were examined. RESULTS: We observed that compared with control (DMSO-treated cerebral arteries), the cerebral arteries treated by DSP exhibited enhanced expression of MMP13 and AT(1) receptors, but not of AT(2) receptors, at both mRNA and protein...... factor ATF-2 and Elk-1. However, ERK 1/2 and SAPK/JNK activities were markedly expressed in the control (organ culture per se with DMSO), and DSP failed to further enhance the activation of ERK 1/2 and SAPK/JNK in the cerebral arteries. CONCLUSIONS: DSP induces cerebral vessel inflammation...

  16. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  17. Autoregulation of cerebral circulation in hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strandgaard, S.

    1978-01-01

    The present work deals with the effects of high blood pressure on cerebrovascular autoregulation, i.e. the mechanism that ensures a constant blood flow in the brain tissue by way of varying the calibre of the smallest resistance vessels. It has been shown that in patients with severe, untreated or uncontrolled hypertension, the lower limit of autoregulation of cerebral blood flow is shifted towards high blood pressure, thus decreasing the tolerance to acute hypotension. This is a functional correlate of the morphological changes present in hypertensive arterioles, i.e. wall thickening and luminal narrowing. Observations in a group of effectively treated hypertensive patients strongly suggest that a readaptation of autoregulation towards normal may take place during long-term entihypertensive treatment. Thus, the present findings should not be interpreted as a warning against clinical blood pressure lowering, which is known from other studies to protect the patient against stroke. Rather, the present observations are a support of the view that a severely elevated blood pressure should be lowered gradually, without aiming at an immediate normalization. It has also been demonstrated that some hypertensive patients do not readapt their cerebrovascular autoregulation towards normal during treatment, and may be better served in the long run with a blood pressure somewhat above normal. An upper blood pressure limit of autoregulation of cerebral blood flow has been demonstrated in man and experimental animal in the present and other investigations. With a blood pressure rise of 40-60% above the resting awake level, autoregulation may fail, and cerebral blood flow increases. At the upper limit of autoregulation, a ''sausage-string'' pattern has been observed in the cat's pial arterioles. It has been shown by vessel calibre measurements to consist of localized dilatations superimposed on autoregulatory arteriolar constriction. At higher pressures, vasodilatation becomes

  18. Effects of the Rabdosia rubescens total flavonoids on focal cerebral ischemia reperfusion model in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingsan Miao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the Rabdosia rubescens total flavonoids on focal cerebral ischemia reperfusion model in rats was observed. The model group, nimodipine group, cerebral collateral group, and large, medium and small dose group of the Rabdosia rubescens total flavonoids were administered with corresponding drugs but sham operation group and model group were administered the same volume of 0.5%CMC, 1 times a day, continuous administration of 7 d. After 1 h at 7 d to medicine, left incision in the middle of the neck of rats after anesthesia, we can firstly expose and isolate the left common carotid artery (CCA, and then expose external carotid artery (ECA and internal carotid artery (ICA. The common carotid artery and the external carotid artery are ligated. Then internal carotid artery with arterial clamp is temporarily clipped. Besides, cut the incision of 0.2 mm from 5 cm of the bifurcation of the common carotid artery. A thread Line bolt is inserted with more than 18–20 mm from bifurcation of CCA into the internal carotid artery until there is resistance. Then the entrance of the middle cerebral artery is blocked and internal carotid artery is ligated (the blank group only exposed the left blood vessel without Plugging wire. Finally it is gently pulled out the plug line after 2 h. Results: Compared with the model mice, Rabdosia rubescens total flavonoids can significantly relieve the injury of brain in hippocampus and cortex nerve cells; experimental rat focal cerebral ischemia was to improve again perfusion model of nerve function defect score mortality; significantly reduce brain homogenate NOS activity and no content, MDA, IL-1, TNF-a, ICAM-1 content; increase in brain homogenate SOD and ATPase activity (P < 0.05, P < 0.01; and reduce the serum S-100β protein content. Each dose group of the Rabdosia rubescens total flavonoids has a better Improvement effect on focal cerebral ischemia reperfusion model in rats.

  19. Personal peculiarities in patients with middle cerebral artery infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonova N.A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work is to reveal personal peculiarities in patients who have suffered middle cerebral artery infarction. Material and Methods. 39 patients with middle cerebral artery infarction have been under the study. All patients have received clinical instrumental inspection (neurologic survey, duplex ultrasound investigation of vessels of neck, head and brain, the research CT or MRT. Personal peculiarities have been studied by "The standard multiple-factor method of research of the personality" (PITCHES. Results. Psychological reactions for the disease have been determined. They include hypochondria, depression, psychasthenia and anxiety. Conclusion. Personal peculiarities in patients suffered from middle cerebral artery infarction may be characterized by the appearance of psychological response to the psychotraumatic situation. Therefore it is necessary to give psychotherapeutic aid.

  20. Morning Glory Syndrome with Carotid and Middle Cerebral Artery Vasculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezzar, Hachemi; Mbekeani, Joyce N; Dalens, Helen

    2015-12-01

    To report a case of incidental asymptomatic atypical morning glory syndrome (MGS) with concomitant ipsilateral carotid and middle cerebral dysgenesis. A 6-year-old child was discovered to have incidental findings of MGS, with atypia. All visual functions were normal including vision and stereopsis. Neuroimaging revealed ipsilateral carotid and middle cerebral vascular narrowing without associated collateral vessels or cerebral ischemia commonly seen in Moyamoya disease. Subsequent annual examinations have been stable, without signs of progression. This case demonstrates disparity between structural aberrations and final visual and neurological function and reinforces the association between MGS and intracranial vascular disruption. Full ancillary ophthalmic and neuroimaging studies should be performed in all patients with MGS with interval reassessments, even when the patient is asymptomatic and functionally intact.

  1. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound and cerebral angiography - alternative or complementary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockenheimer, S.; Lorey, N.

    1985-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler ultrasound is a noninvasive method of recording the flow velocity of larger intracranial vessels. The impact on diagnosis of cerebravascular occlusive disease is not yet evaluated. We present 15 patients, age range 39-73 years, who suffered from completed stroke. The findings of transcranial Doppler ultrasound and of cerebral angiography are presented. The value of both methods in treatment strategy is discussed. (orig.) [de

  2. Pressure vessel integrity 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandari, S.; Doney, R.O.; McDonald, M.S.; Jones, D.P.; Wilson, W.K.; Pennell, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains papers relating to the structural integrity assessment of pressure vessels and piping, with special emphasis on nuclear industry applications. The papers were prepared for technical sessions developed under the sponsorship of the ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Committees for Codes and Standards, Computer Technology, Design and Analysis, and Materials Fabrication. They were presented at the 1991 Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Conference in San Diego, California, June 23-27. The primary objective of the sponsoring organization is to provide a forum for the dissemination and discussion of information on development and application of technology for the structural integrity assessment of pressure vessels and piping. This publication includes contributions from authors from Australia, France, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The papers here are organized in six sections, each with a particular emphasis as indicated in the following section titles: Fracture Technology Status and Application Experience; Crack Initiation, Propagation and Arrest; Ductile Tearing; Constraint, Stress State, and Local-Brittle-Zones Effects; Computational Techniques for Fracture and Corrosion Fatigue; and Codes and Standards for Fatigue, Fracture and Erosion/Corrosion

  3. The reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilous, W.; Hajewska, E.; Szteke, W.; Przyborska, M.; Wasiak, J.; Wieczorkowski, M.

    2005-01-01

    In the paper the fundamental steels using in the construction of pressure vessel water reactor are discussed. The properties of these steels as well as the influence of neutron irradiation on its degradation in the time of exploitation are also done. (authors)

  4. Vacuum distilling vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reik, H

    1928-12-27

    Vacuum distilling vessel for mineral oil and the like, characterized by the ring-form or polyconal stiffeners arranged inside, suitably eccentric to the casing, being held at a distance from the casing by connecting members of such a height that in the resulting space if necessary can be arranged vapor-distributing pipes and a complete removal of the residue is possible.

  5. Visualization of vessel traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, C.M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Moving objects are captured in multivariate trajectories, often large data with multiple attributes. We focus on vessel traffic as a source of such data. Patterns appearing from visually analyzing attributes are used to explain why certain movements have occurred. In this research, we have developed

  6. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  7. Reactor vessel stud tensioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malandra, L.J.; Beer, R.W.; Salton, R.B.; Spiegelman, S.R.; Cognevich, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    A quick-acting stud tensioner, for facilitating the loosening or tightening of a stud nut on a reactor vessel stud, has gripper jaws which when the tensioner is lowered into engagement with the upper end of the stud are moved inwards to grip the upper end and which when the tensioner is lifted move outward to release the upper end. (author)

  8. A clinical study of acute cerebral infarction with a midline shift on the CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemae, Toshiki; Mizukami, Masahiro; Kin, Hiroshi; Kawase, Takeshi; Araki, Goro

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-one cases of acute cerebral infarction with a midline shift on the CT scan were studied with respect to the development of the midline shift, the angiographic findings, the clinical pictures and the outcome of these patients. The CT findings of hemorrhagic infarction were also studied. No cases showed a midline shift on a CT scan taken within 6 hours after the onset. A midline shift was, however, noted as early as 9 hours after the onset, and it reached its peak between the 2nd and 7th day of the onset. It gradually disappeared by the end of the third week. Hemorrhagic infarction was diagnosed in 6 patients by either spinal tap or autopsy. The CT findings of these hemorrhagic infarction were divided into two types, solid hemorrhages with an unequivocal high density within the low-density area, and small, scattered hemorrhagic of almost the same density as normal brain tissue within the low-density area. In 19 of 21 patients, an round-edged occlusion and/or embolus were observed on the initial angiograms. The recanalization of the occluded vessels was proved in 10 of 14 patients by subsequent angiographic studies. Twenty of 21 patients showed a sudden development of neurological symptoms, and 15 patients had a history of various kinds of heart disease, such as atrial fibrillation, valvular heart disease and myocardial infarction. The patients had atrial fibrillation on EKG on admission. These angiographic findings and clinical pictures strongly suggest that the infarction with a midline shift on the CT scan may be caused by a cerebral embolism of cardiac origin. Eight patients died of cerebral herniation between the 2nd and 6th day of the onset. Taking these poor outcomes into consideration, surgical as well as medical decompression of the brain would seem to be most important when the CT scan shows a midline shift. (author)

  9. Cross-correlation of instantaneous phase increments in pressure-flow fluctuations: Applications to cerebral autoregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi; Hu, Kun; Stanley, H. Eugene; Novak, Vera; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2006-03-01

    We investigate the relationship between the blood flow velocities (BFV) in the middle cerebral arteries and beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP) recorded from a finger in healthy and post-stroke subjects during the quasisteady state after perturbation for four different physiologic conditions: supine rest, head-up tilt, hyperventilation, and CO2 rebreathing in upright position. To evaluate whether instantaneous BP changes in the steady state are coupled with instantaneous changes in the BFV, we compare dynamical patterns in the instantaneous phases of these signals, obtained from the Hilbert transform, as a function of time. We find that in post-stroke subjects the instantaneous phase increments of BP and BFV exhibit well-pronounced patterns that remain stable in time for all four physiologic conditions, while in healthy subjects these patterns are different, less pronounced, and more variable. We propose an approach based on the cross-correlation of the instantaneous phase increments to quantify the coupling between BP and BFV signals. We find that the maximum correlation strength is different for the two groups and for the different conditions. For healthy subjects the amplitude of the cross-correlation between the instantaneous phase increments of BP and BFV is small and attenuates within 3-5 heartbeats. In contrast, for post-stroke subjects, this amplitude is significantly larger and cross-correlations persist up to 20 heartbeats. Further, we show that the instantaneous phase increments of BP and BFV are cross-correlated even within a single heartbeat cycle. We compare the results of our approach with three complementary methods: direct BP-BFV cross-correlation, transfer function analysis, and phase synchronization analysis. Our findings provide insight into the mechanism of cerebral vascular control in healthy subjects, suggesting that this control mechanism may involve rapid adjustments (within a heartbeat) of the cerebral vessels, so that BFV remains steady in

  10. Clinical study of acute cerebral infarction with a midline shift on the CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemae, T; Mizukami, M; Kin, H; Kawase, T; Araki, G [Mihara Memorial Hospital, Isezaki, Gunma (Japan)

    1978-12-01

    Twenty-one cases of acute cerebral infarction with a midline shift on the CT scan were studied with respect to the development of the midline shift, the angiographic findings, the clinical pictures and the outcome of these patients. The CT findings of hemorrhagic infarction were also studied. No cases showed a midline shift on a CT scan taken within 6 hours after the onset. A midline shift was, however, noted as early as 9 hours after the onset, and it reached its peak between the 2nd and 7th day of the onset. It gradually disappeared by the end of the third week. Hemorrhagic infarction was diagnosed in 6 patients by either spinal tap or autopsy. The CT findings of these hemorrhagic infarction were divided into two types, solid hemorrhages with an unequivocal high density within the low-density area, and small, scattered hemorrhagic of almost the same density as normal brain tissue within the low-density area. In 19 of 21 patients, an round-edged occlusion and/or embolus were observed on the initial angiograms. The recanalization of the occluded vessels was proved in 10 of 14 patients by subsequent angiographic studies. Twenty of 21 patients showed a sudden development of neurological symptoms, and 15 patients had a history of various kinds of heart disease, such as atrial fibrillation, valvular heart disease and myocardial infarction. The patients had atrial fibrillation on EKG on admission. These angiographic findings and clinical pictures strongly suggest that the infarction with a midline shift on the CT scan may be caused by a cerebral embolism of cardiac origin. Eight patients died of cerebral herniation between the 2nd and 6th day of the onset. Taking these poor outcomes into consideration, surgical as well as medical decompression of the brain would seem to be most important when the CT scan shows a midline shift.

  11. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishnan B

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bindu Balakrishnan,1 Elizabeth Nance,1 Michael V Johnston,2 Rangaramanujam Kannan,3 Sujatha Kannan1 1Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University; Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Department of Neurology and Pediatrics, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Center for Nanomedicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. Keywords: dendrimer, cerebral palsy, neuroinflammation, nanoparticle, neonatal brain injury, G4OH-PAMAM

  12. Cerebral CT of ischaemic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aulich, A

    1981-11-25

    The diagnosis of stroke must first be established by clinical examination. CT has proved useful for confirmation of the diagnosis and provides a global intracranial picture of morphological changes in cerebral vascular diseases. A hemorrhage can be recognized with certainty at the first CT examination as the cause of the stroke, but in the detection of a lesion due to ischemia an important role is played by the correct choice of the time of examination, and in some cases also of the check-up with contrast medium. The differential diagnosis between infarct in the acute stage and encephalitis or gliomas of low-grade malignity can be difficult. A decision can often only be made after a series of examinations. Postmalacial conditions are often difficult to differentiate from defects due to other causes, such as hemorrhage, head injury, postoperative states and after encephalitis. A knowledge of the anamnesis and the clinical findings is indispensable for CT evaluation. In assessing the prognosis before vascular surgery on the extracranial brain-supplying vessels the performance of a CT examination should be advised. A warning is given against the use of CT as a screening method.

  13. Monitoring of cerebral haemodynamics in newborn infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liem, K Djien; Greisen, Gorm

    2010-01-01

    The most important cerebrovascular injuries in newborn infants, particularly in preterm infants, are cerebral haemorrhage and ischemic injury. The typical cerebral vascular anatomy and the disturbance of cerebral haemodynamics play important roles in the pathophysiology. The term 'cerebral haemod...

  14. PDX vacuum vessel stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodem, Z.D.

    1975-01-01

    A stress analysis of PDX vacuum vessel is described and the summary of results is presented. The vacuum vessel is treated as a toroidal shell of revolution subjected to an internal vacuum. The critical buckling pressure is calculated. The effects of the geometrical discontinuity at the juncture of toroidal shell head and cylindrical outside wall, and the concavity of the cylindrical wall are examined. An effect of the poloidal field coil supports and the vessel outside supports on the stress distribution in the vacuum vessel is determined. A method evaluating the influence of circular ports in the vessel wall on the stress level in the vessel is outlined

  15. Stroke from Vasospasm due to Marijuana Use: Can Cannabis Synergistically with Other Medications Trigger Cerebral Vasospasm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marium Jamil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of imaging proven cerebral vasospasm causing ischemic stroke in a young patient chronically on buprenorphine-naloxone for heroin remission who started smoking cannabis on a daily basis. With cannabis legalization spreading across the states in the USA, it is important for physicians not only to be aware of cannabis reported association with cerebral vasospasm in some patients but also to be on the lookout for possible interacting medications that can synergistically affect cerebral vessels causing debilitating strokes.

  16. Cerebellar hemorrhage provoked by combined use of nattokinase and aspirin in a patient with cerebral microbleeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yung-Yee; Liu, Jia-Shou; Lai, Shung-Lon; Wu, Hsiu-Shan; Lan, Min-Yu

    2008-01-01

    Nattokinase is used as a health-promoting medicine for preventing thrombosis due to its fibrinolytic activity. Cerebral microbleed is remnant of blood extravasations from the damaged vessels related to cerebral microangiopathies. We report a patient, having used aspirin for secondary stroke prevention, who had an acute cerebellar hemorrhage after taking nattokinase 400 mg daily for 7 consecutive days. In addition to the hemorrhagic lesion, multiple microbleeds were demonstrated on brain MR images. We suggest that nattokinase may increase risk of intracerebral hemorrhage in patients who have bleeding-prone cerebral microangiopathy and are receiving other antithrombotic agent at the same time.

  17. Low-frequency oscillations and vasoreactivity of cortical vessels in obstructive sleep apnea during wakefulness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik Winther; Jensen, Benedicte Ersted; Jennum, Poul

    2013-01-01

    Effective nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy reduces the cardiovascular outcomes associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but the mechanism behind this effect is unclear. We investigated if OSA patients during wakefulness showed signs of increased sympathetic activity...... and decreased vasoreactivity in cerebral cortical vessels as measured with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and if this may be reversed by CPAP treatment....

  18. Normal cerebral FDG uptake during childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, Kevin; Howman-Giles, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Current understanding of cerebral FDG uptake during childhood originates from a small number of studies in patients with neurological abnormalities. Our aim was to describe cerebral FDG uptake in a dataset of FDG PET scans in children more likely to represent a normal population. We reviewed cerebral FDG PET scans in children up to 16 years of age with suspected/proven extracranial malignancies and the following exclusions: central nervous system metastases, previous malignancies, previous chemotherapy or radiotherapy, development of cerebral metastases during therapy, neurological conditions, taking antiepileptic medication or medications likely to interfere with cerebral metabolism, and general anaesthesia within 24 h. White matter, basal ganglia, thalamus and the cerebellar cortex were analysed using regional SUV max , and the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum were analysed using a regional relative uptake analysis in comparison to maximal cortical uptake. Scans from 30 patients (age range 11 months to 16 years, mean age 10 years 5 months) were included. All regions showed increasing SUV max with age. The parietal, occipital, lateral temporal and medial temporal lobes showed lower rates of increasing FDG uptake causing changing patterns of regional FDG uptake during childhood. The cortical regions showing the most intense uptake in early childhood were the parietal and occipital lobes. At approximately 7 years of age these regions had relatively less uptake than the frontal lobes and at approximately 10 years of age these regions had relatively less uptake than the thalamus. Relative FDG uptake in the brain has not reached an adult pattern by 1 year of age, but continues to change up to 16 years of age. The changing pattern is due to different regional rates of increasing cortical FDG uptake, which is less rapid in the parietal, occipital and temporal lobes than in the frontal lobes. (orig.)

  19. Normal cerebral FDG uptake during childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, Kevin [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Discipline of Paediatrics and Child Health, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Howman-Giles, Robert [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Disciplines of Imaging and Paediatrics and Child Health, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2014-04-15

    Current understanding of cerebral FDG uptake during childhood originates from a small number of studies in patients with neurological abnormalities. Our aim was to describe cerebral FDG uptake in a dataset of FDG PET scans in children more likely to represent a normal population. We reviewed cerebral FDG PET scans in children up to 16 years of age with suspected/proven extracranial malignancies and the following exclusions: central nervous system metastases, previous malignancies, previous chemotherapy or radiotherapy, development of cerebral metastases during therapy, neurological conditions, taking antiepileptic medication or medications likely to interfere with cerebral metabolism, and general anaesthesia within 24 h. White matter, basal ganglia, thalamus and the cerebellar cortex were analysed using regional SUV{sub max}, and the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum were analysed using a regional relative uptake analysis in comparison to maximal cortical uptake. Scans from 30 patients (age range 11 months to 16 years, mean age 10 years 5 months) were included. All regions showed increasing SUV{sub max} with age. The parietal, occipital, lateral temporal and medial temporal lobes showed lower rates of increasing FDG uptake causing changing patterns of regional FDG uptake during childhood. The cortical regions showing the most intense uptake in early childhood were the parietal and occipital lobes. At approximately 7 years of age these regions had relatively less uptake than the frontal lobes and at approximately 10 years of age these regions had relatively less uptake than the thalamus. Relative FDG uptake in the brain has not reached an adult pattern by 1 year of age, but continues to change up to 16 years of age. The changing pattern is due to different regional rates of increasing cortical FDG uptake, which is less rapid in the parietal, occipital and temporal lobes than in the frontal lobes. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolism and cerebral function by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Chuzo; Higuchi, Toshihiro; Umeda, Masahiro; Naruse, Shoji; Horikawa, Yoshiharu; Ueda, Satoshi; Furuya, Seiichi.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) method has the unique potentiality of detecting cerebral metabolites, cerebral blood flow and brain functions in a noninvasive fashion. We have developed several MR techniques to detect these cerebral parameters with the use of clinical MRI scanners. By modifying the MR spectroscopy (MRS) technique, both 31 P- and 1 H-MRS data can be obtained from multiple, localized regions (multi-voxel method) of the brain, and the distribution of each metabolite in the brain can be readily visualized by metabolite mapping. The use of diffusion weighted images (DWI) permits visualization of the anisotropy of water diffusion in white matter, and based on the difference of diffusion coefficiency, the differential diagnosis between epidermoid tumor and arachnoid cyst can be made. By employing dynamic-MRI (Dyn-MRI) with Gd-DTPA administration, it is possible to examine the difference in blood circulation between brain tumor tissue and normal tissue, as well as among different types of brain tumors. By using magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) imaging, it has become possible to detect brain tumors, and with a small dose of Gd-DTPA, to visualize the vascular system. Functional MRI (fMRI) visualizes the activated brain by using conventional gradient echo technique on conventional MRI scanners. This method has the unique characteristic of detecting a brain function with high spatial and temporal resolution by using the intrinsic substance. Moreover, the localization of motor and sensory areas was detected by noninvasive means within few minutes. The fMRI procedure will be used in the future to analyze the higher and complex brain functions. In conclusion, multi-modality MR is a powerful technique that is useful for investigating the pathogenesis of many diseases, and provides a noninvasive analytic modality for studying brain function. (author)

  1. 76 FR 67255 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel KIWI CAT; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD 2011 0135] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel KIWI CAT; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... CAT is: INTENDED COMMERCIAL USE OF VESSEL: ``Small vessel 12 person chartering service for the San...

  2. Endovascular rescue from arterial rupture and thrombosis during middle cerebral artery stenting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, J.Y.; Chung, Y.S. [Department of Neurosurgery, College of Medicine, Pundang CHA Hospital, 351 Yatap-ding, Pundang-gu, 463-712, Sungnam (Korea); Lee, B.H. [Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, College of Medicine, Pundang CHA Hospital, 351 Yatap-dong, Pundang-gu, 463-712, Sungnam (Korea); Kim, O.J. [Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, Pundang CHA Hospital, 351 Yatap-dong, Pundang-gu, 463-712, Sungnam (Korea)

    2003-08-01

    Intravascular stents are being used with increasing frequency in interventional neuroradiology. Iatrogenic arterial rupture is an uncommon but serious complication. We present a case of arterial rupture and subarachnoid haemorrhage during middle cerebral artery stenting, treated by emergency additional, overlapping stenting and balloon tamponade of the dissected vessel. Thrombotic occlusion of the artery was managed by intra-arterial abciximab. Normal vessel patency was re-established within 20 min and the patient recovered with no neurological deficit. (orig.)

  3. Axon guidance factor netrin-1 and its receptors regulate angiogenesis after cerebral ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Qiao; Liao, Song-Jie; Yu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis and angiogenesis play important roles in functional recovery after ischemic stroke. When cerebral ischemia occurs, axon regeneration can compensate for the loss of apoptotic neurons in the ischemic area. The formation of new blood vessels ameliorates the local decrease in blood supply, enhancing the supply of oxygen and nutrients to newly-formed neurons. New blood vessels also act as a scaffold for the migration of neuroblasts to the infarct area after ischemic stroke. In light o...

  4. Vessels in Transit - Web Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — A web tool that provides real-time information on vessels transiting the Saint Lawrence Seaway. Visitors may sort by order of turn, vessel name, or last location in...

  5. Diaschisis with cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, R.; Reivich, M.; Goldberg, H.; Banka, R.; Greenberg, J.

    1977-01-01

    Fifteen patients admitted to Philadelphia General Hospital with acute strokes had repeated measurements of cerebral blood flow measured by the /sup 133/X inhalation method. A progressive decline in cerebral blood flow in both hemispheres was observed during the first week after infarction in twelve of these patients. This decline could be partially explained by loss of autoregulation, but could not be correlated with level of consciousness, clinical status of PCO2. This progressive decline in flow in the non-ischemic hemisphere indicates a process more complex than a simple destruction of axonal afferants to neurons as implied by the term diaschisis. The flow changes in the non-ischemic hemisphere are likely caused by a combination of the immediate effects of decreased neuronal stimulation modified by loss of autoregulation, release of vasoactive substances, cerebral edema, and other factors.

  6. Cerebral hemodynamics in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hachinski, V C; Olesen, Jes; Norris, J W

    1977-01-01

    Clinical and angiographic findings in migraine are briefly reviewed in relation to cerebral hemodynamic changes shown by regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) studies. Three cases of migraine studied by the intracarotid xenon 133 method during attacks are reported. In classic migraine, with typical...... prodromal symptoms, a decrease in cerebral blood flow has been demonstrated during the aura. Occasionally, this flow decrease persists during the headache phase. In common migraine, where such prodromata are not seen, a flow decrease has not been demonstrated. During the headache phase of both types...... of migraine, rCBF has usually been found to be normal or in the high range of normal values. The high values may represent postischemic hyperemia, but are probably more frequently secondary to arousal caused by pain. Thus, during the headache phase rCBF may be subnormal, normal or high. These findings do...

  7. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus is described for sealing a cold leg nozzle of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location comprising: at least one sealing plug for mechanically sealing the nozzle from the inside of the reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plug includes a plate and a cone assembly having an end part receptive in the nozzle, the plate being axially moveable relative to the cone assembly. The plate and cone assembly have confronting bevelled edges defining an opening therebetween. A primary O-ring is disposed about the opening and is supported on the bevelled edges, the plate being guidably mounted to the cone assembly for movement toward the cone assembly to radially expand the primary O-ring into sealing engagement with the nozzle. A means is included for providing relative movement between the outer plate and the cone assembly

  8. Mobile nuclear reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.E.; Spurrier, F.R.; Jones, A.R.

    1978-01-01

    A containment vessel for use in mobile nuclear reactor installations is described. The containment vessel completely surrounds the entire primary system, and is located as close to the reactor primary system components as is possible in order to minimize weight. In addition to being designed to withstand a specified internal pressure, the containment vessel is also designed to maintain integrity as a containment vessel in case of a possible collision accident

  9. Nuclear reactor vessel inspection apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, E.G.; Lofy, R.A.; Williams, L.P.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus for the in situ inspection of a nuclear reactor vessel to detect the location and character of flaws in the walls of the vessel, in the welds joining the various sections of the vessel, in the welds joining attachments such as nozzles, elbows and the like to the reactor vessel and in such attachments wherein an inspection head carrying one or more ultrasonic transducers follows predetermined paths in scanning the various reactor sections, welds and attachments

  10. Reactor vessel stud closure system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegelman, S.R.; Salton, R.B.; Beer, R.W.; Malandra, L.J.; Cognevich, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    A quick-acting stud tensioner apparatus for enabling the loosening or tightening of a stud nut on a reactor vessel stud. The apparatus is adapted to engage the vessel stud by closing a gripper around an upper end of the vessel stud when the apparatus is seated on the stud. Upon lifting the apparatus, the gripper releases the vessel stud so that the apparatus can be removed

  11. Cerebral fat embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Toshihisa; Sawada, Yusuke; Yukioka, Tetsuo; Nishide, Kazuyuki; Yoshioka, Toshiharu

    1982-01-01

    A case of cerebral fat embolism is reported. A 18-year-old patient with multiple bone fractures was in semiconma immediately after an injury. Brain CT showed no brain swelling or intracranial hematoma. Hypoxemia and alcoholemia were noted on admission, which returned to normal without improvement of consciousness level. In addition, respiratory symptoms with positive radiographic changes, tachycardia, pyrexia, sudden drop in hemoglobin level, and sudden thrombocytopenia developed. These symptoms were compatible with Gurd's criteria of systemic fat embolism. Eight days after injury, multiple low density areas appeared on CT and disappeared within the subsequent two weeks, and subdural effusion with cerebral atrophy developed. These CT findings were not considered due to cerebral trauma. Diagnosis of cerebral fat embolism was made. The subdural effusion was drained. Neurologic and pulmonary recoveries took place slowly and one month following the injury the patient became alert and exhibited fully coordinated limb movement. The CT scans of the present case well corresponded with hitherto reported pathological findings. Petechiae in the white matter must have developed on the day of injury, which could not be detected by CT examination. It is suggested that some petechial regions fused to purpuras and then gradually resolved when they were detected as multiple low density areas on CT. CT in the purpuras phase would have shown these lesions as high density areas. These lesions must have healed with formation of tiny scars and blood pigment which were demonstrated as the disappearance of multiple low density areas by CT examination. Cerebral atrophy and subsequent subdural effusion developed as a result of demyelination. The patient took the typical clinical course of cerebral fat embolism and serial CT scans served for its assessment. (author)

  12. Prestressed cast iron pressure vessels as burst-proof pressure vessels for innovative nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehling, W.; Boettcher, A.; Bounin, D.; Steinwarz, W.; Geiss, M.; Trauth, M.

    2000-01-01

    The amendment to the German Atomic Energy Act from July 28, 1994 requires that events 'whose occurrence is practically excluded by the measures against damages', i.e. events of the category residual risk, must not necessitate far reaching protective measures outside the plant. For a conventional reactor pressure vessel, the residual risk consists in the very small probability of a catastrophic failure (formation of a large fracture opening, bursting of the vessel). With a prestressed cast iron vessel (PCIV), the formation of a large fracture opening or bursting of the vessel, respectively, is impossible due to its design properties. Against this background the possibility of the use of this type of pressure vessel for lightwater reactors has been studied in the frame of a 'Working Group for Innovative Nuclear Technology', founded by different research institutes and industrial companies. Furthermore, it has been studied whether the use of the PCIV support the realization of a corecatcher system. The results are presented in this report. Already many years earlier, Siempelkamp has performed industrial development and Forschungszentrum Juelich related experimental and theoretical safety research for the PCIV as an innovative, bust-proof pressure vessel concept. This development of the PCIV as well as its safety properties are also presented in a conclusive manner. (orig.) [de

  13. Gammagraphy of cerebral perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Silvia

    2003-01-01

    Important aspects of the gammagraphy of cerebral perfusion and the diverse clinical applications in the neurological diseases are comment in this article. We focus in the usefulness of the photon emission cerebral tomography (SPECT) and its capacity to cross the hemato encephalic barrier through the use of radiopharmacons like 99 mTc-H M-PAO and 99mTc-EDC, thus managing to offer functional data on the captantes neurons of the radiopharmacon. The clinical applications of SPECT are studied; cerebrovascular disease, transient ischemic attacks, dementias, Alzheimer disease, as well as other neurological diseases are referred. (The author)

  14. Experimental Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Focal cerebral ischemia due to occlusion of a major cerebral artery is the cause of ischemic stroke which is a major reason of mortality, morbidity and disability in the populations of the developed countries. In the seven studies summarized in the thesis focal ischemia in rats induced by occlusion...... in the penumbra is recruited in the infarction process leading to a progressive growth of the infarct. The penumbra hence constitutes an important target for pharmacological treatment because of the existence of a therapeutic time window during which treatment with neuroprotective compounds may prevent...

  15. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity and cerebral blood flow and O2 uptake during dynamic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Sperling, B K; Warming, T

    1993-01-01

    Results obtained by the 133Xe clearance method with external detectors and by transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) suggest that dynamic exercise causes an increase of global average cerebral blood flow (CBF). These data are contradicted by earlier data obtained during less-well-defined conditions....... To investigate this controversy, we applied the Kety-Schmidt technique to measure the global average levels of CBF and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during rest and dynamic exercise. Simultaneously with the determination of CBF and CMRO2, we used TCD to determine mean maximal flow velocity...... in the middle cerebral artery (MCA Vmean). For values of CBF and MCA Vmean a correction for an observed small drop in arterial PCO2 was carried out. Baseline values for global CBF and CMRO2 were 50.7 and 3.63 ml.100 g-1.min-1, respectively. The same values were found during dynamic exercise, whereas a 22% (P

  16. Phenomenological vessel burst investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hippelein, K.W.; Julisch, P.; Muz, J.; Schiedermaier, J.

    1985-07-01

    Fourteen burst experiments have been carried out using vessels with circumferential and longitudinal flaws, for investigation of the fracture behaviour, i.e. the time-related fracture opening. The vessels had dimensions (outer diameter x wall thickness = 800 x 47 mm) which correspond to the dimensions of the main coolant piping of a 1300 MW e PWR. The test specimens had been made of the base-safe material 20 MnMoNi 55 and of a special, 22 NiMoCr 37 base alloy. The experimental conditions with regard to pressure and temperature have been chosen so as to correspond to normal operating conditions of a PWR (p∝17.5 MPa, T∝300 0 C), i.e. the flaws have been so dimensioned that failure was to be expected at a pressure of p∝17.5 MPa. As a rule, water has been used as the pressure medium, or in some cases air, in order to influence the time-dependent pressure decrease. Fluid and structural dynamics calculations have also been made. In order to determine the impact of a fast propagating crack on the leak-to-fracture curve, which normally is defined by quasistationary experiments, suitable tests have been made with large-volume, cylindrical vessels (outer diameter x wall thickness x length = 3000 x 21 x 14000 mm) made of the material WSt E 43. The leak-before-fracture criterion has been confirmed. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Blood Vessels in Allotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahimi, P; Liu, R; Pober, J S

    2015-07-01

    Human vascularized allografts are perfused through blood vessels composed of cells (endothelium, pericytes, and smooth muscle cells) that remain largely of graft origin and are thus subject to host alloimmune responses. Graft vessels must be healthy to maintain homeostatic functions including control of perfusion, maintenance of permselectivity, prevention of thrombosis, and participation in immune surveillance. Vascular cell injury can cause dysfunction that interferes with these processes. Graft vascular cells can be activated by mediators of innate and adaptive immunity to participate in graft inflammation contributing to both ischemia/reperfusion injury and allograft rejection. Different forms of rejection may affect graft vessels in different ways, ranging from thrombosis and neutrophilic inflammation in hyperacute rejection, to endothelialitis/intimal arteritis and fibrinoid necrosis in acute cell-mediated or antibody-mediated rejection, respectively, and to diffuse luminal stenosis in chronic rejection. While some current therapies targeting the host immune system do affect graft vascular cells, direct targeting of the graft vasculature may create new opportunities for preventing allograft injury and loss. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  18. Ionizing radiations and blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, E.I.; Stepanov, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    Data on phenomenology of radiation-induced changes in blood vessels are systematized and authors' experience is generalized. Modern concepts about processes leading to vessel structure injury after irradiation is critically analyzed. Special attention is paid to reparation and compensation of X-ray vessel injury, consideration of which is not yet sufficiently elucidated in literature

  19. Ionizing radiations and blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, E.I.; Stepanov, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    Data on phenomeology of radiation changes of blood vessels are systemized and the authors' experience is generalyzed. A critical analysis of modern conceptions on processes resulting in vessel structure damage after irradiation, is given. Special attention is paid to reparation and compensation of radiation injury of vessels

  20. An intelligent three dimensional reconstruction system for cerebral arteries from biplane cineangiograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Susumu; Guan, Yang; Tsukamoto, Yasuo; Kumamoto, Etsuko; Asada, Katsunobu; Matsuo, Michimasa; Yamasaki, Katsuhito.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, an intelligent system is developed for the three dimensional reconstruction of cerebral arteries from biplane cineangiograms. The system is composed of two blocks, i.e., an inferencing-control-block and a processing-block. The inferencing-control block controls the flow of the image-processing by inferencing with the knowledge stored in the block and is a production system based on 'IF, THEN' rule. The processing-block is a collection of image processing procedures activated by a call from the inferencing-control-block. On the other hand, the flow of the image-processing is outlined as follows: After the extraction of vessel center lines from the angiograms, the blood flow directions and connectivity states of vessels are determined and the vessel graph is translated to a vessel connectivity tree. Then, by utilizing the knowledge about anatomic structure of cerebral arteries and characteristics of angiograms, important arteries are distinguished and vessel groups classified. Finally, by using a shape-oriented matching method, the vessels on the two projected planes are matched and the three dimensional structure of vessels constructed. An example is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the use of the knowledge which enables the system to improve the efficiency and precision of the processing, such as vessel analysis and matching. (author)

  1. In vivo assessment of the human cerebral microcirculation and its glycocalyx: A technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeren, R H L; Rijkers, K; Schijns, O E M G; Dings, J; Hoogland, G; van Zandvoort, M A M J; Vink, H; van Overbeeke, J J

    2018-06-01

    The cerebral microcirculation and its glycocalyx, a matrix coating the luminal endothelium, are key regulators of capillary permeability and cerebral blood flow. Microvascular abnormalities are described in several neurological disorders. However, assessment of the cerebral microcirculation and glycocalyx has mainly been performed ex vivo. Here, the technical feasibility of in vivo assessment of the human cerebral microcirculation and its glycocalyx using sidestream dark field (SDF) imaging is discussed. Intraoperative assessment requires the application of a sterile drape covering the camera (slipcover). First, sublingual measurements with and without slipcover were performed in a healthy control to assess the impact of this slipcover. Subsequently, using SDF imaging, the sublingual (reference), cortical, and hippocampal microcirculation and glycocalyx were evaluated in patients who underwent resective brain surgery as treatment for drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Finally, vessel density, and the perfused boundary region (PBR), a validated gauge of glycocalyx health, were calculated using GlycoCheck © software. The addition of a slipcover affects vessel density and PBR values in a control subject. The cerebral measurements in five patients were more difficult to obtain than the sublingual ones. This was probably at least partly due to the introduction of a sterile slipcover. Results on vessel density and PBR showed similar patterns at all three measurement sites. This is the first report on in vivo assessment of the human cerebrovascular glycocalyx. Assessment of the glycocalyx is an additional application of in vivo imaging of the cerebral microcirculation using SDF technique. This method enables functional analysis of the microcirculation and glycocalyx, however the addition of a sterile slipcover affects the measurements. SDF imaging is a safe, quick, and straightforward technique to evaluate the functional cerebral microcirculation and glycocalyx

  2. Vasculite cutânea de pequenos vasos: etiologia, patogênese, classificação e critérios diagnósticos - Parte I Small vessel cutaneous vasculitis: etiology, pathogenesis, classification and diagnostic criteria - Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebert Roberto Clivati Brandt

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Vasculite é a inflamação da parede dos vasos. Pode variar em gravidade desde doença autolimitada de um único órgão até doença grave com risco de morte por falência de múltiplos órgãos. Existem várias causas, embora só se apresente por poucos padrões histológicos de inflamação vascular. Vasos de qualquer tipo e em qualquer órgão podem ser afetados, resultando em ampla variedade de sinais e sintomas. Diferentes vasculites com apresentações clínicas indistinguíveis têm evolução e tratamento muito diferentes. Essa condição representa desafio para o médico, incluindo classificação, diagnóstico, exames laboratoriais pertinentes, tratamento e seguimento adequado. Neste artigo são revistos a classificação, a etiologia, a patogênese e os critérios diagnósticos das vasculites cutâneas.Vasculitis is an inflammation of vessel walls. It may range in severity from a self-limited disorder in one single organ to a life-threatening disease due to multiple-organ failure. It has many causes, although they result in only a few histological patterns of vascular inflammation. Vessels of any type in any organ can be affected, a fact that results in a broad variety of signs and symptoms. Different vasculitides with indistinguishable clinical presentations have very different prognosis and treatments. This condition presents many challenges to physicians in terms of classification, diagnosis, appropriate laboratory workup, treatment, and the need for careful follow-up. This article reviews the classification, etiology, pathology and diagnostic criteria of cutaneous vasculitis.

  3. Cerebral atrophic and degenerative changes following various cerebral diseases, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kino, Masao; Anno, Izumi; Yano, Yuhiko; Anno, Yasuro.

    1980-01-01

    Patients having cerebral atrophic and degenerative changes following hypoglycemia, cerebral contusion, or cerebral hypoxia including cerebrovascular disorders were reported. Description was made as to cerebral changes visualized on CT images and clinical courses of a patient who revived 10 minutes after heart stoppage during neurosurgery, a newborn with asphyxia, a patient with hypoglycemia, a patient who suffered from asphyxia by an accident 10 years before, a patient with carbon monoxide poisoning at an acute stage, a patient who had carbon monoxide poisoning 10 years before, a patient with diffuse cerebral ischemic changes, a patient with cerebral edema around metastatic tumor, a patient with respiration brain, a patient with neurological sequelae after cerebral contusion, a patient who had an operation to excise right parietal lobe artery malformation, and a patient who was shooted by a machine gun and had a lead in the brain for 34 years. (Tsunoda, M.)

  4. High-resolution intracranial vessel wall MRI in an elderly asymptomatic population: comparison of 3T and 7T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harteveld, Anita A.; Kolk, Anja G. van der; Dieleman, Nikki; Siero, Jeroen C.W.; Luijten, Peter R.; Zwanenburg, Jaco J.M.; Hendrikse, Jeroen [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Postbox 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Worp, H.B. van der; Frijns, Catharina J.M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kuijf, Hugo J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2017-04-15

    Several intracranial vessel wall sequences have been described in recent literature, with either 3-T or 7-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the current study, we compared 3-T and 7-T MRI in visualising both the intracranial arterial vessel wall and vessel wall lesions. Twenty-one elderly asymptomatic volunteers were scanned by 3-T and 7-T MRI with an intracranial vessel wall sequence, both before and after contrast administration. Two raters scored image quality, and presence and characteristics of vessel wall lesions. Vessel wall visibility was equal or significantly better at 7 T for the studied arterial segments, even though there were more artefacts hampering assessment. The better visualisation of the vessel wall at 7 T was most prominent in the proximal anterior cerebral circulation and the posterior cerebral artery. In the studied elderly asymptomatic population, 48 vessel-wall lesions were identified at 3 T, of which 7 showed enhancement. At 7 T, 79 lesions were identified, of which 29 showed enhancement. Seventy-one percent of all 3-T lesions and 59 % of all 7-T lesions were also seen at the other field strength. Despite the large variability in detected lesions at both field strengths, we believe 7-T MRI has the highest potential to identify the total burden of intracranial vessel wall lesions. (orig.)

  5. A case of chronic subdural hematoma associated with an unruptured cerebral aneurysm detected by cerebral computed angiotomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Keiji; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko; Ohue, Shiro; Takeda, Sadanori; Kimura, Hideki; Sakaki, Saburo.

    1986-01-01

    One case of chronic subdural hematoma associated with an unruptured cerebral aneurysm detected by cerebral computed angiotomography is reported. A 44-year-old female slipped and hit her head without loss of consciousness, one month ago. Recently she complained of headaches and visited the department of Neurosurgery, Washokai Sadamoto Hospital on May 21, 1985. There were no physical and neurological signs on examination. Plain CT scans showed a crescent-shaped high density area in the left frontal region with a slight mass sign. She was diagnosed as having a possible chronic subdural hematoma and further examination was recommended. Biplane ultrafast overlapping cerebral computed angiotomograms clearly demonstrated a so-called avascular area delineated by enhanced superficial cerebral vessels with contrast medium. Furthermore, a marked high density mass measuring 8 mm x 10 mm x 6 mm in diameters was simultaneously demonstrated around the right anterior clinoid process on the same image, suggesting a cerebral aneurysm. Right carotid angiograms showed a right internal carotid-posterior communicating junction aneurysm. The irrigation of the left chronic subdural hematoma was carried out on May 24 and the neck clipping of the right IC-PC junction aneurysm was done two weeks later. During the operation, there were no findings suggesting a previous subarachnoid hemorrhage from the aneurysm, but a bleb was found on the aneurysm. The post-operative course was uneventful. (J.P.N.)

  6. Cerebral malaria: susceptibility weighted MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinit Baliyan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria is one of the fatal complications of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Pathogenesis involves cerebral microangiopathy related to microvascular plugging by infected red blood cells. Conventional imaging with MRI and CT do not reveal anything specific in case of cerebral malaria. Susceptibility weighted imaging, a recent advance in the MRI, is very sensitive to microbleeds related to microangiopathy. Histopathological studies in cerebral malaria have revealed microbleeds in brain parenchyma secondary to microangiopathy. Susceptibility weighted imaging, being exquisitely sensitive to microbleeds may provide additional information and improve the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in cerebral malaria.

  7. High Altitude Cerebral Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    described neuropathological findings of cerebral edema and wi4espread petechial hemorrhages in two HAPE fatalities and later reported (52...lethargy, thirst, indigestion, hysterical outburst o: other behavior disturbances, decreased concentration, fever , couhh and peripheral edema (52...autopsy results from the two fatalities in their series. In both cases multiple, widespread petechial hemorrhages were noted throughout the brain. One

  8. Hyperventilation, cerebral perfusion, and syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immink, R V; Pott, F C; Secher, N H

    2014-01-01

    dioxide (PaCO2) and oxygen (PaO2) partial pressures so that hypercapnia/hypoxia increases and hypocapnia/hyperoxia reduces global cerebral blood flow. Cerebral hypoperfusion and TLOC have been associated with hypocapnia related to HV. Notwithstanding pronounced cerebrovascular effects of PaCO2...... the contribution of a low PaCO2 to the early postural reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity is transient. HV together with postural stress does not reduce cerebral perfusion to such an extent that TLOC develops. However when HV is combined with cardiovascular stressors like cold immersion or reduced...... cardiac output brain perfusion becomes jeopardized. Whether, in patients with cardiovascular disease and/or defect, cerebral blood flow cerebral control HV-induced hypocapnia elicits cerebral hypoperfusion, leading to TLOC, remains to be established....

  9. A Means for the Scintigraphic Imaging of Regional Brain Dynamics. Regional Cerebral Blood Flow and Regional Cerebral Blood Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potchen, E. J.; Bentley, R.; Gerth, W.; Hill, R. L.; Davis, D. O. [Washington University School Of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1969-05-15

    The use of freely diffusable inert radioactive gas as a washout indicator to measure regional cerebral blood flow has become a standardized kinetic procedure in many laboratories. Recent investigations with this technique have led us to conclude that we can reliably distinguish regional flow with perfusion against regional flow without perfusion from the early portion of the curve. Based on a detailed study of the early curve kinetics in patients with and without cerebral vascular disease we have defined the sampling duration necessary for application of the Anger gamma camera imaging process to regional changes in cerebral radioactivity. Using a standard camera and a small computer, a procedure has been developed and based upon entire field to determine the time of maximum height followed by analysis of the data in a matrix. This will permit a contour plot presentation of calculated regional cerebral blood flow in millilitres per 100 grams perfused brain per minute. In addition, we propose to augment this data by the display of regional non-perfusion blood flow versus regional cerebral flow with perfusion. Preliminary investigation on sampling duration, and Compton scattering were prerequisite to clinical scintigraphy of regional cerebral blood flow. In addition, the method of interface for the conventional Anger gamma camera to digital computers used in this procedure are discussed. Applications to further assess regional cerebral dynamics by scintigraphy are presented. (author)

  10. Pressure vessel lid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoening, J.; Elter, C.; Becker, G.; Pertiller, S.

    1986-01-01

    The invention concerns a lid for closing openings in reactor pressure vessels containing helium, which is made as a circular casting with hollow spaces and a flat floor and is set on the opening and kept down. It consists of helium-tight metal cast material with sufficient temperature resistance. There are at least two concentric heat resistant seals let into the bottom of the lid. The bottom is in immediate contact with the container atmosphere and has hollow spaces in its inside in the area opposite to the opening. (orig./HP) [de

  11. An often unrecognized cause of thunderclap headache : reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, K; Teune, L K; ter Laan, M; Uyttenboogaart, M; Vroomen, P C; De Keyser, J; Luijckx, G J

    2008-01-01

    Thunderclap headache (TCH) can have several causes of which subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is most common and well known. A rare cause of TCH is the reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) which is characterized by a reversible segmental vasoconstriction of the intracranial vessels. We

  12. Alpha-MSH decreases core and brain temperature during global cerebral ischemia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spulber, S.; Moldovan, Mihai; Oprica, M.

    2005-01-01

    -vessel occlusion forebrain ischemia on core temperature (CT) and brain temperature (BT), respectively. After 10 min cerebral ischemia, BT was lower in alpha-MSH- than in saline-injected animals. After 10 min reperfusion, both CT and BT were lower than the corresponding pre-ischemic levels after injection of alpha...

  13. Reduced vascular amyloid burden at microhemorrhage sites in cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veluw, Susanne J.; Kuijf, Hugo J.; Charidimou, Andreas; Viswanathan, Anand; Biessels, Geert Jan; Rozemuller, Annemieke J M; Frosch, Matthew P.; Greenberg, Steven M.

    Microhemorrhages are strongly associated with advanced cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Although it has been frequently proposed that the deposition of Aβ in the walls of cortical vessels directly causes microhemorrhages, this has not been studied in great detail, mainly because the ruptured

  14. Neural Vascular Mechanism for the Cerebral Blood Flow Autoregulation after Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the initial stages of hemorrhagic stroke, including intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage, the reflex mechanisms are activated to protect cerebral perfusion, but secondary dysfunction of cerebral flow autoregulation will eventually reduce global cerebral blood flow and the delivery of metabolic substrates, leading to generalized cerebral ischemia, hypoxia, and ultimately, neuronal cell death. Cerebral blood flow is controlled by various regulatory mechanisms, including prevailing arterial pressure, intracranial pressure, arterial blood gases, neural activity, and metabolic demand. Evoked by the concept of vascular neural network, the unveiled neural vascular mechanism gains more and more attentions. Astrocyte, neuron, pericyte, endothelium, and so forth are formed as a communicate network to regulate with each other as well as the cerebral blood flow. However, the signaling molecules responsible for this communication between these new players and blood vessels are yet to be definitively confirmed. Recent evidence suggested the pivotal role of transcriptional mechanism, including but not limited to miRNA, lncRNA, exosome, and so forth, for the cerebral blood flow autoregulation. In the present review, we sought to summarize the hemodynamic changes and underline neural vascular mechanism for cerebral blood flow autoregulation in stroke-prone state and after hemorrhagic stroke and hopefully provide more systematic and innovative research interests for the pathophysiology and therapeutic strategies of hemorrhagic stroke.

  15. Pathogenesis of lober intracerebral hemorrhage related to cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Naoto; Namba, Hiroki; Miura, Katsutoshi; Baba, Satoshi; Isoda, Haruo; Yokoyama, Tetsuo

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is an important cause of lober intracerebral hemorrhage in the elderly. Although leptomeningeal and cortical arteries with the deposition of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) have been thought to rupture in CAA, the pathogenesis of CAA-related hemorrhage still remains obscure. We studied 10 cases of CAA according to the Boston criteria from April 2006 to July 2009 in Omaezaki Municipal Hospital. Based on clinical data, we examined the primary site of hemorrhage and hypothesized the mechanisms of bleeding. Intracerebral hematoma evacuation was performed to alleviate neurological deteriolation in 2 patients and to make diagnosis in 3 patients. The surgical specimens were pathologically examined. The characteristic MR images of CAA related hemorrhage were characterized by microbleeds, superficial siderosis, subpial or subarachnoid hemorrhage, subcortical hemorrhage and lober intracerebral hemorrhage. Chronological images obtained in 1 patient revealed that lober intracerebral hemorrhage developed from microbleed with subpial hemorrhage without subarachnoid hemorrhage in one side of the cortex in the affected facing cerebral sulci. Operative findings showed subpial and subarachnoid hemorrhages around the cortical veins on the affected cerebral sulci in all cases. Abnormal fragile vessels existed in one side of the cortex of the affected sulci but not in the other side of the cortex. Complete hamatoma evacuation was performed in 4 cases. The surgical specimens of the hematoma and the adjacent brain parenchyma were pathologically examined by tissue staining with hematoxylin-eosin and Congo red. Many vessels in subpial, subcortical and subarachnoid space along the cerebral sulci were deposited with Aβ. From these findings, we speculated that the primary hemorrhage related to CAA occurred from the cortical arteries with Aβ deposition in the subpial space along the cerebral sulci and formed a lober intracerebral hematoma. Subarachnoid

  16. Stress criteria for nuclear vessel concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, D.

    1975-01-01

    Concrete nuclear vessels are submitted to prestressing forces which limit tensile stresses in concrete when the vessel is under pressure with thermal gradients. Hence, the most severe conditions for concrete appear when the vessel is prestressed and not submitted to internal pressure. The triaxial states of stress in the concrete may be computed postulating elastic or other behavior and compared with safe limits obtained from rupture tests and fatigue tests. The first part of the paper, recalls experimental rupture results and the acceptability procedures currently used. Criteria founded on the lemniscoid surfaces are proposed, parameters for which are obtained by various tests and safety considerations. In the second part, rupture tests are reported on small, thick, cylindrical vessels submitted to external hydraulic pressure simulating prestressing forces. Materials used are plain concrete, microconcrete, marble and graphite. The strengths obtained are much higher than those which could be elastically computed, triaxial rupture states being provided by previous experiments. Such results may be due to a plastic stress redistribution before fracture and to stabilizing effects of stress gradients around the more stressed areas. Fatigue tests by external hydraulic loading are reported [fr

  17. PWR pressure vessel integrity during overcooling accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    Pressurized water reactors are susceptible to certain types of hypothetical accidents that under some circumstances, including operation of the reactor beyond a critical time in its life, could result in failure of the pressure vessel as a result of propagation of crack-like defects in the vessel wall. The accidents of concern are those that result in thermal shock to the vessel while the vessel is subjected to internal pressure. Such accidents, referred to as pressurized thermal shock or overcooling accidents (OCA), include a steamline break, small-break LOCA, turbine trip followed by stuck-open bypass valves, the 1978 Rancho Seco and the TMI accidents and many other postulated and actual accidents. The source of cold water for the thermal shock is either emergency core coolant or the normal primary-system coolant. ORNL performed fracture-mechanics calculations for a steamline break in 1978 and for a turbine-trip case in 1980 and concluded on the basis of the results that many more such calculations would be required. To meet the expected demand in a realistic way a computer code, OCA-I, was developed that accepts primary-system temperature and pressure transients as input and then performs one-dimensional thermal and stress analyses for the wall and a corresponding fracture-mechanics analysis for a long axial flaw. The code is briefly described, and its use in both generic and specific plant analyses is discussed

  18. Stimulating retinal blood vessel protection with hypoxia-inducible factor stabilization: identification of novel small-molecule hydrazones to inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase (an American Ophthalmological Society thesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Jonathan E; Hoppe, George

    2013-09-01

    To discover novel small molecules that inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase (PHD), a key enzyme that regulates the posttranslational stability and hence activity of HIF. NIH3T3 cell line stably transfected with firefly luciferase under a HIF-1-inducible promoter was used to screen a Chembridge library of 34,000 small molecules of molecular weight 250 to 550 Da. Positive hits were considered at 4.5-fold higher luminescence than control. Selected compounds were validated in vitro. The most effective dose was then used to treat mice expressing firefly luciferase fused to the oxygen-dependent degradation domain (lucODD) in order to determine the location of the receptor for systemic treatment with small-molecule HIF PHD inhibitors. Twenty-three novel small molecules were discovered, the majority of which were hydrazones and hydrazines. Of the 23 compounds, each had different selectivity for expression of erythropoietin or vascular endothelial growth factor, two angiogenic, HIF-regulated gene products. In addition, each showed different selectivity for hepatocytes or kidney, or both or neither, when injected intraperitoneally in an in vivo reporter gene assay. The discovery of multiple small molecules that inhibit HIF PHD identifies new reagents to develop strategies to prevent the degradation of HIF by its selective PHD. These molecules are novel hypoxia mimetics that may provide new strategies to protect retinovasculature from hyperoxia.

  19. Quality assurance of the reactor pressure vessel of nuclear power plants. Determination of the fracture toughness KIC above the ductile-brittle transition region on small test specimens by means of a conformal mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, G.; Krompholz, K.

    1994-01-01

    The ''surveillance-programs'' for the determination of the mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) materials, as a function of the neutron dose, include impact and tensile tests for the boiling water reactor; while for pressurized water reactors additional wedge opening load specimens (WOL), for the measurement of the fracture toughness K IC at low temperatures, are utilized. While the Charpy impact toughness gives the total magnitude of energy, which indicates the change of the material state, e.g. the state of embrittlement, the fracture toughness, I IC , gives a base for mechanical calculations. This is of importance for components in which cracks or flaws are assumed. The mechanical analysis, and its relevance to safety assessments, depends on the knowledge of different parameters such as geometry of the structure and flaws, and load history of the structure. Fracture mechanical methods play an important role, if the leak-before-fracture problem is considered. Within the frame work of fracture mechanical methods, only the influence of assumed macroscopic cracks on the structural behaviour can be handled. Flaw formation processes in flaw-free structures, as well as the treatment of short flaws, can not currently be included. In the regime of low and intermediate temperatures (for ferritic and austenitic materials, normally below 400 o C), the rules of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and elasto-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) are applied, some of which are already part of the code cases. (author) 5 figs., 32 refs

  20. Pressure vessels and methods of sealing leaky tubes disposed in pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, G.C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to pressure vessels and to methods of sealing leaky tubes in them and is especially applicable to pressure vessels in the form of sheet-and-tube type heat exchangers constructed with a large number of relatively small diameter tubes grouped in a bundle. To seal off a leaky tube in such a heat exchanger an explosive activated plug in the form of a hollow metal body is used, inserted at each end of the tube to be sealed. Using the arrangement of pressure vessel and associated tube sheets and the explosive activated plug method of sealing a leaky tube as described in this invention it is claimed that distortion of the adjacent tubes and the tube sheets is reduced when the explosive activated plugs are detonated. (U.K.)

  1. Large intracranial vessel occlusion arising after radiotherapy for craniopharingioma. A case report and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, Osamu; Iwasa, Satoshi; Kohno, Norio; Nozaki, Miwako (Kiryu Kohsei General Hospital, Gunma (Japan))

    1994-10-01

    We report a patient who developed occlusion of the intracranial major arteries induced by radiation therapy for craniopharyngioma. The patient, a 9-year-old boy, presented with deterioration of vision, nausea and vomiting. He underwent a right ventriculo-peritoneal shunt operation, and the tumor was partially removed. Postoperatively, he received focal radiation therapy with total of 60 Gy. Preoperative cerebral angiography, cerebral vessels had no sigh of occlusive lesion or stenosis. One year after irradiation, he started to have repeated cerebral ischemic attacks. But no regrowth of the tumor was detected on CT scans. Two years and 8 months after irradiation, he suddenly had right hemiparesis. Cerebral angiography revealed severe stenosis of the right anterior cerebral artery (precommunicating segment), middle cerebral artery (horizontal portion) and terminal portion of the right carotid artery. Left carotid angiography showed complete occlusion of the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery and collateral vessels from the middle meningeal artery to the middle cerebral artery through the shunt burr hole. He has been treated conservatively and is doing well except for slight right hemiparesis. Our experience shows that the risk of occlusive cerebrovasculopathy after radiation therapy should be taken into account, especially in children. (author).

  2. Summary of Reported Whale-Vessel Collisions in Alaskan Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L. Neilson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we summarize 108 reported whale-vessel collisions in Alaska from 1978–2011, of which 25 are known to have resulted in the whale's death. We found 89 definite and 19 possible/probable strikes based on standard criteria we created for this study. Most strikes involved humpback whales (86% with six other species documented. Small vessel strikes were most common (<15 m, 60%, but medium (15–79 m, 27% and large (≥80 m, 13% vessels also struck whales. Among the 25 mortalities, vessel length was known in seven cases (190–294 m and vessel speed was known in three cases (12–19 kn. In 36 cases, human injury or property damage resulted from the collision, and at least 15 people were thrown into the water. In 15 cases humpback whales struck anchored or drifting vessels, suggesting the whales did not detect the vessels. Documenting collisions in Alaska will remain challenging due to remoteness and resource limitations. For a better understanding of the factors contributing to lethal collisions, we recommend (1 systematic documentation of collisions, including vessel size and speed; (2 greater efforts to necropsy stranded whales; (3 using experienced teams focused on determining cause of death; (4 using standard criteria for validating collision reports, such as those presented in this paper.

  3. Contrast settling in cerebral aneurysm angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhijie; Hoffmann, Kenneth R; Guterman, Lee R; Wang Zhou; Rudin, Stephen; Meng Hui

    2005-01-01

    During angiography, blood flow is visualized with a radiopaque contrast agent, which is denser than blood. In complex vasculature, such as cerebral saccular aneurysms, the density difference may produce an appreciable gravity effect, where the contrast material separates from blood and settles along the gravity direction. Although contrast settling has been occasionally reported before, the fluid mechanics behind it have not been explored. Furthermore, the severity of contrast settling in cerebral aneurysms varies significantly from case to case. Therefore, a better understanding of the physical principles behind this phenomenon is needed to evaluate contrast settling in clinical angiography. In this study, flow in two identical groups of sidewall aneurysm models with varying parent-vessel curvature was examined by angiography. Intravascular stents were deployed into one group of the models. To detect contrast settling, we used lateral view angiography. Time-intensity curves were analysed from the angiographic data, and a computational fluid dynamic analysis was conducted. Results showed that contrast settling was strongly related to the local flow dynamics. We used the Froude number, a ratio of flow inertia to gravity force, to characterize the significance of gravity force. An aneurysm with a larger vessel curvature experienced higher flow, which resulted in a larger Froude number and, thus, less gravitational settling. Addition of a stent reduced the aneurysmal flow, thereby increasing the contrast settling. We found that contrast settling resulted in an elevated washout tail in the time-intensity curve. However, this signature is not unique to contrast settling. To determine whether contrast settling is present, a lateral view should be obtained in addition to the anteroposterior (AP) view routinely used clinically so as to rule out contrast settling and hence to enable a valid time-intensity curve analysis of blood flow in the aneurysm

  4. Common-Pressure-Vessel Nickel-Hydrogen Battery Development

    OpenAIRE

    Otzinger, Burton; Wheeler, James

    1991-01-01

    The dual-cell, common-pressure vessel, nickel-hydrogen configuration has recently emerged as an option for small satellite nickel-hydrogen battery application. An important incentive is that the dual-cell, CPV configured battery presents a 30 percent reduction in volume and nearly 50 percent reduction in mounting footprint, when compared with an equivalent battery of individual pressure- vessel (IPV) cells. In addition energy density and cost benefits are significant. Eagle-Picher Industries ...

  5. Open vessel microwave digestion of food matrices (T6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, L.; LeBlanc, G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Advancements in the field of open vessel microwave digestion continue to provide solutions for industries requiring acid digestion of large sample sizes. Those interesting in digesting food matrices are particularly interested in working with large amounts of sample and then diluting small final volumes. This paper will show the advantages of instantaneous regent addition and post-digestion evaporation when performing an open vessel digestion and evaporation methods for various food matrices will be presented along with analyte recovery data. (author)

  6. Semiotics of lesions of the cerebral venous collectors on application of noninvasive techniques of x-ray diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, S.E.; Abalmasov, V.G.

    2001-01-01

    The study included application of a complex of the noninvasive diagnostic techniques such as MR tomography, MR venography, duplex scanning of the internal jugular veins, and transcranial Doppler sonography. The authors provide a detailed description of the semiotics of the MR signs of cerebral venous collector lesion in patients with thrombosis, extravasal compression, aneurysms, and development anomalies. Present the quantitative ultrasound parameters of hemodynamics in the efferent vessels of the brain accessible to inspections describe the effect of spontaneous echo-opacification in the internal jugular veins, which is assumed to be a predictor of thrombosis. Intravenous injection of magnevist resulted in an appreciable refinement of visualization of small dural sinuses at MR venography thereby allowing for the diagnosis of their thrombosis. It is suggested that the use of the entire complex of the X-ray modalities under consideration may lead to a more complete and noninvasive evaluation of the nature of cerebral venous insufficiency and of the degree of hemodynamic significance. Moreover, this will make it possible to outline approaches to therapeutic or surgical correction of the disease [ru

  7. [Semiotics of lesions of the cerebral venous collectors on application of noninvasive techniques of x-ray diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, S; Abalmasov, V

    2001-01-01

    The study included application of a complex of the noninvasive diagnostic techniques such as MR tomography, MR venography, duplex scanning of the internal jugular veins, and transcranial Doppler sonography. The authors provide a detailed description of the semiotics of the MR signs of cerebral venous collector lesion in patients with thrombosis, extravasal compression, aneurysms, and developmental anomalies. Present the quantitative ultrasound parameters of hemodynamics in the efferent vessels of the brain accessible to inspections describe the effect of spontaneous echo-opacification in the internal jugular veins, which is assumed to be a predictor of thrombosis. Intravenous injection of magnevist resulted in an appreciable refinement of visualization of small dural sinuses at MR venography thereby allowing for the diagnosis of their thrombosis. It is suggested that the use of the entire complex of the x-ray modalities under consideration may lead to a more complete and noninvasive evaluation of the nature of cerebral venous insufficiency and of the degree of hemodynamic significance. Moreover, this will make it possible to outline approaches to therapeutic or surgical correction of the disease.

  8. Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, Z.; Surlan, M.; Zvan, B.; Zaletel, M.

    2002-01-01

    Background. Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid endarterectomy is an uncommon but well-defined entity. There are only few reports of ''hyperperfusion injury'' following carotid angioplasty. Case report. We report an unstable arterial hypertension and high-grade carotid stenosis in a 58-year-old, right-handed woman. After a stroke in the territory of middle cerebral artery carotid angioplasty was performed in the patient. Among risk factors, the long lasting arterial hypertension was the most pronounced. Immediately after the procedure, the patient was stable without any additional neurologic deficit. The second day, the patient had an epileptic seizure and CT revealed a small haemorrhage in the left frontal lobe. Conclusions. The combination of a high-grade carotid stenosis and unstable arterial pressure is probably an important prognostic factor in the pathogenesis of hyperperfusion syndrome. (author)

  9. Cerebral palsy characterization by estimating ocular motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Jully; Atehortúa, Angélica; Moncayo, Ricardo; Romero, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a large group of motion and posture disorders caused during the fetal or infant brain development. Sensorial impairment is commonly found in children with CP, i.e., between 40-75 percent presents some form of vision problems or disabilities. An automatic characterization of the cerebral palsy is herein presented by estimating the ocular motion during a gaze pursuing task. Specifically, After automatically detecting the eye location, an optical flow algorithm tracks the eye motion following a pre-established visual assignment. Subsequently, the optical flow trajectories are characterized in the velocity-acceleration phase plane. Differences are quantified in a small set of patients between four to ten years.

  10. The mechanism of cerebral aneurysmal formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoi, Toshihiro; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a disease of poor prognosis and MR- and CT-angiographies are used for its diagnosis and in the preventive therapy of its rupture. Here discussed are formation and growth leading to rupture of the lesion for its advanced diagnosis and prevention of rupturing. Beginning from findings in animal experimentation in mice, rats and monkeys, discussed are pathology of the aneurysm, genes related with its formation, molecular biological approaches concerning apoptosis and NF-kB/TNF-α related inflammatory reactions, participation of sex hormone, clinical hemodynamic analyses based on 3D data from CT and MRI findings, and clinical studies. Authors consider that local hemodynamic stress loading is possibly related to cerebral aneurysm formation as it is yielded at the loading part of the vessel in human and in animal models. The aneurysm is possibly a result of remodeling disturbance by the load and subsequent excessive involution of the artery. In the process, probably included are the inflammation, apoptosis, degradation of extracellular matrix and functional impairment of endotherial cells. Future elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying the aneurismal growth and rupture will bring about the improved treatment to prevent the disease by stabilizing the aneurismal wall. (T.T.)

  11. Cerebral localization in antiquity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, F Clifford

    2009-07-01

    Fragments of neurology can be found in the oldest medical writings in antiquity. Recognizable cerebral localization is seen in Egyptian medical papyri. Most notably, the Edwin Smith papyrus describes hemiplegia after a head injury. Similar echoes can be seen in Homer, the Bible, and the pre-Hippocratic writer Alcmaeon of Croton. While Biblical writers thought that the heart was the seat of the soul, Hippocratic writers located it in the head. Alexandrian anatomists described the nerves, and Galen developed the ventricular theory of cognition whereby mental functions are classified and localized in one of the cerebral ventricles. Medieval scholars, including the early Church Fathers, modified Galenic ventricular theory so as to make it a dynamic model of cognition. Physicians in antiquity subdivided the brain into separate areas and attributed to them different functions, a phenomenon that connects them with modern neurologists.

  12. Cerebral venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soralova, T.; Sevcikova, H.; Petersky, D.

    2014-01-01

    We decided to process this theme due to its nonspecific clinical features as they often cause diagnostic problems not only to clinicians but also to diagnostic. It is important to think of this disease mainly in young women who administer hormonal contraception. Imaging methods play the crucial role in diagnostic of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The gold standard is a native CT of brain which shows the venous sinus thrombosis as a hyperdense lesion in the locus of the sinus (dense triangle sign), CT venography shows the sinus thrombosis as a defect in a contrast filling of the venous sinus (empty delta sign). Other investigative methods are magnetic resonance imaging or MRA. In short we also mention quite a rare but more serious thrombosis of profound cerebral veins v. cerebri magna-Galeni, vv. cerebri internae). The importance of early diagnostic and non specificity of symptoms is presented in 3 clinical cases that are the part of this work. (author)

  13. Applications of cerebral SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McArthur, C., E-mail: claire.mcarthur@nhs.net [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Jampana, R.; Patterson, J.; Hadley, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can provide three-dimensional functional images of the brain following the injection of one of a series of radiopharmaceuticals that crosses the blood-brain barrier and distributes according to cerebral perfusion, neurotransmitter, or cell density. Applications include differentiating between the dementias, evaluating cerebrovascular disease, preoperative localization of epileptogenic foci, diagnosing movement disorders, and evaluation of intracerebral tumours, while also proving a useful research tool. Unlike positronemission tomography (PET), SPECT imaging is widely available and can be performed in any department that has access to a rotating gamma camera. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the utility of cerebral SPECT and increase awareness of its role in the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  14. Targeting Therapy Resistant Tumor Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Morris LS. Hysterectomy vs. resectoscopic endometrial ablation for the control of abnormal uterine bleeding . A cost-comparative study. J Reprod Med 1994;39...after the antibody treatment contain a pericyte coat, vessel architecture is normal, the diameter of the vessels is smaller (dilated, abnormal vessels...involvement of proteases from inflammatory mast cells and functionally abnormal (Carmeliet and Jain, 2000; Pasqualini (Coussens et al., 1999) and other bone

  15. The vessel fluence; Fluence cuve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the technical meeting on the reactors vessels fluence. They are grouped in eight sessions: the industrial context and the stakes of the vessels control; the organization and the methodology for the fluence computation; the concerned physical properties; the reference computation methods; the fluence monitoring in an industrial context; vessels monitoring under irradiation; others methods in the world; the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  16. Morphometry of A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery and its clinical importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, A; Nayak, S R; Bagoji, I B; D'Costa, S; Pai, M M; Jiji, P J; Kumar, C G; Rai, R

    2010-01-01

    Anterior cerebral artery, one of the terminal branches of the internal carotid artery is an important vessel taking part in the formation of circle of Willis. It supplies a large part of the medial surface of the cerebral hemisphere containing the areas of motor and somatosensory cortices of the lower limb. Aim of this study was the morphometry of A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery. 93 formalin fixed brain specimen of either sex and of Indian origin were studied. The mean length, mean external diameter and the anomalies present in A1 segment of the vessel were studied in detail and photographed. The mean length of A1 segment of the vessel was 14.49+/-0.28 mm and 14.22+/-0.22 mm on right and left side respectively. The mean external diameter of the vessel on right and left side was 2.12+/-0.07 mm and 2.32+/-0.06 mm respectively. Narrowing, aneurysm formation, buttonhole formation and median anterior cerebral artery were the anomalies seen with an occurrence of 15.05%, 5.37%, 3.22% and 12.9%, respectively. The above anomalies did not have any sex or side predilection. Knowledge of morphometry of the vessel will be of use to neurosurgeons while performing the shunt operation, in assessing the feasibility of such operations and in the choice of patients. From this study we infer that the morphometry of anterior cerebral artery varies in different population and that the neurosurgeons operating should have a thorough knowledge of the possible variations.

  17. Cerebral ketone body metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A A M

    2005-01-01

    Ketone bodies (KBs) are an important source of energy for the brain. During the neonatal period, they are also precursors for the synthesis of lipids (especially cholesterol) and amino acids. The rate of cerebral KB metabolism depends primarily on the concentration in blood; high concentrations occur during fasting and on a high-fat diet. Cerebral KB metabolism is also regulated by the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which depends on the abundance of monocarboxylic acid transporters (MCT1). The BBB's permeability to KBs increases with fasting in humans. In rats, permeability increases during the suckling period, but human neonates have not been studied. Monocarboxylic acid transporters are also present in the plasma membranes of neurons and glia but their role in regulating KB metabolism is uncertain. Finally, the rate of cerebral KB metabolism depends on the activities of the relevant enzymes in brain. The activities vary with age in rats, but reliable results are not available for humans. Cerebral KB metabolism in humans differs from that in the rat in several respects. During fasting, for example, KBs supply more of the brain's energy in humans than in the rat. Conversely, KBs are probably used more extensively in the brain of suckling rats than in human neonates. These differences complicate the interpretation of rodent studies. Most patients with inborn errors of ketogenesis develop normally, suggesting that the only essential role for KBs is as an alternative fuel during illness or prolonged fasting. On the other hand, in HMG-CoA lyase deficiency, imaging generally shows asymptomatic white-matter abnormalities. The ability of KBs to act as an alternative fuel explains the effectiveness of the ketogenic diet in GLUT1 deficiency, but its effectiveness in epilepsy remains unexplained.

  18. Radiopharmaceuticals for cerebral studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon Cabana, Alba

    1994-01-01

    For obtain good brain scintillation images in nuclear medicine must be used several radiopharmaceuticals. Cerebral studies give a tumors visual image as well as brain anomalities detection and are helpful in the diagnostic diseases . Are described in this work: a cerebrum radiopharmaceuticals classification,labelled compounds proceeding and Tc 99m good properties in for your fast caption, post administration and blood purification for renal way

  19. Radiologic findings of cerebral septic embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Joon; Kim Tae Hoon; Kim, Seung Chul; Kim, Jae Seung; Pai, Hyun Joo [Dankook Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Chang, Kee Hyun [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Choi, Woo Suk [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1998-01-01

    To determine the MR and CT findings which differentiate cerebral septic embolism from thrombotic infarction. Cerebral septic embolism was confirmed by blood culture in six patients and autopsy in two. The number, size, distribution, contrast enhancement, and hemorrhage of the lesions, as seen on MR and CT, were retrospectively analyzed, and four patients were followed up for between one week and seven months. In a total of eight patients, infective endocarditis (n=5) and sepsis (n=3) caused cerebral septic embolism. The number, of lesions was 3 {approx} 7 in six patients, over 10 in one, and innumerable in one: these varied in size from punctate to 6 cm and were distributed in various areas of the brain. Gyral infarction was noted in five patients: non-enhancing patchy lesions involving the basal ganglia or white matter were found in five, tiny isolated nodular or ring-enhancing small lesions involving the cortex and white matter in three, peripheral rim-enhancing large lesions in one, and numerous enhancing nodules disseminated in the cortex in one. Hemorrhage had occurred in six. follow-up studies in four patients showed that initial lesions had enlarged in two and regressed in two: new lesions had appeared in two. Multiple lesions of different sizes and various patterns which include gyral infarction, patchy or nodular lesion in the cortex, white mater of basal ganglia, and isolated small ring-like or nodular enhancement or frequent hemorrhage are findings which could be helpful in the radiologic diagnosis of cerebral septic embolism. (author). 8 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Radiologic findings of cerebral septic embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Joon; Kim Tae Hoon; Kim, Seung Chul; Kim, Jae Seung; Pai, Hyun Joo; Kim, Dong Ik; Chang, Kee Hyun; Choi, Woo Suk

    1998-01-01

    To determine the MR and CT findings which differentiate cerebral septic embolism from thrombotic infarction. Cerebral septic embolism was confirmed by blood culture in six patients and autopsy in two. The number, size, distribution, contrast enhancement, and hemorrhage of the lesions, as seen on MR and CT, were retrospectively analyzed, and four patients were followed up for between one week and seven months. In a total of eight patients, infective endocarditis (n=5) and sepsis (n=3) caused cerebral septic embolism. The number, of lesions was 3 ∼ 7 in six patients, over 10 in one, and innumerable in one: these varied in size from punctate to 6 cm and were distributed in various areas of the brain. Gyral infarction was noted in five patients: non-enhancing patchy lesions involving the basal ganglia or white matter were found in five, tiny isolated nodular or ring-enhancing small lesions involving the cortex and white matter in three, peripheral rim-enhancing large lesions in one, and numerous enhancing nodules disseminated in the cortex in one. Hemorrhage had occurred in six. follow-up studies in four patients showed that initial lesions had enlarged in two and regressed in two: new lesions had appeared in two. Multiple lesions of different sizes and various patterns which include gyral infarction, patchy or nodular lesion in the cortex, white mater of basal ganglia, and isolated small ring-like or nodular enhancement or frequent hemorrhage are findings which could be helpful in the radiologic diagnosis of cerebral septic embolism. (author). 8 refs., 5 figs