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Sample records for small bowel resection

  1. Small bowel resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ileostomy and your diet Ileostomy - caring for your stoma Ileostomy - changing your pouch Ileostomy - discharge Ileostomy - what to ask your doctor Low-fiber diet Preventing falls Small bowel resection - discharge Surgical wound care - open Types of ileostomy Ulcerative colitis - discharge When ...

  2. Large bowel resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blockage in the intestine due to scar tissue Colon cancer Diverticular disease (disease of the large bowel) Other reasons for bowel resection are: Familial polyposis (polyps are growths on the lining of the colon or rectum) Injuries that damage the large bowel ...

  3. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia successfully treated by segmental resections of small bowel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Na Rae; Lee, Suk-Koo; Suh, Yeon-Lim

    2009-10-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare cause of protein-losing enteropathy and usually presents with intermittent diarrhea or malnutrition. Diagnosis depends largely on its pathologic condition demonstrating greatly dilated lymphatics mainly in the lamina propria of the mucosa. We report a case of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia, of the diffuse type, presenting with abdominal pain and voluminous diarrhea in a previously healthy 8-year-old boy. He had periumbilical pain for 3 months before presentation. He was managed by segmental bowel resections and end-to-end anastomoses. The histopathologic condition of the resected small intestine showed lymphatic dilation limited mainly to the subserosa and mesentery but was not prominent in the mucosa. Abdominal pain and diarrhea subsided postoperatively. The present case is the fourth report describing a response to operative resection.

  4. Acute Portomesenteric Venous Thrombosis following Laparoscopic Small Bowel Resection and Ventral Hernia Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhradeev Sivasambu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute portomesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare but life-threatening complication of laparoscopic surgery that has been described in literature. Prompt diagnosis and early initiation of treatment are vital to prevent life-threatening complications such as mesenteric ischemia and infarction. A 51-year-old lady had laparoscopic small bowel resection and primary anastomosis with ventral hernia repair 4 weeks earlier for partial small bowel obstruction. Her postoperative period was uneventful and she was discharged home. Four weeks after surgery she developed watery diarrhea and generalized abdominal pain for four-day duration. A computed tomography of the abdomen revealed portomesenteric venous thrombosis although a computed tomography of abdomen before surgery 4 weeks back did not show any portomesenteric venous thrombosis. We are reporting a case of acute portomesenteric venous thrombosis as a complication of laparoscopic surgery.

  5. The localization of bleeding small bowel lesions for conservative resection: a simple radiographic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, J.M.; Northover, J.M.A.; Raphael, M.J.; Slack, W.W.

    1981-01-01

    Haemorrhage from the small bowel is a serious diagnostic and therapeutic problem. The value of selective superior mesenteric angiography to localize the source accurately does not require emphasizing. However, many of the lesions demonstrated are notoriously difficult to find at operation unless they are actively bleeding at the time. A simple method of intra-operative angiography is described which, because demonstration of the bleeding lesion on the operative films is not an essential requirement, does not involve the use of specialized angiographic equipment. Although only one case is offered to illustrate the method, it seems to possess sufficient versatility to be useful in most situations where intra-operative assistance in isolating a specific loop of small bowel for resection is anticipated. (author)

  6. Localization of bleeding small bowel lesions for conservative resection: a simple radiographic technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, J M; Northover, J M.A.; Raphael, M J; Slack, W W [Middlesex Hospital, London (UK)

    1981-10-01

    Haemorrhage from the small bowel is a serious diagnostic and therapeutic problem. The value of selective superior mesenteric angiography to localize the source accurately does not require emphasizing. However, many of the lesions demonstrated are notoriously difficult to find at operation unless they are actively bleeding at the time. A simple method of intra-operative angiography is described which, because demonstration of the bleeding lesion on the operative films is not an essential requirement, does not involve the use of specialized angiographic equipment. Although only one case is offered to illustrate the method, it seems to possess sufficient versatility to be useful in most situations where intra-operative assistance in isolating a specific loop of small bowel for resection is anticipated.

  7. High-output stoma after small-bowel resections for Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Stephen K K; Baker, Melanie; Nightingale, Jeremy M D

    2005-12-01

    A 56-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of Crohn's disease and multiple bowel resections resulting in a loop jejunostomy was referred to our Nutritional Unit from a neighboring district general hospital for further management. She was first seen in October 2001, and initial assessment indicated that she was malnourished with fluid depletion, evidenced by the high volume of stomal fluid produced. There had been no sudden change in her medication, her Crohn's disease was quiescent and there was no evidence of any intra-abdominal sepsis. Despite a high calorific intake through her diet, she continued to lose weight. Serum urea and electrolytes; magnesium; C-reactive protein; full blood count; urinary spot sodium; anthropometric measurements. High-output stoma with malabsorption as a consequence of repeated small-bowel surgery. The patient was treated with oral hypotonic fluid restriction (0.5 l/day), 2 l of oral glucose-saline solution per day, high-dose oral antimotility agents (loperamide and codeine phosphate), a proton-pump inhibitor (omeprazole) and oral magnesium replacement. A year later, the patient's loop jejunostomy was closed and an end ileostomy fashioned, bringing an additional 35 cm of small bowel into continuity; macronutrient absorption improved but her problem of dehydration was only slightly reduced. She was stabilized on a twice-weekly subcutaneous magnesium and saline infusion and daily oral 1alpha-hydroxycholecalciferol.

  8. Role of luminal nutrients and endogenous GLP-2 in intestinal adaptation to mid-small bowel resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahly, Elizabeth M; Gillingham, Melanie B; Guo, Ziwen

    2003-01-01

    To elucidate the role of luminal nutrients and glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) in intestinal adaptation, rats were subjected to 70% midjejunoileal resection or ileal transection and were maintained with total parenteral nutrition (TPN) or oral feeding. TPN rats showed small bowel mucosal hyperpla......To elucidate the role of luminal nutrients and glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) in intestinal adaptation, rats were subjected to 70% midjejunoileal resection or ileal transection and were maintained with total parenteral nutrition (TPN) or oral feeding. TPN rats showed small bowel mucosal...... rats was associated with a significant positive correlation between increases in plasma bioactive GLP-2 and proglucagon mRNA expression in the colon of TPN rats and ileum of orally fed rats. These data support a significant role for endogenous GLP-2 in the adaptive response to mid-small bowel resection...

  9. Intestinal myoelectric activity and contractile motility in dogs with a reversed jejunal segment after extensive small bowel resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, M; Iwafuchi, M; Ohsawa, Y; Yagi, M; Iinuma, Y; Ohtani, S

    1992-06-01

    To evaluate the functioning and effectiveness of a reversed jejunal segment after extensive small bowel resection, we continuously measured the postoperative bowel motility (using bipolar electrodes and/or contractile strain gage force transducers) in interdigestive and postprandial conscious dogs at 2 to 5 weeks after surgery. The fasting duodenal migrating myoelectric (or motor) complex (MMC) occurred at markedly longer intervals in dogs with a 20-cm reversed jejunal segment created after 75% to 80% extensive small bowel resection (group 3) than in dogs that received extensive resection alone (group 2) or dogs that underwent construction of a reversed jejunal segment without bowel resection (group 1). The MMC arising from the duodenum was often interrupted at the jejunum above the proximal anastomosis and did not migrate smoothly to the reversed segment or terminal ileum in group 3. In addition, brief small discordant contractions were frequent in the reversed segment and the jejunum above the proximal anastomosis in group 3. The duration of the postprandial period without duodenal MMC activity was significantly prolonged in groups 2 and 3. These results suggest that the transit time and passage of intestinal contents were delayed and that the periodical MMC was disturbed in group 3. The delay of transit time was due to prolongation of the interval between duodenal MMCs, the interruption of MMC propagation at the jejunum above the proximal anastomosis, the dominance of MMCs that followed the inherent anatomical continuity of the bowel, and discordant movements across the proximal anastomosis. Functional obstruction could be a potential problem in a 20-cm reversed jejunal segment inserted after extensive small bowel resection.

  10. Resulting long-term intestinal motility in dogs following construction of a reversed jejunal segment after extensive small bowel resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, M; Iwafuchi, M; Ohsawa, Y; Yagi, M; Iinuma, Y; Ohtani, S

    1994-10-01

    To evaluate the long-term function and effective motility of a reversed jejunal segment after extensive small bowel resection, the authors continuously measured postoperative bowel motility during interdigestive and postprandial periods in conscious dogs 6 to 10 months after surgery. The long-term findings were compared with previously reported short-term results measured 2 to 4 weeks after the operation. In the long-term follow-up dogs with a 20-cm reversed jejunal segment constructed after extensive (75% to 80%) small bowel resection, the fasting duodenal migrating myoelectric (or motor) complex (MMC) was often interrupted in the jejunum above the reversed segment, and did not migrate smoothly to the reversed segment or terminal ileum. The MMCs arising from the duodenum predominantly propagated to the ileum through the inherent anatomic continuity of the bowel. In addition, brief small discordant contractions were frequent in the reversed segment and the jejunum, above the proximal anastomosis. These findings are similar to those of the MMC propagation pattern noted 2 to 4 weeks after surgery. However, the postprandial duration without duodenal MMC activity was significantly shorter in the dogs with long-term follow-up than in those with short-term follow-up (both were longer than in control dogs). Marked dilatation of the jejunum and reversed jejunal segment was noted across the proximal anastomosis. These results suggest that the transit time and passage of intestinal contents can be delayed and stagnated for at least 10 months after extensive small bowel resection with a 20-cm reversed jejunal segment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Proteomic analysis of the intestinal adaptation response reveals altered expression of fatty acid binding proteins following massive small bowel resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Andrew N; Pereira-Fantini, Prue M; Wilson, Guineva; Taylor, Russell G; Rainczuk, Adam; Meehan, Katie L; Sourial, Magdy; Fuller, Peter J; Stanton, Peter G; Robertson, David M; Bines, Julie E

    2010-03-05

    Intestinal adaptation in response to the loss of the small intestine is essential to restore enteral autonomy in patients who have undergone massive small bowel resection (MSBR). In a proportion of patients, intestinal function is not restored, resulting in chronic intestinal failure (IF). Early referral of such patients for transplant provides the best prognosis; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying intestinal adaptation remain elusive and there is currently no convenient marker to predict whether patients will develop IF. We have investigated the adaptation response in a well-characterized porcine model of intestinal adaptation. 2D DIGE analysis of ileal epithelium from piglets recovering from massive small bowel resection (MSBR) identified over 60 proteins that changed specifically in MSBR animals relative to nonoperational or sham-operated controls. Three fatty acid binding proteins (L-FABP, FABP-6, and I-FABP) showed changes in MSBR animals. The expression changes and localization of each FABP were validated by immunoblotting and immunohistochemical analysis. FABP expression changes in MSBR animals occurred concurrently with altered triglyceride and bile acid metabolism as well as weight gain. The observed FABP expression changes in the ileal epithelium occur as part of the intestinal adaptation response and could provide a clinically useful marker to evaluate adaptation following MSBR.

  12. Biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical sodium pertechnetate (Na99mTcO4) after massive small bowel resection in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon, Damaso de Araujo; Araujo-Filho, Irami; Villarim-Neto, Arthur; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Medeiros, Aldo Cunha; Rego, Amalia Cinthia Meneses; Azevedo, Italo Medeiros; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biodistribution of sodium pertechnetate (Na 99m TcO 4 ) in organs and tissues, the morphometry of remnant intestinal mucosa and ponderal evolution in rats subjected to massive resection of the small intestine. Methods:Twenty-one Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups of 7 animals each. The short bowel (SB) group was subjected to massive resection of the small intestine; the control group (C) rats were not operated on, and soft intestinal handling was performed in sham rats. The animals were weighed weekly. On the 30th postoperative day, 0.1 mL of Na 99m TcO 4 , with mean activity of 0.66 MBq was injected intravenously into the orbital plexus. After 30 minutes, the rats were killed with an overdose of anesthetic, and fragments of the liver, spleen, pancreas, stomach, duodenum, small intestine, thyroid, lung, heart, kidney, bladder, muscle, femur and brain were harvested. The biopsies were washed with 0.9% NaCl.,The radioactivity was counted using Gamma Counter Wizard TM 1470, Perkin-Elmer. The percentage of radioactivity per gram of tissue (%ATI/g) was calculated. Biopsies of the remaining jejunum were analysed by HE staining to obtain mucosal thickness. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey test for multiple comparisons were used, considering p 99m TcO 4 in the organs of the groups studied (p>0.05). An increase in the weight of the SB rats was observed after the second postoperative week. The jejunal mucosal thickness of the SB rats was significantly greater than that of C and sham rats (p 99m TcO 4 was not affected by massive intestinal resection, suggesting that short bowel syndrome is not the cause of misleading interpretation, if an examination using this radiopharmaceutical is indicated. (author)

  13. Effects of intestinal muscular wrapping on remnant intestinal motility after massive small bowel resection in conscious canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, M; Iwafuchi, M; Yagi, M; Iinuma, Y; Kanada, S; Ohtaki, M; Yamazaki, S; Homma, S

    2000-04-01

    We searched the effect of the muscular valve on the management of short bowel syndrome. The motility of the remnant intestine with a special muscular valve after 80% massive distal small bowel resection (MSBR) was evaluated in conscious dogs. The valve (muscular ring) was made by the autointestinal muscle layer holding vascular pedicle. Interdigestive and postprandial bowel motility using bipolar electrodes and/or contractile strain gauge force transducers 2-4 weeks after the surgery, and data of this group (Group I) were compared to the motility in dogs after MSBR without valve construction (Group II) and in controls (Control). Results; Fasting duodenal migrating myoelectric (or motor) complexes (MMCs) in Group I occurred at longer intervals than in Control and almost similarly to those in Group II. MMCs arising from the duodenum were often interrupted before the jejunum above the valve and the anastomosis. The velocity of duodenal MMC propagation was slowed in every intestinal segment including that from the duodenum to the proximal jejunum, and to the jejunum above the anastomosis. Transit time in MSBR group (I and II) from the duodenum to the terminal ileum was extremely shorter than in Control, but there were no differences between in Groups I and II. The duration of the postprandial period without duodenal MMCs in Group I was significantly prolonged than in Control, but was shorter than that in Group II. The muscular valve was frequently activated, and the jejunum covered with the valve was contracted frequently which synchronized with the valve activity. It seemed the valve worked as sphincter. However, intestinal obstruction was not occurred through the jejunum covered by the valve. In conclusion, changes in gut motility after MSBR with the valve construction compensate for the shortened intestine and maintain the bowel content earlier postoperatively in comparison with the MSBR alone, and also contribute to the adaptive increase in the remnant intestinal

  14. Small Bowel Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pouchings in the wall of the colon), or cancer. Upper GI (esophagus, stomach, or duodenum) bleeding is most often due ... begins transmitting images of the inside of the esophagus, stomach, and small bowel to a ... Bowel Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome ...

  15. Volvulus of the Small Bowel and Colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapadia, Muneera R.

    2017-01-01

    Volvulus of the intestines may involve either the small bowel or colon. In the pediatric population, small bowel volvulus is more common, while in the adult population, colonic volvulus is more often seen. The two most common types of colonic volvulus include sigmoid and cecal volvulus. Prompt diagnosis and treatment is imperative, otherwise bowel ischemia may ensue. Treatment often involves emergent surgical exploration and bowel resection. PMID:28144211

  16. Adenocarcinoma of the small bowel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savli, M.; Jamar, B.

    2007-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of small bowel is generally a rather rare primary tumour of small bowel with a prevalence rate of 0.5 - 3.0 / 100.000 population, but the most frequent tumour of small intestine. It more often involves the duodenum and jejunum than the ileum. The aim of this paper is also to point out the value of small bowel follow through (SBFT) in the diagnosis of stenosing lesions. An 83 - year old male patient suffered from abdominal pain, malaise, vomiting, cachexia and diarrhoea for 3 months. The result of occult blood testing was negative. Haemoglobin level was normal. Proctoscopy, colonoscopy, upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, and ultrasonography (US) did not explain the patient's problems. Ileus of the small bowel was established with abdominal plain film. Small bowel follow through (SBFT) and computer tomography (CT) showed a stenosing tumour in the jejunum. Adenocarcinoma of the small bowel was established with histological examination after resection of the tumor. SBFT, with manual compression of all segments of the small bowel, can be a very accurate diagnostic investigation for evaluation of stenosing lesions in this part of the intestine. (author)

  17. Adenocarcinoma of the small bowel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savli, M; Jamar, B [Inst. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. Medical Centre, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2007-06-15

    Adenocarcinoma of small bowel is generally a rather rare primary tumour of small bowel with a prevalence rate of 0.5 - 3.0 / 100.000 population, but the most frequent tumour of small intestine. It more often involves the duodenum and jejunum than the ileum. The aim of this paper is also to point out the value of small bowel follow through (SBFT) in the diagnosis of stenosing lesions. An 83 - year old male patient suffered from abdominal pain, malaise, vomiting, cachexia and diarrhoea for 3 months. The result of occult blood testing was negative. Haemoglobin level was normal. Proctoscopy, colonoscopy, upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, and ultrasonography (US) did not explain the patient's problems. Ileus of the small bowel was established with abdominal plain film. Small bowel follow through (SBFT) and computer tomography (CT) showed a stenosing tumour in the jejunum. Adenocarcinoma of the small bowel was established with histological examination after resection of the tumor. SBFT, with manual compression of all segments of the small bowel, can be a very accurate diagnostic investigation for evaluation of stenosing lesions in this part of the intestine. (author)

  18. Small bowel resection - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Advanced Skills . 9th ed. New York, NY: Pearson; 2017:chap 26. Read More Colon cancer Crohn ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  19. Duodenal localization is a negative predictor of survival after small bowel adenocarcinoma resection: A population-based, propensity score-matched analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Alexander; Galata, Christian; Beutner, Ulrich; Schmied, Bruno M; Warschkow, Rene; Steffen, Thomas; Brunner, Walter; Post, Stefan; Marti, Lukas

    2018-03-01

    This study assessed the influence of tumor localization of small bowel adenocarcinoma on survival after surgical resection. Patients with resected small bowel adenocarcinoma, ACJJ stage I-III, were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database from 2004 to 2013. The impact of tumor localization on overall and cancer-specific survival was assessed using Cox proportional hazard regression models with and without risk-adjustment and propensity score methods. Adenocarcinoma was localized to the duodenum in 549 of 1025 patients (53.6%). There was no time trend for duodenal localization (P = 0.514). The 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 48.2% (95%CI: 43.3-53.7%) for patients with duodenal carcinoma and 66.6% (95%CI: 61.6-72.1%) for patients with cancer located in the jejunum or ileum. Duodenal localization was associated with worse overall and cancer-specific survival in univariable (HR = 1.73; HR = 1.81, respectively; both P matrimonial status were positive, independent prognostic factors. Duodenal localization is an independent risk factor for poor survival after resection of adenocarcinoma. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A very rare case of a small bowel leiomyosarcoma leading to ileocaecal intussusception treated with a laparoscopic resection: a case report and a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzel, Tomasz; Mech, Katarzyna; Mazurkiewicz, Michał; Dąbrowski, Bohdan; Lech, Gustaw; Chaber, Andrzej; Słodkowski, Maciej

    2016-02-24

    Small bowel tumours are rare and comprise less than 2% of all primary gastrointestinal neoplasms. Among these tumours, a leiomyosarcoma belonging to soft tissue sarcomas is extremely rare and accounts for about 1 % of malignant mesenchymal lesions in the gastrointestinal tract. Due to its aggressive nature and slow growth, it is often diagnosed at the late stage when curative treatment is impossible. Authors report a first case of leiomyosarcoma with chronic recurrent ileocaecal intussusception and literature review to analyse diagnosis and treatment features of the ileum mesenchymal tumours. We present a case of an 87-year-old Caucasian man suffering from cramp-like abdominal pain for months. Due to lack of clinical signs and unspecific complaints, a diagnosis was delayed. Despite a detailed in-hospital examination, a proper diagnosis was established as late as during an operation. The patient was treated by surgery with good results. An uncommon laparoscopic resection of the small bowel with a tumour was performed. A histopathological investigation confirmed a very rare mesenchymal lesion of the distal ileum. The patient is under control with no recurrence for 1 year of the follow-up period. Reported case indicates that a usually asymptomatic tumour can cause uncommon chronic recurrent ileus signs. CT and MRI scans are investigation of choice in such cases, but they are sometimes inconclusive. It might be worth highlighting the good results of laparoscopic leiomyosarcoma lesion resection with a very good outcome.

  1. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgical procedures that create a loop of small intestine where excess bacteria can grow. An example is a Billroth II type of stomach removal ( gastrectomy ). Some cases of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

  2. Arteriovenous Malformation Detected by Small Bowel Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Fujii

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal bleeding that originates in the small intestine is often difficult to diagnose. When successful diagnosis reveals a lesion that can be localized preoperatively, the laparoscopic approach is an appropriate and beneficial treatment modality for small bowel resection. A 69-year-old man presented with a 6-month history of gastrointestinal bleeding and symptomatic transfusion-dependent anemia. Upper and lower endoscopy were normal. Double-balloon endoscopy established the source of the bleeding as a 0.5-cm polypoid mass appearing as a submucosal tumor with redness and pulsation in the lower ileum, suggesting a vascular lesion. Laparoscopic small bowel resection was successful in removing the mass in the ileum. Histological evaluation of the mass revealed an arteriovenous malformation. Preoperative small bowel endoscopy can be useful for diagnosing the cause and localization of arteriovenous malformation in the small intestine.

  3. Murine Ileocolic Bowel Resection with Primary Anastomosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Troy; Borowiec, Anna; Dicken, Bryan; Fedorak, Richard; Madsen, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal resections are frequently required for treatment of diseases involving the gastrointestinal tract, with Crohn’s disease and colon cancer being two common examples. Despite the frequency of these procedures, a significant knowledge gap remains in describing the inherent effects of intestinal resection on host physiology and disease pathophysiology. This article provides detailed instructions for an ileocolic resection with primary end-to-end anastomosis in mice, as well as essential aspects of peri-operative care to maximize post-operative success. When followed closely, this procedure yields a 95% long-term survival rate, no failure to thrive, and minimizes post-operative complications of bowel obstruction and anastomotic leak. The technical challenges of performing the procedure in mice are a barrier to its wide spread use in research. The skills described in this article can be acquired without previous surgical experience. Once mastered, the murine ileocolic resection procedure will provide a reproducible tool for studying the effects of intestinal resection in models of human disease. PMID:25406841

  4. Stricturoplasty—a bowel-sparing option for long segment small bowel Crohn's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Limmer, Alexandra M.; Koh, Hoey C.; Gilmore, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Stricturoplasty is a surgical option for management of severe stricturing Crohn's disease of the small bowel. It avoids the need for small bowel resection and the associated metabolic complications. This report contrasts the indications and technical aspects of two different stricturoplasty techniques. Case 1 describes an extensive Michelassi (side-to-side isoperistaltic) stricturoplasty performed for a 100 cm segment of diseased small bowel in a 45-year-old patient. Case 2 describes...

  5. Indications and outcome of childhood preventable bowel resections in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uchechukwu Obiora Ezomike

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: While many bowel resections in developed countries are due to congenital anomalies, indications for bowel resections in developing countries are mainly from preventable causes. The aim of the following study was to assess the indications for, morbidity and mortality following preventable bowel resection in our centre. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analysis of all cases of bowel resection deemed preventable in children from birth to 18 years from June 2005 to June 2012. Results: There were 22 preventable bowel resections with an age range of 7 days to 17 years (median 6 months and male:female ratio of 2.1:1. There were 2 neonates, 13 infants and 7 older children. The indications were irreducible/gangrenous intussusceptions (13, abdominal gunshot injury (2, gangrenous umbilical hernia (2, blunt abdominal trauma (1, midgut volvulus (1, necrotizing enterocolitis (1, strangulated inguinal hernia (1, post-operative band intestinal obstructions (1. There were 16 right hemicolectomies, 4 small bowel resections and 2 massive bowel resections. Average duration of symptoms before presentation was 3.9 days (range: 3 h-14 days. Average time to surgical intervention was 42 h for survivors and 53 h for non-survivors. Only 19% presented within 24 h of onset of symptoms and all survived. For those presenting after 24 h, the cause of delay was a visit to primary or secondary level hospitals (75% and ignorance (25%. Average duration of post-operative hospital stay is 14 days and 9 patients (41% developed 18 complications. Seven patients died (31.8% mortality which diagnoses were irreducible/gangrenous intussusceptions (5, necrotising enterocolitis (1, midgut volvulus (1. One patient died on the operating table while others had overwhelming sepsis. Conclusion: There is a high rate of morbidity and mortality in these cases of preventable bowel resection. Typhoid intestinal perforation did not feature as an indication for bowel resection in this

  6. Deep organ space infection after emergency bowel resection and anastomosis: The anatomic site does not matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Elizabeth; Siboni, Stefano; Haltmeier, Tobias; Inaba, Kenji; Lam, Lydia; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2015-11-01

    Deep organ space infection (DOSI) is a serious complication after emergency bowel resection and anastomosis. The aim of this study was to identify the incidence and risk factors for the development of DOSI. National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database study including patients who underwent large bowel or small bowel resection and primary anastomosis. The incidence, outcomes, and risk factors for DOSI were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. A total of 87,562 patients underwent small bowel, large bowel, or rectal resection and anastomosis. Of these, 14,942 (17.1%) underwent emergency operations and formed the study population. The overall mortality rate in emergency operations was 12.5%, and the rate of DOSI was 5.6%. A total of 18.0% required ventilatory support in more than 48 hours, and 16.0% required reoperation. Predictors of DOSI included age, steroid use, sepsis or septic shock on admission, severe wound contamination, and advanced American Society of Anesthesiologists classification. The anatomic location of resection and anastomosis was not significantly associated with DOSI. Patients undergoing emergency bowel resection and anastomosis have a high mortality, risk of DOSI, and systemic complications. Independent predictors of DOSI include wound and American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, sepsis or septic shock on admission, and steroid use. The anatomic location of resection and anastomosis was not significantly associated with DOSI. Epidemiologic/prognostic study, level III.

  7. Transrectal Mesh Erosion Requiring Bowel Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Marta Maria; Slim, Karem; Rabischong, Benoît; Bourdel, Nicolas; Canis, Michel; Botchorishvili, Revaz

    To report a case of a transrectal mesh erosion as complication of laparoscopic promontofixation with mesh repair, necessitating bowel resection and subsequent surgical interventions. Sacrocolpopexy has become a standard procedure for vaginal vault prolapse [1], and the laparoscopic approach has gained popularity owing to more rapid recovery and less morbidity [2,3]. Mesh erosion is a well-known complication of surgical treatment for prolapse as reported in several negative evaluations, including a report from the US Food and Drug Administration in 2011 [4]. Mesh complications are more common after surgeries via the vaginal approach [5]; nonetheless, the incidence of vaginal mesh erosion after laparoscopic procedures is as high as 9% [6]. The incidence of transrectal mesh exposure after laparoscopic ventral rectopexy is roughly 1% [7]. The diagnosis may be delayed because of its rarity and variable presentation. In addition, polyester meshes, such as the mesh used in this case, carry a higher risk of exposure [8]. A 57-year-old woman experiencing genital prolapse, with the cervix classified as +3 according to the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification system, underwent laparoscopic standard sacrocolpopexy using polyester mesh. Subtotal hysterectomy and bilateral adnexectomy were performed concomitantly. A 3-year follow-up consultation demonstrated no signs or symptoms of erosion of any type. At 7 years after the surgery, however, the patient presented with rectal discharge, diagnosed as infectious rectocolitis with the isolation of Clostridium difficile. She underwent a total of 5 repair surgeries in a period of 4 months, including transrectal resection of exposed mesh, laparoscopic ablation of mesh with digestive resection, exploratory laparoscopy with abscess drainage, and exploratory laparoscopy with ablation of residual mesh and transverse colostomy. She recovered well after the last intervention, exhibiting no signs of vaginal or rectal fistula and no recurrence

  8. Surgical management of irradiation-induced small bowel damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.T.; Seski, J.C.; Copeland, L.J.; Gershenson, D.M.; Edwards, C.L.; Herson, J.

    1985-04-01

    Seventy-seven patients, presenting with radiation small bowel injuries at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute at Houston between 1962 and 1978, were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two categories: bowel bypass without resection, and resection of irradiated bowel. Each group was then analyzed for its short- and long-term complications. Ileocolectomy with end-to-end anastomosis was the surgical procedure of choice in those people undergoing resection. There was no difference in short-term complications noted between the two groups. The long-term complications of fistula formation and continued small bowel necrosis could be prevented by resection, as a primary procedure. The surgical details of ileocolectomy with end-to-end anastomosis are presented, along with an analysis of the complications encountered in both groups.

  9. Surgical management of irradiation-induced small bowel damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.T.; Seski, J.C.; Copeland, L.J.; Gershenson, D.M.; Edwards, C.L.; Herson, J.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy-seven patients, presenting with radiation small bowel injuries at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute at Houston between 1962 and 1978, were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two categories: bowel bypass without resection, and resection of irradiated bowel. Each group was then analyzed for its short- and long-term complications. Ileocolectomy with end-to-end anastomosis was the surgical procedure of choice in those people undergoing resection. There was no difference in short-term complications noted between the two groups. The long-term complications of fistula formation and continued small bowel necrosis could be prevented by resection, as a primary procedure. The surgical details of ileocolectomy with end-to-end anastomosis are presented, along with an analysis of the complications encountered in both groups

  10. Primary malignant small bowel tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Kyung Seung; Suh, Ho Jong; Kim, So Sun; Kim, Ho Joon; Chun, Byung Hee; Joh, Young Duk [Kosin College, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    Small bowel tumors are rarely detected unless there is intestinal obstruction or bleeding. In the seven years 1982-1988, at Kosin Medical Center, 25 primary malignant small bowel tumors were studied radiographically with barium and / or computed tomography (CT). CT revealed gastrointestinal abnormalities in 20 patients. In ten, lesion were identified by upper G-I series, in 15 by small bowel series, and in addition, in 3 by colon enema. The most common malignant small bowel tumor was adenocarcinoma (N=15) and was next common lymphoma (N=7). On barium study, primary adenocarcinoma appeared as an irregular stricture (66.7%) and polypoid mass with intussusception was most prominent finding in lymphoma. Leiomyosarcoma appeared as an exophytic mass with excavation or ulceration. CT was found to be accurate in detecting wall thickening, complications and other associated findings. In conclusion, barium study was useful in the diagnosis of primary malignant small bowel tumor and CT was more accurate in detecting secondary findings.

  11. Primary malignant small bowel tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Kyung Seung; Suh, Ho Jong; Kim, So Sun; Kim, Ho Joon; Chun, Byung Hee; Joh, Young Duk

    1990-01-01

    Small bowel tumors are rarely detected unless there is intestinal obstruction or bleeding. In the seven years 1982-1988, at Kosin Medical Center, 25 primary malignant small bowel tumors were studied radiographically with barium and / or computed tomography (CT). CT revealed gastrointestinal abnormalities in 20 patients. In ten, lesion were identified by upper G-I series, in 15 by small bowel series, and in addition, in 3 by colon enema. The most common malignant small bowel tumor was adenocarcinoma (N=15) and was next common lymphoma (N=7). On barium study, primary adenocarcinoma appeared as an irregular stricture (66.7%) and polypoid mass with intussusception was most prominent finding in lymphoma. Leiomyosarcoma appeared as an exophytic mass with excavation or ulceration. CT was found to be accurate in detecting wall thickening, complications and other associated findings. In conclusion, barium study was useful in the diagnosis of primary malignant small bowel tumor and CT was more accurate in detecting secondary findings

  12. Tumor of small bowel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Lobo, Elmer Jair; Rubio Vargas, Romulo; Cecilia Hani, Albis

    2009-01-01

    Young woman who is having episodes of overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding that requires transfusions. The endoscopic study consists of 2 endoscopies of the upper digestive system and two colonoscopies. The tests do not find the cause of the digestive hemorrhage. A double-balloon enteroscopy is performed and it is found that the Ileum has an ulcerate subepithelial lesion with neoplasia appearance which is marked with Chinese ink and biopsies are taken from the tissue which are not diagnosed. Studies of staging are performed ant the result is negative. A laparotomy is performed for diagnosis and treatment which includes the intestinal resection of ileum where the tumor is placed. The result of the test shows to be a neuroendocrine carcinoma of high degree of large cells undifferentiated. One appears in addition a revision to overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and neuroendocrine tumor of small

  13. Surgical aspects of radiation enteritis of the small bowel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wobbes, T.; Verschueren, R.C.; Lubbers, E.J.; Jansen, W.; Paping, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    Injury to the small bowel is one of the tragic complications of radiotherapy. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients operated upon for stenosis, perforation, fistulization, and chronic blood loss of the small bowel after radiotherapy for multiple malignant diseases. In the period 1970 to 1982 in the Department of General Surgery of the St. Radboud University Hospital, Nijmegen, and the Department of Surgical Oncology of the State University, Groningen, 27 patients were treated surgically. Twenty patients presented with obstruction. In 17 patients a side-to-side ileotransversostomy was performed; in three the injured bowel was resected. Of the five patients with fistulization, three underwent a bypass procedure; in two cases the affected bowel was resected. In one patient with perforation, a resection was performed, as in a patient with chronic blood loss. Two of the 20 patients (10 per cent) in whom the diseased bowel was bypassed died postoperatively. Of the seven patients whose affected bowel was resected four (57 per cent) died of intra-abdominal sepsis. Management of the patient with chronic radiation enteritis is discussed. We conclude, on the basis of our experience, that in patients with obstruction and fistulization, a bypass procedure of the affected bowel is a safe method of treatment. In case of resection, the anastomosis should be performed during a second operation

  14. Surgical aspects of radiation enteritis of the small bowel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wobbes, T.; Verschueren, R.C.; Lubbers, E.J.; Jansen, W.; Paping, R.H.

    1984-02-01

    Injury to the small bowel is one of the tragic complications of radiotherapy. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients operated upon for stenosis, perforation, fistulization, and chronic blood loss of the small bowel after radiotherapy for multiple malignant diseases. In the period 1970 to 1982 in the Department of General Surgery of the St. Radboud University Hospital, Nijmegen, and the Department of Surgical Oncology of the State University, Groningen, 27 patients were treated surgically. Twenty patients presented with obstruction. In 17 patients a side-to-side ileotransversostomy was performed; in three the injured bowel was resected. Of the five patients with fistulization, three underwent a bypass procedure; in two cases the affected bowel was resected. In one patient with perforation, a resection was performed, as in a patient with chronic blood loss. Two of the 20 patients (10 per cent) in whom the diseased bowel was bypassed died postoperatively. Of the seven patients whose affected bowel was resected four (57 per cent) died of intra-abdominal sepsis. Management of the patient with chronic radiation enteritis is discussed. We conclude, on the basis of our experience, that in patients with obstruction and fistulization, a bypass procedure of the affected bowel is a safe method of treatment. In case of resection, the anastomosis should be performed during a second operation.

  15. Small bowel volvulus in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, M.J.; Shackelford, G.D.; McAlister, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    Two children with small bowel volvulus diagnosed on barium enema examination are reported. In one patient the volvulus was associated with malrotation and in the other patient there was a post-operative peritoneal adhesion. In both cases the diagnosis was based on beaking of the head of the barium column at the site of volvulus. Radiographic demonstration of a beak sign in the small bowel on barium enema examination should suggest a diagnosis of small bowel volvulus, and indicates the need for immediate surgery. (orig.) [de

  16. [Premalignant conditions of the small bowel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drastich, P

    2013-01-01

    Small intestinal dysplastic lesions are rare and difficult to detect before they progress to cancer. New investigative modalities, such as capsule endoscopy and doubleballoon enteroscopy, are very promising in search for premalignant lesions. Screening patients at high-risk for small bowel neoplasia is the only sensible approach. Duodenal adenoma represents the most easily accessible tumors with the possibility of curative endoscopic resection. Due to the strong association of the small bowel and colonic adenomas, it is always necessary to perform colonoscopy. In young patients, the exclusion of familial polyposis by genetic testing is always mandatory. Patients with celiac disease are especially at risk of developing nonHodgkins lymphomas and adenocarcinomas. There is a high-risk of ampuloma and other adenomas in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis. Patients with prolonged and complicated course of Crohns disease, Peutz Jeghers syndrome and patients with ileoanal pouch have higher risk of adenocarcinoma of the small intestine.

  17. Adult small bowel obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark R; Lalani, Nadim

    2013-06-01

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is a clinical condition that is often initially diagnosed and managed in the emergency department (ED). The high rates of potential complications that are associated with an SBO make it essential for the emergency physician (EP) to make a timely and accurate diagnosis. The primary objective was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the history, physical examination, and imaging modalities associated with the diagnosis of SBO. The secondary objectives were to identify the prevalence of SBO in prospective ED-based studies of adult abdominal pain and to apply Pauker and Kassirer's threshold approach to clinical decision-making to the diagnosis and management of SBO. MEDLINE, EMBASE, major emergency medicine (EM) textbooks, and the bibliographies of selected articles were scanned for studies that assessed one or more components of the history, physical examination, or diagnostic imaging modalities used for the diagnosis of SBO. The selected articles underwent a quality assessment by two of the authors using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2 (QUADAS-2) tool. Data used to compile sensitivities and specificities were obtained from these studies and a meta-analysis was performed on those that examined the same historical component, physical examination technique, or diagnostic test. Separate information on the prevalence and management of SBO was used in conjunction with the meta-analysis findings of computed tomography (CT) to determine the test and treatment threshold. The prevalence of SBO in the ED was determined to be approximately 2% of all patients who present with abdominal pain. Having a previous history of abdominal surgery, constipation, abnormal bowel sounds, and/or abdominal distention on examination were the best history and physical examination predictors of SBO. X-ray was determined to be the least useful imaging modality for the diagnosis of SBO, with a pooled positive likelihood ratio (+LR

  18. Small Bowel Follow-Through

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Small bowel follow-through uses a form of real-time x-ray called fluoroscopy and a barium-based ... Dense bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow ...

  19. Unusual causes of mechanical small bowel obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shatnawi, Nawaf J.; Bani-Hani, Kamal E.

    2005-01-01

    We herein report our experience regarding unusual causes of bowel obstruction to increase the awareness of surgeons regarding this disease. From 1991 to 2003, we had experience at the University affiliated hospitals, northern Jordan with 24 patients with small bowel obstruction resulting from unusual causes. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of these patients with regards to the mode of presentation, cause of obstruction, radiological and operative findings, management and outcome. We recorded 15 patients who underwent previous abdominal surgery. Preoperative diagnosis was correct in only one patient with an internal hernia, but the abdominal CT scan suggested the diagnosis in 5 of the 9 patients who had the scan. The final diagnosis was internal hernias in 11 patients, foreign bodies in 5, ischemic strictures in 3, carcinoid tumors in 2, endometriosis in 2, and metastatic deposit from interstitial bladder carcinoma in one patient. Nine of the 12 patients with recurrent obstruction had either short course or recurrence obstruction during the same hospital admission. W carried out bowel resections in 15 patients (5 resections were due to bowel strangulation). Post operative death occurred in 4 patients. Awareness of these rare causes of intestinal obstruction even in patients with previous abdominal operation might improve the outcome. The tentative diagnosis of adhesion obstruction in patients with unusual obstructive etiology might lead to a higher rate of gangrenous complications. Rigorous preoperative evaluation including careful history and early abdominal CT may show the obstructive cause. (author)

  20. Stricturoplasty-a bowel-sparing option for long segment small bowel Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Alexandra M; Koh, Hoey C; Gilmore, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    Stricturoplasty is a surgical option for management of severe stricturing Crohn's disease of the small bowel. It avoids the need for small bowel resection and the associated metabolic complications. This report contrasts the indications and technical aspects of two different stricturoplasty techniques. Case 1 describes an extensive Michelassi (side-to-side isoperistaltic) stricturoplasty performed for a 100 cm segment of diseased small bowel in a 45-year-old patient. Case 2 describes the performance of 12 Heineke-Mikulicz stricturoplasties in a 23-year-old patient with multiple short fibrotic strictures.

  1. Emergency one-stage resection without mechanical bowel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of these, 21 had one-stage primary resection with no clinical anastomotic leak and only one wound infection and fascial dehiscence. The two deaths from this group were due to respiratory failure in a patient aged 100 years and overwhelming sepsis in a younger patient with bowel gangrene from ileosigmoid knotting.

  2. Small Bowel Review: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past year there have been many advances in the area of small bowel physiology and pathology. In preparation for this review, over 500 papers were assessed; some have been selected and reviewed, with a particular focus on presenting clinically useful information for the practising gastroenterologist.

  3. Small Bowel Review: Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past year there have been many advances in the area of small bowel physiology and pathology. In preparation for this review, over 500 papers were assessed, and some have been selected and reviewed, with a particular focus on presenting clinically useful information for the practising gastroenterologist.

  4. Capsule endoscopy: Beyond small bowel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel N Adler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the brief and dramatic history of capsule endoscopy of the digestive tract is reviewed. Capsule endoscopy offers a non invasive method to diagnose diseases that affect the esophagus, small bowel and colon. Technological improvements relating to optics, software, data recorders with two way communication have revolutionized this field. These advancements have produced better diagnostic performance.

  5. Preoperative Diagnosis of Adult Intussusception Caused by Small Bowel Lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Shiba

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Adult intussusception is rare, accounting for only 5% of all intussusceptions, for which preoperative diagnosis is difficult. We herein report a preoperatively diagnosed case of adult intussusception caused by a small bowel lipoma. A 33-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with three weeks history of colicky epigastric pain. Computed tomography revealed thickening of the ileal wall suggestive of intussusception. Colonoscopy revealed an ileocolic intussusception. Barium enema for reduction of ileocolic intussusception demonstrated a small bowel tumor in the ileum 15 cm proximal to the ileocecal valve. The intussusception was reduced, and the patient underwent partial resection of the ileum encompassing the small bowel tumor. Histological findings confirmed the diagnosis of lipoma of the small bowel. The patient made a satisfactory recovery and remains well.

  6. Imaging the small bowel.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Kevin P

    2014-03-01

    Radiologic investigations continue to play a pivotal role in the diagnosis of pathologic conditions of the small intestine despite enhancement of capsule endoscopy and double-balloon endoscopy. Imaging techniques continue to evolve and new techniques in MRI in particular, are being developed.

  7. Small Bowel Review: Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Major scientific advances have been made over the past few years in the areas of small bowel physiology, pathology, microbiology and clinical sciences. Over 1000 papers have been reviewed and a selective number are considered here. Wherever possible, the clinical relevance of these advances have been identified. There have been a number of important and/or interesting developments in the past year that have clinical significance.

  8. Primary small bowel anastomosis in generalised peritonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deGraaf, JS; van Goor, Harry; Bleichrodt, RP

    Objective: To find out if primary small bowel anastomosis of the bowel is safe in patients with generalised peritonitis who are treated by planned relaparotomies. Design: Retrospective study. Setting: University hospital, The Netherlands. Subjects. 10 Patients with generalised purulent peritonitis

  9. Small Bowel Review: Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past year, there have been many advances in the area of small bowel physiology and pathology. More than 1500 papers were assessed in preparation for this review. Some were selected and reviewed, with a particular focus on presenting clinically useful information for the practising gastroenterologist. Relevant review articles have been highlighted, and important clinical learning points have been stressed. The topics are varied in scope, and wherever possible show a logical progression from basic physiology to pathophysiology to clinical disorders and management.

  10. Small Bowel Review: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past year, there have been many advances in the area of small bowel physiology and pathology. In preparation for this review, over 1500 papers were assessed. Some have been selected and reviewed, with a particular focus on presenting clinically useful information for the practising gastroenterologist. Relevant review articles have been highlighted, and important clinical learning points have been stressed. The topics are varied in scope and wherever possible show a logical progression from basic physiology to pathophysiology to clinical disorders and management.

  11. Large Intraluminal Ileal Hematoma Presenting as Small Bowel Obstruction in a Child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Yun Jung; Nam, So Hyun; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Intraluminal small bowel hematoma has been rarely reported in children, as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. We present a case of an intraluminal ileal hematoma presenting as small bowel obstruction in a child. Computed Tomography (CT) indicated a large intraluminal hyperdense lesion in the distal ileum as the cause of small bowel obstruction. Abdominal ultrasonography (US) showed an echogenic mass-like lesion with multiple septa in the distal ileum. Small bowel obstruction due to a complicated cystic mass was provisionally diagnosed. Histopathologic examination of the resected mass suggested a submucosal ileal hematoma. Although intraluminal small bowel hematoma is rare in children, it can present as an intraluminal cystic mass and should be considered as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. The US and CT findings of submucosal ileal hematoma could be useful for the diagnosis of such cases in the future

  12. Merkel cell carcinoma metastatic to the small bowel mesentery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Yu Yang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC is an uncommon cutaneous malignant tumor that presents as a rapidly growing skin nodule on sun-exposed areas of the body. MCC is aggressive with regional nodal and distant metastases to the skin, lung, and bones. There have been no reports of metastatic MCC to the mesentery and 6 reports describing metastasis to the small intestine. We present a case of metastatic MCC to the mesentery with infiltration to the small bowel, 8 years after original tumor resection. This is the 5th metastasis and it encased the small bowel resulting in a hair-pin loop contributing to the unusual clinical presentation. Although MCC metastatic to the bowel is uncommon, it is not rare. It is important to recognize the unusual manifestations of this disease as they are becoming more common in the future. Routine radiologic surveillance and thorough review of systems are important to patient follow-up.

  13. Non-small-bowel abnormalities identified during small bowel capsule endoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedemakers, Reinier; Westerhof, Jessie; Weersma, Rinse K.; Koornstra, Jan J.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the incidence of non-small-bowel abnormalities in patients referred for small bowel capsule endoscopy, this single center study was performed. METHODS: Small bowel capsule endoscopy is an accepted technique to investigate obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. This is defined as

  14. Small-bowel carcinoid with no liver metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juniku-Shkololli, Argjira; Haziri, Adem

    2009-01-01

    Carcinoid is a slowly-growing tumor from the group of neuroendocrine or APUD tumors. Characteristic of these tumors is the production of biogene amins & polypeptide hormones. 90% of all carcinoids are located in the GI system. A female patient, 68 years old, comes for a visit with signs of diffuse abdominal pain, diarrhea, irregular bowel movements, weakness, dyspnea and pretibial edemas. The gastroenterologist gives her only symptomatic therapy at first, and starts the examinations after her hospitalization (initial dg: Enterocolitis). One month later she visits again with the same complains. CT scan result shows steatosis hepatica and lots of liquids in the small bowel and colon. She underwent operation--resection of 20 cm of the small bowel with tumor masses and part-time ileostoma. The biopsy of the resected segment of the bowel shows multiple carcinoids. Our patient had no flushing of the skin and therefore couldn't be suspected clinically for this diagnosis. The intestinal carcinoid does not usually produce the carcionid syndrome unless hepatic metastases have occurred. The infiltration of the mesentery provokes an intense fibrotic reaction resulting in kinking of the bowel segments, which causes intestinal obstruction as it happened in this patient. As long as in our clinic we don't have this technique, it is much harder to make an early diagnosis. Fortunately our patient was diagnosed before liver metastases occurred, and therefore her treatment was successful.

  15. Disturbances in small bowel motility.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, E M

    2012-02-03

    Recently, the small intestine has become the focus of investigation as a potential site of dysmotility in the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A number of motor abnormalities have been defined in some studies, and include \\'clustered\\' contractions, exaggerated post-prandial motor response and disturbances in intestinal transit. The significance of these findings remains unclear. The interpretation of available studies is complicated by differences in subject selection, the direct influence of certain symptoms, such as diarrhoea and constipation, and the interference of compounding factors, such as stress and psychopathology. Dysmotility could also reflect autonomic dysfunction, disturbed CNS control and the response to heightened visceral sensation or central perception. While motor abnormalities may not explain all symptoms in IBS, sensorimotor interactions may be important in symptom pathogenesis and deserve further study.

  16. Uterine Perforation With Subtotal Small Bowel Prolapse – A Rare Complication of Dilatation and Curettage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagannath Mala Sherigar

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Uterine perforation is the well known complication of induced abortion. We report a rare case of uterine perforation with subtotal prolapse of small bowel following first trimester abortion by an unqualified physician. Early surgical exploration with resection and anastomosis of bowel performed. Patient discharged uneventfully after postoperative recovery.

  17. Small-bowel permeability in collagenous colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Madsen, Jan L; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    Collagenous colitis (CC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that affects the colon. However, some patients with CC present with accompanying pathologic small-bowel manifestations such as coeliac disease, defects in bile acid absorption and histopathologic changes in small-intestinal biopsies......, indicating that CC is a pan-intestinal disease. In small-intestinal disease, the intestinal barrier function may be impaired, and the permeability of the small intestine altered. The purpose of this research was to study small-bowel function in patients with CC as expressed by intestinal permeability....

  18. Phytobezoar in a jejunal diverticulum as a cause of small bowel obstruction: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauf Fozia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Phytobezoars are concretions of poorly digested fruit and vegetable fibers found in the alimentary tract. Previous gastric resection, gastrojejunostomy, or pyloroplasty predispose people to bezoar formation. Small-bowel bezoars normally come from the stomach, and primary small-bowel bezoars are very rare. They are seen only in patients with underlying small-bowel diseases such as diverticula, strictures, or tumors. Primary small-bowel bezoars almost always present as intestinal obstructions, although it is a very rare cause, being responsible for less than 3% of all small-bowel obstructions in one series. Jejunal diverticula are rare, with an incidence of less than 0.5%. They are usually asymptomatic pseudodiverticula of pulsion type, and complications are reported in 10% to 30% of patients. A phytobezoar in a jejunal diverticulum is an extremely rare presentation. Case presentation A 78-year-old Pakistani man presented to our clinic with small-bowel obstruction. Upon exploration, we found a primary small-bowel bezoar originating in a jejunal diverticulum and causing jejunal obstruction. Resection and anastomosis of the jejunal segment harboring the diverticulum was performed, and our patient had an uneventful recovery. Conclusion Primary small-bowel bezoars are very rare but must be kept in mind as a possible cause of small-bowel obstruction.

  19. Transabdominal Ultrasonography of the Small Bowel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Kralik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the era of double balloon enteroscopy, capsule endoscopy, CT, and MRI enterography is transabdominal ultrasonography (TUS underestimated method for evaluation of small bowel pathology. As often initial imagine method in abdominal complaints, nowadays has TUS much better diagnostic potential than two decades ago. High-resolution ultrasound probes with harmonic imaging significantly improve resolution of bowel wall in real time, with possibility to asses bowel peristalsis. Color flow doppler enables evaluation of intramural bowel vascularisation, pulse wave doppler helps to quantificate flow in coeliac and superior mesenteric arteries. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography with oral contrast fluid, as well as contrast enhanced ultrasonography with intravenous microbubble contrast also improves small bowel imaging. We present a review of small intestine pathology that should be detected during ultrasound examinations, discuss technical requirements, advantages and limitations of TUS, typical ultrasound signs of Crohn's disease, ileus, celiac disease, intussusception, infectious enteritis, tumours, ischemic and haemorrhagic conditions of small bowel. In the hands of experienced investigator, despite some significant limitations(obesity, meteorism, is transabdominal ultrasonography reliable, noninvasive and inexpensive alternative method to computerised tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in small bowel examination.

  20. Minimization of small bowel volume within treatment fields using customized small bowel displacement system (SBDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, D. H.; Huh, S. J.; Ahn, Y. C.; Kim, D. Y.; Wu, H. G.; Kim, M. K.; Choi, D. R.; Shin, K. H.

    1997-01-01

    Authors designed a customized Small Bowel Displacement System(SBDS) to displace the small bowel from the pelvic radiation fields and minimize treatment-related bowel morbidities. From August 1995 to May 1996, 55 consecutive patients who received pelvic radiation therapy with the SBDS were included in this study. The SBDS consists of a customized styrofoam compression device which can displace the small bowel from the radiation fields and an individualized immobilization abdominal board for easy daily setup in prone position. After opacifying the small bowel with Barium, the patients were laid prone and posterior-anterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) simulation films were taken with and without the SBDS. The areas of the small bowel included in the radiation fields with and without the SBDS were compared. Using the SBDS, the mean small bowel area was reduced by 59% on PA and 51% on LAT films (P=0.0001). In six patients (6/55, 11%), it was possible that no small bowel was included within the treatment fields. The mean upward displacement of the most caudal small bowel was 4.8 cm using the SBDS. Only 15% (8/55) of patients treated with the SBDS manifested diarrhea requiring medication. The SBDS is a novel method that can be used to displace the small bowel away from the treatment portal effectively and reduce the radiation therapy morbidities. Compliance with setup is excellent when the SBDS is used. (author)

  1. Small bowel endoluminal imaging (capsule and enteroscopy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murino, Alberto; Despott, Edward J

    2017-04-01

    Over the last 16 years, the disruptive technologies of small bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy have revolutionised endoluminal imaging and minimally invasive therapy of the small bowel. Further technological developments continue to expand their indications and use. This brief review highlights the state-of-the-art in this arena and aims to summarise the current and potential future role of these technologies in clinical practice.

  2. A new technique of laparoscopic intracorporeal anastomosis for transrectal bowel resection with transvaginal specimen extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Emilie; Albornoz, Jaime; Messori, Pietro; Leroy, Joël; Wattiez, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    To show a new technique of laparoscopic intracorporeal anastomosis for transrectal bowel resection with transvaginal specimen extraction, a technique particularly suited for treatment of bowel endometriosis. Step-by-step explanation of the technique using videos and pictures (educative video). Endometriosis may affect the bowel in 3% to 37% of all endometriosis cases. Bowel endometriosis affects young women, without any co-morbidities and in particular without any vascular disorders. In addition, affected patients often express a desire for childbearing. Radical excision is sometimes required because of the impossibility of conservative treatment such as shaving, mucosal skinning, or discoid resection. Bowel endometriosis should not be considered a cancer, and consequently maximal resection is not the objective. Rather, the goal would be to achieve functional benefit. As a result, resection must be as economic and cosmetic as possible. The laparoscopic approach has proved its superiority over the open technique, although mini-laparotomy is generally performed to prepare for the anastomosis. Total laparoscopic approach in patients with partial bowel stenosis, using the vagina for specimen extraction. This technique of intracorporeal anastomosis with transvaginal specimen extraction enables a smaller resection and avoidance of abdominal incision enlargement that may cause hernia, infection, or pain. When stenosis is partial, this technique seems particularly suited for treatment of bowel endometriosis requiring resection. If stenosis is complete, the anvil can be inserted above the lesion transvaginally. Copyright © 2013 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Obstructive Small Bowel Metastasis from Uterine Leiomyosarcoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutahir A. Tunio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Uterine leiomyosarcoma is a rare and aggressive gynecologic malignancy with an overall poor prognosis. Lungs, bones, and brain are common sites of metastases of uterine leiomyosarcoma. Metastases of uterine leiomyosarcoma to the small bowel are extremely rare, and only four case reports have been published to date. Case presentation. A 55-year-old Saudi woman diagnosed with a case of uterine leiomyosarcoma treated with total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH and bilateral salpingooophorectomy (BSO presented in emergency room after sixteen months with acute abdomen. Subsequent work-up showed a jejunal mass for which resection and end-to-end anastomosis were performed. Biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of small bowel metastasis from uterine leiomyosarcoma. Further staging work-up showed wide spread metastasis in lungs and brain. After palliative cranial irradiation, systemic chemotherapy based on single agent doxorubicin was started. Conclusion. Metastatic leiomyosarcoma of small bowel from uterine leiomyosarcoma is a rare entity and is sign of advanced disease. It should be differentiated from primary leiomyosarcoma of small bowel as both are treated with different systemic chemotherapeutic agents.

  4. Effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 and distal bowel resection on intestinal and systemic adaptive responses in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Sarah W; de Heuvel, Elaine; Wallace, Laurie E; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens J; Brindle, Mary E; Chelikani, Prasanth K; Sigalet, David L

    2017-01-01

    To determine the effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), with or without massive distal bowel resection, on adaptation of jejunal mucosa, enteric neurons, gut hormones and tissue reserves in rats. GLP-2 is a gut hormone known to be trophic for small bowel mucosa, and to mimic intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome (SBS). However, the effects of exogenous GLP-2 and SBS on enteric neurons are unclear. Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to four treatments: Transected Bowel (TB) (n = 8), TB + GLP-2 (2.5 nmol/kg/h, n = 8), SBS (n = 5), or SBS + GLP-2 (2.5 nmol/kg/h, n = 9). SBS groups underwent a 60% jejunoileal resection with cecectomy and jejunocolic anastomosis. All rats were maintained on parenteral nutrition for 7 d. Parameters measured included gut morphometry, qPCR for hexose transporter (SGLT-1, GLUT-2, GLUT-5) and GLP-2 receptor mRNA, whole mount immunohistochemistry for neurons (HuC/D, VIP, nNOS), plasma glucose, gut hormones, and body composition. Resection increased the proportion of nNOS immunopositive myenteric neurons, intestinal muscularis propria thickness and crypt cell proliferation, which were not recapitulated by GLP-2 therapy. Exogenous GLP-2 increased jejunal mucosal surface area without affecting enteric VIP or nNOS neuronal immunopositivity, attenuated resection-induced reductions in jejunal hexose transporter abundance (SGLT-1, GLUT-2), increased plasma amylin and decreased peptide YY concentrations. Exogenous GLP-2 attenuated resection-induced increases in blood glucose and body fat loss. Exogenous GLP-2 stimulates jejunal adaptation independent of enteric neuronal VIP or nNOS changes, and has divergent effects on plasma amylin and peptide YY concentrations. The novel ability of exogenous GLP-2 to modulate resection-induced changes in peripheral glucose and lipid reserves may be important in understanding the whole-body response following intestinal resection, and is worthy of further study.

  5. Effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 and distal bowel resection on intestinal and systemic adaptive responses in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah W Lai

    Full Text Available To determine the effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2, with or without massive distal bowel resection, on adaptation of jejunal mucosa, enteric neurons, gut hormones and tissue reserves in rats.GLP-2 is a gut hormone known to be trophic for small bowel mucosa, and to mimic intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome (SBS. However, the effects of exogenous GLP-2 and SBS on enteric neurons are unclear.Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to four treatments: Transected Bowel (TB (n = 8, TB + GLP-2 (2.5 nmol/kg/h, n = 8, SBS (n = 5, or SBS + GLP-2 (2.5 nmol/kg/h, n = 9. SBS groups underwent a 60% jejunoileal resection with cecectomy and jejunocolic anastomosis. All rats were maintained on parenteral nutrition for 7 d. Parameters measured included gut morphometry, qPCR for hexose transporter (SGLT-1, GLUT-2, GLUT-5 and GLP-2 receptor mRNA, whole mount immunohistochemistry for neurons (HuC/D, VIP, nNOS, plasma glucose, gut hormones, and body composition.Resection increased the proportion of nNOS immunopositive myenteric neurons, intestinal muscularis propria thickness and crypt cell proliferation, which were not recapitulated by GLP-2 therapy. Exogenous GLP-2 increased jejunal mucosal surface area without affecting enteric VIP or nNOS neuronal immunopositivity, attenuated resection-induced reductions in jejunal hexose transporter abundance (SGLT-1, GLUT-2, increased plasma amylin and decreased peptide YY concentrations. Exogenous GLP-2 attenuated resection-induced increases in blood glucose and body fat loss.Exogenous GLP-2 stimulates jejunal adaptation independent of enteric neuronal VIP or nNOS changes, and has divergent effects on plasma amylin and peptide YY concentrations. The novel ability of exogenous GLP-2 to modulate resection-induced changes in peripheral glucose and lipid reserves may be important in understanding the whole-body response following intestinal resection, and is worthy of further study.

  6. Effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 and distal bowel resection on intestinal and systemic adaptive responses in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heuvel, Elaine; Wallace, Laurie E.; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens J.; Brindle, Mary E.; Chelikani, Prasanth K.; Sigalet, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), with or without massive distal bowel resection, on adaptation of jejunal mucosa, enteric neurons, gut hormones and tissue reserves in rats. Background GLP-2 is a gut hormone known to be trophic for small bowel mucosa, and to mimic intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome (SBS). However, the effects of exogenous GLP-2 and SBS on enteric neurons are unclear. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to four treatments: Transected Bowel (TB) (n = 8), TB + GLP-2 (2.5 nmol/kg/h, n = 8), SBS (n = 5), or SBS + GLP-2 (2.5 nmol/kg/h, n = 9). SBS groups underwent a 60% jejunoileal resection with cecectomy and jejunocolic anastomosis. All rats were maintained on parenteral nutrition for 7 d. Parameters measured included gut morphometry, qPCR for hexose transporter (SGLT-1, GLUT-2, GLUT-5) and GLP-2 receptor mRNA, whole mount immunohistochemistry for neurons (HuC/D, VIP, nNOS), plasma glucose, gut hormones, and body composition. Results Resection increased the proportion of nNOS immunopositive myenteric neurons, intestinal muscularis propria thickness and crypt cell proliferation, which were not recapitulated by GLP-2 therapy. Exogenous GLP-2 increased jejunal mucosal surface area without affecting enteric VIP or nNOS neuronal immunopositivity, attenuated resection-induced reductions in jejunal hexose transporter abundance (SGLT-1, GLUT-2), increased plasma amylin and decreased peptide YY concentrations. Exogenous GLP-2 attenuated resection-induced increases in blood glucose and body fat loss. Conclusions Exogenous GLP-2 stimulates jejunal adaptation independent of enteric neuronal VIP or nNOS changes, and has divergent effects on plasma amylin and peptide YY concentrations. The novel ability of exogenous GLP-2 to modulate resection-induced changes in peripheral glucose and lipid reserves may be important in understanding the whole-body response following intestinal resection, and is worthy

  7. Effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 and distal bowel resection on intestinal and systemic adaptive responses in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Sarah W; de Heuvel, Elaine; Wallace, Laurie E

    2017-01-01

    mount immunohistochemistry for neurons (HuC/D, VIP, nNOS), plasma glucose, gut hormones, and body composition. RESULTS: Resection increased the proportion of nNOS immunopositive myenteric neurons, intestinal muscularis propria thickness and crypt cell proliferation, which were not recapitulated by GLP-2......-2 attenuated resection-induced increases in blood glucose and body fat loss. CONCLUSIONS: Exogenous GLP-2 stimulates jejunal adaptation independent of enteric neuronal VIP or nNOS changes, and has divergent effects on plasma amylin and peptide YY concentrations. The novel ability of exogenous GLP-2......OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), with or without massive distal bowel resection, on adaptation of jejunal mucosa, enteric neurons, gut hormones and tissue reserves in rats. BACKGROUND: GLP-2 is a gut hormone known to be trophic for small bowel mucosa...

  8. Pelvic organ function before and after laparoscopic bowel resection for rectosigmoid endometriosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riiskjaer, M; Greisen, S; Glavind-Kristensen, M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess urinary, sexual, and bowel function before and after laparoscopic bowel resection for rectosigmoid endometriosis. DESIGN: Prospectively collected data regarding the function of the pelvic organs. SETTING: Tertiary endometriosis referral unit, Aarhus University Hospital. SAMPLE......: A cohort of 128 patients who underwent laparoscopic bowel resection for endometriosis. METHODS: The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire (ICIQ), Sexual Function-Vaginal Changes Questionnaire (SVQ), and the Low Anterior Resection Syndrome (LARS) questionnaire were answered before.......40; P = 0.002) of increased incontinence problems (I-score) 1 year after surgery. CONCLUSION: A significant and clinically relevant improvement in urinary and sexual function 1 year after laparoscopic bowel resection for endometriosis was found. Except for anastomotic leakage, this could be observed...

  9. Small Bowel Transplantation: Current Clinical Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sigalet

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available With recent refinements in immunosuppression techniques, the first successful reports of small bowel transplantation in humans have now been made, increasing interest in bowel transplantation among clinicians and patients alike. This article reviews recent developments in understanding of the functional capabilities and requirements for effective immune suppression in bowel transplantation. Both experimental and clinical experience with transplantation are discussed, as are the areas which appear to offer the most promise for future developments. Finally guidelines for consideration of patient selection for this procedure are reviewed.

  10. Small bowel volvulus due to torsion of pedunculated uterine leiomyoma: CT findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmo, Nicola; Malgras, Brice; Place, Vinciane; Guerrache, Youcef; Pautrat, Karine; Pocard, Marc; Soyer, Philippe

    Torsion of a uterine leiomyoma is a rare complication that can be life threatening because of ischemia or necrosis. This condition may also lead to gastrointestinal complications such as obstruction or, more rarely, small bowel volvulus. Its diagnosis is difficult and can be facilitated with the use of computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Treatment is based on emergency surgical resection of the twisted uterine leiomyoma and detorsion of the small bowel volvulus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Radiographer performed single contrast small bowel enteroclysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Robert L.; Slack, Nicola; Harvey, Richard F.

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To analyse the technical success and reporting sensitivity of radiographer performed small bowel enteroclysis (SBE) undertaken by a specialist radiographer according to a standard technique [Nolan DJ, Cadman PJ. The small bowel enema made easy. Clinical Radiology 1987;38(3):295-301]. Methods: Patients (1413) had 1646 SBE in 10 years from May 1992 to April 2002. The original request card and the separate radiographer and consultant radiologist reports were reviewed. Where the radiology reports were discordant or inconclusive, the clinical notes were also reviewed. Results: Patients (1022) X-ray films were available. Nine hundred and forty-three (93.3%) SBEs had been successfully completed. Radiographer and consultant radiologist reporting had a 99.3% concordance. There was a 98.4% sensitivity for Crohn's disease (181 of 184 cases where Crohn's disease was the clinical final diagnosis). Overall reporting sensitivity was 93.7% although correct 'probably normal and abnormal' reporting bias suggests a sensitivity of 96.9%. Sixty of 943 (6.4%) reports were inconclusive. Of 1022 patients, 68 (6.6%) of small bowel intubations were not achieved, or else consent was withdrawn at the time of the procedure. Conclusion: Specialist radiographers can perform small bowel enteroclysis with a reporting sensitivity equal to that of a consultant radiologist. Radiographers accustomed to providing an SBE service become skilled at passing fine bore feeding tubes into the small bowel and can provide this service also

  12. Anatomy and Physiology of the Small Bowel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Neil; Lacy, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Comprehension of small intestine physiology and function provides a framework for the understanding of several important disease pathways of the gastrointestinal system. This article reviews the development, anatomy and histology of the small bowel in addition to physiology and digestion of key nutrients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Extensive Intestinal Resection Triggers Behavioral Adaptation, Intestinal Remodeling and Microbiota Transition in Short Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Mayeur

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Extensive resection of small bowel often leads to short bowel syndrome (SBS. SBS patients develop clinical mal-absorption and dehydration relative to the reduction of absorptive area, acceleration of gastrointestinal transit time and modifications of the gastrointestinal intra-luminal environment. As a consequence of severe mal-absorption, patients require parenteral nutrition (PN. In adults, the overall adaptation following intestinal resection includes spontaneous and complex compensatory processes such as hyperphagia, mucosal remodeling of the remaining part of the intestine and major modifications of the microbiota. SBS patients, with colon in continuity, harbor a specific fecal microbiota that we called “lactobiota” because it is enriched in the Lactobacillus/Leuconostoc group and depleted in anaerobic micro-organisms (especially Clostridium and Bacteroides. In some patients, the lactobiota-driven fermentative activities lead to an accumulation of fecal d/l-lactates and an increased risk of d-encephalopathy. Better knowledge of clinical parameters and lactobiota characteristics has made it possible to stratify patients and define group at risk for d-encephalopathy crises.

  14. Radiologic examination of the small bowel: 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, H.C.; Maglinte, D.D.T.

    1987-01-01

    Effective clinical imaging of the small intestine is accomplished only with methods capable of accurately demonstrating bowel morphology. The two major approaches to barium enema examination of this segment of gut - orally and enteroclysis - will be described and illustrated with short videotape presentations. Pursued vigorously and with interest, both methods can yield excellent results in an efficient manner. Careful execution of the examination rather than use of a particular methodology is probably the most important factor in realizing such results. However, each method has its advantages and disadvantages, and these will be presented and discussed. A cursory small bowel examination has no role in modern medicine. Radiologists assume primary responsibility for the diagnostic evaluation of the small bowel and should strive to refine and advance the accuracy of the examination

  15. Small Bowel Obstruction due to Intestinal Xanthomatosis

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    L. E. Barrera-Herrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vast majority of bowel obstruction is due to postoperative adhesions, malignancy, intestinal inflammatory disease, and hernias; however, knowledge of other uncommon causes is critical to establish a prompt treatment and decrease mortality. Xanthomatosis is produced by accumulation of cholesterol-rich foamy macrophages. Intestinal xanthomatosis is an uncommon nonneoplastic lesion that may cause small bowel obstruction and several cases have been reported in the English literature as obstruction in the jejunum. We report a case of small intestinal xanthomatosis occurring in a 51-year-old female who presented with one day of copious vomiting and intermittent abdominal pain. Radiologic images revealed jejunal loop thickening and inflammatory changes suggestive of foreign body obstruction, diagnostic laparoscopy found two strictures at the jejunum, and a pathologic examination confirmed a segmental small bowel xanthomatosis. This case illustrates that obstruction even without predisposing factors such as hyperlipidemia or lymphoproliferative disorders.

  16. Small bowel tissue engineering using small intestinal submucosa as a scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M K; Badylak, S F

    2001-08-01

    Small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is an extracellular matrix used in tissue engineering studies to create de novo abdominal wall, urinary bladder, tendons, blood vessels, and dura mater. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using SIS as a scaffold for small bowel regeneration in an in situ xenograft model. Twenty-three dogs had a partial defect created on the small bowel wall which was repaired with a SIS patch. Four dogs underwent small bowel resection with placement of an interposed tube of SIS. The animals were followed 2 weeks to 1 year. Three of the 23 dogs with SIS placed as a patch died shortly after surgery due to leakage from the site. The other 20 dogs survived up to time of elective necropsy with no evidence of intestinal dysfunction. At necropsy, the bowel circumference in the patched area had no stenosis. Histological evaluation showed the presence of a mucosal epithelial layer, varying amount of smooth muscle, sheets of collagen, and a serosal covering. Architecturally, the layers were not well organized in the submucosal region. An abundance of inflammatory cells was present in the early postoperative period but receded with time. All 4 dogs with a tubular segment of SIS interposed had significant problems. One had partial obstruction at 1 month, and 3 died in the early postoperative period due to leakage. This preliminary study suggests that SIS patches can be used for small bowel regeneration. Tubular segmental replacement is not feasible at this time. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  17. Computed tomography features of small bowel volvulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loh, Y.H.; Dunn, G.D.

    2000-01-01

    Small bowel volvulus is a cause of acute abdomen and commonly occurs in neonates and young infants. Although it is rare in adults in the Western world,' it is a relatively common surgical emergency in the Middle East, India and Central Africa. It is associated with a mortality rate of 10-67% and, hence, it is important to make an early diagnosis to expedite surgical intervention. Computed tomography has become an important imaging modality in diagnosis and a number of signs have been recognized in a handful of documented case reports. We describe a case of small bowel volvulus that illustrates these important CT signs. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  18. Small bowel perforation without tumor recurrence after radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma: report of seven cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Tago, Masao; Igaki, Hiroshi; Shiraishi, Kenshirou; Nakamura, Naoki; Sasano, Nakashi; Yamakawa, Sen; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2006-04-01

    We describe the clinical presentation, evaluation, management and outcome of patients experiencing small bowel perforation following radiation therapy for cervical cancer. A database consisting of 95 Japanese women with stage 0-4 A cervix cancer treated between 1991 and 2004 contained seven patients (7.4%) with small bowel perforation. The median age at the time of perforation was 72.5 years (range 62-78). The median time from completion of radiotherapy to perforation was 6 months (range 2-58). Surgery (one small bowel resection and anastomosis with diversion; six small bowel resection and anastomosis) was performed immediately in all seven patients. One of seven patients died of small bowel perforation (i.e. mortality rate was 14%). Bowel adhesion was detected during the operation in only three cases (43%). Signs of peritonitis were absent in six cases (86%). Severe abdominal pain was seen in all seven patients. The perforation site was ileum in all seven cases. In all patients, pathological changes were compatible with postirradiation injury of the gastrointestinal tract. The presenting complaints of patients with bowel perforation following radiotherapy vary, and signs of peritonitis may be absent. Emergency physicians must be alert for these complications in patients who have been treated with radiotherapy.

  19. Diospyrobezoar as a Cause of Small Bowel Obstruction

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    Andréia Padilha de Toledo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytobezoar, a concretion of indigestible fibers derived from ingested vegetables and fruits, is the most common type of bezoar. Diospyrobezoar is a subtype of phytobezoar formed after excessive intake of persimmons (Diospyros kaki. We report the case of a diabetic man with a 5-day history of abdominal pain after massive ingestion of persimmons who developed signs of complicated small bowel obstruction. The patient had a previous history of Billroth II hemigastrectomy associated with truncal vagotomy to treat a chronic duodenal ulcer 14 years earlier. Since intestinal obstruction was suspected, he underwent emergency laparotomy that revealed an ileal obstruction with small bowel perforation and local peritonitis due to a phytobezoar that was impacted 15 cm above the ileocecal valve. After segmental intestinal resection, the patient had a good recovery and was discharged on the 6th postoperative day. This report provides evidence that diospyrobezoar should be considered as a possible cause of small bowel obstruction in patients who have previously undergone gastric surgery.

  20. Severe small bowel radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaen, J.; Santos, J.A.; Carrion, J.R.; Garcia, P.

    1989-01-01

    We have during recent years observed 8 patients with serious radiation injury to the small intestine. As the cases are quite illustrative, their symptomatology is briefly reported and the treatment and possible predisposing factors are analysed. (orig./MG)

  1. [Leiomyoma of the small bowel with hypercalcaemia: presence of a substance with parathormone activity (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathaus, M; Bernheim, J L; Griffel, B; Bernheim, J; Taragan, R; Gutman, A

    1979-10-22

    A leiomyoma of the small bowel produced laboratory features of hyperparathyroidism which disappeared promptly after tumour resection. Hypercalcaemia, hypophosphatemia, hyperchloremia, elevated chloride/phosphorus ratio, increased urinary cyclic AMP, and blood levels of immunoreactive parathormone were present. Electron microscopy showed dense round granules in the tumour cells.

  2. Effect of loperamide and delay of bowel motility on bile acid malabsorption caused by late radiation damage and ileal resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes Olmos, R. (Nederlands Kanker Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Hartog Jager, F. den; Hoefnagel, C.; Taal, B. (Nederlands Kanker Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Gastroenterology)

    1991-05-01

    Selenium-75 homocholic acid conjugated with taurine ({sup 75}Se-HCAT) was used during loperamide administration in seven patients suspected of having bile acid malabsorption due to late radiation damage and small-bowel resection in order to document the aetiology of ileal dysfunction and to adjust therapeutic mamagement. In two patients with ileal resection up to 50 cm and in one patient without resection, a reduction of bowel motility by loperamide resulted in marked normalization of the {sup 75}Se-HCAT retention measurements. Sequential scintigraphic {sup 75}Se-HCAT imaging demonstrated a significant improvement in the {sup 75}Se-HCAT reabsorption and recirculation, accompanied in one case by prolongation of colonic retention of the radiopharmaceutical. In four patients with more than 80 cm resection, the {sup 75}Se-HCAT test was abnormal during loperamide administration. In two of these patients for whom baseline values were available, no improvement in the pattern of {sup 75}Se-HCAT absorption was observed. In conclusion, the first results of loperamide {sup 75}Se-HCAT in patients suspected of having bile acid malabsorption and abnormal baseline {sup 75}Se-HCAT are promising. Intervention with loperamide is easy and seems to improve the clinical value of the test with direct therapeutic implications. Sequential {sup 75}Se-HCAT imaging is essential for interpreting changes in the {sup 75}Se-HCAT retention measurements. (orig.).

  3. Segmental reversal of distal small intestine in short bowel syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grave, Pernille Kock; Thomsen, Sabrina Valentin; Clark, Pia Susanne

    2018-01-01

    were the influence on cell proliferation and mucosal architecture shown by histological analysis. Methods: Sixteen piglets underwent a 60% resection of the distal small intestine and were randomized into two groups. Group 1 short bowel syndrome alone (SBS) (n = 8) and group 2 with reversal of a distal...... small intestinal segment (SBS-RS) (n = 8). Body weight was measured daily and the pigs were euthanized after 1 month. Crypt depths, villus heights and muscle layers thicknesses were measured. For the evaluation of microvilli of the brush border of the epithelium and cell proliferation...... was found in the SBS group and increase in the thickness of the circular and longitudinal muscle layers in the SBS-RS group. In the distal ileal segment the longitudinal muscle layer thicknesses were increased in the SBS group. Otherwise, no significant changes were found. Conclusion: Reversal of a 20-cm...

  4. Small bowel obstruction and perforation after Essure sterilization: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantel, Hendrik T J; Wijma, Jacobus; Stael, Adrianus P M

    2013-01-01

    We present a rare but serious complication of Essure microinsert sterilization. Case report. A 42-year-old woman presented with nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and abdominal distension 1 month after uncomplicated Essure sterilization. Abdominal X-ray showed small bowel obstruction. At subsequent laparotomy, a stretched Essure device was found ensnaring the terminal ileum. It had caused strangulation and local perforation of the bowel wall. The device was removed and an ileocecal resection with side-to-side ileocolostomy was performed. In retrospect, the aberrant location of the right Essure device near the ileocecal junction was noticed on the abdominal X-ray. This case illustrates that perforation of an Essure device can result in a serious complication leading to ileocecal resection. An abdominal X-ray with specific attention to the correct location of the Essure coils is advisable for patients presenting with small bowel obstruction after Essure sterilization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical sodium pertechnetate (Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}) after massive small bowel resection in rats; Biodistribuicao do radiofarmaco pertecnetato de sodio (Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}) em ratos submetidos a resseccao extensa de intestino delgado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon, Damaso de Araujo; Araujo-Filho, Irami; Villarim-Neto, Arthur; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Medeiros, Aldo Cunha [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias da Saude]. E-mail: damasochacon@uol.com.br; Rego, Amalia Cinthia Meneses [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Iniciacao Cientifica; Azevedo, Italo Medeiros [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Cirurgia; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the biodistribution of sodium pertechnetate (Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}) in organs and tissues, the morphometry of remnant intestinal mucosa and ponderal evolution in rats subjected to massive resection of the small intestine. Methods:Twenty-one Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups of 7 animals each. The short bowel (SB) group was subjected to massive resection of the small intestine; the control group (C) rats were not operated on, and soft intestinal handling was performed in sham rats. The animals were weighed weekly. On the 30th postoperative day, 0.1 mL of Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}, with mean activity of 0.66 MBq was injected intravenously into the orbital plexus. After 30 minutes, the rats were killed with an overdose of anesthetic, and fragments of the liver, spleen, pancreas, stomach, duodenum, small intestine, thyroid, lung, heart, kidney, bladder, muscle, femur and brain were harvested. The biopsies were washed with 0.9% NaCl.,The radioactivity was counted using Gamma Counter Wizard{sup TM} 1470, Perkin-Elmer. The percentage of radioactivity per gram of tissue (%ATI/g) was calculated. Biopsies of the remaining jejunum were analysed by HE staining to obtain mucosal thickness. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey test for multiple comparisons were used, considering p<0.05 as significant. Results: There were no significant differences in %ATI/g of the Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4} in the organs of the groups studied (p>0.05). An increase in the weight of the SB rats was observed after the second postoperative week. The jejunal mucosal thickness of the SB rats was significantly greater than that of C and sham rats (p<0.05). Conclusion: In rats with experimentally-produced short bowel syndrome, an adaptive response by the intestinal mucosa reduced weight loss. The biodistribution of Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4} was not affected by massive intestinal resection, suggesting that short bowel syndrome is not the cause of misleading interpretation

  6. The radiolesions of the small bowel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bories-Azeau, A.; Dayan, L.

    1980-01-01

    The irradiation of the pelvic abdominal cancers extends beyond the centre of the tumour and may induce actinic digestive lesions. The bowel and more rarely the small bowel -which is the subject-matter of our study- are concerned by those radiolesions that are favoured by therapeutic overdose, post-operative adhesions fastening the bows, radio-surgical or chemicostatic associations, and lastly by vascular or nutritive deficiencies. One may distinguish between two kinds of lesions, depending on the lapse of time before their coming out and on the symptoms. The early or acute types are characterized by a radio-mucitis and give an exsudative enteropathy with anorexia, vomiting, diarrhoea and loss of weight, of which the diagnosis is easy because it occurs during the irradiation and lessens at the end of the treatment. The late radiolesions of the small bowel are characterized by sclerosis and chronic endarteritis and, after a longlasting period of latency, give varied symptoms: disordered intestinal transit which sometimes is irreversible, perforation, fistula, syndrome of malabsorption, giving often rise to be mistaken for a recurrence of the cancer. The treatment varies whether the lesion is segmental or diffuse. In the first case, the failure of the medical means accounts for the surgical cutting away or the internal derivation; in the second case, the digestive mutilation which would result from an enlargement of the lesion commands to be more cautious and to call for the methods of parenteral feeding and digestive setting to rest [fr

  7. Small Bowel Perforation due to Gossypiboma Caused Acute Abdomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahsin Colak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gossypiboma, an infrequent surgical complication, is a mass lesion due to a retained surgical sponge surrounded by foreign body reaction. In this case report, we describe gossypiboma in the abdominal cavity which was detected 14 months after the hysterectomy due to acute abdominal pain. Gossypiboma was diagnosed by computed tomography (CT. The CT findings were a rounded mass with a dense central part and an enhancing wall. In explorative laparotomy, small bowel loops were seen to be perforated due to inflammation of long standing gossypiboma. Jejunal resection with end-to-end anastomosis was performed. The patient was discharged whithout complication. This case was presented to point to retained foreign body (RFB complications and we believed that the possibility of a retained foreign body should be considered in the differential diagnosis of who had previous surgery and complained of pain, infection, or palpable mass.

  8. Defining probabilities of bowel resection in deep endometriosis of the rectum: Prediction with preoperative magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perandini, Alessio; Perandini, Simone; Montemezzi, Stefania; Bonin, Cecilia; Bellini, Gaia; Bergamini, Valentino

    2018-02-01

    Deep endometriosis of the rectum is a highly challenging disease, and a surgical approach is often needed to restore anatomy and function. Two kinds of surgeries may be performed: radical with segmental bowel resection or conservative without resection. Most patients undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before surgery, but there is currently no method to predict if conservative surgery is feasible or whether bowel resection is required. The aim of this study was to create an algorithm that could predict bowel resection using MRI images, that was easy to apply and could be useful in a clinical setting, in order to adequately discuss informed consent with the patient and plan the an appropriate and efficient surgical session. We collected medical records from 2010 to 2016 and reviewed the MRI results of 52 patients to detect any parameters that could predict bowel resection. Parameters that were reproducible and with a significant correlation to radical surgery were investigated by statistical regression and combined in an algorithm to give the best prediction of resection. The calculation of two parameters in MRI, impact angle and lesion size, and their use in a mathematical algorithm permit us to predict bowel resection with a positive predictive value of 87% and a negative predictive value of 83%. MRI could be of value in predicting the need for bowel resection in deep endometriosis of the rectum. Further research is required to assess the possibility of a wider application of this algorithm outside our single-center study. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  9. The pathophysiology of the nodular and micronodular small bowel fold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmsted, W.W.; Ros, P.R.; Moser, R.P.; Shekita, K.M.; Lichtenstein, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The normal small bowel fold is easily seen on conventional studies of the small intestine, but visualization of the small bowel villus is at the limit of resolution of current roentgenographic technique. When the villi are enlarged, they appear radiographically as an irregularity or micronodularity of the small bowel fold. The anatomy of the fold and the pathophysiology of diseases producing fold nodularity (tumor,inflammatory disease, NLH, mastocytosis) and micronodularity (lymphangiectasia, Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia, Whipple disease) are presented, with an emphasis on radiologic-pathologic correlation. The radiologist should suggest certain diseases or conditions based on the roentgenographic characteristics of the closely analyzed small bowel fold

  10. Pathophysiology of the nodular and micronodular small bowel fold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmstead, W.W.; Ros, P.R.; Moser, R.P.; Shekitka, K.M.; Lichtenstein, J.E.; Buck, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The normal small bowel fold is easily seen on conventional studies of the small intestine, but visualization of the small bowel villus is just at the resolution of current roentgenographic technique. When the villi are enlarged, they can be seen radiographically as an irregularity or micronodularity of the small bowel fold. The anatomy of the fold and the pathophysiology of diseases producing fold nodularity (tumor, inflammatory disease, NLH, mastocytosis) and micronodularity (lymphangiectasia, Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia, Whipple disease) are presented, with an emphasis on radiologic-pathologic correlation. The radiologist should suggest certain diseases or conditions based on the roentgenographic characteristics of the closely analyzed small bowel fold

  11. Pathophysiology of acute small bowel disease with CT correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwani, N.; Tappouni, R.; Tice, J.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to review the pathophysiology of acute small bowel diseases, and to correlate the mechanisms of disease with computed tomography (CT) findings. Disease entities will be classified into the following: immune mediated and infectious causes, vascular causes, mechanical causes, trauma, and others. Having an understanding of acute small bowel pathophysiology is a useful teaching tool, and can lead to imaging clues to the most likely diagnosis of acute small bowel disorders.

  12. Scintigraphic pattern of small bowel bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anshu Rajnish Sharma; Charan, S.; Silva, I.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Small intestine is the longest part of gastrointestinal tract. Intra-luminal haemorrhage occurring anywhere in its long and tortuous course is difficult to trace. It is relatively inaccessible to endoscopic evaluation. Upper GI endoscopy can see only up to distal duodenum, whereas colonoscope can view maximum of 30 centimeters of terminal ileum after negotiating the scope through ileo-caecal valve. Hence, localization of bleeding source from small bowel remains a difficult clinical problem. This group of patients can be evaluated with scintigraphy for localizing the site of bleeding before undergoing either angiography or surgery. To our best of knowledge, there is no study, which has utilized scintigraphy for evaluation of small bowel bleed exclusively. The present study has been designed to know the efficacy of 99mTc-RBC scintigraphy in detecting small bowel bleed and to know whether it can differentiate between jejunal and ileal bleeding ? Materials and methods: Thirteen patients presenting with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (malena) were enrolled for the study. In all cases, upper GI endoscopy (UGIE) was unremarkable. Colonoscopic examination was either negative or suspected bleeding occurring proximal to ileo-caecal valve. Thus, in these patients, it is presumed clinically that bleeding is originating from small bowel. Barium meal follow through (BMFT) studies, however, could not delineate any etiological lesion in these patients. There were 8 men and 5 women (mean age 48 years). All patients were anemic (Hb- 6 gm%) and mean 3 units of blood were transfused.These patients were subjected to Tc-99m labeled red blood cells scintigraphy (15 mci, in-vivo method) for localization of source of bleeding. The scintiscan was acquired in two phases. A first pass phase acquired at a rate of 2 seconds per frame for 60 seconds followed by acquisition of static abdominal images (500 K, 256 x 256 matrix) at 5 minutes intervals up to 90 minutes on LFOV gamma

  13. Small bowel angiodysplasia and novel disease associations: a cohort study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Holleran, Grainne

    2013-04-01

    Gastrointestinal angiodysplasias recurrently bleed, accounting for 3-5% of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The advent of small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE) has led to an increased recognition of small bowel angiodysplasias (SBAs) but little is known about their etiology. Previous small cohorts and case reports suggest an equal gender incidence and associations with cardiovascular disease, renal impairment, and coagulopathies.

  14. An immunoglobulin G-4 related sclerosing disease of the small bowel: CT and small bowel series findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Young Hwan; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Min, Seon Jeong; Woo, Ji Young; Kim, Jeong Won; Hong, Hye Sook; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related sclerosing disease is rare and is known to involve various organs. We present a case of histologically proven IgG4-related sclerosing disease of the small bowel with imaging findings on computed tomography (CT) and small bowel series. CT showed irregular wall thickening, loss of mural stratification and aneurysmal dilatation of the distal ileum. Small bowel series showed aneurysmal dilatations, interloop adhesion with traction and abrupt angulation.

  15. [Volvulus of the small bowel due to ascaris lumbricoides package: about a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diouf, Cheikh; Kane, Ahmed; Ndoye, Ndeye Aby; Ndour, Oumar; Faye-Fall, Aimé Lakh; Fall, Mbaye; Alumeti, Désiré Munyali; Ngom, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We report an exceptional case of a 7 year-old patient with necrotic small bowel volvulus due to adult ascaris lumbricoides. At the admission, the child had intestinal obstruction evolving since two days with alteration of general state. Abdominal radiography without preparation showed small bowel air-fluid levels and tiger-stripe appearance evoking the diagnosis of acute intestinal obstruction associated with abdominal mass. After resuscitation, the surgical treatment consisted of laparotomy which showed necrotic volvulus of the terminal ileum containing adult ascaris lumbricoides. The patient underwent small bowel resection, approximately one meter of affected section was removed and then an ileostomy was performed. The evolution was favorable. The patient underwent ileorectal anastomosis four weeks later. After a 2 year follow-up period the child had no symptoms.

  16. Rapunzel Syndrome: a rare cause of acute small bowel obstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Rapunzel syndrome is a very rare condition where trichobezoar has extended up to the small bowel. Here we are reporting a rare case of Rapunzel syndrome in an adolescent girl with history of trichophagia who presented with small bowel obstruction. Patient underwent exploratory laparotomy and bezoar was ...

  17. Multiphasic MDCT in small bowel volvulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Shiting; Chan Tao; Sun Canhui; Li Ziping; Guo Huanyi; Yang Guangqi; Peng Zhenpeng; Meng Quanfei

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the use of MDCT with 3D CT angiography (CTA) and CT portal venography (CTPV) reconstruction for the diagnosis of small bowel volvulus (SBV). Methods: Multiphasic MDCT findings in nine patients (seven males and two females, age range 2-70) with surgically proven SBV were retrospectively reviewed. Non-contrast and double phase contrast enhanced MDCT including 3D CTA and CTPV reconstruction were performed in all the patients. Two experienced abdominal radiologists evaluated the images and defined the location, direction and degree of SBV. Results: On axial MDCT images, all cases show segmental or global dilatation of small intestine. Other findings include circumferential bowel wall thickening in eight cases, halo appearance and hyperemia in seven cases, whirl sign in six cases, beak-like appearance in six cases, closed loops in six cases and ascites in one case. CTA/CTPV showed abnormal courses involving main trunks of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and superior mesenteric vein (SMV) in seven cases, with or without distortion of their tributaries. Normal course of SMA but abnormal course of SMV was seen in the other two cases. Of all the nine cases, whirl sign was seen in six cases and barber's pole sign in five cases. Dilated SMV was observed in eight cases and abrupt termination of SMA was found in one case. Compared with surgical findings, the location, direction and degree of SBV were correctly estimated in all cases based on CTA/CTPV. Conclusion: Multiphasic MDCT with CTA/CTPV reconstruction can play an important role in the diagnosis of SBV. The location, direction and degree of SBV can all be defined preoperatively using this method.

  18. Multiphasic MDCT in small bowel volvulus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Shiting, E-mail: fst1977@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, 58th The Second Zhongshan Road, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Chan Tao, E-mail: taochan@hku.hk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Hong Kong, Room 406, Block K, Queen Mary Hospital (Hong Kong); Sun Canhui, E-mail: canhuisun@sina.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, 58th The Second Zhongshan Road, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Li Ziping, E-mail: liziping163@tom.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, 58th The Second Zhongshan Road, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Guo Huanyi, E-mail: guohuanyi@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, 58th The Second Zhongshan Road, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Yang Guangqi, E-mail: shwy03@126.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, 58th The Second Zhongshan Road, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Peng Zhenpeng, E-mail: ppzhen@21cn.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, 58th The Second Zhongshan Road, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Meng Quanfei, E-mail: mzycoco@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, 58th The Second Zhongshan Road, Guangzhou 510080 (China)

    2010-11-15

    Objective: Evaluate the use of MDCT with 3D CT angiography (CTA) and CT portal venography (CTPV) reconstruction for the diagnosis of small bowel volvulus (SBV). Methods: Multiphasic MDCT findings in nine patients (seven males and two females, age range 2-70) with surgically proven SBV were retrospectively reviewed. Non-contrast and double phase contrast enhanced MDCT including 3D CTA and CTPV reconstruction were performed in all the patients. Two experienced abdominal radiologists evaluated the images and defined the location, direction and degree of SBV. Results: On axial MDCT images, all cases show segmental or global dilatation of small intestine. Other findings include circumferential bowel wall thickening in eight cases, halo appearance and hyperemia in seven cases, whirl sign in six cases, beak-like appearance in six cases, closed loops in six cases and ascites in one case. CTA/CTPV showed abnormal courses involving main trunks of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and superior mesenteric vein (SMV) in seven cases, with or without distortion of their tributaries. Normal course of SMA but abnormal course of SMV was seen in the other two cases. Of all the nine cases, whirl sign was seen in six cases and barber's pole sign in five cases. Dilated SMV was observed in eight cases and abrupt termination of SMA was found in one case. Compared with surgical findings, the location, direction and degree of SBV were correctly estimated in all cases based on CTA/CTPV. Conclusion: Multiphasic MDCT with CTA/CTPV reconstruction can play an important role in the diagnosis of SBV. The location, direction and degree of SBV can all be defined preoperatively using this method.

  19. Contrast enema depiction of small-bowel volvulus in complicated neonatal bowel obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Oscar M.; Daneman, Alan; Miller, Stephen F. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2004-12-01

    About one-half of patients with meconium ileus (MI) present with a complication such as volvulus, atresia, meconium peritonitis or giant cystic meconium peritonitis. The treatment of these complications requires surgery. However, the preoperative diagnosis of complicated MI is difficult. We describe two neonates with complicated small-bowel obstruction, one with MI related to cystic fibrosis and the other not related to cystic fibrosis. In both, contrast enema depicted a spiral appearance of the distal small bowel, which at surgery proved to be the result of volvulus associated with antenatal bowel perforation. This appearance of the small bowel on contrast enema in this clinical setting has not been previously described. The recognition of this spiral appearance of the distal small bowel suggests the need for surgery. (orig.)

  20. Contrast enema depiction of small-bowel volvulus in complicated neonatal bowel obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, Oscar M.; Daneman, Alan; Miller, Stephen F.

    2004-01-01

    About one-half of patients with meconium ileus (MI) present with a complication such as volvulus, atresia, meconium peritonitis or giant cystic meconium peritonitis. The treatment of these complications requires surgery. However, the preoperative diagnosis of complicated MI is difficult. We describe two neonates with complicated small-bowel obstruction, one with MI related to cystic fibrosis and the other not related to cystic fibrosis. In both, contrast enema depicted a spiral appearance of the distal small bowel, which at surgery proved to be the result of volvulus associated with antenatal bowel perforation. This appearance of the small bowel on contrast enema in this clinical setting has not been previously described. The recognition of this spiral appearance of the distal small bowel suggests the need for surgery. (orig.)

  1. Primary small bowel adenocarcinoma: current view on clinical features, risk and prognostic factors, treatment and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Gustaw; Korcz, Wojciech; Kowalczyk, Emilia; Słotwiński, Robert; Słodkowski, Maciej

    2017-11-01

    Small bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA) is a rare but increasing cause of gastrointestinal malignancy, being both a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The goal of treatment is margin negative resection of a lesion and local lymphadenectomy, followed by modern adjuvant chemotherapy combinations in selected cases. Improved outcomes in patients with SBA are encouraging, but elucidation of mechanisms of carcinogenesis and risk factors as well as improved treatment for this malignancy is very needed.

  2. Small bowel volvulus with jejunal diverticulum: Primary or secondary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao-Fei; Guan, Wen-Xian; Cao, Ke; Wang, Hao; Du, Jun-Feng

    2015-09-28

    Small bowel volvulus, which is torsion of the small bowel and its mesentery, is a medical emergency, and is categorized as primary or secondary type. Primary type often occurs without any apparent intrinsic anatomical anomalies, while the secondary type is common clinically and could be caused by numerous factors including postoperative adhesions, intestinal diverticulum, and/or tumors. Here, we report a rare case of a 60-year-old man diagnosed with small bowel volvulus using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography. Further discovery by laparotomy showed one jejunal diverticulum, longer corresponding mesentery with a narrower insertion, and a lack of mesenteric fat. This case report includes several etiological factors of small bowel volvulus, and we discuss the possible cause of small bowel volvulus in this patient. We also highlight the importance of MDCT angiography in the diagnosis of volvulus and share our experience in treating this disease.

  3. Postoperative ileus-related morbidity profile in patients treated with alvimopan after bowel resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Bruce G; Weese, James L; Ludwig, Kirk A; Delaney, Conor P; Stamos, Michael J; Michelassi, Fabrizio; Du, Wei; Techner, Lee

    2007-04-01

    Postoperative ileus (POI), an interruption of coordinated bowel motility after operation, is exacerbated by opioids used to manage pain. Alvimopan, a peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist, accelerated gastrointestinal (GI) recovery after bowel resection in randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter phase III POI trials. The effect of alvimopan on POI-related morbidity for patients who underwent bowel resection was evaluated in a post-hoc analysis. Incidence of POI-related postoperative morbidity (postoperative nasogastric tube insertion or POI-related prolonged hospital stay or readmission) was analyzed in four North American trials for placebo or alvimopan 12 mg administered 30 minutes or more preoperatively and twice daily postoperatively until hospital discharge (7 or fewer postoperative days). GI-related adverse events and opioid consumption were summarized for each treatment. Estimations of odds ratios of alvimopan to placebo and number needed to treat (NNT) to prevent one patient from experiencing an event of POI-related morbidity were derived from the analysis. Patients receiving alvimopan 12 mg were less likely to experience POI-related morbidity than patients receiving placebo (odds ratio = 0.44, p POI-related morbidity. There was a lower incidence of postoperative nasogastric tube insertion, and other GI-related adverse events on postoperative days 3 to 6 in the alvimopan group than the placebo group. Opioid consumption was comparable between groups. Alvimopan 12 mg was associated with reduced POI-related morbidity compared with placebo, without compromising opioid-based analgesia in patients undergoing bowel resection. Relatively low NNTs are clinically meaningful and reinforce the potential benefits of alvimopan for the patient and health care system.

  4. Imaging differentiation of phytobezoar and small-bowel faeces: CT characteristics with quantitative analysis in patients with small- bowel obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ya-Cheng; Liu, Chang-Hsien; Hsu, Hsian-He; Yu, Chih-Yung [Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Wang, Hong-Hau [Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Tri-Service General Hospital Songshan Branch, National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Fan, Hsiu-Lung [Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Chen, Ran-Chou [Taipei City Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming Univeristy, Department of Biochemical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China); Chang, Wei-Chou [Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming Univeristy, Department of Biochemical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China)

    2015-04-01

    The objective is to use multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to differentiate phytobezoar impaction and small-bowel faeces in patients with small-bowel obstruction (SBO). We retrospectively reviewed 91 consecutive SBO patients with surgically proven phytobezoars (n = 31) or adhesion with small-bowel faeces (n = 60). Two readers blinded to the diagnosis recorded the following MDCT features: degree of obstruction, transition point, mesenteric fatty stranding, intraperitoneal fluid, air-fluid level, pneumatosis intestinalis, and portal venous gas. MDCT measurements of the food debris length, attenuation, luminal diameter, and wall thickness of the obstructed bowel were also compared. A higher grade of obstruction with an absence of mesenteric fatty stranding and intraperitoneal fluid was more commonly seen in the phytobezoar group than in the small-bowel faeces group (p < 0.01). The food debris length (phytobezoar, 5.7 ± 2.8 cm; small-bowel feces, 20.3 ± 7.9 cm, p < 0.01) and mean attenuation (phytobezoar, -59.6 ± 43.3 Hounsfield units (HU); small-bowel faeces, 8.5 ± 7.7 HU, p <0.01) were significantly different between the two groups. The ROC curve showed that food debris length <9.5 cm and mean attenuation value < -11.75 HU predicted phytobezoar impaction. MDCT features with measurements of the food debris length and mean attenuation assist the differentiation of phytobezoar impaction and small-bowel faeces. (orig.)

  5. Imaging differentiation of phytobezoar and small-bowel faeces: CT characteristics with quantitative analysis in patients with small- bowel obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ya-Cheng; Liu, Chang-Hsien; Hsu, Hsian-He; Yu, Chih-Yung; Wang, Hong-Hau; Fan, Hsiu-Lung; Chen, Ran-Chou; Chang, Wei-Chou

    2015-01-01

    The objective is to use multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to differentiate phytobezoar impaction and small-bowel faeces in patients with small-bowel obstruction (SBO). We retrospectively reviewed 91 consecutive SBO patients with surgically proven phytobezoars (n = 31) or adhesion with small-bowel faeces (n = 60). Two readers blinded to the diagnosis recorded the following MDCT features: degree of obstruction, transition point, mesenteric fatty stranding, intraperitoneal fluid, air-fluid level, pneumatosis intestinalis, and portal venous gas. MDCT measurements of the food debris length, attenuation, luminal diameter, and wall thickness of the obstructed bowel were also compared. A higher grade of obstruction with an absence of mesenteric fatty stranding and intraperitoneal fluid was more commonly seen in the phytobezoar group than in the small-bowel faeces group (p < 0.01). The food debris length (phytobezoar, 5.7 ± 2.8 cm; small-bowel feces, 20.3 ± 7.9 cm, p < 0.01) and mean attenuation (phytobezoar, -59.6 ± 43.3 Hounsfield units (HU); small-bowel faeces, 8.5 ± 7.7 HU, p <0.01) were significantly different between the two groups. The ROC curve showed that food debris length <9.5 cm and mean attenuation value < -11.75 HU predicted phytobezoar impaction. MDCT features with measurements of the food debris length and mean attenuation assist the differentiation of phytobezoar impaction and small-bowel faeces. (orig.)

  6. [Significance of hypo-osmolar diets for oral nutrition build-up in very severe malabsorption--clinical observations exemplified by infants with subtotal small intestine resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, K H; Teufel, M

    1984-01-01

    Regenerative and adaptive processes of the gut are apparently analogous to the absorption rate in small bowel diseases. These processes can be enhanced by the prolongation of passage time which, in turn, is influenced by the osmolality of the formula diet. Since infants who have undergone a subtotal bowel resection, like other children with serious diseases of the small bowel, are extraordinarily sensitive to hyperosmolar food, any preparation with special indications should be balanced and rendered hypoosmolar in full caloric concentration. Such formulas may well facilitate food supply to infants and, in case of short bowel syndrome, encourage more pronounced morphologic adaptation.

  7. MRI of the small bowel: can sufficient bowel distension be achieved with small volumes of oral contrast?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinner, Sonja; Kuehle, Christiane A.; Ladd, Susanne C.; Barkhausen, Joerg; Herbig, Sebastian; Haag, Sebastian; Lauenstein, Thomas C.

    2008-01-01

    Sufficient luminal distension is mandatory for small bowel imaging. However, patients often are unable to ingest volumes of currently applied oral contrast compounds. The aim of this study was to evaluate if administration of low doses of an oral contrast agent with high-osmolarity leads to sufficient and diagnostic bowel distension. Six healthy volunteers ingested at different occasions 150, 300 and 450 ml of a commercially available oral contrast agent (Banana Smoothie Readi-Cat, E-Z-EM; 194 mOsmol/l). Two-dimensional TrueFISP data sets were acquired in 5-min intervals up to 45 min after contrast ingestion. Small bowel distension was quantified using a visual five-grade ranking (5 very good distension, 1 = collapsed bowel). Results were statistically compared using a Wilcoxon-Rank test. Ingestion of 450 ml and 300 ml resulted in a significantly better distension than 150 ml. The all-over average distension value for 450 ml amounted to 3.4 (300 ml: 3.0, 150 ml: 2.3) and diagnostic bowel distension could be found throughout the small intestine. Even 45 min after ingestion of 450 ml the jejunum and ileum could be reliably analyzed. Small bowel imaging with low doses of contrast leads to diagnostic distension values in healthy subjects when a high-osmolarity substance is applied. These findings may help to further refine small bowel MRI techniques, but need to be confirmed in patients with small bowel disorders. (orig.)

  8. ACG Clinical Guideline: Diagnosis and Management of Small Bowel Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Lauren B; Fidler, Jeff L; Cave, David R; Leighton, Jonathan A

    2015-09-01

    Bleeding from the small intestine remains a relatively uncommon event, accounting for ~5-10% of all patients presenting with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given advances in small bowel imaging with video capsule endoscopy (VCE), deep enteroscopy, and radiographic imaging, the cause of bleeding in the small bowel can now be identified in most patients. The term small bowel bleeding is therefore proposed as a replacement for the previous classification of obscure GI bleeding (OGIB). We recommend that the term OGIB should be reserved for patients in whom a source of bleeding cannot be identified anywhere in the GI tract. A source of small bowel bleeding should be considered in patients with GI bleeding after performance of a normal upper and lower endoscopic examination. Second-look examinations using upper endoscopy, push enteroscopy, and/or colonoscopy can be performed if indicated before small bowel evaluation. VCE should be considered a first-line procedure for small bowel investigation. Any method of deep enteroscopy can be used when endoscopic evaluation and therapy are required. VCE should be performed before deep enteroscopy if there is no contraindication. Computed tomographic enterography should be performed in patients with suspected obstruction before VCE or after negative VCE examinations. When there is acute overt hemorrhage in the unstable patient, angiography should be performed emergently. In patients with occult hemorrhage or stable patients with active overt bleeding, multiphasic computed tomography should be performed after VCE or CTE to identify the source of bleeding and to guide further management. If a source of bleeding is identified in the small bowel that is associated with significant ongoing anemia and/or active bleeding, the patient should be managed with endoscopic therapy. Conservative management is recommended for patients without a source found after small bowel investigation, whereas repeat diagnostic investigations are recommended

  9. Transient small-bowel intussusception in children on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strouse, Peter J.; DiPietro, Michael A.; Saez, Fermin

    2003-01-01

    To determine the frequency and significance of small-bowel intussusception identified in children on CT. All abdomen CT reports between July 1995 and April 2002 were reviewed to identify patients with small-bowel intussusception. Intussusceptions were identified as an intraluminal mass with a characteristic layered appearance and/or continuity with adjacent mesenteric fat. Ileocolic intussusceptions and intussusceptions related to feeding tubes were excluded. Imaging studies and medical records were reviewed. Twenty-five pediatric patients (16 boys, 9 girls; mean age 11.2 years) were identified with small-bowel intussusception on CT. No patient had a persistent intussusception requiring surgery. Fourteen had limited immediate repeat CT images as part of the same examination, ten of which demonstrated resolution of the CT abnormality. Follow-up CT [n=13 (6 within 24 h)], ultrasound (n=3), small-bowel follow-through (n=4) and surgery (n=3) showed no intussusception. In four patients with persistent symptoms, underlying pathology was identified requiring treatment (giardiasis, 2; small-bowel inflammation/strictures, 1; abscess and partial small-bowel obstruction after perforated appendicitis, 1). In 21 other patients, direct correlation of symptoms to CT abnormality was absent or questionable, no treatment was required, and there was no clinical or imaging evidence of persistence or recurrence. Most small-bowel intussusceptions identified in children by CT are transient and of no clinical significance. (orig.)

  10. Diverticular Disease of the Small Bowel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Emilio Ferreira-Aparicio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A diverticulum is a bulging sack in any portion of the gastrointestinal tract. The most common site for the formation of diverticula is the large intestine. Small intestine diverticular disease is much less common than colonic diverticular disease. The most common symptom is non-specific epigastric pain and a bloating sensation. Major complications include diverticulitis, gastrointestinal bleeding, acute perforation, pancreatic or biliary (in the case of duodenal diverticula disease, intestinal obstruction, intestinal perforation, localized abscess, malabsorption, anemia, volvulus and bacterial overgrowth. We describe the clinical case of a 65-year-old female patient with a diagnosis on hospital admittance of acute appendicitis and a intraoperative finding of diverticular disease of the small intestine, accompanied by complications such as intestinal perforation, bleeding and abdominal sepsis. This was surgically treated with intestinal resection and ileostomy and a subsequent re-intervention comprising perforation of the ileostomy and stomal remodeling. The patient remained hospitalized for approximately 1 month with antibiotics and local surgical wound healing, as well as changes in her diet with food supplements and metabolic control. She showed a favorable clinical evolution and was dismissed from the hospital to her home. We include here a discussion on trends in medical and surgical aspects as well as early handling or appropriate management to reduce the risk of fatal complications.

  11. The research progress of acute small bowel perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Schiessel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the various aetiologies of small bowel perforations and their management. In addition to the well-known aetiologies such as trauma, inflammation and circulatory disorders, several new causes of small bowel perforation have been described in recent years. The spectrum reaches from iatrogenic perforations during laparoscopic surgery or enteroscopies to drug-induced perforations with new anticancer agents. The management of small bowel perforations requires a concept consisting of the safe revision of the leaking bowel and the treatment of the peritonitis. Depending on the local situation and the condition of the patient, several treatment options are available. The surgical management of the bowel leak can range from a simple primary closure to a delayed restoration of bowel continuity. When the condition of the bowel or patient is frail, the risk of a failure of a closure or anastomosis is too high, and the exteriorization of the bowel defect as a primary measure is a safe option. The treatment of the peritonitis is also dependent on the condition of the patient and the local situation. Early stages of peritonitis can be treated by a simple peritoneal lavage, either performed by laparoscopy or laparotomy. Severe forms of peritonitis with multi-organ failure and an abdominal compartment syndrome need repeated peritoneal revisions. In such cases, the abdomen can only be closed temporarily. Different technical options are available in order to overcome the difficult care of these patients.

  12. Diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of small bowel volvulus in adults: A monocentric summary of a rare small intestinal obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohang Li

    Full Text Available Small bowel volvulus is a rare disease, which is also challenging to diagnose. The aims of this study were to characterize the clinical and radiological features associated with small bowel volvulus and treatment and to identify risk factors for associated small bowel necrosis.Patients with small bowel volvulus who underwent operations from January 2001 to December 2015 at the First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University (Shenyang, China were reviewed. Clinical, surgical and postsurgical data were registered and analyzed.Thirty-one patients were included for analysis. Fifteen patients were female (48.4%, with an average age of 47.7 years (18-79 years. The clinical signs and symptoms were unspecific and resembled intestinal obstruction. Clinical examination revealed abdominal distension and/or diffuse tenderness with or without signs of peritonitis. The use of CT scans, X-rays or ultrasound did not differ significantly between patients. In 9 of 20 patients that received abdominal CT scans, "whirlpool sign" on the CT scan was present. Secondary small bowel volvulus was present in 58.1% of patients, and causes included bands (3, adhesion (7, congenital anomalies (7 and stromal tumor (1. Out of the 31 patients, 15 with gangrenous small bowel had to undergo intestinal resection. Intestinal gangrene was present with higher neutrophils count (p<0.0001 and the presence of bloody ascites (p = 0.004. Three patients died of septic shock (9.68%, and the recurrence rate was 3.23%.To complete an early and accurate diagnosis, a CT scan plus physical exam seems to be the best plan. After diagnosis, an urgent laparotomy must be performed to avoid intestinal necrosis and perforation. After surgery, more than 90% of the patients can expect to have a favorable prognosis.

  13. Diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of small bowel volvulus in adults: A monocentric summary of a rare small intestinal obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohang; Zhang, Jialin; Li, Baifeng; Yi, Dehui; Zhang, Chengshuo; Sun, Ning; Lv, Wu; Jiao, Ao

    2017-01-01

    Small bowel volvulus is a rare disease, which is also challenging to diagnose. The aims of this study were to characterize the clinical and radiological features associated with small bowel volvulus and treatment and to identify risk factors for associated small bowel necrosis. Patients with small bowel volvulus who underwent operations from January 2001 to December 2015 at the First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University (Shenyang, China) were reviewed. Clinical, surgical and postsurgical data were registered and analyzed. Thirty-one patients were included for analysis. Fifteen patients were female (48.4%), with an average age of 47.7 years (18-79 years). The clinical signs and symptoms were unspecific and resembled intestinal obstruction. Clinical examination revealed abdominal distension and/or diffuse tenderness with or without signs of peritonitis. The use of CT scans, X-rays or ultrasound did not differ significantly between patients. In 9 of 20 patients that received abdominal CT scans, "whirlpool sign" on the CT scan was present. Secondary small bowel volvulus was present in 58.1% of patients, and causes included bands (3), adhesion (7), congenital anomalies (7) and stromal tumor (1). Out of the 31 patients, 15 with gangrenous small bowel had to undergo intestinal resection. Intestinal gangrene was present with higher neutrophils count (p<0.0001) and the presence of bloody ascites (p = 0.004). Three patients died of septic shock (9.68%), and the recurrence rate was 3.23%. To complete an early and accurate diagnosis, a CT scan plus physical exam seems to be the best plan. After diagnosis, an urgent laparotomy must be performed to avoid intestinal necrosis and perforation. After surgery, more than 90% of the patients can expect to have a favorable prognosis.

  14. Laparoscopic colonic resection in inflammatory bowel disease: minimal surgery, minimal access and minimal hospital stay.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, E

    2008-11-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is technically demanding but can offer improved short-term outcomes. The introduction of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) as the default operative approach for IBD, however, may have inherent learning curve-associated disadvantages. We hypothesise that the establishment of MIS as the standard operative approach does not increase patient morbidity as assessed in the initial period of its introduction into a specialised unit, and that it confers earlier postoperative gastrointestinal recovery and reduced hospitalisation compared with conventional open resection.

  15. Oral contrast agents for small bowel distension in MRI: influence of the osmolarity for small bowel distention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajaj, Waleed; Kuehle, Christiane; Nuefer, Michael; Goehde, Susanne C.; Lauenstein, Thomas C.; Goyen, Mathias; Schneemann, Hubert; Ruehm, Stefan G.

    2005-01-01

    To assess the effect of the osmolarity for small bowel distension in MRI, ten volunteers ingested at two separate occasions negative oral contrast agents with different quantity and osmolarity: (1) a water solution combined with 2.0% sorbitol and 0.2% locus bean gum (LBG) with a quantity of 1500 ml and an osmolarity of 148 mOsmol/l, (2) a water solution combined with 2.0% sorbitol and 2.0% barium sulphate with a quantity of 1000 ml and an osmolarity of 194 mOsmol/l. Small bowel distension was quantified on coronal 2D-TrueFISP images by measuring the small bowel diameters. There were no statistically significant differences in mean small bowel diameter between both contrast agents. The mean small bowel distension was 19.2 mm after ingestion of 1500 ml of sorbitol-LBG solution and 19.0 mm after ingestion of 1000-ml sorbitol-barium sulphate solution. Furthermore, all volunteers found the ingestion of 1000-ml solution more pleasant than the 1500-ml solution. The ingestion of 1000 ml of sorbitol-barium sulphate solution led to a sufficient small bowel distension compared to 1500 ml of sorbitol-LBG solution. The side effect rate of both solutions was low. Based on these data, we recommend a quantity of 1000 ml of sorbitol-barium sulphate solution as an alternative for 1500-ml sorbitol-LBG solution for optimal bowel distension. (orig.)

  16. The impact of type and number of bowel resections on anastomotic leakage risk in advanced ovarian cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Christoph; Harter, Philipp; Alesina, Pier F; Prader, Sonia; Schneider, Stephanie; Ataseven, Beyhan; Meier, Beate; Brunkhorst, Violetta; Hinrichs, Jakob; Kurzeder, Christian; Heitz, Florian; Kahl, Annett; Traut, Alexander; Groeben, Harald T; Walz, Martin; du Bois, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    To identify risk factors for anastomotic leakage (AL) in patients undergoing primary advanced ovarian cancer surgery and to evaluate the prognostic implication of AL on overall survival in these patients. We analyzed our institutional database for primary EOC and included all consecutive patients treated by debulking surgery including any type of full circumferential bowel resection beyond appendectomy between 1999 and 2015. We performed logistic regression models to identify risk factors for AL and log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association between AL and survival. AL occurred in 36/800 (4.5%; 95% confidence interval [3%-6%]) of all patients with advanced ovarian cancer and 36/518 (6.9% [5%-9%]) patients undergoing bowel resection during debulking surgery. One hundred fifty-six (30.1%) patients had multiple bowel resections. In these patients, AL rate per patient was only slightly higher (9.0% [5%-13%]) than in patients with rectosigmoid resection only (6.9% [4%-10%]), despite the higher number of anastomosis. No independent predictive factors for AL were identified. AL was independently associated with shortened overall survival (HR 1.9 [1.2-3.4], p=0.01). In the present study, no predictive pre- and/or intraoperative risk factors for AL were identified. AL rate was mainly influenced by rectosigmoid resection and only marginally increased by additional bowel resections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Identifying decreased peristalsis of abnormal small bowel segments in Crohn's disease using cine MR enterography: the frozen bowel sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmo, Flavius F; Mitchell, Donald G; O'Kane, Patrick L; Deshmukh, Sandeep P; Roth, Christopher G; Burach, Ilene; Burns, Aaron; Dulka, Susan; Parker, Laurence

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether affected bowel in Crohn's disease patients can be identified by observing decreased peristalsis (frozen bowel sign) using cine balanced steady-state free precession (cine BSSFP) images. 5 radiologists independently reviewed cine BSSFP sequences from randomized MR Enterography (MRE) exams for 30 normal and 30 Crohn's disease patients, graded overall small bowel peristalsis from slowest to fastest, and graded peristalsis for the most abnormal small bowel segment. Sensitivity and specificity of the frozen bowel sign for diagnosing Crohn's disease were calculated. T tests of the peristalsis difference between abnormal segments and overall small bowel were conducted. For 5 readers, the sensitivity and specificity of cine BSSFP of the frozen bowel sign for diagnosing Crohn's disease ranged from 70% to 100% and 87% to 100%, respectively. There were significant differences in peristalsis between abnormal small bowel segments and the overall small bowel for Crohn's patients, but not in the overall small bowel between normal-MRE patients and Crohn's disease patients. Abnormal Crohn's small bowel segments have significantly decreased peristalsis compared to normal small bowel, which can be identified using cine BSSFP sequences as the frozen bowel sign.

  18. Progress ill Small-Bowel Physiology and Disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-10-23

    Oct 23, 1971 ... The epithelial cell of the small-bowel mucosa is second ... an important part in the entrapment of fat micelles before absorption at the .... died with a gastric carcinoma. ... termed 'Mediterranean' because of its frequency in.

  19. Small-bowel neoplasms in patients undergoing video capsule endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rondonotti, E; Pennazio, M; Toth, E

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIM: Small-bowel tumors account for 1% - 3% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Recent studies with video capsule endoscopy (VCE) suggest that the frequency of these tumors may be substantially higher than previously reported. The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency......, clinical presentation, diagnostic/therapeutic work-up, and endoscopic appearance of small-bowel tumors in a large population of patients undergoing VCE. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Identification by a questionnaire of patients with VCE findings suggesting small-bowel tumors and histological confirmation...... of the neoplasm seen in 29 centers of 10 European Countries. RESULTS: Of 5129 patients undergoing VCE, 124 (2.4%) had small-bowel tumors (112 primary, 12 metastatic). Among these patients, indications for VCE were: obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (108 patients), abdominal pain (9), search for primary neoplasm...

  20. Oral contrast agents for small bowel MRI: comparison of different additives to optimize bowel distension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajaj, Waleed; Goehde, Susanne C.; Ruehm, Stefan G.; Debatin, Joerg F.; Lauenstein, Thomas C. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45122, Essen (Germany); Schneemann, Hubert [Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University Hospital Essen, Essen (Germany)

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare two osmotic carbohydrate sugar alcohols (mannitol 2.5% and sorbitol 2.5%, 2.0%, and 1.5% watery solutions) in combination with 0.2% locust bean gum (LBG) for small bowel distension for MR imaging. Small bowel distension was quantified on coronal 2D TrueFISP images by measuring the diameters of 16 small bowel loops in each of 12 healthy subjects (age range 31-55 years). Additionally, the grade of small bowel distension was rated qualitatively. Patient acceptance concerning nausea, vomiting, flatulence, and diarrhea was noted for each solution, and all results were compared by a Wilcoxon test or t test, respectively. The ingestion of water combined with LBG and either 2.5% mannitol or 2.0% sorbitol showed the best distension of the small bowel. The lowest side effect rate was observed following ingestion of sorbitol in a concentration of 2.0 and 1.5%. Based on these data, we recommend a combination of LBG and 2% sorbitol use for optimal bowel distension and minimal side effects resulting in enhanced patient acceptance. (orig.)

  1. Oral contrast agents for small bowel MRI: comparison of different additives to optimize bowel distension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajaj, Waleed; Goehde, Susanne C.; Ruehm, Stefan G.; Debatin, Joerg F.; Lauenstein, Thomas C.; Schneemann, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare two osmotic carbohydrate sugar alcohols (mannitol 2.5% and sorbitol 2.5%, 2.0%, and 1.5% watery solutions) in combination with 0.2% locust bean gum (LBG) for small bowel distension for MR imaging. Small bowel distension was quantified on coronal 2D TrueFISP images by measuring the diameters of 16 small bowel loops in each of 12 healthy subjects (age range 31-55 years). Additionally, the grade of small bowel distension was rated qualitatively. Patient acceptance concerning nausea, vomiting, flatulence, and diarrhea was noted for each solution, and all results were compared by a Wilcoxon test or t test, respectively. The ingestion of water combined with LBG and either 2.5% mannitol or 2.0% sorbitol showed the best distension of the small bowel. The lowest side effect rate was observed following ingestion of sorbitol in a concentration of 2.0 and 1.5%. Based on these data, we recommend a combination of LBG and 2% sorbitol use for optimal bowel distension and minimal side effects resulting in enhanced patient acceptance. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic Resonance Colonography May Predict the Need for Bowel Resection in Colorectal Endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldo Scardapane

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To define if MRI findings in patients with deep pelvic endometriosis (DPE may be predictive for the need of bowel resection. Material and Methods. A retrospective survey of 196 pelvic MRIs of women who received laparoscopic procedures for DPE was carried out. A pelvic MRI was performed in all patients: it consisted in T2w-TSE sequences in axial, sagittal, and coronal planes and T1w and THRIVE sequences in the axial plane; the exam was completed by MR-Colonography. Intestinal lesions were measured in short and long axis and the degree of stenosis was established. A multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the predictors of intestinal resection. Results. 57/196 patients received an intestinal resection. Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated a predictive value of short axis (Odds-Ratio = 2.29, p=0.011 and stenosis (Odds-Ratio = 1.20, p=0.003. ROC analysis showed that a cut-off value of 11 mm for the short axis and 30% for the stenosis may correctly classify, respectively, 96,94% (sensitivity 92,9% and specificity 98,56% and 97,96% (sensitivity 94,74% and specificity 99,3% of the cases. Conclusion. The presence of an endometriotic rectal nodule > 11 mm in short axis causing a stenosis > 30% in pelvic MRI reliably predicts the need of a rectal resection.

  3. Extensive small bowel intramural haematoma secondary to warfarin

    OpenAIRE

    Limmer, Alexandra M.; Clement, Zackariah

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Intramural haematoma is a rare complication of oral anticoagulant therapy, occurring in? 1 in 2500 patients treated with warfarin. This report describes a 71-year-old gentleman who presented with tachycardia, vomiting and abdominal distension on a background of anticoagulation for a metallic aortic valve. He was found to have a supratherapeutic international normalized ratio (INR) of 9.9 with an extensive small bowel intramural haematoma and secondary small bowel obstruction. He was ...

  4. Diagnosis of pediatric gastric, small-bowel and colonic volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garel, Charles; Blouet, Marie; Belloy, Frederique; Petit, Thierry; Pelage, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Digestive volvulus affects the stomach, small bowel and mobile segments of the colon and often has a developmental cause. Reference radiologic examinations include upper gastrointestinal contrast series for gastric volvulus, possibly with ultrasonography for small-bowel volvulus, and contrast enema for colonic volvulus. Treatment is usually surgical. This pictorial essay describes the embryological development and discusses the clinical and radiologic presentation of volvulus, depending on location, and details the appropriate radiologic examinations.

  5. Analysis of 178 penetrating stomach and small bowel injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Ali; Teixeira, Pedro G R; Inaba, Kenji; Brown, Carlos; Browder, Timothy; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2008-03-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs), such as wound infection, fascial dehiscence, and intraabdominal abscess, commonly occur following penetrating abdominal trauma. However, most of the literature involves penetrating colon injuries. There are few reports describing complications following penetrating stomach and small bowel injuries. Based on the hypothesis that SSIs are commonly found following penetrating stomach and small bowel trauma, a prospective observational study was performed at an academic Level I trauma center from March 1, 2004 until August 31, 2006. The subjects were patients who had sustained a penetrating injury to the stomach or small bowel. Patients were followed for the development of an SSI, defined as wound infection, fascial dehiscence, or intraabdominal abscess. A total of 178 patients were admitted with penetrating stomach or small bowel injuries over the 29-month period. There were 121 (68%) gunshot injuries and 57 (32%) stab wounds. Associated intraabdominal injuries occurred in 74% of patients. Overall, SSIs occurred in 20% of cases. Risk factors for SSI included associated duodenal or colon injury, whereas time to operating room, blood loss, and type and duration of antibiotic use were not. When associated colon injuries were excluded, SSIs occurred in 16% of patients with gastric injuries and 13% of those with small bowel injuries. SSIs commonly follow penetrating stomach and small bowel trauma. Risk factors for SSI include associated duodenal or colon injury. Delay to operating room, blood loss, and type and length of antibiotic prophylaxis were not associated with an increased risk of SSI.

  6. Multifocal small bowel stromal tumours presenting with peritonitis in an HIV positive patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    The most common mesenchymal tumour of the gastrointestinal tract is stromal tumours (GISTs). Symptomatic GISTs can present with complications such as haemorrhage, obstruction and perforation. Complete surgical resection with negative margins is the mainstay of treatment but may be imprudent on emergent occasion. Tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been revolutionary in the treatment of GISTs and have resulted in improved outcomes. A 41 year old HIV positive male presented with an acute history of abdominal pain and obstructive symptoms. Clinical examination revealed sepsis and peritonitis. One of the several small bowel tumours discovered at exploratory laparotomy was necrotic and perforated. The perforated tumour alone was resected and a small bowel internal hernia reduced. The patient made an uneventful recovery and will be considered for TKI therapy with a view to later re-operation. GISTs very rarely perforate. The pathophysiology of stromal tumour necrosis is poorly understood. Multifocality and small bowel location are poor prognosticators and may occur in the setting of familial GISTs, specific syndromes and sporadic cases. There is no established association between HIV and GISTs. Perforation occurs infrequently in ≤8% of symptomatic cases and poses increased risk of local recurrence. The surgical management of perforation takes precedence in an emergency. The surgeon must however take cognisance of the adherence to ideal oncologic principles where feasible. TKI therapy is invaluable if a re-exploration is to be later considered. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. CT findings of small bowel metastases from primary lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Wook; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Gab Choul; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-11-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of small bowel metastases from primary lung cancer. Of the 1468 patients with primary lung cancer between 1990 and 2000, 13 patients who had metastasis to the small intestine were collected. Of these 13 patients, nine who underwent CT scan were included for analysis. The pathologic diagnoses of primary lung cancer in these nine patients were squamous cell carcinoma in six, adenocarcinoma in two, and large cell carcinoma in one. CT scans were analyzed with regard to the site and patterns (intraluminal mass/bowel wall thickening/bowel implants) of metastatic masses, and the presence or absence of complication such as intussusception, obstruction, or perforation of the small bowel. The medical records of the patients were also reviewed retrospectively for evaluation of presenting abdominal symptom and time interval of metastases from initial diagnosis of lung cancer. Metastatic lesions were distributed throughout the small intestine: the duodenum in five, the jejunum in four, the ileum in six, and both jejunum and ileum in one patient. The size of metastatic masses of small bowel ranged from 1.3 cm to 5.0 cm (mean size, 2.6 cm) On CT, the small bowel was involved with intraluminal masses (mean size, 3.4 cm) in eight patients, diffuse wall thickening (mean thickness, 1.6 cm) in five, and bowel implants (mean size, 2.2 cm) in two. Complications occurred in seven patients, including intussusceptions without obstruction in two patients and with obstruction in two, obstruction without intussusceptions in two, and bowel perforation in one. Of 9 patients, 6 had at least one symptom referable to the small bowel including abdominal pain in 4, anemia in 3, vomiting in 1, and jaundice in 1. Lung cancer and small bowel lesions were detected simultaneously in four patients and the time interval of metastases from initial diagnosis of lung cancer ranged from 10 days to 30 months (median interval, 54 days) in patients. CT helps in defining the extent and

  8. CT findings of small bowel metastases from primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Wook; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Gab Choul; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of small bowel metastases from primary lung cancer. Of the 1468 patients with primary lung cancer between 1990 and 2000, 13 patients who had metastasis to the small intestine were collected. Of these 13 patients, nine who underwent CT scan were included for analysis. The pathologic diagnoses of primary lung cancer in these nine patients were squamous cell carcinoma in six, adenocarcinoma in two, and large cell carcinoma in one. CT scans were analyzed with regard to the site and patterns (intraluminal mass/bowel wall thickening/bowel implants) of metastatic masses, and the presence or absence of complication such as intussusception, obstruction, or perforation of the small bowel. The medical records of the patients were also reviewed retrospectively for evaluation of presenting abdominal symptom and time interval of metastases from initial diagnosis of lung cancer. Metastatic lesions were distributed throughout the small intestine: the duodenum in five, the jejunum in four, the ileum in six, and both jejunum and ileum in one patient. The size of metastatic masses of small bowel ranged from 1.3 cm to 5.0 cm (mean size, 2.6 cm) On CT, the small bowel was involved with intraluminal masses (mean size, 3.4 cm) in eight patients, diffuse wall thickening (mean thickness, 1.6 cm) in five, and bowel implants (mean size, 2.2 cm) in two. Complications occurred in seven patients, including intussusceptions without obstruction in two patients and with obstruction in two, obstruction without intussusceptions in two, and bowel perforation in one. Of 9 patients, 6 had at least one symptom referable to the small bowel including abdominal pain in 4, anemia in 3, vomiting in 1, and jaundice in 1. Lung cancer and small bowel lesions were detected simultaneously in four patients and the time interval of metastases from initial diagnosis of lung cancer ranged from 10 days to 30 months (median interval, 54 days) in patients. CT helps in defining the extent and

  9. Urachal Cyst Causing Small Bowel Obstruction in an Adult with a Virgin Abdomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. O’Leary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A patent urachus is a rare congenital or acquired pathology, which can lead to complications later in life. We describe a case of urachal cystitis as the etiology of small bowel obstruction in an adult without prior intra-abdominal surgery. Case Report. A 64-year-old male presented to the acute care surgery team with a 5-day history of right lower quadrant abdominal pain, distention, nausea, and vomiting. He had a two-month history of urinary retention and his past medical history was significant for benign prostate hyperplasia. On exam, he had evidence of small bowel obstruction. Computed tomography revealed high-grade small bowel obstruction secondary to presumed ruptured appendicitis. In the operating room, an infected urachal cyst was identified with adhesions to the proximal ileum. After lysis of adhesions and resection of the cyst, the patient was subsequently discharged without further issues. Conclusion. Although rare, urachal pathology should be considered in the differential diagnosis when evaluating a patient with small bowel obstruction without prior intraabdominal surgery, hernia, or malignancy.

  10. Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Presenting with Bowel Obstruction of the Duodenum and Small Bowels: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Guen Ho; Hong, Seong Sook; Kim, Jung Hoon; Chang, Yun Woo; Choi, Duek Lin; Hwang, Jung Hwa; Kwon, Kui Hyang [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    The occurrence of primary duodenal mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is extremely rare, and more so is the obstruction of the duodenum for the MALT lymphoma. We describe the small bowel follow through and CT findings in an uncommon case of MALT lymphoma presenting with bowel obstruction of the 2nd portion of the duodenum and small bowels.

  11. Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Presenting with Bowel Obstruction of the Duodenum and Small Bowels: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Guen Ho; Hong, Seong Sook; Kim, Jung Hoon; Chang, Yun Woo; Choi, Duek Lin; Hwang, Jung Hwa; Kwon, Kui Hyang

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of primary duodenal mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is extremely rare, and more so is the obstruction of the duodenum for the MALT lymphoma. We describe the small bowel follow through and CT findings in an uncommon case of MALT lymphoma presenting with bowel obstruction of the 2nd portion of the duodenum and small bowels

  12. Mesenteric Air Embolism Following Enteroscopic Small Bowel Tattooing Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Double balloon enteroscopy (DBE is a revolutionary procedure in which the entire small bowel can be visualized endoscopically. DBE has the advantage of both diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities in the setting of small bowel neoplasms and vascular malformations. We present a unique case of a 76-year-old female who underwent small bowel DBE tattoo marking of a distal small bowel tumor complicated by development of severe abdominal pain postprocedure secondary to bowel air embolism into the mesenteric veins. Mesenteric air can be seen after other endoscopic procedures such as biopsy, mucosal clip placement and polypectomy, or following a colonoscopy. Mesenteric air embolism following small bowel tattooing procedure has not been previously reported in the literature. Mesenteric air when present may be attributed to mesenteric ischemia and can subject the patient to unnecessary surgical intervention if misdiagnosed. Thus, this report holds significance for the radiologist as computed tomography (CT findings of mesenteric air embolism must be evaluated in the context of appropriate clinical history before treatment decisions are made.

  13. Ultrasound and MRI predictors of surgical bowel resection in pediatric Crohn disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel G.; Conrad, Maire A.; Kelsen, Judith R.; Biko, David M.; Anupindi, Sudha A.; Ruchelli, Eduardo D.

    2017-01-01

    Imaging predictors for surgery in children with Crohn disease are lacking. To identify imaging features of the terminal ileum on short-interval bowel ultrasound (US) and MR enterography (MRE) in children with Crohn disease requiring surgical bowel resection and those managed by medical therapy alone. This retrospective study evaluated patients 18 years and younger with Crohn disease undergoing short-interval bowel US and MRE (within 2 months of one another), as well as subsequent ileocecectomy or endoscopy within 3 months of imaging. Appearance of the terminal ileum on both modalities was compared between surgical patients and those managed with medical therapy, with the following parameters assessed: bowel wall thickness, mural stratification, vascularity, fibrofatty proliferation, abscess, fistula and stricture on bowel US; bowel wall thickness, T2 ratio, enhancement pattern, mesenteric edema, fibrofatty proliferation, abscess, fistula and stricture on MRE. A two-sided t-test was used to compare means, a Mann-Whitney U analysis was used for non-parametric parameter scores, and a chi-square or two-sided Fisher exact test compared categorical variables. Imaging findings in surgical patients were correlated with location-matched histopathological scores of inflammation and fibrosis using a scoring system adapted from the Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn Disease, and a Spearman rank correlation coefficient was used to compare inflammation and fibrosis on histopathology. Twenty-two surgical patients (mean age: 16.5 years; male/female: 13/9) and 20 nonsurgical patients (mean age: 14.8; M/F: 8/12) were included in the final analysis. On US, the surgical group demonstrated significantly increased mean bowel wall thickness (6.1 mm vs. 4.7 mm for the nonsurgical group; P = 0.01), loss of mural stratification (odds ratio [OR] = 6.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-28.4; P = 0.02) and increased fibrofatty proliferation (P = 0.04). On MRE, the surgical group showed

  14. Ultrasound and MRI predictors of surgical bowel resection in pediatric Crohn disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel G. [NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medicine, Division of Pediatric Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Conrad, Maire A.; Kelsen, Judith R. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Biko, David M.; Anupindi, Sudha A. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ruchelli, Eduardo D. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Anatomic Pathology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Imaging predictors for surgery in children with Crohn disease are lacking. To identify imaging features of the terminal ileum on short-interval bowel ultrasound (US) and MR enterography (MRE) in children with Crohn disease requiring surgical bowel resection and those managed by medical therapy alone. This retrospective study evaluated patients 18 years and younger with Crohn disease undergoing short-interval bowel US and MRE (within 2 months of one another), as well as subsequent ileocecectomy or endoscopy within 3 months of imaging. Appearance of the terminal ileum on both modalities was compared between surgical patients and those managed with medical therapy, with the following parameters assessed: bowel wall thickness, mural stratification, vascularity, fibrofatty proliferation, abscess, fistula and stricture on bowel US; bowel wall thickness, T2 ratio, enhancement pattern, mesenteric edema, fibrofatty proliferation, abscess, fistula and stricture on MRE. A two-sided t-test was used to compare means, a Mann-Whitney U analysis was used for non-parametric parameter scores, and a chi-square or two-sided Fisher exact test compared categorical variables. Imaging findings in surgical patients were correlated with location-matched histopathological scores of inflammation and fibrosis using a scoring system adapted from the Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn Disease, and a Spearman rank correlation coefficient was used to compare inflammation and fibrosis on histopathology. Twenty-two surgical patients (mean age: 16.5 years; male/female: 13/9) and 20 nonsurgical patients (mean age: 14.8; M/F: 8/12) were included in the final analysis. On US, the surgical group demonstrated significantly increased mean bowel wall thickness (6.1 mm vs. 4.7 mm for the nonsurgical group; P = 0.01), loss of mural stratification (odds ratio [OR] = 6.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-28.4; P = 0.02) and increased fibrofatty proliferation (P = 0.04). On MRE, the surgical group showed

  15. Ultrasound and MRI predictors of surgical bowel resection in pediatric Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel G; Conrad, Maire A; Biko, David M; Ruchelli, Eduardo D; Kelsen, Judith R; Anupindi, Sudha A

    2017-01-01

    Imaging predictors for surgery in children with Crohn disease are lacking. To identify imaging features of the terminal ileum on short-interval bowel ultrasound (US) and MR enterography (MRE) in children with Crohn disease requiring surgical bowel resection and those managed by medical therapy alone. This retrospective study evaluated patients 18 years and younger with Crohn disease undergoing short-interval bowel US and MRE (within 2 months of one another), as well as subsequent ileocecectomy or endoscopy within 3 months of imaging. Appearance of the terminal ileum on both modalities was compared between surgical patients and those managed with medical therapy, with the following parameters assessed: bowel wall thickness, mural stratification, vascularity, fibrofatty proliferation, abscess, fistula and stricture on bowel US; bowel wall thickness, T2 ratio, enhancement pattern, mesenteric edema, fibrofatty proliferation, abscess, fistula and stricture on MRE. A two-sided t-test was used to compare means, a Mann-Whitney U analysis was used for non-parametric parameter scores, and a chi-square or two-sided Fisher exact test compared categorical variables. Imaging findings in surgical patients were correlated with location-matched histopathological scores of inflammation and fibrosis using a scoring system adapted from the Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn Disease, and a Spearman rank correlation coefficient was used to compare inflammation and fibrosis on histopathology. Twenty-two surgical patients (mean age: 16.5 years; male/female: 13/9) and 20 nonsurgical patients (mean age: 14.8; M/F: 8/12) were included in the final analysis. On US, the surgical group demonstrated significantly increased mean bowel wall thickness (6.1 mm vs. 4.7 mm for the nonsurgical group; P = 0.01), loss of mural stratification (odds ratio [OR] = 6.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-28.4; P = 0.02) and increased fibrofatty proliferation (P = 0.04). On MRE, the

  16. US features of transient small bowel intussusception in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hye

    2004-01-01

    To describe the sonographic (US) and clinical features of spontaneously reduced small bowel intussusception, and to discuss the management options for small bowel intussusception based on US findings with clinical correlation. During a five years of period, 34 small bowel intussusceptions were diagnosed on US in 32 infants and children. The clinical presentations and imaging findings of the patients were reviewed. The clinical presentations included abdominal pain or irritability (n = 25), vomiting (n 5), diarrhea (n = 3), bloody stool (n = 1), and abdominal distension (n = 1), in combination or alone. US showed multi-layered round masses of small (mean, 1.5 ± 0.3 cm) diameters and with thin (mean, 3.5 ± 1 mm) outer rims along the course of the small bowel. The mean length was 1.8 ± 0.5 cm and peristalsis was seen on the video records. There were no visible lead points. The vascular flow signal appeared on color Doppler images in all 21 patients examined. Spontaneous reduction was confirmed by combinations of US (n = 28), small bowel series (n = 6), CT scan (n = 3), and surgical exploration (n 2). All patients discharged with improved condition. Typical US findings of the transient small bowel intussusception included 1) small size without wall swelling, 2) short segment, 3) preserved wall motion, and 4) absence of the lead point. Conservative management with US monitoring rather than an immediate operation is recommended for those patient with typical transient small bowel intussusceptions. Atypical US findings or clinical deterioration of the patient with persistent intussusception warrant surgical exploration

  17. Resection of the large bowel suppresses hunger and food intake and modulates gastrointestinal fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettiarachchi, Priyadarshika; Wickremasinghe, A Rajitha; Frost, Gary S; Deen, Kemal I; Pathirana, Ajith A; Murphy, Kevin G; Jayaratne, SriLal D

    2016-08-01

    To assess appetite and gut hormone levels in patients following partial (PR) or total resection (TR) of the large bowel. A comparative cross sectional study was carried out with healthy controls (n = 99) and patients who had undergone PR (n = 64) or TR (n = 12) of the large bowel. Participants consumed a standard (720 kcal) breakfast meal at 0830 (t = 0) h followed by lactulose (15 g) and a buffet lunch (t = 210 min). Participants rated the subjective feelings of hunger at t = -30, 0, 30, 60, 120, and 180 min. Breath hydrogen (BH) concentrations were also evaluated. In a matched subset (11 controls, 11 PR and 9 TR patients) PYY and GLP-1 concentrations were measured following breakfast. The primary outcome measure was appetite, as measured using visual analogue scales and the buffet lunch. The secondary outcome was BH concentrations following a test meal. PR and TR participants had lower hunger and energy intake at the buffet lunch meal compared to controls. PR subjects had higher BH concentrations compared to controls and TR subjects. BH levels correlated with circulating GLP-1 levels at specific time points. PR or TR of the large bowel reduced feelings of hunger and energy intake, and PR increased gastrointestinal fermentation. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  18. CT Findings of Small Bowel Anisakiasis: Analysis of Four Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wee Kyoung; Song, Soon Young; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Kim, Yong Soo; Jung, Woo Kyoung; Kim, Min Yeong

    2011-01-01

    We wanted to describe the CT findings of small bowel anisakiasis with the pathologic correlation. Four patients with surgically and pathologically proven small bowel anisakiasis were included in this retrospective study. They were three men and one woman and their ages ranged from 28 to 43 years (mean age: 38 years). We evaluated their clinical, CT and histological findings. All the patients had a history of ingesting raw fish within 24 hours from the time of symptom onset. They complained of abdominal pain (n=4), nausea (n=4), vomiting (n=2) and diarrhea (n=1). Physical examination revealed tenderness (n=4), rebound tenderness (n=4) and increased bowel sounds (n=3). Leukocytosis was noted in all the patients on the laboratory examination. None of the patients showed eosinophilia. The CT findings were segmental small bowel wall thickening with preserved layering (n=4), focal segmental luminal narrowing with proximal dilatation (n=4), peritoneal thickening (n=3), mesenteric or omental infiltration (n=4) and varying degrees of ascites (n=4). On the histopathologic examination, they revealed an infiltration of eosinophils (n=4) in all layers of the bowel wall with severe edema. The larvae were found on surgico-pathologic examination in all the cases. The CT findings may be helpful to make the specific diagnosis of small bowel anisakiasis in a patient with the clinical findings of an acute abdomen and a history of eating raw fish

  19. CT Findings of Small Bowel Anisakiasis: Analysis of Four Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wee Kyoung; Song, Soon Young; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Soo; Jung, Woo Kyoung; Kim, Min Yeong [Hanyang University Guri Hospital, College of Medicine, Guri (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    We wanted to describe the CT findings of small bowel anisakiasis with the pathologic correlation. Four patients with surgically and pathologically proven small bowel anisakiasis were included in this retrospective study. They were three men and one woman and their ages ranged from 28 to 43 years (mean age: 38 years). We evaluated their clinical, CT and histological findings. All the patients had a history of ingesting raw fish within 24 hours from the time of symptom onset. They complained of abdominal pain (n=4), nausea (n=4), vomiting (n=2) and diarrhea (n=1). Physical examination revealed tenderness (n=4), rebound tenderness (n=4) and increased bowel sounds (n=3). Leukocytosis was noted in all the patients on the laboratory examination. None of the patients showed eosinophilia. The CT findings were segmental small bowel wall thickening with preserved layering (n=4), focal segmental luminal narrowing with proximal dilatation (n=4), peritoneal thickening (n=3), mesenteric or omental infiltration (n=4) and varying degrees of ascites (n=4). On the histopathologic examination, they revealed an infiltration of eosinophils (n=4) in all layers of the bowel wall with severe edema. The larvae were found on surgico-pathologic examination in all the cases. The CT findings may be helpful to make the specific diagnosis of small bowel anisakiasis in a patient with the clinical findings of an acute abdomen and a history of eating raw fish

  20. Whirl sign as CT finding in small-bowel volvulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nishio, H.; Takashima, S.; Minakuchi, K.; Onoyama, Y.; Nomura, K.; Hayata, S.

    1995-01-01

    In three patients with ileus CT showed a whirl sign in which the bowel and mesenteric folds encircled the superior mesenteric vein in a whirl-like pattern. Two patients were confirmed surgically to have small-bowel volvulus arising from postoperative adhesions. The whirl sign is useful in decision-making about the need for surgery. A CT examination should be performed for patients with ileus of unknown cause. (orig.)

  1. Whirl sign as CT finding in small-bowel volvulus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Osaka City Univ. Medical School, Osaka (Japan); Nakamura, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Osaka City Univ. Medical School, Osaka (Japan); Nishio, H. [Dept. of Radiology, Osaka City Univ. Medical School, Osaka (Japan); Takashima, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Osaka City Univ. Medical School, Osaka (Japan); Minakuchi, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Osaka City Univ. Medical School, Osaka (Japan); Onoyama, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Osaka City Univ. Medical School, Osaka (Japan); Nomura, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Higashi-Osaka Ikeda Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Hayata, S. [Dept. of Surgery, Higashi-Osaka Ikeda Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    In three patients with ileus CT showed a whirl sign in which the bowel and mesenteric folds encircled the superior mesenteric vein in a whirl-like pattern. Two patients were confirmed surgically to have small-bowel volvulus arising from postoperative adhesions. The whirl sign is useful in decision-making about the need for surgery. A CT examination should be performed for patients with ileus of unknown cause. (orig.)

  2. Sequential stenotic strictures of the small bowel leading to obstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Small bowel obstructions (SBOs) are primarily caused by adhesions, hernias, neoplasms, or inflammatory strictures. Intraluminal strictures are an uncommon cause of SBO. This report describes our findings in a unique case of sequential, stenotic intraluminal strictures of the small intestine, discusses the differential diagnosis of intraluminal intestinal strictures, and reviews the literature regarding intraluminal pathology.

  3. Small bowel endoscopy in familial adenomatous polyposis and Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, Jan Jacob

    Patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and patients with Lynch syndrome have an increased risk of developing small intestinal neoplasia. In both conditions, the lifetime risk to develop small bowel cancer is estimated to be around 5%. In FAP, this risk is associated with the degree of

  4. Surgical intervention for complications caused by late radiation damage of the small bowel; a retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halteren, H.K. van; Gortzak, E.; Taal, B.G.; Helmerhorst, Th.J.M.; Aleman, B.M.P.; Hart, A.A.M.; Zoetmulder, F.A.N.

    1993-01-01

    The authors studied the records of 46 patients who had been operated on between 1974 and 1990 in the Netherlands Cancer Institute because of complications due to late radiation damage of the small bowel. The following factors led to an increase in complication-risk: hypalbuminemia. more than one laparotomy prior to irradiation and a short interval (< 12 months) between irradiation and surgical intervention. The following factors related to a poorer survival: incomplete resection of the primary tumor and a short interval (< 12 months) between irradiation and surgical intervention. The type f surgical intervention did not have cumulative prognostic value in relation to complication-risk or survival. (author)

  5. Gastrointestinal Motility, Part 2: Small-Bowel and Colon Transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Alan H

    2016-03-01

    Because of the difficulty often encountered in deciding whether a patient's symptoms originate in the upper or lower gastrointestinal tract, gastrointestinal transit scintigraphy is a uniquely suited noninvasive, quantitative, and physiologic method of determining whether there is a motility disorder affecting the stomach, small bowel, or colon. Small-bowel and colon transit studies can be performed alone or together with gastric emptying studies after oral administration of an appropriately radiolabeled meal. It is hoped that newly published standards for performing these studies and the anticipated arrival of new Current Procedural Terminology codes in the United States for small-bowel and colon transit studies will increase their availability and use. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  6. Acute small bowel obstruction due to chicken bone bezoar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vetpillai P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Preadeepan Vetpillai,1 Ayo Oshowo21CT2 Surgery in General, Charing Cross Hospital, 2Colorectal and Laparoscopic Surgery, Whittington Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Acute intestinal obstruction due to foreign bodies, or bezoar, is a rare occurrence in an adult with a normal intestinal tract. We report an unusual case of a 43-year-old black man with no previous abdominal surgery and no significant medical history who presented with an acute episode of small bowel obstruction due to an impacted undigested chicken bone.Keywords: small bowel obstruction, chicken bone, bezoar

  7. Development of a new method for small bowel transit study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Guang-Uei; Tsai, Chien-Chung; Lin, Wan-Yu

    2006-01-01

    Currently, most studies combine the small bowel transit examination with gastric emptying time examination. There are significant drawbacks to this method. The radiotracer does not enter the small intestine in a bolus and the starting time for transit in the duodenum is difficult to define. This makes the result unreliable. In this study, we used a commercial enteric capsule containing radioactive charcoal to solve these problems. Activated charcoal powder was mixed with Tc-99m pertechnetate and loaded to the enteric capsule which can resist gastric acid and dissolve only in the small intestine, in-vitro stability experiment was performed by immersing these capsules in a colorless phosphate buffer of variable pH which mimicked the condition in stomach and small intestine. In addition, ten healthy Chinese volunteers were included for in-vivo experiment. Anterior and posterior views of abdomen were obtained at regular 30-minute intervals until the eighth hour after administration of the radioactive enteric capsule. Small bowel transit time was calculated. The enteric capsule remained intact for at least 480 minutes in the solution mimicking gastric content (pH=3.0) and disrupted at a mean duration of 227.2 minutes at a pH of 6.8 and at a mean duration of 212.4 minutes at a pH of 7.4 in the solution mimicking pancreaticobiliary secretions. In nine of ten volunteers, the small bowel transit time was between 30 to 270 minutes with a mean transit time of 140 min. In one volunteer, we failed to detect the exact time of small bowel transit because the capsule remained in the stomach throughout the study for up to 8 hours. We consider activated charcoal labeled with Tc-99m pertechnetate using an enteric capsule as the carrier to be a potential radioactive marker for small bowel transit study. (author)

  8. Extensive small bowel intramural haematoma secondary to warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Alexandra M; Clement, Zackariah

    2017-03-01

    Intramural haematoma is a rare complication of oral anticoagulant therapy, occurring in  1 in 2500 patients treated with warfarin. This report describes a 71-year-old gentleman who presented with tachycardia, vomiting and abdominal distension on a background of anticoagulation for a metallic aortic valve. He was found to have a supratherapeutic international normalized ratio (INR) of 9.9 with an extensive small bowel intramural haematoma and secondary small bowel obstruction. He was successfully managed non-operatively with fluid resuscitation, INR reversal, bowel rest and nasogastric decompression. The patient's presentation was atypical with a lack of classic symptoms such as abdominal pain. This highlights the importance of considering intramural haematoma as a differential diagnosis for gastrointestinal symptoms in anticoagulated patients.

  9. MR enterography in the evaluation of small bowel dilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronin, C.G. [Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Galway (Ireland)], E-mail: carmelcronin2000@hotmail.com; Lohan, D.G.; Browne, A.M.; Alhajeri, A.N.; Roche, C.; Murphy, J.M. [Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Galway (Ireland)

    2009-10-15

    Magnetic reasonance (MR) enterography enables high contrast resolution depiction of the location and cause of bowel obstruction through a combination of predictable luminal distension and multiplanar imaging capabilities. Furthermore, because the patient is not exposed to ionizing radiation, sequential 'dynamic' MR imaging can be performed repeatedly over time further facilitating depiction of the site and/or the cause of obstruction. With increasing availability of MR imaging and standardization of the oral contrast medium regimens, it is likely that this technique will assume an ever-increasing role in the evaluation of small bowel dilation in the coming years. We illustrate the utility of MR enterography in the evaluation of small bowel dilation, whether it be mechanical, functional (e.g., ileus), or related to infiltrative mural disease.

  10. The volume effect in radiation-related late small bowel complications. Results of a clinical study of the EORTC Radiotherapy Cooperative Group in patients treated for rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letschert, J.G.J.; Lebesque, J.V.; Aleman, B.M.P.; Bartelink, H.; Bosset, J.F.; Horiot, J.C.; Cionini, L.; Hamers, J.P.; Leer, J.W.H.; van Glabbele, M.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the correlation between irradiated small bowel volume and late occurring small bowel complications. Methods: Small bowel volumes in the high-dose region were measured using orthogonal barium films for 203 patients treated for rectal carcinoma with pelvic postoperative radiotherapy to 50 Gy in an EORTC multicentric study. Results: The 5-year estimate of lat pelvic small bowel obstruction requiring surgery was 11%. No correlation between the irradiated small bowel volume and obstruction was detected. The actuarial 5-year estimate of chronic diarrhea varied from 31% in patients with irradiated small bowel volumes below 77 cm 3 to 42% in patients with volumes over 328 cm 3 . This correlation was significant in the univariate and multivariate analysis (p=0.025). The type of rectal surgery significantly influenced the incidence of chronic diarrhea and malabsorption, the actuarial 5-year estimate being 49% and 26% after low anterior resection and abdominoperineal resection, respectively (p=0.04). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that there is a volume-effect in radiation-induced diarrhea atr a dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions. No volume-effect for small bowel obstruction was detected at this dose-level in pelvic postoperative radiotherapy. A review of the literature data on small bowel obstruction indicates that the volume effect at this dose level can only be demonstrated in patients who were treated with extended field radiotherapy (estimated small bowel volume 800 cm 3 ) after intra-abdominal surgery. (author). 22 refs., 5 tabs

  11. Small bowel obstruction following perforation of the uterus at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Unsafe abortion is an important contributor to maternal morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE: To present a case of small bowel obstruction following perforation of the uterus at induced abortion. METHODS: A 36-year-old woman, presented at a private hospital, with abdominal pain and weight loss. She had ...

  12. Epidemiology of small-bowel obstruction beyond the neonatal period

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the etiologies causing intestinal obstruction beyond the neonatal period. Patients and methods An observational study was conducted on children between 1 month and 17 years of age who underwent surgery for small-bowel obstruction. (SBO) at this tertiary referral center ...

  13. Small bowel ultrasound in patients with celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartusek, D. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: dbartusek@fnbrno.cz; Valek, V. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: v.valek@fnbrno.cz; Husty, J. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: jhusty@fnbrno.cz; Uteseny, J. [Department of Pediatric Internal Medicine, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: juteseny@fnbrno.cz

    2007-08-15

    Objective: Celiac disease (CD) is a common, lifelong disease with small bowel malabsorption based on genetically conditioned gluten intolerance. The clinical manifestation could be very heterogeneous. The proof of celiac disease is now based mainly on clinical and laboratory (antibodies and enterobiopsy) signs, which are in some cases problematic and inconvenient. Materials and methods: In our study we have examined 250 patients with suspection or with proven celiac disease and we evaluated specific ultrasound small bowel changes in this group. In the next step, we chose 59 patients with laboratory proved celiac disease and we statistically compared ultrasound, other laboratory and clinical findings in different forms and stages of the disease. Results: Specific small bowel pathologies in patients with celiac disease (like changes of intestinal villi in different parts of small bowel, abnormal peristalsis and mesenterial lymphadenopathy) can be well visualized by ultrasound and in combination with clinical and laboratory signs ultrasound examination could have an important role in screening, determination of diagnosis and monitoring of patients with different forms of celiac disease.

  14. Small bowel ultrasound in patients with celiac disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartusek, D.; Valek, V.; Husty, J.; Uteseny, J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Celiac disease (CD) is a common, lifelong disease with small bowel malabsorption based on genetically conditioned gluten intolerance. The clinical manifestation could be very heterogeneous. The proof of celiac disease is now based mainly on clinical and laboratory (antibodies and enterobiopsy) signs, which are in some cases problematic and inconvenient. Materials and methods: In our study we have examined 250 patients with suspection or with proven celiac disease and we evaluated specific ultrasound small bowel changes in this group. In the next step, we chose 59 patients with laboratory proved celiac disease and we statistically compared ultrasound, other laboratory and clinical findings in different forms and stages of the disease. Results: Specific small bowel pathologies in patients with celiac disease (like changes of intestinal villi in different parts of small bowel, abnormal peristalsis and mesenterial lymphadenopathy) can be well visualized by ultrasound and in combination with clinical and laboratory signs ultrasound examination could have an important role in screening, determination of diagnosis and monitoring of patients with different forms of celiac disease

  15. A radiologist's guide to small bowel and multivisceral transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, E.M.; Upponi, S.S.; See, T.C.; Cheow, H.K.; Sivaprakasam, R.; Butler, A.J.; Whitley, S.

    2013-01-01

    This review will describe the indications for the various small bowel containing transplants. The importance of early referral will be highlighted. Radiologists play a central role in assessing these complex patients prior to transplantation. Furthermore, in the postoperative period, radiologists play an important part in diagnosing and treating complications

  16. Supra-transumbilical laparotomy (STL) approach for small bowel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Supra-Transumbilical Laparotomy (STL) has been used in paediatric surgery for a broad spectrum of abdominal procedures. We report our experience with STL approach for small bowel atresia repair in newborns and review previous published series on the topic. Patients and Methods: Fourteen patients with ...

  17. Small bowel perforation due to fish bone: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Pulat

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Accidental ingestion of foreign bodies are a common condition in clinical practice. However, small bowel perforation which dues to ingestion foreign bodies has been rarely seen. In this article, we report a case of small bowel perforation which dues to ingestion foreign body. A 80-year-old female patient, presenting with complaints of acute abdomen, was admitted to the emergency department. She denied abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. The patient had tenderness and defense on the right lower quadrant. Contrast enhanced abdominal computed tomography has been used on the patient's diagnosis. This revealed small bowel perforation due to the ingestion of foreign body. The patient was operated emergency. A microperforation due to fish bone was detected on the terminal ileum. The patient underwent debridement and primary repair. The patient was discharged postoperative 7th day without problem. Bowel perforation due to the ingestion of foreign bodies should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen. Keywords: Foreign body, Small intestine, Perforation

  18. Small bowel adenocarcinoma of the jejunum: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Wang, Zhiliang; Liu, Na; Hao, Junfeng; Xu, Xin

    2016-07-04

    In practice, small bowel cancer is a rare entity. The most common histologic subtype is adenocarcinoma. Adenocarcinoma of the small bowel (SBA) is challenging to diagnose, often presents at a late stage and has a poor prognosis. The treatment of early-stage SBA is surgical resection. No standard protocol has been established for unresectable or metastatic disease. We report here on a 26-year-old man with SBA in the jejunum, lacking specific symptoms and with a delay of 6 months in diagnosis. The diagnosis was finally achieved with a combination of balloon-assisted enteroscopy, computed tomography scans, positron emission computed tomography scans and the values of carcino-embryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9. The patient underwent segmental intestine with lymph node resection, followed by eight cycles of FOLFOX palliative chemotherapy with good tolerance. As of the 11-month postoperative follow-up, there has been no evidence of recurrent disease. This case is reported to arouse a clinical suspicion of SBA in patients with abdominal pain of unknown cause. We also provided evidence in this case of a response to palliative chemotherapy with FOLFOX. Because the incidence of SBA is very low, there is a need for further studies to evaluate the possible application of newer investigative agents and strategies to obtain a better outcome within the framework of international collaborations.

  19. Oral traditional Chinese medication for adhesive small bowel obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Tao; Gu, Xixi; Andersson, Roland; Ma, Huaixing; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Wei; Zhang, Boheng; Cai, Dingfang; Qin, Xinyu

    2012-05-16

    ); continuous outcomes are presented as mean differences (MD) and 95% CIs. The data analyses were carried out using Review Manager 5.1. For cases in which necessary information was not reported in the paper, we contacted the primary authors for additional information. Five randomised trials involving 664 participants were analysed. Five different herbal medicines were tested in these trials, including Huo-Xue-Tong-Fu decoction, Xiao-Cheng-Qi-Tang decoction, a combination of Xiao-Cheng-Qi-Tang and Si-Jun-Zi-Tang decoctions, Chang-Nian-Lian-Song-Jie-Tang decoction, and Fufang-Da-Cheng-Qi-Tang decoction. There were variations in the tested herbal compositions and methods of medicine administration. The main outcomes reported in the trials were effects on abdominal pain, abdominal distension, constipation defection, time of first defecation after treatment, and reoperation rate during the course of the disease. Secondary outcomes selected for this review were not available, including complications such as small bowel perfusion (bowel resection, system complications, and other possible complications), length of hospital stay, cost of hospitalisation, and time from admission to surgical intervention. The results of five trials showed that patients receiving TCM combined with conventional therapy seemed to have improved outcomes compared with patients receiving conventional treatment alone (OR 4.24, 95% CI 2.83 to 6.36).However, we cannot conclusively determine the efficacy of TCM in this review due to inadequate reporting, low methodological quality, and the prevalence of various biases in the reviewed studies. Furthermore, because none of the reviewed trials discussed adverse events, we could not evaluate the safety of TCM for adhesive SBO patients. All trials were conducted and published in China. Although many studies have assessed the use of TCM products for adhesive SBO, most were excluded from this review due to their methodological limitations. This systematic review did not

  20. Gallstone Ileus: An Unlikely Cause of Mechanical Small Bowel Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Abich

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Gallstone ileus is a rare disease that accounts for 1–4% of intestinal obstructions. Almost exclusively a condition in the older female population, it is a difficult diagnosis to make. We report the case of gallstone ileus in a 94-year-old Caucasian female, who presented to the emergency department with acute-onset nausea, coffee-ground emesis, lack of bowel movement, and abdominal distension. On CT scan, the diagnosis of gallstone ileus was made by the presence of a cholecystoduodenal fistula, pneumobilia, and small bowel obstruction. Emergent laparotomy with a one-stage procedure of enterolithotomy and stone removal by milking the bowel distal to the stone were performed. The postoperative course was uneventful until postoperative day 4 when the patient was found tachycardic, lethargic, and unresponsive. We reviewed the literature on the diagnosis and treatment of gallstone ileus.

  1. Manual Physical Therapy for Non-Surgical Treatment of Adhesion-Related Small Bowel Obstructions: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda D. Rice

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adhesion formation is a widely acknowledged risk following abdominal or pelvic surgery. Adhesions in the abdomen or pelvis can cause or contribute to partial or total small bowel obstruction (SBO. These adhesions deter or prevent the passage of nutrients through the digestive tract, and may bind the bowel to the peritoneum, or other organs. Small bowel obstructions can quickly become life-threatening, requiring immediate surgery to resect the bowel, or lyse any adhesions the surgeon can safely access. Bowel repair is an invasive surgery, with risks including bowel rupture, infection, and peritonitis. An additional risk includes the formation of new adhesions during the healing process, creating the potential for subsequent adhesiolysis or SBO surgeries. Objective: Report the use of manual soft tissue physical therapy for the reversal of adhesion-related partial SBOs, and create an initial inquiry into the possibility of nonsurgical lysis of adhesions. Case Reports: Two patients presenting with SBO symptoms due to abdominal adhesions secondary to abdominal and pelvic surgery were treated with manual soft tissue physical therapy focused on decreasing adhesions. Conclusions: Successful treatment with resolution of symptom presentation of partial SBO and sustained results were observed in both patients treated.

  2. Prognostic relevance of lymph node ratio and total lymph node count for small bowel adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thuy B; Qadan, Motaz; Dua, Monica M; Norton, Jeffrey A; Poultsides, George A; Visser, Brendan C

    2015-08-01

    Nodal metastasis is a known prognostic factor for small bowel adenocarcinoma. The goals of this study were to evaluate the number of lymph nodes (LNs) that should be retrieved and the impact of lymph node ratio (LNR) on survival. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results was queried to identify patients with small bowel adenocarcinoma who underwent resection from 1988 to 2010. Survival was calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis identified predictors of survival. A total of 2,772 patients underwent resection with at least one node retrieved, and this sample included equal numbers of duodenal (n = 1,387) and jejunoileal (n = 1,386) adenocarcinomas. There were 1,371 patients with no nodal metastasis (N0, 49.4%), 928 N1 (33.5%), and 474 N2 (17.1%). The median numbers of LNs examined for duodenal and jejunoileal cancers were 9 and 8, respectively. Cut-point analysis demonstrated that harvesting at least 9 for jejunoileal and 5 LN for duodenal cancers resulted in the greatest survival difference. Increasing LNR at both sites was associated with decreased overall median survival (LNR = 0, 71 months; LNR 0-0.02, 35 months; LNR 0.21-0.4, 25 months; and LNR >0.4, 16 months; P < .001). Multivariate analysis confirmed number of LNs examined, T-stage, LN positivity, and LNR were independent predictors of survival. LNR has a profound impact on survival in patients with small bowel adenocarcinoma. To achieve adequate staging, we recommend retrieving a minimum of 5 LN for duodenal and 9 LN for jejunoileal adenocarcinomas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Abnormalities of small bowel and colon in systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scutellari, P.N.; Cinotti, A.; Cavallari, L.; Orzincolo, C.; Dovigo, L.; Trotta, F.; Menegale, G.

    1990-01-01

    A series of 21 subjects (2 males and 19 females) affected with systemic sclerosis, was examined by small bowel (oral and intubation methods) and colon enema. The underlying process responsible for abnormalities in the small bowel and colon in systemic sclerosis is a variable and pacthy destruction of the muscularis propria, that produces the structural and functional changes detected on X-ray: Pathologic condition is the same affecting the esophagus. The scout film of the abdomen often reveals colonic distension and fecal impaction, so that it may be quite difficult to prepare adequately the patients for a barium enema. Peristalsis may be virtually absent in short segments, and transit time may be several time longer than that in normal patients. For these reasons, intestinal pseudo-obstruction may appear in systemic sclerosis. The observed radiographic changes are: 1) in the small bowel: a) dilatation of the gut, especially in its proximal portions (duodenum and jejunum), in which the valvulae conniventes are straightened, normal or thinned; b) presence of diverticula, 2-4 cm in diameter, with hemispherical shape without the neck-like opening into the bowel lumen; 2) in the colon, the characteristic finding is an increase in size of individual haustra, forming sacculations or pseudo-diverticula, usually on the antemesenteric border of the transverse colon, better demonstrated on post-evacuation film. Moreover, loss of colonic haustration is also observed associated to colonic elongation and dilatation

  4. Small bowel enteroscopy and intraoperative enteroscopy for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B S; Wenger, J S; Waye, J D

    1991-02-01

    Intraoperative endoscopy (IOE) is accepted as the ultimate diagnostic procedure for completely evaluating the small bowel in patients with obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Small bowel enteroscopy (SBE) has been reported useful in the nonsurgical evaluation of the small intestine in these patients, but findings may be limited because of incomplete small bowel intubation and a lack of tip deflection. Twenty-three patients underwent 25 SBE exams and subsequently had 25 IOE exams during surgical exploration for continued bleeding. Patients' bleeding histories averaged 2 yr, with an average transfusion requirement of 27 units. Findings on IOE were the same as with SBE in 17/22 (77%) of examinations. We conclude that SBE and IOE are comparable in depth of insertion and ability to detect small vascular ectasias. Both procedures missed pathology due to limited visibility and the evanescent nature of ectasias. Long-term success in abolishing bleeding with these combined techniques can be expected in 55% of these patients. SBE should precede surgery, since the finding of diffuse ectasias precludes any benefit from operative intervention.

  5. Effects of the combined use of glutamine and growth hormone in the intestinal adaptation after massive resection of the small bowel in rats Efeitos do uso combinado da glutamina oral e hormônio do crescimento na adaptação intestinal após ressecção extensa do intestino delgado em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim M. Spadoni

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the combined use of glutamine (GL and growth hormone (GH in the intestine of rats submitted to 80% small bowel resection. METHODS: [24] Twenty four Wistar rats were randomized to receive either a standard rat chow - control group (CG, n=12 or the same diet added to 4% glutamine - GL-GH group (n=12 after 80% enterectomy. The latter group received subcutaneously 0,6UI/day of GH. Groups of six rats in each group were killed on the 5th and 14th days. The following variables were studied: body weight, mucosal weight, histomorphometry and DNA content in the resected specimen and in the adapted intestines after necropsy. RESULTS: All animals lost weight stabilizing after the 5th PO day in both groups. There was not any statistical difference in the mucosal weight associated to groups and dates. However, ileal mucosal weight decreased from basal to final results when compared to jejunal mucosa (p= 0.02. The DNA content increased from the initial to the final results (p OBJETIVO: Investigar os efeitos do uso combinado da glutamina (GL e do hormônio do crescimento (GH no intestino de ratos submetidos a ressecção de 80% do intestino delgado. MÉTODOS: Vinte e quatro ratos Wistar foram randomizados para receber uma a dieta padrão- grupo controle (GC, n=12 ou a mesma dieta adicionada de glutamina 4% (isocalórica, isoproteica - grupo glutamina- hormônio do crescimento (GL-GH, n=12 após a enterectomia à 80%. Este último grupo recebeu por via sub-cutânea, 0,6 UI/dia de GH. Grupos de seis ratos cada foram sacrificados no 5º e 14º dias. As seguintes variáveis foram estudadas: peso corporal, peso de mucosa, histomorfometria e conteúdo de DNA no segmento ressecado inicialmente e no intestino adaptado coletado após o sacrifício. RESULTADOS: Todos os animais perderam peso até o 5º dia, estabilizando-se após esta data em ambos os grupos. Não houve diferença estatística no peso da

  6. Prevalence of Sarcopenia and Its Impact on Postoperative Outcome in Patients With Crohn's Disease Undergoing Bowel Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tenghui; Cao, Lei; Cao, Tingzhi; Yang, Jianbo; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2017-05-01

    Sarcopenia has been proposed to be a prognostic factor of outcomes for various diseases but has not been applied to Crohn's disease (CD). We aimed to assess the impact of sarcopenia on postoperative outcomes after bowel resection in patients with CD. Abdominal computed tomography images within 30 days before bowel resection in 114 patients with CD between May 2011 and March 2014 were assessed for sarcopenia as well as visceral fat areas and subcutaneous fat areas. The impact of sarcopenia on postoperative outcomes was evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. Of 114 patients, 70 (61.4%) had sarcopenia. Patients with sarcopenia had a lower body mass index, lower preoperative levels of serum albumin, and more major complications (15.7% vs 2.3%, P = .027) compared with patients without sarcopenia. Moreover, predictors of major postoperative complications were sarcopenia (odds ratio [OR], 9.24; P = .04) and a decreased skeletal muscle index (1.11; P = .023). Preoperative enteral nutrition (OR, 0.13; P = .004) and preoperative serum albumin level >35 g/L (0.19; P = .017) were protective factors in multivariate analyses. The prevalence of sarcopenia is high in patients with CD requiring bowel resection. It significantly increases the risk of major postoperative complications and has clinical implications with respect to nutrition management before surgery for CD.

  7. Use of 5-mm Laparoscopic Stapler to Perform Open Small Bowel Anastomosis in a Neonatal Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Ian C; Bruns, Nicholas E; Ponsky, Todd A

    2016-10-01

    While adult bowel anastomoses are typically performed with staplers, neonatal small bowel anastomoses have traditionally been performed in a hand-sewn manner due to the large size of surgical staplers. The purpose of this study was to compare stapled anastomosis using a newly available, 5-mm laparoscopic stapler to a hand-sewn anastomosis in an open animal model. Twenty anastomoses were performed by two general surgery residents (10 stapled and 10 hand-sewn) in an adult New Zealand white rabbit. The small bowel was divided with a scalpel. Surgical technique was alternated between single-layer hand-sewn and stapled anastomoses. Each anastomosis was resected for ex vivo testing. Measurements collected were outer diameter of the bowel before division, time to perform the anastomosis, anastomosis inner diameter (ID), and leak test. IDs were measured by cutting the anastomosis in cross-section, taking a photograph, and measuring the diameter by computer software. In addition, the surgeons qualitatively evaluated the anastomoses for hemostasis and overall quality. Statistical significance was determined using the Student's t-test. There were statistically significant differences between stapled and hand-sewn anastomosis, respectively, for average operative time (4 minutes 2 seconds versus 16 minutes 6 seconds, P animal model, a 5-mm stapled anastomosis is an acceptable alternative to hand-sewn small bowel anastomosis. The stapler is faster and creates a larger diameter anastomosis, however, there was one leak when closing the enterotomy in the stapled group and overlapping staple lines should be avoided.

  8. The role of mechanical bowel preparation for colonic resection and anastomosis: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feres, O; Monteiro dos Santos, J C; Andrade, J I

    2001-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) on colonic resection and anastomosis. Mongrel dogs were divided into two groups of 20 animals each. During the preoperative period (24 h) group A was not subjected to MBP, and group B was fasted and ingested 20 ml magnesium hydroxide plus 15 ml/kg 10% mannitol orally. All animals underwent segmental colectomy followed by end-to-end anastomosis. The survivors of both groups were reoperated upon on the 7th postoperative day. Mortality before reoperation was significantly higher in group A (45%) than in group B (10%; P0.05). Aerobic and anaerobic bacterial cultures showed similar growth in the two groups. We conclude that the omission of MBP increased the mortality due to early anastomotic leakage with peritonitis; MBP did not change the rate of localized anastomotic leakage, leakage with peritonitis, or intact anastomoses on the 7th day; no quantitative or qualitative differences were observed in the bacteria isolated from the two groups.

  9. Resection of small plexiform neurofibromas in neurofibromatosis type 1 children

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    Fünsterer Carsten

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plexiform neurofibromas (PNF are benign tumors of the peripheral nerve which mostly develop in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1. Surgical interventions are usually not applied to children with small tumors. These are rather restricted to debulking of larger tumors in adults that cause clinical complications or aesthetic disfigurement. In most cases, a total resection of PNF is not possible due to the network-like growth of the tumors. Patients and methods Early surgical intervention was carried out for 9 small PNFs in 7 NF1 children. Tumor resection was performed following the graphical delineation of the affected skin and according the MRI findings. Results Total resection was achieved for all 9 PNF without causing any neurological or organic deficit. Annual magnetic resonance tomography over a period of four years did not reveal any relapse of the tumors. Conclusions Early surgical intervention for small superficial PNFs in NF1 children have various advantages and may especially be considered a strategy to prevent progression.

  10. Small Bowel Volvulus Induced by Mesenteric Lymphangioma in an Adult: a Case Report

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    Jang, Jin Hee; Lee, Su Lim; Ku, Young Mi; An, Chang Hyeok; Chang, Eun Deok [Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Mesenteric lymphangiomas are rare abdominal masses that are seldom associated with small bowel volvulus, and especially in adult patients. We report here on an unusual case of small bowel volvulus that was induced by a mesenteric lymphangioma in a 43-year-old man who suffered from repeated bouts of abdominal pain. At multidetector CT, we noticed whirling of the cystic mesenteric mass and the adjacent small bowel around the superior mesenteric artery. Small bowel volvulus induced by the rotation of the mesenteric lymphangioma was found on exploratory laparotomy. Lymphangioma should be considered as a rare cause of small bowel volvulus in adult patients.

  11. Blind bedside insertion of small bowel feeding tubes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, SN

    2009-12-01

    The use of Naso-Jejunal (NJ) feeding is limited by difficulty in feeding tube placement. Patients have traditionally required transfer to Endoscopy or Radiology for insertion of small bowel feeding tubes, with clear resource implications. We hypothesised that the adoption of a simple bedside procedure would be effective and reduce cost. Clinical nutrition and nurse specialist personnel were trained in the 10\\/10\\/10 method of blind bedside NJ insertion.

  12. Small Bowel Perforation as a Postoperative Complication from a Laminectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Krieger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain is one of the leading chief complaints affecting adults in the United States. As a result, this increases the percentage of patients that will eventually undergo surgical intervention to alleviate debilitating, chronic symptoms. A 37-year-old woman presented ten hours postoperatively after a lumbar laminectomy with an acute abdomen due to the extraordinarily rare complication of small bowel injury secondary to deep surgical penetration.

  13. Portal venous air in an adult patient with obstructive small bowel volvulus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, ECTH; Jager, GJ; Bleeker, WA; van Goor, Harry

    2002-01-01

    Background. Diagnosis of small bowel volvulus is frequently delayed often resulting in bowel ischaemia and infarction and impairing clinical outcome. Instant and correct diagnosis and subsequent adequate surgery may improve the outcome. Methods: We describe a 19-year-old female with small bowel

  14. Surgery for post-operative entero-cutaneous fistulas: is bowel resection plus primary anastomosis without stoma a safe option to avoid early recurrence? Report on 20 cases by a single center and systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauro, A; Cirocchi, R; Cautero, N; Dazzi, A; Pironi, D; Di Matteo, F M; Santoro, A; Faenza, S; Pironi, L; Pinna, A D

    2017-01-01

    A review was performed on entero-cutaneous fistula (ECF) repair and early recurrence, adding our twenty adult patients (65% had multiple fistulas). The search yielded 4.098 articles but only 15 were relevant: 1.217 patients underwent surgery. The interval time between fistula's diagnosis and operative repair was between 3 months and 1 year. A bowel resection with primary anastomosis was performed in 1.048 patients, 192 (18.3%) underwent a covering stoma: 856 patients (81.7%) had a fistula takedown in one procedure. The patients had 14.3% recurrence and 13.1% mortality rate. In our experience 75% were surgically treated after a period equal or above one year from fistula occurrence: surgery was very demolitive (in 40% remnant small bowel was less than 100 cm). We performed a bowel resection with a hand-sewn anastomosis (95%) without temporary stoma. In-hospital mortality was 0% and at discharge all were back to oral intake with 0% early re-fistulisation. Literature supports our experience: ECF takedown could be safely performed after an adequate period of recovery from 3 months to one year from fistula occurrence. In our series primary repair (bowel resection plus reconnection surgery without temporary stoma) avoided an early recurrence without mortality.

  15. Biodistribution of the radiophamarceutical sodium pertechnetate (Na99mTcO4 after massive small bowel resection in rats Biodistribuição do radiofármaco pertecnetato de sódio (Na99mTcO4 em ratos submetidos a ressecção extensa de intestino delgado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dâmaso de Araújo Chacon

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the biodistribution of sodium pertecnetate (Na99mTcO4 in organs and tissues, the morphometry of remnant intestinal mucosa and ponderal evolution in rats subjected to massive resection of the small intestine. METHODS: Twenty-one Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups of 7 animals each. The short bowel (SB group was subjected to massive resection of the small intestine; the control group (C rats were not operated on, and soft intestinal handling was performed in sham rats. The animals were weighed weekly. On the 30th postoperative day, 0.l mL of Na99mTcO4, with mean activity of 0.66 MBq was injected intravenously into the orbital plexus. After 30 minutes, the rats were killed with an overdose of anesthetic, and fragments of the liver, spleen, pancreas, stomach, duodenum, small intestine, thyroid, lung, heart, kidney, bladder, muscle, femur and brain were harvested. The biopsies were washed with 0.9% NaCl.,The radioactivity was counted using Gama Counter WizardTM 1470, PerkinElmer. The percentage of radioactivity per gram of tissue (%ATI/g was calculated. Biopsies of the remaining jejunum were analysed by HE staining to obtain mucosal thickness. Analysis of variance (ANOVA and the Tukey test for multiple comparisons were used, considering p0.05. An increase in the weight of the SB rats was observed after the second postoperative week. The jejunal mucosal thickness of the SB rats was significantly greater than that of C and sham rats (pOBJETIVO: Avaliar em modelo animal com ressecção extensa do intestino delgado a biodistribuição de pertecnetato de sódio (Na99mTcO4 em órgãos e tecidos, a evolução ponderal e a morfometria da mucosa do intestino delgado remanescente. MÉTODOS: Vinte e um ratos Wistar foram aleatoriamente divididos em três grupos de sete animais cada. O grupo intestino curto (IC foi submetido a ressecção extensa do intestino delgado, o grupo controle (C não foi operado e o grupo sham foi

  16. Combined small and large bowel MR imaging in patients with Crohn's disease: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narin, Burcu; Ajaj, Waleed; Goehde, Susanne; Lauenstein, Thomas C.; Langhorst, Jost; Gerken, Guido; Akgoez, Haldun; Ruehm, Stefan G.

    2004-01-01

    MRI of the small bowel is a new method for the assessment of inflammatory bowel diseases. However, inflammatory bowel disease can affect both the small and large bowel. Therefore, our goal was to assess the feasibility of displaying the small bowel and colon simultaneously by MR imaging. Eighteen patients with inflammatory bowel disease were studied. For small bowel distension, patients ingested a solution containing mannitol and locust bean gum. Furthermore, the colon was rectally filled with water. MR examinations were performed on a 1.5-T system. Before and after intravenous gadolinium administration, a T1w data set was collected. All patients underwent conventional colonoscopy as a standard of reference. The oral ingestion and the rectal application of water allowed an assessment of the small bowel and colon in all patients. By means of MRI (endoscopy), 19 (13) inflamed bowel segments in the colon and terminal ileum were detected. Furthermore, eight additional inflammatory lesions in the jejunum and proximal ileum that had not been endoscopically accessible were found by MRI. The simultaneous display of the small and large bowel by MRI is feasible. Major advantages of the proposed MR concept are related to its non-invasive character as well as to the potential to visualize parts of the small bowel that cannot be reached by endoscopy. (orig.)

  17. Segmental small bowel necrosis associated with antiphospholipid syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qun-Ying; Ye, Xiao-Hua; Ding, Jin; Wu, Xiao-Kang

    2015-04-07

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is a multi-system disease characterized by the formation of thromboembolic complications and/or pregnancy morbidity, and with persistently increased titers of antiphospholipid antibodies. We report the case of a 50-year-old, previously healthy man who presented with fever and new-onset, dull abdominal pain. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan showed segmental small bowel obstruction, for which an emergency laparotomy was performed. Histopathologic examination of resected tissues revealed multiple intestinal and mesenteric thromboses of small vessels. Laboratory tests for serum antiphospholipid (anticardiolipin IgM) and anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies were positive. Despite proactive implementation of anticoagulation, steroid, and antibiotic therapies, the patient's condition rapidly deteriorated, and he died 22 d after admission. This case highlights that antiphospholipid syndrome should be suspected in patients with unexplainable ischemic bowel and intestinal necrosis presenting with insidious clinical features that may be secondary to the disease, as early diagnosis is critical to implement timely treatments in order to ameliorate the disease course.

  18. Short bowel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, L.G.J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis describes some aspects of short bowel syndrome. When approximately 1 m or less small bowel is retained after extensive resection, a condition called short bowel syndrome is present. Since the advent of parenteral nutrition, the prognosis of patients with a very short bowel has dramatically improved. Patients with 40 to 100 cm remaining jejunum and/or ileum can generally be maintained with oral nutrition due to increased absorption of the small bowel remnant as result of intestinal adaptation. This study reports clinical, biochemical and nutritional aspects of short bowel patients on oral or parenteral nutrition, emphasizing data on absorption of various nutrients and on bone metabolism. Furthermore, some technical apsects concerning long-term parenteral nutrition are discussed. (Auth.)

  19. Small bowel obstruction complicating colonoscopy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter Iain A

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This report describes a rare complication of colonoscopy and reviews the literature with regard to other rare causes of acute abdominal presentations following colonoscopy. Case presentation After a therapeutic colonoscopy a 60-year-old woman developed an acute abdomen. At laparotomy she was discovered to have small bowel obstruction secondary to incarceration through a congenital band adhesion. Conclusion Although there is no practical way in which such rare complications can be predicted, this case report emphasises the wide array of pathologies that can result in acute abdominal symptoms following colonoscopy.

  20. Prediction of radiation-related small-bowel damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potish, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    In order to predict which patients have a high risk for radiation-related small-bowel damage, the concept of the dose-response curve was applied to the predisposing factors (number of previous laparotomies, extent of surgery, thin physique, hypertension, age, cancer stage, number of treatment days, fractionation, and weight change during radiotherapy) present in 92 patients receiving identical radiation doses and volumes This analysis allows an estimate of the probability of complication to be assigned to individual patients. The utility and limitations of the dose-response concept are discussed

  1. Small Bowel Obstruction Caused by Aloe vera Bezoars: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, In Taik; Cha, Jae Myung; Ki, Hye Jin; Kwak, Min Seob; Yoon, Jin Young; Shin, Hyun Phil; Jeoun, Jung Won; Choi, Sung Il

    2017-05-25

    Small bowel obstruction is a clinical condition commonly caused by postoperative adhesion, volvulus, intussusceptions, and hernia. Small bowel obstruction due to bezoars is clinically uncommon, accounting for approximately 2-4% of all obstructions. Computed tomography (CT) is a useful method in diagnosing the cause of small bowel obstruction. However, small bowel obstruction caused by bezoars may not be detected by an abdominal CT examination. Herein, we report a rare case of small bowel obstruction by Aloe vera bezoars, which were undetected by an abdominal CT. Phytobezoars should be included in the differential diagnosis of small bowel obstruction in patients with predisposing factors, such as excessive consumption of high-fiber food and diabetes.

  2. Nutritive support in short Bowel syndrome (sbs

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    Simić Dušica

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Short bowel syndrome most commonly result after bowel resection for necrosis of the bowel. It may be caused by arterial or venous thrombosis, volvolus and in children, necrotizing enterocolitis. The other causes are Crohn,s disease intestinal atresia. The factors influencing the risk on short bowel syndrome are the remaining length of the small bowel, the age of onset, the length of the colon, the presence or absence of the ileo-coecal valve and the time after resection. Besides nutritional deficiencies there some other consequences of extensive resections of the small intestine (gastric acid hypersecretion, d-lactic acidosis, nephrolithiasis, cholelithiasis, which must be diagnosed, treated, and if possible, prevented. With current therapy most patients with short bowel have normal body mass index and good quality of life.

  3. Small-bowel volvulus in late pregnancy due to internal hernia after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naef, Markus; Mouton, Wolfgang G; Wagner, Hans E

    2010-12-01

    Internal hernias are a specific cause of acute abdominal pain and are a well-known complication after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity. Although internal hernias are a rare cause of intestinal obstruction, they may evolve towards serious complications, such as extensive bowel ischemia and gangrene, with the need for bowel resection and sometimes for a challenging reconstruction of intestinal continuity. The antecolic position of the Roux limb is associated with a decrease in the incidence of small-bowel obstruction and internal hernias. The best prevention of the formation of these hernias is probably by closure of potential mesenteric defects at the initial operation with a non-absorbable running suture. We present a patient in late pregnancy with a small-bowel volvulus following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity and discuss the available literature. For a favorable obstetric and neonatal outcome, it is crucial not to delay surgical exploration and an emergency operation usually is mandatory.

  4. Bowel symptoms and self-care strategies of survivors in the process of restoration after low anterior resection of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lishi; Fan, Ling; Tan, Renfu; Yang, Guangjing; Jiang, Fenglin; Zhang, Chao; Ma, Jun; Yan, Yang; Zou, Yanhong; Zhang, Yaowen; Wang, Yamei; Zhang, Guifang

    2018-06-04

    The purpose of this research is to identify the bowel symptoms and self-care strategies for rectal cancer survivors during the recovery process following low anterior resection surgery. A total of 100 participants were investigated under the structured interview guide based on the dimensions of "symptom management theory". 92% of participants reported changes in bowel habits, the most common being the frequent bowel movements and narrower stools, which we named it finger-shaped consistency stools. The 6 most frequently reported bowel symptoms were excessive flatus (93%), clustering (86%), urgency (77%), straining (62%), bowel frequency (57%) and anal pendant expansion (53%). Periodic bowel movements occurred in 19% participants. For a group of 79 participants at 6 to 24 months post-operation, 86.1% reported a significant improvement of bowel symptoms. Among 68 participants of this subgroup with significant improvements, 70.5% participants reported the length of time it took was at least 6 months. Self-care strategies adopted by participants included diet, bowel medications, practice management and exercise. It is necessary to educate patients on the symptoms experienced following low anterior resection surgery. Through the process of trial and error, participants have acquired self-care strategies. Healthcare professionals should learn knowledge of such strategies and help them build effective interventions.

  5. Microscopic polyangiitis: Atypical presentation with extensive small bowel necrosis, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, and renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin M. Segraves, M.D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic polyangiitis is an uncommon systemic vasculitis of varying severity that is associated with myeloperoxidase (MPO and perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic (p-ANCA antibodies. The most commonly affected organs are the lungs and kidneys. We report on a very unusual case of microscopic polyangiitis presenting with severe mesenteric ischemia in addition to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and acute renal failure. The patient was initially diagnosed with acute pancreatitis at an outside facility given his severe abdominal pain and elevated pancreatic enzymes. Further investigations after transfer to our facility determined that the patient was actually suffering from a severe exacerbation of previously diagnosed microscopic polyangiitis. He quickly developed diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH necessitating intubation and acute kidney injury (AKI requiring dialysis. He subsequently developed mesenteric ischemia and bowel necrosis resulting in emergent laparotomy and extensive small bowel resection. Physicians need to be aware that microscopic polyangiitis can very rarely present with severe involvement of the abdominal viscera and mesenteric vessels. Severe disease necessitates the use of high dose IV steroids, rituximab or cyclophosphamide, and plasma exchange (PLEX.

  6. Microscopic polyangiitis: Atypical presentation with extensive small bowel necrosis, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, and renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segraves, Justin M; Iyer, Vivek N

    2017-01-01

    Microscopic polyangiitis is an uncommon systemic vasculitis of varying severity that is associated with myeloperoxidase (MPO) and perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic (p-ANCA) antibodies. The most commonly affected organs are the lungs and kidneys. We report on a very unusual case of microscopic polyangiitis presenting with severe mesenteric ischemia in addition to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and acute renal failure. The patient was initially diagnosed with acute pancreatitis at an outside facility given his severe abdominal pain and elevated pancreatic enzymes. Further investigations after transfer to our facility determined that the patient was actually suffering from a severe exacerbation of previously diagnosed microscopic polyangiitis. He quickly developed diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) necessitating intubation and acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring dialysis. He subsequently developed mesenteric ischemia and bowel necrosis resulting in emergent laparotomy and extensive small bowel resection. Physicians need to be aware that microscopic polyangiitis can very rarely present with severe involvement of the abdominal viscera and mesenteric vessels. Severe disease necessitates the use of high dose IV steroids, rituximab or cyclophosphamide, and plasma exchange (PLEX).

  7. Small bowel preparations for capsule endoscopy with mannitol and simethicone: a prospective, randomized, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-bin; Huang, Yue; Chen, Su-yu; Song, Hui-wen; Li, Xiao-lin; Dai, Dong-lin; Xie, Jia-tia; He, Song; Zhao, Yuan-yuan; Huang, Chun; Zhang, Sheng-jun; Yang, Lin-na

    2011-04-01

    There is no consensus concerning small bowel preparation before capsule endoscopy (CE). This study evaluated the effects of 4 regimens on small bowel cleansing and diagnostic yield. Patients were randomly divided into 4 groups. Group A consumed a clear liquid diet after lunch on the day before CE, followed by overnight fasting. Group B took 250 mL 20% mannitol and 1 L 0.9% saline orally at 05:00 hours on the day of the procedure. In group C, the same regimen was taken at 20:00 hours on the day before and at 05:00 hours on the day of CE. In group D, in addition to the group C regimen, 20 mL oral simethicone was taken 30 minutes before CE. Two hundred patients were prospectively enrolled, and 7 were excluded from the final analysis because of incomplete small bowel transit. No significant difference was noted among the 4 groups for small bowel transit time. Bowel preparation in group D was significantly better than for the other regimens for overall cleansing of the proximal small bowel, and showed improved overall cleansing of the distal small bowel when compared with 10-hours overnight fasting. Pathological lesions of the proximal and distal small bowel were, respectively, achieved in 82 and 74 patients, mostly distributed in group D. Small bowel preparation that involves split-dose oral mannitol plus single-dose simethicone for CE can improve mucosal visualization and subsequent diagnostic yield when compared with 10-hours overnight fasting.

  8. Bedside Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Small Bowel Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Anshus

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: An elderly female with no history of prior abdominal surgeries presented to the emergency department (ED with acute onset of abdominal pain and distention. Upon arrival, she began having large volume bilious emesis. While waiting for a computed tomography (CT scan of her abdomen and pelvis, a point of care ultrasound (POCUS was performed which showed evidence of a small bowel obstruction (SBO. The patient had a nasogastric tube placed that put out over two liters of bilious contents. A subsequent CT scan confirmed the diagnosis of SBO from a left inguinal hernia and the patient was admitted to the surgical service. Significant findings: The POCUS utilizing the low frequency curvilinear probe demonstrates fluid-filled, dilated bowel loops greater than 2.5cm with to-and-fro peristalsis, and thickened bowel walls greater than 3mm, concerning for SBO. Discussion: Gastrointestinal obstruction is a common diagnosis in the ED, accounting for approximately 15% of all ED visits for acute abdominal pain.1 SBO accounts for approximately 80% of all obstructions.2 In the diagnosis of SBO, studies show that abdominal x-rays have a sensitivity of 66-77% and specificity of 50-57%,3 CT scans have a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 93%,4 and ultrasound has a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 96%.5 While CT scan remains a widely accepted modality for diagnosing SBO, ultrasound is more cost effective, well tolerated, does not involve ionizing radiation, and can be done in a timely manner at the patient’s bedside. Ultrasound can also identify transition points as well as distinguish between functional and mechanical obstruction.6 In addition to SBO, ultrasound can be used to diagnose external hernias, intussusception, tumors, superior mesenteric artery (SMA syndrome, foreign bodies, bezoars, and ascariasis.7

  9. Comparison of Endoscopic and Open Resection for Small Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Feng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommends conservative follow-up for gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs less than 2 cm. We have previously reported that the mitotic index of 22.22% of small gastric GISTs exceeded 5 per 50 high-power fields and recommended that all small gastric GISTs should be resected once diagnosed. The aim of the present study is to compare the safety and outcomes of endoscopic and open resection of small gastric GISTs. From May 2010 to March 2014, a total of 90 small gastric GIST patients were enrolled in the present study, including 40 patients who underwent surgical resection and 50 patients who underwent endoscopic resection. The clinicopathological characteristics, resection-related factors, and clinical outcomes were recorded and analyzed. The clinicopathological characteristics were comparable between the two groups except for tumor location and DOG-1 expression. Compared with the surgical resection group, the operation time was shorter (P = .000, blood loss was less (P = .000, pain intensity was lower (P < .05, duration of first flatus and defecation was shorter (P < .05, and medical cost of hospitalization was lower (P = .027 in the endoscopic resection group. The complications and postoperative hospital stay were comparable between the two groups. No in situ recurrence or liver metastasis was observed during follow-up. Endoscopic resection of small gastric GISTs is safe and feasible compared with surgical resection, although perforation could not be totally avoided during and after resection. The clinical outcome of endoscopic resection is also favorable.

  10. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Small Bowel Cancer Risk, Clinical Characteristics, and Histopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, Rasmus Dahlin; Riis, Lene Buhl; Høgdall, Estrid

    2017-01-01

    descriptions, we identified 40 cases of IBD-SBC. Risk was calculated by standardized incidence ratio (SIR) (observed/expected); patient characteristics were derived from medical files, and surgery specimens were obtained from hospitals nationwide for histopathological and molecular analyses. RESULTS: During...... 241,620 person-years of follow-up, 23 patients with Crohn's disease developed small bowel adenocarcinoma (SIR, 14.38; 95% confidence interval, 8.78-22.20) and 9 developed neuroendocrine tumors (SIR, 6.83; 95% confidence interval, 3.13-12.97). No significantly increased risk of SBC was found among...... had evidence of microsatellite instability. CONCLUSIONS: In a population-based study of patients in Denmark with IBD and SBC, we found risk of adenocarcinomas and neuroendocrine tumors to be increased among persons with Crohn's disease. Most patients with IBD-SBC had extensive IBD of moderate...

  11. High-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization in sporadic and celiac disease-related small bowel adenocarcinomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diosdado, B.; Buffart, T.E.; Watkins, R.; Carvalho, B.; Ylstra, B.; Tijssen, M.; Bolijn, A.S.; Lewis, F.; Maude, K.; Verbeke, C.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Grabsch, H.; Mulder, C.J.; Quirke, P.; Howdle, P.; Meijer, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The molecular pathogenesis of small intestinal adenocarcinomas is not well understood. Understanding the molecular characteristics of small bowel adenocarcinoma may lead to more effective patient treatment. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Forty-eight small bowel adenocarcinomas (33 non-celiac disease

  12. The prevalence of overgrowth by aerobic bacteria in the small intestine by small bowel culture: relationship with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyleris, Emmannouil; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Tzivras, Dimitrios; Koussoulas, Vassilios; Barbatzas, Charalambos; Pimentel, Mark

    2012-05-01

    Many studies have linked irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), although they have done so on a qualitative basis using breath tests even though quantitative cultures are the hallmark of diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to underscore the frequency of SIBO in a large number of Greeks necessitating upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract endoscopy by using quantitative microbiological assessment of the duodenal aspirate. Consecutive subjects presenting for upper GI endoscopy were eligible to participate. Quantitative culture of aspirates sampled from the third part of the duodenum during upper GI tract endoscopy was conducted under aerobic conditions. IBS was defined by Rome II criteria. Among 320 subjects enrolled, SIBO was diagnosed in 62 (19.4%); 42 of 62 had IBS (67.7%). SIBO was found in 37.5% of IBS sufferers. SIBO was found in 60% of IBS patients with predominant diarrhea compared with 27.3% without diarrhea (P = 0.004). Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp and Klebsiella pneumoniae were the most common isolates within patients with SIBO. A step-wise logistic regression analysis revealed that IBS, history of type 2 diabetes mellitus and intake of proton pump inhibitors were independently and positively linked with SIBO; gastritis was protective against SIBO. Using culture of the small bowel, SIBO by aerobe bacteria is independently linked with IBS. These results reinforce results of clinical trials evidencing a therapeutic role of non-absorbable antibiotics for the management of IBS symptoms.

  13. Small bowel obstruction in children: usefulness of CT for diagnosis and localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Cheol; Kim, Young Tong; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Il Young

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of CT for the diagnosis of the cause and localization of small bowel obstruction. Out of a group of children who underwent a CT examination for a suspected small bowel obstruction, 19 patients with confirmed underlying disorders were identified and included in the study. Neonates and patients with duodenal obstruction were excluded from the study. The CT findings were analyzed for the location of obstruction site, abnormalities of the mesentery and mesenteric vessels, bowel wall thickening, closed loop obstruction, and strangulation. The obstruction site was divided into five parts. The preoperative CT diagnosis was compared with the final diagnosis. Causes of small bowel obstruction were intussusception (n = 6), appendiceal perforation (n = 4), transmesenteric internal hernia (n = 2), postoperative bands (n = 1), idiopathic multiple bands (n = 1), a foreign body (n = 1), a small bowel adenocarcinoma (n = 1), Meckel's diverticulitis (n = 1), tuberculous peritonitis (n = 1) and Salmonella enteritis with bowel perforation (n = 1). The CT findings showed mesenteric vascular prominence (n = 13), omental or mesenteric infiltration (n = 10), localized bowel wall thickening (n = 7) closed loops obstruction (n = 3) and strangulation (n = 1). The obstruction site was identified in all cases. The causes of obstruction could be diagnosed preoperatively in 14 cases, but a preoperative diagnosis was difficult in 5 cases. The causes of small bowel obstruction in children are variable, and CT is useful for evaluating the cause and localization of small bowel obstruction

  14. Small bowel obstruction in children: usefulness of CT for diagnosis and localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Cheol; Kim, Young Tong; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Il Young [Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of CT for the diagnosis of the cause and localization of small bowel obstruction. Out of a group of children who underwent a CT examination for a suspected small bowel obstruction, 19 patients with confirmed underlying disorders were identified and included in the study. Neonates and patients with duodenal obstruction were excluded from the study. The CT findings were analyzed for the location of obstruction site, abnormalities of the mesentery and mesenteric vessels, bowel wall thickening, closed loop obstruction, and strangulation. The obstruction site was divided into five parts. The preoperative CT diagnosis was compared with the final diagnosis. Causes of small bowel obstruction were intussusception (n = 6), appendiceal perforation (n = 4), transmesenteric internal hernia (n = 2), postoperative bands (n = 1), idiopathic multiple bands (n = 1), a foreign body (n = 1), a small bowel adenocarcinoma (n = 1), Meckel's diverticulitis (n = 1), tuberculous peritonitis (n = 1) and Salmonella enteritis with bowel perforation (n = 1). The CT findings showed mesenteric vascular prominence (n = 13), omental or mesenteric infiltration (n = 10), localized bowel wall thickening (n = 7) closed loops obstruction (n = 3) and strangulation (n = 1). The obstruction site was identified in all cases. The causes of obstruction could be diagnosed preoperatively in 14 cases, but a preoperative diagnosis was difficult in 5 cases. The causes of small bowel obstruction in children are variable, and CT is useful for evaluating the cause and localization of small bowel obstruction.

  15. Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome following Small Bowel Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoumitro Deb

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 64-year-old lady who developed clinical features of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome following a laparotomy for small bowel obstruction. Following the operation she developed paralytic ileus and required total parenteral nutrition for one month. A suspected history of average 40 units of weekly alcohol consumption prior to the operation could not be confirmed and the patient did not show any sign of alcohol dependence. Within a few months of treatment with a daily oral dose of thiamine 200 mgs supplemented by multivitamins the patient showed subjective evidence of improvement in confusion, confabulation, and anterograde amnesia, although objective tests showed residual deficits in many areas of cognitive functioning, including immediate and delayed recall of verbal and non-verbal materials, planning and switching of attention.

  16. Colonic carcinoma with multiple small bowel perforations mimicking intestinal obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanna Rahul

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carcinoma of the colon may present with perforation proximal to the site of malignancy. Caecum is the commonest site of perforation if the ileocecal valve is patent and the jejunal and ileal perforations are very rare. Case presentation A 35 year male presented with intestinal obstruction. Emergency laparotomy revealed carcinoma of the transverse colon with multiple pinpoint perforations along antimesenteric border of ileum, which were wrapped with omentum, and no peritoneal contamination was present. Extended right hemicolectomy with jejunocolic anastomosis was done. Patient made uneventful recovery in postoperative period and was treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusion Patients with colonic carcinoma and incompetent ileocecal valve may present with intestinal perforation. Increased intraluminal pressure and closed loop obstruction may lead to ischemia and perforation of the small bowel.

  17. Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome following Small Bowel Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Shoumitro; Law-Min, Richard; Fearnley, David

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of a 64-year-old lady who developed clinical features of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome following a laparotomy for small bowel obstruction. Following the operation she developed paralytic ileus and required total parenteral nutrition for one month. A suspected history of average 40 units of weekly alcohol consumption prior to the operation could not be confirmed and the patient did not show any sign of alcohol dependence. Within a few months of treatment with a daily oral dose of thiamine 200 mgs supplemented by multivitamins the patient showed subjective evidence of improvement in confusion, confabulation, and anterograde amnesia, although objective tests showed residual deficits in many areas of cognitive functioning, including immediate and delayed recall of verbal and non-verbal materials, planning and switching of attention. PMID:12446948

  18. High sensitivity of quick view capsule endoscopy for detection of small bowel Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling, Morten Lee; Nathan, Torben; Kjeldsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) has a high sensitivity for diagnosing small bowel Crohn's disease, but video analysis is time consuming. The quick view (qv) function is an effective tool to reduce time consumption. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of missed small bowel ulcerations with qv-C...

  19. Small-bowel cancer in Lynch syndrome : is it time for surveillance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, Jan J.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Vasen, Hans F. A.

    Small-bowel cancer is part of the tumour spectrum of Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome, or hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, is caused by germline mutations in one of the mismatch repair genes. Mutation carriers have an estimated lifetime risk for the development of small-bowel cancer of

  20. Modern MRI of the small bowell; Moderne MRT des Duenndarms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharitzer, M.; Ba-Ssalamah, A. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria)

    2015-12-15

    The radiological diagnostics of diseases of the small intestine have undergone a great change in the last two decades. Through rapid progress with new treatments and an increasing therapeutic focus on transmural healing, a complete evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract is now crucial. With the introduction of endoscopy, gastrointestinal imaging with a relatively high radiation exposure had only limited applications. The development of cross-sectional imaging allowed a much broader radiological evaluation of abdominal diseases. Due to rapid investigation techniques, excellent soft tissue contrast and the distinct advantage of eliminating exposure to radiation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the gastrointestinal tract has gained increasing importance. With sufficient filling of the intestinal lumen, simultaneous imaging of all the intestinal wall layers, the perienteric structures and associated abdominal pathologies is now possible. New MR sequences, such as diffusion-weighted sequences, dynamic contrast-enhanced sequences and MR fluoroscopy, enable the detection of morphological changes, with additional characterization of affected bowel loops as well as the assessment of functional pathologies with dynamic information about intestinal motility disturbances. Recent guidelines of European radiological and gastroenterological organizations have confirmed the importance of cross-sectional imaging and particularly of MRI for diagnostics and follow-up in patients with Crohn's disease. Due to the possibility of assessment of all the layers of the intestinal wall and the presence of extramural complications, MRI has a significant impact on further therapeutic treatment in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Especially in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, MR enterography and MR enteroclysis should be the methods of choice for the evaluation of small bowel pathologies because of radiation issues and the great diagnostic value they provide. A

  1. Survived case of tardive small bowel injury resulting from radiotherapy for ovarial tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haruyama, H; Hattori, K; Okubo, H; Ishizaki, Y; Kanemoto, T [National Hospital of Sapporo (Japan)

    1981-07-01

    In a patient who underwent surgical excision of recurrent tumor of ovarian disgerminoma, small bowel injury following radiotherapy was treated by extensive excision of the small intestine followed by intravenous hyperalimentation (I.V.H.) and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. From its clinical course and treatment, we concluded that 1) In small bowel complication due to radiation injury, especially perforation of the small bowel, radical excision of the diseased segment is most promising, if the general and local conditions permit. 2) I.V.H. is effective for protecting and improving postoperative malnutrition after extensive excision of the small bowel. 3) Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is very effective for postoperative paralytic ileus in the case in which surgical operation cannot be performed. 4) Zinc deficiency as a complication of prolonged I.V.H. therapy must be protected. 5) It is necessary to study pathophysiology of short bowel syndrome following the extensive excision and to continue treatment and careful long-term follow-up.

  2. The effect of barium infusion rate on the diagnostic value of small bowel enteroclysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudkerk, M.; Rijke, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Although enteroclysis may have many advantages over the conventional methods of small bowel examination, the contrast material is not always infused at a rate appropriate to gain maximum diagnostic information. In this study, 190 patients were examined by small bowell enteroclysis at five contrast infusion rates ranging from 50 to 150 ml/min using a newly designed infusion pump system. The results show that at rates above 75 ml/min, motility disturbances are masked by small bowel dilatation and paralysis, transit times are extended and morphological detail is obscured. At rates below 75 ml/min, incomplete filling of the loops renders optimal diagnostic evaluation impossible. An infusion rate of 75 ml/min was found to be optimal for initiating small bowel studies. This rate can be adjusted for individual cases when pathology or drugs affect the motility of the small bowel. 13 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 table

  3. Leukocyte scintigraphy compared to intraoperative small bowel enteroscopy and laparotomy findings in Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almen, Sven; Granerus, Göran; Ström, Magnus

    2007-01-01

    Background: Leukocyte scintigraphy is a noninvasive investigation to assess inflammation. We evaluated the utility of labeled leukocytes to detect small bowel inflammation and disease complications in Crohn's disease and compared it to whole small bowel enteroscopy and laparotomy findings. Methods......: Scintigraphy with technetium-99m exametazime-labeled leukocytes was prospectively performed in 48 patients with Crohn's disease a few days before laparotomy; 41 also had an intraoperative small bowel enteroscopy. The same procedures were performed in 8 control patients. Independent grading of scans...... was compared with the results of enteroscopy and with surgical, histopathologic, and clinical data. Results: In the 8 control patients leukocyte scan, endoscopy, and histopathology were all negative for the small bowel. In patients with Crohn's disease and small bowel inflammation seen at enteroscopy and...

  4. Historical analysis of experience with small bowel capsule endoscopy in a spanish tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea Valenzuela, Juan; Carrilero Zaragoza, Gabriel; Iglesias Jorquera, Elena; Tomás Pujante, Paula; Alberca de Las Parras, Fernando; Carballo Álvarez, Fernando

    2017-02-01

    Capsule endoscopy was approved by the FDA in 2001. Gastrointestinal bleeding and inflammatory bowel disease are the main indications. It has been available in our hospital since 2004. We retrospectively analysed data from patients who underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy in our hospital from October 2004 to April 2015. Indications were divided into: Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (occult and overt), inflammatory bowel disease, and other indications. Findings were divided into: Vascular lesions, inflammatory lesions, other lesions, normal studies, and inconclusive studies. A total of 1027 out of 1291 small bowel studies were included. Mean patient age was 56.45 years; 471 were men and 556 women. The most common lesion observed was angiectasia, as an isolated finding or associated with other lesions. Findings were significant in up to 80% of studies when the indication was gastrointestinal bleeding, but in only 50% of studies in inflammatory bowel disease. Diagnostic yield was low in the group «other indications». No major complications were reported. Small bowel capsule endoscopy has high diagnostic yield in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding, but yield is lower in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Our experience shows that capsule endoscopy is a safe and useful tool for the diagnosis of small bowel disease. The diagnostic yield of the technique in inflammatory bowel disease must be improved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U., AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  5. An unusual cause of small bowel obstruction: Gossypiboma – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inceoglu Resit

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The term "gossypiboma" denotes a mass of cotton that is retained in the body following surgery. Gossypiboma is a medico-legal problem especially for surgeons. To the best of our knowledge, the patient presented herein is the second reported patient in whom the exact site of migration of a retained surgical textile material into the intestinal lumen could be demonstrated by preoperative imaging studies. Case presentation A 74-year-old woman presented with symptoms of small bowel obstruction due to incomplete intraluminal migration of a laparotomy towel 3 years after open cholecystectomy and umbilical hernia repair. Plain abdominal radiography did not show any sign of a radio-opaque marker in the abdomen. However, contrast enhanced abdominal computerized tomography revealed a round, well-defined soft-tissue mass with a dense, enhanced wall, containing an internal high-density area with air-bubbles in the mid-abdomen. A fistula between the abscess cavity containing the suspicious mass and gastrointestinal tract was identified by upper gastrointestinal series. The presence of a foreign body was considered. It was surgically removed with a partial small bowel resection followed by anastomosis. Conclusions Although gossypiboma is rarely seen in daily clinical practice, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute mechanical intestinal obstruction in patients who underwent laparotomy previously. The best approach in the prevention of this condition can be achieved by meticulous count of surgical materials in addition to thorough exploration of surgical site at the conclusion of operations and also by routine use of surgical textile materials impregnated with a radio-opaque marker.

  6. PREVALENCE OF SMALL INTESTINAL BACTERIAL OVERGROWTH IN IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premaletha Narayanan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS is a common functional disorder and the pathophysiology of IBS is poorly understood. The aim of the study is to assess the prevalence of SIBO in patients with IBS using Lactulose Hydrogen Breath Test (LHBT. Diagnosis of IBS was made according to the Rome III Criteria and Lactulose Hydrogen Breath Test (LHBT was done. MATERIALS AND METHODS The current hypothesis suggests that altered gastrointestinal motility, disturbance of visceral hypersensitivity and infection may contribute to the symptoms. Gut microbiota and intestinal pathogens are likely to influence the pathogenesis of IBS. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO is defined as an abnormally high bacterial count (≥105 colony-forming units/mL in the proximal small intestine. RESULTS Out of the 120 patients, 9 were LHBT positive (7.5% compared to none in controls (p <0.01. IBS patients with LHBT positivity was correlated well with the increased frequency of stools. There was no correlation noted with LHBT positivity and abdominal pain or flatulence or bloating compared to IBS patients who were LHBT negative. CONCLUSION These findings may suggest that patients with chronic diarrhoea including IBS should be tested for SIBO. Our study also showed that LHBT positivity is associated with increased frequency of stools and diarrhoea. If SIBO is found in patients with chronic diarrhoea, specific treatment with antibiotics may benefit them.

  7. Older age at diagnosis of Hirschsprung disease decreases risk of postoperative enterocolitis, but resection of additional ganglionated bowel does not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haricharan, Ramanath N; Seo, Jeong-Meen; Kelly, David R; Mroczek-Musulman, Elizabeth C; Aprahamian, Charles J; Morgan, Traci L; Georgeson, Keith E; Harmon, Carroll M; Saito, Jacqueline M; Barnhart, Douglas C

    2008-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of age at diagnosis and length of ganglionated bowel resected on postoperative Hirschsprung-associated enterocolitis (HAEC). Children who underwent endorectal pull-through (ERPT) between January 1993 and December 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. t Test, analysis of variance, Kaplan-Meier, and Cox's proportional hazards analyses were performed. Fifty-two children with Hirschsprung disease (median age, 25 days; range, 2 days-16 years) were included. Nineteen (37%) had admissions for HAEC. Proportional hazards regression showed that HAEC admissions decreased by 30% with each doubling of age at diagnosis (P = .03) and increased 9-fold when postoperative stricture was present (P 5 cm]). No significant difference in the number of HAEC admissions during initial 2 years post-ERPT was seen between groups A (n = 18) and B (n = 18). The study had a power of 0.8 to detect a difference of 1 admission over 2 years. Children diagnosed with Hirschsprung disease at younger ages are at a greater risk for postoperative enterocolitis. Excising a longer margin of ganglionated bowel (>5 cm) does not seem to be beneficial in decreasing HAEC admissions.

  8. Retroperitoneal fibrosis: A rare cause of both ureteral and small bowel obstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Faisal Aziz; Srinivasulu Conjeevaram; Than Phan

    2006-01-01

    Retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF) is a rare condition of unclear etiology. It can cause ureteral obstruction. We present the unique case of a 54 years old female, who initially presented with spontaneous perforation of the cecum. Upon exploring the abdomen, the classical glistening white, unyielding retroperitoneal fibrosis was encountered. A right hemicolectomy was performed.Subsequently, the patient presented with bilateral ureteral obstruction, and later on with small bowel obstruction. Ureteral obstruction was treated with stents,and small bowel obstruction was treated with bypass.To our knowledge no case of idiopathic RPF presenting with features of both bilateral ureteral and small bowel obstruction has been reported in the literature.

  9. Small bowel volvulus in children. Its appearance on the barium enema examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, M.J.; Shackelford, G.D.; McAlister, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    Two children with small bowel volvulus diagnosed on barium enema examination are reported. In one patient the volvulus was associated with malrotation and in the other patient there was a post-operative peritoneal adhesion. In both cases the diagnosis was based on beaking of the head of the barium column at the site of volvulus. Radiographic demonstration of a beak sign in the small bowel on barium enema examination should suggest a diagnosis of small bowel volvulus, and indicates the need for immediate surgery.

  10. Fetal primary small bowel volvulus in a child without intestinal malrotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jae Hee; Lim, Gye-Yeon; We, Ji Sun

    2013-07-01

    Fetal primary small bowel volvulus without atresia or malrotation is an extremely rare but life-threatening surgical emergency. We report a case of primary small bowel volvulus that presented as sudden fetal distress and was diagnosed on the basis of the 'whirl-pool sign' of fetal sonography. This diagnosis led to emergency operation after birth at the third trimester with a good outcome. Although the pathogenesis of fetal primary small bowel volvulus is unclear, ganglion cell immaturity may play a role in the etiology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Goblet Cell Carcinoid Tumor of the Appendix with Small Bowel Obstruction: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Su Yeon; Jang, Kyung Mi; Kim, Min Jeong; Koh, Sung Hye; Jeon, Eui Yong; Min, Kwang Seon; Seo, Jin Won; Park, Hyoung Chul [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    Goblet cell carcinoid tumor of the appendix (GCTA) is a tumor with histological features of both adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumors. The most common clinical presentation of GCTA is acute appendicitis, although small bowel obstruction has been reported as a rare clinical symptom of GCTA. However, to the best of our knowledge, the CT feature of small bowel obstructions in patients with GCTA has not been reported to date. Here, we present a case of small bowel obstruction in a patient with GCTA caused by extensive tumor infiltration at the terminal ileum and distal ileum.

  12. Intestinal intussusception and occlusion caused by small bowel polyps in the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. Management by combined intraoperative enteroscopy and resection through minimal enterostomy: case report Intussuscepção intestinal e oclusão intestinal causada por pólipos em intestino delgado na síndrome Peutz-Jeghers. Tratamento com ressecção por enterotomia associado a enteroscopia intra-operatória: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim J. Gama-Rodrigues

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is a hereditary disease that requires frequent endoscopic and surgical intervention, leading to secondary complications such as short bowel syndrome. CASE REPORT: This paper reports on a 15-year-old male patient with a family history of the disease, who underwent surgery for treatment of an intestinal occlusion due to a small intestine intussusception. DISCUSSION: An intra-operative fiberscopic procedure was included for the detection and treatment of numerous polyps distributed along the small intestine. Enterotomy was performed to treat only the larger polyps, therefore limiting the intestinal resection to smaller segments. The postoperative follow-up was uneventful. CONCLUSION: We point out the importance of conservative treatment for patients with this syndrome, especially those who will undergo repeated surgical interventions because of clinical manifestation while they are still young.A síndrome de Peutz-Jeghers é uma doença de caráter hereditário que freqüentemente requer intervenções endoscópicas e cirúrgicas repetidas, levando a complicações secundárias como, por exemplo, a síndrome do intestino curto. RELATO DE CASO: Relatamos neste artigo o caso de paciente de 15 anos, masculino, com história familiar para a doença, que foi submetido ao procedimento cirúrgico para tratar oclusão devido a intussucepção de intestino delgado. DISCUSSÃO: Associou-se método fibroscópico intra-operatório com a finalidade de detecção e ressecção de numerosos pólipos distribuídos em todo o intestino delgado. Realizaram-se enterotomias para a retirada dos pólipos maiores, restringindo-se, portanto, a ressecção intestinal a segmentos menores. A evolução clínica foi boa. CONCLUSÃO: Ressalta-se a importância do manejo de forma conservadora dos pacientes portadores desta síndrome, principalmente naqueles cujas manifestações clínicas de importância cirúrgica aparecem precocemente.

  13. Dose-volume correlation in radiation-related late small-bowel complication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letschert, J.G.J.; Lebesque, J.V.; Boer, R.W. de; hart, A.A.M.; Barteling, H.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of the volume of irradiated small bowel on late small-bowel tolerance was studied, taking into account the equivalent total dose ant type of pre-irradiation surgical procedure. A method was developed to estimate small-bowel volumes in the high-bowel volumes were measured for three-field and AP-PA pelvic treatments (165 cm 3 and 400 cm 3 , respectively), extended AP-PA treatment of para-aortic and iliac nodes (1000 cm 3 ). In a retrospective study of 111 patientst irradiated after surgery for rectal or recto-sigmoid cancer to a dose of 45-50 Gy in 5 weeks, extended AP-PA pelvic treatment (n = 27) resulted in a high incidence of severe small-bowel complications (37%), whereas for limited (three-field) pelvic treatment (n = 84) the complication rate was 6%. These complication data together with data from the literature on postoperative radiation-related small-bowel complications were analysed using the maximum likelihood method to fit the data to the logistic form of the dose-response relation, taking the volume effect into account by a power law. The analysis indicated that the incidence of radiation-related small-bowel compllications was higher after rectal surgery than after other types of surgery, which might be explained by the development of more adhesions. For both types of surgery a volume exponent of the power-law of 0.26 ± 0.05 was established. This means that if the small-bowel volume is increased by a factor of 2, the total dose has to be reduced by 17% for the same incidence of small-bowel complications. (author). 45 refs.; 6 figs.; 4 tabs

  14. Laparoscopy in small bowel obstruction - current status - review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeliga, Jacek; Jackowski, Marek

    2017-12-01

    Acute small bowel obstruction (SBO) is an urgent medical condition. Its diagnosis is based mainly on a clinical examination followed by confirmatory simple routine radiological examinations such as plain X-ray of the abdominal cavity or computed tomography (CT). However, a real surgical challenge is not a decision whether to perform a surgery, but a decision when and how to perform it. To determine the place of laparoscopy in contemporary management of acute SBO based on the current literature. A review of the literature based on the Medline database and including mainly the period of 2013-2017 was performed. With regard to SBO, laparoscopy is a technique showing its advantages resulting from a minimally invasive approach. However, SBO is still a condition where the use of laparoscopy is limited mainly to selected cases such as SBO caused by single adhesions or foreign bodies. A basic limitation of using this technique is advanced and complicated SBO and lack of sufficient technical skills of the surgeon.

  15. Development and adaptation to resection of infant rat gut

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E. de Vries

    1982-01-01

    textabstractInfants with malrotation of the gut easily develop midgut volvuluse If this volvulus is not treated immediately, ischemic necrosis of the small bowel may develop rapidly. The treatment of these children requires extensive small bowel resection. Infrequently, children are born with

  16. Coffee Enema for Preparation for Small Bowel Video Capsule Endoscopy: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck; Ryu, Ho Sang

    2014-01-01

    Coffee enemas are believed to cause dilatation of bile ducts and excretion of bile through the colon wall. Proponents of coffee enemas claim that the cafestol palmitate in coffee enhances the activity of glutathione S-transferase, an enzyme that stimulates bile excretion. During video capsule endoscopy (VCE), excreted bile is one of the causes of poor preparation of the small bowel. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and effect of coffee enema for preparation of the small bowel during VCE. In this pilot study, 17 of 34 patients were assigned to the coffee enema plus polyethylene glycol (PEG) 2 L ingestion group, whereas the 17 remaining control patients received 2 L of PEG only. The quality of bowel preparation was evaluated in the two patient groups. Bowel preparations in the proximal segments of small bowel were not differ between two groups. In the mid and distal segments of the small intestine, bowel preparations tend to be better in patients who received coffee enemas plus PEG than in patients who received PEG only. The coffee enema group did not experience any complications or side effects. Coffee enemas may be a feasible option, and there were no clinically significant adverse events related to coffee enemas. More prospective randomized studies are warranted to improve small bowel preparation for VCE. PMID:25136541

  17. Bowel resection for severe endometriosis: an Australian series of 177 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Hannah J; Reid, Geoffrey D; Cooper, Michael J W; Tsaltas, Jim; Morgan, Matthew; Woods, Rodney J

    2009-08-01

    Colorectal resection for severe endometriosis has been increasingly described in the literature over the last 20 years. To describe the experiences of three gynaecological surgeons who perform radical surgery for colorectal endometriosis. The records of three surgeons were reviewed. Relevant information was extracted and complied into a database. One hundred and seventy-seven women were identified as having undergone surgery between February 1997 and October 2007. The primary reason for presentation was pain in the majority of women (79%). Eighty-one segmental resections were performed, 71 disc excisions, ten appendicectomies and multiple procedures in ten women. The majority of procedures (81.4%) were performed laparoscopically. Histology confirmed the presence of disease in 98.3% of cases. A further 124 procedures to remove other sites of endometriosis were conducted, along with an additional 44 procedures not primarily for endometriosis. A total of 16 unintended events occurred. Our study adds to the growing body of literature describing colorectal resection for severe endometriosis. Overall, the surgery appeared to be well tolerated, demonstrating the role for this surgery.

  18. Small-bowel obstruction secondary to bezoar impaction: a diagnostic dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Thomas W; Koh, Dean C

    2007-05-01

    Gastrointestinal bezoar (GIB) is uncommon and is reported to occur in 4% of all admissions for small-bowel obstruction (SBO). Because of a lack of diagnostic features, it is often associated with a delay in treatment, with increased morbidity. In this article, we report our experience with managing bezoar-induced SBO and the role of early computed tomography (CT) imaging in establishing the diagnosis. We retrospectively reviewed all cases of bezoar-induced SBO treated in our unit between 1999 and 2005. There were 43 patients, of whom 2 had a recurrence, giving a total of 45 episodes. The frequency of bezoar in our patients presenting with SBO was 4.3%. All patients were of Asian origin: 41 Chinese, 1 Indian, and 1 Malay. Twenty-eight (65%) patients had previous abdominal surgery of which 26 were gastric surgery. Thirty-eight (88%) patients were edentulous. Forty-one (91%) underwent serial abdominal radiography, whereas only 4 patients (9%) had either CT imaging or contrast study alone. Only 11 (24%) cases had a correct diagnosis of bezoar impaction made preoperatively by CT imaging. The diagnostic accuracy of CT imaging in our series was 65%, with six cases of misdiagnosis. Overall, CT led to a change in management of 76% (13 in 17). The median time to surgery from admission was 2 (0-10) days. There were 2 cases of ischemic bowel that necessitated bowel resection. The median length of hospital stay was 11 (5-100) days. Ten patients (22%) had postoperative complications, and there was one death. Bezoar-induced SBO is uncommon and remains a diagnostic and management challenge. It should be suspected in patients with an increased risk of formation of GIB, such as previous gastric surgery, poor dentition, and a suggestive history of increased fibre intake. We advocate that CT imaging be performed early in these at-risk patients and in patients presenting with SBO with or without a history of abdominal surgery in order to reduce unnecessary delays before appropriate

  19. The effect of obesity levels on irradiated small bowel volume in belly board with small bowel displacement device for rectal cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Se Young; Kim, Joo Ho; Park, Hyo Kuk; Cho, Jeong Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    For radiotherapy in rectal cancer patients treated with small bowel displacement device (SBDD) and belly board, We will suggest new indication of using SBDD depending on obesity index by analyzing correlation between obesity and irradiated small bowel volume. In this study, We reviewed 29 rectal cancer patients who received pelvic radiation therapy with belly board and SBDD from January to April in 2012. We only analyzed those patients treated with three-field technique (PA and both LAT) on 45 Gy (1.8 Gy/fx). We measured patients' height, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR) and divided BMI into two groups.(≥23:BMI=group 1, <23:BMI=group 2) We performed a statistical analysis to evaluate correlation between total volume of bladder (TV{sub bldder}), obesity index and high dose volume of small bowel (small bowel volume irradiated at 90% of prescribed dose, HDV{sub sb}), low dose volume of small bowel (small bowel volume irradiated at 33% of prescribed dose, LDV{sub sb}). The result shows, gender, WHR and status of pre operative or post operative do not greatly affect HDV{sub sb} and LDV{sub sb}. Statistical result shows, there are significant correlation between HDV{sub sb} and BMI (p<0.04), HDV{sub sb} and TV{sub bladder} (p<0.01), LDV{sub sb} and TV{sub bladder} (p<0.01). BMI seems to correlate with HDV{sub sb} but does not with LDV{sub sb} (p>0.05). There are negative correlation between HDV{sub sb} and BMI, TV{sub bladder} and HDV{sub sb}, TV{sub bladder} and LDV{sub sb} . Especially, BMI group1 has more effective and negative correlation with HDV{sub sb} (p=0.027) than in BMI group 2. In the case of BMI group 1, TV{sub bladder} has significant negative correlation with HDV{sub sb} and LDV{sub sb} (p<0.04). In conclusions, we confirmed that Using SBDD with belly board in BMI group 1 could more effectively reduce irradiated small bowel volume in radiation therapy for rectal cancer. Therefore, We suggest using belly board with SBDD in order

  20. The effect of obesity levels on irradiated small bowel volume in belly board with small bowel displacement device for rectal cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Se Young; Kim, Joo Ho; Park, Hyo Kuk; Cho, Jeong Hee

    2013-01-01

    For radiotherapy in rectal cancer patients treated with small bowel displacement device (SBDD) and belly board, We will suggest new indication of using SBDD depending on obesity index by analyzing correlation between obesity and irradiated small bowel volume. In this study, We reviewed 29 rectal cancer patients who received pelvic radiation therapy with belly board and SBDD from January to April in 2012. We only analyzed those patients treated with three-field technique (PA and both LAT) on 45 Gy (1.8 Gy/fx). We measured patients' height, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR) and divided BMI into two groups.(≥23:BMI=group 1, <23:BMI=group 2) We performed a statistical analysis to evaluate correlation between total volume of bladder (TV bldder ), obesity index and high dose volume of small bowel (small bowel volume irradiated at 90% of prescribed dose, HDV sb ), low dose volume of small bowel (small bowel volume irradiated at 33% of prescribed dose, LDV sb ). The result shows, gender, WHR and status of pre operative or post operative do not greatly affect HDV sb and LDV sb . Statistical result shows, there are significant correlation between HDV sb and BMI (p<0.04), HDV sb and TV bladder (p<0.01), LDV sb and TV bladder (p<0.01). BMI seems to correlate with HDV sb but does not with LDV sb (p>0.05). There are negative correlation between HDV sb and BMI, TV bladder and HDV sb , TV bladder and LDV sb . Especially, BMI group1 has more effective and negative correlation with HDV sb (p=0.027) than in BMI group 2. In the case of BMI group 1, TV bladder has significant negative correlation with HDV sb and LDV sb (p<0.04). In conclusions, we confirmed that Using SBDD with belly board in BMI group 1 could more effectively reduce irradiated small bowel volume in radiation therapy for rectal cancer. Therefore, We suggest using belly board with SBDD in order to reduce the small bowel toxicity in rectal radiotherapy, if patients' BMI is above 23

  1. Value of cine MRI for better visualization of the proximal small bowel in normal individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torkzad, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Lennart; Vargas, Roberto; Tanaka, Chikako

    2007-01-01

    While enteroclysis seems to be the most efficacious method in achieving bowel distension, enterographic methods have become widespread due to the unpleasantness of enteroclysis and the radiation involved with positioning the catheter. Cine images in MRI can be done without radiation. Our aim is to see if and how cine MR imaging can improve visualization of bowel loops by capturing them while distended. Ten healthy individuals were asked to drink up to 2,000 ml of an oral solution made locally over a 60-min period. Then they underwent MRI using coronal balanced fast field echo (b-FFE) covering small bowel loops. If the initial exam revealed collapsed bowel loops an additional 50 mg of erythromycine was given intravenously with the subject still in the scanner and then cine imaging was performed. The degree of distension of different segments of the small bowel was measured before and after cine imaging and compared. The distension score was significantly higher after addition of the cine images as well, being only significant for depiction of the duodenum and jejunum. Our preliminary study suggests that cine MRI can give better image depiction of the proximal small bowel in healthy volunteers, perhaps circumventing the need for enteroclysis in some cases. There is a need for validation of these results in patients with small bowel disease. (orig.)

  2. Imaging findings of hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the small bowel: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Won; Kim, Kyoung Ah; Jung, Sang Geun [CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Hepatoid adenocarcinoma is a rare extrahepatic tumor defined as having a morphologic and immunohistochemical similarity to hepatocellular carcinoma. In this case report, we describe a patient with hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the jejunum with multiple liver metastases that developed in the absence of risk factors. We describe the radiologic findings including those of dynamic computed tomography and small bowel follow-through. To the best of our knowledge, only two cases of hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the small bowel have been reported in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  3. Enteroclysis and small bowel series: Comparison of radiation dose and examination time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoeni, R.F.; Gould, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    Respective radiation doses and total examination and fluoroscopy times were compared for 50 patients; 25 underwent enteroclysis and 25 underwent small bowel series with (n = 17) and without (n = 8) an examination of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract. For enteroclysis, the mean skin entry radiation dose (12.3 rad [123 mGy]) and mean fluoroscopy time (18.4 minutes) were almost 1 1/2 times greater than those for the small bowel series with examination of the upper GI tract (8.4 rad [84 mGy]; 11.4 minutes) and almost three times greater than those for the small bowel series without upper GI examination (4.6 rad [46 mGy]; 6.3 minutes). However, the mean total examination completion time for enteroclysis (31.2 minutes) was almost half that of the small bowel series without upper GI examination (57.5 minutes) and almost four times shorter than that of the small bowel series with upper GI examination (114 minutes). The higher radiation dose of enteroclysis should be considered along with the short examination time, the age and clinical condition of the patient, and the reported higher accuracy when deciding on the appropriate radiographic examination of the small bowel

  4. Non-emergency small bowel obstruction: assessment of CT findings that predict need for surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshmukh, Swati D.; Shin, David S.; Willmann, Juergen K.; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Shin, Lewis; Jeffrey, R.B. [Stanford University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-05-15

    To identify CT findings predictive of surgical management in non-emergency small bowel obstruction (SBO). Contrast-enhanced abdominal CT of 129 patients with non-emergency SBO were evaluated for small bowel luminal diameter, wall thickness, presence of the small bowel faeces sign (intraluminal particulate matter in a dilated small bowel) and length, transition point, submucosal oedema, mesenteric stranding, ascites and degree of obstruction (low grade partial, high grade partial and complete obstruction). Medical records were reviewed for age, gender, management and history of abdominal surgery, abdominal malignancy, or SBO. Statistical analyses were performed with Stata Release 9.2. Degree of obstruction was the only predictor of need for surgery. Whereas 18.0% of patients with low-grade partial obstruction (n = 50) underwent surgery, 32.5% of patients with high-grade partial obstruction (n = 77) and 100% of patients with complete obstruction (n = 2) required surgery (P = 0.004). The small bowel faeces sign was inversely predictive of surgery (P = 0.018). In non-emergency SBO patients with contrast-enhanced CT imaging, grade of obstruction predicts surgery, while the small bowel faeces sign inversely predicts need for surgery. (orig.)

  5. Detection of high-grade small bowel obstruction on conventional radiography with convolutional neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Phillip M; Tejura, Tapas K; Tran, Khoa N; Whang, Gilbert

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this pilot study is to determine whether a deep convolutional neural network can be trained with limited image data to detect high-grade small bowel obstruction patterns on supine abdominal radiographs. Grayscale images from 3663 clinical supine abdominal radiographs were categorized into obstructive and non-obstructive categories independently by three abdominal radiologists, and the majority classification was used as ground truth; 74 images were found to be consistent with small bowel obstruction. Images were rescaled and randomized, with 2210 images constituting the training set (39 with small bowel obstruction) and 1453 images constituting the test set (35 with small bowel obstruction). Weight parameters for the final classification layer of the Inception v3 convolutional neural network, previously trained on the 2014 Large Scale Visual Recognition Challenge dataset, were retrained on the training set. After training, the neural network achieved an AUC of 0.84 on the test set (95% CI 0.78-0.89). At the maximum Youden index (sensitivity + specificity-1), the sensitivity of the system for small bowel obstruction is 83.8%, with a specificity of 68.1%. The results demonstrate that transfer learning with convolutional neural networks, even with limited training data, may be used to train a detector for high-grade small bowel obstruction gas patterns on supine radiographs.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel in children with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease: evaluation of disease activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Loggitsi, Dimitra; Economopoulos, Nikos; Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Kelekis, Nikolaos L. [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, General University Hospital, Second Department of Radiology, Athens (Greece); Roma, Eleftheria; Panagiotou, Ioanna; Pahoula, Ioanna [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Aghia Sofia Children' s Hospital, First Department of Paediatrics, Athens (Greece)

    2009-08-15

    Examinations using ionizing radiation are frequently used in the evaluation of disease activity in children affected by idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To develop an MR imaging protocol without the need for fluoroscopic insertion of an enteral tube and to assess the disease activity in children with IBD. Included in the study were 37 children (22 girls and 15 boys; age range 7-15 years, mean 11.67 years) with IBD who underwent MR imaging of the small bowel. Of these 37 children, 32 had Crohn disease and 5 had indeterminate colitis. A water solution containing herbal fibres was administered orally or through a nasogastric tube. Patients were imaged on a 1.5-T MR scanner with T1-weighted and {tau}2-weighted sequences followed by a dynamic study using 3-D T1-W images after intravenous administration of gadolinium. The percentage enhancement of the bowel wall was significantly increased in patients with abnormal C-reactive protein (CRP) values compared to patients with CRP values in the normal range (P<0.001). A relatively weak but significant correlation between percentage enhancement of the bowel wall and CRP values was noted during all phases of enhancement. This MR imaging protocol is a safe and well-tolerated method for evaluating disease activity and extraintestinal manifestations of IBD in children. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel in children with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease: evaluation of disease activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Loggitsi, Dimitra; Economopoulos, Nikos; Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Kelekis, Nikolaos L.; Roma, Eleftheria; Panagiotou, Ioanna; Pahoula, Ioanna

    2009-01-01

    Examinations using ionizing radiation are frequently used in the evaluation of disease activity in children affected by idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To develop an MR imaging protocol without the need for fluoroscopic insertion of an enteral tube and to assess the disease activity in children with IBD. Included in the study were 37 children (22 girls and 15 boys; age range 7-15 years, mean 11.67 years) with IBD who underwent MR imaging of the small bowel. Of these 37 children, 32 had Crohn disease and 5 had indeterminate colitis. A water solution containing herbal fibres was administered orally or through a nasogastric tube. Patients were imaged on a 1.5-T MR scanner with T1-weighted and Τ2-weighted sequences followed by a dynamic study using 3-D T1-W images after intravenous administration of gadolinium. The percentage enhancement of the bowel wall was significantly increased in patients with abnormal C-reactive protein (CRP) values compared to patients with CRP values in the normal range (P<0.001). A relatively weak but significant correlation between percentage enhancement of the bowel wall and CRP values was noted during all phases of enhancement. This MR imaging protocol is a safe and well-tolerated method for evaluating disease activity and extraintestinal manifestations of IBD in children. (orig.)

  8. Small bowel obstruction in percutaneous fixation of traumatic pelvic fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of external fixation for the initial treatment of unstable, complex pelvic injuries with hemodynamic instability remains an effective treatment for multiply injured patients. Bowel entrapment within a pelvic fracture is a rarely reported, potentially fatal complication. Here, we report a polytrauma patient with pelvic fractures who developed an intestinal obstruction after an external fixation. At an explorative laparotomy, we found an ileum segment trapped in the sacral fracture. Reported cases of bowel entrapment in pelvic fractures, especially in sacral fractures, are exceedingly rare. The diagnosis is often delayed due to difficulty distinguishing entrapment from the more common adynamic ileus. In conclusion, clinicians and radiologists should be aware of this potentially lethal complication of pelvic fractures treatment. To exclude bowel entrapment, patients with persistent ileus or sepsis should undergo early investigations.

  9. Diagnostic Value of Serial Measurement of C-Reactive Protein in the Detection of a Surgical Complication after Laparoscopic Bowel Resection for Endometriosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riiskjær, Mads; Forman, Axel; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: The study aimed to assess the diagnostic value of serial monitoring of biochemical inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell (WBC) count) in the postoperative diagnosis of anastomotic leakage or ureteral injury after bowel resection for deep infiltrating endometrio......AIMS: The study aimed to assess the diagnostic value of serial monitoring of biochemical inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell (WBC) count) in the postoperative diagnosis of anastomotic leakage or ureteral injury after bowel resection for deep infiltrating...... endometriosis. METHODS: This is a review of prospectively collected data from 217 patients who underwent laparoscopic bowel resection for endometriosis from January 2009 to April 2015. Patients with an anastomotic leakage or ureteral injury were identified and classified. RESULTS: The frequency of anastomotic...... leakage requiring reoperation was 8.3%. The frequency of ureteral injury was 4.6%. Median time to diagnosis was 6 days for anastomotic leakage and 8 days for ureteral injury. The daily mean values of serum CRP were significantly higher in patients with a surgical complication starting at the second...

  10. Graft-versus-host reaction in small-bowel transplantation and possibilities for its circumvention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K; Yagi, T; Iwagaki, H; Kimura, Y; Mitsuoka, N; Inagaki, M; Tanaka, S; Tanaka, N

    2001-01-01

    To study graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR) in small-bowel transplantation and its underlying mechanisms and to find methods for circumventing GVHR, we used an unidirectional GVHR model in which F1 Lewis (LEW) x Wistar King A (WKA) hybrid rats received small-bowel transplants from either LEW or WKA parent rats. The survival time of F1 hybrid rats that received full-length small-bowel transplantation from LEW and WKA was 16.3+/-2.1 days and 18.2+/-3.4 days, respectively. When one-quarter of LEW small bowel was transplanted to an F1 hybrid recipient, the survival time was significantly longer at 44.0+/-23.4 days compared with rats that had received full-length LEW small-bowel transplantation. The survival time of F1 hybrid rats which received an injection of high-dose (5 x 10(8) cells) LEW or WKA spleen cells was 11.9+/-4.0 days and 13.1+/-3.6 days, respectively. However, when an injection containing a low dose (1 x 108 cells) of LEW spleen cells was used, survival was > 100 days, showing significance compared with the survival of rats receiving the higher dose LEW spleen-cell injection. Both small-bowel transplantation and spleen-cell injection were compared for the effective period of recipient resistance to donor cell or small-bowel transplantation as second challenge. When the F1 rats given a quarter LEW small-bowel transplant as first challenge were treated with a high-dose of spleen cells 30 days after transplantation, they survived for > 30 days without GVHR. F1 rats that were treated with a low-dose LEW spleen-cell injection, followed 30 days later by full LEW small-bowel transplantation, had a survival time of > 100 days. These results indicate that segmental small-bowel transplantation and spleen-cell injection as first challenge may facilitate the prevention of GVHR, resulting in resistance to subsequent immunological challenge.

  11. The value of MR enteroclysis with air infusion in the diagnosis of small bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shizheng; Ren Xiaojun; Zhang Qiaowei

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of MR enteroclysis with air infusion in the diagnosis of small bowel disease. Methods: Sixteen patients with suspected small bowel disease, but without acute inflammatory disease or bowel obstruction, received MR enteroclysis with air infusion. There were 12 males and 4 females, and their age ranged from 17 to 75 years. 10 patients had abdominal pain, 4 with melena or blood stool, and 2 with diarrhea. The longest course was 7 years, and the shortest 1 week. Before MR imaging, a nasoenteric catheter was inserted into the distal part of duodenum, and about 1000 ml of air was infused through the tube to distend the small bowel. 20 mg of IV anisodamine was given to reduce small-bowel peristalsis. All patients were imaged with fat-saturated Gd-DTPA enhanced coronal and axial T 1 -weighted spin-echo (SE) sequence and fast spoiled gradient echo (FSPGR) sequence. Comparison between the diagnosis of MRI and the results of surgery, pathology or clinic was performed to assess the sensitivity and specificity of MRI. Results: 5 cases were normal, 6 with Crohn disease, 2 with gastric intestinal stromal tumor (GIST), and 1 each of lymphoma, tuberculosis and irritable bowel syndrome. The lumen of normal small bowel in MR enteroclysis was no signal, the wall was outlined as middle signal by intraluminal air and surrounding air-distended bowel and was between 1-3 mm thick, and the diameter of the lumen was between 17-28 mm. Crohn disease showed segmental mural thickening, increased enhancement, luminal stricture, and even extraluminal inflammatory mass or fistula. Intestinal tuberculosis invaded the distal section of ileum, cecum, and the proximal ascending colon, the wall thickened and enhanced apparently, and cecum and proximal ascending colon shortened. GIST showed a mass that was iso-signal on T 1 WI, high signal on T 2 WI, and enhanced significantly after IV Gd-DTPA. 1 recurrent lymphoma of ileum showed mural thickening and increased

  12. Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel: Comparison of Different Oral Contrast Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbach, P.; Breitwieser, C.; Diederichs, G.; Eisele, S.; Kivelitz, D.; Taupitz, M.; Zeitz, M.; Hamm, B.; Klessen, C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate several substances regarding small bowel distension and contrast on balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) cine magnetic resonance (MR) images. Material and Methods: Luminal contrast was evaluated in 24 volunteers after oral application of two different contrast agent groups leading to either bright lumen (pineapple, blueberry juice) or dark lumen (tap water, orange juice) on T1-weighted images. Bowel distension was evaluated in 30 patients ingesting either methylcellulose or mannitol solution for limiting intestinal absorption. Fifteen patients with duodeno-jejunal intubation served as the control. Quantitative evaluation included measurement of luminal signal intensities and diameters of four bowel segments, qualitative evaluation assessed luminal contrast and distension on a five-point scale. Results: Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the four contrast agents revealed no significant differences regarding luminal contrast on bSSFP images. Quantitative evaluation revealed significantly lower (P<0.05) small bowel distension for three out of four segments (qualitative evaluation: two out of four segments) for methylcellulose in comparison to the control. Mannitol was found to be equal to the control. Conclusion: Oral ingestion of tap water or orange juice in combination with mannitol is recommended for cine MR imaging of the small bowel regarding luminal contrast and small bowel distension on bSSFP sequences

  13. Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel: Comparison of Different Oral Contrast Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asbach, P.; Breitwieser, C.; Diederichs, G.; Eisele, S.; Kivelitz, D.; Taupitz, M.; Zeitz, M.; Hamm, B.; Klessen, C. [Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Charite Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate several substances regarding small bowel distension and contrast on balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) cine magnetic resonance (MR) images. Material and Methods: Luminal contrast was evaluated in 24 volunteers after oral application of two different contrast agent groups leading to either bright lumen (pineapple, blueberry juice) or dark lumen (tap water, orange juice) on T1-weighted images. Bowel distension was evaluated in 30 patients ingesting either methylcellulose or mannitol solution for limiting intestinal absorption. Fifteen patients with duodeno-jejunal intubation served as the control. Quantitative evaluation included measurement of luminal signal intensities and diameters of four bowel segments, qualitative evaluation assessed luminal contrast and distension on a five-point scale. Results: Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the four contrast agents revealed no significant differences regarding luminal contrast on bSSFP images. Quantitative evaluation revealed significantly lower (P<0.05) small bowel distension for three out of four segments (qualitative evaluation: two out of four segments) for methylcellulose in comparison to the control. Mannitol was found to be equal to the control. Conclusion: Oral ingestion of tap water or orange juice in combination with mannitol is recommended for cine MR imaging of the small bowel regarding luminal contrast and small bowel distension on bSSFP sequences.

  14. CT findings of primary undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma in the small bowel: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Youe Ree; Lee, Young Hwan; Yoon, Kwon Ha; Yun, Ki Jung [Wonkwang University School of Medicine and Hospital, Institute of Wonkwang Medical Science, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS), previously known as malignant fibrous histiocytoma, is a soft tissue sarcoma arising from mesenchymal tissue of the body. UPS of the gastrointestinal tract is known to be rare and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Based on our case and review of the other relevant literature, the CT findings of primary UPS of the small bowel included nodular bowel wall thickening with homogeneous enhancement. It presents as a rapidly growing tumor without bowel obstruction, and it may be accompanied by distant metastasis.

  15. Fecal impaction: a cause of isolated small bowel dilatation on abdominal radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torigian, Drew A.; Levine, Marc S.; Rubesin, Stephen E.; Laufer, Igor

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency of isolated small bowel dilatation on abdominal radiographs in patients with colonic fecal impaction and also to elucidate the cause of this finding. Methods: A computerized search of radiology files revealed 515 patients with colonic fecal impaction on abdominal radiographs. The radiologic reports described isolated small bowel dilatation not related to other known causes of ileus or obstruction in 18 (3.5%) of the 515 patients. The films were reviewed to determine the distribution of fecal impaction and the degree and extent of small bowel dilatation. In 16 cases, medical records were reviewed to determine the clinical presentation, treatment, and course. Finally, follow-up radiographs were reviewed in four cases to determine the response to treatment of the impaction. Results: All 16 patients with available medical records had abdominal symptoms. The average diameter of the dilated small bowel on abdominal radiographs was 3.7 cm. Fourteen patients (78%) had a diffuse colonic fecal impaction (nine) or a predominantly right-sided fecal impaction (five) that involved the cecum, and the remaining four (22%) had a left-sided colonic fecal impaction. All 12 patients with clinical follow-up had resolution of symptoms and all four with follow-up radiographs had resolution of small bowel dilatation after treatment of the underlying impaction. Conclusion: Fecal impaction should be considered in the differential diagnosis of small bowel dilatation on abdominal radiographs, as treatment of the underlying impaction usually produces a dramatic clinical response with resolution of the small bowel dilatation on follow-up radiographs

  16. Strangulated small bowel gangrene due to torsioned gangrenous appendix in an old man: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardavan Shahbazi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Torsion of the appendix is a rare entity and divided into two categories: primary and secondary. The primary mode is due to an abnormality in either appendix anatomy or its meso or both and is more common in children. The secondary forms happen in adults which can be associated with appendiceal tumor, appendiceal mucocele, fecal impaction, volvulus of ovarian cyctadenoma. Adynamic small bowel obstruction or ileus is seen frequently with all forms of peritoneal inflammation. However, Anatomical small intestinal obstruction or gangrene due to torsioned appendix is a rare condition and few cases reported in the literature. Method: Here we have a 83-year-old man patient with small bowel obstruction and localized right lower quadrant peritonitis who undergo emergency laparotomy to eliminate small bowel obstruction and peritonitis. Preoperative abdominal radiography showed multiple dilated small bowel loops with empty colon. Results: During exploration necrosis of the terminal 40cm of the ileum due to a twisted and gangrenous appendix was discovered. Other parts were normal. Conclusion: it may be useful to recommend early midline exploratory laparotomy for patients with small bowel obstruction even in the presence symptoms of local appendicitis. This operation can be both diagnostic and therapeutic.

  17. Interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, and expression of human leukocyte antigen-DR on peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients after laparoscopic vs. conventional bowel resection - A randomized study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunker, M. S.; ten Hove, T.; Bemelman, W. A.; Slors, J. F. M.; Gouma, D. J.; van Deventer, S. J. H.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of surgical trauma in terms of approach (laparoscopic vs. conventional surgery) and extent of bowel resection (ileocolic resection vs. colectomy) on interleukin-6 level, C-reactive protein level, and expression of human leukocyte antigen-DR

  18. Spectrum of imaging findings on MDCT enterography in patients with small bowel tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalra, N.; Agrawal, P.; Mittal, V.; Kochhar, R.; Gupta, V.; Nada, R.; Singh, R.; Khandelwal, N.

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal tuberculosis (TB) is the sixth most common extrapulmonary site of involvement. The sites of involvement in abdominal tuberculosis, in descending order of frequency, are lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity, and gastrointestinal tract. The radiological armamentarium for evaluating tuberculosis of the small bowel (SBTB) includes barium studies (small bowel follow-through, SBFT), CT (multidetector CT, CT enterography, and CT enteroclysis), ultrasound (sonoenteroclysis), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; enterography and enteroclysis). In this review, we illustrate the abnormalities at MDCT enterography in 20 consecutive patients with SB TB and also describe extraluminal findings in these patients. MDCT enterography allows non-invasive good-quality assessment of well-distended bowel loops and the adjacent soft tissues. It displays the thickness and enhancement of the entire bowel wall in all three planes and allows examination of all bowel loops, especially the ileal loops, which are mostly superimposed. The terminal ileum and ileocaecal junction are the most common sites of small bowel involvement in intestinal TB. The most common abnormality is short-segment strictures with symmetrical concentric mural thickening and homogeneous mural enhancement. Other findings include lymphadenopathy, ascites, enteroliths, peritoneal thickening, and enhancement. In conclusion, MDCT enterography is a comprehensive technique for the evaluation of SB TB

  19. Mechanical small bowel obstruction in children at a tertiary care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The operative procedures performed included enterotomy in 37 (29.3%), milking of worms in 18 (14.2%), resection anastomosis in 31 (24.6%) and adhesiolysis in 13 (10.3%). Appendicular perforation was seen in 4 (1.9%) and worm in gall bladder in 1 (0.5%) patients. Surgical complications were wound infection in 18 ...

  20. Complete small bowel obstruction secondary to transomental herniation in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Katawala, Tasneem; Hamlyn, E.L.

    2011-01-01

    During pregnancy, abdominal pain can be caused by both obstetric and non-obstetric causes. Non-obstetric causes of severe abdominal pain during pregnancy must always be considered. Complete bowel obstruction caused by an internal hernia is rare in obstetric surgical patients. Delays in diagnosis can occur due to non-specific signs and symptoms which can be present in normal pregnancy, and a reluctance to operate on the pregnant patient. Prompt diagnosis and early surgical intervention is the ...

  1. A simple technique to reduce small bowel toxicity when irradiating the periaortic area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, J.C.; Fine, B.; Herman, T.S.; Rothenberg, M.; Nicol, N.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Patients receiving periaortic radiation are normally treated in the supine position. We decided to evaluate whether positioning the patient prone on a modified 'belly-board' can reduce the volume of small bowel within the lateral fields in patients receiving four field periaortic radiation. Materials and Methods: Sixteen consecutive women with gynecologic primaries underwent simulation of the periaortic area using a four-field set up (AP, PA, Lats). The fields extended from the top of the L1 vertebral body to the bottom of L5 and had a mean length of 16.2 cm. The AP and PA fields had a width of 8 cm (centered on the midline of the vertebral bodies) while the right and left lateral fields had a width of 4 cm (2 cm anterior and 2 cm posterior to the anterior margin of the vertebral bodies) and did not include the spinal cord. Following oral ingestion of small bowel contrast, simulation films were obtained in the supine position and in the prone position on a modified 'belly-board' (with the pelvic opening extended superiorly to the superior abdomen). It was hypothesized that the prone position on a modified 'belly-board' would allow the abdominal small bowel to fall by gravity away from the periaortic area. We measured the volume of small bowel irradiated through the lateral fields for both the supine and prone-in-belly-board positions using the method described by Gallagher et al. Results: The volume of small bowel included within the lateral fields in the supine position ranged from 164 to 359.5 cc 3 (mean 285 cc 3 ) while placement in the prone-in-bellyboard position reduced the volume of small bowel within the lateral fields to a range of 35-152 cc 3 (mean 86 cc 3 ), an overall reduction of approximately 70% in the volume of small bowel included within lateral fields. Conclusion: The use of lateral fields in the prone-in-bellyboard position allows for significant small bowel sparing through the lateral component of a four-field periaortic set

  2. Wedge resection and segmentectomy in patients with stage I non-small cell lung carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Reveliotis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of sublobar resections as definitive management in stage I non-small cell lung carcinoma is a controversial topic in the medical community. We intend to report the latest developments and trends in relative indications for each of the above-mentioned surgical approaches for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung carcinoma as well as the results of studies regarding local recurrence, disease-free survival and five-year survival rates. We reviewed 45 prospective and retrospective studies conducted over the last 25 years listed in the Pubmed and Scopus electronic databases. Trials were identified through bibliographies and a manual search in journals. Authors, citations, objectives and results were extracted. No meta-analysis was performed. Validation of results was discussed. Segmentectomies are superior to wedge resections in terms of local recurrences and cancer-related mortality rates. Sublobar resections are superior to lobectomy in preserving the pulmonary parenchyma. High-risk patients should undergo segmentectomy, whereas lobectomies are superior to segmentectomies only for tumors >2 cm (T2bN0M0 in terms of disease-free and overall 5-year survival. In most studies no significant differences were found in tumors <2 cm. Disease-free surgical margins are crucial to prevent local recurrences. Systematic lymphadenectomy is mandatory regardless of the type of resection used. In sublobar resections with less thorough nodal dissections, adjuvant radiotherapy can be used. This approach is preferable in case of prior resection. In pure bronchoalveolar carcinoma, segmentectomy is recommended. Sublobar resections are associated with a shorter hospital stay. The selection of the type of resection in T1aN0M0 tumors should depend on characteristic of the patient and the tumor. Patient age, cardiopulmonary reserve and tumor size are the most important factors to be considered. However further prospective randomized trials are needed to

  3. X-ray findings of small bowel taeniasis: A clinical and experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hong Soo; Kang, Hee Woong; Bahk, Yong Whee [St Mary' s Hospital Catholic Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1972-12-15

    Unlike ascariasis of the small bowel, taeniasis can be detected radiologically with much difficulty because of the basic difference between the morphological features of each helminth. However once the characteristics of tape worms are appreciated and kept in mind, radiological diagnosis is fairly accurately made. In the present study we have reported typical radiological features of the small bowel taeniasis as observed in 6 adults patients seen at the Department of Radiology of St. Mary's Hospital and Holy Family Hospital, Catholic Medical College. Tapering tape-like or ribbon -like radiolucent shadows in distal small bowel appear unique. Compression spot film study of the ileum is most important in revealing such findings. An animal experiment using the swine small intestine and parasitological specimen of evacuated worm of taenia saginata was designed to help understand radiological manifestation in vivo.

  4. X-ray findings of small bowel taeniasis: A clinical and experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hong Soo; Kang, Hee Woong; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1972-01-01

    Unlike ascariasis of the small bowel, taeniasis can be detected radiologically with much difficulty because of the basic difference between the morphological features of each helminth. However once the characteristics of tape worms are appreciated and kept in mind, radiological diagnosis is fairly accurately made. In the present study we have reported typical radiological features of the small bowel taeniasis as observed in 6 adults patients seen at the Department of Radiology of St. Mary's Hospital and Holy Family Hospital, Catholic Medical College. Tapering tape-like or ribbon -like radiolucent shadows in distal small bowel appear unique. Compression spot film study of the ileum is most important in revealing such findings. An animal experiment using the swine small intestine and parasitological specimen of evacuated worm of taenia saginata was designed to help understand radiological manifestation in vivo

  5. Surgical resection versus radiofrequency ablation in treatment of small hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Xiuting

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo compare clinical efficacy and recurrence between surgical resection and radiofrequency ablation (RFA in the treatment of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. MethodsThe clinical data of 97 patients with small HCC, who underwent surgical resection or RFA as the initial treatment in The First Hospital of Jilin University from January 2002 to December 2008, were collected. Sixty-three cases, who survived 2 years after treatment, were followed up; of the 63 cases, 34 underwent surgical resection, and 29 underwent RFA. The recurrence of these patients was analyzed retrospectively. The measurement data were analyzed by chi-square test. The Cox regression analysis was used for determining the risk factors for recurrence. The log-rank test was used for disease-free survival (DFS difference analysis. ResultsThe 3-month, 1-year, and 2-year intrahepatic recurrence rates for the patients who underwent surgical resection were 15%, 38%, and 64%, respectively, versus 21%, 35%, and 45% for those who underwent RFA, without significant differences between the two groups of patients. The intrahepatic recurrence after initial treatment was not significantly associated with treatment method, sex, age, Child-Pugh grade, tumor size, number of nodules, presence of cirrhosis, and alpha-fetoprotein level. There was no significant difference in DFS between the two groups of patients. ConclusionRFA produces a comparable outcome to that by surgical resection in the treatment of small HCC. RFA holds promise as a substitute for surgical resection.

  6. Reduction of acute rejection by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells during rat small bowel transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yang

    Full Text Available Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs have shown immunosuppressive activity in transplantation. This study was designed to determine whether BMMSCs could improve outcomes of small bowel transplantation in rats.Heterotopic small bowel transplantation was performed from Brown Norway to Lewis rats, followed by infusion of BMMSCs through the superficial dorsal veins of the penis. Controls included rats infused with normal saline (allogeneic control, isogeneically transplanted rats (BN-BN and nontransplanted animals. The animals were sacrificed after 1, 5, 7 or 10 days. Small bowel histology and apoptosis, cytokine concentrations in serum and intestinal grafts, and numbers of T regulatory (Treg cells were assessed at each time point.Acute cellular rejection occurred soon after transplantation and became aggravated over time in the allogeneic control rats, with increase in apoptosis, inflammatory response, and T helper (Th1/Th2 and Th17/Treg-related cytokines. BMMSCs significantly attenuated acute cellular rejection, reduced apoptosis and suppressed the concentrations of interleukin (IL-2, IL-6, IL-17, IL-23, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, and interferon (IFN-γ while upregulating IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF-β expression and increasing Treg levels.BMMSCs improve the outcomes of allogeneic small bowel transplantation by attenuating the inflammatory response and acute cellular rejection. Treatment with BMMSCs may overcome acute cellular rejection in small bowel transplantation.

  7. Auxiliary en-bloc liver-small bowel transplantation with partial pancreas preservation in pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Yu Yin; Xiao-Dong Ni; Feng Jiang; Ning Li; You-Sheng Li; Xiao-Ming Wang; Jie-Shou Li

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to describe an auxiliary combined liver-small bowel transplantation model with the preservation of duodenum, head of pancreas and hepatic biliary system in pigs. The technique, feasibility, security and immunosuppression were commented.METHODS: Forty outbred long-white pigs were randomized into two groups, and the auxiliary composite liver/small bowel allotransplantations were undertaken in 10 long-white pigs in each group with the recipient liver preserved.Group A was not treated with immunosuppressive drugs while group B was treated with cyclosporine A and methylprednisolone after operation. The hemodynamic changes and amylase of body fluid (including blood, urine and abdominal drain) were analyzed.RESULTS: The average survival time of the animals was 10±1.929 d (6 to 25 d) in group A while more than 30 d in group B. The pigs could tolerate the hemodynamic fluctuation during operation and the hemodynamic parameters recovered to normal 2 h after blood reperfusion. The transient high amylase level was decreased to normal one week after operation and autopsy showed no pancreatitis.CONCLUSION: Auxiliary en-bloc liver-small bowel transplantation with partial pancreas preservation is a feasible and safe model with simplified surgical techniques for composite liver/small bowel transplantation. This model may be used as a preclinical training model for clinical transplantation method, clinical liver-small bowel transplantation related complication research, basic research including immunosuppressive treatment, organ preservation, acute rejection, chronic rejection, immuno-tolerance and xenotransplantation.

  8. CT findings in acute small bowel diverticulitis; Computertomographie bei akuter Duenndarmdivertikulitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferstl, F.J.; Obert, R. [Radiologisch-Nuklearmedizinisches Zentrum (RNZ) am St. Theresienkrankenhaus Nuernberg (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    Small bowel diverticulitis is a rare cause of an acute abdomen. Originating from acquired diverticula of the jejunum, less often of the ileum, or Meckel diverticulum, the symptoms are non-specific, simulating other acute inflammatory disorders, such as appendicitis, cholecystitis or colonic diverticulitis. The diagnosis of small bowel diverticulitis is solely based on radiologic findings, with computed tomography (CT) regarded as the method of choice. In recent years, a number of case reports have described the spectrum of the CT features in acute small bowel diverticulitis and its dependence on the severity of the inflammatory process. Typical findings are an inflamed diverticulum, inflammatory mesenteric infiltration, extraluminal gas collection and mural edema of adjacent small bowel loops with resultant separation of bowel loops. An enterolith is rarely found in an inflamed diverticulum. Complications include abscesses, fistulae, small bowel obstruction and free perforation with peritonitis. Small bowel diverticulitis can be a diagnostic problem if it involves the terminal ileum or Meckel's diverticulum. For preoperative confirmation of the presumed diagnosis of small bowel diverticulitis on CT, an enteroclysis for acquired diverticula or a technetium scan for Meckel's diverticulum should be performed. We present the CT findings in three patients of acute small bowel diverticulitis, two affecting the jejunum and one a Meckel's diverticulum. (orig.) [German] Die akute Duenndarmdivertikulitis ist eine seltene Ursache eines akuten Abdomens. Ausgehend von den erworbenen Divertikeln des Jejunums, seltener des Ileums, oder von einem Meckel-Divertikel, manifestiert sich die Divertikulitis klinisch durch eine unspezifische Symptomatik, die zuerst an die haeufigeren, akutentzuendlichen Erkrankungen des Abdomens wie z. B. Appendizitis, Cholezystitis oder Kolondivertikulitis denken laesst. Die Duenndarmdivertikulitis kann praeoperativ nur durch

  9. Late small bowel toxicity after aggressive abdominopelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Ling, BA

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: It may be possible with IMRT to deliver high doses to small volumes of small bowel with low rates of significant long-term complications. Further studies should explore tolerable dose-volume relationships in cases in which aggressive abdominal or pelvic treatment may be warranted to treat the underlying malignancy.

  10. Prenatal magnetic resonance and ultrasonographic findings in small-bowel obstruction: imaging clues and postnatal outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio, Eva I.; Blask, Anna R.; Bulas, Dorothy I. [Children' s National Medical System, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Badillo, Andrea T. [Children' s National Medical System, Division of General and Thoracic Surgery, Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Prenatal small-bowel obstruction can result from single or multiple atresias, and it can be an isolated abnormality or part of a syndrome. It is sometimes the first manifestation of cystic fibrosis. Accurate prediction of the level of obstruction and length of bowel affected can be difficult, presenting a challenge for counseling families and planning perinatal management. To review the prenatal US and MRI findings of small-bowel obstruction and to assess whether fetal MRI adds information that could improve prenatal counseling and perinatal management. We retrospectively reviewed 12 prenatally diagnosed cases of small-bowel obstruction evaluated by both US and MRI from 2005 to 2015. We analyzed gestational age at evaluation, US and MRI findings, gestational age at delivery and postnatal outcomes. The final diagnoses were jejunal atresia (7), ileal atresia (1), cystic fibrosis (3) and combined jejunal and anal atresia (1). Four of the eight with jejunal atresia were found to have multiple small-bowel atresias. Prenatal perforation was noted in three. We identified a trend of increasing complexity of bowel contents corresponding to progressively distal level of obstruction, as indicated by increasing US echogenicity and high T1 signal on MRI. Seven cases of jejunal atresia and one case of ileal atresia demonstrated small ascending, transverse and descending colon (microcolon) with filling of a normal-diameter rectum. In contrast, all three fetuses with cystic fibrosis and the fetus with jejunal-anal atresia demonstrated microcolon as well as abnormal paucity or absence of rectal meconium. Polyhydramnios was present in nine. Eight were delivered prematurely, of whom seven had polyhydramnios. The fetus with jejunal and anal atresia died in utero. Postnatally, three had short gut syndrome, all resulting from multiple jejunal atresias; these three were among a subset of four fetuses whose bowel diameter measured more than 3 cm. Eight infants had no further

  11. Prenatal magnetic resonance and ultrasonographic findings in small-bowel obstruction: imaging clues and postnatal outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio, Eva I.; Blask, Anna R.; Bulas, Dorothy I.; Badillo, Andrea T.

    2017-01-01

    Prenatal small-bowel obstruction can result from single or multiple atresias, and it can be an isolated abnormality or part of a syndrome. It is sometimes the first manifestation of cystic fibrosis. Accurate prediction of the level of obstruction and length of bowel affected can be difficult, presenting a challenge for counseling families and planning perinatal management. To review the prenatal US and MRI findings of small-bowel obstruction and to assess whether fetal MRI adds information that could improve prenatal counseling and perinatal management. We retrospectively reviewed 12 prenatally diagnosed cases of small-bowel obstruction evaluated by both US and MRI from 2005 to 2015. We analyzed gestational age at evaluation, US and MRI findings, gestational age at delivery and postnatal outcomes. The final diagnoses were jejunal atresia (7), ileal atresia (1), cystic fibrosis (3) and combined jejunal and anal atresia (1). Four of the eight with jejunal atresia were found to have multiple small-bowel atresias. Prenatal perforation was noted in three. We identified a trend of increasing complexity of bowel contents corresponding to progressively distal level of obstruction, as indicated by increasing US echogenicity and high T1 signal on MRI. Seven cases of jejunal atresia and one case of ileal atresia demonstrated small ascending, transverse and descending colon (microcolon) with filling of a normal-diameter rectum. In contrast, all three fetuses with cystic fibrosis and the fetus with jejunal-anal atresia demonstrated microcolon as well as abnormal paucity or absence of rectal meconium. Polyhydramnios was present in nine. Eight were delivered prematurely, of whom seven had polyhydramnios. The fetus with jejunal and anal atresia died in utero. Postnatally, three had short gut syndrome, all resulting from multiple jejunal atresias; these three were among a subset of four fetuses whose bowel diameter measured more than 3 cm. Eight infants had no further

  12. A combination of small bowel imaging methods: conventional enteroclysis with complementary magnetic resonance enteroclysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akman, C. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Korman, U. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: ugurk9@istanbul.edu.tr; Oguet, G. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Kurugoglu, S. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Urger, E. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Ulus, S. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Esen, G. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Tasci, I. [Department of Surgery, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2005-07-01

    AIM: The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the overall findings of conventional enteroclysis (CE) with complementary magnetic resonance enteroclysis (MRE) in small bowel disease. METHODS: The study included 32 patients referred from various clinical departments, with known or suspected small bowel disease and abnormalities on CE. Immediately after CE, true fast imaging with steady-state precession (true FISP), and unenhanced and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequences with fat saturation were obtained. Mucosal, mural and luminal changes of the small bowel were evaluated by each technique. In addition, bowel wall thickening, bowel wall enhancement and perienteric changes were assessed by MRE. The radiological findings obtained were evaluated together as a combination, and the role of MRE in the determination of the activity and complications of the small bowel disease was assessed. Radiological findings were correlated with clinical evaluation and follow-up in all cases, including endoscopy in 14 cases and surgery in 5 cases. RESULTS: MRE provided important supplementary mural and extramural information, including degree of pathological wall thickness, mural enhancement pattern associated with disease activity, perivisceral collection, abscess formation, mesenteric fibrofatty proliferation, lymphadenopathy and increase in perienteric vascularity. Short strictures were not revealed on MRE; however, for patients with a history of abdominal malignancy, MRE helped characterize the level of any obstruction and the extent of the disease. CONCLUSION: We recommend MRE for patients who have findings of advanced inflammatory bowel disease or neoplasm on CE examination. The combination of these two techniques can provide important information on the degree and extent of the disorder.

  13. Wireless capsule endoscopy of the small bowel: development, testing, and first human trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Paul; Iddan, Gavriel J.; Meron, Gavriel; Glukhovsky, Arkady

    2001-01-01

    Small bowel endoscopy with existing endoscopes is limited by problems of discomfort and the technical difficulty of advancing far into the small-bowel. Our aim has been to develop and test wireless capsule endoscopy. Wireless endoscopes, in the form of capsules (11 x 33 mm), were constructed by Given Imaging. These were powered by silver oxide batteries and each contained a CMOS imaging chip and miniature processor, white light emitting diodes (LEDs), a short focal length lens, and a miniature transmitter and antenna. Two video frames per second were transmitted, using radio-frequency (approx. 410 MHz), to an array of aerials attached to the body. The array of aerials can also be used to calculate the position of the capsule in the body. The images were stored on a portable recorder carried on a belt and subsequently downloaded for analysis. The batteries allow more than 5 hours of recording, although the capsule generally passes through the whole small bowel in under two hours. Clear video images of the human bowel were recorded from the pylorus to the caecum. Wireless endoscopy, for the first time, allows painless optical imaging of the whole of the small bowel.

  14. Infantile Short Bowel Syndrome: short and long term evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F. Olieman (Joanne)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractInfantile short bowel syndrome is a condition which is characterized by malabsorption of nutrients, as a result of congenital intestinal shortening or massive small bowel resection. Survival rates have improved over the years, but morbidity remains high and clinical management of these

  15. Diagnostic and therapeutic value of laparoscopy for small bowel blunt injuries: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addeo, Pietro; Calabrese, Daniela Paola

    2011-01-01

    Small bowel injuries after blunt abdominal trauma represent both a diagnostic and a therapeutic challenge. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment are necessary in order to avoid a dangerous diagnostic delay. Laparoscopy can represent a diagnostic and therapeutic tool in patients with uncertain clinical symptoms. We report the case of a 25-year-old man, haemodynamically stable, admitted for acute abdominal pain a few hours after a physical assault. Giving the persistence of the abdominal pain and the presence of free fluids at the computed tomography examination, an exploratory laparoscopy was performed. At the laparoscopic exploration, an isolated small bowel perforation was found, 60 cm distal from the ligament of Treitz. The injury was repaired by laparoscopic suturing and the patient was discharged home at postoperative day 3 after an uneventful postoperative course. Laparoscopy represents a valuable tool for patients with small bowel blunt injuries allowing a timely diagnosis and a prompt treatment.

  16. Adhesive small bowel obstruction due to pelvic inflammatory disease: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razan A Al-Ghassab

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of a 32-year-old woman with adhesive small bowel obstruction due to pelvic inflammatory disease. She had no history of abdominal surgery, gynecological complaints or constitutional symptoms of chronic illness. The diagnosis was based on the laparoscopic findings of small bowel adhesions, free peritoneal fluid, “violin string” adhesions of Fitz-Hugh–Curtis syndrome and left hydrosalpinx. Laparoscopic adhesiolysis was performed successfully, and the patient had an uneventful postoperative course. The authors conclude that pelvic inflammatory disease should be included as a cause of adhesive small bowel obstruction in sexually active young women with no history of abdominal surgery or constitutional symptoms of chronic disease. When performed by experienced surgeons, laparoscopy in such patients is feasible and safe.

  17. Small bowel obstruction secondary to migration of a fragment of lithobezoar: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Medani, Mekki

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Small bowel obstruction is a common world-wide condition that has a range of etiological factors. The management is largely dependent on the cause of the obstruction. Small bowel obstruction caused by foreign body ingestion is rare; many items have been reported as responsible, but there are no reports implicating polyurethane foam. CASE PRESENTATION: We report the case of a 44-year-old Irish male who presented following ingestion of polyurethane foam. He was asymptomatic on presentation but developed a small bowel obstruction shortly thereafter. CONCLUSION: Patients presenting following ingestion of polyurethane foam should be scheduled for elective laparotomy, gastrotomy, and retrieval of the cast on the next available theatre list - given that they are suitable for surgery.

  18. Prenatal Diagnosis of a Segmental Small Bowel Volvulus with Threatened Premature Labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Monard

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal primary small bowel volvulus is extremely rare but represents a serious life-threatening condition needing emergency neonatal surgical management to avoid severe digestive consequences. We report a case of primary small bowel volvulus with meconium peritonitis prenatally diagnosed at 27 weeks and 4 days of gestation during threatened premature labor with reduced fetal movements. Ultrasound showed a small bowel mildly dilated with thickened and hyperechogenic intestinal wall, with a typical whirlpool configuration. Normal fetal development allowed continuation of pregnancy with ultrasound follow-up. Induction of labor was decided at 37 weeks and 2 days of gestation because of a significant aggravation of intestinal dilatation appearing more extensive with peritoneal calcifications leading to the suspicion of meconium peritonitis, associated with reduced fetal movements and reduced fetal heart rate variability, for neonatal surgical management with a good outcome.

  19. Prenatal Diagnosis of a Segmental Small Bowel Volvulus with Threatened Premature Labor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottet, Nicolas; Ramanah, Rajeev; Riethmuller, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Fetal primary small bowel volvulus is extremely rare but represents a serious life-threatening condition needing emergency neonatal surgical management to avoid severe digestive consequences. We report a case of primary small bowel volvulus with meconium peritonitis prenatally diagnosed at 27 weeks and 4 days of gestation during threatened premature labor with reduced fetal movements. Ultrasound showed a small bowel mildly dilated with thickened and hyperechogenic intestinal wall, with a typical whirlpool configuration. Normal fetal development allowed continuation of pregnancy with ultrasound follow-up. Induction of labor was decided at 37 weeks and 2 days of gestation because of a significant aggravation of intestinal dilatation appearing more extensive with peritoneal calcifications leading to the suspicion of meconium peritonitis, associated with reduced fetal movements and reduced fetal heart rate variability, for neonatal surgical management with a good outcome. PMID:29230337

  20. Ultrasound of the Small Bowel in Crohn’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Calabrese

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several radiological and endoscopic techniques are now available for the study of inflammatory bowel diseases. In everyday practice, the choice of the technique to be used depends upon its availability and a careful evaluation of diagnostic accuracy, clinical usefulness, safety, and cost. The recent development of innovative and noninvasive imaging techniques has led to a new and exciting area in the exploration of the gastrointestinal tract, especially in Crohn’s disease patients by using ultrasound with oral or intravenous contrast.

  1. A novel diagnostic tool for detecting functional patency of the small bowel: the Given patency capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, C; Spera, G; Riccioni, M; Biancone, L; Petruzziello, L; Tringali, A; Familiari, P; Marchese, M; Onder, G; Mutignani, M; Perri, V; Petruzziello, C; Pallone, F; Costamagna, G

    2005-09-01

    The current visualization of small-bowel strictures using traditional radiological methods is associated with high radiation doses and false-negative results. These methods do not always reveal small-bowel patency for solids. The aim is to assess the safety of the Given patency system and its ability to detect intestinal strictures in patients with strictures that are known or suspected radiologically. The Given patency capsule is composed of lactose, remains intact in the gastrointestinal tract for 40-100 hours post ingestion, and disintegrates thereafter. A total of 34 patients with small-bowel stricture were prospectively enrolled; 30 had a previous diagnosis of Crohn's disease, three had adhesion syndrome and in one ischemic enteritis was suspected. Of the patients, 15 (44.1 %) had previously undergone surgery. Following ingestion, the capsule was monitored for integrity and transit time, using a specially designed Given scanner and also radiologically. Seventeen patients had been enrolled with the intent of using the patency capsule as a preliminary test in patients with small-bowel strictures before undergoing video capsule endoscopy. 30 patients (88.2 %) retrieved the capsule in the stool; it was intact in 20 (median transit time 22 hours), and disintegrated in 10 patients (median transit time 53 hours). Six patients complained of abdominal pain which disappeared within 24 hours. The scanner successfully indicated the presence of the capsule in 94 % of cases. Ten patients underwent video capsule endoscopy following the patency capsule examination; in all of these the video capsule passed through the small-bowel stricture. This feasibility study has shown that the Given patency capsule is a safe, effective, and convenient tool for assessment of functional patency of the small bowel. It can indicate functional patency even in cases where traditional radiology indicates stricture.

  2. A novel and simple method using a transanal intestinal long tube for protecting intestinal anastomosis and decompressing the small bowel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose I introduce the use of transanal intestinal long tube (TILT) using nasogastric tube. TILT passes from anus to the anastomosis, helping to decompress a dilated bowel loop. Methods TILT procedure was limited to those patients predicting a severe luminal size discrepancy after intestinal anastomosis, and who had postoperative prolonged ileus. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 10 infants (7 male an 3 female patients) who were treated using the TILT procedure between 2012 and 2016. Results Median gestational age was 27+5 weeks and birth weight was 940 g. The first operation was done at a median of 4.5 days after birth due to necrotizing enterocolitis perforation (4 cases), isolated intestinal perforation (3 cases), meconium related ileus (1 case), congenital ileal volvulus (1 case), and ileal atresia (1 case). Nine cases of ileostomy closure were planned at a median of 130.5 days with a body weight of 3,060 g. For the ileal atresia case, TILT procedure without additional small bowel resection was performed to treat postoperative prolonged ileus. Nine out of ten were well functioned and defecation via anus was observed in a median of 4.5 days. Milk feeding began at a median of 6 days and the long intestinal tube was removed in a median of 14.5 days. Conclusion I suggested that TILT procedure could be a noninvasive operative option, predicting of size mismatched anastomosis causing prolonged ileus. Passive drainage of proximal intestinal contents might be helpful for decompress endoluminal pressure during the time of anastomosis healing with bowel movement recovery. PMID:28932729

  3. Comparison of outcomes following laparoscopic and open treatment of emergent small bowel obstruction: an 11-year analysis of ACS NSQIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Richa; Borad, Neil P; Merchant, Aziz M

    2018-06-04

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) continues to be a common indication for acute care surgery. While open procedures are still widely used for treatment, laparoscopic procedures may have important advantages in certain patient populations. We aim to analyze differences in outcomes between the two for treatment of bowel obstruction. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program was used to find patients that underwent emergent or non-elective surgery for SBO. Propensity matching was used to create comparable groups. Logistic regression was used to assess differences in the primary outcome of interest, return to operating room, and morbidity and mortality outcomes. Logistic regression was also used to assess the contribution of various preoperative demographic and comorbidity characteristics to 30-day mortality. A total of 24,028 patients underwent surgery for SBO from 2005 to 2011. Of those, 3391 were laparoscopic. Propensity matching resulted in 6782 matched patients. Laparoscopic cases had significantly decreased odds of experiencing any morbidity and wound complications compared to open cases in bowel-resection and adhesiolysis-only cases. There was no significant difference found for odds of returning to operating room. Laparoscopic cases resulted in significantly shorter hospital stays than open cases (7.18 vs.10.84 days, p  25) decreased odds of mortality. Analysis of emergent SBO cases between 2005 and 2015 demonstrates that laparoscopy is not utilized as often as open approaches in surgical treatment. Laparoscopic surgery resulted in reduced postoperative morbidity and significantly shorter hospital stays compared to open intervention and was not associated with significant differences in odds of reoperation compared to open surgery.

  4. [Microflora of the upper part of the small bowel in healthy Peruvian subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Neira, L; Yi-Chu, A; León Barúa, R

    1983-01-01

    In 20 healthy Peruvians aerobic cultures were done of upper small bowel contents, obtained following the method of the string capsule or Enterotest, and of faringeal material, obtained doing gargles with sterilized water. In 15 (75%) of the 20 subjects cultures of small bowel contents either were sterile (in 5 subjects, or 25% of the total) or revealed only diverse aerobic germs (in 10 subjects, or 50% of the total), the germs more frequently found being: negative coagulase staphylococcus albus (in 7 subjects, or 35% of the total), alpha hemolytic streptococcus (in 4 subjects, or 20% of the total) and Neisseria catarrhalis (in 4 subjects, or 20% of the total). In 5 (25%) of the 20 subjects, coliform bacteria were found in the upper small bowel (Klebsiella pneumonia in 2, and Escherichia coli in the remaining 3). Of those 5 subjects, only 2 (10% or the total of 20) had the microorganisms exclusively in the bowel, and in both the concentration of germs was 10(4)/ml. On the contrary, the 3 remaining subjects (15% of the total) had coliforms also in the pharynx; in 2 of the 3 subjects the concentration of germs found in the bowel was 10(3)/ml, and, in the remaining one, 10/ml; only one of the 3 subjects presented germs in the pharynx in a greater concentration than in the bowel, while another presented germs in the same concentration in both localizations, and the remaining one presented germs in the bowel in a concentration lower than in the pharynx.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Extramedullary plasmacytoma of small bowel mesentery in associated with cecal cancer: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong Soo; Kim, Young Sun; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Park, Choog Ki; Park, Dong Woo; Park, Yong Wook; Oh, Young Ha

    2005-01-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytoma is a rare disease that is histopathologically defined as a solitary tumor composed of a monoclonal proliferation of cells with plasmacytic differentiation in an extramedullary site. Most of these tumors occur in the submucosa of the upper aerodigestive tract, and they rarely occur in the small bowel mesentery. We report here on a case of extramedullary plasmacytoma of the small bowel mesentery that was in association with a cecal cancer. Abdominal ultrasound and CT revealed a lobulated soft tissue mass with a cystic portion and peripheral calcification. In this case, the preoperative radiological diagnosis was difficult due to accompanying cecal cancer

  6. Extramedullary plasmacytoma of small bowel mesentery in associated with cecal cancer: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong Soo; Kim, Young Sun; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Park, Choog Ki; Park, Dong Woo [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yong Wook; Oh, Young Ha [Hanyang University Guri Hospital, Guri (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-15

    Extramedullary plasmacytoma is a rare disease that is histopathologically defined as a solitary tumor composed of a monoclonal proliferation of cells with plasmacytic differentiation in an extramedullary site. Most of these tumors occur in the submucosa of the upper aerodigestive tract, and they rarely occur in the small bowel mesentery. We report here on a case of extramedullary plasmacytoma of the small bowel mesentery that was in association with a cecal cancer. Abdominal ultrasound and CT revealed a lobulated soft tissue mass with a cystic portion and peripheral calcification. In this case, the preoperative radiological diagnosis was difficult due to accompanying cecal cancer.

  7. Alterations in myoelectric activity of the small bowel in rabbits after transarterial embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ai Songtao; Wang Xiaolin; Gong Gaoquan; Chen Yi; Lin Genlai; Zhang Feng; Li Guoping; Liu Lingxiao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore alterations in myoelectric activity of the small bowel in rabbits after transarterial embolization and provide academic basis for assessing bowel viability and management. Methods: Twenty normal rabbits were selected and divided into three groups (2 mg group, n=10; 6 mg group, n=5; control group, n=5). Members of 2 mg group were embolized with PVA 2 mg, those of 6 mg group with PVA 6 mg, and the control group with normal saline 2 ml. After microcatherization embolization, myoelectric activity of the small bowel was recorded for 24 hr using chronically implanted electrodes in conscious rabbits. Results: In 2 mg group, the frequency and the amplitude of slow wave of proximal jejunum were significantly lower in post-embolization period than pre-embolization period [(17.83±0.55) cpm vs (11.59±0.23) cpm(P 0.05) and (0.1632±0.002) mV vs (0.1606±0.003) mV (P>0.05), respectively]. Conclusions: Embolization with PVA evokes significant and passive effect on basal electrical rhythm of small bowel. It could provide academic basis for assessing bowel viability to interventional embolization. (authors)

  8. Software-assisted quantitative analysis of small bowel motility compared to manual measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickelhaupt, S.; Froehlich, J.M.; Cattin, R.; Raible, S.; Bouquet, H.; Bill, U.; Patak, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To validate a newly developed software prototype that automatically analyses small bowel motility by comparing it directly with manual measurement. Material and methods: Forty-five patients with clinical indication for small bowel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were retrospectively included in this institutional review board-approved study. MRI was performed using a 1.5 T system following a standard MR-enterography protocol. Small bowel motility parameters (contractions-per-minute, luminal diameter, amplitude) were measured three times each in identical segments using the manual and the semiautomatic software-assisted method. The methods were compared for agreement, repeatability, and time needed for each measurement. All parameters were compared between the methods. Results: A total of 91 small-bowel segments were analysed. No significant intra-individual difference (p > 0.05) was found for peristaltic frequencies between the methods (mean: 4.14/min manual; 4.22/min software-assisted). Amplitudes (5.14 mm; 5.57 mm) and mean lumen diameters (17.39 mm; 14.68) differed due to systematic differences in the definition of the bowel wall. Mean duration of single measurement was significantly (p < 0.01) shorter with the software (6.25 min; 1.30 min). The scattering of repeated measurements was significantly (p < 0.05) lower using the software. Conclusion: The software-assisted method accomplished highly reliable, fast and accurate measurement of small bowel motility. Measurement precision and duration differed significantly between the two methods in favour of the software-assisted technique

  9. Gastric emptying rate and small bowel transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome determined with 99mTc-labeled pellets and scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, O.H.; Gjorup, T.; Christensen, F.N.

    1986-12-01

    A new method employing 99mTc-labeled pellets for determination of the gastric emptying rate and small bowel transit time is described. The participants were six normal subjects and 16 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (eight with diarrhea and eight with obstipation as the primary complaint). The gastric emptying rate was the same in the three groups. The patients in the obstipation group had a significantly longer small bowel transit time than the normals (P less than 0.02) and the patients in the diarrhea group (P less than 0.01). There was no demonstrable difference between the small bowel transit time in the normals and in the patients in the diarrhea group.

  10. Gastric emptying rate and small bowel transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome determined with 99mTc-labeled pellets and scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, O.H.; Gjorup, T.; Christensen, F.N.

    1986-01-01

    A new method employing 99mTc-labeled pellets for determination of the gastric emptying rate and small bowel transit time is described. The participants were six normal subjects and 16 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (eight with diarrhea and eight with obstipation as the primary complaint). The gastric emptying rate was the same in the three groups. The patients in the obstipation group had a significantly longer small bowel transit time than the normals (P less than 0.02) and the patients in the diarrhea group (P less than 0.01). There was no demonstrable difference between the small bowel transit time in the normals and in the patients in the diarrhea group

  11. The Accuracy of Point-of-Care Ultrasound in Detecting Small Bowel Obstruction in Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pourmand

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiological imaging plays an essential role in the evaluation of a patient with suspected small bowel obstruction (SBO. In a few studies, point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS has been utilized as a primary imaging modality in patients with suspected SBO. POCUS has been shown to be an accurate tool in the diagnosis of SBO with multiple research studies noting a consistent high sensitivity with a range of 94–100% and specificity of 81–100%. Specific sonographic findings that increase the likelihood of SBO include dilatation of small bowel loops > 25 mm, altered intestinal peristalsis, increased thickness of the bowel wall, and intraperitoneal fluid accumulation. Studies also reported that emergency physicians could apply this technique with limited and short-term ultrasound training. In this article, we aim to review the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound examinations performed by emergency physicians in patients with suspected SBO.

  12. Quantification, validation, and follow-up of small bowel motility in Crohn's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrolaza, Juan J.; Peng, Jennifer Q.; Safdar, Nabile M.; Conklin, Laurie; Sze, Raymond; Linguraru, Marius George

    2015-03-01

    The use of magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) has become a mainstay in the evaluation, assessment and follow up of inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease (CD), thanks to its high image quality and its non-ionizing nature. In particular, the advent of faster MRE sequences less sensitive to image-motion artifacts offers the possibility to obtain visual, structural and functional information of the patient's small bowel. However, the inherent subjectivity of the mere visual inspection of these images often hinders the accurate identification and monitoring of the pathological areas. In this paper, we present a framework that provides quantitative and objective motility information of the small bowel from free-breathing MRE dynamic sequences. After compensating for the breathing motion of the patient, we create personalized peristaltic activity maps via optical flow analysis. The result is the creation of a new set of images providing objective and precise functional information of the small bowel. The accuracy of the new method was also evaluated from two different perspectives: objective accuracy (1.1 ± 0.6 mm/s of error), i.e., the ability of the system to provide quantitative and accurate information about the motility of moving bowel landmarks, and subjective accuracy (avg. difference of 0.7 ± 0.7 in a range of 1 to 5), i.e., the degree of agreement with the subjective evaluation of an expert. Finally, the practical utility of the new method was successfully evaluated in a preliminary study with 32 studies of healthy and CD cases, showing its potential for the fast and accurate assessment and follow up of CD in the small bowel.

  13. A case of closed loop small bowel obstruction within a strangulated incisional hernia in association with an acute gastric volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosai, Nik Ritza; Gendeh, H S; Noorharisman, M; Sutton, Paul Anthony; Das, Srijit

    2014-01-01

    Small bowel obstruction is a common clinical problem presenting with abdominal distention, colicky pain, absolute constipation and bilious vomiting. There are numerous causes, most commonly attributed to an incarcerated hernia, adhesions or obstructing mass secondary to malignancy. Here we present an unusual cause of a small bowel obstruction secondary to an incarcerated incisional hernia in association with an acute organoaxial gastric volvulus.

  14. Diseases of the small bowel in chronic diarrhea: diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Simadibrata

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of chronic diarrhea in Asia is between 0.8-1.0%. The diseases and abnormalities according to the location, which can cause chronic diarrhea, are divided into three locations: the small bowel, the large bowel and extraintestinal. The small bowel diseases include infectious and non-infectious diseases. The infectious diseases are bacterial infections, parasitic infections etc. The non-infectious diseases include of Crohn’s disease, Celiac sprue, NSAID enteropathy, lactose intolerance, benign tumor, carcinoid tumor, carcinoma, post surgery complications, laxative etc. The approaches to diagnosis include good anamnesis, careful physical examination, supporting laboratory tests, more specialized supporting examinations including X-ray of the colon, esophagogastroduodenum follow-through, enteroclysis, ileo-colonoscopy and endoscopy on the upper portion of the digestive tract including the small intestine with biopsy for histopathology examinations. The treatment for chronic diarrhea is divided into supportive and causal therapy. (Med J Indones 2002; 11: 179-89 Keywords: small bowel, chronic diarrhea, approaches to diagnosis, treatment

  15. Prevalence of small-bowel neoplasia in Lynch syndrome assessed by video capsule endoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, Jasmijn F.; Al-Toma, Abdul; Dekker, Evelien; Vanhoutvin, Steven A. L. W.; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M.; van Leerdam, Monique E.; de Vos tot Nederveen Cappel, Wouter H.; Sanduleanu, Silvia; Veenendaal, Roeland A.; Cats, Annemieke; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Koornstra, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to determine the prevalence of small-bowel neoplasia in asymptomatic patients with Lynch syndrome (LS) by video capsule endoscopy (VCE). After obtaining informed consent, asymptomatic proven gene mutation carriers aged 35-70 years were included in this prospective multicentre study in

  16. Prevalence of small-bowel neoplasia in Lynch syndrome assessed by video capsule endoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, Jasmijn F.; Al-Toma, Abdul; Dekker, Evelien; Vanhoutvin, Steven A. L. W.; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M.; van Leerdam, Monique E.; Cappel, Wouter H. de Vos tot Nederveen; Sanduleanu, Silvia; Veenendaal, Roeland A.; Cats, Annemieke; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Koornstra, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim was to determine the prevalence of small-bowel neoplasia in asymptomatic patients with Lynch syndrome (LS) by video capsule endoscopy (VCE). Design After obtaining informed consent, asymptomatic proven gene mutation carriers aged 3570 years were included in this prospective

  17. Penetrating ectopic peptic ulcer in the absence of Meckel's diverticulum ultimately presenting as small bowel obstruction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, Hilary

    2012-02-03

    We report here how a heterotopic penetrating peptic ulcer progressed to cause small bowel obstruction in a patient with multiple previous negative investigations. The clinical presentation, radiographic features and pathological findings of this case are described, along with the salient lessons learnt. The added value of wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) in such circumstances is debated.

  18. Treating Small Bowel Obstruction with a Manual Physical Therapy: A Prospective Efficacy Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda D. Rice

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel obstructions (SBOs caused by adhesions are a common, often life-threatening postsurgical complication with few treatment options available for patients. This study examines the efficacy of a manual physical therapy treatment regimen on the pain and quality of life of subjects with a history of bowel obstructions due to adhesions in a prospective, controlled survey based study. Changes in six domains of quality of life were measured via ratings reported before and after treatment using the validated Small Bowel Obstruction Questionnaire (SBO-Q. Improvements in the domains for pain (p=0.0087, overall quality of life (p=0.0016, and pain severity (p=0.0006 were significant when average scores before treatment were compared with scores after treatment. The gastrointestinal symptoms (p=0.0258 domain was marginally significant. There was no statistically significant improvement identified in the diet or medication domains in the SBO-Q for this population. Significant improvements in range of motion in the trunk (p≤0.001, often limited by adhesions, were also observed for all measures. This study demonstrates in a small number of subjects that this manual physical therapy protocol is an effective treatment option for patients with adhesive small bowel obstructions as measured by subject reported symptoms and quality of life.

  19. Non-traumatic perforation of the small bowel | Eid | African Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... medical records of four patients who have presented with non-traumatic perforation of the small bowel and were treated at Al-Ain Hospital during the last 5 years were studied retrospectively. Results: The presenting symptoms of all patients were similar. Erect chest X-ray has shown free air under diaphragm in 3 patients.

  20. Transient small-bowel intussusceptions in adults: significance of ultrasonographic detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maconi, G.; Radice, E.; Greco, S.; Bezzio, C.; Bianchi Porro, G.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the frequency, clinical significance, and outcome of small-bowel intussusceptions in adults detected using ultrasound in an outpatient setting. Patients and methods: In two different retrospective (January 2001 to April 2003) and prospective (May 2003 to June 2005) periods, 33 small-bowel intussusceptions were found in 32 patients (13 females; mean age: 38.1 years) with known or suspected intestinal disease. Patients underwent diagnostic work-up to assess any organic disease. Patients with self-limiting intussusception were submitted to clinical and ultrasonographic follow-up. Results: Of the 32 patients with small-bowel intussusception, 25 were identified in the prospective series of 4487 examinations (0.53%) and seven in the retrospective series of 5342 examinations (0.15%; p = 0.002). Four patients had persistent and 28 self-limiting intussusceptions. Self-limiting intussusceptions were idiopathic in 11 patients (39%) or associated with organic diseases in 17 (Crohn's disease in 11 patients, celiac disease in three, ulcerative colitis in one patient, and previous surgery for cancer in two). Self-limiting intussusceptions were asymptomatic in 25% of patients. Conclusion: Small-bowel intussusceptions in adults are not rare and are frequently self-limiting, idiopathic, or related to organic diseases, mainly Crohn's disease and coeliac disease

  1. Transient small-bowel intussusceptions in adults: significance of ultrasonographic detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maconi, G. [Chair of Gastroenterology, Department of Clinical Sciences, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: giovanni.maconi@unimi.it; Radice, E. [Chair of Gastroenterology, Department of Clinical Sciences, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan (Italy); Greco, S. [Chair of Gastroenterology, Department of Clinical Sciences, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan (Italy); Bezzio, C. [Chair of Gastroenterology, Department of Clinical Sciences, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan (Italy); Bianchi Porro, G. [Chair of Gastroenterology, Department of Clinical Sciences, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan (Italy)

    2007-08-15

    Aim: To investigate the frequency, clinical significance, and outcome of small-bowel intussusceptions in adults detected using ultrasound in an outpatient setting. Patients and methods: In two different retrospective (January 2001 to April 2003) and prospective (May 2003 to June 2005) periods, 33 small-bowel intussusceptions were found in 32 patients (13 females; mean age: 38.1 years) with known or suspected intestinal disease. Patients underwent diagnostic work-up to assess any organic disease. Patients with self-limiting intussusception were submitted to clinical and ultrasonographic follow-up. Results: Of the 32 patients with small-bowel intussusception, 25 were identified in the prospective series of 4487 examinations (0.53%) and seven in the retrospective series of 5342 examinations (0.15%; p = 0.002). Four patients had persistent and 28 self-limiting intussusceptions. Self-limiting intussusceptions were idiopathic in 11 patients (39%) or associated with organic diseases in 17 (Crohn's disease in 11 patients, celiac disease in three, ulcerative colitis in one patient, and previous surgery for cancer in two). Self-limiting intussusceptions were asymptomatic in 25% of patients. Conclusion: Small-bowel intussusceptions in adults are not rare and are frequently self-limiting, idiopathic, or related to organic diseases, mainly Crohn's disease and coeliac disease.

  2. Yeast mediates lactic acidosis suppression after antibiotic cocktail treatment in short small bowel?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaerts, G.P.A.; Severijnen, R.S.V.M.; Skladal, D.; Bakkeren, J.A.J.; Sperl, W.

    2005-01-01

    During acidotic periods in a girl with a short small bowel, very high D-lactic acid concentrations were measured in blood and urine; the patient's characteristic faecal flora contained mainly lactobacilli, and during antibiotic cocktail treatment also many yeasts. In this case report we sought to

  3. MDCT in the diagnosis of small-bowel obstruction by a retained ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    assessment of complications such as abscess formation, fistula. MDCT in the diagnosis of small-bowel obstruction by a retained surgical swab. M. Bindapersad, M.B. Ch.B., F.C.Rad. (Diag.) N. Govender, M.B. Ch.B. Department of Radiology, Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the ...

  4. Risk factors affecting morbidity and mortality following emergency laparotomy for small bowel obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Maja Haunstrup; Tolstrup, Mai-Britt; Kehlet Watt, Sara

    2016-01-01

    laparotomy for small bowel obstruction at a Copenhagen University Hospital (2009-2013). Complications were evaluated according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. RESULTS: A total of 323 patients were included. The overall 30-day morbidity and mortality rates were 28% and 13%, respectively. Six covariates...

  5. Small bowel adenocarcinoma copy number profiles are more closely related to colorectal than to gastric cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, J.C.; Buffart, T.E.; Eijk, P.P.; van de Wiel, M.A.; van Wieringen, W.N.; Howdle, P.D.; Mulder, C.J.J.; van de Velde, CJ; Quirke, P.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; van Grieken, N.C.T.; Grabsch, H.; Meijer, G.A.; Ylstra, B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Small bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA) is a rare cancer and consequently, the options for clinical trials are limited. As they are treated according to either a colorectal or a gastric cancer regimen and the molecular biology of a tumor is a pivotal determinant for therapy response,

  6. Small bowel adenocarcinoma copy number profiles are more closely related to colorectal than to gastric cancers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, J.C.; Buffart, T.E.; Eijk, P.P.; Wiel, M.A. van de; Wieringen, W.N. van; Howdle, P.D.; Mulder, C.J.; Velde, C.J. van de; Quirke, P.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Grieken, N.C. van; Grabsch, H.; Meijer, G.A.; Ylstra, B.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Small bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA) is a rare cancer and consequently, the options for clinical trials are limited. As they are treated according to either a colorectal or a gastric cancer regimen and the molecular biology of a tumor is a pivotal determinant for therapy response,

  7. An unusual case of herniation of small bowel through an iatrogenic defect of the falciform ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sourtzis, S.; Canizares, C.; Damry, N.; Thibeau, J.F.; Philippart, P.

    2002-01-01

    Internal herniation through a congenital defect in the falciform ligament is extremely rare. We report an unusual observation of small bowel obstruction through an iatrogenic defect of the falciform ligament. Prompt diagnosis was made by helical CT, permitting a rapid surgical procedure to preserve the viability of the obstructed segment. (orig.)

  8. Application of small intestine decompression combined with oral feeding in middle and late period of malignant small bowel obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dechun; Du, Hongtao; Shao, Guoqing; Guo, Yongtuan; Lu, Wan; Li, Ruihong

    2017-07-01

    The application value of small intestine decompression combined with oral feeding in the middle and late period of malignant small bowel obstruction was examined. A total of 22 patients with advanced malignant small bowel obstruction were included in the present study. An ileus tube was inserted via the nose under fluoroscopy into the obstructed small intestine of each patient. At the same time, the insertion depth the of the catheter was adjusted. When the catheter was blocked, small bowel selective angiography was performed to determine the location and cause of the obstruction and the extent of the obstruction, and to determine the length of the small intestine in the site of obstruction, and to select the variety and tolerance of enteral nutrition. We observed the decompression tube flow and ease of intestinal obstruction. In total, 20 patients were treated with oral enteral nutrition after abdominal distension, and 22 cases were treated by the nose to observe the drainage and the relief of intestinal obstruction. The distal end of the catheter was placed in a predetermined position. The symptoms of intestinal obstruction were relieved 1-4 days after decompression. The 22 patients with selective angiography of the small intestine showed positive X-ray signs: 18 patients with oral enteral nutrition therapy had improved the nutritional situation 2 weeks later. In 12 cases, where there was anal defecation exhaust, 2 had transient removal of intestinal obstruction catheter. In conclusion, this comprehensive treatment based on small intestine decompression combined with enteral nutrition is expected to become a new therapeutic approach and method for the treatment of patients with advanced tumor small bowel obstruction.

  9. DSA study of the effect of vasopressin on the small-bowel circulation before and after embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xueqin; Wang Qiaoxi; Guo Yuxin; Yang Xinhong; Hu Hongyao

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of vasopressin (VS) on the small-bowel circulation and the safety of embolotherapy for the small intestinal hemorrhage by DSA. Methods: Ten dogs were divided into three groups. Vasa recta were ligated 30 min after VS infusion ended in group A (n = 4), and 2h after VS infusion ended in group B (n = 4), they were ligated without VS infusion in control group (n = 2). DSA were performed before and after VS infusion, before and after the ligation. The tested parts of intestine were resected to make the pathologic examination a week late. Results: All branches of mesenteric arteries contracted and the contrast developed light in the intestinal wall after VS infusion. Branches contraction recovered but the contrast developed still slight in the intestinal wall about 30 min after infusion ended. All manifestation of DSA recovered to normal 2h after infusion ended. In all groups, the blood vessel net can be seen but is fewer and scattered in the area of ligation. The collocate presented soon after the ligation. The pathologic examination proved that there was only mind mucosal ischemia in all groups. Conclusion: The repressive effect of VS to the circulation of intestine weakened and then disappeared rapidly after the infusion ended. VS infusion had no significant effect on the safety of embolotherapy for small intestinal bleeding when the infusion has been finished for more than 2hr. DSA can demonstrated the circulation state of the intestine before and after embolization

  10. Transient angioedema of small bowel secondary to intravenous iodinated contrast medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirankumar N Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the clinical details and imaging findings of a case of transient angioedema of the small bowel following intravenous administration of non-ionic iodinated contrast material in a 17 year old female with no predisposing risk factors. Findings included long segment, symmetric, circumferential, low-density, bowel wall thickening involving the duodenum, jejunum, and most of the ileum on computed tomography scan obtained at 7 min following intravenous contrast material injection. This entity is self-limiting with a favourable clinical outcome and requires no specific treatment but only aggressive clinical monitoring.

  11. Ruptured Jejunal Diverticulum Due to a Single-Band Small Bowel Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaraman Durai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Jejunal diverticulosis is rare and often goes unnoticed until complications occur. The diverticula are true, acquired diverticula and often asymptomatic. Jejunal diverticulosis can be associated with diverticulosis of the duodenum, ileum, and colon. Here we describe a patient with known severe diverticular disease of the large bowel, who presented acutely with abdominal pain and signs of generalised peritonitis. Laparotomy showed ruptured jejunal diverticulosis with a single band over the terminal ileum, causing small bowel obstruction. Spontaneous perforation of a jejunal diverticulum is rare and is usually an intraoperative finding. One should exclude a precipitating cause, such as coexisting distal obstruction, stricture, or a foreign body.

  12. Large bowel resection - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Advanced Skills . 9th ed. New York, NY: Pearson; 2016:chap 26. Read More Colon cancer Colostomy ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  13. Small and large bowel volvulus: Clues to early recognition and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepage-Saucier, Marianne; Tang, An; Billiard, Jean-Sebastien; Murphy-Lavallee, Jessica; Lepanto, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    Small and large bowel volvulus are uncommon causes of bowel obstruction with nonspecific clinical manifestations which may delay the diagnosis and increase morbidity. Therefore, radiologists play an important role in promptly establishing the diagnosis, recognizing underlying congenital or acquired risk factors and detecting potentially life-threatening complications. Multidetector CT performed with intravenous contrast is currently the preferred modality for the evaluation of volvulus, which is best appreciated when imaging is perpendicular to the axis of bowel rotation, hence the benefit of multiplanar reformations. In this pictorial essay we review the pathophysiology of the different types of intestinal volvulus, discuss diagnostic criteria for prompt diagnosis of volvulus and emphasize early recognition of the complications.

  14. Small and large bowel volvulus: Clues to early recognition and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepage-Saucier, Marianne [Departement de radiologie, Hopital Saint-Luc, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal (CHUM), 1058 rue Saint-Denis, Montreal, Quebec, H2X 3J4 (Canada); Tang, An [Departement de radiologie, Hopital Saint-Luc, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal (CHUM), 1058 rue Saint-Denis, Montreal, Quebec, H2X 3J4 (Canada)], E-mail: duotango@gmail.com; Billiard, Jean-Sebastien; Murphy-Lavallee, Jessica; Lepanto, Luigi [Departement de radiologie, Hopital Saint-Luc, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal (CHUM), 1058 rue Saint-Denis, Montreal, Quebec, H2X 3J4 (Canada)

    2010-04-15

    Small and large bowel volvulus are uncommon causes of bowel obstruction with nonspecific clinical manifestations which may delay the diagnosis and increase morbidity. Therefore, radiologists play an important role in promptly establishing the diagnosis, recognizing underlying congenital or acquired risk factors and detecting potentially life-threatening complications. Multidetector CT performed with intravenous contrast is currently the preferred modality for the evaluation of volvulus, which is best appreciated when imaging is perpendicular to the axis of bowel rotation, hence the benefit of multiplanar reformations. In this pictorial essay we review the pathophysiology of the different types of intestinal volvulus, discuss diagnostic criteria for prompt diagnosis of volvulus and emphasize early recognition of the complications.

  15. Axial torsion of meckel's diverticulum causing small bowel obstruction in adult: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, In Kyung; Lee, Su Lim; Ku, Young Mi [Dept. of Radiology, Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Meckel's diverticulum (MD) is the most common congenital abnormality of the gastrointestinal tract that is prevalent in 2–3% of the population. The lifetime risk of complications is estimated at 4%. Small bowel obstruction is the second most common complication of MD. Among the causes of bowel obstruction, axial torsion of MD is the rarest complication. Urgent surgical treatment is needed in cases of small bowel obstruction associated with torsion of MD. Pre-operative diagnosis of MD as a cause of small bowel obstruction is difficult, because the diagnosis can be made only if the diverticulum is delineated at the site of obstruction. We reported a case of axial torsion of MD with necrosis that caused proximal small bowel perforation in a 21 year old male.

  16. Small bowel volvulus in the adult populace of the United States: results from a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Taylor M; Chang, David C; Sicklick, Jason K

    2015-08-01

    Small bowel volvulus is a rare entity in Western adults. Greater insight into epidemiology and outcomes may be gained from a national database inquiry. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (1998 to 2010), a 20% stratified sample of United States hospitals, was retrospectively reviewed for small bowel volvulus cases (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition [ICD-9] code 560.2 excluding gastric/colonic procedures) in patients greater than or equal to 18 years old. There were 2,065,599 hospitalizations for bowel obstruction (ICD-9 560.x). Of those, there were 20,680 (1.00%) small bowel volvulus cases; 169 were attributable to intestinal malrotation. Most cases presented emergently (89.24%) and operative management was employed more frequently than nonoperative (65.21% vs 34.79%, P volvulus, our findings provide a robust representation of this rare cause of small bowel obstruction in American adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Small Bowel Obstruction due to Anomalous Congenital Bands in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basak Erginel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of the study was to evaluate our children who are operated on for anomalous congenital band while increasing the awareness of this rare reason of intestinal obstruction in children which causes a diagnostic challenge. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the records of fourteen children treated surgically for intestinal obstructions caused by anomalous congenital bands. Results. The bands were located between the following regions: the ascending colon and the mesentery of the terminal ileum in 4 patients, the jejunum and mesentery of the terminal ileum in 3 patients, the ileum and mesentery of the terminal ileum in 2 patients, the ligament of Treitz and mesentery of the jejunum in one patient, the ligament of Treitz and mesentery of the terminal ileum in one patient, duodenum and duodenum in one patient, the ileum and mesentery of the ileum in one patient, the jejunum and mesentery of the jejunum in one patient, and Meckel’s diverticulum and its ileal mesentery in one patient. Band excision was adequate in all of the patients except the two who received resection anastomosis for intestinal necrosis. Conclusion. Although congenital anomalous bands are rare, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with an intestinal obstruction.

  18. Small bowel involvement documented by capsule endoscopy in Churg-Strauss syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beye, Birane; Lesur, Gilles; Claude, Pierre; Martzolf, Lionel; Kieffer, Pierre; Sondag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is a small and medium vessel vasculitis and is also known as allergic granulomatous angiitis. Gastrointestinal involvement is common in patients with Churg-Strauss syndrome (20-50%). The most common symptoms are abdominal pain, diarrhoea and occasionally gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation. We present a case of Churg-Strauss syndrome with small bowel lesions documented by video capsule endoscopy.

  19. Experience of General Surgery Residents in the Creation of Small Bowel and Colon Anastomoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Zoltan H; Lazar, Eric L; Paglinco, Samantha R; Hicks, Addison S; Lei, Jason; Barratt-Stopper, Patricia A; Rolandelli, Rolando H

    2016-01-01

    With the introduction of stapling devices (SDs), the proportion of hand-sewn (HS) intestinal anastomoses (IAs) has declined. As more IAs are constructed with SDs, there are fewer opportunities for general surgery residents (GSRs) to acquire the skills for HS techniques during their training. Data for this study were extracted from an existing database of all IAs performed at the Department of Surgery of the Morristown Medical Center since 2003. For the purposes of this study, a 5.5-year timeframe was used between July 2006 and 2011, which contained 1659 IA operations on adult patients with resident involvement. GSRs of the 5-year general surgery residency program were grouped by postgraduate year (PGY) for further analysis. The number of all IAs created by each resident during the 5-year training was 67.2 on average. Most of these operations were done in the last 2 years of the training: 45.1% of all IAs in PGY5 and 37.3% of all IAs in PGY4. Of all, 1659 IAs performed in the study period, 711 (42.9% of total) were done laparoscopically and 948 (57.1% of all IAs) were done as open operations. Laparoscopic operations had a proportionally higher rate of SD use when compared to open cases (90.9% vs 82.4%). On average, each resident constructed 9.4 HS IAs (13.98% of all IAs) and 57.8 SD IAs (86.02% of total). Out of all anastomoses, ostomy reversals (30.7%) had the highest percentage of HS suturing followed by right colectomies (27.5%), ileal pouch-anal anastomoses and total colectomies and proctocolectomies (23.3%), small bowel resection (17.0%), and left colectomies (5.5%). Regardless of the location of the operation, stapled and sutured anastomoses had similar outcomes measured by the rate of anastomotic leaks. Residents used significantly more SDs in the creation of anastomoses than HS suturing in the PGY3, PGY4, and PGY5 years. We also documented that attending surgeons who are older more often used HS suturing than their younger colleagues when creating IAs. The

  20. Small Bowel Dose Parameters Predicting Grade ≥3 Acute Toxicity in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: An Independent Validation Study Comparing Peritoneal Space Versus Small Bowel Loop Contouring Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Robyn; Chakraborty, Santam; Nygren, Ian; Sinha, Richie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether volumes based on contours of the peritoneal space can be used instead of individual small bowel loops to predict for grade ≥3 acute small bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A standardized contouring method was developed for the peritoneal space and retrospectively applied to the radiation treatment plans of 67 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for rectal cancer. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data were extracted and analyzed against patient toxicity. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression were carried out for both contouring methods. Results: Grade ≥3 small bowel toxicity occurred in 16% (11/67) of patients in the study. A highly significant dose-volume relationship between small bowel irradiation and acute small bowel toxicity was supported by the use of both small bowel loop and peritoneal space contouring techniques. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that, for both contouring methods, the greatest sensitivity for predicting toxicity was associated with the volume receiving between 15 and 25 Gy. Conclusion: DVH analysis of peritoneal space volumes accurately predicts grade ≥3 small bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy, suggesting that the contours of the peritoneal space provide a reasonable surrogate for the contours of individual small bowel loops. The study finds that a small bowel V15 less than 275 cc and a peritoneal space V15 less than 830 cc are associated with a less than 10% risk of grade ≥3 acute toxicity

  1. A study of diagnosis and manegement of mechanical small-bowel obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Masayasu; Kurumi, Yoshimasa; Naitoh, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    We tried to clarify the most appropriate management for simple bowel obstruction and effective methods for diagnosis of strangulated bowel obstruction. Consecutive 252 cases of mechanical small-bowel obstruction treated in the hospital from 2000 to 2005 were assessed retrospectively. There were 219 cases of simple obstructions and 33 cases of strangulated obstruction. Seventy-eight percent of simple obstruction cases were treated conservatively (fasting in 82, decompression tube treatment in 88 and operation in 49). The average duration for indwelling the decompression tube was 5.2 days and the amount of discharge from the tube decreased day by day. In the cases of operation, the operation was performed on the 4.5th day after admission on the average, and the average amount of tube discharge before the operation was more than 450 ml/day. On the other hand, strangulation was most frequently diagnosed by enhanced abdominal CT scan, followed by physical examination, and the properties of decompression tube discharge in this order, and the blood data were only used for reference. Simple small-bowel obstruction should be treated by surgical therapy if symptomatic remission could not be gained by five days after beginning of the treatment. Enhanced abdominal CT scan is the most useful method for diagnosis of strangulation in an early stage of ischemia. (author)

  2. Stagnant loop syndrome resulting from small-bowel irradiation injury and intestinal by-pass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swan, R.W.

    1974-01-01

    Stagnant or blind-loop syndrome includes vitamin B12 malabsorption, steatorrhea, and bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. A case is presented to demonstrate this syndrome occurring after small-bowel irradiation injury with exaggeration postenterocolic by-pass. Alteration of normal small-bowel flora is basic to development of the stagnant-loop syndrome. Certain strains of bacteria as Bacteriodes and E. coli are capable of producing a malabsorption state. Definitive therapy for this syndrome developing after severe irradiation injury and intestinal by-pass includes antibiotics. Rapid symptomatic relief from diarrhea and improved malabsorption studies usually follow appropriate antibiotic therapy. Recolonization of the loop(s) with the offending bacterial species may produce exacerbation of symptoms. Since antibiotics are effective, recognition of this syndrome is important. Foul diarrheal stools should not be considered a necessary consequence of irradiation injury and intestinal by-pass

  3. Medical malpractice in the management of small bowel obstruction: A 33-year review of case law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Asad J; Haddad, Nadeem N; Rivera, Mariela; Morris, David S; Zietlow, Scott P; Schiller, Henry J; Jenkins, Donald H; Chowdhury, Naadia M; Zielinski, Martin D

    2016-10-01

    Annually, 15% of practicing general surgeons face a malpractice claim. Small bowel obstruction accounts for 12-16% of all surgical admissions. Our objective was to analyze malpractice related to small bowel obstruction. Using the search terms "medical malpractice" and "small bowel obstruction," we searched through all jury verdicts and settlements for Westlaw. Information was collected on case demographics, alleged reasons for malpractice, and case outcomes. The search criteria yielded 359 initial case briefs; 156 met inclusion criteria. The most common reason for litigation was failure to diagnose and timely manage the small bowel obstruction (69%, n = 107). Overall, 54% (n = 84) of cases were decided in favor of the defendant (physician). Mortality was noted in 61% (n = 96) of cases. Eighty-six percent (42/49) of cases litigated as a result of failing to diagnose and manage the small bowel obstruction in a timely manner, resulting in patient mortality, had a verdict with an award payout for the plaintiff (patient). The median award payout was $1,136,220 (range, $29,575-$12,535,000). A majority of malpractice cases were decided in favor of the defendants; however, cases with an award payout were costly. Timely intervention may prevent a substantial number of medical malpractice lawsuits in small bowel obstruction, arguing in favor of small bowel obstruction management protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Small bowel carcinomas in celiac or Crohn's disease: distinctive histophenotypic, molecular and histogenetic patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanoli, Alessandro; Di Sabatino, Antonio; Martino, Michele; Klersy, Catherine; Grillo, Federica; Mescoli, Claudia; Nesi, Gabriella; Volta, Umberto; Fornino, Daniele; Luinetti, Ombretta; Fociani, Paolo; Villanacci, Vincenzo; D'Armiento, Francesco P; Cannizzaro, Renato; Latella, Giovanni; Ciacci, Carolina; Biancone, Livia; Paulli, Marco; Sessa, Fausto; Rugge, Massimo; Fiocca, Roberto; Corazza, Gino R; Solcia, Enrico

    2017-10-01

    Non-familial small bowel carcinomas are relatively rare and have a poor prognosis. Two small bowel carcinoma subsets may arise in distinct immune-inflammatory diseases (celiac disease and Crohn's disease) and have been recently suggested to differ in prognosis, celiac disease-associated carcinoma cases showing a better outcome, possibly due to their higher DNA microsatellite instability and tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes. In this study, we investigated the histological structure (glandular vs diffuse/poorly cohesive, mixed or solid), cell phenotype (intestinal vs gastric/pancreatobiliary duct type) and Wnt signaling activation (β-catenin and/or SOX-9 nuclear expression) in a series of 26 celiac disease-associated small bowel carcinoma, 25 Crohn's disease-associated small bowel carcinoma and 25 sporadic small bowel carcinoma cases, searching for new prognostic parameters. In addition, non-tumor mucosa of celiac and Crohn's disease patients was investigated for epithelial precursor changes (hyperplastic, metaplastic or dysplastic) to help clarify carcinoma histogenesis. When compared with non-glandular structure and non-intestinal phenotype, both glandular structure and intestinal phenotype were associated with a more favorable outcome at univariable or stage- and microsatellite instability/tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte-inclusive multivariable analysis. The prognostic power of histological structure was independent of the clinical groups while the non-intestinal phenotype, associated with poor outcome, was dominant among Crohn's disease-associated carcinoma. Both nuclear β-catenin and SOX-9 were preferably expressed among celiac disease-associated carcinomas; however, they were devoid, per se, of prognostic value. We obtained findings supporting an origin of celiac disease-associated carcinoma in SOX-9-positive immature hyperplastic crypts, partly through flat β-catenin-positive dysplasia, and of Crohn's disease-associated carcinoma in a metaplastic (gastric and

  5. Chlamydia trachomatis antigens in enteroendocrine cells and macrophages of the small bowel in patients with severe irritable bowel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandström Gunnar

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation and immune activation have repeatedly been suggested as pathogentic factors in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. The driving force for immune activation in IBS remains unknown. The aim of our study was to find out if the obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia could be involved in the pathogenesis of IBS. Methods We studied 65 patients (61 females with IBS and 42 (29 females healthy controls in which IBS had been excluded. Full thickness biopsies from the jejunum and mucosa biopsies from the duodenum and the jejunum were stained with a monoclonal antibody to Chlamydia lipopolysaccharide (LPS and species-specific monoclonal antibodies to C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae. We used polyclonal antibodies to chromogranin A, CD68, CD11c, and CD117 to identify enteroendocrine cells, macrophages, dendritic, and mast cells, respectively. Results Chlamydia LPS was present in 89% of patients with IBS, but in only 14% of healthy controls (p C. trachomatis major outer membrane protein (MOMP. Staining for C. pneumoniae was negative in both patients and controls. Chlamydia LPS was detected in enteroendocrine cells of the mucosa in 90% of positive biopsies and in subepithelial macrophages in 69% of biopsies. Biopsies taken at different time points in 19 patients revealed persistence of Chlamydia LPS up to 11 years. The odds ratio for the association of Chlamydia LPS with presence of IBS (43.1; 95% CI: 13.2-140.7 is much higher than any previously described pathogenetic marker in IBS. Conclusions We found C. trachomatis antigens in enteroendocrine cells and macrophages in the small bowel mucosa of patients with IBS. Further studies are required to clarify if the presence of such antigens has a role in the pathogenesis of IBS.

  6. Posterolateral diaphragmatic hernia with small-bowel incarceration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cm defect in the posterior diaphragm repaired with interrupted polydiaxonone sutures, and the abdomen closed. The patient required organ support postoperatively and was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU). Postoperatively, gut function was slow to return and a small empyema resolved with sustained drainage ...

  7. Small bowel lymphangiectasia and angiodysplasia: a positive association; novel clinical marker or shared pathophysiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Jonathan; Porter, Victoria; Scott, Neil W; McNamara, Deirdre

    2010-10-01

    Small bowel angiodysplasia accounts for 30 to 40% of cases of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Identifying lesions can be difficult. Small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE) is a significant advance on earlier diagnostic techniques. The cause of angiodysplasia is unknown and the natural history poorly understood. Many lesions are thought to arise from a degenerative process associated with ageing, local vascular anomalies, and tissue hypoxia. Nonpathologic lymphangiectasias are commonly seen throughout the small bowel and are considered a normal finding. To determine whether there is an association between lymphangiectasias, angiodysplasia, and atherosclerosis related conditions. Relevant information was collected from a dedicated SBCE database. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations between angiodysplasia, lymphangiectasia, patient demographics, and comorbidity. In all, 180 patients underwent SBCE during the study period, 46 (25%) had angiodysplasia and 47 (26%) lymphangiectasia. Lymphangiectasia were seen in 24 (52%) of 46 with angiodysplasia, in 16 (19%) of 84 with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding without angiodysplasia and in 7 (14%) of 50 without gastrointestinal bleeding. Logistic regression analysis confirmed a strong positive association between angiodysplasia and lymphangiectasia; odds ratio 4.42, PLymphangiectasia are strongly associated with the presence of small intestinal angiodysplasia and may represent a useful clinical marker for this condition. Angiodysplasia are also associated with increasing age. Conditions associated with systemic atherosclerosis did not increase the risk of angiodysplasia.

  8. Imaging of small bowel-related complications following major abdominal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Maglinte, Dean D.T.

    2005-01-01

    To recognize and document the small bowel reactions following major abdominal surgery is an important key for a correct diagnosis. Usually, plain abdominal radiography is the initial imaging examination requested in the immediate postoperative period, whereas gastrointestinal contrast studies are used to look for specific complications. In some countries, especially in Europe, sonography is widely employed to evaluate any acute affection of the abdomen. CT is commonly used to assess postoperative abdominal complications; in our institution also CT enteroclysis is often performed, to provide additional important informations. Radiologist should be able to diagnose less common types of obstruction, such as afferent loop, closed loop, strangulating obstruction as well as internal hernia. This knowledge may assume a critical importance for surgeons to decide on therapy. In this article, we focus our attention on the imaging (particularly CT) in small bowel complications following abdominal surgery

  9. Oral versus intravenous premedication for small bowel biopsy in children: effect on procedure and fluoroscopy times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenhammar, L; Wärngård, O; Lewander, P; Nordvall, M

    1993-01-01

    Oral alimemazine and cisapride, or diazepam and cisapride, or iv midazolam and metoclopramide were given as premedication for small bowel biopsy to three groups of children from a total population of 185 individuals. The biopsy procedures were performed under intermittent fluoroscopy and times for both were recorded. The median biopsy procedure time was significantly shorter in children given iv midazolam and metoclopramide (6 min) compared to those given oral premedication (10 min) (p < 0.001). The median fluoroscopy time was very short in all groups, ranging between 3 and 6 s. It is concluded that iv premedication is superior to oral premedication for small bowel biopsy in children because more effective sedation is obtained.

  10. Laparoscopic Treatment of a Rare Right Diaphragmatic Rupture with Small Bowel Herniation after Blunt Thoracic Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hoffmann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt traumatic diaphragmatic rupture (BTDR is a life-threatening condition with an incidence from 0,8%–1,6% in blunt trauma, mostly located on the left side. The main prognostic factors are severe side injuries and the delay of diagnosis. We present a rare case of a 68-year-old female, with an isolated right diaphragm rupture. The diagnosis was done with a delay of 4 days by thoracic radiographs, which showed a herniation of small bowel into the right thoracic cavity. A reposition of the small bowel and a closure of the diaphragmatic defect by running suture were carried out laparoscopicly. Although large prospective studies concerning the outcome of laparoscopic approach to right BTDR are still missing, we could show, that laparoscopy can be performed safely in right traumatic diaphragm rupture.

  11. Fetal small bowel volvulus without malrotation: the whirlpool & coffee bean signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakhere, S G; Saifi, S A; Ranwaka, A A

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal volvulus is a common condition seen in infancy and adulthood, but small bowel volvulus is a rare condition affecting the fetus in utero. Very few cases have been reported describing the ultrasound findings of the same. We present a case report of a case of intestinal volvulus which was diagnosed prenatally based on the ultrasound features of whirlpool sign and coffee bean sign. An emergency caesarian section was performed, small bowel volvulus was confirmed on post-natal ultrasound, and the neonate was subsequently operated. Although these signs have been separately described previously in the literature, in our case both these signs were seen in the same patient. Our case is a rare presentation with the occurrence of volvulus without malrotation, the contrary being more common.

  12. Radiologic findings of small bowel rupture due to blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Hyeon Kweun; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1987-01-01

    Bowel rupture due to blunt abdominal trauma is no longer rare, and is among the most challenging problems that confront the physicians and radiologists. It is frequently difficult to diagnose because the symptoms may be trivial during the early stage and masked by more obvious, but less lethal injuries. It is well known that the roentgen examination of the abdomen is also of little value to exclude bowel rupture because of infrequency of positive findings and free gas. The plain films of 23 cases of jejunal rupture and 8 cases of ileal rupture were evaluated to sort and diagnostic features of small bowel rupture caused by blunt abdominal trauma. 1. Free intraperitoneal gas was noted in 6 cases of jejunal rupture (26%) and 1 case of ileal rupture (13%), and definite radiological evidence of free intraperitoneal fluid was present in 16 cases of patients (52%). 2. The contour change of bowel loops such as tapering or indentation were seen in 11 cases of patients (36%), and local opacity along the mesenteric root axis was demonstrated in 19 cases of patients (61%). 3. Paralytic ileus was localized to LUQ in jejunal rupture and to mid-abdomen in ileal rupture, and gastric and transverse-colon distension with gas was noticeable especially in jejunal rupture

  13. Consensus guidelines for the use of bowel preparation prior to colonic diagnostic procedures: colonoscopy and small bowel video capsule endoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth; Pellisé, Maria; Heresbach, Denis; Fischbach, Wolfgang; Dixon, Tricia; Belsey, Jonathan; Parente, Fabrizio; Rio-Tinto, Ricardo; Brown, Alistair; Toth, Ervin; Crosta, Cristiano; Layer, Peter; Epstein, Owen; Boustiere, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Adequate bowel preparation prior to colonic diagnostic procedures is essential to ensure adequate visualisation. This consensus aims to provide guidance as to the appropriate use of bowel preparation for a range of defined clinical circumstances. A consensus group from across Europe was convened and

  14. Modified temporary end-to-side portocaval shunt in liver and small bowel transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molmenti, E P; Marsh, J W; Molmenti, H; Reyes, J; Fung, J J

    2001-10-01

    Piggyback orthotopic liver transplantation (LTx) has permitted the elimination of extra-corporeal venovenous bypass. In some instances, an internal temporary portocaval shunt has to be constructed in order to prevent hemodynamic instability. We describe a technique in which a donor iliac vein graft is used to bridge the distance between the portal vein and vena cava in cases where a direct shunt cannot be constructed. This technique can be applied to liver Tx as well as to liver and small bowel Tx.

  15. The effects of erythromycin in small-bowel follow-through

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hyun Yong; Lee, Young Hwan; Jung, Kyung Jae; Chung, Duck Soo; Kim, Ok Dong; Hwang, Jin Bok [Catholic Univ. School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of erythromycin(EM), known to accelerate gastric emptying, in modified small-bowel follow-through(SBFT). We evaluated 32 normal patients who underwent modified SBFT by oral administration of methylcellulose. In the EM injection group(n=20), 500 mg EM (3 mg/kg in pediatric patients) in 100 ml saline was infused intravenously over a 15-minute period prior to the administration of a barium meal, while in the control group(n=12), EM was not infused. Gastric emptying time(GET), small-bowel transit time(SBTT) for barium and methylcellulose, small-bowel transit(SBT) during the first 15 minutes, luminal diameter and quality of image were compared between the two groups. SBT was assigned 1, 2, 3, or 4 points, depending on the extent to which the barium head reached the proximal or distal jejunum, and the proximal or distal ileum during the initial 15-minute. Three radiologists reached a consensus as to image quality. Mean GET was significantly faster in the EM injection group (18.5 mins for 150 ml barium suspension and 25.8 mins for 600 ml methylcellulose). The SBT score during the initial 15 minutes was significantly higher in the EM injection group (3.3 points) than in the control group (2.4points), but mean SBTT was not significantly different between the two groups. Luminal diameter and image quality were also higher in the EM injection group. EM does not decrease SBTT but is highly effective for shortening gastric emptying time, helping to increase the range of fluoroscopic examination and improve image quality in modified small-bowel follow-through, especially in patients with delayed gastric emptying.

  16. Spontaneous transmesenteric hernia: a rare cause of small bowel obstruction in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poras Chaudhary

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of spontaneous transmesenteric hernia with strangulation in an adult. Transmesenteric hernia (TMH is a rare cause of small bowel obstruction and is seldom diagnosed preoperatively, and most TMHs in adults are related to predisposing factors, such as previous surgery, abdominal trauma, and peritonitis. TMH are more likely to develop volvulus and strangulation or ischemia. A brief review of etiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment is discussed.

  17. The role of multidetector computed tomography in evaluation of small bowel obstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Fatih İnci

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate therole and additional diagnostic contribution of multi-detectorcomputed tomography (MDCT in patients with acuteabdominal pain caused by small bowel obstruction.Materials and methods: A total of 48 patients who admittedto our hospital with acute abdominal pain and underwentMDCT on suspicion of intestinal obstruction and hadabdominal surgery between January 2012 and October2012 were included to our study. MDCT images were interpretedby two experienced radiologist retrospectively.All clinical data and surgery notes also were evaluated.Patients had surgery due to penetrating or blunt abdominalinjury were excluded.Results: Of these 48 patients, 26 (54.1% were male and22 (45.9% were female. Patients’ ages ranged 25 to 71and mean age was 52±5.4 years. The causes of intestinalobstruction of patients were adhesions for 12 (46.1% patients,tumors for 7 (26.9% patients, external hernias for5 (19.2% patients, internal hernia for 1 (3.9% patient andintussusception for 1 (3.9% patient. A total concordancebetween the MDCT findings and definitive diagnosis wasfound in 26 of 23 cases and the sensitivity and specifityof MDCT in the diagnosis of small bowel obstruction werefound to be 88.5% and 90%, respectively.Conclusion: MDCT is a fast, effective and reliable imagingmethod for preoperative diagnosing small bowel obstructioncauses acute abdominal pain with the advantagesof MDCT such as multi-planar and three-dimensionalreformatted imaging.Key words: Acute abdominal pain, multi-detector computed tomography, small bowel obstruction

  18. Detection of unsuspected colonic abnormalities using the pneumocolon technique during small bowel meal examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, S.; Skehan, S.J.; Brown, A.L.; Rawlinson, J.; Somers, S.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS: The pneumocolon technique in small bowel meal examination is used to obtain double-contrast views of the distal ileum. The purpose of this study was to determine the proportion of cases in which an overhead pneumocolon radiograph demonstrated clinically relevant findings in the colon. METHODS: The overhead pneumocolon radiographs in 151 patients who underwent small bowel meals were evaluated retrospectively. A chart review was performed on those patients with positive colonic findings to determine if the suspected abnormalities affected patient management. RESULTS: Colonic abnormalities were identified in 34 of the 151 patients. One patient had a previously undiagnosed ascending colonic cancer; 17 had evidence of acute or chronic colitis; 13 had diverticulosis; one had a caecal polyp; one had an ileosigmoid fistula; one had a filling defect in the ascending colon. In 25 cases the colonic abnormality was visible only on the pneumocolon radiograph and not on the preceding single-contrast images. Management was altered by the colonic findings in seven cases. False-positive findings occurred in two cases. CONCLUSIONS: A routine overhead radiograph following use of the pneumocolon technique is a useful adjunct to small bowel meal examination as it can yield unsuspected and clinically significant colonic findings. Chou, S. (2000)

  19. Spontaneous sublingual and intramural small-bowel hematoma in a patient on oral anticoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Moftah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous sublingual hematoma and intramural small bowel hematoma are rare and serious complications of anticoagulant therapy. Though previously reported individually, there has been no previous report of the same two complications occurring in a single patient. A 71-year-old Caucasian man, who was on warfarin for atrial fibrillation, presented with difficulty in swallowing due to a sublingual hematoma. He was observed in our intensive care unit, his warfarin was held and he recovered with conservative management. He represented two months later with a two day history of abdominal pain and distension. An abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT scan now showed small bowel obstruction due to intramural small bowel hematoma and haemorrhagic ascites. Again, this was treated expectantly with a good outcome. In conclusion, life threatening haemorrhagic complications of oral anticoagulant therapy can recur. Conservative treatment is successful in most cases, but an accurate diagnosis is mandatory to avoid unnecessary surgery. CT scan is the investigation of choice for the diagnosis of suspected haemorrhagic complications of over coagulation.

  20. Graft-versus-host reaction in small bowel transplantation and possibilities for its circumvention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deltz, E.; Ulrichs, K.; Schack, T.; Friedrichs, B.; Mueller-Ruchholtz, W.M.; Mueller-Hermelink, H.K.T.; Thiede, A.

    1986-01-01

    To describe GVHR in small bowel transplantation and its underlying mechanisms and to find methods for circumventing that response, accessory small bowel transplantation was carried out in the rat model. Animals not treated with cyclosporine, irradiation, or removal of the mesenteric lymph nodes of the graft died within 22 days postoperatively due to graft versus host disease. Mesenteric lymph nodes of the graft and recipient spleen and peripheral lymph nodes showed strong immunologic stimulation histologically and high antihost T-cell-mediated cytotoxic antihost reactivity. Seventy-one percent of the animals that had received 15 mg of cyclosporine per kilogram body weight orally survived 150 days after transplantation. After donor irradiation with 50 rads, 77 percent of the recipients survived 120 days. After microsurgical removal of the mesenteric lymph nodes of the graft, 89 percent survived 120 days. We conclude that GVHR plays an important role in small bowel transplantation and that the experimental regimens of donor, graft, and recipient treatment described herein have proved their efficacy for circumventing GVHR

  1. Software-assisted small bowel motility analysis using free-breathing MRI: feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Froehlich, Johannes M; Cattin, Roger; Raible, Stephan; Bouquet, Hanspeter; Bill, Urs; Patak, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    To validate a software prototype allowing for small bowel motility analysis in free breathing by comparing it to manual measurements. In all, 25 patients (15 male, 10 female; mean age 39 years) were included in this Institutional Review Board-approved, retrospective study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on a 1.5T system after standardized preparation acquiring motility sequences in free breathing over 69-84 seconds. Small bowel motility was analyzed manually and with the software. Functional parameters, measurement time, and reproducibility were compared using the coefficient of variance and paired Student's t-test. Correlation was analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient and linear regression. The 25 segments were analyzed twice both by hand and using the software with automatic breathing correction. All assessed parameters significantly correlated between the methods (P software (3.90%, standard deviation [SD] ± 5.69) than manual examinations (9.77%, SD ± 11.08). The time needed was significantly less (P software (4.52 minutes, SD ± 1.58) compared to manual measurement, lasting 17.48 minutes for manual (SD ± 1.75 minutes). The use of the software proves reliable and faster small bowel motility measurements in free-breathing MRI compared to manual analyses. The new technique allows for analyses of prolonged sequences acquired in free breathing, improving the informative value of the examinations by amplifying the evaluable data. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Detected peritoneal fluid in small bowel obstruction is associated with the need for surgical intervention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Daly, Brendan J

    2009-06-01

    BACKGROUND: Predicting the clinical course in adhesional small bowel obstruction is difficult. There are no validated clinical or radiologic features that allow early identification of patients likely to require surgical intervention. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of 100 patients consecutively admitted to a tertiary level teaching hospital over a 3-year period (2002-2004) who had acute adhesional small bowel obstruction and underwent computed tomography (CT). The primary outcomes that we assessed were conservative management or the need for surgical intervention. We investigated time to physiologic gastrointestinal function recovery as a secondary outcome. We examined independent predictors of surgical intervention in a bivariate analysis using a stepwise logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Of the 100 patients investigated, we excluded 12. Of the 88 remaining patients, 58 (66%) were managed conservatively and 30 (34%) underwent surgery. Peritoneal fluid detected on a CT scan (n = 37) was associated more frequently with surgery than conservative management (46% v. 29%, p = 0.046, chi(2)). Logistical regression identified peritoneal fluid detected on a CT scan as an independent predictor of surgical intervention (odds ratio 3.0, 95% confidence interval 1.15-7.84). CONCLUSION: The presence of peritoneal fluid on a CT scan in patients with adhesional small bowel obstruction is an independent predictor of surgical intervention and should alert the clinician that the patient is 3 times more likely to require surgery.

  3. Metastatic osteosarcoma to the small bowel with resultant intussusception: a case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; West, Danel C.

    2003-01-01

    Intussusception resulting from osteosarcoma metastasis to the small bowel is a rare diagnosis. This case report describes a patient with this diagnosis, demonstrates the CT appearance of this lesion, and reviews the literature. (orig.)

  4. CLMP is required for intestinal development, and loss-of-function mutations cause congenital short-bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Werf, Christine S.; Wabbersen, Tara D.; Hsiao, Nai-Hua; Paredes, Joana; Etchevers, Heather C.; Kroisel, Peter M.; Tibboel, Dick; Babarit, Candice; Schreiber, Richard A.; Hoffenberg, Edward J.; Vekemans, Michel; Zeder, Sirkka L.; Ceccherini, Isabella; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Ribeiro, Ana S.; Seruca, Raquel; Meerman, Gerard J. Te; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.; Shepherd, Iain T.; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Short-bowel syndrome usually results from surgical resection of the small intestine for diseases such as intestinal atresias, volvulus, and necrotizing enterocolitis. Patients with congenital short-bowel syndrome (CSBS) are born with a substantial shortening of the small

  5. An experimental study on radiological examination of obstructed small bowel with various contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong; Kim, Sung Jin; Han, Moon Hee; Park, Jae Hyung

    1991-01-01

    For the evaluation of the level and cause of small bowel obstruction, an oral barium study is usually chosen. When perforation is whether barium or a water-soluble contrast agent should be used, because barium causes from foreign body reactions as well as adhesions in the extraluminal tissues. Water-soluble contrast agent, on the other hand, are less satisfactory but in general have no untoward effects in the extraluminal tissues. Because of hyperosomolarity, water-soluble contrast agents attract large amounts of fluid with subsequent dilution and loss of contrast and pose a risk of pulmonary edema if aspirated. The use of the newer non-ionic and low-osmolarity water-soluble contrast will likely avoid pulmonary complications due to aspiration. The author performed this experimental study to compare the radiological efficacy of different contrast media in enteric follow-through examinations of obstructed small bowel. Rate had a ligature applied to the distal ileum via laparotomy. Four contrast media were subjected to testing by instillation via oro-gastric tube immediately after laparotomy. Radiographs were exposed at 1, 4 and 8 hours and evaluated later. After 24 hours the animals were sacrificed and the stomach and small bowels, free from mesentery and omental tissue, were weighted with contrasts. The progression in the bowel was proportionate to the osmolarity of the contrast media. After 1 hour, the observations indicated sodium diatrizoate (Gastrografin, Schering) to be the least favorable medium with respect to sharpness of the mucosal border. After 8 hours, barium gave a poorer delineation compared to Ioxaglate (Hexabric, Guerbet) and Iopromide (Ultravist, Schering). Early deaths were noted in the sodium diatrizoate and ioxaglate groups. So we conclude that when using a rather high-volume bolus, low-osmolar non-ionic contrast media seem to have significant prospects for general diagnostic use in patients with suspected intestinal obstruction

  6. Virtual endoscopy of the small bowel: phantom study and preliminary clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogalla, P.; Werner-Rustner, M.; Meiri, N.; Hamm, B.; Huitema, A.; van Est, A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal scanning technique for lesion detection in a small bowel phantom and to evaluate the virtual endoscopy (VE) technique in patients. A small bowel phantom with a fold thickness of 7 mm and length of 115 cm was prepared with nine round lesions (3 x 1 mm, 2 x 2 mm, 2 x 3 mm, 2 x 4 mm). Spiral CT parameters were 7/7/4, 3/5/2, 3/5/1, 1.5/3/1 (slice thickness/table feed/reconstruction interval). VE was done using volume rendering technique with 1 cm distance between images and 120 viewing angle. Two masked readers were asked to determine the number and location of the lesions. Seven patients underwent an abdominal CT during one breathhold after placement of a duodenal tube and filling of the small bowel with methyl cellulose contrast solution. VE images were compared with the axial slices with respect to detectability of pathology. With the 7/7/4 protocol only the 4-mm lesions were visualised with fuzzy contours. The 3/5/2 protocol showed both 4-mm lesions, one 3-mm lesion and one false positive lesion. The 3/5/1 protocol showed both 4-mm and both 3-mm (one uncertain) lesions with improved sharpness, and no false positive lesions. One 2-mm and one 1-mm lesion were additionally seen with the 1.5/3/1 protocol. Path definition was difficult in sharp turns or kinks in the lumen. In all patients, no difference was found between VE and axial slices for bowel pathology; however, axial slices showed 'outside' information that was not included in VE. We conclude that the 3/5/2 protocol may be regarded as an optimal compromise between lesion detection, coverage during one breathhold, and number of reconstructed images in patients; round lesions of 4 mm in diameter can be detected with high certainty. (orig.)

  7. Obstructive Bezoars of the Small Bowel Treated with Coca-Cola Zero through a Long Intestinal Tube and Endoscopic Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Kei; Kakisaka, Keisuke; Suzuki, Yuji; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Takikawa, Yasuhiro

    2017-11-15

    An 82-year-old Japanese man visited our hospital with abdominal fullness accompanied by lower abdominal pain. He presented with small bowel obstruction due to multiple diospyrobezoars. The bezoars were successfully removed without any surgical intervention by the administration of Coca-Cola Zero through a long intestinal tube and subsequent endoscopic manipulation. Such a combination may be the treatment of choice for small bowel obstruction due to bezoars.

  8. A CASE OF CLOSED LOOP SMALL BOWEL OBSTRUCTION WITHIN A STRANGULATED INCISIONAL HERNIA IN ASSOCIATION WITH AN ACUTE GASTRIC VOLVULUS

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    Nik Ritza Kosai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel obstruction is a common clinical problem presenting with abdominal distention, colicky pain, absolute constipation and bilious vomiting. There are numerous causes, most commonly attributed to an incarcerated hernia, adhesions or obstructing mass secondary to malignancy. Here we present an unusual cause of a small bowel obstruction secondary to an incarcerated incisional hernia in association with an acute organoaxial gastric volvulus.

  9. Application of Intraoperative Ultrasonography for Guiding Microneurosurgical Resection of Small Subcortical Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jia; Duan, Yun You; Liu, Xi; Wang, Yu; Gao, Guo Dong; Qin, Huai Zhou; Wang, Liang

    2011-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the clinical value of intraoperative ultrasonography for real-time guidance when performing microneurosurgical resection of small subcortical lesions. Fifty-two patients with small subcortical lesions were involved in this study. The pathological diagnoses were cavernous hemangioma in 25 cases, cerebral glioma in eight cases, abscess in eight cases, small inflammatory lesion in five cases, brain parasite infection in four cases and the presence of an intracranial foreign body in two cases. An ultrasonic probe was sterilized and lightly placed on the surface of the brain during the operation. The location, extent, characteristics and adjacent tissue of the lesion were observed by high frequency ultrasonography during the operation. All the lesions were located in the cortex and their mean size was 1.3 ± 0.2 cm. Intraoperative ultrasonography accurately located all the small subcortical lesions, and so the neurosurgeon could provide appropriate treatment. Different lesion pathologies presented with different ultrasonic appearances. Cavernous hemangioma exhibited irregular shapes with distinct margins and it was mildly hyperechoic or hyperechoic. The majority of the cerebral gliomas displayed irregular shapes with indistinct margins, and they often showed cystic and solid mixed echoes. Postoperative imaging identified that the lesions had completely disappeared, and the original symptoms of all the patients were significantly alleviated. Intraoperative ultrasonography can help accurately locate small subcortical lesions and it is helpful for selecting the proper approach and guiding thorough resection of these lesions.

  10. Application of Intraoperative Ultrasonography for Guiding Microneurosurgical Resection of Small Subcortical Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jia; Duan, Yun You; Liu, Xi; Wang, Yu; Gao, Guo Dong; Qin, Huai Zhou; Wang, Liang [Tangdu Hospital of the Fourth Military Medicine University, Xi an (China)

    2011-10-15

    We wanted to evaluate the clinical value of intraoperative ultrasonography for real-time guidance when performing microneurosurgical resection of small subcortical lesions. Fifty-two patients with small subcortical lesions were involved in this study. The pathological diagnoses were cavernous hemangioma in 25 cases, cerebral glioma in eight cases, abscess in eight cases, small inflammatory lesion in five cases, brain parasite infection in four cases and the presence of an intracranial foreign body in two cases. An ultrasonic probe was sterilized and lightly placed on the surface of the brain during the operation. The location, extent, characteristics and adjacent tissue of the lesion were observed by high frequency ultrasonography during the operation. All the lesions were located in the cortex and their mean size was 1.3 {+-} 0.2 cm. Intraoperative ultrasonography accurately located all the small subcortical lesions, and so the neurosurgeon could provide appropriate treatment. Different lesion pathologies presented with different ultrasonic appearances. Cavernous hemangioma exhibited irregular shapes with distinct margins and it was mildly hyperechoic or hyperechoic. The majority of the cerebral gliomas displayed irregular shapes with indistinct margins, and they often showed cystic and solid mixed echoes. Postoperative imaging identified that the lesions had completely disappeared, and the original symptoms of all the patients were significantly alleviated. Intraoperative ultrasonography can help accurately locate small subcortical lesions and it is helpful for selecting the proper approach and guiding thorough resection of these lesions.

  11. The glucose breath test: a diagnostic test for small bowel stricture(s) in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, Daniel; Boston, Francis M; Blank, David; Yalovsky, Morty; Mishkin, Seymour

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an indirect noninvasive indicator of proximal bacterial overgrowth, the glucose breath test, was of diagnostic value in inflammatory bowel disease. Twenty four of 71 Crohn's disease patients tested had a positive glucose breath test. No statistical conclusions could be drawn between the Crohn's disease activity index and glucose breath test status. Of patients with radiologic evidence of small bowel stricture(s), 96.0% had a positive glucose breath test, while only one of 46 negative glucose breath test patients had a stricture. The positive and negative predictive values for a positive glucose breath test as an indicator of stricture formation were 96.0% and 97.8%, respectively. This correlation was not altered in Crohn's disease patients with fistulae or status postresection of the terminal ileum. The data in ulcerative colitis were nondiagnostic. In conclusion, the glucose breath test appears to be an accurate noninvasive inexpensive diagnostic test for small bowel stricture(s) and secondary bacterial overgrowth in Crohn's disease.

  12. Autoimmune Hepatitis with Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis and Small Bowel Partial Malrotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaiyalal Modi, Tejas; Parikh, Hardik; Sadalge, Abhishek; Gupte, Amit; Bhatt, Pratin; Shukla, Akash

    2015-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is not uncommon in patient with chronic autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), but usually remains latent. Here, we report a case of renal tubular acidosis RTA who presented with AIH. She was also diagnosed to have partial bowel malrotation. A 9-year-old girl, a case of distal RTA, presented with jaundice, abdominal distension and altered sensorium. She was diagnosed to be AIH, which was successfully treated with steroids and azathioprine. Coexistent midgut partial malrotation with volvulus was diagnosed during the treatment. She was treated successfully with anti-tuberculous treatment for cervical lymphadenitis. Autoimmune hepatitis should not be ruled out in each case of RTA presenting with jaundice. Modi TK, Parikh H, Sadalge A, Gupte A, Bhatt P, Shukla A. Autoimmune Hepatitis with Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis and Small Bowel Partial Malrotation. Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2015;5(2):107-109.

  13. Small bowel permeability to 51Cr-EDTA in children with recurrent abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meer, S.B. van der.; Forget, P.P.

    1990-01-01

    Small bowel permeability was investigated in 87 children with recurrent abdominal pain by measuring the 24-h urinary excretion of orally administered 51 Cr-EDTA. The mean excreation was 3.64% ± 1.49% per 24 h. The difference between the mean urinary excretion in children with recurrent abdominal pain and control children (2.51% ± 0.70%), was significant (p<0.01, two sample t-test). The increased small permeability in children with recurrent abdominal pain might indicate an intestinal etiology for the patients complaints

  14. Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma Complicating Coeliac Disease: A Report of Three Cases and the Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafida Benhammane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coeliac disease is associated with an increased risk of malignancy, not only of intestinal lymphoma but also of small intestinal adenocarcinoma which is 82 times more common in patients with celiac disease than in the normal population. We report three additional cases of a small bowel adenocarcinoma in the setting of coeliac disease in order to underline the epidemiological features, clinicopathological findings, and therapeutic approaches of this entity based on a review of the literature. The three patients underwent a surgical treatment followed by adjuvant chemotherapy based on capecitabine/oxaliplatin regimen, and they have well recovered.

  15. Short bowel syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donohoe, Claire L

    2012-02-01

    The short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a state of malabsorption following intestinal resection where there is less than 200 cm of intestinal length. The management of short bowel syndrome can be challenging and is best managed by a specialised multidisciplinary team. A good understanding of the pathophysiological consequences of resection of different portions of the small intestine is necessary to anticipate and prevent, where possible, consequences of SBS. Nutrient absorption and fluid and electrolyte management in the initial stages are critical to stabilisation of the patient and to facilitate the process of adaptation. Pharmacological adjuncts to promote adaptation are in the early stages of development. Primary restoration of bowel continuity, if possible, is the principle mode of surgical treatment. Surgical procedures to increase the surface area of the small intestine or improve its function may be of benefit in experienced hands, particularly in the paediatric population. Intestinal transplant is indicated at present for patients who have failed to tolerate long-term parenteral nutrition but with increasing experience, there may be a potentially expanded role for its use in the future.

  16. Protective fibrin-sealed plication of the small bowel in recurrent laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland-Cunz, S; Boelter, A V; Waag, K L

    2003-09-01

    Adhesions after recurrent abdominal operations remain extremely common and are sources of severe morbidity. Fibrin-glued plication of the small gut in a meander-like formation is supposed to guarantee a decreased risk of intestinal obstruction postoperatively. This retrospective study analyses the clinical outcome after recurrent laparotomy in children treated with bowel plication by fibrin sealant. The surgical technique of performing the fibrin-glued plication is rather simple and quick: after taking off all adhesions two to four loops of the small gut are positioned so that they lie side by side. Beginning proximal fibrin [Tissucol fibrin sealant (Baxter)] is applied between the loops; approximately 20-30 s are needed to keep the loops in position until the fibrin dries. This manoeuvre is continued until all of the small gut is fixed in one block. The gut is brought back into the abdominal cavity without loosening the loops. This fixed formation by sero-serosal adhesions or mesenterial plications is supposed to guarantee postoperative free passage. The charts of 60 children who had undergone a fibrin plication of the small bowel between 1991 and 1999 were evaluated. Additionally, questionnaires were sent to all patients, and they were invited for an examination. Sixty patients (38 boys and 22 girls) received a fibrin sealant plication because of recurrent laparotomies with heavily serosal defects or recurrent ileus because of adhesions. The youngest baby was 10 days. Since 23 patients were premature the oldest patient was 11 years old. There were no intraoperative complications attributed to the method. In the postoperative period 7/60 (12%) patients had a recurrent ileus or subileus, leading in three (5%) patients to an early relaparotomy. The fibrin-glued plication of the small bowel decreases the risk of recurrent ileus or subileus considering the high figures in the literature concerning this issue. The time-saving method is very simple and easily feasible

  17. Small bowel Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors can physiologically alter gut motility before causing mechanical obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Kothari, Manish S; Kosmoliaptsis, Vasilis; Meyrick-Thomas, John

    2005-01-01

    Background Gastro Intestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs) are rare stromal neoplasms that represent the most common mesenchymal tumor of the G.I. tract, accounting for 5% of all sarcomas [1,2]. Originating from interstitial cells of Cajal, which are regulators of gut peristalsis, they are preferentially located in the stomach and the small intestine [3] and clinical presentation is variable, ranging from vague complaints to major G.I. bleeding. Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment for pa...

  18. The use of alvimopan for postoperative ileus in small and large bowel resections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Justin T; Dosokey, Eslam M G; Crawshaw, Benjamin P; Steele, Scott R; Delaney, Conor P

    2015-01-01

    Transient ileus is a normal physiologic process after surgery. When prolonged, it is an important contributor to postoperative complications, increased length of stay and increased healthcare costs. Efforts have been made to prevent and manage postoperative ileus; alvimopan is an oral, peripheral μ-opioid receptor antagonist, and the only currently US FDA-approved medication to accelerate the return of gastrointestinal function postoperatively.

  19. Prophylactic cranial irradiation in resected small cell lung cancer: A systematic review with meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Danhong; Zhou, Xia; Bao, Wuan; Ji, Yonglin; Sheng, Liming; Cheng, Lei; Chen, Ying; Du, Xianghui; Qiu, Guoqin

    2018-01-01

    Background: The use of PCI in early operable patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is still controversial. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis to investigate the effects of PCI in resected SCLC patients. Methods: Relevant studies were identified from PubMed and EMBASE databases, the pooled hazard risks were obtained by the random-effects model. We also analyzed the brain metastasis (BM) risk in p-stage I patients without PCI. Results: Five retrospective studies were identified and a total of 1691 patients were included in our analysis, 315 of them received PCI. For all the resected patients, PCI was associated with improved overall survival (HR: 0.52, 95% CI: 0.33-0.82), and reduced brain metastasis risk (RR: 0.50, 95%CI: 0.32-0.78). However, with regard to p-stage I patients, no survival benefit was brought by PCI (HR: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.34-2.24). Moreover, the pooled analysis of 7 studies found that the 5-year brain metastasis risk was relatively low (12%, 95% CI: 8%-17%) for p-stage I patients without PCI. Conclusions: PCI might be associated with a favorable survival advantage and reduced BM risk in complete resected SCLC patients, except for p-stage I patients. PMID:29344290

  20. Diaphragm disease of the small intestine: an interesting case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Sana; Ajab, Shereen; Rao, Rajashekhar; Raghunathan, Girish; DaCosta, Philip

    2015-06-01

    Diaphragm disease of small intestine usually presents with nonspecific clinical features. Radiological investigations often fail to differentiate it from small intestinal tumors and inflammatory bowel disease. It is therefore diagnosed on final histology after surgical resection. We hereby report an interesting case of a suspected small bowel tumor later diagnosed as diaphragm disease on histology. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Microscopic colitis and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth--diagnosis behind the irritable bowel syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoicescu, Adriana; Andrei, M; Becheanu, G; Stoicescu, M; Nicolaie, T; Diculescu, M

    2012-01-01

    Some patients previously diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may develop microscopic colitis or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). To estimate the prevalence of microscopic colitis and SIBO in patients with IBS, to evaluate the symptoms and the efficacy of treatment. We examined patients with IBS admitted in our clinic during a three-year period. We identified patients with microscopic colitis by performing total colonoscopy with multiple biopsies from normal intestinal mucosa and those with SIBO by performing a H2-breath test with glucose. We compared the symptoms and the effectiveness of the treatment. Out of the 132 patients initially diagnosed with IBS 3% (n=4) had microscopic colitis and 43.9% (n=58) had SIBO. Diarrhea was the main symptom in patients with microscopic colitis and SIBO (p=0.041), while abdominal pain, abdominal bloating and flatulence were prominent in IBS patients (p=0.042; p=0.039; p=0.048). Specific treatment with rifaximin in SIBO patients negativated H2-breath test in 70.9% cases. Patients suspected to have irritable bowel syndrome should be evaluated for microscopic colitis and SIBO. The proper diagnosis and the specific treatment may cure some difficult cases of the so called "irritable bowel syndrome".

  2. Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence with Small Bowel Evisceration 14 Months after Total Abdominal Hysterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nida Jareemit, M.D.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vaginal cuff dehiscence is a rare complication following hysterectomy. The condition coexisting with intraabdominal organ evisceration occurs even rarer. Nevertheless this should not be neglected owing to high morbidity and mortality. Case presentation: The reported case is a 48-year-old widow presenting with vaginal cuff dehiscence and small bowel evisceration after undergoing a total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH in the past 14 months due to myoma uteri. She denied having a history of sexual intercourse after the operation. The exposed bowel, 60 cm in length, appeared viable and no peritoneal sign was observed. There was a vaginal cuff defect approximately 3 cm in length. An exploratory laparotomy was then carried out. Eviscerated bowel was reduced back in the abdominal cavity and the vaginal cuff defect was repaired. No complications such as recurrent dehiscence were observed during one year follow-up. Conclusion: To minimize the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence after hysterectomy, surgical techniques should be of concern. Patient instructions, including delaying sexual intercourse and avoiding all possible causes of increased intra-abdominal pressure should be provided postoperatively.

  3. Current Treatments for Surgically Resectable, Limited-Stage, and Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2017-12-01

    The prevalence of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has declined in the U.S. as the prevalence of tobacco use has declined. However, a significant number of people in the U.S. are current or former smokers and are at risk of developing SCLC. Routine histological or cytological evaluation can reliably make the diagnosis of SCLC, and immunohistochemistry stains (thyroid transcription factor-1, chromogranin, synaptophysin, and CD56) can be used if there is uncertainty about the diagnosis. Rarely do patients present with SCLC amendable to surgical resection, and evaluation requires a meticulous workup for extra-thoracic metastases and invasive staging of the mediastinum. Resected patients require adjuvant chemotherapy and/or thoracic radiation therapy (TRT), and prophylactic cranial radiation (PCI) should be considered depending on the stage. For limited-stage disease, concurrent platinum-etoposide and TRT followed by PCI is the standard. Thoracic radiation therapy should be started early in treatment, and can be given twice daily to 45 Gy or once daily to 60-70 Gy. For extensive-stage disease, platinum-etoposide remains the standard first-line therapy, and the standard second-line therapy is topotecan. Preliminary studies have demonstrated the activity of immunotherapy, and the response rate is approximately 10-30% with some durable responses observed. Rovalpituzumab tesirine, an antibody drug conjugate, has shown promising activity in patients with high delta-like protein 3 tumor expression (approximately 70% of patients with SCLC). The emergence of these and other promising agents has rekindled interest in drug development in SCLC. Several ongoing trials are investigating novel agents in the first-line, maintenance, and second-line settings. This review will provide an update on the standard therapies for surgically resected limited-stage small cell lung cancer and extensive-stage small cell lung cancer that have been investigated in recent clinical trials. © Alpha

  4. Unusual Case Report of Thrombotic Microangiopathy of the Small Bowel Following Liver Transplantation, a Possible Immunosuppressant-Induced Disease with Histological and Ultrastructural Findings

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    Domenico Piscitelli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclosporin-A (CsA and tacrolimus (FK-506 are immunomodulating agents used to prevent rejection in organ transplantation. They are both associated with several side effects, including nephrotoxicity and severe hypertension due to vascular injury, which often appears as a microvascular occlusive disorder (thrombotic microangiopathy, TMA. We report the first case of a microvascular occlusive disorder with the features of TMA in the small bowel of an orthotopic liver transplant (OLT patient after immunosuppressive therapy with CsA and FK506. The patient presented with severe recurrent abdominal colics and distal subocclusion, requiring aggressive surgical treatment. Histological and ultrastructural analysis of the resected specimen disclosed intestinal TMA. Although rare, such a complication should be considered in the differential diagnosis of abdominal colics in patients undergoing immunosuppressant therapy after OLT.

  5. Value of MDCT and Clinical and Laboratory Data for Predicting the Need for Surgical Intervention in Suspected Small-Bowel Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrima, Andrew; Lubner, Meghan G; King, Scott; Pankratz, Joshua; Kennedy, Gregory; Pickhardt, Perry J

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to assess the value of a large panel of clinical and MDCT variables in patients with suspected small-bowel obstruction (SBO) for predicting urgent surgical intervention (data were abstracted from electronic medical record review. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Among all 179 patients with suspected SBO, 56 (31.3%) underwent surgical intervention within 72 hours, 10 (5.6%) had ischemia at surgery, and nine (5.0%) required small-bowel resection. On univariate analysis, multiple CT findings were highly significant (p < 0.01) for predicting the main surgical outcomes, including degree of obstruction, 5-point radiology likelihood scores, and the presence of a transition point, closed loop, and mesenteric congestion. None of the objective clinical or laboratory variables (including serum lactate level) reached this level of significance. At multivariate analysis, forward stepwise logistic regression with 0.05 significance level cutoff included both degree of obstruction (p < 0.001) and closed loop (p < 0.01), with the presence of a transition point showing a trend toward significance (p = 0.081). A number of findings at abdominal MDCT are associated with the need for surgery and other important surgical outcomes in patients with suspected SBO. Overall radiologist impression of need for surgical intervention was a better predictor than any clinical or laboratory parameter.

  6. Endoscopic management of intraoperative small bowel laceration during natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery: a blinded porcine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyock, Christopher J; Forsmark, Chris E; Wagh, Mihir S

    2011-01-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has recently gained great enthusiasm, but there is concern regarding the ability to endoscopically manage complications purely via natural orifices. To assess the feasibility of endoscopically managing enteral perforation during NOTES using currently available endoscopic accessories. Twelve pigs underwent transgastric or transcolonic endoscopic exploration. Full-thickness enterotomies were intentionally created to mimic accidental small bowel lacerations during NOTES. These lacerations were then closed with endoclips. In the blinded arm of the study, small bowel repair was performed by a second blinded endoscopist. Adequate closure of the laceration was confirmed with a leak test. Primary access sites were closed with endoclips or T-anchors. At necropsy, the peritoneal cavity was inspected for abscesses, bleeding, or damage to surrounding structures. The enterotomy site was examined for adequacy of closure, adhesions, or evidence of infection. Fifteen small bowel lacerations were performed in 12 animals. Successful closure was achieved in all 10 cases in the nonblinded arm. Survival animals had an uncomplicated postoperative course and all enterotomy sites were well healed without evidence of necrosis, adhesions, abscess, or bleeding at necropsy. Leak test was negative in all animals. In the blinded arm, both small intestinal lacerations could not be identified by the blinded endoscopist. Necropsy revealed open small bowel lacerations. Small intestinal injuries are difficult to localize with currently available flexible endoscopes and accessories. Endoscopic clips, however, may be adequate for closure of small bowel lacerations if the site of injury is known.

  7. Consolidating duodenal and small bowel toxicity data via isoeffective dose calculations based on compiled clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Phillip; Tai, An; Erickson, Beth; Li, X Allen

    2014-01-01

    To consolidate duodenum and small bowel toxicity data from clinical studies with different dose fractionation schedules using the modified linear quadratic (MLQ) model. A methodology of adjusting the dose-volume (D,v) parameters to different levels of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was presented. A set of NTCP model parameters for duodenum toxicity were estimated by the χ(2) fitting method using literature-based tolerance dose and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) data. These model parameters were then used to convert (D,v) data into the isoeffective dose in 2 Gy per fraction, (D(MLQED2),v) and convert these parameters to an isoeffective dose at another NTCP (D(MLQED2'),v). The literature search yielded 5 reports useful in making estimates of duodenum and small bowel toxicity. The NTCP model parameters were found to be TD50(1)(model) = 60.9 ± 7.9 Gy, m = 0.21 ± 0.05, and δ = 0.09 ± 0.03 Gy(-1). Isoeffective dose calculations and toxicity rates associated with hypofractionated radiation therapy reports were found to be consistent with clinical data having different fractionation schedules. Values of (D(MLQED2'),v) between different NTCP levels remain consistent over a range of 5%-20%. MLQ-based isoeffective calculations of dose-response data corresponding to grade ≥2 duodenum toxicity were found to be consistent with one another within the calculation uncertainty. The (D(MLQED2),v) data could be used to determine duodenum and small bowel dose-volume constraints for new dose escalation strategies. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Studies of the small bowel surface by scanning electron microscopy in infants with persistent diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Fagundes-Neto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the ultrastructural abnormalities of the small bowel surface in 16 infants with persistent diarrhea. The age range of the patients was 2 to 10 months, mean 4.8 months. All patients had diarrhea lasting 14 or more days. Bacterial overgrowth of the colonic microflora in the jejunal secretion, at concentrations above 10(4 colonies/ml, was present in 11 (68.7% patients. The stool culture was positive for an enteropathogenic agent in 8 (50.0% patients: for EPEC O111 in 2, EPEC O119 in 1, EAEC in 1, and Shigella flexneri in 1; mixed infections due to EPEC O111 and EAEC in 1 patient, EPEC O119 and EAEC in 1 and EPEC O55, EPEC O111, EAEC and Shigella sonnei in 1. Morphological abnormalities in the small bowel mucosa were observed in all 16 patients, varying in intensity from moderate 9 (56.3% to severe 7 (43.7%. The scanning electron microscopic study of small bowel biopsies from these subjects showed several surface abnormalities. At low magnification (100X most of the villi showed mild to moderate stunting, but on several occasions there was subtotal villus atrophy. At higher magnification (7,500X photomicrographs showed derangement of the enterocytes; on several occasions the cell borders were not clearly defined and very often microvilli were decreased in number and height; in some areas there was a total disappearance of the microvilli. In half of the patients a mucus-fibrinoid pseudomembrane was seen partially coating the enterocytes, a finding that provides additional information on the pathophysiology of persistent diarrhea.

  9. Accelerating the transit time of barium sulphate suspensions in small bowel examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, David S.; Roger, Mark D.; Allan, Paul L.; Murchison, John T.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether hyperosmolar and effervescent agents proven individually to accelerate transit time in the barium small bowel examination have an additive effect when combined, surpassing that of either agent alone. Materials and methods: One hundred and forty-nine patients were randomised to four groups. Three hundred milliliters of barium sulphate alone was given to the first group. Fifteen milliliters of iodinated hyperosmolar contrast agent (Gastrografin, meglumine/sodium diatrizoate, Schering) was given in addition to barium sulphate to the second group while six packets of effervescent granules (Carbex, Ferring) were added for the third group. The final group was given a combination of both additives and barium sulphate. The time taken following ingestion for the contrast column to reach the caecum, as assessed by frequent interval fluoroscopy, was recorded. A subgroup of 32 patients were selected randomly from the four groups, 8 from each and assessed for quality of examination. Statistical assessments were made using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: One hundred and nineteen patients were analysed after exclusions. The addition of accelerant to barium sulphate, both individually and in combination significantly reduced the small bowel transit time (p < 0.001). No significant difference existed between the additives when used with barium alone. The combined group had significantly faster transit times compared to the hyperosmolar group (p = 0.02). Differences between combined and effervescent groups tended towards significance (p = 0.09). No significant difference existed between groups when examination quality was assessed. Conclusion: These results suggest that the addition of combined effervescent and hyperosmolar agents to the barium suspension may significantly shorten the small bowel transit time without adversely affecting examination quality. This has implications for patient acceptability of the examination as well as

  10. [Estimation of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with constipation and diarrhea irritable bowel syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łokieć, Katarzyna; Klupińska, Grazyna; Walecka-Kapica, Ewa; Błońska, Aleksandra

    2014-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common reason for gastroenterology consultations. The diverse in symptomatology of the disease comes from its rich etiopathogenesis. Recently studies talk about infectious etiology of IBS and because of that it is necessary to expand its diagnostics by small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) test. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with constipation (IBS-C) and diarrhea (IBS-D) irritable bowel syndrome with regard to nutrition. The study involved 46 subjects (33 women and 13 men) in average age of 44 years, which were divided into two groups: diarrhea and constipation IBS. All patients underwent hydrogen breath test studying bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine. In addition, each person had fulfilled a feeding questionnaire. Student's t-test, Pearson test. It has been shown that there is no statistical significances between the prevalence of SIBO in form of diarrheal IBS and constipation IBS and gender. Average value of increments of hydrogen in breath during the test was higher in IBS-C in comparison with IBS-D, which was the highest in the intestine bacterial overgrowth in patients with IBS-C. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS showed that there is no relationship between the type and frequency of consumption of milk, meat, fruit and vegetables, sweets and coffee and the prevalence of SIBO in form of diarrhea and constipation IBS. The occurrence of constipation or diarrhea irritable bowel syndrome is not related to gender. SIBO is more common in patients with IBS-C than in IBS-D group. There is no relationship between the type of food consumed and the amount of SIBO in people with IBS. Type of food intake do not affect the status of the intestinal flora of people with IBS.

  11. An Intestinal Occlusion Device for Prevention of Small Bowel Distention During Transgastric Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasko, Jonathan M.; Mathew, Abraham; Moyer, Matthew T.; Haluck, Randy S.; Pauli, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Bowel distention from luminal gas insufflation reduces the peritoneal operative domain during natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) procedures, increases the risk for iatrogenic injury, and leads to postoperative patient discomfort. Methods: A prototype duodenal occlusion device was placed in the duodenum before NOTES in 28 female pigs. The occlusion balloon was inflated and left in place during the procedure, and small bowel distension was subject...

  12. Clinico-Pathological Profile and Management of Acute Mechanical Small Bowel Obstruction: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahir Saleem Khan

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Abdominal pain and distention of the abdomen are the most common symptoms and physical findings in patients presenting with acute mechanical small bowel obstruction (SBO. Worm (ascaridial obstruction is the most common cause of obstruction followed by postoperative adhesions. Although all patients were managed conservatively to start with, the operative rate in our series remained very high because it is very difficult to distinguish simple from strangulation obstruction on clinical, biochemical and/or radiological grounds with certainty. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(3.000: 154-160

  13. Ectopic intestinal glands after segmental small bowel irradiation in the cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio, C.A.; Eriksson, B.; Johnsson, L.

    1983-01-01

    Following segmental irradiation of the small bowel, 5 of 64 cats demonstrated ectopic intestinal glands in the submucosal tissue. In addition, one of these 5 cats had foci of abnormal glands in the muscularis mucosae. In 2 of the 5 animals, cellular polymorphism, nucleolar irregularity and loss of cellular polarity were present in irradiation-induced ectopic intestinal glands. The review of the literature indicates that intestinal irradiation may induce intestinal adenocarcinomas with metastatic growth. The possibility that ectopic intestinal glands are precancerous lesions in the irradiated cat is discussed. (Auth.)

  14. Small bowel volvulus in pregnancy with associated superior mesenteric artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterson, Yonah B; Villani, Robert; Dela Cruz, Ronald A; Friedman, Barak; Grimaldi, Gregory M

    Here we report the case of a pregnant 28-year-old who presented with acute upper abdominal pain. CT demonstrated midgut volvulus with short segment occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). Emergent detorsion of the small bowel was performed, at which time underlying intestinal malrotation was discovered. Following detorsion, the SMA had a bounding pulse and did not require thrombectomy or revascularization. Fewer than 25 cases of midgut volvulus during pregnancy have been reported over the past 20years. To our knowledge, this is the first report of maternal midgut volvulus in which imaging captures the resultant occlusion of the SMA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Migration of eroded laparoscopic adjustable gastric band causing small bowel obstruction and perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekera, Ashvini; Lee, Jerry; Ghosh, Simon; Hacking, Craig

    2017-05-12

    We present an unusual and rare complication caused by gastric band erosion into the stomach after band placement 15 years ago. The complication was only picked up after the band had subsequently migrated from the stomach at the site of erosion, to the distal ileum causing acute small bowel obstruction and focal perforation requiring emergency laparotomy.Abdominal pain in patients with gastric band should always be treated as serious until proven otherwise. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Meckel’s diverticulitis causing small bowel obstruction by a novel mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishalkumar G. Shelat

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Meckel’s diverticulum occurs in 2% of the general population and majority of patients remain asymptomatic. Gastrointestinal bleeding is the most common presentation in the paediatric population. While asymptomatic and incidentally found Meckel’s diverticulum may be left alone, surgery is essential for treating a symptomatic patient. Despite advances in imaging and technology, pre-operative diagnosis is often difficult. We present a first report of an unusual mechanism of small bowel obstruction due to Meckel’s diverticulitis in a paediatric patient. The diagnosis was only apparent at laparotomy.

  17. The long-term results of resection and multiple resections in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupnick, A S; Morris, J B

    2000-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a panenteric, transmural inflammatory disease of unknown origin. Although primarily managed medically, 70% to 90% of patients will require surgical intervention. Surgery for small bowel Crohn's is usually necessary for unrelenting stenotic complications of the disease. Fistula, abscess, and perforation can also necessitate surgical intervention. Most patients benefit from resection or strictureplasty with an improved quality of life and remission of disease, but recurrence is common and 33% to 82% of patients will need a second operation, and 22% to 33% will require more than two resections. Short-bowel syndrome is unavoidable in a small percentage of Crohn's patients because of recurrent resection of affected small bowel and inflammatory destruction of the remaining mucosa. Although previously a lethal and unrelenting disease with death caused by malnutrition, patients with short-bowel syndrome today can lead productive lives with maintenance on total parenteral nutrition (TPN). This lifestyle, however, does not come without a price. Severe TPN-related complications, such as sepsis of indwelling central venous catheters and liver failure, do occur. Future developments will focus on more powerful and effective anti-inflammatory medication specifically targeting the immune mechanisms responsible for Crohn's disease. Successful medical management of the disease will alleviate the need for surgical resection and reduce the frequency of short-bowel syndrome. Improving the efficacy of immunosuppression and the understanding of tolerance induction should increase the safety and applicability of small-bowel transplant for those with short gut. Tissue engineering offers the potential to avoid immunosuppression altogether and supplement intestinal length using the patient's own tissues.

  18. Imaging findings of midgut volvuIus associated with a large small-bowel diverticulum in an aduIt patient: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jee Young; Rha, Sung Eun; Oh, Soon Nam; Bo, Seal Hwang; Byun, Jae Young [College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-05-01

    Although most patients with jejunoileal diverticulum are asymptomatic, a large, small-bowel diverticulum can be associated with midgut volvulus in an adult. We present a rare case of midgut volvulus that was associated with a large, small-bowel diverticulum in a 77-year-old woman presenting with chronic recurrent abdominal pain. The CT showed the characteristic whirl sign of twisted mesentery, the small bowel loops along the superior mesenteric artery and a large sac-like small-bowel diverticulum. A small bowel series also demonstrated a corkscrew appearance of proximal jejunum, a finding suggestive of midgut volvulus, and a large jejunal diverticulum. During the laparotomy, the small bowel was seen twisted counterclockwise 270 .deg.. The mesenteric root was very shortened. A 4 cm sized diverticulum was seen on the mesenteric border of jejunum, on the portion about 40 cm distal from the Treitz ligament.

  19. Imaging findings of midgut volvuIus associated with a large small-bowel diverticulum in an aduIt patient: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jee Young; Rha, Sung Eun; Oh, Soon Nam; Bo, Seal Hwang; Byun, Jae Young

    2004-01-01

    Although most patients with jejunoileal diverticulum are asymptomatic, a large, small-bowel diverticulum can be associated with midgut volvulus in an adult. We present a rare case of midgut volvulus that was associated with a large, small-bowel diverticulum in a 77-year-old woman presenting with chronic recurrent abdominal pain. The CT showed the characteristic whirl sign of twisted mesentery, the small bowel loops along the superior mesenteric artery and a large sac-like small-bowel diverticulum. A small bowel series also demonstrated a corkscrew appearance of proximal jejunum, a finding suggestive of midgut volvulus, and a large jejunal diverticulum. During the laparotomy, the small bowel was seen twisted counterclockwise 270 .deg.. The mesenteric root was very shortened. A 4 cm sized diverticulum was seen on the mesenteric border of jejunum, on the portion about 40 cm distal from the Treitz ligament

  20. Prevalence of Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 in Patients with Resected Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyokawa, Gouji; Takada, Kazuki; Tagawa, Tetsuzo; Kinoshita, Fumihiko; Kozuma, Yuka; Matsubara, Taichi; Haratake, Naoki; Takamori, Shinkichi; Akamine, Takaki; Hirai, Fumihiko; Yamada, Yuichi; Hamamoto, Ryuji; Oda, Yoshinao; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2018-06-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is a histone methyltransferase that is deeply involved in cancer pathogenesis. Although clinicopathological significance of EZH2 in non-small cell lung cancer has been gradually elucidated, such significance in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has yet to be fully investigated. Forty patients with resected SCLC were analyzed for EZH2. EZH2 expression was evaluated using the Allred score (0-8) and was classified into negative (0-6) and positive (7 and 8). We evaluated the association between EZH2 and the clinicopathological characteristics and postoperative survivals. Among 40 patients, 15 (37.5%) and 25 (62.5%) were classified as being negative and positive for EZH2, respectively. Fisher's exact test demonstrated no significant associations between the positivity for EZH2 and clinicopathological characteristics. No significant differences were observed in recurrence-free and overall survivals between EZH2-negative/low and EZH2-high patients. EZH2 was frequently observed in patients with resected SCLC, but no significant associations were found between its expression and the clinicopathological characteristics and postoperative survivals. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  1. Postoperative Radiation Therapy in Resected N2 Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Geol

    1993-01-01

    A total of forty patients with resected N2 stage non-small cell lung cancer treated with postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy between Jan. 1975 and Dec. 1990 at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei Cancer Center were retrospectively analysed to evaluate whether postoperative radiation therapy improves survival. Patterns of failure and prognostic factors affecting survival were also analysed. The 5 year overall and disease free survival rate were 26.3%, 27.3% and median survival 23.5 months. The 5 year survival rates by T-stage were T1 66.7%, T2 25.6% and T3 12.5%. Loco-regional failure rate was 14.3% and distant metastasis rate was 42.9% and both 2.9%. Statistically significant factor affecting distant failure rate was number of positive lymph nodes(>= 4). This retrospective study suggests that postoperative radiation therapy in resected N2 stage non-small cell lung cancer can reduce loco-regional recurrence and may improve survival rate as compared with other studies which were treated by surgery alone. Further study of systemic control is also needed due to high rate of distant metastasis

  2. Pleural Dye Marking Using Radial Endobronchial Ultrasound and Virtual Bronchoscopy before Sublobar Pulmonary Resection for Small Peripheral Nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachkar, Samy; Baste, Jean-Marc; Thiberville, Luc; Peillon, Christophe; Rinieri, Philippe; Piton, Nicolas; Guisier, Florian; Salaun, Mathieu

    2018-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery of pulmonary nodules allows suboptimal palpation of the lung compared to open thoracotomy. The objective of this study was to assess endoscopic pleural dye marking using radial endobronchial ultrasound (r-EBUS) and virtual bronchoscopy to localize small peripheral lung nodules immediately before minimally invasive resection. The endoscopic procedure was performed without fluoroscopy, under general anesthesia in the operating room immediately before minimally invasive surgery. Then, 1 mL of methylene blue (0.5%) was instilled into the guide sheath, wedged in the subpleural space. Wedge resection or segmentectomy were guided by visualization of the dye on the pleural surface. Contribution of dye marking to the surgical procedure was rated by the surgeon. Twenty-five nodules, including 6 ground glass opacities, were resected in 22 patients by video-assisted thoracoscopic wedge resection (n = 11) or robotic-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (10 segmentectomies and 1 wedge resection). The median greatest diameter of nodules was 8 mm. No conversion to open thoracotomy was needed. The endoscopic procedure added an average 10 min to surgical resection. The dye was visible on the pleural surface in 24 cases. Histological diagnosis and free margin resection were obtained in all cases. Median skin-to-skin operating time was 90 min for robotic segmentectomy and 40 min for video-assisted wedge resection. The same operative precision was considered impossible by the surgeon without dye marking in 21 cases. Dye marking using r-EBUS and virtual bronchoscopy can be easily and safely performed to localize small pulmonary nodules immediately before minimally invasive resection. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Effect of acetylcysteine on adaptation of intestinal smooth muscle after small bowel bypass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisbrodt, N.W.; Belloso, R.M.; Biskin, L.C.; Dudrick, P.S.; Dudrick, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have postulated that the adaptive changes in function and structure of bypassed segments of small bowel are due in part to the change in intestinal contents following operation. The purpose of these experiments was to determine if a mucolytic agent could alter the adaptation. Rats were anesthetized and a 70% jejunoileal bypass was performed. The bypassed segments then were perfused with either saline or acetylcysteine for 3-12 days. Then, either intestinal transit was determined using Cr-51, or segments were taken for morphometric analysis. Transit, as assessed by the geometric center, was increased 32% by acetylcysteine treatment. Treatment also caused a decrease in hypertrophy of the muscularis. Muscle wet weight, muscle cross-sectional area, and muscle layer thickness all were significantly less in those animals infused with acetyl-cysteine. No decreases in hypertrophy were seen in the in-continuity segments. These data indicate that alterations in intestinal content can affect the course of adaptation of intestinal muscle in response to small bowel bypass

  4. The stepchild of intestinal diagnostics. Evaluation of radiological methods to diagnose leiomyomas of the small bowel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keberle, M.; Wittenberg, G.; Jenett, M.; Hahn, D.; Mueller, J.G.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Various radiological methods to diagnose small bowel neoplasmas and problems of differential diagnosis specially considerating leiomyomas are discussed. Patients and methods: Two patients with leiomyoma of the ileum underwent enteroclysis, computed tomography of the abdomen, intra-arterial DSA and colour Doppler sonography. Another patient with leiomyosarcoma just underwent CT of the abdomen with CT-guided biopsy. Results: Due to the homogenous density and the smooth surface of the tumors in computed tomography and respectively enteroclysis and the presentation of the tumor vascularisation in the angiography and Colour Doppler sonography in both patients a leiomyoma of the small bowel was diagnosed. Postoperatively this diagnosis was histologically confirmed. The CT-findings of the patient with leiomyosarcoma were not suspicious of a malignant tumor. Conclusion: Radiologically it is not possible to determine the dignity of smooth muscle cell tumors safely. That is the reason why the diagnosis has to be achieved operatively. But the histopathological diagnosis based on the mitotic rate may be difficult. Therefore the after care has to be carried out thoroughly. (orig.) [de

  5. Growing indications for CEUS: The kidney, testis, lymph nodes, thyroid, prostate, and small bowel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantisani, V., E-mail: vito.cantisani@uniroma1.it [Department of Radiology, Anatomopathology and Oncology, “Sapienza” University of Rome (Italy); Bertolotto, M. [Department of Radiology, University of Trieste (Italy); Weskott, H.P. [Central Ultrasound Department, Klinikum Siloah , Hannover (Germany); Romanini, L. [University Hospital of Pavia (Italy); Grazhdani, H. [Department of Radiology, Anatomopathology and Oncology, “Sapienza” University of Rome (Italy); Passamonti, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze Radiologiche, Ospedale di Lodi (Italy); Drudi, F.M.; Malpassini, F. [Department of Radiology, Anatomopathology and Oncology, “Sapienza” University of Rome (Italy); Isidori, A. [Department of Experimental Medicine, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome (Italy); Meloni, F.M. [Dipartimento servizi diagnostici, Ospedale Valduce, Como (Italy); Calliada, F. [University Hospital of Pavia (Italy); D’Ambrosio, F. [Department of Radiology, Anatomopathology and Oncology, “Sapienza” University of Rome (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Contrast enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) is increasingly used for non-hepatic applications. • There is a growing clinical use for a variety of pathologies of the kidney, testis, and small bowel. • Updated knowledge for proper use of CEUS in uncommon fields is provided. - Abstract: Contrast enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) is increasingly used for non-hepatic applications as well, so that nearly all organs have been investigated. Among them, there is a growing clinical use for a variety of pathologies of the kidney, testis, and small bowel. The possibility to differentiate benign from malignant nodes in cancer patients has been investigated. A new application is in the detection of sentinel nodes after intradermal microbubble injection. The need to distinguish thyroid nodules eligible for fine needle aspiration cytology has led to the use of CEUS in thyroid examinations as well. The potential of CEUS for prostate cancer detection has been extensively investigated, with encouraging initial results. Early promise, however, has not been fulfilled. New perspective regards evaluation of the extent of prostate tissue devascularization following ablative treatments.

  6. Small bowel entrapment and ureteropelvic junction disruption associated with L3 Chance fracture-dislocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesenti, Sebastien; Blondel, Benjamin; Faure, Alice; Peltier, Emilie; Launay, Franck; Jouve, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric Chance fracture are rare lesions but often associated with abdominal injuries. We herein present the case of a seven years old patient who sustained an entrapment of small bowel and an ureteropelvic disruption associated with a Chance fracture and spine dislocation following a traffic accident. Initial X-rays and computed tomographic (CT) scan showed a Chance fracture with dislocation of L3 vertebra, with an incarceration of a small bowel loop in the spinal canal and a complete section of the left lumbar ureter. Paraplegia was noticed on the initial neurological examination. A posterior L2-L4 osteosynthesis was performed firstly. In a second time she underwent a sus umbilical laparotomy to release the incarcerated jejunum loop in the spinal canal. An end-to-end anastomosis was performed on a JJ probe to suture the left injured ureter. One month after the traumatism, she started to complain of severe headaches related to a leakage of cerebrospinalis fluid. Three months after the traumatism there was a clear regression of the leakage. One year after the trauma, an anterior intervertebral fusion was done. At final follow-up, no neurologic recovery was noticed. In case of Chance fracture, all physicians should think about abdominal injuries even if the patient is asymptomatic. Initial abdominal CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging provide in such case crucial info for management of the spine and the associated lesions. PMID:27672641

  7. Growing indications for CEUS: The kidney, testis, lymph nodes, thyroid, prostate, and small bowel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantisani, V.; Bertolotto, M.; Weskott, H.P.; Romanini, L.; Grazhdani, H.; Passamonti, M.; Drudi, F.M.; Malpassini, F.; Isidori, A.; Meloni, F.M.; Calliada, F.; D’Ambrosio, F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Contrast enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) is increasingly used for non-hepatic applications. • There is a growing clinical use for a variety of pathologies of the kidney, testis, and small bowel. • Updated knowledge for proper use of CEUS in uncommon fields is provided. - Abstract: Contrast enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) is increasingly used for non-hepatic applications as well, so that nearly all organs have been investigated. Among them, there is a growing clinical use for a variety of pathologies of the kidney, testis, and small bowel. The possibility to differentiate benign from malignant nodes in cancer patients has been investigated. A new application is in the detection of sentinel nodes after intradermal microbubble injection. The need to distinguish thyroid nodules eligible for fine needle aspiration cytology has led to the use of CEUS in thyroid examinations as well. The potential of CEUS for prostate cancer detection has been extensively investigated, with encouraging initial results. Early promise, however, has not been fulfilled. New perspective regards evaluation of the extent of prostate tissue devascularization following ablative treatments

  8. Single-balloon enteroscopy following videocapsule endoscopy for diagnosis of small bowel tumors: preliminary experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifan, A; Singeap, A M; Cojocariu, C; Sfarti, C; Tarcoveanu, E; Georgescu, S

    2010-01-01

    Small bowel tumors (SBTs), either benign or malignant, are rare, accounting for 3-6% of all digestive neoplasms. Videocapsule endoscopy (VCE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) have revolutionized the diagnosis and management of patients with small bowel diseases, including SBTs. A novel method using the single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE) has recently been developed. The aim of present study was to present our preliminary experience with SBE in patients with suspected SBTs on VCE examination. Patients in whom VCE showed one or more lesions suggesting SBTs underwent SBE. Three patients (2 males, 1 female; mean age 52 +/- 11 years) underwent SBE, and then surgery. There were two gastrointestinal stromal tumors and one adenocarcinoma. Clinically, all patients had iron-deficiency anemia and abdominal pain, and one patient had episodes of nausea/ vomiting. SBE was well tolerated without adverse events. SBE is a safe procedure and overcomes the limitations of VCE. Both procedures are complimentary in patients with suspected SBTs. VCE should be used first for initial diagnosis, followed by SBE for histopathological confrmation of the diagnosis and, if necessary, endoscopic therapy.

  9. Advanced imaging techniques for small bowel Crohn's disease: what does the future hold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Inês; Magro, Fernando

    2018-01-01

    Treatment of Crohn's disease (CD) is intrinsically reliant on imaging techniques, due to the preponderance of small bowel disease and its transmural pattern of inflammation. Ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the most widely employed imaging methods and have excellent diagnostic accuracy in most instances. Some limitations persist, perhaps the most clinically relevant being the distinction between inflammatory and fibrotic strictures. In this regard, several methodologies have recently been tested in animal models and human patients, namely US strain elastography, shear wave elastography, contrast-enhanced US, magnetization transfer MRI and contrast dynamics in standard MRI. Technical advances in each of the imaging methods may expand their indications. The addition of oral contrast to abdominal US appears to substantially improve its diagnostic capabilities compared to standard US. Ionizing dose-reduction methods in CT can decrease concern about cumulative radiation exposure in CD patients and diffusion-weighted MRI may reduce the need for gadolinium contrast. Clinical indexes of disease activity and severity are also increasingly relying on imaging scores, such as the recently developed Lémann Index. In this review we summarize some of the recent advances in small bowel CD imaging and how they might affect clinical practice in the near future.

  10. Closed loop obstructions of the small bowel: role of Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbiera, F.; Ciraulo, R.; Cusma', S.

    1999-01-01

    Small bowel obstructions can be distinguished into more simple and closed loop obstructions. The latter is a more severe condition which is often complicated by strangulation with vascular impairment, edema and intramural and mesenteric hemorrhage. Consequent arterial insufficiency rapidly leads to ischemia, infarction and necrosis. The radiologist plays a role in the early recognition of the closed loop obstruction and of any sign of strangulation. The role of CT in the diagnosis and workup of patients with suspected intestinal occlusion has been analyzed in the literature with reported 63% sensitivity, 78% specificity and 66% accuracy. CT is also capable of revealing the causes of occlusion in 73-95% of cases. The above CT signs allow to identify closed loop obstruction and also small bowel strangulation, thus supplying a valuable contribution to diagnosis and accurate preoperative evaluation. The conclusion is that CT can accurately demonstrate the presence of closed loop obstruction and can be the technique of choice in patients in whom obstruction is associated with clinical signs suggestive of strangulation [it

  11. The dose-volume relationship of acute small bowel toxicity from concurrent 5-FU-based chemotherapy and radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baglan, Kathy L.; Frazier, Robert C.; Yan Di; Huang, Raywin R.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Robertson, John M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: A direct relationship between the volume of small bowel irradiated and the degree of acute small bowel toxicity experienced during concurrent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiotherapy for rectal carcinoma is well recognized but poorly quantified. This study uses three-dimensional treatment-planning tools to more precisely quantify this dose-volume relationship. Methods and Materials: Forty patients receiving concurrent 5-FU-based chemotherapy and pelvic irradiation for rectal carcinoma had treatment-planning CT scans with small bowel contrast. A median isocentric dose of 50.4 Gy was delivered using a posterior-anterior and opposed lateral field arrangement. Bowel exclusion techniques were routinely used, including prone treatment position on a vacuum bag cradle to allow anterior displacement of the abdominal contents and bladder distension. Individual loops of small bowel were contoured on each slice of the planning CT scan, and a small bowel dose-volume histogram was generated for the initial pelvis field receiving 45 Gy. The volume of small bowel receiving each dose between 5 and 40 Gy was recorded at 5-Gy intervals. Results: Ten patients (25%) experienced Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 3+ acute small bowel toxicity. A highly statistically significant association between the development of Grade 3+ acute small bowel toxicity and the volume of small bowel irradiated was found at each dose level. Specific dose-volume threshold levels were found, below which no Grade 3+ toxicity occurred and above which 50-60% of patients developed Grade 3+ toxicity. The volume of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy (V 15 ) was strongly associated with the degree of toxicity. Univariate analysis of patient and treatment-related factors revealed no other significant predictors of severe toxicity. Conclusions: A strong dose-volume relationship exists for the development of Grade 3+ acute small bowel toxicity in patients receiving concurrent 5-FU-based chemoradiotherapy

  12. Prognostic significance of CD44s expression in resected non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko Yoon

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD44s is a cell adhesion molecule known to mediate cellular adhesion to the extracellular matrix, a prerequisite for tumor cell migration. CD44s plays an important role in invasion and metastasis of various cancers. In the present study, we sought to determine whether CD44s is involved in clinical outcomes of patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods Using immunohistochemical staining, we investigated CD44s protein expression using tissue array specimens from 159 patients with resected NSCLC (adenocarcinoma (AC; n = 82 and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; n = 77. Additionally, the immunoreactivity of cyclooxygenase (COX-2 was also studied. The clinicopathological implications of these molecules were analyzed statistically. Results High CD44s expression was detected more frequently in NSCLC patients with SCC (66/72; 91.7% than in those with AC histology (P 0.001. Additionally, high CD44s expression was significant correlated with more advanced regional lymph node metastasis (P = 0.021. In multivariate analysis of survival in NSCLC patients with AC histology, significant predictors were lymph node metastasis status (P P = 0.046, and high CD44s expression (P = 0.014. For NSCLC patients with SCC histology, the significant predictor was a more advanced tumor stage (P = 0.015. No significant association was found between CD44s and clinical outcome (P = 0.311. Conclusions High CD44s expression was a negative prognostic marker with significance in patients with resected NSCLC, particularly those with AC histology, and was independent of tumor stage.

  13. Lungscape: resected non-small-cell lung cancer outcome by clinical and pathological parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Solange; Weder, Walter; Dafni, Urania; Kerr, Keith M; Bubendorf, Lukas; Meldgaard, Peter; O'Byrne, Kenneth J; Wrona, Anna; Vansteenkiste, Johan; Felip, Enriqueta; Marchetti, Antonio; Savic, Spasenija; Lu, Shun; Smit, Egbert; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Blackhall, Fiona H; Baas, Paul; Camps, Carlos; Rosell, Rafael; Stahel, Rolf A

    2014-11-01

    The Lungscape project was designed to address the impact of clinical, pathological, and molecular characteristics on outcome in resected non-small- cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A decentralized biobank with fully annotated tissue samples was established. Selection criteria for participating centers included sufficient number of cases, tissue microarray building capability, and documented ethical approval. Patient selection was based on availability of comprehensive clinical data, radical resection between 2003 and 2009 with adequate follow-up, and adequate quantity and quality of formalin-fixed tissue. Fifteen centers contributed 2449 cases. The 5-year overall survival (OS) was 69.6% and 63.6% for stages IA and IB, 51.6% and 47.7% for stages IIA and IIB, and 29.0% and 13.0% for stages IIIA and IIIB, respectively (p < 0.001). Median and 5-year relapse-free survival (RFS) were 52.8 months and 47.3%, respectively. Distant relapse was recorded for 44.4%, local for 26.0%, and both for 16.9% of patients. Based on multivariate analysis for the OS, RFS, and time to relapse, the factors significantly associated with all of them are performance status and pathological stage. The aim of this report is to present the results from Lungscape, the first large series reporting on NSCLC surgical outcome measured not only by OS but also by RFS and time to relapse and including multivariate analysis by significant clinical and pathological prognostic parameters. As tissue from all patients is preserved locally and is available for detailed molecular investigations, Lungscape provides an excellent basis to evaluate the influence of molecular parameters on the disease outcome after radical resection, besides providing an overview of the molecular landscape of stage I to III NSCLC.

  14. Prognostic significance of CD44s expression in resected non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Yoon Ho; Won, Hye Sung; Jeon, Eun Kyoung; Hong, Sook Hee; Roh, Sang Young; Hong, Young Seon; Byun, Jae Ho; Jung, Chan-Kwon; Kang, Jin Hyoung

    2011-01-01

    CD44s is a cell adhesion molecule known to mediate cellular adhesion to the extracellular matrix, a prerequisite for tumor cell migration. CD44s plays an important role in invasion and metastasis of various cancers. In the present study, we sought to determine whether CD44s is involved in clinical outcomes of patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using immunohistochemical staining, we investigated CD44s protein expression using tissue array specimens from 159 patients with resected NSCLC (adenocarcinoma (AC; n = 82) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; n = 77). Additionally, the immunoreactivity of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 was also studied. The clinicopathological implications of these molecules were analyzed statistically. High CD44s expression was detected more frequently in NSCLC patients with SCC (66/72; 91.7%) than in those with AC histology (P <0.001). Additionally, high CD44s expression was significant correlated with more advanced regional lymph node metastasis (P = 0.021). In multivariate analysis of survival in NSCLC patients with AC histology, significant predictors were lymph node metastasis status (P < 0.001), high-grade tumor differentiation (P = 0.046), and high CD44s expression (P = 0.014). For NSCLC patients with SCC histology, the significant predictor was a more advanced tumor stage (P = 0.015). No significant association was found between CD44s and clinical outcome (P = 0.311). High CD44s expression was a negative prognostic marker with significance in patients with resected NSCLC, particularly those with AC histology, and was independent of tumor stage

  15. Understanding about diagnosis of acute small bowel retrograde intussusception in adults by means of 64-slice-spinal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Ruizhou; Chen Jincheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To have a further study of the value of MSCT in diagnosing acute small bowel retrograde intussusception in adults by means of 64-slice-spinal CT. Methods: A 46-year-old female patient with the history of abdominal operation was found having acute mechanical small bowel obstruction through plain X-ray radiograph. 64-slice MSCT was performed afterwards (plain scan + 3 stage contrast scans). Hence, evidence is provided for operation. Results: Using the technique of MSCT for the patient can promptly approach the diagnosis of jejuno-jejunal intussusception with severe bowel obstruction; no small bowel tumor or other organic lesion found in this case. With the patient who has the history of abdominal operations, MSCT can predict the reason of adhesion causing bowel intussusception, and provide the evidence for operation; whereas MSCT with contrast media offers a further investigation of the blood supply to the bowels through SMA, and observation of blood circulation through the intussuscepting site, which represents venous congestion of intussusception. This case is a retrograde small bowel intussusception and confirmed with operation evidence. A greater amount of gas and fluid is accumulated between the dilated space of middle-distal portion of intussusceptum and intussuscipiens. Nevertheless, less gas at the proximal portion and that can be an important sign for retrograde intussusception. Conclusion: MSCT is a good choice of examination for diagnosis of adult's intussusception. As the literature mentioned the advantages of MSCT for observing the circulation of intussusceptum and whether the diagnosis is antegrade or retrograde intussusception is also essential. (authors)

  16. Small bowel obstruction: the role of computed tomography in its diagnosis and management with reference to other imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkill, G.; Bell, J.; Healy, J.

    2001-01-01

    Small bowel obstruction is a leading cause of acute surgical admissions for abdominal pain. There is an increasing tendency for initial conservative management rather than immediate operative intervention, as a proportion of cases will resolve spontaneously. This has resulted in a growing reliance on radiological investigations to reassure the surgeon that medical therapy can be safely instituted. The onus therefore rests with radiologists to guide their surgical colleagues by correctly interpreting the plain abdominal radiograph and suggesting appropriate further investigation if warranted. Recently, computed tomography (CT) has been proposed as the test of choice to define the level and cause of acute small bowel obstruction and to identify complications such as ischaemia and perforation which will prompt surgical intervention. This review will discuss the utility of early CT in the diagnosis of acute small bowel obstruction and outline its impact on patient management. (orig.)

  17. Increased Expression of Toll-Like Receptors 4, 5, and 9 in Small Bowel Mucosa from Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldona Dlugosz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to compare patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS and healthy controls regarding the expression of toll-like receptors 2, 4, 5, and 9 (TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9, the primary mucosal receptors of bacterial components, in small and large bowel mucosa. Methods. We analysed biopsies from jejunum and sigmoid colon of 22 patients (17 females with IBS aged 18–66 (median: 39 years and 14 healthy volunteers (12 females aged 22–61 (median: 42 years. Eight patients had constipation-predominant IBS (C-IBS, 7 had diarrhoea-predominant IBS (D-IBS, and 7 had IBS without predominance of constipation or diarrhoea. We analysed mRNA levels for TLRs using quantitative PCR and distribution of TLRs in mucosa using immunohistochemistry. Results. We found increased mRNA expression of TLR4 (mean fold change 1.85±0.31 versus 1.0±0.20; p<0.05, TLR5 (1.96±0.36 versus 1.0±0.20; p<0.05 and TLR9 (2.00±0.24 versus 1.0±0.25; p<0.01 but not of TLR2 in the small bowel mucosa from patients with IBS compared to the controls. There was no significant difference in mRNA levels for TLRs in colon mucosa between patients and controls. Conclusion. Upregulation of TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9 suggests the involvement of bacteria or dysregulation of the immune response to commensal flora in small bowel mucosa in IBS patients.

  18. Evaluation of gastric and small bowel transit times in coeliac disease with the small bowel PillCam®: a single centre study in a non gluten-free diet adult Italian population with coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgesi, R; Cianci, R; Bizzotto, A; Costamagna, G; Riccioni, M E

    2013-05-01

    The mechanisms underlying bowel disturbances in coeliac disease are still relatively unclear. Past reports suggested that small bowel motor abnormalities may be involved in this pathological condition; there are no studies addressing small bowel transit in coeliac disease before and after a gluten-free diet. The objective of this study was to determine whether capsule endoscopy (CE) could serve as a test for measurement of gastric and small bowel transit times in a group of symptomatic or asymptomatic coeliac patients at the time of diagnosis with respect to a control group. Thirty coeliac untreated patients and 30 age-, sex- and BMI-matched healthy controls underwent CE assessment of whole gut transit times. All subjects completed the study per protocol and experienced natural passage of the pill. No statistical significant differences between gastric emptying and small bowel transit times both in coeliac and control group were found (p = 0.1842 and p = 0.7134; C.I. 95%, respectively). No correlation was found in coeliac patients and control group between transit times and age, sex and BMI. By using the Pearson's correlation test, significant correlation emerged between gastric emptying time and small bowel transit times in coeliac disease (r = 0.1706). CE reveals unrecognized gender differences and may be a novel outpatient technique for gut transit times' assessment without exposure to radiation and for the evaluation of upper gut dysfunction in healthy patients suffering from constipation without evidence of intestinal malabsorption. Nevertheless, CE does not seem to be the most suitable method for studying gut transit times in untreated coeliac patients; this might be ascribed to the fact that CE consists of inert (non-digestible, non-absorbable) substances.

  19. Axial Torsion of Gangrenous Meckel's Diverticulum Causing Small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dividing the band. Resection and anastomosis of the small bowel including the MD was performed. We hereby report a rare and unusual complication of a MD. Although treatment outcome is generally good, pre-operative diagnosis is often difficult. Key words: Axial torsion, Meckel's diverticulum, small bowel obstruction.

  20. The Dose-Volume Relationship of Small Bowel Irradiation and Acute Grade 3 Diarrhea During Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, John M.; Lockman, David; Yan Di; Wallace, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Previous work has found a highly significant relationship between the irradiated small-bowel volume and development of Grade 3 small-bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer. This study tested the previously defined parameters in a much larger group of patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 96 consecutive patients receiving pelvic radiation therapy for rectal cancer had treatment planning computed tomographic scans with small-bowel contrast that allowed the small bowel to be outlined with calculation of a small-bowel dose-volume histogram for the initial intended pelvic treatment to 45 Gy. Patients with at least one parameter above the previously determined dose-volume parameters were considered high risk, whereas those with all parameters below these levels were low risk. The grade of diarrhea and presence of liquid stool was determined prospectively. Results: There was a highly significant association with small-bowel dose-volume and Grade 3 diarrhea (p ≤ 0.008). The high-risk and low-risk parameters were predictive with Grade 3 diarrhea in 16 of 51 high-risk patients and in 4 of 45 low-risk patients (p = 0.01). Patients who had undergone irradiation preoperatively had a lower incidence of Grade 3 diarrhea than those treated postoperatively (18% vs. 28%; p = 0.31); however, the predictive ability of the high-risk/low-risk parameters was better for preoperatively (p = 0.03) than for postoperatively treated patients (p = 0.15). Revised risk parameters were derived that improved the overall predictive ability (p = 0.004). Conclusions: The highly significant dose-volume relationship and validity of the high-risk and low-risk parameters were confirmed in a large group of patients. The risk parameters provided better modeling for the preoperative patients than for the postoperative patients

  1. A long-Segmental Vascular Malformation in the Small Bowel Presenting With Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Preschool-Aged Child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yeoun Joo; Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Cho, Yong Hoon; Kim, Yong-Woo; Kim, Tae Un; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in pediatric patients has several causes. Vascular malformation of the small bowel is a rare disease leading to pediatric GI bleeding. To our knowledge, few reports describe ultrasound and computed tomography findings of venous malformations involving the small bowel. We present a case of long-segmental and circumferential vascular malformation that led to GI bleeding in a pre-school aged child, focusing on the radiologic findings. Although vascular malformation including of the GI tract is rare in children, it should be considered when GI bleeding occurs in pediatric patients

  2. Churg-Strauss Syndrome Leading to Small Bowel Infarction: An Unusual Case of Abdominal Pain in a Young Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Sookram

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old man with a history of severe asthma presented to the emergency department with a week-long history of severe unrelenting abdominal pain, nausea and decreased appetite. He was admitted to hospital, and routine gastrointestinal investigations were performed, which did not elucidate the cause of his abdominal pain. Exploratory laparotomy demonstrated patchy infarction of the entire small bowel, characteristic of Churg-Strauss syndrome. The patient subsequently underwent 12 separate laparotomies to salvage surviving small bowel. The patient is maintained on total parenteral nutrition.

  3. Microscopy of bacterial translocation during small bowel obstruction and ischemia in vivo – a new animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafner Mathias

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Existing animal models provide only indirect information about the pathogenesis of infections caused by indigenous gastrointestinal microflora and the kinetics of bacterial translocation. The aim of this study was to develop a novel animal model to assess bacterial translocation and intestinal barrier function in vivo. Methods In anaesthetized male Wistar rats, 0.5 ml of a suspension of green fluorescent protein-transfected E. coli was administered by intraluminal injection in a model of small bowel obstruction. Animals were randomly subjected to non-ischemic or ischemic bowel obstruction. Ischemia was induced by selective clamping of the terminal mesenteric vessels feeding the obstructed bowel loop. Time intervals necessary for translocation of E. coli into the submucosal stroma and the muscularis propria was assessed using intravital microscopy. Results Bacterial translocation into the submucosa and muscularis propria took a mean of 36 ± 8 min and 80 ± 10 min, respectively, in small bowel obstruction. Intestinal ischemia significantly accelerated bacterial translocation into the submucosa (11 ± 5 min, p E. coli were visible in frozen sections of small bowel, mesentery, liver and spleen taken two hours after E. coli administration. Conclusions Intravital microscopy of fluorescent bacteria is a novel approach to study bacterial translocation in vivo. We have applied this technique to define minimal bacterial transit time as a functional parameter of intestinal barrier function.

  4. Computed tomography to detect body packing: an unusual cause of small bowel obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.A.; Phang, T.; Enns, R.; Butchart, M.K.; Filipenko, J.D.; Mason, A.C.; Cooperberg, P.I.

    2002-01-01

    Concealment of illicit drugs within the alimentary tract is now an established method used by both smugglers and traffickers to evade detection by authorities. Those who ingest wrapped packets of drugs to transport them across international borders are known as 'body packers,' whereas those who ingest packages of drugs upon an unexpected encounter with law enforcement agents are known as 'body stuffers' or 'quick swallowers. Although most of these individuals require no medical care, acute drug toxicity (from inadvertent leaking of contents or rupture of the drug packet) and bowel obstruction are recognized hazards of drug packet ingestion. The detection of these packets is a challenge to custom officials and police interested in preventing the import and trafficking of illegal drugs, as well as to physicians who have to treat individuals who have ingested them. We report a case of a 38-year-old intravenous drug abuser who presented with an acute small bowel obstruction secondary to an impacted intraluminal heroin balloon in the mid jejunum. The value of computed tomography (CT) in the patient's diagnostic evaluation is highlighted. (author)

  5. Computed tomography to detect body packing: an unusual cause of small bowel obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J.A. [St. Paul' s Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Phang, T. [St. Paul' s Hospital, Dept. of Surgery, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Enns, R. [St. Paul' s Hospital, Div. of Gastroenterology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Butchart, M.K. [St. Paul' s Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Filipenko, J.D. [St. Paul' s Hospital, Dept. of Pathology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Mason, A.C.; Cooperberg, P.I. [St. Paul' s Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2002-04-01

    Concealment of illicit drugs within the alimentary tract is now an established method used by both smugglers and traffickers to evade detection by authorities. Those who ingest wrapped packets of drugs to transport them across international borders are known as 'body packers,' whereas those who ingest packages of drugs upon an unexpected encounter with law enforcement agents are known as 'body stuffers' or 'quick swallowers. Although most of these individuals require no medical care, acute drug toxicity (from inadvertent leaking of contents or rupture of the drug packet) and bowel obstruction are recognized hazards of drug packet ingestion. The detection of these packets is a challenge to custom officials and police interested in preventing the import and trafficking of illegal drugs, as well as to physicians who have to treat individuals who have ingested them. We report a case of a 38-year-old intravenous drug abuser who presented with an acute small bowel obstruction secondary to an impacted intraluminal heroin balloon in the mid jejunum. The value of computed tomography (CT) in the patient's diagnostic evaluation is highlighted. (author)

  6. Association of the Addition of Oral Antibiotics to Mechanical Bowel Preparation for Left Colon and Rectal Cancer Resections With Reduction of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Elaine; Massarweh, Nader N; Chai, Christy Y; Tran Cao, Hop S; Zamani, Nader; Abraham, Sherry; Adigun, Kafayat; Awad, Samir S

    2018-02-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) after colorectal surgery remain a significant complication, particularly for patients with cancer, because they can delay the administration of adjuvant therapy. A combination of oral antibiotics and mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) is a potential, yet controversial, SSI prevention strategy. To determine the association of the addition of oral antibiotics to MBP with preventing SSIs in left colon and rectal cancer resections and its association with the timely administration of adjuvant therapy. A retrospective review was performed of 89 patients undergoing left colon and rectal cancer resections from October 1, 2013, to December 31, 2016, at a single institution. A bowel regimen of oral antibiotics and MBP (neomycin sulfate, metronidazole hydrochloride, and magnesium citrate) was implemented August 1, 2015. Patients receiving MBP and oral antibiotics and those undergoing MBP without oral antibiotics were compared using univariate analysis. Multivariable logistic regression controlling for factors that may affect SSIs was used to evaluate the association between use of oral antibiotics and MBP and the occurrence of SSIs. Surgical site infections within 30 days of the index procedure and time to adjuvant therapy. Of the 89 patients (5 women and 84 men; mean [SD] age, 65.3 [9.2] years) in the study, 49 underwent surgery with MBP but without oral antibiotics and 40 underwent surgery with MBP and oral antibiotics. The patients who received oral antibiotics and MBP were younger than those who received only MBP (mean [SD] age, 62.6 [9.1] vs 67.5 [8.8] years; P = .01), but these 2 cohorts of patients were otherwise similar in baseline demographic, clinical, and cancer characteristics. Surgical approach (minimally invasive vs open) and case type were similarly distributed; however, the median operative time of patients who received oral antibiotics and MBP was longer than that of patients who received MBP only (391 minutes

  7. The first joint ESGAR/ ESPR consensus statement on the technical performance of cross-sectional small bowel and colonic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, S.A.; Torkzad, M.R.; Bhatnagar, G.; Avni, F.; Cronin, C.G.; Hoeffel, C.; Kim, S.H.; Laghi, A.; Napolitano, M.; Petit, P.; Rimola, J.; Tolan, D.J.; Zappa, M.; Puylaert, C.A.J.; Stoker, J.

    2017-01-01

    To develop guidelines describing a standardised approach to patient preparation and acquisition protocols for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound (US) of the small bowel and colon, with an emphasis on imaging inflammatory bowel disease. An expert consensus committee of 13 members from the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) and European Society of Paediatric Radiology (ESPR) undertook a six-stage modified Delphi process, including a detailed literature review, to create a series of consensus statements concerning patient preparation, imaging hardware and image acquisition protocols. One hundred and fifty-seven statements were scored for agreement by the panel of which 129 statements (82 %) achieved immediate consensus with a further 19 (12 %) achieving consensus after appropriate modification. Nine (6 %) statements were rejected as consensus could not be reached. These expert consensus recommendations can be used to help guide cross-sectional radiological practice for imaging the small bowel and colon. (orig.)

  8. The first joint ESGAR/ ESPR consensus statement on the technical performance of cross-sectional small bowel and colonic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, S.A.; Torkzad, M.R.; Bhatnagar, G. [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Avni, F. [Lille University Hospitals, Department of Paediatric Imaging, Jeanne de Flandre Hospital, Lille (France); Cronin, C.G. [Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Hoeffel, C. [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Radiology, Reims (France); Kim, S.H. [Inje University College of Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Department of Radiology, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Laghi, A. [Sapienza University of Rome, I.C.O.T. Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Latina (Italy); Napolitano, M. [V. Buzzi Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Petit, P. [Timone Enfant Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Marseille (France); Rimola, J. [University of Barcelona, Radiology Department, Hospital Clinic Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Tolan, D.J. [St James' s University Hospital, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Zappa, M. [Hopital Beaujon, AP-HP, Universite Paris 7, INSERM CRI U1149, Department of Radiology, Clichy (France); Puylaert, C.A.J.; Stoker, J. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-06-15

    To develop guidelines describing a standardised approach to patient preparation and acquisition protocols for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound (US) of the small bowel and colon, with an emphasis on imaging inflammatory bowel disease. An expert consensus committee of 13 members from the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) and European Society of Paediatric Radiology (ESPR) undertook a six-stage modified Delphi process, including a detailed literature review, to create a series of consensus statements concerning patient preparation, imaging hardware and image acquisition protocols. One hundred and fifty-seven statements were scored for agreement by the panel of which 129 statements (82 %) achieved immediate consensus with a further 19 (12 %) achieving consensus after appropriate modification. Nine (6 %) statements were rejected as consensus could not be reached. These expert consensus recommendations can be used to help guide cross-sectional radiological practice for imaging the small bowel and colon. (orig.)

  9. UK-based, multisite, prospective cohort study of small bowel obstruction in acute surgical services: National Audit of Small Bowel Obstruction (NASBO) protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Matthew J; Sayers, Adele E; Drake, Thomas M; Hollyman, Marianne; Bradburn, Mike; Hind, Daniel; Wilson, Timothy R; Fearnhead, Nicola S

    2017-10-05

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is a common indication for emergency laparotomy in the UK, which is associated with a 90-day mortality rate of 13%. There are currently no UK clinical guidelines for the management of this condition. The aim of this multicentre prospective cohort study is to describe the burden, variation in management and associated outcomes of SBO in the UK adult population. UK hospitals providing emergency general surgery are eligible to participate. This study has three components: (1) a clinical preference questionnaire to be completed by consultants providing emergency general surgical care to assesses preferences in diagnostics and therapeutic approaches, including laparoscopy and nutritional interventions; (2) site resource profile questionnaire to indicate ease of access to diagnostic services, operating theatres, nutritional support teams and postoperative support including intensive care; (3) prospective cohort study of all cases of SBO admitted during an 8-week period at participating trusts. Data on diagnostics, operative and nutritional interventions, and in-hospital mortality and morbidity will be captured, followed by data validation. This will be conducted as a national audit of practice in conjunction with trainee research collaboratives, with support from patient representatives, surgeons, anaesthetists, gastroenterologists and a clinical trials unit. Site-specific reports will be provided to each participant site as well as an overall report to be disseminated through specialist societies. Results will be published in a formal project report endorsed by stakeholders, and in peer-reviewed scientific reports. Key findings will be debated at a focused national meeting with a view to quality improvement initiatives. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Survival outcomes for oligometastasis in resected non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yoshihisa; Saji, Hisashi; Kakihana, Masatoshi; Kajiwara, Naohiro; Ohira, Tatsuo; Ikeda, Norihiko

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the factors associated with post-recurrence survival and the treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer patients with postoperative distant recurrence, especially oligometastasis. We reviewed the data of 272 patients with distant recurrence who underwent resection of non-small-cell lung cancer from January 2000 through December 2011. The type of distant recurrence was classified as oligometastasis (n = 76, 28%) or polymetastasis (n = 196, 72%). Forty-seven (62%) patients with oligometastasis received local therapy (surgery 5, radiotherapy 9, sequential local and systemic therapy 28, chemoradiotherapy 5). Multivariate analysis revealed older age, non-adenocarcinoma, shorter disease-free interval, no pulmonary metastasis, liver metastases, bone metastases, and polymetastasis had significant associations with unfavorable post-recurrence survival. Subgroup analysis of patients with oligometastasis showed histology and disease-free interval had a great impact on survival. Smoking history and histology were associated with survival in patients with lung oligometastasis, whereas systemic treatment and longer disease-free interval were related to increased post-recurrence survival in those with brain oligometastasis. This study showed that an oligometastatic state per se was a significant favorable factor. Optimization of personalized systemic treatment and adding local treatment are important in the management of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and oligometastasis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Target tailoring and proton beam therapy to reduce small bowel dose in cervical cancer radiotherapy. A comparison of benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, Peter de; Westerveld, Henrike; Smit, Mark; Bel, Arjan; Rasch, Coen R.N.; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Schoot, Agustinus J.A.J. van de; Buist, Marrije R.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the potential clinical benefit from both target tailoring by excluding the tumour-free proximal part of the uterus during image-guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) and improved dose conformity based on intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The study included planning CTs from 11 previously treated patients with cervical cancer with a >4-cm tumour-free part of the proximal uterus on diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). IGART and robustly optimised IMPT plans were generated for both conventional target volumes and for MRI-based target tailoring (where the non-invaded proximal part of the uterus was excluded), yielding four treatment plans per patient. For each plan, the V 15Gy , V 30Gy , V 45Gy and D mean for bladder, sigmoid, rectum and bowel bag were compared, and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for ≥grade 2 acute small bowel toxicity was calculated. Both IMPT and MRI-based target tailoring resulted in significant reductions in V 15Gy , V 30Gy , V 45Gy and D mean for bladder and small bowel. IMPT reduced the NTCP for small bowel toxicity from 25% to 18%; this was further reduced to 9% when combined with MRI-based target tailoring. In four of the 11 patients (36%), NTCP reductions of >10% were estimated by IMPT, and in six of the 11 patients (55%) when combined with MRI-based target tailoring. This >10% NTCP reduction was expected if the V 45Gy for bowel bag was >275 cm 3 and >200 cm 3 , respectively, during standard IGART alone. In patients with cervical cancer, both proton therapy and MRI-based target tailoring lead to a significant reduction in the dose to surrounding organs at risk and small bowel toxicity. (orig.) [de

  12. Seatbelt injury causing small bowel devascularisation: case series and review of the literature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dowd, Vincent

    2012-01-31

    The use of seatbelts has increased significantly in the last twenty years, leading to a decrease in mortality from road traffic accidents (RTA). However, this increase in seatbelt use has also led to a change in the spectrum of injuries from RTA; abdominal injuries, particularly intestinal injuries have dramatically increased with the routine use of seatbelts. Such intestinal injuries frequently result from improper placement of the "lap belt". We present 3 cases in which passengers wearing a seatbelt sustained significant devascularisation injuries to the small bowel requiring emergency surgical intervention. A high index of suspicion is crucial in such cases to prevent delays in diagnosis that can lead to severe complications and adverse outcomes. It is evident that while advocating seatbelt use, the importance of education in correct seatbelt placement should also be a focus of public health strategies to reduce RTA morbidity and mortality.

  13. Systemic amyloidosis due to unknown multiple myeloma in small bowel pseudo-obstruction: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Caparrotti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is a pathologic diagnosis characterized by extracellular deposition of insoluble protein fibrils in various organs and tissues. There are two main forms of amyloidosis, primary amyloidosis, and secondary amyloidosis. Gastrointestinal involvement is common in both amyloidosis forms. We describe the case of a 78-year-old woman taken to the operating room for small bowel obstruction, found to have pseudo-obstruction and enteritis. Exploratory laparotomy revealed gastric mass and histological examen showed extensive amyloid deposition consistent with amyloidosis. Hematological evaluation revealed unknown multiple myeloma. This case report and literature data suggest to perform a hematological examination in patients with amyloidosis diagnosis to exclude a multiple myeloma or other plasma cell disorders

  14. Small bowel obstruction subsequent to Essure microinsert sterilization: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belotte, Jimmy; Shavell, Valerie I; Awonuga, Awoniyi O; Diamond, Michael P; Berman, Jay M; Yancy, Amanda F

    2011-07-01

    To report a case of small bowel obstruction (SBO) subsequent to Essure microinsert sterilization. Case report. University teaching hospital. A 38-year-old woman, gravida 1, para 1, with a history of pelvic pain, vaginal spotting, nausea, vomiting, and constipation 1 month after Essure hysteroscopic sterilization. Radiologic investigation, including a computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis, followed by operative laparoscopy. Alleviation of the SBO. Radiologic investigation suggested a distal SBO, with the left Essure microinsert noted in the left lower pelvis. These findings, including an inflamed appendix, were confirmed at operative laparoscopy. Lysis of adhesions, removal of the Essure microinsert, appendectomy, and left salpingectomy were performed. This case is reported to increase awareness that SBO is a potential complication of Essure microinsert placement. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Management of perforated essure with migration into small and large bowel mesentery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braginsky, Lena; George, Sean T; Locher, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    The Essure permanent birth control system (Conceptus Inc, San Carlos, CA) is currently the only Food and Drug Administration-approved hysteroscopic sterilization method and has been widely accepted as a safe and effective procedure. We present a rare case of tubal perforation, coil fragmentation, and distal migration into small and large bowel mesentery 8 days after the insertion of the Essure device. We describe the successful management of this complication using laparoscopy and intraoperative fluoroscopy. Providers using Essure must be aware of the possibility of fragmentation of the Essure coils. Intraoperative imaging, ideally fluoroscopy, should be strongly considered in the management of Essure migration to ensure localization and full retrieval of Essure material. Copyright © 2015 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Massive retroperitoneal ganglioneuroma presenting with small bowel obstruction 18 years following initial diagnosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, E M P

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Ganglioneuroma is a rare tumour of neural crest origin, which arises from maturation of a neuroblastoma. While previously considered to be non-functioning, they are now known to be frequently endocrinologically active. AIMS AND METHODS: We report a case of a massive retroperitoneal ganglioneuroma presenting with small bowel obstruction in an adult, 18 years after initial diagnosis. Urinary dopamine levels were elevated, but other catecholamines were within normal limits. This is the first report in the English-language literature of a retroperitoneal ganglioneuroma presenting with or causing intestinal obstruction. We also review the metabolic, radiological, and histological features of these tumours. Relevant publications were identified from a Medline search using the MeSH headings \\'ganglioneuroma\\

  17. Capsule Endoscopy for Ileitis with Potential Involvement of Other Sections of the Small Bowel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Seok Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ileitis is defined as inflammation of the ileum. This condition includes ulcers, aphthous ulcers, erosions, and nodular or erythematous mucosa. Various etiologies are associated with ileitis. Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, infectious conditions, neoplasms, infiltrative disorders, vasculitides, spondyloarthritis, endometriosis, and radiation therapy-related conditions involve the ileum. However, the differential diagnosis of terminal ileitis can be difficult in many cases. Video capsule endoscopy (VCE has become a useful tool for the diagnosis of a variety of small bowel lesions. This review describes each of the various conditions associated with ileitis and the diagnostic value of VCE for ileitis, which may help identify and evaluate these conditions in clinical practice. Based on the information provided by VCE, a definitive diagnosis could be made using the patients’ medical history, clinical course, laboratory and ileocolonoscopic findings, radiologic imaging findings, and histologic findings.

  18. Adult zebrafish intestine resection: a novel model of short bowel syndrome, adaptation, and intestinal stem cell regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, K A; Holoyda, K A; Grant, C N; Levin, D E; Torres, E R; Maxwell, A; Pollack, H A; Moats, R A; Frey, M R; Darehzereshki, A; Al Alam, D; Lien, C; Grikscheit, T C

    2015-08-01

    Loss of significant intestinal length from congenital anomaly or disease may lead to short bowel syndrome (SBS); intestinal failure may be partially offset by a gain in epithelial surface area, termed adaptation. Current in vivo models of SBS are costly and technically challenging. Operative times and survival rates have slowed extension to transgenic models. We created a new reproducible in vivo model of SBS in zebrafish, a tractable vertebrate model, to facilitate investigation of the mechanisms of intestinal adaptation. Proximal intestinal diversion at segment 1 (S1, equivalent to jejunum) was performed in adult male zebrafish. SBS fish emptied distal intestinal contents via stoma as in the human disease. After 2 wk, S1 was dilated compared with controls and villus ridges had increased complexity, contributing to greater villus epithelial perimeter. The number of intervillus pockets, the intestinal stem cell zone of the zebrafish increased and contained a higher number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells after 2 wk of SBS. Egf receptor and a subset of its ligands, also drivers of adaptation, were upregulated in SBS fish. Igf has been reported as a driver of intestinal adaptation in other animal models, and SBS fish exposed to a pharmacological inhibitor of the Igf receptor failed to demonstrate signs of intestinal adaptation, such as increased inner epithelial perimeter and BrdU incorporation. We describe a technically feasible model of human SBS in the zebrafish, a faster and less expensive tool to investigate intestinal stem cell plasticity as well as the mechanisms that drive intestinal adaptation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Emergency department patients with small bowel obstruction: What is the anticipated clinical course?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah E Frasure; Amy Hildreth; Sukhjit Takhar; Michael B Stone

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Emergency physicians(EPs)often care for patients with acute small bowel obstruction.While some patients require exploratory laparotomy,others are managed successfully with supportive care.We aimed to determine features that predict the need for operative management in emergency department(ED)patients with small bowel obstruction(SBO).METHODS:We performed a retrospective chart review of 370 consecutive patients admitted to a large urban academic teaching hospital with a diagnosis of SBO over a two-year period.We evaluated demographic characters(prior SBO,prior abdominal surgery,active malignancy)and clinical findings(leukocytosis and lactic acid)to determine features associated with the need for urgent operative intervention.RESULTS:Patients with a prior SBO were less likely to undergo operative intervention[20.3%(42/207)]compared to those without a prior SBO[35.2%(57/162)].Abnormal bloodwork was not associated with need for operative intervention.68%of patients with CT scan findings of both an SBO and a hernia,however,were operatively managed.CONCLUSIONS:Patients with a history of SBO were less likely to require operative intervention at any point during their hospitalization.Abnormal bloodwork was not associated with operative intervention.The CT finding of a hernia,however,predicted the need for operative intervention,while other findings(ascites,duodenal thickening)did not.Further research would be helpful to construct a prediction rule,which could help community EPs determine which patients may benefit from expedited transfer for operative management,and which patients could be safely managed conservatively as an initial treatment strategy.

  20. Small bowel obstruction in the virgin abdomen: time to challenge surgical dogma with evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Yvonne Ying-Ru; Ngu, James Chi-Yong; Wong, Andrew Siang-Yih

    2018-01-01

    Although adhesions account for more than 70% of small bowel obstruction (SBO), they are thought to be less likely aetiologies in patients without previous abdominal surgery. Expedient surgery has historically been advocated as prudent management in these patients. Emerging evidence appears to challenge such a dogmatic approach. A retrospective analysis was performed in all SBO patients with a virgin abdomen admitted between January 2012 and August 2014. Patients with obstruction secondary to abdominal wall hernias were excluded. Patient demographics, clinical presentation, management strategy and pathology involved were reviewed. A total of 72 patients were included in the study. The majority of patients were males (66.7%), with a median age of 58 years (range: 23-101). Abdominal pain (97%) and vomiting (86%) were the most common presentations while abdominal distention (60%) and constipation (25%) were reported less frequently. Adhesions accounted for the underlying cause in 44 (62%) patients. Other aetiologies included gallstone ileus (n = 5), phytobezoar (n = 5), intussusception (n = 4), internal herniation (n = 4), newly diagnosed small bowel tumour (n = 3), mesenteric volvulus (n = 3), stricture (n = 3) and Meckel's diverticulum (n = 1). Twenty-nine (40%) patients were successfully managed conservatively while the remaining 43 (60%) underwent surgery. The intraoperative findings were in concordance with the preoperative computed tomography scan in 76% of cases. Adhesions remain prevalent despite the absence of previous abdominal surgery. Non-operative management is feasible for SBO in a virgin abdomen. Computed tomography scan can be a useful adjunct in discerning patients who may be treated non-operatively by elucidating the underlying cause of obstruction. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  1. Laparoscopic management of a small bowel obstruction secondary to Elipse intragastric balloon migration: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saud Al-Subaie

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Elipse™ intragastric balloon (IGB for weight loss is a swallowable capsule that is filled with 550 mL of fluid and resides in the stomach for four months before being excreted from the gastrointestinal tract. Although initial data showed that use of this device is safe and free from serious complications, we report for the first time the successful management of an Elipse™ IGB-related adverse event. Presentation of case: A 41-year-old woman presented to our emergency department following two days of abdominal pain, vomiting, and constipation. Her medical history included four caesarean sections and insertion of the Elipse™ IGB 16 weeks prior to presentation. The patient was vitally stable at presentation and abdominal examination revealed a mildly distended abdomen. Plain X-ray revealed a small bowel obstruction (SBO, and a double contrast computed tomography scan showed a dilated small bowel with mild free fluid proximal to a transition zone at the distal jejunum. Laparoscopic enterotomy was performed just proximal to the obstruction site, and the balloon was visualized and extracted after it had been incised and emptied. The enterotomy incision was closed with an intracorporeal continuous absorbable suture. The patient’s recovery was uneventful and she was discharged on postoperative day 4. Discussion: We discuss the possible etiologies of SBO following Elipse™ IGB insertion, and present a brief literature review regarding surgical and nonsurgical management options for such cases. Conclusion: Although initial data showed the Elipse™ IGB to be safe, complications can occur and be managed successfully. Keywords: Elipse, Intragastric balloon, Capsule, Obesity, Case report

  2. Impact of introduction of an acute surgical unit on management and outcomes of small bowel obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiienko, Anton M; Shakerian, Rose; Gorelik, Alexandra; Thomson, Benjamin N J; Skandarajah, Anita R

    2016-10-01

    The acute surgical unit (ASU) is a recently established model of care in Australasia and worldwide. Limited data are available regarding its effect on the management of small bowel obstruction. We compared the management of small bowel obstruction before and after introduction of ASU at a major tertiary referral centre. We hypothesized that introduction of ASU would correlate with improved patient outcomes. A retrospective review of prospectively maintained databases was performed over two separate 2-year periods, before and after the introduction of ASU. Data collected included demographics, co-morbidity status, use of water-soluble contrast agent and computed tomography. Outcome measures included surgical intervention, time to surgery, hospital length of stay, complications, 30-day readmissions, use of total parenteral nutrition, intensive care unit admissions and overall mortality. Total emergency admissions to the ASU increased from 2640 to 4575 between the two time periods. A total of 481 cases were identified (225 prior and 256 after introduction of ASU). Mortality decreased from 5.8% to 2.0% (P = 0.03), which remained significant after controlling for confounders with multivariate analysis (odds ratio = 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.08-0.73, P = 0.012). The proportion of surgically managed patients increased (20.9% versus 32.0%, P = 0.003) and more operations were performed within 5 days from presentation (76.6% versus 91.5%, P = 0.02). Fewer patients received water-soluble contrast agent (27.1% versus 18.4%, P = 0.02), but more patients were investigated with a computed tomography (70.7% versus 79.7%, P = 0.02). The ASU model of care resulted in decreased mortality, shorter time to intervention and increased surgical management. Overall complications rate and length of stay did not change. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  3. Towards a less costly but accurate test of gastric emptying and small bowel transit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilleri, M.; Zinsmeister, A.R.; Greydanus, M.P.; Brown, M.L.; Proano, M. (Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Our aim is to develop a less costly but accurate test of stomach emptying and small bowel transit by utilizing selected scintigraphic observations 1-6 hr after ingestion of a radiolabeled solid meal. These selected data were compared with more detailed analyses that require multiple scans and labor-intensive technical support. A logistic discriminant analysis was used to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of selected summaries of scintigraphic transit measurements. We studied 14 patients with motility disorders (eight neuropathic and six myopathic, confirmed by standard gastrointestinal manometry) and 37 healthy subjects. The patient group had abnormal gastric emptying (GE) and small bowel transit time (SBTT). The proportion of radiolabel retained in the stomach from 2 to 4 hr (GE 2 hr, GE 3 hr, GE 4 hr), as well as the proportion filling the colon at 4 and 6 hr (CF 4 hr, CF 6 hr) were individually able to differentiate health from disease (P less than 0.05 for each). From the logistic discriminant model, an estimated sensitivity of 93% resulted in similar specificities for detailed and selected transit parameters for gastric emptying (range: 62-70%). Similarly, combining selected observations, such as GE 4 hr with CF 6 hr, had a specificity of 76%, which was similar to the specificity of combinations of more detailed analyses. Based on the present studies and future confirmation in a larger number of patients, including those with less severe motility disorders, the 2-, 4-, and 6-hr scans with quantitation of proportions of counts in stomach and colon should provide a useful, relatively inexpensive strategy to identify and monitor motility disorders in clinical and epidemiologic studies.

  4. Usefulness of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in predicting strangulated small bowel obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotada Kittaka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The level of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP is considered to be useful diagnostic markers of small bowel ischemia. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate whether the serum I-FABP level is a predictive marker of strangulation in patients with small bowel obstruction (SBO. METHODS: A total of 37 patients diagnosed with SBO were included in this study. The serum I-FABP levels were retrospectively compared between the patients with strangulation and those with simple obstruction, and cut-off values for the diagnosis of strangulation were calculated using a receiver operating characteristic curve. In addition, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV were calculated. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients were diagnosed with strangulated SBO. The serum I-FABP levels were significantly higher in the patients with strangulation compared with those observed in the patients with simple obstruction (18.5 vs. 1.6 ng/ml p<0.001. Using a cut-off value of 6.5 ng/ml, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 71.4%, 93.8%, 93.8% and 71.4%, respectively. An I-FABP level greater than 6.5 ng/ml was found to be the only independent significant factor for a higher likelihood of strangulated SBO (P =  0.02; odds ratio: 19.826; 95% confidence interval: 2.1560 - 488.300. CONCLUSIONS: The I-FABP level is a useful marker for discriminating between strangulated SBO and simple SBO in patients with SBO.

  5. Non-small-cell lung cancer resectability: diagnostic value of PET/MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraioli, Francesco; Menezes, Leon; Kayani, Irfan; Syed, Rizwan; O'Meara, Celia; Barnes, Anna; Bomanji, Jamshed B.; Punwani, Shonit; Groves, Ashley M.; Screaton, Nicholas J.; Janes, Samuel M.; Win, Thida; Zaccagna, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic performance of PET/MR in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. Fifty consecutive consenting patients who underwent routine 18 F-FDG PET/CT for potentially radically treatable lung cancer following a staging CT scan were recruited for PET/MR imaging on the same day. Two experienced readers, unaware of the results with the other modalities, interpreted the PET/MR images independently. Discordances were resolved in consensus. PET/MR TNM staging was compared to surgical staging from thoracotomy as the reference standard in 33 patients. In the remaining 17 nonsurgical patients, TNM was determined based on histology from biopsy, imaging results (CT and PET/CT) and follow-up. ROC curve analysis was used to assess accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the PET/MR in assessing the surgical resectability of primary tumour. The kappa statistic was used to assess interobserver agreement in the PET/MR TNM staging. Two different readers, without knowledge of the PET/MR findings, subsequently separately reviewed the PET/CT images for TNM staging. The generalized kappa statistic was used to determine intermodality agreement between PET/CT and PET/MR for TNM staging. ROC curve analysis showed that PET/MR had a specificity of 92.3 % and a sensitivity of 97.3 % in the determination of resectability with an AUC of 0.95. Interobserver agreement in PET/MR reading ranged from substantial to perfect between the two readers (Cohen's kappa 0.646 - 1) for T stage, N stage and M stage. Intermodality agreement between PET/CT and PET/MR ranged from substantial to almost perfect for T stage, N stage and M stage (Cohen's kappa 0.627 - 0.823). In lung cancer patients PET/MR appears to be a robust technique for preoperative staging. (orig.)

  6. Prognostic factors of tumor recurrence in completely resected non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tantraworasin, Apichat; Saeteng, Somcharoen; Lertprasertsuke, Nirush; Arreyakajohn, Nuttapon; Kasemsarn, Choosak; Patumanond, Jayanton

    2013-01-01

    Patients with completely resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have an excellent outcome; however tumor recurs in 30%–77% of patients. This study retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathologic features of patients with any operable stage of NSCLC to identify the prognostic factors that influence tumor recurrence, including intratumoral blood vessel invasion (IVI), tumor size, tumor necrosis, and intratumoral lymphatic invasion. From January 2002 to December 2011, 227 consecutive patients were enrolled in this study. They were divided into two groups: the “no recurrence” group and the “recurrence” group. Recurrence-free survival was analyzed by multivariable Cox regression analysis, stratified by tumor staging, chemotherapy, and nodal involvement. IVI, tumor necrosis, tumor diameter more than 5 cm, and nodal involvement were identified as independent prognostic factors of tumor recurrence. The hazard ratio (HR) of patients with IVI was 2.1 times higher than that of patients without IVI (95% confident interval [CI]: 1.4–3.2) (P = 0.001).The HR of patients with tumor necrosis was 2.1 times higher than that of patients without tumor necrosis (95% CI: 1.3–3.4) (P = 0.001). Patients who had a maximum tumor diameter greater than 5 cm had significantly higher risk of recurrence than patients who had a maximum tumor diameter of less than 5 cm (HR 1.9, 95% CI: 1.0–3.5) (P = 0.033). IVI, tumor diameter more than 5 cm, and tumor necrosis are prognostic factors of tumor recurrence in completely resected NSCLC. Therefore, NSCLC patients, with or without nodal involvement, who have one or more prognostic factors of tumor recurrence may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy for prevention of tumor recurrence

  7. Spectrum of small-bowel mucosal abnormalities identified by capsule endoscopy in patients with portal hypertension of varied etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, T S; Janakan, Gokul Bollu; Chandrasekar, Viveksandeep Thoguluva; Kalamegam, Raja Yogesh; Suriyanarayanan, Sathiamoorthy; Sanjeevaraya, Prasad Menta

    2017-01-01

    Bleeding from small intestinal ectopic varices and persistent anemia caused by portal hypertensive enteropathy (PHE) can be very challenging. Capsule endoscopy (CE) is one of the best noninvasive modalities in identifying such lesions. The aims of this study are to study the prevalence of small-bowel changes related to portal hypertension (PHT) and to correlate them with the observations related to the effects of portal hypertension in the esophagus, stomach, and colon. Thirty-two patients with various etiologies of PHT with either anemia or gastrointestinal bleed were included along with age- and sex-matched controls without PHT. All patients underwent blood tests, gastroscopy, colonoscopy, and CE. The small-bowel findings by CE were categorized as inflammatory-like and vascular lesions. The small-bowel changes were analyzed to find out any association with various demographic, clinical, and endoscopic variables. Thirty-one out of 32 patients with PHT (96.8%) had PHE identified by CE. Of them, 31 (96.8%) had inflammatory-like appearance, 11 (34.4%) had vascular lesions, and 2 (6.2%) had small-bowel varices. Inflammatory-like appearance was noted in eight (25%) and angiodysplastic lesions in two (6.2%) controls. Findings compatible with PHE were detected in 96.8% of the patients and 25% of the controls (X 2 =34.72, p=0.000).The presence of PHE was not associated with any of the above-mentioned variables. Small-bowel mucosal changes were seen in significantly higher number of patients with PHT with anemia.

  8. CT-guided localization of small pulmonary nodules using adjacent microcoil implantation prior to video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Tian-Hao; Jin, Long; He, Wen [Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China); Fan, Yue-Feng [Xiamen University, Department of Interventional Therapy, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xiamen, Fujian (China); Hu, Li-Bao [Peking University People' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China)

    2015-09-15

    To describe and assess the localization of small peripheral pulmonary nodules prior to video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical (VATS) resection using the implantation of microcoils. Ninety-two patients with 101 pulmonary nodules underwent computed tomography (CT)-guided implantation of microcoils proximal to each nodule. Patients were randomly assigned to undergo entire microcoil or leaving-microcoil-end implantations. The complications and efficacy of the two implantation methods were evaluated. VATS resection of lung tissue containing each pulmonary lesion and microcoil were performed in the direction of the microcoil marker. Histopathological analysis was performed for the resected pulmonary lesions. CT-guided microcoil implantation was successful in 99/101 cases, and the placement of microcoils within 1 cm of the nodules was not disruptive. There was no difference in the complications and efficacy associated with the entire implantation method (performed for 51/99 nodules) versus the leaving-microcoil-end implantation method (performed for 48/99 nodules). All nodules were successfully removed using VATS resection. Asymptomatic pneumothorax occurred in 16 patients and mild pulmonary haemorrhage occurred in nine patients. However, none of these patients required further surgical treatment. Preoperative localization of small pulmonary nodules using a refined percutaneous microcoil implantation method was found to be safe and useful prior to VATS resection. (orig.)

  9. Supra-transumbilical laparotomy (STL approach for small bowel atresia repair: Our experience and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Leva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Supra-Transumbilical Laparotomy (STL has been used in paediatric surgery for a broad spectrum of abdominal procedures. We report our experience with STL approach for small bowel atresia repair in newborns and review previous published series on the topic. Patients and Methods: Fourteen patients with small bowel atresia were treated via STL approach at our Institution over a 5-year period and their charts were retrospectively reviewed. Results: STL procedure was performed at mean age of 3.1 day. No malrotation disorders were detected with pre-operative contrast enema. Eight patients (54.1% presented jejunal atresia, five (35.7% ileal atresia, and one (7.1% multiple ileal and jejunal atresias. Standard repair with primary end-to-back anastomosis was performed in all but one patient. In the newborn with multiple atresia, STL incision was converted in supra-umbilical transverse incision due to difficulty of exposition. After surgery, one patient developed anastomotic stricture, and another developed occlusion due to adhesions: Both infants required second laparotomy. No infections of the umbilical site were recorded, and cosmetic results were excellent in all patients. Conclusions: Increasing evidence suggests that STL approach for small bowel atresia is feasible, safe and provides adequate exposure for small bowel atresia surgery. When malrotation and colonic/multiple atresia are pre-operatively ruled out, STL procedure can be choosen as first approach.

  10. The State of Mechanical Bowel Preparation in Colorectal Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P. van 't Sant (Hans Pieter)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Surgical resection is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with colorectal cancer and has an important role in patients with inflammatory bowel disease or other benign bowel conditions requiring surgical treatment. Generally, restoration of bowel continuity

  11. A case of small bowel injury induced by preoperative irradiation for rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Noguchi, Tomoyoshi; Akimoto, Shin

    1988-01-01

    A 54-year-old man underwent anterior resection with intraoperative radiation following preoperative irradiation for carcinoma of the rectum in August 1984, and subsequently was suffering from severe diarrhea and abdominal pain. One year and two months later he was admitted to our hospital with a sudden onset of lower abdominal pain, nausea and vomitting. The symptoms were so severe that emergency laparotomy was performed. There was no evidence of recurrent tumor, but the terminal ileum, from a point 30 cm. proximal to the cecum was found to be dark red, constricted and fixed to the urinary bladder. In addition, another two parts of the ileum from a point 50 cm. to that segment showed dark red. These damaged ileum were resected. Pathological examination revealed that there was thickness of the endothelium of arteriole and thromboses of the venule and mucosal damage (ie, ulceration, necroses). These vascular changes had resulted in radiation enteritis induced by preoperative radiotherapy. After the operation severe diarrhea continued until March 1986, when the granning diarrhea and pain became unbearable. At reoperation, another part of ileum was found to be dark red and constricted. There was a recurrent episode of radiation injury of small intestine. We report this case for the recognition of high-risk clinical factors and attention to careful selection or preparation of the patients with cancer for radiotherapy. (author)

  12. Anaesthetic Management of a patient with Myasthenia Gravis and Small Bowel Intussusception for Jejuno-Ileal Anastomoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kumar Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is a chronic autoimmune disease affecting voluntary skeletal muscles. The altered sensitivity of acetylcholine receptors to muscle relaxants and concomitant treatment with anticholinesterase in these patients affect their anaesthetic management. Patients who have undergone bowel anastomosis and are on regular anticholinesterase treatment are susceptible to anastomotic leaks. We report successful anaesthetic management of class I myasthenic patient with coexisting small bowel intussusception operated for jejuno-ileal anastomoses using regional, inhalational and intravenous (i.v anaesthesia based on train of four responses, and avoiding the use of reversal (anticholinesterase.

  13. Experimental high-frequency ultrasound can detect graft rejection after small bowel transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R; Liu, Q; Wu, E X; Pescovitz, M D; Collins, M H; Kopecky, K K; Grosfeld, J L

    1994-02-01

    Early diagnosis of graft rejection after small bowel transplantation (SBT) can allow prompt institution of vigorous immunosuppressive therapy, with resultant reversal of the rejection process. The current method for graft monitoring is random mucosal biopsy from a stomal site or through an endoscope. However, because early rejection often has a patchy distribution, it could be missed by random biopsy. We hypothesized that the pathological process of rejection would alter acoustic impedance of the tissue and thus change the ultrasonic patterns of the graft intestinal wall. If this hypothesis is correct, then high-frequency endoscopic ultrasound (US) could be used to monitor the entire transplanted bowel and guide the biopsy, with improved yields. This hypothesis was tested in a rat orthotopic SBT model. Sixty-two intestinal specimens (9 isografts, 12 allografts treated with cyclosporine A [CsA], 22 untreated allografts, and 19 intestines from normal rats) were collected for in vitro transluminal US imaging (30 MHz) and histopathologic study. The echo pattern of normal rat intestinal wall consisted of five echo layers that correlated spatially with the histological layers: the innermost hyperechoic layer 1, plus hypoechoic layer 2, corresponded to the mucosa; hyperechoic layer 3, the submucosa; anechoic layer 4, the muscularis propria; and hyperechoic layer 5, the serosa. The isografts and CsA-treated allografts were identical histologically and ultrasonically to normal intestine. However, the echo patterns of the untreated allografts had progressive loss of architectural stratification, with worsening rejection. The change began with patchy indistinctness and disruption of hyperechoic layers 1, 3 and 5, and progressed to total obliteration of the layers, with the intestinal wall becoming a nonstratified hypoechoic structure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Prolonged survival after resection and radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chee, R. J.; Bydder, S.; Cameron, F.

    2007-01-01

    Selected patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer benefit from aggressive treatment. This report describes three patients who developed solitary brain metastases after previous resection of primary adenocarcinoma of the lung. Each underwent surgical resection of their brain metastasis followed by cranial irradiation and remain disease free 10 or more years later. Two patients developed cognitive impairment approximately 8 years after treatment of their brain metastasis, which was felt to be due to their previous brain irradiation. Here we discuss the treatment of solitary brain metastasis, particularly the value of combined method approaches in selected patients and dose-volume considerations

  15. [High-grade small bowel angiosarcoma associated with angiosarcomatosis: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahbouni, Sanae; Barnoud, Raphaëlle; Watkin, Emmanuel; Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan

    2011-08-01

    Angiosarcoma is a rare soft-tissue neoplasm occurring most often in the skin and the subcutaneous tissues and very rarely in the gastrointestinal tract. We report a case of a 25-year-old woman who presented with a small intestinal angiosarcoma associated with angiosarcomatosis. The diagnosis was established on surgical intestinal resection, that showed a high-grade angiosarcoma with epithelioid component and foci of agressive form of hemangioendothelioma. Immunohistochemical study revealed tumour cell positivity with endothelial markers CD31 and factor VIII whereas CD34 and epithelial markers were negative. The tumour displayed KIT (CD117) immunoreactivity without KIT or PDGFRA mutation on molecular analysis. Clinical and pathological features as well as differential diagnosis of this rare entity in gastrointestinal tract are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in irritable bowel syndrome: are there any predictors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCallum Richard W

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO is a condition in which excessive levels of bacteria, mainly the colonic-type species are present in the small intestine. Recent data suggest that SIBO may contribute to the pathophysiology of Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. The purpose of this study was to identify potential predictors of SIBO in patients with IBS. Methods Adults with IBS based on Rome II criteria who had predominance of bloating and flatulence underwent a glucose breath test (GBT to determine the presence of SIBO. Breath samples were obtained at baseline and at 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 minutes after ingestion of 50 g of glucose dissolved in 150 mL of water. Results of the glucose breath test, which measures hydrogen and methane levels in the breath, were considered positive for SIBO if 1 the hydrogen or methane peak was >20 ppm when the baseline was Results Ninety-eight patients were identified who underwent a GBT (mean age, 49 y; 78% female. Thirty-five patients (36% had a positive GBT result suggestive of SIBO. A positive GBT result was more likely in patients >55 years of age (odds ratio [OR], 3.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-9.0 and in females (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.1-14.5. Hydrogen was detected more frequently in patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS (OR, 8; 95% CI, 1.4-45, and methane was the main gas detected in patients with constipation-predominant IBS (OR, 8; 95% CI, 1.3-44. There was no significant correlation between the presence of SIBO and the predominant bowel pattern or concurrent use of tegaserod, proton pump inhibitors, or opiate analgesics. Conclusions Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth was present in a sizeable percentage of patients with IBS with predominance of bloating and flatulence. Older age and female sex were predictors of SIBO in patients with IBS. Identification of possible predictors of SIBO in patients with IBS could aid in the development of successful treatment plans.

  17. Wireless capsule endoscopy and proximal small bowel lesions in Crohn’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzziello, Carmelina; Onali, Sara; Calabrese, Emma; Zorzi, Francesca; Ascolani, Marta; Condino, Giovanna; Lolli, Elisabetta; Naccarato, Paola; Pallone, Francesco; Biancone, Livia

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of proximal small bowel (SB) lesions detected by wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) in Crohn’s disease (CD). METHODS: WCE was performed in 64 patients: 32 with CD of the distal ileum, and 32 controls with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) or diarrhea. WCE was performed using the Given SB-WCE, followed by small intestine contrast ultrasonography (SICUS). Findings compatible with CD by using WCE included erosions, aphthoid or deep ulcers, and strictures/stenosis. RESULTS: WCE detected proximal SB lesions in 16/32 (50%) patients (14 aphthoid ulcers, 2 deep ulcers, one stricture), which appeared not to be related to clinical parameters [epigastric pain, age, smoking, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), IDA]. Among patients with proximal SB lesions, 6 (37%) were smokers, 3 (19%) NSAID users, 3 (19%) had epigastric pain and 4 (25%) had IDA. SICUS detected proximal SB lesions in 3/32 patients (19%) also showing lesions with WCE. No correlations were observed between proximal SB lesions assessed by WCE or by SICUS (χ2 = 1.5, P = 0.2). CONCLUSION: The use of WCE allows the detection of previously unknown upper SB lesions in a high proportion of patients with a previous diagnosis of CD involving the distal ileum. PMID:20614486

  18. Prognostic significance of microsatellite instability in curatively resected adenocarcinoma of the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueckl, Wolfgang M; Heinze, Elvira; Milsmann, Catrin; Wein, Axel; Koebnick, Corinna; Jung, Andreas; Croner, Roland S; Brabletz, Thomas; Günther, Klaus; Kirchner, Thomas; Hahn, Eckhart G; Hohenberger, Werner; Becker, Heinz; Reingruber, Bertram

    2004-01-20

    Adenocarcinoma of the small intestine (ACSI) is a rare condition with few studies addressing follow-up and prognosis. Tumors of 35 patients with curative resection of an ACSI were retrospectively analyzed by immunohistochemistry: p53, hMLH1, hMSH2 and hMSH6 and microsatellite instability (MSI): BAT-26, BAX, TGF-beta RII. With a median follow up of 6.1 years, the median cancer-specific survival (CSS) was 36.2 months. Patients who were highly instable (MSI-H) (n=10) had a CSS of 49.6 months in contrast to patients with stable tumors (23.2 months) (P=0.010). Additionally, a low tumor stage according to UICC and MSI-H were shown to be independent factors (P=0.005 and P<0.001) for an increased survival in multivariate analysis. Therefore, it is suggested that analysis of the MSI status might prove useful in discerning prognosis within cancers of the same stage.

  19. Prognostic factors of tumor recurrence in completely resected non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tantraworasin A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Apichat Tantraworasin,1 Somcharean Seateang,1 Nirush Lertprasertsuke,2 Nuttapon Arreyakajohn,3 Choosak Kasemsarn,4 Jayanton Patumanond5 1General Thoracic Unit, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University Hospital, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 2Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University Hospital, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 3Cardiovascular Thoracic Unit, Department of Surgery, Lampang Hospital, Lampang, Thailand; 4Cardiovascular Thoracic Unit, Department of Surgery, Chest Institute, Nonthaburi, Thailand; 5Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University Hospital, Chiang Mai, Thailand Background: Patients with completely resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC have an excellent outcome; however tumor recurs in 30%-77% of patients. This study retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathologic features of patients with any operable stage of NSCLC to identify the prognostic factors that influence tumor recurrence, including intratumoral blood vessel invasion (IVI, tumor size, tumor necrosis, and nodal involvement. Methods: From January 2002 to December 2011, 227 consecutive patients were enrolled in this study. They were divided into two groups: the “no recurrence” group and the “recurrence” group. Recurrence-free survival was analyzed by multivariable Cox regression analysis, stratified by tumor staging, chemotherapy, and lymphatic invasion. Results: IVI, tumor necrosis, tumor diameter more than 5 cm, and nodal involvement were identified as independent prognostic factors of tumor recurrence. The hazard ratio (HR of patients with IVI was 2.1 times higher than that of patients without IVI (95% confident interval [CI]: 1.4–3.2 (P = 0.001.The HR of patients with tumor necrosis was 2.1 times higher than that of patients without tumor necrosis (95% CI: 1.3–3.4 (P = 0.001. Patients who had a maximum tumor diameter greater than 5 cm had significantly higher risk of recurrence than

  20. Arterial hypertension due to fructose ingestion: model based on intermittent osmotic fluid trapping in the small bowel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurbel Sven

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Based on recently reported data that fructose ingestion is linked to arterial hypertension, a model of regulatory loops involving the colon role in maintenance of fluid and sodium homeostasis is proposed. In normal digestion of hyperosmolar fluids, also in cases of postprandial hypotension and in patients having the "dumping" syndrome after gastric surgery, any hyperosmolar intestinal content is diluted by water taken from circulation and being trapped in the bowel until reabsorption. High fructose corn sirup (HFCS soft drinks are among common hyperosmolar drinks. Fructose is slowly absorbed through passive carrier-mediated facilitated diffusion, along the entire small bowel, thus preventing absorption of the trapped water for several hours. Here presented interpretation is that ingestion of hyperosmolar HFCS drinks due to a transient fluid shift into the small bowel increases renin secretion and sympathetic activity, leading to rise in ADH and aldosterone secretions. Their actions spare water and sodium in the large bowel and kidneys. Alteration of colon absorption due to hormone exposure depends on cell renewal and takes days to develop, so the momentary capacity of sodium absorption in the colon depends on the average aldosterone and ADH exposure during few previous days. This inertia in modulation of the colon function can make an individual that often takes HFCS drinks prone to sodium retention, until a new balance is reached with an expanded ECF pool and arterial hypertension. In individuals with impaired fructose absorption, even a higher risk of arterial hypertension can be expected.

  1. GLP-1 and GLP-2 act in concert to inhibit fasted, but not fed, small bowel motility in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozkurt, Ayhan; Näslund, Erik; Holst, Jens Juul

    2002-01-01

    Small bowel motility was studied in rats at increasing (1-20 pmol/kg/min) intravenous doses of either glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) or glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) alone, or in combination in the fasted and fed state. There was a dose-dependent inhibitory action of GLP-1 on the migrating myo...... demonstrates an additive effect of peripheral administration of GLP-1 and GLP-2 on fasted small bowel motility. In the fed state, GLP-1 and GLP-2 seem to display counter-balancing effects on motility of the small intestine....... myoelectric complex (MMC), where the dose of 5 pmol/kg/min induced an increased MMC cycle length. No effect was seen with GLP-2 alone, but the combination of GLP-1 and GLP-2 induced a more pronounced inhibitory effect, with significant increase of the MMC cycle length from a dose of 2 pmol/kg/min. During fed...

  2. Assessment of small bowel motility in patients with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction using cine-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Hidenori; Kessoku, Takaomi; Fuyuki, Akiko; Iida, Hiroshi; Inamori, Masahiko; Fujii, Tetsuro; Kawamura, Harunobu; Hata, Yasuo; Manabe, Noriaki; Chiba, Toshimi; Kwee, Thomas C; Haruma, Ken; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki; Nakajima, Atsushi; Takahara, Taro

    2013-07-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a rare, serious motility disorder, with life-threatening complications over time. However, lack of an established, non-invasive diagnostic method has caused delays in the diagnosis of this intractable disease. Cine-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an emerging technique, with a potential to evaluate the motility of the entire bowel. We compared small bowel motility in healthy volunteers, patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and those with CIPO, using cine-MRI, and evaluated the usefulness of cine-MRI as a novel diagnostic method for CIPO. Twelve healthy volunteers, IBS patients, and CIPO patients prospectively underwent cine-MRI at 1.5 T. Luminal diameter, contraction ratio, and contraction cycle were measured and compared between the groups. Cine-MRI provided sufficient dynamic images to assess the motility of the entire small bowel. Luminal diameter (mean±s.d.) in CIPO patients was significantly higher than that in healthy volunteers and IBS patients (43.4±14.1, 11.1±1.5, and 10.9±1.9 mm, respectively), and contraction ratio was significantly lower in CIPO patients than that in healthy volunteers and IBS patients (17.1±11.0%, 73.0±9.3%, and 74.6±9.4%, respectively). No significant differences were observed in the contraction cycle. This study is the first to assess the clinical utility of cine-MRI in CIPO patients. Cine-MRI clearly detected contractility impairments in CIPO patients. Cine-MRI is noninvasive, radiation-free, and can directly evaluate the entire small bowel peristalsis, and can detect the affected loops at a glance; therefore, it might be extremely useful for the diagnosis and follow-up of CIPO patients in clinical practice.

  3. Appropriateness of the study of iron deficiency anemia prior to referral for small bowel evaluation at a tertiary center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jaime Pereira; Pinho, Rolando; Silva, Joana; Ponte, Ana; Sousa, Mafalda; Silva, João Carlos; Carvalho, João

    2017-06-28

    To evaluate the adequacy of the study of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in real life practice prior to referral to a gastroenterology department for small bowel evaluation. All consecutive patients referred to a gastroenterology department for small bowel investigation due to iron deficiency anemia, between January 2013 and December 2015 were included. Both patients referred from general practitioners or directly from different hospital departments were selected. Relevant clinical information regarding prior anemia workup was retrospectively collected from medical records. An appropriate pre-referral study was considered the execution of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) investigation, colonoscopy with quality standards (recent, total and with adequate preparation) and celiac disease (CD) screening (through serologic testing and/or histopathological investigation). A total of 77 patients (58.4% female, mean age 67.1 ± 16.7 years) were included. Most (53.2%) patients were referred from general practitioners, 41.6% from other hospital specialties and 5.2% directly from the emergency department. The mean pre-referral hemoglobin concentration was 8.8 ± 2.0 g/dL and the majority of anemias had microcytic (71.4%) and hypochromic (72.7%) characteristics. 77.9% of patients presented with an incomplete pre-referral study: EGD in 97.4%, with H. pylori investigation in 58.3%, colonoscopy with quality criteria in 63.6%, and CD screening in 24.7%. Patients with an appropriate study at the time of referral were younger (48.7 ± 17.7 vs 72.3 ± 12.3 years, P < 0.001). Small bowel evaluation was ultimately undertaken in 72.7% of patients, with a more frequent evaluation in patients with a quality colonoscopy at referral (78.6% vs 23.8%); P < 0.001 (OR = 11.7, 95%CI: 3.6-38.6). The most common diagnosis regarded as the likely cause of IDA was small bowel angioectasia (18.2%) but additional causes were also found in the upper and lower

  4. The scintigraphic determination of small intestinal transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marano, A.R.; Caride, V.J.; Shah, R.V.; Prokop, E.K.; Troncale, F.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Diffuse disturbance in gastrointestinal motility may be present in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To further investigate small intestinal motility in IBS patients small intestinal transit time (SITT) was determined and related to the symptom status. 11 female patients with IBS (mean age 29 years) were divided into those whose predominate symptom was diarrhea (N=6), and those with only constipation (N=5). All subjects ingested an isosmotic solution of lactulose (10 gm in 150cc of water) labeled with 99m-Tc-DTPA (Sn). The patient was studied supine under a 25 inch gamma camera with data collected at 1 frame per minute for 180 minutes or until activity appeared in the ascending colon. Regions of interest were selected over the cecum and ascending colon. The time of first appearance of radioactivity in the region of the cecum was taken as the small intestinal transit time. SITT in the 5 normal females was 98.7 +- 13 min (mean +- SEM). SITT in the IBS patients with diarrhea, 67.3 +- 7 min was significantly faster (p< 0.08). SITT in the constipated IBS patients, 126 +- 12 min, was slower than normals and significantly different from diarrhea patients (p< 0.001). These studies show that IBS patients with diarrhea have significantly faster SITT than normals while constipated IBS patients have significantly slower SITT than the diarrhea subgroup. Further, this study emphasizes the need to study the various symptomatic subgroups of IBs patients independently and indicates a possible role for abnormal SITT in the pathogenesis of IBS

  5. The scintigraphic determination of small intestinal transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marano, A.R.; Caride, V.J.; Shah, R.V.; Prokop, E.K.; Troncale, F.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Diffuse disturbance in gastrointestinal motility may be present in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To further investigate small intestinal motility in IBS patients small intestinal transit time (SITT) was determined and related to the symptom status. 11 female patients with IBS (mean age 29 years) were divided into those whose predominate symptom was diarrhea (N=6), and those with only constipation (N=5). All subjects ingested an isosmotic solution of lactulose (10 gm in 150cc of water) labeled with 99m-Tc-DTPA (Sn). The patient was studied supine under a 25 inch gamma camera with data collected at 1 frame per minute for 180 minutes or until activity appeared in the ascending colon. Regions of interest were selected over the cecum and ascending colon. The time of first appearance of radioactivity in the region of the cecum was taken as the small intestinal transit time. SITT in the 5 normal females was 98.7 +- 13 min (mean +- SEM). SITT in the IBS patients with diarrhea, 67.3 +- 7 min was significantly faster (p< 0.08). SITT in the constipated IBS patients, 126 +- 12 min, was slower than normals and significantly different from diarrhea patients (p< 0.001). These studies show that IBS patients with diarrhea have significantly faster SITT than normals while constipated IBS patients have significantly slower SITT than the diarrhea subgroup. Further, this study emphasizes the need to study the various symptomatic subgroups of IBs patients independently and indicates a possible role for abnormal SITT in the pathogenesis of IBS.

  6. Genetics and epigenetics of small bowel adenocarcinoma: the interactions of CIN, MSI, and CIMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Arne; Kloor, Matthias; Schirmacher, Peter; Bläker, Hendrik

    2011-04-01

    Characterization of tumor genetics and epigenetics allows to stratify a tumor entity according to molecular pathways and may shed light on the interactions of different types of DNA alterations during tumorigenesis. Small intestinal adenocarcinoma is rare, and to date the interrelation of genomic instability and epigenetics has not been investigated in this tumor type. We therefore analyzed 37 primary small bowel carcinomas with known microsatellite instability and KRAS status for chromosomal instability using comparative genomic hybridization, for the presence of aberrant methylation (CpG island methylation phenotype) by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction, and for BRAF mutations. Chromosomal instability was detected in 22 of 37 (59%) tumors (3 of 9 microsatellite instable, and 19 of 28 microsatellite stable carcinomas). Nine carcinomas (24%) were microsatellite and chromosomally stable. High-level DNA methylation was found in 16% of chromosomal instable tumors and in 44% of both microsatellite instable and microsatellite and chromosomally stable carcinomas. KRAS was mutated in 55, 0, and 10% of chromosomal instable, microsatellite instable, and microsatellite and chromosomally stable tumors, respectively whereas the frequencies of BRAF mutations were 6% for chromosomal instable and 22% for both microsatellite instable and microsatellite and chromosomally stable carcinomas. In conclusion, in this study we show that chromosomal instable carcinomas of the small intestine are distinguished from microsatellite instable and microsatellite and chromosomally stable tumors by a high frequency of KRAS mutations, low frequencies of CpG island methylation phenotype, and BRAF mutations. In microsatellite instable and microsatellite and chromosomally stable cancers, CpG island methylation phenotype and BRAF/KRAS mutations are similarly distributed, indicating common mechanisms of tumor initiation or progression in their molecular pathogenesis.

  7. Small- bowel mucosal changes and antibody responses after low- and moderate-dose gluten challenge in celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lähdeaho Marja-Leena

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the restrictive nature of a gluten-free diet, celiac patients are looking for alternative therapies. While drug-development programs include gluten challenges, knowledge regarding the duration of gluten challenge and gluten dosage is insufficient. We challenged adult celiac patients with gluten with a view to assessing the amount needed to cause some small-bowel mucosal deterioration. Methods Twenty-five celiac disease adults were challenged with low (1-3 g or moderate (3-5g doses of gluten daily for 12 weeks. Symptoms, small-bowel morphology, densities of CD3+ intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs and celiac serology were determined. Results Both moderate and low amounts of gluten induced small-bowel morphological damage in 67% of celiac patients. Moderate gluten doses also triggered mucosal inflammation and more gastrointestinal symptoms leading to premature withdrawals in seven cases. In 22% of those who developed significant small- intestinal damage, symptoms remained absent. Celiac antibodies seroconverted in 43% of the patients. Conclusions Low amounts of gluten can also cause significant mucosal deterioration in the majority of the patients. As there are always some celiac disease patients who will not respond within these conditions, sample sizes must be sufficiently large to attain to statistical power in analysis.

  8. Radiation exposure and examination time during enteroclysis and small bowel follow-through

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoeni, R.F.; Gould, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have investigated radiation exposures and total examination and fluoroscopy times in enterolysis and small-bowel-follow-through (SBFT). Enteroclysis was performed in 25 patients and SBFT in another 25 (17 with UGI/SBFT and 8 with SBFT alone), with 5 TLD dosimeters placed in areas of the back exposed to primary x-rays during fluoroscopy, spot, and overhead radiography. Skin entry exposures, fluoroscopy, and total examination times in enteroclysis were compared to those in SBFTs. Biphasic enteroclyis was performed, with an average of 18 radiographs per study, SBFT with 16, and UGI/SBFT with 23. Indications and pathology for enteroclysis and SBFT were similar. Detailed findings are presented. The authors conclude that total examination time for enteroclysis is two to three times shorter and skin entry exposure is less than two to three times higher than for SBFT. Higher radiation exposure of enteroclysis should be weighted against very short examination times and reported high accuracy in deciding between enteroclysis and SBFT

  9. Peristalsis gap sign at cine magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing strangulated small bowel obstruction. Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahara, Taro; Kwee, T.C.; Haradome, Hiroki

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosing strangulated small bowel obstruction (SBO). This study included 38 patients with clinically confirmed SBO who had undergone cine MRI. Cine MRI scans were evaluated regarding the presence of the 'peristalsis gap sign' (referring to an akinetic or severely hypokinetic closed loop), indicating strangulation. Computed tomography (CT) was performed in 34 of 38 patients with (n=25) or without (n=9) contrast enhancement. CT images were evaluated using a combination of criteria (presence of hyperattenuation, poor contrast enhancement, mesenteric edema, wall thickening, massive ascites) indicating strangulation. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of cine MRI and CT for the diagnosis of strangulation were calculated and compared using surgical findings and the clinical course as the reference standard. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of cine MRI were 100%, 92.9%, 83.3%, and 100%, respectively; and those of CT (of which 26.5% was performed without contrast enhancement) were 66.7%, 92.0%, 75.0%, and 88.5%, respectively. There was no significant difference in diagnostic accuracy between the two methods (P=0.375). Cine MRI is a feasible and promising technique for diagnosing strangulation. (author)

  10. Small-Bowel Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Suspected Crohn's Disease—Diagnostic Value and Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Pedro; Almeida, Nuno; Lopes, Sandra; Duque, Gabriela; Freire, Paulo; Lérias, Clotilde; Gouveia, Hermano; Sofia, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Background. The aim of this work was to assess the value of capsule enteroscopy in the diagnosis of patients with suspected Crohn's Disease (CD). Methods. This was a retrospective study in a single tertiary care centre involving patients undergoing capsule enteroscopy for suspected CD. Patients taking nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs during the thirty preceding days or with a follow-up period of less than six months were excluded. Results. Seventy eight patients were included. The endoscopic findings included mucosal breaks in 50%, ulcerated stenosis in 5%, and villous atrophy in 4%. The diagnosis of CD was established in 31 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of the endoscopic findings were 93%, 80%, 77%, and 94%, respectively. Capsule retention occurred in four patients (5%). The presence of ulcerated stenosis was significantly more frequent in patients with positive inflammatory markers. The diagnostic yield of capsule enteroscopy in patients with negative ileoscopy was 56%, with a diagnostic acuity of 93%. Conclusions. Small bowel capsule endoscopy is a safe and valid technique for assessing patients with suspected CD. Capsule retention is more frequent in patients with positive inflammatory markers. Patients with negative ileoscopy and suspected CD should be submitted to capsule enteroscopy. PMID:20811612

  11. Small-Bowel Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Suspected Crohn's Disease—Diagnostic Value and Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Figueiredo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this work was to assess the value of capsule enteroscopy in the diagnosis of patients with suspected Crohn's Disease (CD. Methods. This was a retrospective study in a single tertiary care centre involving patients undergoing capsule enteroscopy for suspected CD. Patients taking nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs during the thirty preceding days or with a follow-up period of less than six months were excluded. Results. Seventy eight patients were included. The endoscopic findings included mucosal breaks in 50%, ulcerated stenosis in 5%, and villous atrophy in 4%. The diagnosis of CD was established in 31 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of the endoscopic findings were 93%, 80%, 77%, and 94%, respectively. Capsule retention occurred in four patients (5%. The presence of ulcerated stenosis was significantly more frequent in patients with positive inflammatory markers. The diagnostic yield of capsule enteroscopy in patients with negative ileoscopy was 56%, with a diagnostic acuity of 93%. Conclusions. Small bowel capsule endoscopy is a safe and valid technique for assessing patients with suspected CD. Capsule retention is more frequent in patients with positive inflammatory markers. Patients with negative ileoscopy and suspected CD should be submitted to capsule enteroscopy.

  12. Small-bowel capsule endoscopy in patients with suspected Crohn's disease-diagnostic value and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Pedro; Almeida, Nuno; Lopes, Sandra; Duque, Gabriela; Freire, Paulo; Lérias, Clotilde; Gouveia, Hermano; Sofia, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the value of capsule enteroscopy in the diagnosis of patients with suspected Crohn's Disease (CD). Methods. This was a retrospective study in a single tertiary care centre involving patients undergoing capsule enteroscopy for suspected CD. Patients taking nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs during the thirty preceding days or with a follow-up period of less than six months were excluded. Results. Seventy eight patients were included. The endoscopic findings included mucosal breaks in 50%, ulcerated stenosis in 5%, and villous atrophy in 4%. The diagnosis of CD was established in 31 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of the endoscopic findings were 93%, 80%, 77%, and 94%, respectively. Capsule retention occurred in four patients (5%). The presence of ulcerated stenosis was significantly more frequent in patients with positive inflammatory markers. The diagnostic yield of capsule enteroscopy in patients with negative ileoscopy was 56%, with a diagnostic acuity of 93%. Small bowel capsule endoscopy is a safe and valid technique for assessing patients with suspected CD. Capsule retention is more frequent in patients with positive inflammatory markers. Patients with negative ileoscopy and suspected CD should be submitted to capsule enteroscopy.

  13. Measurement of small bowel transit time by 99Tcm-SC imaging: preliminary clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shaohua; Xu Jingying; Bei Lian; Zhu Chaohui; Ba Jiantao

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To develop a method of measuring small bowel transit time (SBTT) by 99 Tc m -sulfur collide (SC) imaging and to compare with the method of added lactose in the test meal. Methods: 20 healthy volunteers and 26 patients with gastrointestinal disorders were studied. In fasting state, the subjects were asked to ingest the 99 Tc m -SC labelled solid meal within 5 minutes, then the image acquisition was immediately started with SPECT. The images were acquired every 15 min during the first hour, at 30 min intervals during 2∼4 hours and hourly thereafter until 80% radioactivity had entered the colon. One week later, the same procedure of imaging with 15 g lactulose added in the test meal was performed. The regions of interest (ROIs) were taken at stomach and colon, and the SBTT was calculated by deconvolution or by subtraction of the 50% time of gastric emptying from the 50% time of colon filling. Results: 1) The mean SBTT of 20 healthy volunteers was (4.2 +- 0.5) h, oral-caecum transit time (OCTT) was (4.3 +- 0.6) h; lactulose shortened the SBTT by (1.8 +- 0.6) h; 2) 26 patients showed different results of SBTT due to their different gastrointestinal disorders bases. Conclusions: 99 Tc m -SC imaging was a noninvasive and useful method to measure SBTT. The added lactulose can shorten the examination time and help to identify the time of food to the ileocecal region

  14. Adhesions small bowel obstruction in emergency setting: conservative or operative treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenza, M; De Gruttola, I; Rossi, D; Castaldi, S; Falaschi, F; Giuliano, G

    2016-01-01

    Adhesions small bowel obstructions (aSBO) are among the leading causes of emergency operative intervention. About the 80% of aSBO cases resolve without a surgical treatment. It's important to identify which patients could undergo a conservative treatment to prevent an useless surgery The aim of this study is to determine findings that can indicate whether patients with aSBO should undergo a conservative or a surgical treatment. 313 patients with diagnosis of submission of aSBO were restudied. Patients were divided into two groups based on the different type of treatment received, 225 patients who underwent surgical treatment within 24 hours after admission, 88 patients which underwent conservative treatment successfully. For each patient, clinical, hematochemical and radiological findings have been analysed. The treatment of aSBO should be, at the beginning, conservative except that cases that presents clinical and/or CT-scan findings predictive for a surgical treatment (free peritoneal fluid, mesenterial edema, transitional point) or a peritonitis (pneumatosis intestinalis, pneumoperitoneum).

  15. Epidemiological investigation of Candida species causing bloodstream infection in paediatric small bowel transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhr, Mallory J; Gomes-Neto, João Carlos; Banjara, Nabaraj; Florescu, Diana F; Mercer, David F; Iwen, Peter C; Hallen-Adams, Heather E

    2017-06-01

    Small bowel transplantation (SBT) can be a life-saving medical procedure. However, these recipients experience high risk of bloodstream infections caused by Candida. This research aims to characterise the SBT recipient gut microbiota over time following transplantation and investigate the epidemiology of candidaemia in seven paediatric patients. Candida species from the recipients' ileum and bloodstream were identified by internal transcribed spacer sequence and distinguished to strain by multilocus sequence typing and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA. Antifungal susceptibility of bloodstream isolates was determined against nine antifungals. Twenty-two ileostomy samples harboured at least one Candida species. Fungaemia were caused by Candida parapsilosis, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida orthopsilosis and Candida pelliculosa. All but three bloodstream isolates showed susceptibility to all the antifungals tested. One C. glabrata isolate showed multidrug resistance to itraconazole, amphotericin B and posaconazole and intermediate resistance to caspofungin. Results are congruent with both endogenous (C. albicans, C. glabrata) and exogenous (C. parapsilosis) infections; results also suggest two patients were infected by the same strain of C. parapsilosis. Continuing to work towards a better understanding of sources of infection-particularly the exogenous sources-would lead to targeted prevention strategies. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Impact of remote ischemic preconditioning on wound healing in small bowel anastomoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzner, Philipp Anton; Kulemann, Birte; Kuesters, Simon; Timme, Sylvia; Hoeppner, Jens; Hopt, Ulrich Theodor; Marjanovic, Goran

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the influence of remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) on anastomotic integrity. METHODS: Sixty male Wistar rats were randomized to six groups. The control group (n = 10) had an end-to-end ileal anastomosis without RIPC. The preconditioned groups (n = 34) varied in time of ischemia and time of reperfusion. One group received the amino acid L-arginine before constructing the anastomosis (n = 9). On postoperative day 4, the rats were re-laparotomized, and bursting pressure, hydroxyproline concentration, intra-abdominal adhesions, and a histological score concerning the mucosal ischemic injury were collected. The data are given as median (range). RESULTS: On postoperative day 4, median bursting pressure was 124 mmHg (60-146 mmHg) in the control group. The experimental groups did not show a statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). Regarding the hydroxyproline concentration, we did not find any significant variation in the experimental groups. We detected significantly less mucosal injury in the RIPC groups. Furthermore, we assessed more extensive intra-abdominal adhesions in the preconditioned groups than in the control group. CONCLUSION: RIPC directly before performing small bowel anastomosis does not affect anastomotic stability in the early period, as seen in ischemic preconditioning. PMID:21455330

  17. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth and irritable bowel syndrome-related symptoms: experience with Rifaximin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Sergio; Cottone, Claudia; Doveri, Tiziana; Almasio, Piero Luigi; Craxi, Antonio

    2009-06-07

    To estimate the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in our geographical area (Western Sicily, Italy) by means of an observational study, and to gather information on the use of locally active, non-absorbable antibiotics for treatment of SIBO. Our survey included 115 patients fulfilling the Rome II criteria for diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); a total of 97 patients accepted to perform a breath test with lactulose (BTLact), and those who had a positive test, received Rifaximin (Normix, Alfa Wassermann) 1200 mg/d for 7 d; 3 wk after the end of treatment, the BTLact was repeated. Based on the BTLact results, SIBO was present in about 56% of IBS patients, and it was responsible for some IBS-related symptoms, such as abdominal bloating and discomfort, and diarrhoea. 1-wk treatment with Rifaximin turned the BTLact to negative in about 50% of patients and significantly reduced the symptoms, especially in those patients with an alternated constipation/diarrhoea-variant IBS. SIBO should be always suspected in patients with IBS, and a differential diagnosis is done by means of a "breath test". Rifaximin may represent a valid approach to the treatment of SIBO.

  18. Assessment of Crohn's disease activity in the small bowel with MR and conventional enteroclysis: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas; Papanikolaou, Nickolas; Grammatikakis, John; Papamastorakis, George; Prassopoulos, Panos; Roussomoustakaki, Maria

    2004-01-01

    Every single imaging finding that can be disclosed on conventional and MR enteroclysis was correlated with the Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI). Nineteen consecutive patients with Crohn's disease underwent colon endoscopy and both conventional and MR enteroclysis examinations. Seventeen MR imaging findings and seven conventional enteroclysis findings were ranked on a four-point grading scale and correlated with CDAI, with a value of 150 considered as the threshold for disease activity. Six patients had active disease in the colon according to colon endoscopy. In the remaining 13 patients, the presence of deep ulcers (P=0.002), small bowel wall thickening (P=0.022) and gadolinium enhancement of mesenteric lymph nodes (P=0.014) identified on MR enteroclysis images were strongly correlated to disease activity. The product of deep ulcers and enhancement of lymph node ranks identified on MR enteroclysis were the optimum combination for discriminating active from non-active disease (F-test: 55.95, P<0.001). Additionally, the ranking of deep ulcers on conventional enteroclysis provided statistically significant differences between active and non-active patients (F-test: 14.12, P=0.004). Abnormalities strongly suggestive of active Crohn's disease can be disclosed on MR enteroclysis examinations and may provide pictorial information for local inflammatory activity. (orig.)

  19. The small intestine and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): a batch process model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Brian C

    2008-11-01

    Faults in a batch process model of the small intestine create the symptoms of all types of irritable bowel syndrome. The model has three sequential processing sections corresponding to the natural divisions of the intestine. It is governed by a brain controller that is divided into four sub-controllers, each with a unique neurotransmitter. Each section has a sub-controller to manage transport. Sensors in the walls of the intestine provide input and output goes to the muscles lining the walls of the intestine. The output controls the speed of the food soup, moves it in both directions, mixes it, controls absorption, and transfers it to the next section at the correct speed (slow). The fourth sub-controller manages the addition of chemicals. It obtains input from the first section of the process via the signalling hormone Cholecystokinin and sends output to the muscles that empty the gall bladder and pancreas. The correct amounts of bile salts and enzymes are then added to the first section. The sub-controllers produce output only when input is received. When output is missing the enteric nervous system applies a default condition. This default condition normally happens when no food is in the intestine. If food is in the intestine and a transport sub-controller fails to provide output then the default condition moves the food soup to the end of that section. The movement is in one direction only (forward), at a speed dependent on the amount and type of fibre present. Cereal, bean and vegetable fibre causes high speeds. This default high speed transport causes irritable bowel syndrome. A barrier is created when a section moving fast at the default speed, precedes a section controlled by a transport sub-controller. Then the sub-controller constricts the intestine to stop the fast flow. The barrier causes constipation, cramping, and bloating. Diarrhoea results when the section terminating the process moves at the fast default speed. Two problems can occur to prevent

  20. Circulating Zonulin Correlates with Density of Enteroviruses and Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells in the Small Bowel Mucosa of Celiac Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobjova, Tamara; Raikkerus, Helerin; Kadaja, Lumme; Talja, Ija; Uibo, Oivi; Heilman, Kaire; Uibo, Raivo

    2017-02-01

    Impaired intestinal integrity, including increased permeability of the small bowel mucosa, has been shown in patients with celiac disease (CD) as well as with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Zonulin (ZO, pre-haptoglobin), a tight junction regulator, plays a particular role in the regulation of intestinal barrier function and in the pathogenesis of the above-mentioned diseases. To investigate whether enteroviruses (EVs) and immunoregulatory cells are associated with intestinal permeability in patients with CD alone and with coexistent T1D. Altogether 80 patients (mean age 10.68 ± 6.69 years) who had undergone small bowel biopsy were studied. Forty patients with functional dyspepsia and normal small bowel mucosa formed the control group. The circulating ZO level in sera was evaluated using ELISA. The densities of EV, FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO+) dendritic cells (DCs) and glutamic acid dexarboxylase (GAD)65+ cells in small bowel mucosa were investigated by immunohistochemistry. The expression analysis of FOXP3, tight junction protein 1 (TJP1), gap junction (GJA1), IDO and CD103 genes was evaluated by real-time PCR. The ZO level was higher in CD patients compared to subjects with a normal small bowel mucosa, particularly in those with Marsh IIIc atrophy (p = 0.01), and correlated with the density of EV (r = 0.63; p = 0.0003) and IDO+ DCs (r = 0.58; p = 0.01) in the small bowel mucosa. The density of GAD65+ epithelial cells was correlated with the density of EV (r = 0.59; p = 0.03) and IDO+ DCs (r = 0.78; p = 0.004) in CD patients. The relative expression of FOXP3 mRNA in the small bowel mucosa tissue was significantly higher in patients with CD, compared to subjects with a normal mucosa, and correlated with the density of EV (r = 0.62; p = 0.017) as well as with the relative expression of IDO mRNA (r = 0.54; p = 0.019). The CD is associated with elevation of the circulating ZO level, the value of which

  1. Efficacy of an absorbable mesh in keeping the small bowel out of the human pelvis following surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devereux, D.F.; Chandler, J.J.; Eisenstat, T.; Zinkin, L.

    1988-01-01

    Patients with pelvic malignancies frequently require postoperative radiation therapy either as adjunctive or palliative treatment. Tumoricidal doses, however, are frequently associated with small-bowel damage. Animal experiments demonstrated tolerance to high-dose radiation therapy and protection from radiation enteritis by use of an absorbable polymer polyglycolic acid (PGA) that is used as an intestinal sling to elevate the small bowel away from the operated site. Sixty patients (42 with rectal carcinomas and 18 with gynecologic malignancies) underwent surgical treatment that included the intestinal sling procedure. Postoperative radiation was begun within three weeks following surgery and patients received a mean approximating 5500 rads in fractionated doses. A mean follow-up time of 28 months has not revealed a single case of radiation enteritis (by either contrast studies or physiologic studies) or PGA mesh-related complications. The authors believe that this surgical technique should be employed in patients who may require postoperative radiation treatment for pelvic malignancy

  2. Comparison of upper gastrointestinal radiographic findings to histopathologic observations: a retrospective study of 41 dogs and cats with suspected small bowel infiltrative disease (1985 to 1990)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichselbaum, R.C.; Feeney, D.A.; Hayden, D.W.

    1994-01-01

    It was the intent of this study to define which, if any, radiographic observations corresponded with specific causes of diffuse infiltrative small bowel disease and if radiographic findings could differentiate inflammatory disease from neoplastic disease and either of them from normal. Bowel spasticity, luminal narrowing, and thumb printing tend to indicate the presence of tumor more often than inflammatory disease. Increased bowel gas in cats and barium adhesion in dogs and cats suggest that a component of enteritis is present. Decreased bowel gas in dogs is more often associated with obstructive disease, but is not helpful in differentiating diffuse inflammatory disease from diffuse neoplastic disease. While several observations that can foster differentiation of neoplastic from inflammatory disease were found, this study also indicated that the UGI lacks a high degree of predictive value other than to indicate the presence of infiltrative small bowel disease

  3. Surveillance of FAP: a prospective blinded comparison of capsule endoscopy and other GI imaging to detect small bowel polyps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tescher Paul

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP is a hereditary disorder characterized by polyposis along the gastrointestinal tract. Information on adenoma status below the duodenum has previously been restricted due to its inaccessibility in vivo. Capsule Endoscopy (CE may provide a useful adjunct in screening for polyposis in the small bowel in FAP patients. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of CE in the assessment of patients with FAP, compared to other imaging modalities for the detection of small bowel polyps. Method 20 consecutive patients with previously diagnosed FAP and duodenal polyps, presenting for routine surveillance of polyps at The Royal Melbourne Hospital were recruited. Each fasted patient initially underwent a magnetic resonance image (MRI of the abdomen, and a barium small bowel follow-through study. Capsule Endoscopy was performed four weeks later on the fasted patient. An upper gastrointestinal side-viewing endoscopy was done one (1 to two (2 weeks after this. Endoscopists and investigators were blinded to results of other investigations and patient history. Results Within the stomach, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy found more polyps than other forms of imaging. SBFT and MRI generally performed poorly, identifying fewer polyps than both upper gastrointestinal and capsule endoscopy. CE was the only form of imaging that identified polyps in all segments of the small bowel as well as the only form of imaging able to provide multiple findings outside the stomach/duodenum. Conclusion CE provides important information on possible polyp development distal to the duodenum, which may lead to surgical intervention. The place of CE as an adjunct in surveillance of FAP for a specific subset needs consideration and confirmation in replication studies. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12608000616370

  4. The influence of food restriction on the small bowel: Does intensive short‑term food restriction lead to weight loss?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Makovický, Peter; Tůmová, E.; Volek, Z.; Makovický, P.; Arnone, J.M.; Švecová, Ivana; Samasca, G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 6 (2017), s. 361-365 ISSN 0006-9248 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015040; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : experimental medicine * food restriction * rabbit * slimming * small bowel weight loss Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Pathology Impact factor: 0.667, year: 2016

  5. Modified small bowel follow-through using methylcellulose after administration of barium suspension : comparison with conventional series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Park, Sung Tae; Yoon, Soo Woong; Kim, Ho Sung; Kim, Sun Mi

    1998-01-01

    To compare modified small bowel follow-through (SBFT) using methylcellulose after the administration of barium suspension with a conventional series. Materials and Methods : In order to evaluate small bowel pathology, modified SBFT was performed in 155 patients during a 15 month period. All patients received 600 mL of methylcellulose ; 98 had taken 250 mL of 40% wt/vol barium suspension and 57 had taken 150 mL of 70% barium. For the group of 98, the barium suspension was prepared by mixing barium powder with water (n=46) or with methylcellulose in(n=52). For comparison with a modified series, 49 patients who underwent conventional SBFT using 500 mL of 40 %wt/vol barium were lso included. Image quality was rated by three radiologists as p oor , f air , g ood , or e xcellent . We analyzed the relationship between image quality, transit time and small bowel pathology;the sensitivity and specificity of each technique was also determined. Results : Among the four techniques, modified SBFT with 250 mL of 40% wt/vol barium suspension, prepared by mixing barium powder with methylcellulose, showed the best image quality ['excellent' result in 33 of the 52 patients (63%)] and shortest transit time to the cecum. The high image quality of this technique was not affected by the presence of small bowel pathology;its use resulted in the lowest incidence and slowest development of flocculation. The sensitivity (91-95%) of the three modified SBFT procedures was superior to that of a conventional series(76%), but there was no difference in specificity.Conclusion : Modified SBFT using methylcellulose after administering barium suspension with barium powder as a mixing agent is a simple technique. Its use easily improves the image quality and diagnostic accuracy of peroral SBFT

  6. A Simple Evaluation Tool (ET-CET) Indicates Increase of Diagnostic Skills From Small Bowel Capsule Endoscopy Training Courses

    OpenAIRE

    Albert, J.G.; Humbla, O.; McAlindon, M.E.; Davison, C.; Seitz, U.; Fraser, C.; Hagenm?ller, F.; Noetzel, E.; Spada, C.; Riccioni, M.E.; Barnert, J.; Filmann, N.; Keuchel, M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE) has become a first line diagnostic tool. Several training courses with a similar format have been established in Europe; however, data on learning curve and training in SBCE remain sparse. Between 2008 and 2011, different basic SBCE training courses were organized internationally in UK (n?=?2), Italy (n?=?2), Germany (n?=?2), Finland (n?=?1), and nationally in Germany (n?=?10), applying similar 8-hour curricula with 50% lectures and 50% hands-on t...

  7. Long-term results of a randomized controlled trial evaluating preoperative chemotherapy in resectable non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhiwei; Luo, Qingquan; Jian, Hong; Zhou, Zhen; Cheng, Baijun; Lu, Shun; Liao, Meilin

    2013-01-01

    Zhiwei Chen,* Qingquan Luo,* Hong Jian, Zhen Zhou, Baijun Cheng, Shun Lu, Meilin LiaoShanghai Lung Tumor Clinical Medical Center, Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equallyObjective: We aimed to evaluate whether preoperative chemotherapy provides benefits in the survival and prognosis of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in resectable stages I to IIIA, except T1N0. Methods: In this ra...

  8. Surgical treatment of bowel occlusion as late radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeschl, P.; Miholic, J.; Wolner, E.

    1989-01-01

    67 patients were operated for intestinal complications following radiotherapy. The lesions were located in the small bowel (n = 41) and in the sigmoid colon/rectum (n = 33). 98.5% of the patients were females, the most frequent cause for irradiation being ovarian cancer. Bowel stenosis with resultant chronic or acute ileus was the most frequent indication for operation. Percutaneous irradiation resulted in a significantly higher proportion of small bowel lesions (77%, p = 0.001), whilst endocavitary irradiation was followed in 67% of cases by colorectal lesions. Different application modality of irradiation also resulted in completely different symptoms for small and large bowel lesions. The operative mortality was 9.5%. Peritonitis following anastomotic leakage was the cause of death in 6 of 7 cases. In the treatment of small bowel ileus mortality following bowel resection (9%, one of 11 cases) was comparable to that of the bypass operation (6%, one of 18 cases). Both operation methods seem to be justified. Single-layer anastomosis resulted in zero mortality (21 cases) for ileus operation compared with 19% mortality (16 cases) in double-layer anastomosis and should be prefered for operations on the irradiated bowel. (author)

  9. Determining the efficiency of a commercial belly board device in reducing small bowel volume in rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukarski, Dusko; Petkovska, Sonja; Angelovska, Natalija; Grozdanovska, Biljana; Mitrevski, Nenad

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this treatment planning study was to evaluate the efficiency of a commercial belly board device in reducing the irradiated volume of the small bowel. In this study 10 patients with rectal carcinoma receiving postoperative radiotherapy were included. For each of them we made two computer tomography series in prone position. In the first one the patients were lying on the flat table top, and in the second one they were lying on the belly board device which is under investigation. On both series we calculated and optimized plans according to the standing protocol of our department. From the dose-volume histograms of these plans we compared the volumes of the small bowel irradiated to three dose levels 15, 30 and 45 Gy. The results showed that the absolute irradiated volumes were significantly smaller in the plans with the belly board device. Based on these results we believe that the employment of this belly board device will reduce the acute and late small bowel toxicity. This should be verified with a clinical study.(Author)

  10. Determining the efficiency of a commercial belly board device in reducing small bowel volume in rectal cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukarski, Dusko; Petkovska, Sonja; Angelovska, Natalija; Grozdanovska, Biljana; Mitrevski, Nenad [University Clinic of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Skopje(Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this treatment planning study was to evaluate the efficiency of a commercial belly board device in reducing the irradiated volume of the small bowel. In this study 10 patients with rectal carcinoma receiving postoperative radiotherapy were included. For each of them we made two computer tomography series in prone position. In the first one the patients were lying on the flat table top, and in the second one they were lying on the belly board device which is under investigation. On both series we calculated and optimized plans according to the standing protocol of our department. From the dose-volume histograms of these plans we compared the volumes of the small bowel irradiated to three dose levels 15, 30 and 45 Gy. The results showed that the absolute irradiated volumes were significantly smaller in the plans with the belly board device. Based on these results we believe that the employment of this belly board device will reduce the acute and late small bowel toxicity. This should be verified with a clinical study.(Author)

  11. The role of computed tomography in the diagnosis and management of clinically occult post-traumatic small bowel perforation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, I.; Ahmed, N.; Bell, D.J.; Hughes, D.V.; Evans, G.H.; Howlett, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of computed tomography [CT] in the diagnosis of occult post-traumatic small bowel perforation and to discuss the role of CT in the management of this patient group. Method: This review includes three patients who presented with mild abdominal symptoms following minor blunt abdominal trauma. Initial radiographs and laboratory investigations were unremarkable but their symptoms failed to resolve and contrast-enhanced CT was performed for further evaluation. Results: In each case the CT appearances were indicative of localised small bowel perforation, with no evidence of other visceral injury. In two patients pockets of free intraperitoneal air were present closely related to the second part of the duodenum suggesting injury at this site. In the third case, a thickened proximal jejunal loop was demonstrated with free air and fluid in the adjacent mesentery consistent with a focal perforation. These CT findings were subsequently confirmed at laparotomy. Conclusion: CT is an accurate diagnostic tool in the assessment of clinically and radiologically occult traumatic small bowel injury. The use of CT should be considered in patients who have unresolving abdominal symptoms even after apparently insignificant abdominal trauma.

  12. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small bowel injuries identified by double-balloon endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yoshikazu; Yamamoto, Hironori; Kita, Hiroto; Sunada, Keijiro; Sato, Hiroyuki; Yano, Tomonori; Iwamoto, Michiko; Sekine, Yutaka; Miyata, Tomohiko; Kuno, Akiko; Iwaki, Takaaki; Kawamura, Yoshiyuki; Ajibe, Hironari; Ido, Kenichi; Sugano, Kentaro

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To clarify clinical features of the NSAID-induced small bowel lesions using a new method of endoscopy. METHODS: This is a retrospective study and we analyzed seven patients with small bowel lesions while taking NSAIDs among 61 patients who had undergone double-balloon endoscopy because of gastro-intestinal bleeding or anemia between September 2000 and March 2004, at Jichi Medical School Hospital in Japan. Neither conventional EGD nor colonoscopy revealed any lesions of potential bleeding sources including ulcerations. Double-balloon endoscopy was carried out from oral approach in three patients, from anal approach in three patients, and from both approaches in one patient. RESULTS: Ulcers or erosions were observed in the ileum in six patients and in the jejunum in one patient, respectively. The ulcers were multiple in all the patients with different features from tiny punched out ulcers to deep ulcerations with oozing hemorrhage or scar. All the patients recovered uneventfully and had full resolution of symptoms after suspension of the drug. CONCLUSION: NSAIDs can induce injuries in the small bowel even in patients without any lesions in both the stomach and colon. PMID:16097059

  13. Contribution of multi-detector row CT (MDCT) to decision making in the management of patients with small bowel obstruction or ileus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osada, Hisato; Watanabe, Wataru; Okada, Taketomo

    2007-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the contribution of multi-detector row CT (MDCT) to patient management decisions in 62 patients with small bowel obstruction or ileus. The sensitivity and specificity of MDCT diagnosis of small bowel obstruction with strangulation or closed loop were 78.9% (15/19) and 93.0% (40/43), respectively. In 19 patients with small bowel obstruction with strangulation or closed loop, the median interval between CT examination and the commencement of surgery was significantly longer in misdiagnosed patients than in those correctly diagnosed (43.3 vs. 4.5 hours, p<0.05). Only two patients displayed severe physical signs that required urgent surgical treatment. Our results suggest that MDCT plays a key role in the management of patients with small bowel obstruction. (author)

  14. The relationship between physical activity level and completion rate of small bowel examination in patients undergoing capsule endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Tomoyoshi; Mori, Hiroki; Takeda, Tsutomu; Konishi, Masae; Fukuo, Yuka; Matsumoto, Kenshi; Beppu, Kazuko; Sakamoto, Naoto; Osada, Taro; Nagahara, Akihito; Otaka, Michiro; Ogihara, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Sumio

    2012-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) allows direct examination of the small bowel in a safe, noninvasive and well-tolerated manner. Nonetheless, experience indicates failure to reach the cecum in 20-30% of patients within the 8 hour battery life. Attempts to improve the completion rate (CR) as defined by reaching the cecum have been unsuccessful. This study was to investigate the relationship between patients' physical activity and CR. Between January 2009 and January 2010, 76 patients (44 men, 32 women; median age 64.5 yr) underwent CE for the diagnosis of small intestinal disorders. Indications for CE were obscure gastrointestinal bleeding/anemia (62 cases), others (14 cases). Patients were divided into an outpatient group (n=23), mild bed rest group (n=35) and strict bed rest group (n=18). For all patients, the average gastric transit time was 65.5 minutes, small bowel transit time was 301.4 minutes and the CR was 86.8%. However, the CR was 100% (23/23) in the outpatient group, an 85.7% (30/35) in the mild bed rest group, and 72.2% (13/18) in the strict bed rest group. The CR increased with physical activity of patients by Cochran-Armitage Trend Test (p=0.009). In multivariate logistic regression analyses, low physical activity was a significant risk factor for failure to reach the cecum during CE examination; adjusted OR: 3.39, 95% CI: 1.01-11.42 (p=0.048). Our observations suggested that increasing physical activity would increase the likelihood of a complete bowel examination by CE. Further, for CE, inconvenient bowel preparations like the use of polyethylene glycol may be avoided.

  15. The relevance of free fluid between intestinal loops detected by sonography in the clinical assessment of small bowel obstruction in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, Roberto; Romano, Stefania; D'Amario, Fenesia; Giorgio Rossi, Antonio; Romano, Luigia; Pinto, Fabio; Di Mizio, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: The main role of the radiologist in the management of patients with suspicion of small bowel obstruction is to help triage patients into those that need immediate surgical intervention from those that require medical therapy or delayed surgery. Ultrasound examination is usually considered not helpful in bowel obstruction because of air in the intestinal lumen that interferes the evaluation of the intestinal loops, however recently some Authors attested the increasing important role of sonography in the acute abdominal disease. Aim of our report is to demonstrate the value of free fluid detected by US in differentiating between low and high-grade small bowel obstruction. Materials and methods: The study is based on 742 consecutive patients who presented symptoms of the acute abdomen; all patients had undergone initial serial abdominal plain film and US examinations prior to any medical intervention. We reviewed the imaging findings of 150 cases in whom small bowel obstruction was clinically suspected and confirmed at surgery. We consider the following radiographic and US findings: dilatation of small bowel loops; bowel wall thickness; presence of air-fluid levels; thickness of valvulae conniventes; evidence of peristalsis; presence and echogenicity of extraluminal fluid. We looked at the value of extraluminal peritoneal fluid at US examination in differentiating low and high-grade small bowel obstruction based on the surgical outcome. Results: In 46 patients altered peristaltic activity, thin bowel walls, fluid filled loops with hyperechoic spots in the bowel segment proximal to obstruction were noted at US, whereas radiographic features were: moderate dilatation of small bowel loops, with thin bowel wall and evidence of numerous and subtle valvulae conniventes; presence of air-fluid levels was also noted. In 70 other patients, US examination revealed all the findings described in the precedent cases and also the presence of free extraluminal fluid

  16. The relevance of free fluid between intestinal loops detected by sonography in the clinical assessment of small bowel obstruction in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassi, Roberto; Romano, Stefania E-mail: stefromano@libero.it; D' Amario, Fenesia; Giorgio Rossi, Antonio; Romano, Luigia; Pinto, Fabio; Di Mizio, Roberto

    2004-04-01

    Introduction: The main role of the radiologist in the management of patients with suspicion of small bowel obstruction is to help triage patients into those that need immediate surgical intervention from those that require medical therapy or delayed surgery. Ultrasound examination is usually considered not helpful in bowel obstruction because of air in the intestinal lumen that interferes the evaluation of the intestinal loops, however recently some Authors attested the increasing important role of sonography in the acute abdominal disease. Aim of our report is to demonstrate the value of free fluid detected by US in differentiating between low and high-grade small bowel obstruction. Materials and methods: The study is based on 742 consecutive patients who presented symptoms of the acute abdomen; all patients had undergone initial serial abdominal plain film and US examinations prior to any medical intervention. We reviewed the imaging findings of 150 cases in whom small bowel obstruction was clinically suspected and confirmed at surgery. We consider the following radiographic and US findings: dilatation of small bowel loops; bowel wall thickness; presence of air-fluid levels; thickness of valvulae conniventes; evidence of peristalsis; presence and echogenicity of extraluminal fluid. We looked at the value of extraluminal peritoneal fluid at US examination in differentiating low and high-grade small bowel obstruction based on the surgical outcome. Results: In 46 patients altered peristaltic activity, thin bowel walls, fluid filled loops with hyperechoic spots in the bowel segment proximal to obstruction were noted at US, whereas radiographic features were: moderate dilatation of small bowel loops, with thin bowel wall and evidence of numerous and subtle valvulae conniventes; presence of air-fluid levels was also noted. In 70 other patients, US examination revealed all the findings described in the precedent cases and also the presence of free extraluminal fluid

  17. Patterns of failure after resection of non-small-cell lung cancer: Implications for postoperative radiation therapy volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsey, Chris R.; Light, Kim L.C.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze local-regional patterns of failure after surgical resection of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: This retrospective analysis included 61 patients who underwent resection of NSCLC at Duke University Medical Center. Inclusion into the study required the following: margin-negative resection, no neoadjuvant/adjuvant radiation therapy (RT), first recurrence involving a local-regional site, and imaging studies available for review. Sites of intrathoracic disease recurrence were documented. Diagrams were constructed that illustrated sites of failure on the basis of lobe of primary tumor. Failure rates were compared by application of a two-tailed Fisher's exact test. Results: All patients had CT imaging for review, and 54% also had PET imaging. The median number of local-regional recurrent sites was two (range, 1-6). For all patients, the most common site of failure was the bronchial stump/staple line (44%), which was present more often in those who had a wedge resection than in those who had a more radical procedure (79% vs. 34%, p = 0.005). Patients with initial nodal involvement (pN1-2) were not more likely to have involvement of the mediastinum than were patients with pN0 disease (64% vs. 72%, p = 0.72), but were more likely to have involvement of the supraclavicular fossa (27% vs. 4%, p = 0.04). Mediastinal involvement, without overt evidence of hilar involvement, occurred in 59% of patients. Left-sided tumors tended to involve the contralateral mediastinum more frequently than did right-sided tumors. Patterns of failure after resection are diagrammed and follow a fairly predictable pattern on the basis of involved lobe. Conclusions: These data may help clinicians construct postoperative RT volumes that are smaller than ones traditionally utilized, which may improve the therapeutic ratio

  18. The incidence of inclusion of the sigmoid colon and small bowel in the planning target volume in radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meerleer, G.O. de; Vakaet, L.; Neve, W.J. de; Villeirs, G.M.; Delrue, L.J.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: in radiotherapy for prostate cancer, the rectum is considered the dose-limiting organ. The incidence of overlap between the sigmoid colon and/or small bowel and the planning target volume (PTV) as well as the dose to sigmoid colon and small bowel were investigated. Patients and methods: the CT data of 75 prostate cancer patients were analyzed. The clinical target volume (CTV) consisted of prostate and seminal vesicles. The PTV was defined as a three-dimensional expansion of the CTV with a 10-mm margin in craniocaudal and a 7-mm margin in the other directions. All patients were planned to a mean CTV dose of at least 76 Gy. Minimum CTV dose was set at 70 Gy. Dose inhomogeneity within the CTV was kept between 12% and 17%. Sigmoid colon was defined upward from the level where the rectum turned in a transverse plane. Contrast-filled small bowel was contoured on all slices where it was visible. The presence of sigmoid colon and/or small bowel in close vicinity to or overlapping with the PTV was recorded. For each case, the dose to the sigmoid colon and small bowel was calculated. Results: the PTV was found to overlap with the sigmoid colon in 60% and with the small bowel in 19% of the cases. In these patients, mean maximum dose to the sigmoid colon was 76.2 Gy (5th-95th percentile: 70.0-80.7 Gy). Mean maximum dose to the small bowel was 74.9 Gy (5th-95th percentile: 68.0-80.0 Gy). Conclusion: when systematically investigating the anatomic position of sigmoid colon and small bowel in patients accepted for prostate irradiation, parts of both organs were often observed in close vicinity to the PTV. Apart from the rectum, these organs may be dose-limiting in prostate radiotherapy. (orig.)

  19. Incidence of bloodstream infections in small bowel transplant recipients receiving selective decontamination of the digestive tract: A single-center experience

    OpenAIRE

    Galloway, David; Danziger-Isakov, Lara; Goldschmidt, Monique; Hemmelgarn, Trina; Courter, Joshua; Nathan, Jaimie D.; Alonso, Maria; Tiao, Greg; Fei, Lin; Kocoshis, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric patients undergoing small bowel transplantation are susceptible to postoperative CLABSI. SDD directed against enteric microbes is a strategy for reducing CLABSI. We hypothesized that SDD reduces the frequency of CLABSI, infections outside the bloodstream, and allograft rejection during the first 30 days following transplant. A retrospective chart review of 38 pediatric small bowel transplant recipients at CCHMC from 2003 to 2011 was conducted. SDD antimicrobials were oral colistin, ...

  20. The incidence of inclusion of the sigmoid colon and small bowel in the planning target volume in radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerleer, G.O. de; Vakaet, L.; Neve, W.J. de [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gent Univ. Hospital, Gent (Belgium); Villeirs, G.M.; Delrue, L.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Gent Univ. Hospital, Gent (Belgium)

    2004-09-01

    Background and purpose: in radiotherapy for prostate cancer, the rectum is considered the dose-limiting organ. The incidence of overlap between the sigmoid colon and/or small bowel and the planning target volume (PTV) as well as the dose to sigmoid colon and small bowel were investigated. Patients and methods: the CT data of 75 prostate cancer patients were analyzed. The clinical target volume (CTV) consisted of prostate and seminal vesicles. The PTV was defined as a three-dimensional expansion of the CTV with a 10-mm margin in craniocaudal and a 7-mm margin in the other directions. All patients were planned to a mean CTV dose of at least 76 Gy. Minimum CTV dose was set at 70 Gy. Dose inhomogeneity within the CTV was kept between 12% and 17%. Sigmoid colon was defined upward from the level where the rectum turned in a transverse plane. Contrast-filled small bowel was contoured on all slices where it was visible. The presence of sigmoid colon and/or small bowel in close vicinity to or overlapping with the PTV was recorded. For each case, the dose to the sigmoid colon and small bowel was calculated. Results: the PTV was found to overlap with the sigmoid colon in 60% and with the small bowel in 19% of the cases. In these patients, mean maximum dose to the sigmoid colon was 76.2 Gy (5th-95th percentile: 70.0-80.7 Gy). Mean maximum dose to the small bowel was 74.9 Gy (5th-95th percentile: 68.0-80.0 Gy). Conclusion: when systematically investigating the anatomic position of sigmoid colon and small bowel in patients accepted for prostate irradiation, parts of both organs were often observed in close vicinity to the PTV. Apart from the rectum, these organs may be dose-limiting in prostate radiotherapy. (orig.)

  1. Assessment of dynamic contrast enhancement of the small bowel in active Crohn's disease using 3D MR enterography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knuesel, Patrick R.; Kubik, Rahel A.; Crook, David W.; Eigenmann, Franz; Froehlich, Johannes M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the dynamic contrast enhancement of the small bowel segments with and without active Crohn's disease at 3D MR enterography (MRE). Materials and methods: Thirteen patients (five men, eight women; mean age 41.2 years; range 29-56) were imaged on a 1.5-T MR scanner (Sonata, Siemens Medical) with standard MR sequences after having ingested 1000 ml of a 3% mannitol solution. Subsequently, high resolution 3D gradient-echo (volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination = VIBE) data sets were obtained pre-contrast and 20-40 s, 60-80 s, and 120-140 s after i.v. Gd-DOTA administration (0.2 mmol/kg). Signal enhancement was measured on single slices both in normal and histologically confirmed (12/13) inflamed small bowel wall segments as well as in the aorta, the psoas muscle, and the background to calculate signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR). Results: Small bowel wall enhancement was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in inflamed compared to normal segments at 20-40 s (SNR inflamed: 58.7 ± 33.8 vs normal: 36.0 ± 19.8; p = 0.048; CNR inflamed: 34.8 ± 23.4 vs normal: 16.3 ± 11.2; p = 0.017) and at 60-80 s (SNR: 60.3 ± 25.1 vs 41.9 ± 20.0; p = 0.049; CNR: 34.9 ± 15.1 vs 19.3 ± 13.2; p = 0.01) after i.v. contrast administration, respectively. Even at 120-140 s CNR was still increased in inflamed segments (33.7 ± 16.0 vs 18.1 ± 13.2; p = 0.04), while differences in SNR did not attain statistical significance (63.0 ± 26.2 vs 45.3 ± 23.3; p = 0.15). Conclusion: In active Crohn's disease, histologically confirmed inflamed small bowel wall segments demonstrate a significantly increased early uptake of gadolinium on 3D VIBE sequences compared to normal small bowel segments.

  2. Surgical quality of wedge resection affects overall survival in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, Gaurav S; Wang, Chi-Hsiung; Kim, Ki Wan; Howington, John A; Krantz, Seth B

    2018-07-01

    Very few studies have examined the quality of wedge resection in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Using the National Cancer Database, we evaluated whether the quality of wedge resection affects overall survival in patients with early disease and how these outcomes compare with those of patients who receive stereotactic radiation. We identified 14,328 patients with cT1 to T2, N0, M0 disease treated with wedge resection (n = 10,032) or stereotactic radiation (n = 4296) from 2005 to 2013 and developed a subsample of propensity-matched wedge and radiation patients. Wedge quality was grouped as high (negative margins, >5 nodes), average (negative margins, ≤5 nodes), and poor (positive margins). Overall survival was compared between patients who received wedge resection of different quality and those who received radiation, adjusting for demographic and clinical variables. Among patients who underwent wedge resection, 94.6% had negative margins, 44.3% had 0 nodes examined, 17.1% had >5 examined, and 3.0% were nodally upstaged; 16.7% received a high-quality wedge, which was associated with a lower risk of death compared with average-quality resection (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67-0.82). Compared with stereotactic radiation, wedge patients with negative margins had significantly reduced hazard of death (>5 nodes: aHR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.43-0.58; ≤5 nodes: aHR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.60-0.70). There was no significant survival difference between margin-positive wedge and radiation. Lymph nodes examined and margins obtained are important quality metrics in wedge resection. A high-quality wedge appears to confer a significant survival advantage over lower-quality wedge and stereotactic radiation. A margin-positive wedge appears to offer no benefit compared with radiation. Copyright © 2018 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical outcome in acute small bowel obstruction after surgical or conservative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Raphael P H; de Saussure, Wassila Oulhaci; Orci, Lorenzo A; Gutzwiller, Eveline M; Morel, Philippe; Ris, Frédéric; Schwenter, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is characterized by a high rate of recurrence. In the present study, we aimed to compare the outcomes of patients managed either by conservative treatment or surgical operation for an episode of SBO. The outcomes of all patients hospitalized at a single center for acute SBO between 2004 and 2007 were assessed. The occurrence of recurrent hospitalization, surgery, SBO symptoms at home, and mortality was determined. Among 221 patients admitted with SBO, 136 underwent a surgical procedure (surgical group) and 85 were managed conservatively (conservative group). Baseline characteristics were similar between treatment groups. The median follow-up time (interquartile range) was 4.7 (3.7-5.8) years. Nineteen patients (14.0 %) of the surgical group were hospitalized for recurrent SBO versus 25 (29.4 %) of the conservative group [hazard ratio (HR), 0.5; 95 % CI, 0.3-0.9]. The need for a surgical management of a new SBO episode was similar between the two groups, ten patients (7.4 %) in the surgical group and six patients (7.1 %) in the conservative group (HR, 1.1; 95 % CI, 0.4-3.1). Five-year mortality from the date of hospital discharge was not significantly different between the two groups (age- and sex-adjusted HR, 1.1; 95 % CI, 0.6-2.1). A follow-up evaluation was obtained for 130 patients. Among them, 24 patients (34.8 %) of the surgical group and 35 patients (57.4 %) of the conservative group had recurrent SBO symptoms (odds ratio, 0.4; 95 % CI, 0.2-0.8). The recurrence of SBO symptoms and new hospitalizations were significantly lower after surgical management of SBO compared with conservative treatment.

  4. The influence of sociodemographic factors on operative decision-making in small bowel obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Raymond A; Chiu, Alexander S; O'Neill, Kathleen M; Lin, Zhenqiu; Pei, Kevin Y

    2018-07-01

    Current guidelines for small bowel obstruction (SBO) recommend a limited trial of nonoperative management of no more than 3-5 d. For patients requiring surgery, it is uncertain if sociodemographic factors are associated with disparities in the duration of the trial of nonoperative therapy. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project National Inpatient Sample from 2012 to 2014 was queried for discharges with a primary diagnosis of SBO. Primary outcomes of interest were the effects of sociodemographic factors, including race, insurance status, and income on the rate of receiving any operative management for SBO, and subsequently, among patients managed surgically, the risk of operative delay, defined as operative management ≥ 5 d after admission. We did this by using logistic hierarchical generalized linear models, accounting for hospital clustering and adjusted for sex, age, comorbidity, and hospital factors. Of the 589,850 admissions for SBO between 2012 and 2014, 22.0% underwent operations. Overall, 26.2% were non-White, including 12.2% Black and 8.6% Hispanic patients, and the majority (56.0%) had Medicare insurance coverage. Income quartiles were evenly distributed across the overall study population. In adjusted logistic regression, operative delay was associated with increased odds of in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 1.30 95% confidence interval [1.10, 1.54]). Adjusted for patient and hospital factors, Black patients were significantly more likely to receive operations for SBO, whereas Medicaid and Medicare patients were significantly less likely. However, Black, Medicaid, and Medicare patients who were managed operatively were significantly more likely to have an operative delay of 5 or more d. There was no significant association between income and operative management in adjusted regression models. Significant disparities in the operative management were based on race and insurance status. Further research is warranted to understand the causes of, and

  5. Small Bowel Transit and Altered Gut Microbiota in Patients With Liver Cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Jin, Ye; Li, Jun; Zhao, Lei; Li, Zhengtian; Xu, Jun; Zhao, Fuya; Feng, Jing; Chen, Huinan; Fang, Chengyuan; Shilpakar, Rojina; Wei, Yunwei

    2018-01-01

    Disturbance of the gut microbiota is common in liver cirrhosis (LC) patients, the underlying mechanisms of which are yet to be unfolded. This study aims to explore the relationship between small bowel transit (SBT) and gut microbiota in LC patients. Cross-sectional design was applied with 36 LC patients and 20 healthy controls (HCs). The gut microbiota was characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes (F/B) ratio and the Microbial Dysbiosis index (MDI) were used to evaluate the severity of microbiota dysbiosis. The scintigraphy method was performed in patients to describe the objective values of SBT. Patients were then subdivided according to the Child-Pugh score (threshold = 5) or SBT value (threshold = 0.6) for microbiota analysis. LC patients were characterized by an altered gut microbiota; F/B ratios and MDI were higher than HC in both Child_5 (14.00 ± 14.69 vs. 2.86 ± 0.99, p gut microbiota between Child_ 5 and Child_5+ patients was inappreciable, but the SBT was relatively slower in Child_5+ patients (43 ± 26% vs. 80 ± 15%, p gut microbiota was observed between SBT_0.6- and SBT_0.6+ patients [Pr(> F ) = 0.0068, pMANOVA], with higher F/B ratios and MDI in SBT_0.6- patients (19.71 ± 16.62 vs. 7.33 ± 6.65, p gut microbiota abnormalities observed in patients with LC.

  6. Oxidative stress gene expression profile in inbred mouse after ischemia/reperfusion small bowel injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoletto, Paulo Roberto; Ikejiri, Adauto Tsutomu; Somaio Neto, Frederico; Chaves, José Carlos; Teruya, Roberto; Bertoletto, Eduardo Rodrigues; Taha, Murched Omar; Fagundes, Djalma José

    2012-11-01

    To determine the profile of gene expressions associated with oxidative stress and thereby contribute to establish parameters about the role of enzyme clusters related to the ischemia/reperfusion intestinal injury. Twelve male inbred mice (C57BL/6) were randomly assigned: Control Group (CG) submitted to anesthesia, laparotomy and observed by 120 min; Ischemia/reperfusion Group (IRG) submitted to anesthesia, laparotomy, 60 min of small bowel ischemia and 60 min of reperfusion. A pool of six samples was submitted to the qPCR-RT protocol (six clusters) for mouse oxidative stress and antioxidant defense pathways. On the 84 genes investigated, 64 (76.2%) had statistic significant expression and 20 (23.8%) showed no statistical difference to the control group. From these 64 significantly expressed genes, 60 (93.7%) were up-regulated and 04 (6.3%) were down-regulated. From the group with no statistical significantly expression, 12 genes were up-regulated and 8 genes were down-regulated. Surprisingly, 37 (44.04%) showed a higher than threefold up-regulation and then arbitrarily the values was considered as a very significant. Thus, 37 genes (44.04%) were expressed very significantly up-regulated. The remained 47 (55.9%) genes were up-regulated less than three folds (35 genes - 41.6%) or down-regulated less than three folds (12 genes - 14.3%). The intestinal ischemia and reperfusion promote a global hyper-expression profile of six different clusters genes related to antioxidant defense and oxidative stress.

  7. Radiation enteropathy and leucocyte-endothelial cell reactions in a refined small bowel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Nadia

    2004-09-01

    recruitment of leucocytes and changes in intestinal microflora in the small bowel after radiotherapy.

  8. Acute small bowel toxicity and preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: Investigating dose-volume relationships and role for inverse planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tho, Lye Mun; Glegg, Martin; Paterson, Jennifer; Yap, Christina; MacLeod, Alice; McCabe, Marie; McDonald, Alexander C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The relationship between volume of irradiated small bowel (VSB) and acute toxicity in rectal cancer radiotherapy is poorly quantified, particularly in patients receiving concurrent preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Using treatment planning data, we studied a series of such patients. Methods and Materials: Details of 41 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were reviewed. All received 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks, 3-4 fields three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with daily 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid during Weeks 1 and 5. Toxicity was assessed prospectively in a weekly clinic. Using computed tomography planning software, the VSB was determined at 5 Gy dose intervals (V 5 , V 1 , etc.). Eight patients with maximal VSB had dosimetry and radiobiological modeling outcomes compared between inverse and conformal three-dimensional planning. Results: VSB correlated strongly with diarrheal severity at every dose level (p 5 and V 15 . Conclusions: A strong dose-volume relationship exists between VSB and acute diarrhea at all dose levels during preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Our constructed model may be useful in predicting toxicity, and this has been derived without the confounding influence of surgical excision on bowel function. Inverse planning can reduce calculated dose to small bowel and late NTCP, and its clinical role warrants further investigation

  9. A rare case of small bowel volvulus after jenjunoileal bariatric bypass requiring emergency surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Pranav H

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bariatric surgery is on the increase throughout the world. Jejunoileal bypass bariatric procedures have fallen out of favor in western surgical centers due to the high rate of associated complications. They are, however, performed routinely in other centers and as a consequence of health tourism, management of complications related to these procedures may still be encountered. Case presentation We describe a rare case of small bowel obstruction in a 45-year-old British Caucasian woman, secondary to a volvulus of the jejunoileal anastomosis following bariatric bypass surgery. The pre-operative diagnosis was confirmed by radiology. We describe a successful surgical technique for this rare complication. Conclusions Bariatric surgery may be complicated by bowel obstruction. Early imaging is vital for diagnosis and effective management. The use of our surgical technique provides a simple and effective approach for the successful management of this bariatric complication.

  10. Differentiation between active and chronic Crohn's disease using MRI small-bowel motility examinations — Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickelhaupt, S.; Froehlich, J.M.; Cattin, R.; Patuto, N.; Tutuian, R.; Wentz, K.U.; Culmann, J.L.; Raible, S.; Bouquet, H.; Bill, U.; Patak, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the influence of locally active Crohn's disease on systemic small-bowel motility in patients with chronic Crohn's disease compared to healthy individuals. Material and methods: Fifteen healthy individuals (11 men, four women; mean age 37 years) and 20 patients with histopathologically proven active (n = 15; 10 women, 5 men; mean age 45 years) or chronic (n = 5; four women, one man; mean age 48 years) Crohn's disease were included in this institutional review board-approved, retrospective study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 1.5 T) was performed after standardized preparation. Two-dimensional (2D) cine sequences for motility acquisition were performed in apnoea (27 s). Motility assessment was performed using dedicated software in three randomly chosen areas of the small-bowel outside known Crohn's disease-affected hotspots. The main quantitative characteristics (frequency, amplitude, occlusion rate) were compared using Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: Three randomly chosen segments were analysed in each participant. Patients with active Crohn's disease had significantly (p < 0.05) reduced contraction frequencies (active Crohn's disease: 2.86/min; chronic: 4.14/min; healthy: 4.53/min) and luminal occlusion rates (active: 0.43; chronic: 0.70; healthy: 0.73) compared to healthy individuals and patients with chronic Crohn's disease. Contraction amplitudes were significantly reduced during active Crohn's disease (6.71 mm) compared to healthy participants (10.14 mm), but this only reached borderline significance in comparison to chronic Crohn's disease (8.87 mm). Mean bowel lumen diameter was significantly (p = 0.04) higher in patients with active Crohn's disease (16.91 mm) compared to healthy participants (14.79 mm) but not in comparison to patients with chronic Crohn's disease (13.68). Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that local inflammatory activity of small-bowel segments in patients with

  11. MR imaging of the small bowel with increasing concentrations of an oral osmotic agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borthne, Arne S. [Ullevaal University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Ullevaal University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Abdelnoor, Michael [Ullevaal University Hospital, Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centre of Clinical Research, Oslo (Norway); Hellund, Johan C.; Geitung, Jonn T.; Kloew, Nils-E. [Ullevaal University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Storaas, Trygve; Gjesdal, Kjell I. [Ullevaal University Hospital, Department of Medical Physics, Oslo (Norway)

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the quality of MR imaging and level of adverse effects with increasing concentrations of gastrografin. This is a prospective study with 24 healthy volunteers which were randomised into four groups receiving 50%, 25%, 10% and 0% gastrografin. The endpoint was bowel image quality based on distension, signal homogeneity and wall delineation evaluated by three independent radiologists, and the maximum bowel diameter at three different levels. The subjects also scored any adverse events on a 1-5 scale. The interradiologist agreement was relatively good, with kappa values varying between 0.81 and 0.41. Improved bowel distension and image quality were achieved with increasing concentrations. But significant dose-response effects were found between increasing osmolalities and the bowel diameters and also versus the score of adverse events. The most frequent adverse reactions were diarrhea, nausea and lack of palatability. There is a gradient relationship between increasing osmolality of gastrografin and improved image quality and the score of adverse effects. The optimum concentration of gastrografin is dependent of the tolerance of the adverse events. (orig.)

  12. MR imaging of the small bowel with increasing concentrations of an oral osmotic agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borthne, Arne S.; Abdelnoor, Michael; Hellund, Johan C.; Geitung, Jonn T.; Kloew, Nils-E.; Storaas, Trygve; Gjesdal, Kjell I.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the quality of MR imaging and level of adverse effects with increasing concentrations of gastrografin. This is a prospective study with 24 healthy volunteers which were randomised into four groups receiving 50%, 25%, 10% and 0% gastrografin. The endpoint was bowel image quality based on distension, signal homogeneity and wall delineation evaluated by three independent radiologists, and the maximum bowel diameter at three different levels. The subjects also scored any adverse events on a 1-5 scale. The interradiologist agreement was relatively good, with kappa values varying between 0.81 and 0.41. Improved bowel distension and image quality were achieved with increasing concentrations. But significant dose-response effects were found between increasing osmolalities and the bowel diameters and also versus the score of adverse events. The most frequent adverse reactions were diarrhea, nausea and lack of palatability. There is a gradient relationship between increasing osmolality of gastrografin and improved image quality and the score of adverse effects. The optimum concentration of gastrografin is dependent of the tolerance of the adverse events. (orig.)

  13. Mucosal pathobiology and molecular signature of epithelial barrier dysfunction in the small intestine in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Castro, Ana M; Martínez, Cristina; Salvo-Romero, Eloísa; Fortea, Marina; Pardo-Camacho, Cristina; Pérez-Berezo, Teresa; Alonso-Cotoner, Carmen; Santos, Javier; Vicario, María

    2017-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorders in developed countries. Its etiology remains unknown; however, a common finding, regardless of IBS subtype, is the presence of altered intestinal barrier. In fact, signaling and location of cell-to-cell adhesion proteins, in connection with increased immune activity, seem abnormal in the intestinal epithelium of IBS patients. Despite that most research is performed on distal segments of the intestine, altered permeability has been reported in both, the small and the large bowel of all IBS subtypes. The small intestine carries out digestion and nutrient absorption and is also the site where the majority of immune responses to luminal antigens takes place. In fact, the upper intestine is more exposed to environmental antigens than the colon and is also a site of symptom generation. Recent studies have revealed small intestinal structural alterations of the epithelial barrier and mucosal immune activation in association with intestinal dysfunction, suggesting the commitment of the intestine as a whole in the pathogenesis of IBS. This review summarizes the most recent findings on mucosal barrier alterations and its relationship to symptoms arising from the small intestine in IBS, including epithelial structural abnormalities, mucosal immune activation, and microbial dysbiosis, further supporting the hypothesis of an organic origin of IBS. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. VIDEO CAPSULE ENDOSCOPY: A TOOL FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF SMALL BOWEL TRANSIT TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza A Hejazi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Video capsule endoscopy (VCE is a procedure that uses a wireless camera to take pictures of the gastrointestinal tract. A wireless motility capsule (WMC of a similar size has been developed, which measures pH, pressure, and temperature, and can be used to assess regional and total gastrointestinal transit times. VCE could also potentially be used as a tool for measuring small bowel transit time (SBTT.Methods: This study was designed to obtain SBTT from VCE and compare it with historical data generated by WMC. Gastric transit time (GTT was also measured. Patients were included if the indication for VCE was either iron deficiency anemia (IDA or overt obscure GI bleed (OOGIB and they did not have any known motility disorder. Results from VCE were also compared in diabetic versus non-diabetic patients. Results: There were a total of 147 VCE studies performed, including 42 for OOGIB and 105 for IDA. Median GTT and SBTT were 0.3 and 3.6 hours, respectively. The overall median GTT and SBTT were 0.3 and 3.6 hours, respectively, in the IDA group compared with 0.3 and 3.4 hours in the OOGIB group. When compared with WMC, the GTT and SBTT were significantly faster in both groups (GTT: 3.6 hours and SBTT: 4.6 hours. The median GTT and SBTT were not significantly different in diabetics versus non-diabetics: (GTT: 17.5 vs. 18.0 minutes (P=0.86 and SBTT: 3.9 hours (237 minutes vs. 3.8 hours (230 minutes, respectively (P=0.90.Conclusion: SBTT as measured using VCE is not significantly different in OOGIB compared with IDA. Both GTT and SBTT are significantly faster as assessed by VCE, which is initiated in the fasting state, compared with WMC measurement, which is initiated after a standard meal. In summary, VCE could potentially be used for measuring SBTT in the fasting state.

  15. Video Capsule Endoscopy: A Tool for the Assessment of Small Bowel Transit Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazi, Reza A; Bashashati, Mohammad; Saadi, Mohammed; Mulla, Zuber D; Sarosiek, Irene; McCallum, Richard W; Zuckerman, Marc J

    2016-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a procedure that uses a wireless camera to take pictures of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. A wireless motility capsule (WMC) of a similar size has been developed, which measures pH, pressure, and temperature and can be used to assess regional and total GI transit times. VCE could also potentially be used as a tool for measuring small bowel transit time (SBTT). This study was designed to obtain SBTT from VCE and compare it with historical data generated by WMC. Gastric transit time (GTT) was also measured. Patients were included if the indication for VCE was either iron deficiency anemia (IDA) or overt obscure GI bleed (OOGIB), and they did not have any known motility disorder. Results from VCE were also compared in diabetic vs. non-diabetic patients. There were a total of 147 VCE studies performed, including 42 for OOGIB and 105 for IDA. Median GTT and SBTT were 0.3 and 3.6 h, respectively. The overall median GTT and SBTT were 0.3 and 3.6 h, respectively, in the IDA group compared with 0.3 and 3.4 h in the OOGIB group. When compared with WMC, the GTT and SBTT were significantly faster in both groups (GTT: 3.6 h and SBTT: 4.6 h). The median GTT and SBTT were not significantly different in diabetics vs. non-diabetics [GTT: 17.5 vs. 18.0 min (P = 0.86) and SBTT: 3.9 h (237 min) vs. 3.8 h (230 min), respectively (P = 0.90)]. SBTT as measured using VCE is not significantly different in OOGIB compared with IDA. Both GTT and SBTT are significantly faster as assessed by VCE, which is initiated in the fasting state, compared with WMC measurement, which is initiated after a standard meal. In summary, VCE could potentially be used for measuring SBTT in the fasting state.

  16. Preoperative Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs) and Outcomes from Resected Early Stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almquist, Daniel; Khanal, Nabin; Smith, Lynette; Ganti, Apar Kishor

    2018-05-01

    Preoperative pulmonary function tests (PFTs) predict operative morbidity and mortality after resection in lung cancer. However, the impact of preoperative PFTs on overall outcomes in surgically-resected stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been well studied. This is a retrospective study of 149 patients who underwent surgical resection as first-line treatment for stage I and II NSCLC at a single center between 2003 and 2014. PFTs [forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), Diffusing Capacity (DLCO)], both absolute values and percent predicted values were categorized into quartiles. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to determine whether PFTs predicted for overall survival (OS). Logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of postoperative complications and length of stay (LOS) greater than 10 days based on the results of PFTs. The median age of the cohort was 68 years. The cohort was predominantly males (98.6%), current or ex-smokers (98%), with stage I NSCLC (82.76%). The majority of patients underwent a lobectomy (n=121, 81.21%). The predominant tumor histology was adenocarcinoma (n=70, 47%) followed by squamous cell carcinoma (n=61, 41%). The median follow-up of surviving patients was 53.2 months. DLCO was found to be a significant predictor of OS (HR=0.93, 95% CI=0.87-0.99; p=0.03) on univariate analysis. Although PFTs did not predict for postoperative complications, worse PFTs were significant predictors of length of stay >10 days. Preoperative PFTs did not predict for survival from resected early-stage NSCLC, but did predict for prolonged hospital stay following surgery. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  17. Choice of Surgical Procedure for Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer ≤ 1 cm or > 1 to 2 cm Among Lobectomy, Segmentectomy, and Wedge Resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dai, Chenyang; Shen, Jianfei; Ren, Yijiu

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: According to the lung cancer staging project, T1a (≤ 2 cm) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) should be additionally classified into ≤ 1 cm and > 1 to 2 cm groups. This study aimed to investigate the surgical procedure for NSCLC ≤ 1 cm and > 1 to 2 cm. METHODS: We identified 15...... multiple prognostic factors. RESULTS: OS and LCSS favored lobectomy compared with segmentectomy or wedge resection in patients with NSCLC ≤ 1 cm and > 1 to 2 cm. Multivariable analysis showed that segmentectomy and wedge resection were independently associated with poorer OS and LCSS than lobectomy...... for NSCLC ≤ 1 cm and > 1 to 2 cm. With sublobar resection, lower OS and LCSS emerged for NSCLC > 1 to 2 cm after wedge resection, whereas similar survivals were observed for NSCLC ≤ 1 cm. Multivariable analyses showed that wedge resection is an independent risk factor of survival for NSCLC > 1 to 2 cm...

  18. Clinical variables related to small bowel obstruction: comparison of patients with and without Crohn’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awad Al Qahtani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel obstruction is a known complication of Crohn’s disease. Determining need for operation is a demanding task. The aim of this study was to fine tune the decision-making process by evaluating standard clinical and laboratory parameters in small bowel obstruction of any cause and compare etiologies. Consecutive patients with Crohn’s disease and small bowel obstruction were selected retrospectively and compared to a randomly selected group of non Crohn’s patients with obstruction over a 9 year period. Twenty-two clinical, laboratory and radiological variables were assessed for the following outcomes: i diagnosis of Crohn’s; ii operative or non operative treatment in Crohn’s; iii operative or non operative treatment without Crohn’s; iv exacerbation or adhesions causing obstruction among Crohn’s patients. Multivariable models were developed for each outcome using logistic regression. Age less than 50, history of smoking, Jewish ethnicity, white count >11x10E9, neutrophils >7.5x10E9 and platelet volume <9.9 fL, supported the diagnosis of Crohn’s disease. Operation in Crohn’s disease within the same admission was associated with a history of smoking, temperature >38˚, high pulse >100, leukocytosis (>11x10E9 and obstruction on abdominal scan, while operation in patients without Crohn’s in the sentinel admission, was associated with temperature >38˚, tachycardia, leukocytosis (>11x10E9 and previous operation. Confirmation of these predictive patterns in a validation group could help in clinical decisions regarding therapeutic options in an emergency setting.

  19. Acquired Epidermodysplasia Verruciformis Associated with Human Papilloma Virus Type 14 in a Small Bowel Transplanted Child--A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschman, Derek; Tacastacas, Joselin; Rady, Peter L; Tyring, Stephen K; Cooper, Kevin; Honda, Kord

    2016-01-01

    A 3-year-old African American girl taking sirolimus and tacrolimus for a small bowel transplantation presented with hypopigmented macules and papules throughout her trunk. A biopsy diagnosed epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) that was found to be associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) type 14 according to polymerase chain reaction analysis. There are few cases of acquired EV in the setting of organ transplantation. Although there is no standardized treatment for acquired EV, prevention and surveillance for transformation to squamous cell carcinoma are primary concerns. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. [Myeloid sarcoma of the small bowel with inversion of chromosome 16: a description of 3 clinical cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilina, O A; Bariakh, E A; Parovichnikova, E N; Troitskaia, V V; Zvonkov, E E; Kravchenko, S K; Sinitsyna, M N; Obukhova, T N; Gitis, M K; Savchenko, V G

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma (MS) is a rare malignant solid tumor presented with myeloid blast cells showing varying degrees of maturation. MS may have an extramedullary site, precede, or develop simultaneously with the clinical manifestations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML); it may also occur as an AML relapse. Besides AML, MS may be a manifestation of chronic myeloid leukemia or other chronic myeloproliferative diseases. Due to the fact that this disease is rare, the bulk of the literature on MS is presented with single descriptions of retrospective studies and clinical cases. The paper describes 3 cases of MS with inversion of chromosome 16 and small bowel lesion.

  1. The Effects of Distention and Obstruction on the Accumulation of Fluid in the Lumen of Small Bowel of Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Nand K.; Appert, Hubert E.; Howard, John M.

    1974-01-01

    Fluid accumulation in either the obstructed upper or lower intestinal segments of the dog was found in most animals to be negligible. Distention pressures of 25 cm of water tended to reduce fluid accumulation within the intestinal lumen. These studies suggest that if the dog is comparable to man, the intraluminal accumulation of fluid in the obstructed small bowel of man might be due to alterations in blood supply to the intestine, rather than to obstruction per se, or the accumulated fluid originates proximal to the jejunum. PMID:4419581

  2. Circulating blocking factors of lymphoid-cell cytotoxicity in x-ray-induced rat small-bowel adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, R.H.; Brooks, G.P.; Osborne, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    Circulating blocking factors capable of abrogating cell-mediated immune responses measured by in vitro lymphoid-cell cytotoxicity were identified in the sera of Holtzman outbred rats 6 to 9 months after a single exposure of only the temporarily exteriorized, hypoxic ileum and jejunum to 1700 to 2000 R of X radiation. Such factors were found to exist in the serum of every animal exposed to the ionizing radiation regardless of whether a